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Sample records for neutron irradiated fissile

  1. Separation and Quantification of Chemically Diverse Analytes in Neutron Irradiated Fissile Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, Matthew; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Farmer, Orville T.; Thomas, Linda MP; Maiti, Tapas C.; Finn, Erin C.; Garofoli, Stephanie J.; Gassman, Paul L.; Huff, Morgan M.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Smith, Steven C.; Thomas, Kathie K.; Bachelor, Paula P.

    2009-10-01

    Quantitative measurement of fission and activation products resulting from neutron irradiation of fissile materials is of interest for applications in environmental monitoring, nuclear waste management, and national security. To overcome mass and spectral interferences, and the relative small quantities of some target analytes, an extensive series of chemical separations is necessary. Based on established separations processes involving co-precipitation, solvent extraction, and ion-exchange and extraction chromatography, we have been evaluating and optimizing a proposed sequence of separation steps to allow for the timely quantification of analytes of interest. For simplicity, much of the chemical separation development work has been performed using stable elements as surrogates for the radioactive material. We have recently evaluated the optimized procedures using an irradiated sample to examine the adequacy of separations for measurement of desired analytes by gamma spectrometry. Here we present the results of this evaluation and describe the radiochemical separations utilized.

  2. Experimental Studies on the Self-Shielding Effect in Fissile Fuel Breeding Measurement in Thorium Oxide Pellets Irradiated with 14 MeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitul, Abhangi; Nupur, Jain; Rajnikant, Makwana; Sudhirsinh, Vala; Shrichand, Jakhar; K. Basu, T.; V. S. Rao, C.

    2013-02-01

    The 14 MeV neutrons produced in the D-T fusion reactions have the potential of breeding Uranium-233 fissile fuel from fertile material Thorium-232. In order to estimate the amount of U-233 produced, experiments are carried out by irradiating thorium dioxide pellets with neutrons produced from a 14 MeV neutron generator. The objective of the present work is to measure the reaction rates of 232Th + 1n → 233Th → 233Pa → 233U in different pellet thicknesses to study the self-shielding effects and adopt a procedure for correction. An appropriate assembly consisting of high-density polyethylene is designed and fabricated to slow down the high-energy neutrons, in which Thorium pellets are irradiated. The amount of fissile fuel (233U) produced is estimated by measuring the 312 keV gammas emitted by Protactinium-233 (half-life of 27 days). A calibrated High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector is used to measure the gamma ray spectrum. The amount of 233U produced by Th232 (n, γ) is calculated using MCNP code. The self-shielding effect is evaluated by calculating the reaction rates for different foil thickness. MCNP calculation results are compared with the experimental values and appropriate correction factors are estimated for self-shielding of neutrons and absorption of gamma rays.

  3. Fissile Material Detection Using a Prompt Fission Neutron Chamber System

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond P. Keegan; Leo A. Van Ausdeln

    2007-11-01

    The calculations supporting the design of a chamber system to detect and verify fissile material in items such as mail packages or luggage are described. Stimulated neutrons from fission are separated from those produced by the system 14 MeV neutron generators by time delay. The proposed system design has a chamber volume of 60 × 60 × 90 cm. It is anticipated that at least 1g of fissile material could be detected in as little as 5s of interrogation.

  4. Fissile solution measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Crane, T.W.; Collinsworth, P.R.

    1984-06-11

    An apparatus for determining the content of a fissile material within a solution by detecting delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material after it is temporarily irradiated by a neutron source. The apparatus comprises a container holding the solution and having a portion defining a neutron source cavity centrally disposed within the container. The neutron source cavity temporarily receives the neutron source. The container has portions defining a plurality of neutron detector ports that form an annular pattern and surround the neutron source cavity. A plurality of neutron detectors count delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material. Each neutron detector is located in a separate one of the neutron detector ports.

  5. Impact of delayed neutron precursor mobility in fissile solution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, B. C.

    2012-07-01

    A research version of the Monte Carlo software package MCNP6 is modified to incorporate advection and diffusion of delayed neutron precursors, resulting in the emission of delayed neutrons at locations different from the original fission sites. Results of two test problems, a pipe carrying flowing fissile solution and a sphere of fissile solution with precursor diffusion, show that the fission product mobility tends to perturb the fundamental mode, has a negative reactivity effect, and, perhaps most importantly, causes a decrease in the effective delayed neutron fraction. (authors)

  6. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelashvili, I.; Dubi, C.; Ettedgui, H.; Ocherashvili, A.; Pedersen, B.; Beck, A.; Roesgen, E.; Crochmore, J. M.; Ridnik, T.; Yaar, I.

    2015-06-01

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented.

  7. Neutron dieaway methods for criticality safety measurements of fissile waste

    SciTech Connect

    Coop, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    The differential dieaway technique (DDT), which uses a pulsed neutron source to interrogate containers of fissile materials with thermal neutrons, is reviewed. This method is widely used for certifying transuranic nuclear wastes for eventual emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. For purposes of criticality safety, an upper limit of 200 g of fissile material is permitted in a 55-gal waste drum. Problems involving waste-matrix effects and self-shielding may severely limit the accuracy of the DDT measurement. A dieaway method that uses both thermal and epithermal neutron interrogation, which has the potential for reducing these problems, is being developed. Recent experimental and calculational results for this development are described. 14 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Fissile Materials Detection via Neutron Differential Die-Away Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batyaev, V. F.; Bochkarev, O. V.; Sklyarov, S. V.

    2014-02-01

    This work is devoted to the differential die-away technique that is widely used for active detection of fissile materials via pulsed neutron generators. The technique allows direct detection of milligram quantities of uranium-235 and plutonium-239 in objects with volumes up to several cubic meters. Our group has demonstrated this technique, creating a special installation based on the commercially produced ING-07T pulsed neutron generator. The installation includes eight proportional 3He-counters mounted inside a polyethylene moderator with a cadmium filter, as well as a polyethylene chamber into which a 70-liter container is loaded for inspection. Preliminary testing showed that the minimum detectable mass of unshielded uranium-235 is ˜3 mg, using a 5.108 n/s neutron yield and 8 min measurement time. When the container is filled with neutron absorbing materials, e.g., iron, the minimum detectable mass increases to ˜30 mg. Use of borated screens further increases the minimum mass that can be detected. The tested installation and/or its modifications can be used for control and detection of fissile materials in various applications from luggage inspection to control containers with nuclear fuel cycle radioactive wastes.

  9. Neutron capture by fissile and fertile actinide targets

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, Vladimir M.

    2009-01-28

    For fissile actinide targets {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu the capture cross sections are strongly influenced by the target spin, fission transition states spectroscopy and fission/{gamma}-emission competition of the compound nuclides. The capture cross sections were obtained via a consistent description of fission and elastic/inelastic scattering, (n,{gamma}f) reaction being included.For neutron capture reactions on even-even U, Pu and Cm nuclei the methods, proven in case of {sup 232}Th(n,{gamma}) and {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}) data analysis are used. Calculated {sup 240}Pu(n,{gamma}) and {sup 244}Cm(n,{gamma}) reaction cross sections shapes are much similar to that, observed for the {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}) and {sup 232}Th(n,{gamma}) reactions. Differences are due to fission and neutron emission competition, which depends on the (Z,N)-composition of the compound nucleus.

  10. Assay of fissile materials using a combined thermal/epithermal neutron interrogation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Coop, K.L.; Caldwell, J.T.; Goulding, C.A. )

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed and built a prototype device to assay fissile materials using a technique that interrogates samples with both thermal and epithermal neutrons. The technique is based on that used in the lead slowing down spectrometer. However, the device is much smaller and less expensive, with poorer energy resolution than a true lead slowing down spectrometer. It is believed that this development may be uniquely suited for the very difficult problem of determining the fissile content in nuclear waste derived from irradiated breeder reactor fuel rods. The waste is of highly variable composition, ranging from absorbed solutions to discrete Pieces several grams in size, embedded in different matrices. The nuclear material is mixed uranium/plutonium fuel of variable enrichment and burnup. While this device was developed specifically to assay remote handled waste, it may be of value for other safeguards applications. One problem in particular for which it may be useful is determining whether enriched uranium is being concealed with lead and cadmium shielding in a box or package.

  11. Fission Product Gamma-Ray Line Pairs Sensitive to Fissile Material and Neutron Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E; Norman, E B; Burke, J T; Macri, R A; Shugart, H A; Browne, E; Smith, A R

    2007-11-15

    The beta-delayed gamma-ray spectra from the fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu by thermal and near-14-MeV neutrons have been measured for delay times ranging from 1 minute to 14 hours. Spectra at all delay times contain sets of prominent gamma-ray lines with intensity ratios that identify the fissile material and distinguish between fission induced by low-energy or high-energy neutrons.

  12. A single-shot nanosecond neutron pulsed technique for the detection of fissile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V.; Miklaszewski, R. A.; Chernyshova, M.; Scholz, M.; Prokopovicz, R.; Tomaszewski, K.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wiacek, U.; Gabanska, B.; Dworak, D.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.

    2012-07-01

    A novel technique with the potential of detecting hidden fissile materials is presented utilizing the interaction of a single powerful and nanosecond wide neutron pulse with matter. The experimental system is based on a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) device as a neutron source generating pulses of almost mono-energetic 2.45 MeV and/or 14.0 MeV neutrons, a few nanoseconds in width. Fissile materials, consisting of heavy nuclei, are detected utilizing two signatures: firstly by measuring those secondary fission neutrons which are faster than the elastically scattered 2.45 MeV neutrons of the D-D reaction in the DPF; secondly by measuring the pulses of the slower secondary fission neutrons following the pulse of the fast 14 MeV neutrons from the D-T reaction. In both cases it is important to compare the measured spectrum of the fission neutrons induced by the 2.45 MeV or 14 MeV neutron pulse of the DPF with theoretical spectra obtained by mathematical simulation. Therefore, results of numerical modelling of the proposed system, using the MCNP5 and the FLUKA codes are presented and compared with experimental data.

  13. Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    DOEpatents

    Menlove, Howard O.; Stewart, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the .sup.235 U nuclide content of samples containing UF.sub.6, UF.sub.4, or UO.sub.2 utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1.sigma.) for cylinders containing UF.sub.6 with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF.sub.6 takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures.

  14. Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    DOEpatents

    Menlove, H.O.; Stewart, J.E.

    1985-02-04

    Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the /sup 235/U nuclide content of samples containing UF/sub 6/, UF/sub 4/, or UO/sub 2/ utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1sigma) for cylinders containing UF/sub 6/ with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF/sub 6/ takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Neutron-gamma hodoscope detection of fissile materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The neutron-gamma hodoscope has been developed to make use of two aspects of the fission process that occur during severe safety testing of nuclear reactor fuel; fission-product heating that induces realistic effects in the fuel and penetrating radiation that enables the imaging of fuel behavior. During in-pile transient reactor experiments, the radiation which escapes from the test fuel, its surrounding coolant, and a thick-walled container is detected by a large collimated array that produced cineradiographic images. Phenomena observed in hundreds of destructive experiments have included pre-failure fuel motion, cladding breach, and post-failure fuel motion. On the basis of this successful 25-year experience, application of hodoscope techniques to arms control treaty verification is now being studied. 7 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  17. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, John R.; Halbig, James K.; Menlove, Howard O.; Klosterbuer, Shirley F.

    1985-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  18. Synthesis of neutron-rich transuranic nuclei in fissile spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishustin, Igor; Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2015-04-01

    A possibility of synthesizing neutron-rich superheavy elements in spallation targets of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) is considered. A dedicated software called Nuclide Composition Dynamics (NuCoD) was developed to model the evolution of isotope composition in the targets during a long-time irradiation by intense proton and deuteron beams. Simulation results show that transuranic elements up to 249Bk can be produced in multiple neutron capture reactions in macroscopic quantities. However, the neutron flux achievable in a spallation target is still insufficient to overcome the so-called fermium gap. Further optimization of the target design, in particular, by including moderating material and covering it by a reflector could turn ADS into an alternative source of transuranic elements in addition to nuclear fission reactors.

  19. Fissile material detector

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Alexander I.; Lushchikov, Vladislav I.; Shabalin, Eugeny P.; Maznyy, Nikita G.; Khvastunov, Michael M.; Rowland, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  20. Determining fissile content in PWR spent fuel assemblies using a passive neutron Albedo reactivity with fission chambers technique

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    State regulatory bodies and organizations such as the IAEA that are concerned with preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons are interested in a means of quantifying the amount of plutonium in a given spent fuel assembly. The complexity of spent nuclear fuel makes the measurement of plutonium content challenging. There are a variety of techniques that can measure various properties of spent nuclear fuel including burnup, and mass of fissile content. No single technique can provide all desired information, necessitating an approach using multiple detector systems and types. This paper presents our analysis of the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity Fission Chamber (PNAR-FC) detector system. PNAR-FC is a simplified version of the PNAR technique originally developed in 1997. This earlier research was performed with a high efficiency, {sup 3}He-based system (PNAR-3He) with which multiplicty analysis was performed. With the PNAR technique a portion of the spent fuel assembly is wrapped in a 1 mm thick cadmium liner. Neutron count rates are measured both with and without the cadmium liner present. The ratio of the count rate with the cadmium liner to the count rate without the cadmium liner is calculated and called the cadmium ratio. In the PNAR-3He technique, multiplicity measurements were made and the cadmium ratio was shown to scale with the fissile content of the material being measured. PNAR-FC simplifies the PNAR technique by using only a few fission chambers instead of many {sup 3}He tubes. Using a simplified PNAR-FC technique provides for a cheaper, lighter, and thus more portable detector system than was possible with the PNAR-3He system. The challenge with the PNAR-FC system are two-fold: (1) the change in the cadmium ratio is weaker as a afunction of the changing fissile content relative to multiplicity count rates, and (2) the efficiency for the fission chamber based system are poorer than for the {sup 3}He based detectors. In this paper, we present our

  1. Predicting fissile content of spent nuclear fuel assemblies with the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique and Monte Carlo code emulation

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-10-13

    There is a great need in the safeguards community to be able to nondestructively quantify the mass of plutonium of a spent nuclear fuel assembly. As part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative, we are investigating several techniques, or detector systems, which, when integrated, will be capable of quantifying the plutonium mass of a spent fuel assembly without dismantling the assembly. This paper reports on the simulation of one of these techniques, the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity with Fission Chambers (PNAR-FC) system. The response of this system over a wide range of spent fuel assemblies with different burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time characteristics is shown. A Monte Carlo method of using these modeled results to estimate the fissile content of a spent fuel assembly has been developed. A few numerical simulations of using this method are shown. Finally, additional developments still needed and being worked on are discussed.

  2. Total body calcium analysis. [neutron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, T. K.; Nelp, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    A technique to quantitate total body calcium in humans is developed. Total body neutron irradiation is utilized to produce argon 37. The radio argon, which diffuses into the blood stream and is excreted through the lungs, is recovered from the exhaled breath and counted inside a proportional detector. Emphasis is placed on: (1) measurement of the rate of excretion of radio argon following total body neutron irradiation; (2) the development of the radio argon collection, purification, and counting systems; and (3) development of a patient irradiation facility using a 14 MeV neutron generator. Results and applications are discussed in detail.

  3. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  4. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-11-01

    Pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90-850 °C to 0.03-2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (<0.3 dpa), while the formation of intermetallic second phase precipitation, resulting from transmutation, dominates the radiation-induced strengthening beginning with a relatively modest dose (>0.6 dpa). The precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.

  5. Neutrons as Party Animals: An Analogy for Understanding Heavy-Element Fissility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2012-12-01

    I teach a general education class on the history of nuclear physics and the Manhattan Project. About halfway through the course we come to the discovery of fission and Niels Bohr's insight that it is the rare isotope of uranium, U-235, which fissions under slow-neutron bombardment as opposed to the much more common U-238 isotope. As an "explanation" of the differing responses of the two isotopes to bombarding neutrons, I use the known (measured) masses of the various isotopes involved to compute the energies released upon neutron capture and then compare them to the fission barriers of the "compound" nuclei so formed (U-236 and U-239). The energy released in the (neutron + U-235) reaction exceeds the fission barrier by about one million electron-volts (1 MeV), while that for the (neutron + U-238) case falls about 1.6 MeV short. (The fission barriers are respectively about 5.7 and 6.5 MeV.)

  6. Neutrons as Party Animals: An Analogy for Understanding Heavy-Element Fissility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2012-01-01

    I teach a general education class on the history of nuclear physics and the Manhattan Project. About halfway through the course we come to the discovery of fission and Niels Bohr's insight that it is the rare isotope of uranium, U-235, which fissions under slow-neutron bombardment as opposed to the much more common U-238 isotope. As an…

  7. Neutron-Absorbing Coatings for Safe Storage of Fissile Materials with Enhanced Shielding & Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J; Farmer, J; Lee, C; Fischer, L; Boussoufi, M; Liu, B; Egbert, H

    2007-07-03

    Neutron-absorbing Fe-based amorphous-metal coatings have been developed that are more corrosion resistant than other criticality-control materials, including Al-B{sub 4}C composites, borated stainless steels, and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys. The presence of relatively high concentration of boron in these coatings not only enhances its neutron-absorption capability, but also enables these coatings to exist in the amorphous state. Exceptional corrosion resistance has been achieved with these Fe-based amorphous-metal alloys through additions of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten. The addition of rare earth elements such as yttrium has lowered the critical cooling rate of these materials, thereby rendering them more easily processed. Containers used for the storage of nuclear materials, and protected from corrosion through the application of amorphous metal coatings, would have greatly enhanced service lives, and would therefore provide greater long-term safety. Amorphous alloy powders have been successfully produced in multi-ton quantities with gas atomization, and applied to several half-scale spent fuel storage containers and criticality control structures with the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. Salt fog testing and neutron radiography of these prototypes indicates that such an approach is viable for the production of large-scale industrial-scale facilities and containers. The use of these durable neutron-absorbing materials to coat stainless steel containers and storage racks, as well as vaults, hot-cell facilities and glove boxes could substantially reduce the risk of criticality in the event of an accident. These materials are particularly attractive for shielding applications since they are fire proof. Additionally, layers of other cold and thermal sprayed materials that include carbon and/or carbides can be used in conjunction with the high-boron amorphous metal coatings for the purpose of moderation. For example, various carbides, including boron

  8. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-08-26

    In this paper, pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90–850 °C to 0.03–2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (<0.3 dpa), while the formation of intermetallic second phase precipitation, resulting from transmutation, dominates the radiation-induced strengthening beginning with a relativelymore » modest dose (>0.6 dpa). Finally, the precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.« less

  9. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  10. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M.; Tsai, H.

    1998-03-01

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  11. Neutron Spectrum Measurements from Irradiations at NCERC

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, Kevin Richard; Mosby, Michelle A.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Hutchens, Gregory Joe; White, Morgan Curtis

    2015-04-15

    Several irradiations have been conducted on assemblies (COMET/ZEUS and Flattop) at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Configurations of the assemblies and irradiated materials changed between experiments. Different metallic foils were analyzed using the radioactivation method by gamma-ray spectrometry to understand/characterize the neutron spectra. Results of MCNP calculations are shown. It was concluded that MCNP simulated spectra agree with experimental measurements, with the caveats that some data are limited by statistics at low-energies and some activation foils have low activities.

  12. Vanadium irradiation at ATR - neutronics aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate damage and transmutation rates in vanadium irradiated in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) located in Idaho. The main focuses of the study are to evaluate the transmutation of vanadium to chromium and to explore ways to design the irradiation experiment to avoid excessive transmutation. It was found that the A-hole of ATR produces damage rate of {approximately} 0.2%/dpa of vanadium to chromium. A thermal neutron filter can be incorporated into the design to reduce the vanadium-to-chromium transmutation rate to low levels. A filter 1-2 mm thick of gadolinium or hafnium can be used.

  13. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  14. Epithermal interrogation of fissile waste

    SciTech Connect

    Coop, K.L.; Hollas, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    Self-shielding of interrogating thermal neutrons in lumps of fissile material can be a major source of error in transuranic waste assay using the widely employed differential dieaway technique. We are developing a new instrument, the combined thermal/epithermal neutron (CTEN) interrogation instrument to detect the occurrence of self- shielding and mitigate its effects. Neutrons are moderated in the graphite walls of the CTEN instrument to provide an interrogating flux of epithermal and thermal neutrons. The induced prompt fission neutrons are detected in proportional counters. We report the results of measurements made with the CTEN instrument, using minimal and highly self-shielding plutonium and uranium sources in 55 gallon drums containing a variety of mock waste matrices. Fissile isotopes and waste forms for which the method is most applicable, and limitations associated with the hydrogen content of the waste package/matrix are described.

  15. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  16. DECONTAMINATION OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATED REACTOR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Buyers, A.G.; Rosen, F.D.; Motta, E.E.

    1959-12-22

    A pyrometallurgical method of decontaminating neutronirradiated reactor fuel is presented. In accordance with the invention, neutron-irradiated reactor fuel may be decontaminated by countercurrently contacting the fuel with a bed of alkali and alkaine fluorides under an inert gas atmosphere and inductively melting the fuel and tracking the resulting descending molten fuel with induction heating as it passes through the bed. By this method, a large, continually fresh surface of salt is exposed to the descending molten fuel which enhances the efficiency of the scrubbing operation.

  17. TEM study of neutron-irradiated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, L.L.; Bentley, J.; Farrell, K.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a transmission electron microscopy study of the defect structure in iron neutron-irradiated to low fluences (less than or equal to 1 dpa) at temperatures of 455 to 1013/sup 0/K are presented. The dislocation microstructures coarsen with increasing irradiation temperature from decorated dislocations, through clusters of dislocation loops, to near-edge, interstitial dislocation loops with b = a<100>, and network segments. Significant cavity formation occurred only at 548 to 723/sup 0/K, with homogeneous distributions found only at 623 and 673/sup 0/K. The maximum swelling of 0.07% occurred at 673/sup 0/K. Large cavities had a truncated octahedral shape with (111) facets and (100) truncations. Damage halos were observed around boron-containing precipitates. The effects of interstitial impurities on microstructural development and the differences in the observed microstructures compared to those in refractory bcc metals are discussed. 8 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Laser annealing of neutron irradiated boron-10 isotope doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.; Butler, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    10B isotope doped p-type diamond epilayer grown by chemical vapor deposition on (110) oriented type IIa diamond single crystal substrate was subjected to neutron transmutation at a fluence of 2.4 9 1020 thermal and 2.4 9 1020 fast neutrons. After neutron irradiation, the epilayer and the diamond substrate were laser annealed using Nd YAG laser irradiation with wave length, 266 nm and energy, 150 mJ per pulse. The neutron irradiated diamond epilayer and the substrate were characterized before and after laser annealing using different techniques. The characterization techniques include optical microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and electrical sheet conductance measurement. The results indicate that the structure of the irradiation induced amorphous epilayer changes to disordered graphite upon laser annealing. The irradiated substrate retains the (110) crystalline structure with neutron irradiation induced defects.

  19. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities, the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.

  20. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities,more » the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.« less

  1. Effect of neutron energy and fluence on deuterium retention behaviour in neutron irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroe; Yuyama, Kenta; Li, Xiaochun; Hatano, Yuji; Toyama, Takeshi; Ohta, Masayuki; Ochiai, Kentaro; Yoshida, Naoaki; Chikada, Takumi; Oya, Yasuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium (D) retention behaviours for 14 MeV neutron irradiated tungsten (W) and fission neutron irradiated W were evaluated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) to elucidate the correlation between D retention and defect formation by different energy distributions of neutrons in W at the initial stage of fusion reactor operation. These results were compared with that for Fe2+ irradiated W with various damage concentrations. Although dense vacancies and voids within the shallow region near the surface were introduced by Fe2+ irradiation, single vacancies with low concentration were distributed throughout the sample for 14 MeV neutron irradiated W. Only the dislocation loops were introduced by fission neutron irradiation at low neutron fluence. The desorption peak of D for fission neutron irradiated W was concentrated at low temperature region less than 550 K, but that for 14 MeV neutron irradiated W was extended toward the higher temperature side due to D trapping by vacancies. It can be said that the neutron energy distribution could have a large impact on irradiation defect formation and the D retention behaviour.

  2. Characteristics of the KUR Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility as a neutron irradiation field with variable energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2000-10-01

    The Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) was updated in March 1996, mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy (NCT). A striking feature of the updated facility is that the energy spectrum of the neutron beam can be controlled from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal, within 5 min by remote control under a continuous reactor operation. This feature is advantageous not only to medical science such as NCT, but also to the other research fields such as physics, engineering, biology, etc. The performance of the updated facility as a neutron irradiation field with variable energy spectra, was characterized. Thermal neutron flux, cadmium ratio, gamma-ray dose rate, etc., at the normal irradiation position for various irradiation modes were determined, mainly on the basis of the measurement using gold activation foils and thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The emphasis was on the performance of the new neutron energy spectrum shifter and cadmium thermal neutron filter, that control the mixing ratio of thermal and epi-thermal neutrons, through the change in the heavy water thickness of the spectrum shifter and the aperture size of the cadmium filter. The evaluation of neutron energy spectra at the normal irradiation position was also performed for three representative irradiation modes, in which the neutron intensities are largest of all the irradiation modes. In addition, the irradiation characteristics of two irradiation devices, namely the Irradiation Rail Device and the Remote Patient Carrier, which were updated concurrently with the facility update, were evaluated.

  3. Neutron Flux Characterization of Irradiation Holes for Irradiation Test at HANARO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Park, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    The High flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO) is a unique research reactor in the Republic of Korea, and has been used for irradiation testing since 1998. To conduct irradiation tests for nuclear materials, the irradiation holes of CT and OR5 have been used due to a high fast-neutron flux. Because the neutron flux must be accurately calculated to evaluate the neutron fluence of irradiated material, it was conducted using MCNP. The neutron flux was measured using fluence monitor wires to verify the calculated result. Some evaluations have been conducted, however, more than 20% errors have frequently occurred at the OR irradiation hole, while a good agreement between the calculated and measured data was shown at the CT irradiation hole.

  4. Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Zhang, J.; Yang, J.

    1999-07-01

    Various effects of proton and neutron irradiated Ti: sapphires were studied. Proton irradiation induced F, F{sup +} and V center in Ti: sapphires and 3310 cm{sup -1} infrared absorption, and made ultraviolet absorption edge shift to short wave. Neutron irradiation produced a number of F, F{sup +} and F{sub 2} centers and larger defects in Ti: sapphires, and changed Ti{sup 4+}into Ti{sup 3+} ions. Such valence state variation enhanced characteristic luminescence of Ti: sapphires, and no singular variances of intrinsic fluorescence spectra of Ti: sapphires took place with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 17}n/cm{sup 2}, but the fluorescence vanished with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 18}n/cm{sup 2} which means the threshold for the concentration of improving Ti{sup 3+} ions by neutron irradiation.

  5. Weldability of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kyoichi; Nishimura, Seiji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuji; Kato, Takahiko; Hashimoto, Tsuneyuki

    1999-01-01

    Degradation of weldability in neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel is an important issue to be addressed in the planning of proactive maintenance of light water reactor core internals. In this work, samples selected from reactor internal components which had been irradiated to fluence from 8.5 × 10 22 to 1.4 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) corresponding to helium content from 0.11 to 103 appm, respectively, were subjected to tungsten inert gas arc (TIG) welding with heat input ranged 0.6-16 kJ/cm. The weld defects were characterized by penetrant test and cross-sectional metallography. The integrity of the weld was better when there were less helium and at lower heat input. Tensile properties of weld joint containing 0.6 appm of helium fulfilled the requirement for unirradiated base metal. Repeated thermal cycles were found to be very hazardous. The results showed the combination of material helium content and weld heat input where materials can be welded with little concern to invite cracking. Also, the importance of using properly selected welding procedures to minimize thermal cycling was recognized.

  6. Improvement of non-destructive fissile mass assays in α low-level waste drums: A matrix correction method based on neutron capture gamma-rays and a neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallu, F.; Loche, F.

    2008-08-01

    Within the framework of radioactive waste control, non-destructive assay (NDA) methods may be employed. The active neutron interrogation (ANI) method is now well-known and effective in quantifying low α-activity fissile masses (mainly 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu) with low densities, i.e. less than about 0.4, in radioactive waste drums of volumes up to 200 l. The PROMpt Epithermal and THErmal interrogation Experiment (PROMETHEE [F. Jallu, A. Mariani, C. Passard, A.-C. Raoux, H. Toubon, Alpha low level waste control: improvement of the PROMETHEE 6 assay system performances. Nucl. Technol. 153 (January) (2006); C. Passard, A. Mariani, F. Jallu, J. Romeyer-Dherber, H. Recroix, M. Rodriguez, J. Loridon, C. Denis, PROMETHEE: an alpha low level waste assay system using passive and active neutron measurement methods. Nucl. Technol. 140 (December) (2002) 303-314]) based on ANI has been under development since 1996 to reach the incinerating α low level waste (LLW) criterion of about 50 Bq[α] per gram of crude waste (≈50 μg Pu) in 118 l drums on the date the drums are conditioned. Difficulties arise when dealing with matrices containing neutron energy moderators such as H and neutron absorbents such as Cl. These components may have a great influence on the fissile mass deduced from the neutron signal measured by ANI. For example, the calibration coefficient measured in a 118 l drum containing a cellulose matrix (density d = 0.144 g cm -3) may be 50 times higher than that obtained in a poly-vinyl-chloride matrix ( d = 0.253 g cm -3). Without any information on the matrix, the fissile mass is often overestimated due to safety procedures and by considering the most disadvantageous calibration coefficient corresponding to the most absorbing and moderating calibration matrix. The work discussed in this paper was performed at the CEA Nuclear Measurement Laboratory in France. It concerns the development of a matrix effect correction method, which consists in identifying and quantifying

  7. Characterization of neutron calibration fields at the TINT's 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liamsuwan, T.; Channuie, J.; Ratanatongchai, W.

    2015-05-01

    Reliable measurement of neutron radiation is important for monitoring and protection in workplace where neutrons are present. Although Thailand has been familiar with applications of neutron sources and neutron beams for many decades, there is no calibration facility dedicated to neutron measuring devices available in the country. Recently, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) has set up a multi-purpose irradiation facility equipped with a 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator. The facility is planned to be used for research, nuclear analytical techniques and, among other applications, calibration of neutron measuring devices. In this work, the neutron calibration fields were investigated in terms of neutron energy spectra and dose equivalent rates using Monte Carlo simulations, an in-house developed neutron spectrometer and commercial survey meters. The characterized neutron fields can generate neutron dose equivalent rates ranging from 156 μSv/h to 3.5 mSv/h with nearly 100% of dose contributed by neutrons of energies larger than 0.01 MeV. The gamma contamination was less than 4.2-7.5% depending on the irradiation configuration. It is possible to use the described neutron fields for calibration test and routine quality assurance of neutron dose rate meters and passive dosemeters commonly used in radiation protection dosimetry.

  8. Morphological changes in neutron irradiated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A C; Wyle, H R

    1985-01-01

    Living human red blood cells (erythrocytes) were irradiated with a beam of thermal neutrons having a thermal neutron flux of 9.4 X 10(9) neutrons/cm2 per sec corresponding to a dose rate of 5 Gray per hour. The neutron beam was obtained from the thermal neutron facility at the MIT Nuclear Reactor and contained some gamma-ray contamination which contributes approximately 8% of the dose effect. Approximately 92% of the dose effect is due to the neutron radiation. Populations of neutron irradiated red blood cells were examined under scanning electron microscopy to observe morphological changes due to the radiation dose. The thermal neutron doses ranged from zero for controls to 75 Gray, and cell populations were examined at various post-irradiation time periods of 10, 48, and 96 h. A four-stage discoid to spheroid shape transformation of the damaged red blood cells was characterized, and the time dependence of each transformation stage was determined for both unirradiated and irradiated cells. The radiation dose caused an initial dose-dependent shift from Stage 1 to Stage 2 with an associated increase in the transformation rate constants. The thermal neutron doses delivered are considered to be in the low dose range for radiation effects on red blood cells, yet the pronounced effects indicate a high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for thermal neutrons.

  9. Effects of Fast Neutron Irradiation on Zirconium Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai; Kondo, Sosuke

    2010-01-01

    High-purity zone refined zirconium carbide has been fast neutron irradiated in the dose and temperature range of 1-10 x 10{sup 25} N/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) and 635-1480 C, respectively. Non-irradiated and as-irradiated properties were measured including the lattice parameter, hardness and elastic modulus as determined through nano-indentation, thermal conductivity, and indentation fracture toughness. The effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructure were also determined though using transmission electron microscopy. The general finding of this paper, limited to this particular zone refined ZrC of nominal C/Zr ratio of 0.93, is that this ceramic is quite stable under neutron irradiation in the temperature and dose range studied. Measurement of lattice parameter before and after irradiation indicated a lack of significant crystalline strain due to irradiation. Only modest changes were observed in the mechanical properties of hardness, elastic modulus, and indentation fracture toughness. The thermal conductivity underwent a slight reduction near 1000 C irradiation, though was essentially unchanged for 1300-1480 C irradiation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed black-spot-type defects (likely Frank or other small loops) for irradiation at 670 C, maturing to faulted Frank loops at 1280 C. As the irradiation temperature increased from 1280 C to the highest irradiation temperature, of 1496 C, a transition to prismatic loops occurs.

  10. Analysis of Electron and Antineutrino Energy Spectra from Fissile Samples under Irradiation based on Gross Theory of Beta-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Tachibana, T.; Chiba, S.

    2016-06-01

    We applied the gross theory of β-decay to calculate the reactor electron and antineutrino ({{{bar ν }}{e}}) spectra emitted from 235,238U and 239,241Pu by summing up all the contributions from a large number of decaying fission-products (FPs). We make it clear what kinds of transition types and FP nuclides are important to shape the lepton spectra. After taking the ambiguity in the current data for fission yields and Qβ-values into account, we suggested a possibility that the high-energy part of the widely referred electron-spectra by Schreckenbach et al., almost only one experimental data set available now, might possibly be too low. Arguments on a special role of the odd(Z)-odd(N) nuclides and on the consistency between U-238 and other fissiles in the experimental data lead to the importance of a new and independent measurement of electron energy spectra which could be converted into the reactor {{{bar ν }}{e}} spectra.

  11. A separation of protactinium from neutron-irradiated thorium.

    PubMed

    Lyle, S J; Shendrikar, A D

    1966-01-01

    A convenient-method, based on liquid-liquid extraction with N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine in chloroform, is given for the separation of protactinium-233 from neutron-irradiated thorium. PMID:18959855

  12. Transmission detectors for cyclotron in-vivo irradiations with neutrons.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, K V; Thomas, B J; Filkin, O J

    1975-01-01

    The neutron fluence imparted to the irradiated subjects needs to be measured accurately in order to obtain meaningful results from diagnostic irradiations. A convenient neutron detector for this purpose is in the form of a transmission chamber, which covers the whole beam directed at the subject. In one design the detector is an ionization chamber, filled with propane gas, in another a thin sheet of plastic scintillator is coupled to a pair of photomultipliers.

  13. Anisotropic shift of the irreversibility line by neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sauerzopf, F.M.; Wiesinger, H.P.; Weber, H.W. ); Crabtree, G.W.; Frischherz, M.C.; Kirk, M.A. )

    1991-09-01

    The irreversibility line of high-{Tc} superconductors is shifted considerably by irradiating the material with fast neutrons. The anisotropic and non-monotonous shift is qualitatively explained by a simple model based on an interaction between three pinning mechanisms, the intrinsic pinning by the ab-planes, the weak pinning by the pre-irradiation defect structure, and strong pinning by neutron induced defect cascades. A correlation between the cascade density and the position of the irreversibility line is observed.

  14. PROCESSING OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, H.H. Jr.

    1960-09-01

    An improved "Purex" process for separating uranium, plutonium, and fission products from nitric acid solutions of neutron-irradiated uranium is offered. Uranium is first extracted into tributyl phosphate (TBP) away from plutonium and fission products after adjustment of the acidity from 0.3 to 0.5 M and heating from 60 to 70 deg C. Coextracted plutonium, ruthenium, and fission products are fractionally removed from the TBP by three scrubbing steps with a 0.5 M nitric acid solution of ferrous sulfamate (FSA), from 3.5 to 5 M nitric acid, and water, respectively, and the purified uranium is finally recovered from the TBP by precipitation with an aqueous solution of oxalic acid. The plutonium in the 0.3 to 0.5 M acid solution is oxidized to the tetravalent state with sodium nitrite and extracted into TBP containing a small amount of dibutyl phosphate (DBP). Plutonium is then back-extracted from the TBP-DBP mixture with a nitric acid solution of FSA, reoxidized with sodium nitrite in the aqueous strip solution obtained, and once more extracted with TBP alone. Finally the plutonium is stripped from the TBP with dilute acid, and a portion of the strip solution thus obtained is recycled into the TBPDBP for further purification.

  15. LET effects following neutron irradiation of lithium formate EPR dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Eirik; Waldeland, Einar; Hole, Eli Olaug; Sagstuen, Einar

    2006-03-13

    Lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters were irradiated using 60Co gamma-rays or fast neutrons to doses ranging from 5 to 20 Gy and investigated by EPR spectroscopy. Using a polynomial fitting procedure in order to accurately analyze peak-to-peak line widths of first derivative EPR spectra, dosimeters irradiated with neutrons had on average 4.4+/-0.9% broader EPR resonance lines than gamma-irradiated dosimeters. The increase in line width was slightly asymmetrical. Computer simulated first derivative polycrystalline EPR spectra of a *CO2- radical gave very good reconstructions of experimental spectra of irradiated dosimeters. The spectrum simulations could then be used as a tool to investigate the line broadening observed following neutron irradiation. It was shown that an increase in the simulated Lorentzian line width could explain both the observed line broadening and the asymmetrical effect. The ratio of the peak-to-peak amplitude of first derivative EPR spectra obtained at two different microwave powers (20 and 0.5 mW) was 7.8+/-1.2% higher for dosimeters irradiated with neutrons. The dependence of the spectrum amplitude on the microwave power was extensively investigated by fitting observations to an analytical non-linear model incorporating, among others, the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times as fitting parameters. Neutron irradiation resulted in a reduction in T(2) in comparison with gamma-irradiation, while a smaller difference in T1 was found. The effects observed indicate increased local radical density following irradiation using high linear energy transfer (LET) neutrons as compared to low LET gamma-irradiation. A fingerprint of the LET may thus be found either by an analysis of the line width or of the dependence of the spectrum amplitude on the microwave power. Lithium formate is therefore a promising material for EPR dosimetry of high LET radiation.

  16. Evaluation of Neutron Irradiated Silicon Carbide and Silicon Carbide Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome G, Snead L, Hinoki T, Katoh Y, Peters D

    2007-03-26

    The effects of fast neutron irradiation on SiC and SiC composites have been studied. The materials used were chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC and SiC/SiC composites reinforced with either Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, Hi-Nicalon{trademark} or Sylramic{trademark} fibers fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration. Statistically significant numbers of flexural samples were irradiated up to 4.6 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV) at 300, 500 and 800 C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dimensions and weights of the flexural bars were measured before and after the neutron irradiation. Mechanical properties were evaluated by four point flexural testing. Volume increase was seen for all bend bars following neutron irradiation. Magnitude of swelling depended on irradiation temperature and material, while it was nearly independent of irradiation fluence over the fluence range studied. Flexural strength of CVD SiC increased following irradiation depending on irradiation temperature. Over the temperature range studied, no significant degradation in mechanical properties was seen for composites fabricated with Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, while composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon{trademark} or Sylramic fibers showed significant degradation. The effects of irradiation on the Weibull failure statistics are also presented suggesting a reduction in the Weibull modulus upon irradiation. The cause of this potential reduction is not known.

  17. Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

    2012-04-01

    This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

  18. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance characteristics of high-power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  19. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance characteristics of high power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  20. Optical properties of MgO irradiated by fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, M.; Seiyama, T.; Ichihara, C.; Nakagawa, M.

    1985-08-01

    Optical properties of color centers in MgO single crystals irradiated by fission neutrons (Kyoto University Reactor, KUR) and by 14 MeV neutrons (RTNS-II, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, LLNL) have been investigated. The absorption spectra of MgO crystals irradiated by neutrons from the two different sources are similar; exhibited principal bands are 250 nm band consisting of F and F + bands, 352 (F 2 center), 570 and 975 (F 2 center) nm bands. In the samples irradiated by fission neutrons, the absorption intensity of the 570 nm band does not reach a maximum by neutron fluence through which the F and F 2 type bands reach a maximum. These phenomena are remarkable in the impurity-doped samples. A linear increase of the intensity of the 570 nm band with a dose of fast neutrons does not change with impurity contents, and exists in the extensive range examined of fast neutron dose (10 15-10 19 n/cm 2). This fact suggests that the crystalline MgO can be applied as a fluence monitor for fast neutrons with extensive energy.

  1. Neutron flux assessment of a neutron irradiation facility based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, M L; Miller, M E

    2015-12-01

    Neutron generators based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion were considered for the design of a neutron irradiation facility for explanted organ Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) that could be installed in a health care center as well as in research areas. The chosen facility configuration is "irradiation chamber", a ~20×20×40 cm(3) cavity near or in the center of the facility geometry where samples to be irradiated can be placed. Neutron flux calculations were performed to study different manners for improving scattering processes and, consequently, optimize neutron flux in the irradiation position. Flux distributions were assessed through numerical simulations of several models implemented in MCNP5 particle transport code. Simulation results provided a wide spectrum of combinations of net fluxes and energy spectrum distributions. Among them one can find a group that can provide thermal neutron fluxes per unit of production rate in a range from 4.1·10(-4) cm(-2) to 1.6·10(-3) cm(-2) with epithermal-to-thermal ratios between 0.3% and 13% and fast-to-thermal ratios between 0.01% to 8%. Neutron generators could be built to provide more than 10(10) n s(-1) and, consequently, with an arrangement of several generators appropriate enough neutron fluxes could be obtained that would be useful for several BNCT-related irradiations and, eventually, for clinical practice.

  2. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  3. Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Karim, Julia Abdul

    2011-03-30

    Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

  4. Defect microstructures in neutron-irradiated copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The defect microstructures of copper and type 304L austenitic stainless steel have been examined following neutron irradiation under widely different conditions. Less than 0.2% of the defect clusters in steel irradiated at 120/sup 0/C with moderated fission neutrons were resolvable as stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). The fraction of defect clusters identified as SFT in copper varied from approx.10% for a low-dose 14-MeV neutron irradiation at 25/sup 0/C to approx.50% for copper irradiated to 1.3 dpa in a moderated fission spectrum at 182/sup 0/C. The mean cluster size in copper was about 2.6 nm for both cases, despite the large differences in irradiation conditions. The mean defect cluster size in the irradiated steel was about 1.8 nm. The absence of SFT in stainless steel may be due to the generation of 35 appm He during the irradiation, which caused the vacancies to form helium-filled cavities instead of SFT. 20 refs.

  5. Comparison of Deuterium Retention for Ion-irradiated and Neutron-irradiated Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuhisa Oya; Masashi Shimada; Makoto Kobayashi; Takuji Oda; Masanori Hara; Hideo Watanabe; Yuji Hatano; Pattrick Calderoni; Kenji Okuno

    2011-12-01

    The behavior of D retention for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten with a damage of 0.025-3 dpa was compared with that for neutron-irradiated tungsten with 0.025 dpa. The D{sub 2} thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten consisted of two desorption stages at 450 and 550 K, while that for neutron-irradiated tungsten was composed of three stages and an addition desorption stage was found at 750 K. The desorption rate of the major desorption stage at 550K increased as the displacement damage increased due to Fe{sup 2+} irradiation increasing. In addition, the first desorption stage at 450K was found only for damaged samples. Therefore, the second stage would be based on intrinsic defects or vacancy produced by Fe{sup 2+} irradiation, and the first stage should be the accumulation of D in mono-vacancy and the activation energy would be relatively reduced, where the dislocation loop and vacancy is produced. The third one was found only for neutron irradiation, showing the D trapping by a void or vacancy cluster, and the diffusion effect is also contributed to by the high full-width at half-maximum of the TDS spectrum. Therefore, it can be said that the D{sub 2} TDS spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten cannot represent that for the neutron-irradiated one, indicating that the deuterium trapping and desorption mechanism for neutron-irradiated tungsten is different from that for the ion-irradiated one.

  6. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  7. Review of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) materials irradiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Goland, A.N. )

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to document as accurately as possible the present and future needs for neutron irradiation capacity and facilities as related to the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) which will be the next generation steady-state research reactor. The report provides the findings and recommendations of the working group. After introductory and background information is presented, the discussion includes the status of the ANS design, in particular in-core materials irradiation facilities design and important experimental parameters. The summary of workshop discussions describes a survey of irradiation-effects research community and opportunities for ex-core irradiation facilities. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs. (MHB)

  8. Materials for cold neutron sources: Cryogenic and irradiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Materials for the construction of cold neutron sources must satisfy a range of demands. The cryogenic temperature and irradiation create a severe environment. Candidate materials are identified and existing cold sources are briefly surveyed to determine which materials may be used. Aluminum- and magnesium-based alloys are the preferred materials. Existing data for the effects of cryogenic temperature and near-ambient irradiation on the mechanical properties of these alloys are briefly reviewed, and the very limited information on the effects of cryogenic irradiation are outlined. Generating mechanical property data under cold source operating conditions is a daunting prospect. It is clear that the cold source material will be degraded by neutron irradiation, and so the cold source must be designed as a brittle vessel. The continued effective operation of many different cold sources at a number of reactors makes it clear that this can be accomplished. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab.

  9. 49 CFR 173.420 - Uranium hexafluoride (fissile, fissile excepted and non-fissile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... uranium hexafluoride; and (iii) withstand the test specified in 10 CFR 71.73(c)(4) without rupture of the... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Uranium hexafluoride (fissile, fissile excepted....420 Uranium hexafluoride (fissile, fissile excepted and non-fissile). (a) In addition to any...

  10. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.-P.; Holden, N. E.; Reciniello, R. N.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4-7% lower than

  11. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J. P.; Holden, N. E.; Reciniello, R. N.

    2014-05-23

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4 - 7

  12. Neutron irradiation of MgB2 bulk superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Eisterer, M; Zehetmayer, M; Tonies, S; Weber, H W.; Kambara, M; Babu, N H.; Cardwell, D A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R. )

    2001-12-01

    Sintered samples of MgB2 were irradiated in a fission reactor. Defects in the bulk microstructure are produced during this process mainly by the 10B(n,a7Li) reaction while collisions of fast neutrons with the lattice atoms induce much less damage. Self-shielding effects turn out to be very important and lead to a highly inhomogeneous defect distribution in the irradiated samples. The resulting disorder enhances the normal state resistivity and the upper critical field. The irreversibility line shifts to higher fields at low temperatures and the measured critical current densities increase following irradiation.

  13. Radiation Damages in Aluminum Alloy SAV-1 under Neutron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salikhbaev, Umar; Akhmedzhanov, Farkhad; Alikulov, Sherali; Baytelesov, Sapar; Boltabaev, Azizbek

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of neutron irradiation on the kinetics of radiation damages in the SAV-1 alloy, which belongs to the group of aluminum alloys of the ternary system Al-Mg-Si. For fast-neutron irradiation by different doses up to fluence 1019 cm-2 the SAV-1 samples were placed in one of the vertical channels of the research WWR type reactor (Tashkent). The temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of the alloy samples was investigated in the range 290 - 490 K by the four-compensation method with an error about 0.1%. The experimental results were shown that at all the temperatures the dependence of the SAV-1 alloy resistivity on neutron fluence was nonlinear. With increasing neutron fluence the deviation from linearity and the growth rate of resistivity with temperature becomes more appreciable. The observed dependences are explained by means of martensitic transformations and the radiation damages in the studied alloy under neutron irradiation. The mechanisms of radiation modification of the SAV-1 alloy structure are discussed.

  14. Radiation resistance of endohedral metallofullerenols under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szhogina, A. A.; Shilin, V. A.; Sedov, V. P.; Lebedev, V. T.

    2016-07-01

    The endohedral metallofullerenols Me@C2 n (OH)38-40 + C2 n (OH)38-40 ( Me = Tb, Sc, Gd, Fe, Pr, Mo) have been obtained and their radiation resistance under irradiation by a neutron flux of 8 × 1013 cm-2 s-1 has been studied. The factors affecting the radiation resistance of endohedral metallofullerenols are discussed.

  15. Self shielding in cylindrical fissile sources in the APNea system

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, D.

    1997-02-01

    In order for a source of fissile material to be useful as a calibration instrument, it is necessary to know not only how much fissile material is in the source but also what the effective fissile content is. Because uranium and plutonium absorb thermal neutrons so Efficiently, material in the center of a sample is shielded from the external thermal flux by the surface layers of the material. Differential dieaway measurements in the APNea System of five different sets of cylindrical fissile sources show the various self shielding effects that are routinely encountered. A method for calculating the self shielding effect is presented and its predictions are compared with the experimental results.

  16. Low-temperature neutron irradiation tests of superconducting magnet materials using reactor neutrons at KUR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Nakamoto, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Xu, Q.; Itahashi, T.; Kuno, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Mori, Y.; Qin, B.; Sato, A.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.

    2012-06-01

    Radiation resistant superconducting magnets are required for high intensity particle accelerators and associated secondary particle beamlines, such as the LHC upgrade and the COMET experiment at J-PARC. Expected neutron fluence on the superconducting coils reaches 1021 n/m2 or higher, therefore the magnet should be designed taking into account the irradiation effects. Irradiation tests for superconducting magnet materials have been carried out using reactor neutrons at Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Institute. As a first step of the experiment, aluminum alloy stabilizer for superconducting cable was exposed to the reactor neutrons at low temperature and the resistance has been measured in situ during neutron exposure. After the irradiation at 12 K-15 K, the sample resistance increase was proportional to the integrated neutron fluence, and reached almost double for a fast-neutron fluence of 2.3×1020 n/m2 (>0.1 MeV). It is also confirmed that the induced resistance is fully recovered by thermal cycling to room temperature. Details of the irradiation test and the prospects are described.

  17. Effects of neutron irradiation on high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerer, John J., Jr.

    1988-06-01

    Neutron irradiation of high temperature superconductors was performed in order to determine the effects of nuclear weapons on these novel materials. This radiation could also be encountered in space radiation belts, fusion reactors and particle accelerators. Fluences used were on the order of 10 to the 18th power fast and thermal neutrons/sq cm. The result of the irradiation was a complete loss of observed superconductivity in YBa2Cu3O7 and ErBa2Cu3O7. A combination of gamma heating of 5 W/g and fast neutron flux imposed serve thermal stress on sample pellets. In two cases, the pellets were reduced to powder. Samples were prepared at the Naval Research Laboratory and the National Research Laboratory and the National Bureau of Standards. They were checked for the Meissner effect using magnetic levitation. The dc four terminal method was used to determine the transition temperature.

  18. Radioisotopes produced by neutron irradiation of food.

    PubMed

    Albright, S; Seviour, R

    2016-04-01

    The use of neutrons for cargo interrogation has the potential to drastically improve threat detection. Previous research has focussed on the production of (24)Na, based on the isotopes produced in pharmaceuticals and medical devices. For both the total activity and the ingestion dose we show that a variety of isotopes contribute and that (24)Na is only dominant under certain conditions. The composition of the foods has a strong influence on the resulting activity and ingestion dose suggesting that the pharmaceuticals and medical devices considered initially are not a viable analogue for foodstuffs. There is an energy dependence to the isotopes produced due to the cross-sections of different reactions varying with neutron energy. We show that this results in different isotopes dominating the ingestion dose at different energies, which has not been considered in the previous literature. PMID:26749562

  19. SPECTER: neutron damage calculations for materials irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Smither, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron displacement damage-energy cross sections have been calculated for 41 isotopes in the energy range from 10/sup -10/ to 20 MeV. Calculations were performed on a 100-point energy grid using nuclear cross sections from ENDF/B-V and the DISCS computer code. Elastic scattering is treated exactly including angular distributions from ENDF/B-V. Inelastic scattering calculations consider both discrete and continuous nuclear level distributions. Multiple (n,xn) reactions use a Monte Carlo technique to derive the recoil distributions. The (n,d) and (n,t) reactions are treated as (n,p) and (n,/sup 3/He) as (n,/sup 4/He). The (n,..gamma..) reaction and subsequent ..beta..-decay are also included, using a new treatment of ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidences, angular correlations, ..beta..-neutrino correlations, and the incident neutron energy. The Lindhard model was used to compute the energy available for nuclear displacement at each recoil energy. The SPECTER computer code has been developed to simplify damage calculations. The user need only specify a neutron energy spectrum. SPECTER will then calculate spectral-averaged displacements, recoil spectra, gas production, and total damage energy (Kerma). The SPECTER computer code package is readily accessible to the fusion community via the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory.

  20. Retention of Hydrogen Isotopes in Neutron Irradiated Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Yuji Hatano; Masashi Shimada; Yasuhisa Oya; Guoping Cao; Makoto Kobayashi; Masanori Hara; Brad J. Merrill; Kenji Okuno; Mikhail A. Sokolov; Yutai Katoh

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effects of neutron irradiation on hydrogen isotope retention in tungsten, disk-type specimens of pure tungsten were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor in Oak Ridge National Laboratory followed by exposure to high flux deuterium (D) plasma in Idaho National Laboratory. The results obtained for low dose n-irradiated specimens (0.025 dpa for tungsten) are reviewed in this paper. Irradiation at coolant temperature of the reactor (around 50 degrees C) resulted in the formation of strong trapping sites for D atoms. The concentrations of D in n-irradiated specimens were ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 mol% after exposure to D plasma at 200 and 500 degrees C and significantly higher than those in non-irradiated specimens because of D-trapping by radiation defects. Deep penetration of D up to a depth of 50-100 µm was observed at 500 degrees C. Release of D in subsequent thermal desorption measurements continued up to 900 degrees C. These results were compared with the behaviour of D in ion-irradiated tungsten, and distinctive features of n-irradiation were discussed.

  1. Defect-induced magnetism in graphite through neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yutian; Pochet, Pascal; Jenkins, Catherine A.; Arenholz, Elke; Bukalis, Gregor; Gemming, Sibylle; Helm, Manfred; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the variation in the magnetization of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) after neutron irradiation, which introduces defects in the bulk sample and consequently gives rise to a large magnetic signal. We observe strong paramagnetism in HOPG, increasing with the neutron fluence. The induced paramagnetism can be well correlated with structural defects by comparison with density-functional theory calculations. In addition to the in-plane vacancies, the transplanar defects also contribute to the magnetization. The lack of any magnetic order between the local moments is possibly due to the absence of hydrogen/nitrogen chemisorption, or the magnetic order cannot be established at all in the bulk form.

  2. Cation disorder in high-dose, neutron-irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Larson, A.C.; Yu, N.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine whether MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is a suitable ceramic for fusion applications. The crystal structures of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel single crystals irradiated to high neutron fluences [>5{times}10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E{sub n}>0.1 MeV)] were examined by neutron diffraction. Crystal structure refinement of the highese dose sample indicated that the average scattering strength of the tetrahedral crystal sites decreased by {approx}20% while increasing by {approx}8% on octahedral sites.

  3. Precipitate stability in neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. J. S.

    1988-09-01

    Zircaloy-4, a zirconium-base alloy used extensively as cladding and core structural materials in water-cooled nuclear reactors, was examined by transmission electron microscopy, after neutron irradiation and postirradiation annealing. Phase instabilities found during irradiation at 561 K include the amorphous transformation and the dissolution of the intermetallic Zr(Fe,Cr) 2. The α-matrix is driven toward a single phase solid solution as the neutron fluence increases. This is evidenced by the continuous dissolution of the precipitate without precipitation of any new phase during irradiation. During postirradiation annealing at 833 K, solute Fe precipitates out particularly at the grain boundaries as Zr-Fe zeta-phase. Recrystallization of the amorphous precipitates occurs at a postirradiation annealing temperature of 1023 K. In general, the observed phenomena of amorphous transformation, precipitate dissolution, reprecipitation and recrystallization reflect the complex solute-point defect interactions in the α-matrix. The continuous solute dissolution during irradiation is expected to have a potential effect on irradiation growth, creep and corrosion properties of the alloy.

  4. Characterization of 14C in Neutron-Irradiated Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrier, Daniel Patrick

    A long-term radiological concern regarding irradiated graphite waste is the presence of the radionuclide 14C. Recent studies suggest that a significant portion of 14C contamination present in reactor-irradiated graphite is concentrated on the surface and within near-surface layers. Methods for treating irradiated graphite waste (e.g. pyrolysis, oxidation) in order to remove 14C-bearing species from the bulk graphite are being investigated to lend guidance in optimizing long-term disposal strategies. Characterization studies were performed in order to determine the chemical nature of 14C on irradiated graphite surfaces. Samples of the nuclear-grade graphite NBG-25 were irradiated in a neutron flux of 10 14 n/cm2-s for 360 days at the Advanced Test Reactor (at the Idaho National Laboratory). Surface-sensitive analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS, SEM/EDS and Raman) were employed to determine the type, location and quantity of specific chemical species and bonds that were present on the surfaces of irradiated graphite samples. Several 14C precursor species were identified on the surfaces of irradiated NBG-25; the quantities of these species decrease at sub-surface depths, which, is consistent with the observation of high concentrations of 14C on the surfaces of graphite reactor components. The elevated presence of surface oxide complexes on irradiated NBG-25 surfaces was attributed directly to neutron irradiation. Pathways for the release of 14C were identified for irradiated NBG-25: carboxyls and lactones (14CO 2), and carbonyls, ethers and quinones (14CO). Increased amounts of C-O and C=O bonding were observed on irradiated NBG-25 surfaces (when compared to unirradiated samples) in the form of interlattice (e.g. ether) and dangling (e.g. carboxyl or quinone) bonds; the quantities of these bond types also decrease at sub-surface depths. The results of this study are consistent with thermal treatment studies that indicate that the primary candidates for the release of

  5. Neutron irradiation and compatibility testing of Li 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Krsul, J. R.; Laug, M. T.; Walters, L. C.; Tetenbaum, M.

    1984-05-01

    A study was made of the neutron irradiation behavior of 6Li-enriched Li 2O in EBR-II. In addition, a stress corrosion study was performed ex-reactor to test the compatibility of Li 2O with a variety of stainless steels. The irradiation tests showed that tritium and helium retention in the Li 2O (˜ 89% dense) lessened with neutron exposure, and the retentions appear to approach a steady-state after ˜ 1% 6Li burnup. The stress corrosion studies, using 316 stainless steel (Ti-modified) and a 35% Ni alloy, showed that stress does not enhance the corrosion, and that dry Li 2O is not significantly corrosive, the LiOH content producing the corrosive effects. Corrosion, in general, was not severe because a passivation in sealed capsules seemed to occur after a time which greatly reduced corrosion rates.

  6. Fast neutron irradiation for advanced tumors in the pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.; Breur, K.

    1981-08-01

    Since the end of 1975, fast neutron irradiation has been used in the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital for the treatment of advanced tumors, which had no prospect of cure by other treatment modalities. Fifty-nine patients were irradiated in the pelvic area, 22 for inoperable bladder cancer, 25 for rectal and 12 for gynecological cancer. Treatments were given 5 times per week with a 14 MeV d + T neutron generator. Persisting complete tumor regression was achieved in 11 of 22 bladded patients, 14 of 25 rectum patients and 6 of 12 gynecological patients. Because of unfavorable beam characteristics, 15 of 59 (25%) treated patients had severe radiation-induced intestinal and skin complications.

  7. Elastic stability of high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Chan, S.K.; Garner, F.A.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to identify ceramic materials that are suitable for fusion reactor applications. Elastic constants (C{sub 11}, C{sub 12}, and C{sub 44}) of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) single crystals irradiated to very high neutron fluences have geen measured by an ultrasonic technique. Although results of a neutron diffraction study show that cation occupation sites are significantly changed in the irradiated samples, no measurable differences occurred in their elastic properties. In order to understand such behavior, the elastic properties of a variety of materials with either normal or inverse spinel structures were studied. The cation valence and cation distribution appear to have little influence on the elastic properties of spinel materials.

  8. Effect of re-irradiation by neutrons on mechanical properties of un-irradiated/irradiated SS316LN weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Shimizu, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kalinin, G.

    2008-02-01

    Stainless steel of type SS316LN-IG (ITER Grade) is used for the branch pipeline connecting of the module coolant system and for other structures of ITER. One of the most important requirements for the branch pipeline connection is to recover various defects by welding. In the present study, characteristics of irradiated weldments were evaluated. SS316LN-IG specimens irradiated to helium contents of 3 and 10 appm He were prepared by the first neutron irradiation. Thereafter, the SS316LN-IG specimens with three different combinations of un-irradiation and irradiation were welded by a tungsten inert-gas (TIG) welding method. These weldments were re-irradiated at 150 °C up to a fast neutron fluence of about 7.5 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV). Tensile tests of the weldments and the base material were carried out at 20 and 150 °C after the re-irradiation. The results of the comparison before and after the re-irradiation showed that tensile properties of all weldment specimens with the different combinations were almost the same as those of the base materials.

  9. Neutron irradiation effects on high Nicalon silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.C.; Steiner, D.; Snead, L.L.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties and microstructure of SiC and SiC-based fibers is a current focal point for the development of radiation damage resistant SiC/SiC composites. This report discusses the radiation effects on the Nippon Carbon Hi-Nicalon{trademark} fiber system and also discusses an erratum on earlier results published by the authors on this material. The radiation matrix currently under study is also summarized.

  10. Cation disorder in high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Larson, A.C.; Yu, N.; Nastasi, M.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Garner, F.A.; Bradt, R.C.

    1994-06-01

    The crystal structures of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel single crystals irradiated to high neutron fluences (>5{center_dot}10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E{sub n}>0.1 MeV)), were examined by neutron diffraction. Crystal structure refinement of the highest dose sample indicated that the average scattering strength of the tetrahedral crystal sites decreased by {approximately}20% while increasing by {approximately}8% on octahedral sites. Since the neutron scattering length for Mg is considerably larger than for Al, this result is consistent with site exchange between Mg{sup 2+} ions on tetrahedral sites and Al{sup 3+} ions on octahedral sites. Least squares refinements also indicated that in all irradiated samples, at least 35% of Mg{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions in the crystal experienced disordering replacements. This retained dpa on the cation sublattices is the largest retained damage ever measured in an irradiated spinel material.

  11. Evaluation of thermal neutron irradiation field using a cyclotron-based neutron source for alpha autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y; Suzuki, M; Masunaga, S; Mitsumoto, T; Kinashi, Y; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Nakagawa, Y; Watanabe, T; Fujimoto, N; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K

    2014-06-01

    It is important to measure the microdistribution of (10)B in a cell to predict the cell-killing effect of new boron compounds in the field of boron neutron capture therapy. Alpha autoradiography has generally been used to detect the microdistribution of (10)B in a cell. Although it has been performed using a reactor-based neutron source, the realization of an accelerator-based thermal neutron irradiation field is anticipated because of its easy installation at any location and stable operation. Therefore, we propose a method using a cyclotron-based epithermal neutron source in combination with a water phantom to produce a thermal neutron irradiation field for alpha autoradiography. This system can supply a uniform thermal neutron field with an intensity of 1.7×10(9) (cm(-2)s(-1)) and an area of 40mm in diameter. In this paper, we give an overview of our proposed system and describe a demonstration test using a mouse liver sample injected with 500mg/kg of boronophenyl-alanine.

  12. Neutron irradiation of superconductors and damage energy scaling of different neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, P.A.; Weber, H.W.; Guinan, M.W.; Birtcher, R.C.; Brown, B.S.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1985-08-01

    Three different neutron sources were used to irradiate identical sets of NbTi superconductors up to about half the lifetime dose of a superconducting magnet in a fusion reactor. Based on a careful source characterization of the TRIGA Mark-II reactor in Vienna, the spallation neutron source IPNS at Argonne and the 14 MeV neutron source RTNS-II at Livermore, the damage energy cross sections were calculated for four different types of NbTi alloys (42, 46.5, 49 and 54 wt % Ti). The experimental results on the variations of critical current densities j/sub c/ with neutron dose are found to scale within the experimental uncertainties with the appropriate damage energy cross sections. This first explicit proof of damage energy scaling for j/sub c/-variations in superconductors is considered to be most valuable for the evaluation of radiation damage in superconductors under fusion reactor conditions. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Neutron irradiation of superconductors and damage energy scaling of different neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, P. A.; Weber, H. W.; Guinan, M. W.; Birtcher, R. C.; Brown, B. S.; Greenwood, L. R.

    1985-08-01

    Three different neutron sources were used to irradiate identical sets of NbTi superconductors up to about half the lifetime dose of a superconducting magnet in a fusion reactor. Based on a careful source characterization of the TRIGA Mark-II reactor in Vienna, the spallation neutron source IPNS at Argonne and the 14 MeV neutron source RTNS-II at Livermore, the damage energy cross sections were calculated for four different types of NbTi alloys (42, 46.5, 49 and 54 wt % Ti). The experimental results on the variations of critical current densities j sub c with neutron dose are found to scale within the experimental uncertainties with the appropriate damage energy cross sections. This first explicit proof of damage energy scaling for j sub c-variations in superconductors is considered to be most valuable for the evaluation of radiation damage in superconductors under fusion reactor conditions.

  14. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations. PMID:18196797

  15. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    DOE PAGES

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Kelly, D. G.

    2014-11-27

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six ³He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine ²³³U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  16. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Kelly, D. G.

    2015-03-01

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six ³He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine ²³³U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  17. Photofission Analysis for Fissile Dosimeters Dedicated to Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourganel, Stéphane; Faucher, Margaux; Thiollay, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Fissile dosimeters are commonly used in reactor pressure vessel surveillance programs. In this paper, the photofission contribution is analyzed for in-vessel 237Np and 238U fissile dosimeters in French PWR. The aim is to reassess this contribution using recent tools (the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code) and latest nuclear data (JEFF3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII nuclear libraries). To be as exhaustive as possible, this study is carried out for different configurations of fissile dosimeters, irradiated inside different kinds of PWR: 900 MWe, 1300 MWe, and 1450 MWe. Calculation of photofission rate in dosimeters does not present a major problem using the TRIPOLI-4® Monte Carlo code and the coupled neutron-photon simulation mode. However, preliminary studies were necessary to identify the origin of photons responsible of photofissions in dosimeters in relation to the photofission threshold reaction (around 5 MeV). It appears that the main contribution of high enough energy photons generating photofissions is the neutron inelastic scattering in stainless steel reactor structures. By contrast, 137Cs activity calculation is not an easy task since photofission yield data are known with high uncertainty.

  18. Short-time reactor neutron irradiation of YSZ prepared using reactive calcination method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izerrouken, M.; Boucheffa, Y.; Souami, S.; Sari, A.; Hammache, A.; Meftah, A.; Nekab, M.

    2006-05-01

    The present work is devoted to study the short-time reactor neutron irradiation of yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) at 315 K. The samples were prepared by the reactive calcination method and characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electronic microscope. The prepared samples were irradiated by reactor neutrons at different exposure times and investigated by XRD analysis. The results obtained show good radiation resistance of YSZ to reactor neutron irradiation.

  19. Radioactivity of neutron-irradiated cat's-eye chrysoberyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S. M.; Tay, T. S.

    1999-04-01

    The recent report of marketing of radioactive chrysoberyl cat's-eyes in South-East Asian markets has led us to use an indirect method to estimate the threat to health these color-enhanced gemstones may pose if worn close to skin. We determined the impurity content of several cat's-eye chrysoberyls from Indian States of Orissa and Kerala using PIXE, and calculated the radioactivity that would be generated from these impurities and the constitutional elements if a chrysoberyl was irradiated by neutrons in a nuclear reactor for color enhancement. Of all the radioactive nuclides that could be created by neutron irradiation, only four ( 46Sc, 51Cr, 54Mn and 59Fe) would not have cooled down within a month after irradiation to the internationally accepted level of specific residual radioactivity of 2 nCi/g. The radioactivity of 46Sc, 51Cr and 59Fe would only fall to this safe limit after 15 months and that of 54Mn could remain above this limit for several years.

  20. Impurities effect on the swelling of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Donne, M.D.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.

    1995-09-01

    An important factor controlling the swelling behaviour of fast neutron irradiated beryllium is the impurity content which can strongly affect both the surface tension and the creep strength of this material. Being the volume swelling of the old beryllium (early sixties) systematically higher than that of the more modem one (end of the seventies), a sensitivity analysis with the aid of the computer code ANFIBE (ANalysis of Fusion Irradiated BEryllium) to investigate the effect of these material properties on the swelling behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium has been performed. Two sets of experimental data have been selected: the first one named Western refers to quite recently produced Western beryllium, whilst the second one, named Russian refers to relatively old (early sixties) Russian beryllium containing a higher impurity rate than the Western one. The results obtained with the ANFIBE Code were assessed by comparison with experimental data and the used material properties were compared with the data available in the literature. Good agreement between calculated and measured values has been found.

  1. Age-dependent protection quantities for external neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chou, D P; Wang, J N; Chen, I J; Chang, B J

    2003-01-01

    Based on the recommendations issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), equivalent doses and effective doses for different ages are obtained for external neutron sources. The calculations at 28 neutron energies from 1 x 10(-9) MeV to 20 MeV are carried out for six irradiation geometries: AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO. An age-dependent anthropomorphic mathematical phantom series of six age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old and adult is used with the Monte Carlo computer code MCNP for the dose evaluations. The results for adults are compared with those in ICRP Publication 74 and are in good agreement. At low energies the effective doses increase as the phantom age increases, but at high energics they decrease with increasing age for the AP, PA, ROT and ISO irradiation geometries. In the whole energy region the effective doses decrease as the phantom age increases for the RLAT and LLAT irradiation geometries. The age-dependent equivalent doses behave similarly to the effective doses, with some exceptions caused by the influence of the organ position. PMID:12862238

  2. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  3. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  4. Post irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Ferguson, Phillip D; Mansur, Louis K

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of target vessel. Though mitigation of cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel will be a critical for successful high-power operation of the SNS facility, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  5. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-15

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 10{sup 15} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  6. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-17

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. Lastly, the results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structuremore » may be investigated.« less

  7. Tritium release properties of neutron-irradiated Be 12Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, M.; Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H.

    2002-12-01

    Be 12Ti has a high melting point and good chemical stability and is a promising advanced material for the neutron multiplier of the DEMO reactor that requires temperatures higher than 600 °C in a blanket. To evaluate the tritium inventory in the breeding blanket, a tritium release experiment of neutron-irradiated Be 12Ti with a total fast fluence of about 4×10 20 n/cm 2 ( E>1 MeV) was carried out at 330, 400 and 500 °C. It was clear that tritium could be released easier than from beryllium, and the apparent diffusion coefficient in Be 12Ti was about two orders larger than that in beryllium at 600-100 °C. In addition to the good tritium release property, the swelling calculated from the density change of the specimens up to 1100 °C in this test was smaller than that of beryllium.

  8. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-17

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. Lastly, the results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  9. Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

    2012-01-02

    Two scenarios are typically envisioned for thorium fuel cycles: 'open' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th and fission of {sup 233}U in situ without reprocessing or 'closed' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th followed by reprocessing, and recycling of {sup 233}U either in situ or in critical fission reactors. This study evaluates a third option based on the possibility of breeding fissile material in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor and burning the same fuel in a critical reactor without any reprocessing or reconditioning. This fuel cycle requires the hybrid and the critical reactor to use the same fuel form. TRISO particles embedded in carbon pebbles were selected as the preferred form of fuel and an inertial laser fusion system featuring a subcritical blanket was combined with critical pebble bed reactors, either gas-cooled or liquid-salt-cooled. The hybrid reactor was modeled based on the earlier, hybrid version of the LLNL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE1) system, whereas the critical reactors were modeled according to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) design. An extensive neutronic analysis was carried out for both the hybrid and the fission reactors in order to track the fuel composition at each stage of the fuel cycle and ultimately determine the plant support ratio, which has been defined as the ratio between the thermal power generated in fission reactors and the fusion power required to breed the fissile fuel burnt in these fission reactors. It was found that the maximum attainable plant support ratio for a thorium fuel cycle that employs neither enrichment nor reprocessing is about 2. This requires tuning the neutron energy towards high energy for breeding and towards thermal energy for burning. A high fuel loading in the pebbles allows a faster spectrum in the hybrid blanket; mixing dummy carbon pebbles with fuel pebbles enables a softer spectrum in the critical reactors

  10. Progress on performance assessment of ITER enhanced heat flux first wall technology after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, T.; Bao, L.; Barabash, V.; Chappuis, Ph; Eaton, R.; Escourbiac, F.; Giqcuel, S.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Raffray, R.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Wirtz, M.; Boomstra, D.; Magielsen, A.; Chen, J.; Wang, P.; Gervash, A.; Safronov, V.

    2016-02-01

    ITER first wall (FW) panels are irradiated by energetic neutrons during the nuclear phase. Thus, an irradiation and high heat flux testing programme is undertaken by the ITER organization in order to evaluate the effects of neutron irradiation on the performance of enhanced heat flux (EHF) FW components. The test campaign includes neutron irradiation (up to 0.6-0.8 dpa at 200 °C-250 °C) of mock-ups that are representative of the final EHF FW panel design, followed by thermal fatigue tests (up to 4.7 MW m-2). Mock-ups were manufactured by the same manufacturing process as proposed for the series production. After a pre-irradiation thermal screening, eight mock-ups will be selected for the irradiation campaigns. This paper reports the preparatory work of HHF tests and neutron irradiation, assessment results as well as a brief description of mock-up manufacturing and inspection routes.

  11. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of lattice defects in some neutron-irradiated oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Moritami; Atobe, Kozo; Nakagawa, Masuo

    2004-11-01

    Temperature dependence of production efficiency of irradiation-induced defects in neutron-irradiated oxides has been investigated. Some oxide single crystals, MgO, α-Al2O3 (sapphire) and TiO2 (rutile), were irradiated at several controlled temperatures, 10, 20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 K, using the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL), and at ambient temperature (∼370 K) in the same facility. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of a 1 μm band in TiO2 differs greatly from that of anion vacancy (F-type centers) in MgO and α-Al2O3. Results for MgO and α-Al2O3 show steep negative gradients from 10 to 370 K, whereas that for TiO2 includes a valley between 40 and 60 K and a hump at about 130 K, and then disappear at about 200 K. In MgO and α-Al2O3, this behavior can be explained by the recombination of Frenkel pairs, which is activated at higher temperature. In TiO2, in addition to the recombination mechanism, a covalent bonding property is thought to be exerted strong influence, and it is suggested that a disappearance of the 1 μm band at above 200 K is due to the recombination process of Frenkel pairs which is caused by the irradiation-induced crystallization.

  12. The effect of neutron irradiation on silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    Nine types of SiC fiber have been exposed to neutron radiation in the Advanced Test Reactor at 250 C for various lengths of time ranging from 83 to 128 days. The effects of these exposures have been initially determined using scanning electron microscopy. The fibers tested were Nicalon{trademark} CG, Tyranno, Hi-Nicalon{trademark}, Dow Corning SiC, Carborundum SiC, Textron SCS-6, polymethysilane (PMS) derived SiC from the University of Michigan, and two types of MER SiC fiber. This covers a range of fibers from widely used commercial fibers to developmental fibers. Consistent with previous radiation experiments, Nicalon fiber was severely degraded by the neutron irradiation. Similarly, Tyranno suffered severe degradation. The more advanced fibers which approach the composition and properties of SiC performed well under irradiation. Of these, the Carborundum SiC fiber appeared to perform the best. The Hi-Nicalon and Dow Corning Fibers exhibited good general stability, but also appear to have some surface roughening. The MER fibers and the Textron SCS-6 fibers both had carbon cores which adversely influenced the overall stability of the fibers.

  13. In vitro neutron irradiation of glioma and endothelial cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, L; Gaetano, L; Zampolli, A; Del Turco, S; Ferrari, C; Bortolussi, S; Stella, S; Altieri, S; Salvadori, P A; Cionini, L

    2009-07-01

    To fully develop its potential boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires the combination of a suitable thermal/epithermal neutron flux together with a selective intake of (10)B-boron nuclei in the target tissue. The latter condition is the most critical to be realized as none of the boron carriers used for experimental or clinical purposes proved at the moment an optimal selectivity for cancer cells compared to normal cells. In addition to complex physical factors, the assessment of the intracellular concentration of boron represent a crucial parameter to predict the dose delivered to the cancer cells during the treatment. Nowadays the dosimetry calculation and then the prediction of the treatment effectiveness are made using Monte Carlo simulations, but some of the model assumption are still uncertain: the radiobiological dose efficacy and the probability of tumour cell survival are crucial parameters that needs a more reliable experimental approach. The aim of this work was to evaluate the differential ability of two cell lines to selectively concentrate the boron-10 administered as di-hydroxyboryl-phenylalanine (BPA)-fructose adduct, and the effect of the differential boron intake on the damage produced by the irradiation with thermal neutrons; the two cell lines were selected to be representative one of normal tissues involved in the active/passive transport of boron carriers, and one of the tumour. Recent in vitro studies demonstrated how BPA is taken by proliferating cells, however the mechanism of BPA uptake and the parameters driving the kinetics of influx and the elimination of BPA are still not clarified. In these preliminary studies we analysed the survival of F98 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cells line after irradiation, using different thermal fluencies at the same level of density population and boron concentration in the growing medium prior the irradiation. This is first study performed on endothelium model obtained by a

  14. Characterization of the fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor after core conversion.

    PubMed

    Marques, J G; Sousa, M; Santos, J P; Fernandes, A C

    2011-08-01

    The fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor was characterized after the reduction in uranium enrichment and rearrangement of the core configuration. In this work we report on the determination of the hardness parameter and the 1MeV equivalent neutron flux along the facility, in the new irradiation conditions, following ASTM E722 standard.

  15. Optical absorption and luminescence in neutron-irradiated, silica-based fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Clinard, F.W.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this work are to assess the effects of thermal annealing and photobleaching on the optical absorption of neutron-irradiated, silica fibers of the type proposed for use in ITER diagnostics, and to measure x-ray induced luminescence of unirradiated (virgin) and neutron-irradiated fibers.

  16. Irradiation Effects for the Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    2001-02-02

    At the request of Safety and Ecology Corporation of Tennessee, radiation effects of the proposed Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System have been examined. First, fissile cargo were examined to determine if a significant neutron signal would be observable during interrogation. Results indicated that ample multiplication would be seen for near critical bare targets. The water-reflected sphere showed relatively little multiplication. By implication, a fissile target shielded by hydrogenous cargo might not be detectable by neutron interrogation, particularly if reliance is placed on the neutron signal. The cargo may be detectable if use can be made of the ample increase in the photon signal. Second, dose rates were calculated at various locations within and just outside the facility building. These results showed that some dose rates may be higher than the target dose rate of 0.05 mrem/h. However, with limited exposure time, the total dose may be well below the allowed total dose. Lastly, estimates were made of the activation of structures and typical cargo. Most cargo will not be exposed long enough to be activated to levels of concern. On the other hand, portions of the structure may experience buildup of some radionuclides to levels of concern.

  17. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-01-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10−9 MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal–ventral, ventral–dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV. PMID:26661852

  18. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70 °C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa. After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5 × 1025 m-2 to reach the total ion fluence of 1 × 1026 m-2 in order to investigate the near-surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Final thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate the irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near-surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at% D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at% D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near-surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.3 dpa) at 500 °C cases even in the relatively low ion fluence of 1026 m-2.

  19. Displacement damage induce degradation of COTS array CCDs irradiated by neutron beams from a nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Chen, Wei; Xiao, Zhigang; Liu, Minbo; Huang, Shaoyan; He, Baoping; Luo, Tongding

    2015-01-01

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on COTS array charge coupled devices (CCDs) induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The charge transfer inefficiency (CTI), saturation output signal voltage (VS), dynamic range (DR), dark signal, and camera imaging quality versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of the CCDs irradiated by reactor neutron beams are also analyzed. The CTI increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The experiments show that VS degradation induced by neutron irradiation is much less than that induced by gamma irradiation. The dark images from the CCDs irradiated by neutrons are given to investigate dark signal degradation. The degradation forms and mechanisms of the camera imaging quality are very different between the reactor neutron displacement damage and the gamma total ionization dose damage. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron-equivalent fluences of 1×1011, 5×1011, and 1×1012 n/cm2, respectively. A sample was exposed by 1 MeV neutron-equivalent fluences up to 2×1013 n/cm2, and the CCD is a functional failure after irradiation.

  20. 49 CFR 173.459 - Mixing of fissile material packages with non-fissile or fissile-excepted material packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mixing of fissile material packages with non... (Radioactive) Materials § 173.459 Mixing of fissile material packages with non-fissile or fissile-excepted material packages. Mixing of fissile material packages with other types of Class 7 (radioactive)...

  1. Quantitative TEM analysis of precipitation and grain boundary segregation in neutron irradiated EUROFER 97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethloff, Christian; Gaganidze, Ermile; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of irradiation induced microstructural defects is essential for assessing the applicability of structural steels like the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel EUROFER 97 in upcoming fusion reactors. In this work Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used to analyze the types and structure of precipitates, and the evolution of their size distributions and densities caused by neutron irradiation to a dose of 32 displacements per atom (dpa) at 330-340 °C in the irradiation experiment ARBOR 1. A significant growth of MX and M23C6 type precipitates is observed after neutron irradiation, while the precipitate density remains unchanged. Hardening caused by MX and M23C6 precipitate growth is assessed by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening (DBH) model, and shown to be of minor importance when compared to other irradiation effects like dislocation loop formation. Additionally, grain boundary segregation of chromium induced by neutron irradiation was investigated and detected in irradiated specimens.

  2. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of neutron irradiated ultrafine grained ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad Alsabbagh; Apu Sarkar; Brandon Miller; Jatuporn Burns; Leah Squires; Douglas Porter; James I. Cole; K. L. Murty

    2014-10-01

    Neutron irradiation effects on ultra-fine grain (UFG) low carbon steel prepared by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) has been examined. Counterpart samples with conventional grain (CG) sizes have been irradiated alongside with the UFG ones for comparison. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to 1.24 dpa. Atom probe tomography revealed manganese, silicon-enriched clusters in both ECAP and CG steel after neutron irradiation. X-ray quantitative analysis showed that dislocation density in CG increased after irradiation. However, no significant change was observed in UFG steel revealing better radiation tolerance.

  3. Properties of simulated cosmic matters after gamma-ray and neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Koike, C.; Chihara, H.; Okada, M.; Matsumura, M.; Awata, T.; Atobe, K.; Takada, J.

    2006-04-01

    Interstellar and circumstellar matter is known to be strongly irradiated by cosmic radiation and several types of cosmic ray particles. The effects of irradiation on simulated interstellar and circumstellar matter such as CaCO3, MgCO3, SiO2 and Al2O3 are investigated. Especially, thermoluminescence (TL) spectra after γ-ray and neutron irradiation are compared carefully. It is shown that the thermoluminescence after neutron irradiation appears significantly in the wavelength of blue region. On the reflectance in infrared region, the irradiation effect appears scarcely.

  4. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  5. Resistivity measurements on the neutron irradiated detector grade silicon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng

    1993-11-01

    Resistivity measurements under the condition of no or low electrical field (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) have been made on various device configurations on detector grade silicon materials after neutron irradiation. Results of the measurements have shown that the ENB resistivity increases with neutron fluence ({Phi}{sub n}) at low {phi}{sub n} (<10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}) and saturates at a value between 300 and 400 k{Omega}-cm at {phi}{sub n} {approximately}10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}. Meanwhile, the effective doping concentration N{sub eff} in the space charge region (SCR) obtained from the C-V measurements of fully depleted p{sup +}/n silicon junction detectors has been found to increase nearly linearly with {phi}{sub n} at high fluences ({phi}{sub n} > 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}). The experimental results are explained by the deep levels crossing the Fermi level in the SCR and near perfect compensation in the ENB by all deep levels, resulting in N{sub eff} (SCR) {ne} n or p (free carrier concentrations in the ENB).

  6. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-10-09

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  7. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    DOE PAGES

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-10-09

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of themore » samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility.« less

  8. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-07-02

    We performed a neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In order to investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ~90–~800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02–9.00 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the hardness and microstructure changes exhibitedmore » a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Finally, irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten.« less

  9. Electron microscopic studies of damage evolution in fission neutron-irradiated metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Kiritani, M.; Kitagawa, K.; Yamakawa, K.

    1985-08-01

    The same kinds of specimens of both foil and bulk of metals, as those irradiated previously with D-T neutrons at RTNS-II, were irradiated with fission neutrons at KUR. The irradiations were performed at 20 and 350 K to fluences of 5 × 10 16 and 1 × 10 19 n/cm 2(E > 0.1 MeV), respectively. The results on pure gold are described to exemplify the typical value of cascade defects. A cascade in fission neutron irradiated gold consists of 2.2 small defects on average. This is compared with 6.7 small defects for the fusion neutron irradiation. The cross section for the formation of observed cascade defects is 0.15 barn, which is a twelveth of that in fusion neutron irradiation. The cryotransfer of the thin foil to the electron microscope was carried out to observe the cascade defects at low temperatures. The average size of cascade defects in fission neutron-irradiated gold was much smaller than that in fusion irradiation. The damage evolution in the bulk specimen was also examined.

  10. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten was performed in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). To investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ∼90-∼800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02-9.00 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness and microstructure changes exhibited a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten.

  11. Migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    The model of the migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium and the formation of helium-vacancy pore nuclei in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation has been proposed. As illustrations of its application, the dependences of the characteristics of pore nuclei on the temperature of neutron irradiation have been calculated. The results of the calculations have been compared with the experimental data in the literature on measuring the characteristics of radiation-induced porosity that arises upon the irradiation of shells of fuel elements of a 16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Si-Ti-Nb-V-B steel in a fast BN600 neutron reactor at different temperatures.

  12. Optical absorption and luminescence studies of fast neutron-irradiated complex oxides for jewellery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Skvortsova, V.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We studied the optical absorption and luminescence of agate (SiO2), topaz (Al2[SiO4](F,OH)2), beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18), and prehnite (Ca2Al(AlSi3O10)(OH)2) doped with different concentrations of transition metal ions and exposed to fast neutron irradiation. The exchange interaction between the impurity ions and the defects arising under neutron irradiation causes additional absorption as well as bands' broadening in the crystals. These experimental results allow us to suggest the method for obtaining new radiation-defect induced jewellery colors of minerals due to neutron irradiation.

  13. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, I.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Bem, P.

    2010-10-15

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  14. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University Reactor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K; Ujeno, Y; Ishida, M R

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described.

  15. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Ďuran, I; Bolshakova, I; Viererbl, L; Sentkerestiová, J; Holyaka, R; Lahodová, Z; Bém, P

    2010-10-01

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10(16) cm(-2) was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  16. Characteristics of the Neutron Irradiation Facilities of the PSI Calibration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hoedlmoser, H.; Schuler, Ch.; Butterweck, G.; Mayer, S.

    2011-12-13

    The neutron radiation fields of the Calibration Laboratory at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) are traceable to the national standards of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. A Berthold LB6411 neutron dose rate meter for neutron radiation is used as a secondary standard. Recently, a thorough characterization of the neutron irradiation fields of the {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 252}Cf sources by means of reference measurements and a detailed MCNPX simulation of the irradiation facility has been initiated. In this work, the characteristics of the neutron radiation fields are summarized and presented together with model equations and an uncertainty analysis. MCNPX results are shown for the {sup 241}Am-Be source. A comparison of measured and simulated data shows an excellent agreement. From the simulation, valuable information about the neutron fields like the contribution of scattered neutrons in the fields and the energy spectra could be obtained.

  17. Characterization of the neutron irradiation system for use in the Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Manuel,

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the neutron irradiation system consisting of americium-241 beryllium (241AmBe) neutron sources placed in a polyethylene shielding for use at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF). With a total activity of 0.3 TBq (9 Ci), the source consisted of three recycled 241AmBe sources of different activities that had been combined into a single source. The source in its polyethylene shielding will be used in neutron irradiation testing of components. The characterization of the source-shielding system was necessary to evaluate the radiation environment for future experiments. Characterization of the source was also necessary because the documentation for the three component sources and their relative alignment within the Special Form Capsule (SFC) was inadequate. The system consisting of the source and shielding was modeled using Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP). The model was validated by benchmarking it against measurements using multiple techniques. To characterize the radiation fields over the full spatial geometry of the irradiation system, it was necessary to use a number of instruments of varying sensitivities. First, the computed photon radiography assisted in determining orientation of the component sources. With the capsule properly oriented inside the shielding, the neutron spectra were measured using a variety of techniques. A N-probe Microspec and a neutron Bubble Dosimeter Spectrometer (BDS) set were used to characterize the neutron spectra/field in several locations. In the third technique, neutron foil activation was used to ascertain the neutron spectra. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to characterize the photon spectrum. The experimentally measured spectra and the MCNP results compared well. Once the MCNP model was validated to an adequate level of confidence, parametric analyses was performed on the model to optimize for potential

  18. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70°C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5×10²⁵ m⁻² to reach a total ion fluence of 1×10²⁶ m⁻² in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Final thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at % D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at. % D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was migrated and trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.025 dpa) at 500 °C case even in the relatively low ion fluence of 10²⁶ m⁻².

  19. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70°C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5×10²⁵ m⁻² to reach a total ion fluence of 1×10²⁶ m⁻² in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Finalmore » thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at % D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at. % D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was migrated and trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.025 dpa) at 500 °C case even in the relatively low ion fluence of 10²⁶ m⁻².« less

  20. Development of microstructure and irradiation hardening of Zircaloy during low dose neutron irradiation at nominally 358 C

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, Brian V; Smith, Richard W; Leonard, Keith J; Byun, Thak Sang; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2011-01-01

    Wrought Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 were neutron irradiated at nominally 358 C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at relatively low neutron fluences between 5.8 1022 and 2.9 1025 n/m2 (E > 1 MeV). The irradiation hardening and change in microstructure were characterized following irradiation using tensile testing and examinations of microstructure using Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM). Small increments of dose (0.0058, 0.11, 0.55, 1.08, and 2.93 1025 n/m2) were used in the range where the saturation of irradiation hardening is typically observed so that the role of microstructure evolution and hai loop formation on irradiation hardening could be correlated. An incubation dose between 5.8 1023 and 1.1 1024 n/m2 was needed for loop nucleation to occur that resulted in irradiation hardening. Increases in yield strength were consistent with previous results in this temperature regime, and as expected less irradiation hardening and lower hai loop number density values than those generally reported in literature for irradiations at 260 326 C were observed. Unlike previous lower temperature data, there is evidence in this study that the irradiation hardening can decrease with dose over certain ranges of fluence. Irradiation induced voids were observed in very low numbers in the Zircaloy-2 materials at the highest fluence.

  1. Ag transport in high temperature neutron irradiated 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, J. H.; Neethling, J. H.

    2014-02-01

    The effect of high temperature neutron irradiation on the ability of a Pd-Ag mixture to penetrate 3C-SiC has been investigated. Previous work has revealed enhanced Ag transport in SiC in the presence of the fission product Pd. In this work it has been shown that high temperature neutron irradiation leads to enhanced transport of this Pd-Ag mixture as compared to unirradiated material and that both high irradiation temperature and high neutron fluence is required for significant transport enhancement. The results suggest that grain boundary type and misorientation is not significantly altered by high temperature neutron irradiation, suggesting that these characteristics play only a secondary role in Pd-Ag transport.

  2. Effects of neutron irradiation of ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.-W.; Bian, S.; Shohet, J. L.; Ren, H.; Agasie, R. J.; Nishi, Y.

    2014-01-20

    Neutron irradiation at low fluence decreases the Pb-type and E′ defect levels in ultra-thin hafnium dioxide films because electrons can fill existing states. These electrons come from electron-hole pairs generated by neutron interactions with silicon and oxygen. Thus, a low fluence of neutrons “anneals” the sample. However, when neutron fluence increases, more neutrons collide with oxygen atoms and cause them to leave the lattice or to transmute into different atoms. This causes the E′ states to increase. As defect-state concentrations increase, leakage currents increase, but since the E′ is much lower than the Pb concentration, this is not a dominant factor.

  3. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the EBRII COBRA-1A irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S. and Japanese COBRA-1A1 and 1A2 irradiations in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The maximum total neutron fluences at midplane were 2.0E+22 and 7.5E+22 n/cm{sup 2}, for the 1A1 and 1A2 irradiations, respectively, resulting in about 8.0 and 30.3 dpa in stainless steel.

  4. Model of defect reactions and the influence of clustering in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Cooper, P. J.; Wampler, W. R.

    2008-08-15

    Transient reactions among irradiation defects, dopants, impurities, and carriers in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si were modeled taking into account the clustering of the primal defects in recoil cascades. Continuum equations describing the diffusion, field drift, and reactions of relevant species were numerically solved for a submicrometer spherical volume, within which the starting radial distributions of defects could be varied in accord with the degree of clustering. The radial profiles corresponding to neutron irradiation were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of vacancy and interstitial distributions obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using a spectrum of primary recoil energies computed for a fast-burst fission reactor. Model predictions of transient behavior were compared with a variety of experimental results from irradiated bulk Si, solar cells, and bipolar-junction transistors. The influence of defect clustering during neutron bombardment was further distinguished through contrast with electron irradiation, where the primal point defects are more uniformly dispersed.

  5. Neutron irradiated uranium silicides studied by neutron diffraction and Rietveld analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Mueller, M.H.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The irradiation behavior of high-density uranium silicides has been a matter of interest to the nuclear industry for use in high power or low enrichment applications. Transmission electron microscopy studies have found that heavy ion bombardment renders U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} amorphous at temperatures below about 250 C and that U{sub 3}Si becomes mechanically unstable suffering rapid growth by plastic flow. In this present work, crystallographic changes preceding amorphization by fission fragment damage have been studied by high-resolution neutron diffraction as a function of damage produced by uranium fission at room temperature. Initially, both silicides had tetragonal crystal structures. Crystallographic and amorphous phases were studied simultaneously by combining conventional Rietveld refinement of the crystallographic phases with Fourier-filtering analysis of the non-crystalline scattering component. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Mechanical strength of neutron-irradiated window materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidinger, R.

    2002-12-01

    Highly specialised window materials considered for transmission lines in plasma heating and diagnostic systems in nuclear fusion reactors were studied in terms of mechanical strength properties and potential radiation effects introduced by neutron irradiation up to 10 21 n/m 2 ( E>0.1 MeV). Small disks of CVD diamond cut from model windows for high power transmission and from rods of a special fused silica grade (KU1) with radiation-hard optical properties were tested together with disks of commercially available high quality silica grades. Based on a biaxial mechanical test method, the influence of specimen machining could be kept under special control. The results obtained for CVD diamond clearly indicate that median strength values of 400 MPa and high Weibull moduli of 20 can be maintained with structural damage introduced at 10 -4 dpa. For high quality silica grades, median strength levels of 300 MPa were reached in the test geometries applied. However, they tend to be very sensitive to changes in the surface quality. Median values of about 120 MPa and Weibull moduli of 10 can be taken for conservative strength evaluations for spontaneous failure.

  7. PROCESSES FOR SEPARATING AND RECOVERING CONSTITUENTS OF NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Connick, R.E.; Gofman, J.W.; Pimentel, G.C.

    1959-11-10

    Processes are described for preparing plutonium, particularly processes of separating plutonium from uranium and fission products in neutron-irradiated uraniumcontaining matter. Specifically, plutonium solutions containing uranium, fission products and other impurities are contacted with reducing agents such as sulfur dioxide, uranous ion, hydroxyl ammonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and ferrous ion whereby the plutoninm is reduced to its fluoride-insoluble state. The reduced plutonium is then carried out of solution by precipitating niobic oxide therein. Uranium and certain fission products remain behind in the solution. Certain other fission products precipitate along with the plutonium. Subsequently, the plutonium and fission product precipitates are redissolved, and the solution is oxidized with oxidizing agents such as chlorine, peroxydisulfate ion in the presence of silver ion, permanganate ion, dichromate ion, ceric ion, and a bromate ion, whereby plutonium is oxidized to the fluoride-soluble state. The oxidized solution is once again treated with niobic oxide, thus precipitating the contamirant fission products along with the niobic oxide while the oxidized plutonium remains in solution. Plutonium is then recovered from the decontaminated solution.

  8. THE FISSILE MATERIAL TRANSPARENCY TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION (FMTTD)

    SciTech Connect

    L. R. AVENS; J. E. DOYLE; M. F. MULLEN

    2001-06-01

    The United States Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency Cooperative Threat Reduction program is supporting the construction of a fissile material storage facility at Mayak in the Russian Federation. Up to 34 tons of weapon-grade plutonium will be stored in the facility to await disposition. In order to meet arms control and nonproliferation objectives, the U.S. Congress has requested assurances that the nuclear material stored at the Mayak facility is derived from dismantled nuclear weapons. The usual approach to identify the origin or state of radioactive materials is to measure the intensity and energy of neutron and gamma radiation emitted. However, the Russian Federation considers such details as isotopic composition and mass to be classified. The solution arrived at by a DOE multilaboratory team is to place the radioactive specimen, the gamma and neutron counters, and all the computational equipment behind an information barrier. In the Fissile Materials Transparency Technology Demonstration (FMTD), this equipment was configured and programmed to measure the following six attributes: isotopic ratio, threshold mass, absence of oxide, presence of plutonium, age, and symmetry. On August 16, 2000, at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a delegation of Russian officials observed the successful demonstration of this new technology (called an Attribute Measurement System with Information Barrier, or AMS/IB). The scientists were able to demonstrate without releasing classified information that the nuclear material sample being tested (a nuclear weapon pit) had the declared weapon-grade plutonium characteristics. Once fully developed, AMS/IB technology will protect sensitive information while providing the United States increased confidence that the mandated Russian fissile materials have been stored. Attribute measurement systems can play a role in a number of U.S.-Russian nuclear security regimes such as the Trilateral Initiative, the Plutonium

  9. The optimization study of Bonner sphere in the epi-thermal neutron irradiation field for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Ueda, H; Tanaka, H; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K; Sakurai, Y

    2011-12-01

    The optimization study on the Bonner sphere in the epi-thermal neutron irradiation field for BNCT was done for the moderator material, moderator size, and activation foils as a neutron detector in the sphere. The saturated activity for the activation foil was obtained from the calculated response, and the effective energy range for each Bonner sphere was determined from the saturated activity. We can see that boric acid solution moderator is suitable for the spectrum measurement of a epi-thermal neutron irradiation field.

  10. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  11. Fission-suppressed blankets for fissile fuel breeding fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. D.; Moir, R. W.

    1981-07-01

    Two blanket concepts for deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reactors are presented which maximize fissile fuel production while at the same time suppress fission reactions. By suppressing fission reactions, the reactor will be less hazardous, and therefore easier to design, develop, and license. A fusion breeder operating a given nuclear power level can produce much more fissile fuel by suppressing fission reactions. The two blankets described use beryllium for neutron multiplication. One blanket uses two separate circulating molten salts: one salt for tritium breeding and the other salt for U-233 breeding. The other uses separate solid forms of lithium and thorium for breeding and helium for cooling.

  12. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    SciTech Connect

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Shimoda, Kazuya; Kondo, Sosuke; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Ozawa, Kazumi; Katoh, Yutai

    2014-12-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180 °C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. Microstructural observation and data analysis were performed.

  13. Resistivity recovery in high purity iron after fission- and fusion- neutron irradiation*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, H.; Takehana, S.; Guinan, M. W.

    1988-07-01

    A resistometric study of high-purity iron has been performed after irradiation at 20 K by 14 MeV neutrons in RTNS-II or by fission neutrons in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). The annealing behavior of iron after fusion neutrons is very different from that after electron irradiation. The fractional recovery in stage I is much smaller and the recovery of vacancy type defects starts to occur at a much lower temperature with a lower activation energy than after electron iradiation. The difference between fission and fusion neutron irradiation, however, is much smaller; the isochronal curves for these two types of irradiation are essentially the same below 170 K. It is concluded that the local defect configuration for these two types of irradiation is similar. The induced resistivity by fusion neutrons is about a factor of 2 larger than by fission neutrons (fluence for E > 1 MeV). This is in accord with a rough estimation of the ratio of damage energy cross sections.

  14. Effect of neutron irradiation on charge collection efficiency in 4H-SiC Schottky diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Jiang, Yong; Lei, Jiarong; Fan, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Yu; Li, Meng; Zou, Dehui; Liu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The charge collection efficiency (CCE) in 4H-SiC Schottky diode is studied as a function of neutron fluence. The 4H-SiC diode was irradiated with fast neutrons of a critical assembly in Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Institute and CCE for 3.5 MeV alpha particles was then measured as a function of the applied reverse bias. It was found from our experiment that an increase of neutron fluence led to a decrease of CCE. In particular, CCE of the diode was less than 1.3% at zero bias after an irradiation at 8.26×1014 n/cm2. A generalized Hecht's equation was employed to analyze CCE in neutron irradiated 4H-SiC diode. The calculations nicely fit the CCE of 4H-SiC diode irradiated at different neutron fluences. According to the calculated results, the extracted electron μτ product (μτ)e and hole μτ product (μτ)h of the irradiated 4H-SiC diode are found to decrease by increasing the neutron fluence.

  15. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C.; Marino, Stephen A.; Geard, Charles R.; Brenner, David J.; Garty, Guy

    2015-01-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  16. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  17. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields.

  18. Behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium during temperature excursions up to and beyond its melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajuste, Elina; Kizane, Gunta; Avotiņa, Līga; Zariņš, Artūrs

    2015-10-01

    Beryllium pebble behaviour has been studied regarding the accidental operation conditions of tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactors. Structure evolution, oxidation and thermal properties have been compared for nonirradiated and neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles during thermal treatment in a temperature range from ambient temperature to 1600 K. For neutron irradiated pebbles tritium release process was studied. Methods of temperature programmed tritium desorption (TPD) in combination with thermogravimetry (TG) and temperature differential analysis (TDA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) have been used. It was found that there are strong relation between tritium desorption spectra and structural evolution of neutron irradiated beryllium. The oxidation rate is also accelerated by the structure damages caused by neutrons.

  19. Flux dependence of cluster formation in neutron-irradiated weld material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, F.; Ulbricht, A.; Hein, H.; Kammel, M.

    2008-03-01

    The effect of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is an unresolved issue. Small-angle neutron scattering was measured for a neutron-irradiated RPV weld material containing 0.22 wt% impurity Cu. The experiment was focused on the influence of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters at fixed fluence. The aim was to separate and tentatively interpret the effect of flux on the characteristics of the cluster size distribution. We have observed a pronounced effect of neutron flux on cluster size, whereas the total volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters is insensitive to the level of flux. The result is compatible with a rate theory model according to which the range of applied fluxes covers the transition from a flux-independent regime at lower fluxes to a regime of decelerating cluster growth. The results are confronted with measured irradiation-induced changes of mechanical properties. Despite the observed flux effect on cluster size, both yield stress increase and transition temperature shift turned out to be independent of flux. This is in agreement with the volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters being insensitive to the level of flux.

  20. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel in HFIR experiment HRB-13

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1982-03-01

    Irradiation capsule HRB-13 tested High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel under accelerated conditions in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The ORNL part of the capsule was designed to provide definitive results on how variously misshapen kernels affect the irradiation performance of weak-acid-resin (WAR)-derived fissile fuel particles. Two batches of WAR fissile fuel particles were Triso-coated and shape-separated into four different fractions according to their deviation from spericity, which ranged from 9.6 to 29.7%. The fissile particles were irradiated for 7721 h. Heavy-metal burnups ranged from 80 to 82.5% FIMA (fraction of initial heavy-metal atoms). Fast neutron fluences (>0.18 MeV) ranged from 4.9 x 10/sup 25/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ to 8.5 x 10/sup 25/ neutrons/m/sup 2/. Postirradiation examination showed that the two batches of fissile particles contained chlorine, presumably introduced during deposition of the SiC coating.

  1. Spectrum evaluation at the filter-modified neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy in Kyoto University Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2004-10-01

    The Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR-HWNIF) was updated in March 1996, mainly to improve the facility for neutron capture therapy (NCT). In this facility, neutron beams with various energy spectra, from almost pure thermal to epithermal, are available. The evaluation of the neutron energy spectra by multi-activation-foil method was performed as a series of the facility characterization. The spectra at the normal irradiation position were evaluated for the combinations of heavy-water thickness of the spectrum shifter and the open-close condition of the cadmium and boral filters. The initial spectra were made mainly using a two-dimensional transport code, and the final spectra were obtained using an adjusting code. For the verification of the evaluated spectra, simulation calculations using a phantom were performed on the assumption of NCT-clinical-irradiation conditions. It resulted that the calculated data for the depth neutron-flux distributions were in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  2. Radiological risks from irradiation of cargo contents with EURITRACK neutron inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroletti, E.; Bonomi, G.; Donzella, A.; Viesti, G.; Zenoni, A.

    2012-07-01

    The radiological risk for the population related to the neutron irradiation of cargo containers with a tagged neutron inspection system has been studied. Two possible effects on the public health have been assessed: the modification of the nutritional and organoleptic properties of the irradiated materials, in particular foodstuff, and the neutron activation of consumer products (i.e. food and pharmaceuticals). The result of this study is that irradiation of food and foodstuff, pharmaceutical and medical devices in container cargoes would neither modify the properties of the irradiated material nor produce effective doses of concern for public health. Furthermore, the dose received by possible stowaways present inside the container during the inspection is less than the annual effective dose limit defined by European Legislation for the public.

  3. High-dose neutron irradiation performance of dielectric mirrors

    DOE PAGES

    Nimishakavi Anantha Phani Kiran Kumar; Leonard, Keith J.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-05-01

    The study presents the high-dose behavior of dielectric mirrors specifically engineered for radiation-tolerance: alternating layers of Al2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2 were grown on sapphire substrates and exposed to neutron doses of 1 and 4 dpa at 458 10K in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In comparison to previously reported results, these higher doses of 1 and 4 dpa results in a drastic drop in optical reflectance, caused by a failure of the multilayer coating. HfO2/SiO2 mirrors failed completely when exposed to 1 dpa, whereas the reflectance of Al2O3/SiO2 mirrors reduced to 44%, eventually failing at 4 dpa. Transmission electron microscopymore » (TEM) observation of the Al2O3/SiO2 specimens showed SiO2 layer defects which increases size with irradiation dose. The typical size of each defect was 8 nm in 1 dpa and 42 nm in 4 dpa specimens. Buckling type delamination of the interface between the substrate and first layer was typically observed in both 1 and 4 dpa HfO2/SiO2 specimens. Composition changes across the layers were measured in high resolution scanning-TEM mode using energy dispersive spectroscopy. A significant interdiffusion between the film layers was observed in Al2O3/SiO2 mirror, though less evident in HfO2/SiO2 system. Lastly, the ultimate goal of this work is the provide insight into the radiation-induced failure mechanisms of these mirrors.« less

  4. High-dose neutron irradiation performance of dielectric mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Nimishakavi Anantha Phani Kiran Kumar; Leonard, Keith J.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-05-01

    The study presents the high-dose behavior of dielectric mirrors specifically engineered for radiation-tolerance: alternating layers of Al2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2 were grown on sapphire substrates and exposed to neutron doses of 1 and 4 dpa at 458 10K in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In comparison to previously reported results, these higher doses of 1 and 4 dpa results in a drastic drop in optical reflectance, caused by a failure of the multilayer coating. HfO2/SiO2 mirrors failed completely when exposed to 1 dpa, whereas the reflectance of Al2O3/SiO2 mirrors reduced to 44%, eventually failing at 4 dpa. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of the Al2O3/SiO2 specimens showed SiO2 layer defects which increases size with irradiation dose. The typical size of each defect was 8 nm in 1 dpa and 42 nm in 4 dpa specimens. Buckling type delamination of the interface between the substrate and first layer was typically observed in both 1 and 4 dpa HfO2/SiO2 specimens. Composition changes across the layers were measured in high resolution scanning-TEM mode using energy dispersive spectroscopy. A significant interdiffusion between the film layers was observed in Al2O3/SiO2 mirror, though less evident in HfO2/SiO2 system. Lastly, the ultimate goal of this work is the provide insight into the radiation-induced failure mechanisms of these mirrors.

  5. Tensile property changes of metals irradiated to low doses with fission, fusion and spallation neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Hamilton, M.L.; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1991-11-01

    Radiation effects due to low doses of spallation neutrons are compared directly to those produced by fission and fusion neutrons. Yield stress changes of pure Cu, alumina-dispersion-strengthened Cu and AISI 316 stainless steel irradiated at 36--55{degrees}C in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) are compared with earlier results of irradiations at 90{degrees}C using 14 MeV D-T fusion neutrons at the Rotating Target Neutron Source and fission reactor neutrons in the Omega West Reactor. At doses up to 0.04 displacements per atom (dpa), the yield stress changes due to the three quite different neutron spectra correlate well on the basis of dpa in the stainless steel and the Cu alloy. However, in pure Cu, the measured yield stress changes due to spallation neutrons were anomalously small and should be verified by additional irradiations. With the exception of pure Cu, the low dose, low temperature experiments reveal no fundamental differences in radiation hardening by fission, fusion or spallation neutrons when compared on the basis of dpa.

  6. Mechanisms of Neutron Irradiation Hardening in Impurity-Doped Ferritic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Y.; Liu, X. Y.; Kameda, J.

    2008-05-01

    Mechanisms of neutron irradiation hardening in phosphorus (P)-doped, sulfur (S)-doped, and copper (Cu)-doped ferritic alloys have been studied by applying a rate theory to the temperature dependence of the yield strength. Hardening behavior induced by neutron irradiation at various temperatures (473 to 711 K) is characterized in terms of the variations in athermal stress and activation energy for plasticity controlled by precipitation or solid solution, and kink-pair formation with the content and type of impurities. In P-doped alloys, neutron irradiation below 563 K brings about a remarkable increase in the athermal stress and activation energy, due to the dispersion of fine (˜1.7-nm) P-rich precipitates that is more extensive than that for the Cu-rich precipitates reported in irradiated steel. During neutron irradiation above 668 K, precipitation hardening occurs to some extent in Cu-doped and S-doped alloys, compared to small or negligible hardening in the P-doped alloys. In alloys with a low to moderate content of various dissolved impurities subjected to high-temperature irradiation, the formation of kink pairs becomes considerably difficult. Differing dynamic interactions of dissolved and precipitated impurities, i.e., P and Cu, with the nucleation and growth of dislocations are discussed, giving rise to irradiation hardening.

  7. [The shape of the absorbed dosage in neutron irradiation of a water phantom].

    PubMed

    Kapchigashev, S P; Chernichenko, I M; Kuznetsov, M V; Obaturov, G M; Baranov, O V; Korobeĭnikov, V V

    1990-02-01

    The paper is concerned with the results of experimental and estimated investigations into the spatial distribution of an absorbed dose and the spectrum of neutrons during irradiation of a water phantom by a P-3 beam of a BP-10 reactor. The ratio of densely ionizing and rarely ionizing components of an absorbed dose as well as the ratios between neutrons of different energetic groups were shown to undergo considerable changes with the penetration of reactor neutrons into the depth of a tissue-equivalent medium. The obtained results serve as basic data in various biomedical investigations using reactor neutron beams, including the planning of their use in cancer therapy.

  8. Measurement of the fast neutron flux in the MNSR inner irradiation site.

    PubMed

    Khattab, K

    2007-01-01

    The WIMSD4 code was used to calculate the fast neutron flux spectrum and the fast neutron fission cross-sections for (238)U, using six energy groups ranging from 0.5 to 10 MeV. These results, with the measured radioactivities of the (140)Ba, (131)I, (103)Ru, (95)Zr and (97)Zr fission products emerging from the fission of the (238)U foil covered with a cadmium filter, were used to measure the fast neutron flux in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor inner irradiation site.

  9. Neutron irradiation of Am-241 effectively produces curium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. W.; Milstead, J.; Stewart, D. C.

    1967-01-01

    Computer study was made on the production of multicurie amounts of highly alpha-active curium 242 from americium 241 irradiation. The information available includes curium 242 yields, curium composition, irradiation data, and production techniques and safeguards.

  10. Microstructure evolution in austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated with rotons: comparison with neutron-irradiated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.

    2001-08-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructures of high purity and commercial purity austenitic stainless steels were investigated using proton-irradiation. For high purity alloys, Fe-20Cr-9Ni (HP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons between 300°C and 600°C at a dose rate of 7×10 -6 dpa/ s to doses up to 3.0 dpa. The commercial purity alloys, CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 5.0 dpa. The dose, temperature and composition dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were characterized. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier-hardening (DBH) model. The dose and temperature dependence of proton-irradiated microstructure (loops, voids) and the irradiation hardening are consistent with the neutron-data trend. Results indicate that proton-irradiation can accurately reproduce the microstructure of austenitic alloys irradiated in LWR cores.

  11. Microstructure of V-4Cr-4Ti following low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.M.; Snead, L.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    The V-4Cr-4Ti alloys displays excellent mechanical properties, including a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) below - 200 C in the unirradiated conditions. Samples were fission neutron- irradiated in HFBR to a 0.4 dpa dose at 100-275 C. Mechanical tests showed significant irradiation hardening which increased with irradiation temperature. Charpy impact testing also showed a dramatic increase in DBTT on the order of 100 to 350 C. The mechanical property changes are correlated with preliminary results from TEM analysis of the defect microstructure resulting from the low-dose neutron irradiations. TEM of the irradiated material showed a nearly constant defect density of {approximately}1.6x10{sup 23}m{sup -3}, with an average defect diameter of slightly greater than 3 nm.

  12. Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, /sup 252/Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by /sup 60/Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use.

  13. Effects of neutron irradiation on strength of fusion reactor materials and their electron beam welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaga, S.; Tamura, T.; Yoshida, H.; Miyata, K.

    1991-03-01

    Several aluminum alloys (A7N01, A5083 and A6061) and a ferritic martensitic steel (JFMS) were used in the present study of the effects of neutron irradiation on the strength of base materials and their electron beam welded joints. Neutron irradiation tests were performed using the core irradiation facility at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Neutron fluences were 2.0 × 10 22 9.1 × 10 22 and 1.7 × 10 23n/ m2 ( E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile tests were performed at 4.2, 77 and 293 K on miniature specimens prepared from both the base and welded materials. Aluminum alloys exhibit serrations in the nominal stress-nominal strain curve at 4.2 K. Little effect of neutron irradiation on the serration is observed. The ductility decrease of base metal and welded joints of aluminum alloys by neutron irradiation is smaller than that of JFMS. JFMS, especially welded joints, showed strong radiation embrittlement at cryogenic temperatures.

  14. The Effect of Neutron Irradiation on the Fracture Toughness of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Strizak, Joe P

    2012-01-01

    As part of our irradiated graphite recycle program a small quantity of PCEA grade graphite was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The graphite will provide the raw material for future recycle experiments. The geometry of the irradiated graphite allowed us to study the effects of neutron irradiation on the Critical Stress Intensity Factor, KIc, of graphite. The specimens where irradiated in two groups of 6 at an irradiation temperature of 900 C in rabbit capsules to doses of 6.6 and 10.2 DPA, respectively. Following a full suite of pre-and post-irradiation examination, which included dimensions, mass, electrical resistivity, elastic constants, and thermal expansion (to 800 C) the samples were notched and tested to determine their KIc using the newly approved ATSM test method for SENB fracture toughness of graphite. Here we report the irradiation induced changes in the dimensions, elastic constants, resistivity, and coefficient of thermal expansion of PCEA graphite. Moreover, irradiation induced changes in the Critical Stress Intensity Factor, KIc, or fracture toughness, are reported and discussed. Very little work on the effect of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of graphite has previously be performed or reported.

  15. Controllability of depth dose distribution for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    The updating construction of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor has been performed from November 1995 to March 1996 mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy. On the performance, the neutron irradiation modes with the variable energy spectra from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal neutrons became available by the control of the heavy-water thickness in the spectrum shifter and by the open-and-close of the cadmium and boral thermal neutron filters. The depth distributions of thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured by activation method using gold and indium, and the depth distributions of gamma-ray absorbed dose rate were measured using thermo-luminescent dosimeter of beryllium oxide for the several irradiation modes. From these measured data, the controllability of the depth dose distribution using the spectrum shifter and the thermal neutron filters was confirmed.

  16. Design of sample carrier for neutron irradiation facility at TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Y.; Hamid, N. A.; Mansor, M. A.; Ahmad, M. H. A. R. M.; Yusof, M. R.; Yazid, H.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work is to design a sample carrier for neutron irradiation experiment at beam ports of research nuclear reactor, the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP). The sample carrier was designed so that irradiation experiment can be performed safely by researchers. This development will resolve the transferring of sample issues faced by the researchers at the facility when performing neutron irradiation studies. The function of sample carrier is to ensure the sample for the irradiation process can be transferred into and out from the beam port of the reactor safely and effectively. The design model used was House of Quality Method (HOQ) which is usually used for developing specifications for product and develop numerical target to work towards and determining how well we can meet up to the needs. The chosen sample carrier (product) consists of cylindrical casing shape with hydraulic cylinders transportation method. The sample placing can be done manually, locomotion was by wheel while shielding used was made of boron materials. The sample carrier design can shield thermal neutron during irradiation of sample so that only low fluencies fast neutron irradiates the sample.

  17. Neutron irradiation study of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets made from melt-spun ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D.; Cost, J.R.; Meisner, G.P.; Brewer, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in the magnetization of sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets are known to vary widely among specimens produced by different manufacturers. Samples of Nd-Fe-B MAGNEQUENCH magnets, which are made from melt-spun ribbons, have now been studied and show a much reduced sensitivity to neutron irradiation than do sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets. All melt-spun ribbon-based MAGNEQUENCH magnets, i.e., epoxy-bonded, hot-pressed, and die-upset magnets, show essentially the same slow decrease in magnetic remanence with neutron dose. Measurements of the open-circuit remanence B/sub r//B/sub ro/ at various times during the irradiation show a decay of only 1.5% of the preirradiated value for the MAGNEQUENCH magnets after 1 hour of irradiation, or a dose of 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 16/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/, compared to a 4.6% drop in remanence for the best sintered Nd-Fe-B magnet (Sumitomo 3OH) with the same irradiation dose. Moreover, after 5.3 hours of irradiation, the remanence drops by only 3% for the MAGNEQUENCH magnets. Magnets made from melt-spun ribbons are thus the least sensitive to neutron irradiation so far measured for Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, but are somewhat more sensitive than samarium-cobalt magnets. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Neutron irradiation effects on metal-gallium nitride contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Evan J.; Lin, Chung-Han; Zhang, Zhichun; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Mishra, Umesh K.; Brillson, Leonard J.

    2014-03-28

    We have measured the effect of fast and thermal neutrons on GaN Schottky barriers and ohmic contacts using current–voltage and transmission line method electrical techniques, optical, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy morphological techniques, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy chemical techniques. These studies reveal a 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} neutron threshold for Schottky barrier ideality factor increases, a 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} fast plus thermal neutron threshold for ohmic contact sheet and contact resistance increases, and 10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2} neutron fluence threshold for major device degradation identified with thermally driven diffusion of Ga and N into the metal contacts and surface phase changes. These results demonstrate the need for protecting metal-GaN contacts in device applications subject to neutron radiation.

  20. Neutron irradiation effects on gallium nitride-based Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chung-Han; Katz, Evan J.; Zhang, Zhichun; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Mishra, Umesh K.; Brillson, Leonard J.

    2013-10-14

    Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (DRCLS), time-resolved surface photovoltage spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and current-voltage measurements together show that fast versus thermal neutrons differ strongly in their electronic and morphological effects on metal-GaN Schottky diodes. Fast and thermal neutrons introduce GaN displacement damage and native point defects, while thermal neutrons also drive metallurgical reactions at metal/GaN interfaces. Defect densities exhibit a threshold neutron fluence below which thermal neutrons preferentially heal versus create new native point defects. Scanning XPS and DRCLS reveal strong fluence- and metal-dependent electronic and chemical changes near the free surface and metal interfaces that impact diode properties.

  1. The effects of gamma irradiation on neutron displacement sensitivity of lateral PNP bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenhui; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yan; Jin, Xiaoming; Yang, Shanchao; Qi, Chao

    2016-09-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on neutron displacement sensitivity of four types of lateral PNP bipolar transistors (LPNPs) with different neutral base widths, emitter widths and the doping concentrations of the epitaxial base region are studied. The physical mechanisms of the effects are explored by defect analysis using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) techniques and numerical simulations of recombination process in the base region of the lateral PNP bipolar transistors, and are verified by the experiments on gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistors (GCLPNPs) manufactured in the identical commercial bipolar process with different gate bias voltage. The results indicate that gamma irradiation increases neutron displacement damage sensitivity of lateral PNP bipolar transistors and the mechanism of this phenomenon is that positive charge induced by gamma irradiation enhances the recombination process in the defects induced by neutrons in the base region, leading to larger recombination component of base current and greater gain degradation.

  2. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kitsunai, Yuji; Kasahara, Shigeki; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%-2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps.

  3. Embrittlement of molybdenum-rhenium welds under low and high temperature neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnikov, A. V.; Morito, F.; Danylenko, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of low- and high-temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile strength, microhardness, and fracture mode has been studied for a series of Mo-Re welds with various Re concentrations. Radiation-induced hardening and concurrent ductility reduction are the key after-effects of neutron exposure. Low-temperature irradiation usually leads to a very hard embrittlement. The hardening effect is rather limited and unstable because of the lack of ductility. Irradiated specimens fail by brittle intergranular or transgranular fracture. The damaging effect of neutrons is less pronounced after high-temperature irradiation. The hardening of the matrix is rather high, but irradiated specimens still keep residual plasticity. High-temperature irradiation intensifies homogeneous nucleation of Re-rich phases, and this effect equalises the difference in mechanical properties between the different weld zones. A characteristic ductility loss exposure temperature was found to separate the temperature fields of absolutely brittle and relatively ductile behaviour. It usually varies between 850 K and 1000 K depending on the alloy composition and irradiation conditions.

  4. Welding-induced microstructure in austenitic stainless steels before and after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, R.; Schäublin, R.; Gavillet, D.; Baluc, N.

    2007-02-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of welded joints made of austenitic stainless steels have been investigated. The materials were welded AISI 304 and AISI 347, so-called test weld materials, and irradiated with neutrons at 300 °C to 0.3 and 1.0 dpa. In addition, an AISI 304 type from a decommissioned pressurised water reactor, so-called in-service material, which had accumulated a maximum dose of 0.35 dpa at about 300 °C, was investigated. The microstructure of heat-affected zones and base materials was analysed before and after irradiation, using transmission electron microscopy. Neutron diffraction was performed for internal stress measurements. It was found that the heat-affected zone contains, relative to the base material, a higher dislocation density, which relates well to a higher residual stress level and, after irradiation, a higher irradiation-induced defect density. In both materials, the irradiation-induced defects are of the same type, consisting in black dots and Frank dislocation loops. Careful analysis of the irradiation-induced defect contrast was performed and it is explained why no stacking fault tetrahedra could be identified.

  5. Helium effects on neutron-irradiated Cr-Mo ferritic steels: A review of recent results

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Large amounts of transmutation helium will be produced in the first wall of a fusion reactor by the high-energy neutrons from the fusion reaction. Since no fusion reactor is available, the effect of simultaneous helium production and displacement damage from neutron irradiation must be simulated. One method that has been used in ferritic steels is to add nickel to the steels and irradiate them in a mixed-spectrum reactor. In such reactors, the fast neutrons produce displacement damage, while helium is produced by a two-step reaction of /sup 58/Ni with thermal neutrons. This technique has been used to investigate the effect of helium on swelling, tensile properties, impact properties, and elevated-temperature embrittlement. Results indicate that helium accelerates swelling and affects tensile and impact properties of Cr-Mo ferritic steels below /approximately/450/degree/C. However, these steels are highly resistant to elevated-temperature helium embrittlement. 44 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Calculation of dose contributions of electron and charged heavy particles inside phantoms irradiated by monoenergetic neutron.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Akira; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    The radiation-transport code PHITS with an event generator mode has been applied to analyze energy depositions of electrons and charged heavy particles in two spherical phantoms and a voxel-based mouse phantom upon neutron irradiation. The calculations using the spherical phantoms quantitatively clarified the type and energy of charged particles which are released through interactions of neutrons with the phantom elements and contribute to the radiation dose. The relative contribution of electrons increased with an increase in the size of the phantom and with a decrease in the energy of the incident neutrons. Calculations with the voxel-based mouse phantom for 2.0-MeV neutron irradiation revealed that the doses to different locations inside the body are uniform, and that the energy is mainly deposited by recoil protons. The present study has demonstrated that analysis using PHITS can yield dose distributions that are accurate enough for RBE evaluation. PMID:18580044

  7. Neutron Exposure Parameters for the Dosimetry Capsule in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Baldwin; F.B.K. Kam; I. Remec

    1998-10-01

    This report describes the computational methodology for the least-squares adjustment of the dosimetry data from the HSSI 10.OD dosimetry capsule with neutronics calculations. It presents exposure rates at each dosimetry location for the neutron fluence greater than 1.0 MeV, fluence greater than 0.1 MeV, and displacements per atom. Exposure parameter distributions are also described in terms of three- dimensional fitting functions. When fitting functions are used it is suggested that an uncertainty of 6% (1 o) should be associated with the exposure rate values. The specific activity of each dosimeter at the end of irradiation is listed in the Appendix.

  8. Effect of gamma and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of Spectralon™ porous PTFE

    DOE PAGES

    Gourdin, William H.; Datte, Philip; Jensen, Wayne; Khater, Hesham; Pearson, Mark; Girard, Sylvain; Paillet, Philippe; Alozy, Eric

    2016-07-21

    Here, we establish a correspondence between the mechanical properties (maximum load and failure elongation) of Spectralon™ porous PTFE irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons and 1.17 and 1.33 MeV gammas from a cobalt-60 source. From this correspondence we infer that the effects of neutrons and gammas on this material are approximately equivalent for a given absorbed dose.

  9. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the ATR-A1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-09-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the collaborative US/Japan ATR-A1 irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 9.4 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (5.5 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 4.6 dpa in vanadium.

  10. Antiradiation Vaccine: Technology Development Of Prophylaxis, Prevention And Treatment Of Biological Consequences And Complications After Neutron Irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    Introduction: Neutrons irradiation produce a unique biological effectiveness compare to different types of radiation because their ability to create a denser trail of ionized atoms in biological living tissues[Straume 1982; Latif et al.2010; Katz 1978; Bogatyrev 1982]. The efficacy of an Anti-Radiation Vaccine for the prophylaxis, prevention and therapy of acute radiation pathology was studied in a neutron exposure facility. The biological effects of fast neutrons include damage of central nervous system and cardiovascular system with development of Acute Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular forms of acute radiation pathology. After irradiation by high doses of fast neutron, formation of neurotoxins, hematotoxins,cytotoxins forming from cell's or tissue structures. High doses of Neutron Irradiation generate general and specific toxicity, inflammation reactions. Current Acute Medical Management and Methods of Radiation Protection are not effective against moderate and high doses of neutron irradiation. Our experiments demonstrate that Antiradiation Vaccine is the most effective radioprotectant against high doses of neutron-radiation. Radiation Toxins(biological substances with radio-mimetic properties) isolated from central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals could be working substance with specific antigenic properties for vaccination against neutron irradiation. Methods: Antiradiation Vaccine preparation standard - mixture of a toxoid form of Radiation Toxins - include Cerebrovascular RT Neurotoxin, Cardiovascular RT Neurotoxin, Gastrointestinal RT Neurotoxin, Hematopoietic RT Hematotoxin. Radiation Toxins were isolated from the central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals with different forms of Acute Radiation Syndromes - Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, Hematopoietic forms. Devices for Y-radiation were "Panorama","Puma". Neutron exposure was accomplished at the Department of Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Dubna, Russia. The neutrons

  11. Shuffler instruments for the nondestructive assay of fissile materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rinard, P.M.

    1991-05-01

    A shuffler is a nondestructive assay instrument used to determine the fissile content of materials. It places an isotopic source of neutrons near the material to induce fissions, withdraws the source, and counts the delayed neutrons. The source is shuffled until a sufficient number of delayed neutrons have been counted. The shuffler technique is generally applied to difficult assay cases. The amount of material present may be very small (a few milligrams), and thus it does not spontaneously emit neutrons of consequence; the amount of material is also below an active well counter's level of sensitivity. On the other hand, the fissile amount may be fairly large, but the rate of spontaneously emitted neutrons may still be low (so a passive neutron count will not work) or the highest assay precision may be desired (favoring a shuffler over an active well counter) even if the material is inhomogeneous (making it difficult to interrogate with thermal neutrons). In all these cases, gamma-ray backgrounds, self- shielding, or matrix effects can make gamma-ray assays impractical. Materials ranging from highly radioactive spent-fuel assemblies to low-level waste drums have been assayed with shufflers, as have leached hulls, various process materials, scrap, and waste. This report presents a theoretical background for shufflers and describes techniques for practical applications. Procedures for assaying mixtures of fissile isotopes, inhomogeneous materials, and flowing liquids are discussed. It is shown how the precision and limits of detection of a shuffler can be calculated for a given neutron background rate. A section on data analysis gives a stepwise procedure for converting the measured counts into an assay value, including random, systematic, and total uncertainties. 31 refs.

  12. Uses of AES and RGA to study neutron-irradiation-enhanced segregation to internal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gessel, G.R.; White, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The high flux of point defects to sinks during neutron irradiation can result in segregation of impurity or alloy additions to metals. Such segregants can be preexisting or produced by neutron-induced transmutations. This segregation is known to strongly influence swelling and mechanical properties. Over a period of years, facilities have been developed at ORNL incorporating AES and RGA to examine irradiated materials. Capabilities of this system include in situ tensile fracture at elevated temperatures under ultrahigh vacuum 10/sup -10/ torr and helium release monitoring. AES and normal incidence inert ion sputtering are exploited to examine segregation at the fracture surface and chemical gradients near the surface.

  13. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  14. Study of the defects in oxygen implanted silicon subjected to neutron irradiation and high pressure annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, W.; Kaniewska, M.; Misiuk, A.; Londos, C. A.

    2004-07-01

    This paper reports on capacitance measurements on Czochralski-grown and float-zone silicon subjected to oxygen implantation, subsequent neutron irradiation and finally high pressure thermal anneals. The purpose of this work was the study of the effect of irradiation on the formation of thermal donors in silicon. The observed changes in the C-V characteristic curves and profiles are discussed. We found that oxygen-ion implantation followed by neutron irradiation results in shallow and deep level acceptor-like defects formation. Prolonged heat treatment leads to thermal donor generation as usual in Cz-Si annealed at 450°C. The most striking result of the study is finding that high pressure thermal anneals result in extra donor formation. The effects mentioned above may lead to changes in the type of conductivity depending on oxygen content in the material, hydrostatic pressure and an extent of damage caused by the irradiation.

  15. Effects of silicon, carbon and molybdenum additions on IASCC of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, J.; Miwa, Y.; Kohya, T.; Tsukada, T.

    2004-08-01

    To study the effects of minor elements on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), high purity type 304 and 316 stainless steels (SSs) were fabricated and minor elements, Si or C were added. After neutron irradiation to 3.5 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E>1 MeV), slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) of irradiated specimens were conducted in oxygenated high purity water at 561 K. Specimen fractured surfaces were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) after the SSRTs. The fraction of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) on the fractured surface after the SSRTs increased with neutron fluence. In high purity SS with added C, the fraction of IGSCC was the smallest in the all SSs, although irradiation hardening level was the largest of all the SSs. Addition of C suppressed the susceptibility to IGSCC.

  16. Magnetization studies of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-x irradiated by fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, A.; Baran, M.; Przysłupski, P.; Szymczak, H.; Pajaczkowska, A.; Pytel, B.; Pytel, K.

    1988-02-01

    Studies of the effect of fast neutron damage on the magnetic hysteresis of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-x ceramic samples subjected to fluence of neutrons of 2∗10 16 n/cm 2 up to 6∗10 17 n/cm 2 have been performed. irradiation up to dose of 1∗10 17 did not cause any change in the critical temperature. However it causes a strong increase of the magnetic hysteresis which is presumably connected with the creation of defects. The critical current density at 77 K in H = 10 k0e for the sample irradiated with the dose 1∗10 17 n/cm 2 was estimated to be 520 A/cm 2 as compared to 29 A/cm 2 for the reference non-irradiated sample, non-irradiated sample.

  17. Additive analysis of nano silicon under the influence of neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibli, Aydan; Huseynov, Elchin; Garibov, Adil; Mehdiyeva, Ravan

    2016-04-01

    Nano silicon with 80m2g‑1 specific surface area, 100 nm size and 0.08 g/cm3 density has been irradiated continuously with neutrons (2 × 1013n ṡcm‑2s‑1) up to 20 h at various periods in TRIGA Mark II type research reactor. After the neutron irradiation, cooling time of the samples is taken approximately 360 h. It is found that the initial radioactivity of the irradiated samples changes within 0.1 kBq-3.1 GBq range. Definition of elements’ concentration is determined based on the activities formed in the relevant energy range. After the irradiation, the result of activity analysis carried out the element content of 1% mixture existing in nano Si which has been defined with radionuclides of the relevant element. Moreover, from activities of mixed radioisotopes, their amounts in percentage has been determined.

  18. Stochastic annealing simulation of copper under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1998-03-01

    This report is a summary of a presentation made at ICFRM-8 on computer simulations of defect accumulation during irradiation of copper to low doses at room temperature. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data on defect cluster densities in copper irradiated in RTNS-II.

  19. The effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of C/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Chunghao; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Steinbeck, John

    2013-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation to 3.5 and 9.5 dpa at 730 C on a 2D plain woven carbon fiber reinforced polymer derived SiC matrix composite are presented. For both fluences, the irradiation caused in-plane contraction and trans-plane expansion. Irradiation also caused substantial reduction in composite flexural strength (54%) and increase in flexural tangent modulus (+85%). The extents of dimensional/ mechanical property changes were greater for the higher fluence irradiated samples. Those changes suggest the instability of the polymer derived SiC matrix following irradiation. The nature of the mechanical property changes suggest increased clamping stress between the fiber and the matrix. The composite property changes are explained in terms of irradiation effects on composite constituents and are compared with carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composite as a reference material.

  20. Evaluation of ferritic alloy Fe-2-1/4Cr-1Mo after neutron irradiation - irradiation creep and swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Puigh, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    Irradiation creep and swelling measurements are reported for Fe-2-1/4Cr-1Mo after irradiation by fast neutrons over the temperature range 390 to 560/sup 0/C. Diameter change measurements on thin walled pressurized tubes in a bainitic condition and density change measurements on rods in a nonstandard condition were made following irradiation in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The irradiation creep specimens were irradiated to a fluence of 5.7 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) or 30 dpa and the swelling specimens were irradiated to a peak fluence of 2.4 x 10/sup 23/ n/cm/sup 2/ or 115 dpa. These results have been used as a basis to establish in-reactor creep and swelling correlations for 2-1/4Cr-1Mo in a bainitic condition. The correlations predict moderate swelling and moderate irradiation enhanced creep at 390/sup 0/C.

  1. Correlation between shear punch and tensile data for neutron-irradiated aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.L.; Edwards, D.J.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1995-04-01

    This work was performed to determine whether shear punch and tensile data obtained on neutron irradiated aluminum alloys exhibited the same type of relationship as had been seen in other work and to assess the validity of extrapolating the results to proton-irradiated alloys. This work was also meant to be the first of a series of similar test matrices designed to determine whether the shear punch/tensile relationship varied or was the same for different alloy classes.

  2. The effects of oxide evolution on mechanical properties in proton- and neutron-irradiated Fe-9%Cr ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, M. J.; Dolph, C. K.; Wharry, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of irradiation on the strengthening mechanisms of a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel. The alloy was irradiated with protons or neutrons to a dose of 3 displacements per atoms at 500 °C. Nanoindentation was used to measure strengthening due to irradiation, with neutron irradiation causing a greater increase in yield strength than proton irradiation. The irradiated microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT). Cluster analysis reveals solute migration from the Y-Ti-O-rich nanoclusters to the surrounding matrix after both irradiations, though the effect is more pronounced in the neutron-irradiated specimen. Because the dissolved oxygen atoms occupy interstitial sites in the iron matrix, they contribute significantly to solid solution strengthening. The dispersed barrier hardening model relates microstructure evolution to the change in yield strength, but is only accurate if solid solution contributions to strengthening are considered simultaneously.

  3. Efficient generation of fusion neutrons from cryogenically cooled heteronuclear clusters irradiated by intense femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Lu, Haiyang; Li, Song; Xu, Yi; Guo, Xiaoyang; Leng, Yuxin; Liu, Jiansheng; Shen, Baifei; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-02-01

    We present experimental studies on the conversion efficiency of fusion neutrons generated from Coulomb explosion of cryogenically cooled heteronuclear deuterated methane (CD4) clusters irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses. A stronger nonlinear relationship between the cluster size and the stagnation temperature for CD4 clusters than that for monoatomic or diatomic clusters is revealed, resulting in marked increases in the average kinetic energy of deuterons and the fusion neutron yield. Finally, a significantly enhanced conversion efficiency of 1.9 × 107 neutrons/J of incident laser energy is achieved by lowering the stagnation temperature to 217 K under a backing pressure of 80 bars.

  4. Long counter and its application for the calibration of the neutron irradiators.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeonseo; Kim, Jungho; Choi, Kil-Oung

    2014-10-01

    The Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) has constructed a new long counter that can be disassembled in parts and reassembled. This counter can be easily transported and used as a transfer standard instrument for neutron fluence measurements. The response function and the effective centre of the counter are investigated by calculating neutron energies from thermal to 30 MeV using MCNPX. By carrying out measurements using a (252)Cf source in the KRISS irradiation room, the accuracy of the evaluated effective centre position is confirmed. The 'distance variation method' is adopted to eliminate the effect of inscatter neutrons. This method is effective and used for the experimental determination of the effective centre. The neutron emission rates determined by the neutron fluence measurements using the long counter developed are compared with those measured by a manganese sulphate bath, and show good agreement within 3 %.

  5. Annealing studies of silicon microstrip detectors irradiated at high neutron fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñano, M.; Balbuena, J. P.; García, C.; González, S.; Lacasta, C.; Lacuesta, V.; Lozano, M.; Martí i Garcia, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.

    2008-06-01

    Silicon p-type detectors are being investigated for the development of radiation-tolerant detectors for the luminosity upgrade of the CERN large hadron collider (Super-LHC (sLHC)). Microstrip detectors have been fabricated by CNM-IMB with an n-side read-out on p-type high-resistivity float zone substrates. They have been irradiated with neutrons at the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor in Ljubljana. The irradiation fluxes match with the expected doses for the inner tracker at the sLHC (up to 10 16 equivalent 1 MeV neutrons cm -2). The macroscopic properties of the irradiated prototypes after irradiation were characterized at the IFIC-Valencia laboratory. The charge collection studies were carried out by means of a radioactive source setup as well as by an infrared laser illumination. The annealing behavior was studied in detail on a microstrip detector irradiated with a flux of 10 15 equivalent 1 MeV neutrons cm -2. Collected charge measurements were made after accelerated annealing times at 80 °C up to an equivalent annealing time of several years at room temperature. This note reports on the recorded results from the annealing of the irradiated p-type microstrip sensor.

  6. Advanced neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Si Young

    A heavily filtered fast neutron irradiation system (FNIS) was developed for a variety of applications, including the study of long-term health effects of fast neutrons by evaluating the biological mechanisms of damage in cultured cells and living animals such as rats or mice. This irradiation system includes an exposure cave made with a lead-bismuth alloy, a cave positioning system, a gamma and neutron monitoring system, a sample transfer system, and interchangeable filters. This system was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). By increasing the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy, the neutron spectra were shifted into lower energies by the scattering interactions of fast neutrons with the alloy. It is possible, therefore, by changing the alloy thickness, to produce distinctly different dose weighted neutron spectra inside the exposure cave of the FNIS. The calculated neutron spectra showed close agreement with the results of activation foil measurements, unfolded by SAND-II close to the cell window. However, there was a considerable less agreement for locations far away from the cell window. Even though the magnitude of values such as neutron flux and tissue kerma rates in air differed, the weighted average neutron energies showed close agreement between the MCNP and SAND-II since the normalized neutron spectra were in a good agreement each other. A paired ion chamber system was constructed, one with a tissue equivalent plastic (A-150) and propane gas for total dose monitoring, and another with graphite and argon for photon dose monitoring. Using the pair of detectors, the neutron to gamma ratio can be inferred. With the 20 cm-thick FNIS, the absorbed dose rates of neutrons measured with the paired ion chamber method and calculated with the SAND-II results were 13.7 +/- 0.02 Gy/min and 15.5 Gy/min, respectively. The absorbed dose rate of photons and the gamma contribution to total dose were 6.7 x 10

  7. Dose-Dependent Onset of Regenerative Program in Neutron Irradiated Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Artibani, Mara; Kobos, Katarzyna; Colautti, Paolo; Negri, Rodolfo; Amendola, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Tissue response to irradiation is not easily recapitulated by cell culture studies. The objective of this investigation was to characterize, the transcriptional response and the onset of regenerative processes in mouse skin irradiated with different doses of fast neutrons. Methodology/Principal Findings To monitor general response to irradiation and individual animal to animal variation, we performed gene and protein expression analysis with both pooled and individual mouse samples. A high-throughput gene expression analysis, by DNA oligonucleotide microarray was done with three months old C57Bl/6 mice irradiated with 0.2 and 1 Gy of mono-energetic 14 MeV neutron compared to sham irradiated controls. The results on 440 irradiation modulated genes, partially validated by quantitative real time RT-PCR, showed a dose-dependent up-regulation of a sub-class of keratin and keratin associated proteins, and members of the S100 family of Ca2+-binding proteins. Immunohistochemistry confirmed mRNA expression data enabled mapping of protein expression. Interestingly, proteins up-regulated in thickening epidermis: keratin 6 and S100A8 showed the most significant up-regulation and the least mouse-to-mouse variation following 0.2 Gy irradiation, in a concerted effort toward skin tissue regeneration. Conversely, mice irradiated at 1 Gy showed most evidence of apoptosis (Caspase-3 and TUNEL staining) and most 8-oxo-G accumulation at 24 h post-irradiation. Moreover, no cell proliferation accompanied 1 Gy exposure as shown by Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Conclusions/Significance The dose-dependent differential gene expression at the tissue level following in vivo exposure to neutron radiation is reminiscent of the onset of re-epithelialization and wound healing and depends on the proportion of cells carrying multiple chromosomal lesions in the entire tissue. Thus, this study presents in vivo evidence of a skin regenerative program exerted independently from DNA repair

  8. Technical Specifications for the Neutron Radiography Facility (TRIGA Mark 1 Reactor). Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, R.L.; Perfect, J.F.

    1988-04-01

    These Technical Specifications state the limits under which the Neutron Radiography Facility, with its associated TRIGA Mark I Reactor, is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. These specifications cover operation of the Facility for the purpose of examination of specimens (including contained fissile material) by neutron radiography, for the irradiation of specimens in the pneumatic transfer system and approved in-core or in-pool irradiation facilities and operator training. The Final Safety Analysis Report (TC-344) and its supplements, and these Technical Specifications are the basic safety documents of the Neutron Radiography Facility.

  9. Effect of neutron irradiation on fracture toughness behaviour of copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Pyykkönen, M.; Karjalainen-Roikonen, P.; Singh, B. N.; Toft, P.

    1998-10-01

    One of the most important factors in deciding about the applicability of materials in the structural components of ITER, is the effect of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness behaviour of these materials. In the present work, the fracture toughness properties of two candidate materials for the first wall and divertor components of ITER, namely precipitation hardened CuCrZr and dispersion hardened CuAl25 alloys, have been studied in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. In parallel, tensile properties of these alloys have been also investigated in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions.

  10. The observation of structural defects in neutron-irradiated lithium-doped silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to observe the distribution and morphology of lattice defects introduced into lithium-doped silicon solar cells by neutron irradiation. Upon etching the surface of the solar cells after irradiation, crater-like defects are observed that are thought to be associated with the space charge region around vacancy clusters. Thermal annealing experiments showed that the crater defects were stable in the temperature range 300 to 1200 K in all of the lithium-doped samples. Some annealing of the crater defects was observed to occur in the undoped cells which were irradiated at the lowest doses.

  11. Parotid gland pathophysiology after mixed gamma and neutron irradiation of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.W.; Izutsu, K.T.; Rice, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    Electrolyte and protein concentrations were measured in parotid saliva samples obtained from patients receiving localized, fractionated, neutron and gamma irradiation for the treatment of cancer. Salivary sodium chloride concentration increased transiently but then usually decreased to preirradiation values after 2 weeks of therapy. There were concurrent decreases in salivary flow rate, pH, and bicarbonate concentration. The decreases in sodium chloride concentration and flow rate are inconsistent with a previously suggested, irradiation-induced ductal sodium resorption defect. The findings contribute toward understanding how salivary gland physiology is altered in irradiation injury.

  12. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  13. Hardening and microstructural evolution in A533B steels under neutron irradiation and a direct comparison with electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Nakata, H.; Fukuya, K.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Yoshiie, T.

    2010-05-01

    A533B steels irradiated at 290 °C up to 10 mdpa in the Kyoto University Reactor were examined by hardness, positron annihilation and atom probe measurements. Dose dependent irradiation hardening and formation of Cu-rich clusters were confirmed in medium Cu (0.12% and 0.16%Cu) steels whereas neither hardening nor cluster formation was detected in low Cu (0.03%Cu) steel. No microvoids were formed in any of the steels. Post-irradiation annealing in medium Cu steels revealed that the hardening recovery at temperatures above 350-400 °C could be attributed to compositional changes and dissociation of the Cu-rich clusters. Compared to electron irradiation at almost the same dose and dose rate, KUR irradiation caused almost the same hardening and produced Cu-rich clusters, more solute-enriched with larger size and lower density. Considering lower production of freely-migrating vacancies in neutron irradiation, the results suggested that cascades enhance the formation of Cu-rich clusters.

  14. [CYTOGENETIC EFFECTS IN MICE BONE MARROW AFTER IRRADIATION BY FAST NEUTRONS].

    PubMed

    Vorozhtsova, S V; Bulynina, T M; Ivanov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of damaging mice bone marrow cells by 1.5 MeV neutrons at the dose of 25-250 cGy, dose rate of 23.9 cGy/s and γ-quants ⁶⁰Co as a standard radiation were studied. The mitotic index and aberrant mitoses in marrow preparations were counted in 24 and 72 hours after irradiation. Coefficients of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons 24 and 72 hours post irradiation calculated from mitotic index reduction and aberrant mitoses formation were within the range from 4.1 ± 0.1 to 7.3 ± 0.1. Mean time of the existence of chromosomal aberrations in marrow cells was determined. For the specified doses from γ-rays, the period of aberrations existence was 1.4-1.1 cycles and for neutrons, 1.0-0.6 cycles. Morphologic analysis of neutron-induced damages and ratio of the most common breaks demonstrated a high production of bridges, which outnumbered cells with fragments in 3 to 4 times suggesting a more destructive effect on the genetic structures of cells. RBE of fast neutrons is a variable that grows with a radiation dose. Moreover, RBE estimated after 72 hours exceeded values it had 24 hours after irradiation. PMID:27347593

  15. Accumulation of /sup 254g/Es in the neutron irradiation of californium

    SciTech Connect

    Adaev, V.A.; Klinov, A.V.; Mamelin, A.V.; Toporov, Yu.G.

    1987-06-01

    Preliminary calculations have shown that the ratio of the rates of formation and burnup of /sup 254g/Es can be shifted toward the rate of formation, provided that the californium-containing targets are irradiated with neutrons having a very hard spectrum, (the hardness of the neutron spectrum is defined as the ratio of the flux density of ipithermal neutrons per unit mean logarithmic energy decrement to the flux density of the thermal neutrons). For the purpose of experimentally verifying this conclusion, we irradiated two test samples provided with metal cadmium shields and containing a mixture of californium isotopes as the initial material (approx. 70% of the total was /sup 252/Cf nuclei). After target irradiation, the targets were subjected to a radiochemical treatment and the concentration of the products accumulated was analyzed. It follows from a comparison of experimental and calculated data that the published data on the neutron cross section of the einsteinium isotopes render excessive /sup 254g/Es yields and too small /sup 253/Es yields. Therefore a series of calculations was made for the various values of the resonance integral of the /sup 253/Es absorption and of the partial resonances of the radiative capture integrals of /sup 253/Es in the reaction leading to the formation of /sup 254g/Es and /sup 254m/Es. The calculations have shown that the /sup 253/Es yield in the targets can be satisfactorily predicted with a resonance integral I/sub a/ = 3500 b of absorption

  16. [CYTOGENETIC EFFECTS IN MICE BONE MARROW AFTER IRRADIATION BY FAST NEUTRONS].

    PubMed

    Vorozhtsova, S V; Bulynina, T M; Ivanov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of damaging mice bone marrow cells by 1.5 MeV neutrons at the dose of 25-250 cGy, dose rate of 23.9 cGy/s and γ-quants ⁶⁰Co as a standard radiation were studied. The mitotic index and aberrant mitoses in marrow preparations were counted in 24 and 72 hours after irradiation. Coefficients of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons 24 and 72 hours post irradiation calculated from mitotic index reduction and aberrant mitoses formation were within the range from 4.1 ± 0.1 to 7.3 ± 0.1. Mean time of the existence of chromosomal aberrations in marrow cells was determined. For the specified doses from γ-rays, the period of aberrations existence was 1.4-1.1 cycles and for neutrons, 1.0-0.6 cycles. Morphologic analysis of neutron-induced damages and ratio of the most common breaks demonstrated a high production of bridges, which outnumbered cells with fragments in 3 to 4 times suggesting a more destructive effect on the genetic structures of cells. RBE of fast neutrons is a variable that grows with a radiation dose. Moreover, RBE estimated after 72 hours exceeded values it had 24 hours after irradiation.

  17. The response of ataxia-telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells to neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Houldsworth, J.; Cohen, D.; Singh, S.; Lavin, M.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The response of control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells to increasing doses of high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (neutrons) was compared. Ataxia-telangiectasia cells were markedly more sensitive to neutron irradiation than were control cells. The D0 value for the two A-T cell lines was 0.4 Gy while the value for controls was approximately 1.4 Gy. Fast neutrons were considerably more effective than gamma rays in inducing cell death in both cell types, but the sensitivity factor remained approximately the same as with gamma rays. A minimal depression of DNA synthesis was observed in ataxia-telangiectasia cells after neutron irradiation, similar to that reported previously after gamma irradiation. The extent of inhibition was not significantly greater in control cells, contrary to that seen with gamma rays. In time-course experiments a significant difference in degree of inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed between the cell types. Low doses of fast neutrons induced a G2-phase delay in both cell types, but the degree and extent of this delay was greater in ataxia-telangiectasia cells as observed previously with low-LET radiation.

  18. Results of d+T fast neutron irradiation on advanced tumors of bladder and rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.

    1982-12-01

    From November, 1975 to November, 1981, around 400 patients were irradiated with 14 MeV d+T fast neutrons at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam. Special interest was focused on inoperable tumors of bladder and rectum. During the pilot phase of the study 47 patients were treated, mostly via two parallel opposed ports with dosages that ranged from 18 to more than 22 Gy. Although persistent local control was achieved in 23 patients (48%), 14 patients (29%) died of severe complications. By the introduction of a six field technique, the fatal complication rate could be reduced significantly. Since May 1978 patients were randomized in a three arm trial, using two dose levels on the neutron site. The preliminary results of a group of 91 patients show a similar survival in the three treatment arms with a somewhat better local control rate for high dose neutrons. An attempt was made to estimate RBE values for tumor control and normal tissue reactions by comparing the data for neutron irradiation with the data obtained with photons on a similar group of patients. From the values derived it must be concluded that the gain for neutron irradiation on these tumors in the pelvis will be negligible.

  19. Results of d+T fast neutron irradiation on advanced tumors of bladder and rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.

    1982-12-01

    From November, 1975 to November, 1981, around 400 patients were irradiated with 14 MeV d+T fast neutrons at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam. Special interest was focused on inoperable tumors of bladder and rectum. During the pilot phase of the study 47 patients were treated, mostly via two parallel opposed ports with dosages that ranged from 18 to more than 22 Gy. Although persistent local control was achieved in 23 patients (48%), 14 patients (29%) died of severe complications. By the introduction of a six field technique, the fatal complication rate could be reduced significantly. Since May 1978 patients were randomized in a three arm trial, using two dose levels on the neutron site. The preliminary results of a group of 91 patients show a similar survival in the three treatment arms with a somewhat better local control rate for high dose neutrons. An attempt was made to estimate RBE values for tumor control and normal tissue reaction by comparing the data for neutron irradiation with the data obtained with photons on a similar group of patients. From the values derived it must be concluded that the gain for neutron irradiation on these tumors in the pelvis will be negligible.

  20. Resistivity measurements of neutron-irradiated pure metals and Al-Zn alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horak, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Report presents resistivity measurements and their interpretation for neutron-irradiated pure metals and Al-Zn alloys. The influence of temperature, the role of point defects, and the aging behavior on resistivity are considered. The experimental procedures and results are discussed in detail.

  1. Large lattice relaxation deep levels in neutron-irradiated GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Zhang, J.D.; Beling, C.D.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.X.; Gong, M.; Sarkar, C.K.

    2005-11-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) measurements have been carried out in neutron-irradiated n-type hydride-vapor-phase-epitaxy-grown GaN. A defect center characterized by a DLTS line, labeled as N1, is observed at E{sub C}-E{sub T}=0.17 eV. Another line, labeled as N2, at E{sub C}-E{sub T}=0.23 eV, seems to be induced at the same rate as N1 under irradiation and may be identified with E1. Other defects native to wurtzite GaN such as the C and E2 lines appear to enhance under neutron irradiation. The DLOS results show that the defects N1 and N2 have large Frank-Condon shifts of 0.64 and 0.67 eV, respectively, and hence large lattice relaxations. The as-grown and neutron-irradiated samples all exhibit the persistent photoconductivity effect commonly seen in GaN that may be attributed to DX centers. The concentration of the DX centers increases significantly with neutron dosage and is helpful in sustaining sample conductivity at low temperatures, thus making possible DLTS measurements on N1 an N2 in the radiation-induced deep-donor defect compensated material which otherwise are prevented by carrier freeze-out.

  2. Filtered fast neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, S. Y.; Kim, C. H.; Reece, W. D.; Braby, L. A.

    2004-09-01

    A heavily filtered fast neutron irradiation system (FNIS) was developed for a variety of applications, including the study of long-term health effects of fast neutrons by evaluating the biological mechanisms of damage in cultured cells and living animals such as rats or mice. This irradiation system includes an exposure cave made with a lead-bismuth alloy, a cave positioning system, a gamma and neutron monitoring system, a sample transfer system, and interchangeable filters. This system was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). For a realistic modeling of the NSCR, the irradiation cell, and the FNIS, this study used the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code and a set of high-temperature ENDF/B-VI continuous neutron cross-section data. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find the characteristics of the FNIS as a function of the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy. A paired ion chamber system was constructed with a tissue-equivalent plastic (A-150) and propane gas for total dose monitoring and with graphite and argon for gamma dose monitoring. This study, in addition, tested the Monte Carlo modeling of the FNIS system, as well as the performance of the system by comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements using activation foils and paired ion chambers.

  3. Neutron irradiation induced microstructural changes in NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, Chinnathambi; Kane, Joshua; Butt, Darryl P.; Windes, William E.; Ubic, Rick

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports the neutron-irradiation-induced effects on the microstructure of NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites. The high-temperature neutron irradiation at two different irradiation conditions was carried out at the Advanced Test Reactor National User Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. NBG-18 samples were irradiated to 1.54 dpa and 6.78 dpa at 430 °C and 678 °C respectively. IG-110 samples were irradiated to 1.91 dpa and 6.70 dpa at 451 °C and 674 °C respectively. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to study the changes in different microstructural components such as filler particles, microcracks, binder and quinoline-insoluble (QI) particles. Significant changes have been observed in samples irradiated to about 6.7 dpa. The closing of pre-existing microcracks was observed in both the filler and the binder phases. The binder phase exhibited substantial densification with near complete elimination of the microcracks. The QI particles embedded in the binder phase exhibited a complete microstructural transformation from rosettes to highly crystalline solid spheres. The lattice images indicate the formation of edge dislocations as well as extended line defects bridging the adjacent basal planes. The positive climb of these dislocations has been identified as the main contributor to the irradiation-induced swelling of the graphite lattice.

  4. Irradiation Induced Defect Characterization in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yougn-Soo; Shin, Eun-Joo; Lee, Chang-Hee; Park, Duck-Gun

    The degradation of the mechanical properties of the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) steel during an irradiation in a nuclear power plant is closely related to the irradiation induced defects. The size of these defects is known to be a few nanometer, and the small angle neutron scattering technique is regarded as the best non destructive technique to characterize the nano sized inhomogeneities in bulk samples. The investigated the RPV steel has been used in YeongKwang nuclear power plant at Korea and the Cu content of the RPV steel is 0.06 wt%. The RPV steel was irradiated in the HANARO reactor at KAERI. The small angle neutron scattering experiments were performed by the SANS instrument in the HANARO reactor. The nano sized irradiation induced defects were quantitatively analyzed by SANS and the type of the irradiation induced defects was discussed in detail. The relation between irradiation induced defects and the yield strength was investigated. The characteristics of irradiation induced defects in low Cu containing RPV steel were discussed.

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David M.; Lindquist, Lloyd O.

    1985-01-01

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and non-invasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. No external neutron-emitting interrogation source or fissile material is used and no scanning is required, although if a profile is desired scanning can be used. As in active assays, here both reactivity and content of fissionable material can be measured. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly. The return flux is altered by changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  6. Swelling behavior detection of irradiated U-10Zr alloy fuel using indirect neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong; Huo, He-yong; Wu, Yang; Li, Jiangbo; Zhou, Wei; Guo, Hai-bing; Li, Hang; Cao, Chao; Yin, Wei; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Bin; Feng, Qi-jie; Tang, Bin

    2016-11-01

    It is hopeful that fusion-fission hybrid energy system will become an effective approach to achieve long-term sustainable development of fission energy. U-10Zr alloy (which means the mass ratio of Zr is 10%) fuel is the key material of subcritical blanket for fusion-fission hybrid energy system which the irradiation performance need to be considered. Indirect neutron radiography is used to detect the irradiated U-10Zr alloy because of the high residual dose in this paper. Different burnup samples (0.1%, 0.3%, 0.5% and 0.7%) have been tested with a special indirect neutron radiography device at CMRR (China Mianyang Research Reactor). The resolution of the device is better than 50 μm and the quantitative analysis of swelling behaviors was carried out. The results show that the swelling behaviors relate well to burnup character which can be detected accurately by indirect neutron radiography.

  7. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.M.; Lindquist, L.O.

    1982-09-07

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and noninvasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly by means of changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  8. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zujun Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Xiao, Zhigang; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2014-07-15

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10{sup 11}, 5 × 10{sup 11}, and 1 × 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The mean dark signal (K{sub D}), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V{sub N}), saturation output signal voltage (V{sub S}), and dynamic range (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike.

  9. In-pile and post-irradiation creep of type 304 stainless steel under different neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Y.; Itabashi, Y.; Mimura, H.; Kikuchi, T.; Amezawa, H.; Shimakawa, S.; Tsuji, H.; Shindo, M.

    2000-12-01

    In addition to post-irradiation creep tests, in-pile creep tests were performed using newly developed technology with in situ measurement under different neutron spectra. The in-pile creep properties of type 304 stainless steel at 550°C appear to depend on neutron spectrum, but a spectral effect on post-irradiation creep properties is not clearly seen. The rupture time of in-pile creep under a high thermal neutron flux condition is the shortest. The order of the rupture time following the high thermal flux condition is post-irradiation creep, in-pile creep with a thermal neutron shield condition and finally creep of unirradiated material, all in increasing order. It is suggested that the acceleration of creep deformation and fracture observed in irradiation creep tests may be related to enhancement of thermal creep in terms of FMD increased under a high thermal neutron flux in addition to increased helium embrittlement.

  10. Neutron capture effects in lunar gadolinium and the irradiation histories of some lunar rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.; Marti, K.

    1971-01-01

    The Gd isotopic composition in 19 lunar rock and soil samples from three Apollo sites is reported. The analytical techniques and the high precision mass spectrometric measurements are discussed. Enrichments in the Gd-158 oxide to G-157 oxide ratio due to neutron capture range up to 0.75%. Integrated 'thermal' neutron fluxes derived from the isotopic anomalies of Gd are compared with spallation Kr data from aliquot samples to construct a model which gives both average cosmic-ray irradiation depths and effective neutron exposure ages for some rocks. Rock 14310 is the first lunar sample where Kr anomalies due to resonance neutron capture in Br are observed. A Kr-81/Kr exposure age of 262 (plus or minus 7)m.y. is calculated for this rock.

  11. Voids in neutron-irradiated metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering are powerful analytical tools for investigating long-range fluctuations in electron (x-rays) or magnetic moment (neutrons) densities in materials. In recent years they have yielded valuable information about voids, void size distributions, and swelling in aluminum, aluminum alloys, copper, molybdenum, nickel, nickel-aluminum, niobium and niobium alloys, stainless steels, graphite and silicon carbide. In the case of aluminum, information concerning the shape of the voids and the ratio of specific surface energies was obtained. The technique of small-angle scattering and its application to the study of voids is reviewed in the paper. Emphasis is placed on the conditions which limit the applicability of the technique, on the interpretation of the data, and on a comparison of the results obtained with companion techniques such as transmission electron microscopy and bulk density. 8 figures, 41 references.

  12. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Onchi, T.; Hide, K.; Mayuzumi, M.; Hoshiya, T.

    2000-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS) have been used as core component materials for light water reactors. As reactors age, however, the material tends to suffer from degradation primarily resulting from irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) as well as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 (UNS S30400) stainless steels (SS) were examined by slow strain rate (SSR) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests in 290 C water of 0.2 ppm dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) and by SSR tensile tests in 290 C inert gas environment. Neutron fluences ranged from 4 x 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (energy [E] > 1 MeV). percent intergranular (%IG) cracking, which has been used as an intergranular (IG) cracking susceptibility indicator in the SSR SCC tests, changes anomalously with neutron fluence in spite of the strain-to-failure rate decreasing with an increase of neutron fluence. Apparently, %IG is a misleading indicator for the irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS when IG cracking susceptibility is compared at different neutron fluences, test temperatures, DO, and strain rates. These test parameters may affect deformation and fracture behaviors of the irradiated SS during the SSR SCC tests, resulting in changing %IG, which is given by the ratio of the total IG cracking area to the entire fracture surface area. It is suggested that strain-to-IG crack initiation for the irradiated, thermally sensitized SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS is the alternative indicator in the SSR SCC tests. An engineering expedient to determine the IG crack initiation strain is given by a deviating point on superposed stress-strain curves in inert gas and in oxygenated water. The strain-to-IG crack initiation becomes smaller with an increase of neutron fluence and DO. The SSR tensile tests in inert gas are needed to obtain strain-to-IG crack initiation in

  13. Significant disparity in base and sugar damage in DNA resulting from neutron and electron irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Dalong; Nico, Jeffrey S.; Karam, Lisa; Timofeeva, Olga; Blakely, William F.; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Jaruga, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a comparison of the effects of neutron and electron irradiation of aqueous DNA solutions was investigated to characterize potential neutron signatures in DNA damage induction. Ionizing radiation generates numerous lesions in DNA, including base and sugar lesions, lesions involving base–sugar combinations (e.g. 8,5′-cyclopurine-2′-deoxynucleosides) and DNA–protein cross-links, as well as single- and double-strand breaks and clustered damage. The characteristics of damage depend on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the incident radiation. Here we investigated DNA damage using aqueous DNA solutions in 10 mmol/l phosphate buffer from 0–80 Gy by low-LET electrons (10 Gy/min) and the specific high-LET (∼0.16 Gy/h) neutrons formed by spontaneous 252Cf decay fissions. 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), (5′R)-8,5′-cyclo-2′-deoxyadenosine (R-cdA) and (5′S)-8,5′-cyclo-2′-deoxyadenosine (S-cdA) were quantified using liquid chromatography–isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry to demonstrate a linear dose dependence for induction of 8-OH-dG by both types of radiation, although neutron irradiation was ∼50% less effective at a given dose compared with electron irradiation. Electron irradiation resulted in an exponential increase in S-cdA and R-cdA with dose, whereas neutron irradiation induced substantially less damage and the amount of damage increased only gradually with dose. Addition of 30 mmol/l 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (TRIS), a free radical scavenger, to the DNA solution before irradiation reduced lesion induction to background levels for both types of radiation. These results provide insight into the mechanisms of DNA damage by high-LET 252Cf decay neutrons and low-LET electrons, leading to enhanced understanding of the potential biological effects of these types of irradiation. PMID:25034731

  14. Optical absorption of neutron-irradiated silica fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Bennett, B.L.

    1996-10-01

    Induced-loss spectra of silica-based optical fibers exposed to high (10{sup 23} n-m{sup {minus}2}) and low (10{sup 21} n-m{sup {minus}2}) fluences of neutrons at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) have been measured. Two types of fibers consisting of a pure fused silica core with fluorine-doped ({approximately}4 mole %) cladding were obtained from Fiberguide Industries and used in the as-received condition. Anhydroguide{trademark} and superguide{trademark} fibers contained less than 1 ppm, and 600 to 800 ppm of OH, respectively. The data suggest that presently available silica fibers can be used in plasma diagnostics, but the choice and suitability depends upon the spectral region of interest. Low-OH content fibers can be used for diagnostic purposes in the interval {approximately}800 to 1400 mn if the exposure is to high-fluence neutrons. For low-fluence neutron exposures, the low-OH content fibers are best suited for use in the interval {approximately}800 to 2000 nm, and the high-OH content fibers are the choice for the interval {approximately}400 to 800 nm.

  15. Neutron-transmuted carbon-14 in neutron-irradiated GaN: Compensation of DX-like center

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, T.; Oga, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Xu, Q.; Fukutani, S.

    2013-12-04

    The transmuted-C related luminescence and net carrier concentration are studied by combining photoluminescence, liquid scintillation, and Raman scattering. GaN single crystal films grown by metalorganic-vapor-phase epitaxy are irradiated with fast and thermal neutrons at fluxes of 3.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} and 8.15 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1}, respectively. Irradiation time is 48 hours. The calculated {sup 72}Ge and {sup 14}C concentrations are 1.24 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and 1.13 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}, respectively. The transmuted {sup 14}C is detected by the liquid scintillation method to survey β-rays emitted in the process of {sup 14}C decays from {sup 14}N. Tritium ({sup 3}H) is also emitted by a (n,t) reaction of {sup 14}N due to the neutron irradiation above 4.5 MeV. Photoluminescence relating to C, DX-like center of Ge and yellow luminescence band are observed in 1000 °C annealed NTD-GaN. The free electron concentration estimated from Raman scattering is 4.97 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. This value is lower than that from the transmuted Ge concentration, suggesting the compensation due to the transmuted {sup 14}C acceptors.

  16. EPR study of new defects in neutron irradiated KS-4V and KU1 fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomacini, J. C.; Bravo, D.; Martín, P.; Ibarra, A.; Martín, A.; López, F. J.

    2010-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies have been carried out on high purity fused silica KS-4V (low OH content) and KU1 (high OH content), irradiated with fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) at a high fluence of 1022 n/m2. The spectrum of irradiated samples shows various well-known types of paramagnetic defects, POR, NBOHC and E'. Their thermal stability has also been studied by heating the samples in air up to 775 °C. A detailed analysis of the spectra shows that the POR spectrum of neutron-irradiated KS-4V and KU1 has two contributions from centres POR(I) and POR(II), which show very different thermal annealing behaviour. POR(I) is identified with the POR centre previously reported, whereas POR(II) is associated to the effects of fast neutrons. Moreover, a new broad line centred at g = 2.02 is reported that we suggest could be associated to oxygen-hole centres in the neighbourhood of the high amount of tracks generated by ion displacement due to fast neutrons.

  17. Pathologic changes in the hearts of beagles irradiated with fractionated fast neutrons or photons

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, B.C.; Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-12-01

    Thirty-nine adult male purebred beagles received either fast-neutron or photon irradiation to the right thorax to determine the effects on pulmonary tissue. The right atrium, a small portion of the right ventricle, and the right anterior abdomen were included in the field. Twenty-four dogs (six/group) received fast neutrons with a mean energy of 15 MeV to doses of 1000, 1500, 2250, or 3375 rad in four fractions per week for 6 weeks. Fifteen dogs received 3000, 4500, or 6750 rad of photons (five/group) in an identical fractionation pattern. Fourteen dogs died or were euthanatized in extremis between 47 and 708 days after radiation because of radiation damage to digestive organs. Six other dogs died of anesthetic accidents between 196 and 1144 days after radiation; these deaths were probably related to hepatic dysfunction. Two neutron-irradiated dogs developed cardiac neoplasms after 396 and 1624 days. One dog died of a myocardial infarct and one died of an unrelated infection. The major atrial lesions were hemorrhage and necrosis of myocardial cells in dogs that died 47-109 days postirradiation. Myocardial and endocardial fibrosis were most extensive in dogs that died 84 or more days following irradiation. All beagles had degenerative and occlusive vascular changes associated with atrial lesions. The relative biological effectiveness of fast neutrons for pathologic injury of the heart was estimated to be between 4 and 5.

  18. V79 survival following simultaneous or sequential irradiation by 15-MeV neutrons and /sup 60/Co photons

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Gould, M.N.

    1983-07-01

    A unique tandem source irradiation facility, composed of an intense d-T neutron source and a /sup 60/Co teletherapy unit, was used to investigate biological responses for different neutron/photon configurations. V79 Chinese hamster cells, attached as monolayers in log-phase growth, were irradiated at 37 degrees C by either 14.8-MeV neutrons, /sup 60/Co, or a mixture of 40% neutrons and 60% photons in simultaneous or sequential application. Measurements of cell survival indicate an increased effectiveness in cell killing for simultaneously administered neutrons and photons compared to that measured or predicted for sequentially applied beam modalities. An understanding of the magnitude of these interactive effects is important both for calculating accurate effective doses for neutron radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, for which the photon component is appreciable, and for determination of environmental hazards to people occupationally exposed to mixtures of photons and neutrons.

  19. V79 survival following simultaneous or sequential irradiation by 15-MeV neutrons and /sup 60/Co photons

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Gould, M.N.

    1983-07-01

    A unique tandem source irradiation facility, composed of an intense d-T neutron source and a /sup 60/Co teletherapy unit, was used to investigate biological responses for different neutron/photon configurations. V79 Chinese hamster cells, attached as monolayers in log-phase growth, were irradiated at 37/sup 0/C by either 14.8-MeV neutrons, /sup 60/Co, or a mixture of 40% neutrons and 60% photons in simultaneous or sequential application. Measurements of cell survival indicate an increased effectiveness in cell killing for simultaneously administered neutrons and photons compared to that measured or predicted for sequentially applied beam modalities. An understanding of the magnitude of these interactive effects is important both for calculating accurate effective doses for neutron radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, for which the photon component is appreciable, and for determination of environmental hazards to people occupationally exposed to mixtures of photons and neutrons.

  20. Deuterium trapping at defects created with neutron and ion irradiations in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Hatano; M. Shimada; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; V.Kh. Alimov; M. Hara; J. Shi; M. Kobayashi; T. Oda; G. Cao; K. Okuno; T. Tanaka; K. Sugiyama; J. Roth; B. Tyburska-Püschel; J. Dorner; N. Yoshida; N. Futagami; H. Watanabe; M. Hatakeyama; H. Kurishita; M. Sokolov; Y. Katoh

    2013-07-01

    The effects of neutron and ion irradiations on deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) were investigated. Specimens of pure W were irradiated with neutrons to 0.3 dpa at around 323 K and then exposed to high-flux D plasma at 473 and 773 K. The concentration of D significantly increased by neutron irradiation and reached 0.8 at% at 473 K and 0.4 at% at 773 K. Annealing tests for the specimens irradiated with 20 MeV W ions showed that the defects which play a dominant role in the trapping at high temperature were stable at least up to 973 K, while the density decreased at temperatures equal to or above 1123 K. These observations of the thermal stability of traps and the activation energy for D detrapping examined in a previous study (˜1.8 eV) indicated that the defects which contribute predominantly to trapping at 773 K were small voids. The higher concentration of trapped D at 473 K was explained by additional contributions of weaker traps. The release of trapped D was clearly enhanced by the exposure to atomic hydrogen at 473 K, though higher temperatures are more effective for using this effect for tritium removal in fusion reactors.

  1. Subtask 12F3: Effects of neutron irradiation on tensile properties of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the tensile properties of candidate vanadium-base alloys. Vanadium-base alloys of the V-Cr-Ti system are attractive candidates for use as structural materials in fusion reactors. The current focus of the U.S. program of research on these alloys is on the V-(4-6)Cr-(3-6)Ti-(0.05-0.1)Si (in wt.%) alloys. In this paper, we present experimental results on the effects of neutron irradiation on tensile properties of selected candidate alloys after irradiation at 400{degrees}C-600{degrees}C in lithium in fast fission reactors to displacement damages of up to {approx}120 displacement per atom (dpa). Effects of irradiation temperature and dose on yield and ultimate tensile strengths and uniform and total elongations are given for tensile test temperatures of 25{degrees}C, 420{degrees}C, 500{degrees}, and 600{degrees}C. Effects of neutron damage on tensile properties of the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr-4Ti are examined in detail. 7 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Degradation of mechanical properties of stainless steel cladding due to neutron irradiation and thermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.

    1994-09-01

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect following neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 X 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29{degrees}C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to -125{degrees}C) and no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub {kappa}}) much more than did thermal aging alone. However, irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. The effects of long-term thermal exposure times (20,000 and 50,000 h) will be investigated when the specimens become available. Also, long-term thermal exposure of the three-wire cladding as well as type 308 stainless steel weld materials at 343{degrees}C is in progress.

  3. Swelling of several commercial alloys following high fluence neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.W.; Peterson, D.T.; Zimmerschied, M.K.; Bates, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Swelling values have been determined for a set of commercial alloys irradiated to a peak fluence of 17.8 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) over the temperature range of 400 to 650/sup 0/C. The alloys studied fall into three classes: the ferritic alloys AISI 430F, AISI 416, EM-12, H-11 and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo; the superalloys Inconel 718 and Inconel X-750; and the refractory alloys TZM and Nb-1 Zr. After irradiation to a peak fluence approaching goal exposures envisioned for advanced fusion reactor first walls, all of the alloys display swelling resistance far superior to cold worked AISI 316. Of the three alloy classes examined the swelling resistance of the ferritics is the least sensitive to composition.

  4. Synergistic effect of mixed neutron and gamma irradiation in bipolar operational amplifier OP07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liu; Wei, Chen; Shanchao, Yang; Xiaoming, Jin; Chaohui, He

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the synergistic effects in bipolar operational amplifier OP07. The radiation effects are studied by neutron beam, gamma ray, and mixed neutron/gamma ray environments. The characterateristics of the synergistic effects are studied through comparison of different experiment results. The results show that the bipolar operational amplifier OP07 exhibited significant synergistic effects in the mixed neutron and gamma irradiation. The bipolar transistor is identified as the most radiation sensitive unit of the operational amplifier. In this paper, a series of simulations are performed on bipolar transistors in different radiation environments. In the theoretical simulation, the geometric model and calculations based on the Medici toolkit are built to study the radiation effects in bipolar components. The effect of mixed neutron and gamma irradiation is simulated based on the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of radiation effects in bipolar transistors. The simulated results agree well with the experimental data. The results of the experiments and simulation indicate that the radiation effects in the bipolar devices subjected to mixed neutron and gamma environments is not a simple combination of total ionizing dose (TID) effects and displacement damage. The data suggests that the TID effect could enhance the displacement damage. The synergistic effect should not be neglected in complex radiation environments.

  5. Trehalose dimycolate enhances survival of fission neutron-irradiated mice and Klebsiella pneumoniae-challenged irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    McChesney, D.G.; Ledney, G.D.; Madonna, G.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The survival of B6D2F1 female mice exposed to lethal doses of fission neutron radiation is increased when trehalose dimycolate (TDM) preparations are given either 1 h after exposure or 1 day before exposure to radiation. TDM in an emulsion of squalene, Tween 80, and saline was the most effective formulation for increasing the 30-day survival of mice when given 1 day before (90%) or 1 h after (88%) exposure to radiation. An aqueous suspension of a synthetic analog of TDM was less effective at increasing 30-day survival (60%) when given 1 day prior to radiation exposure and not effective when given 1 h after radiation. Mice receiving a sublethal dose (3.5 Gy) of fission neutron radiation and either the TDM emulsion or synthetic TDM 1 h after irradiation were substantially more resistant to challenge with 10, 100, 1000, or 5000 times the LD50/30 dose of Klebsiella pneumoniae than untreated mice.

  6. Effect of neutron irradiation on the tensile properties and microstructure of several vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Specimens of V-15Cr-5Ti, VANSTAR-7, and V-3Ti-1Si were encapsulated in TZM tubes containing /sup 7/Li to prevent interstitial pickup and irradiated in FFTF (MOTA experiment) to a damage level of 40 dpa. The irradiation temperatures were 420, 520, and 600/sup 0/C. For a better simulation of fusion reactor conditions, helium was preimplanted in some specimens using a modified version of the ''tritium trick.'' The V-15Cr-5Ti alloy was most susceptible to irradiation hardening and helium embrittlement, followed by VANSTAR-7 and V-3Ti-1Si. VANSTAR-7 exhibited a relatively high maximum void swelling of approx.6% at 520/sup 0/C while V-15Cr-5Ti and V-3Ti-1Si had values of less than 0.3% at all three temperatures. The V-3Ti-1Si clearly outperformed the other two vanadium alloys in resisting the effects of neutron irradiation.

  7. Relationship of microstructure and tensile properties for neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The microstructures in V-15Cr-5Ti, V-10Cr-5RTi, V-3Ti-1Si, V-15Ti-7.5Cr, and V-20Ti alloys were examined by transmission electron microscopy after neutron irradiation at 600{degree}C to 21--84 atom displacements per atom in the Materials Open Test Assembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility. The microstructures in these irradiated alloys were analyzed to determine the radiation-produced dislocation density, precipitate number density and size, and void number density and size. The results of these analyses were used to compute increases in yield stress and swelling of the irradiated alloys. The computed increase in yield stress was compared with the increase in yield stress determined from tensile tests on these irradiated alloys. This comparison made it possible to evaluate the influence of alloy composition on the evolution of radiation-damaged microstructures and the resulting tensile properties. 11 refs.

  8. Fast neutron irradiation effects on magnetization relaxation in YBCO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lensink, J.G.; Griessen, R.; Wiesinger, H.P.; Sauerzopf, F.M.; Weber, H.W.; Crabtree, G.W.

    1991-07-01

    A high-quality YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} single crystal has been investigated by torque magnetometry prior to and following fast neutron irradiation to a fluence of 2{times}10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). In addition to large enhancements of the critical current densities, which have been observed in similar form previously by Sauerzopf et al, we find a dramatic change in the relaxation behavior following irradiation. At low temperatures ({le} 50 k) the relaxation rates are lowered by factors up to 4 in the irradiated state in a magnetic field of 1.5 T. At higher temperatures, on the other hand, they are enhanced compared to the unirradiated state. Both before and after irradiation, the magnetization relaxation follows a logarithmic time dependence, which we ascribe to thermally activated flux motion.

  9. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  10. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (∼90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S-W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage, providing insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  11. The effect of neutron irradiation dose on vacancy defect accumulation and annealing in pure nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhkov, A. P.; Arbuzov, V. L.; Perminov, D. A.

    2012-02-01

    In order to investigate the dose dependence of vacancy defect evolution in nickel, specimens of high-purity Ni were neutron-irradiated at ˜330 K in the IVV-2M reactor (Russia) to fluencies in the range of 1 × 10 21-1 × 10 23 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) corresponding to displacement dose levels in the range of about 0.0001-0.01 dpa and subsequently stepwise annealed to about 900 K. Ni was characterized both in as-irradiated state as well as after post-irradiation annealing by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The formation of three-dimensional vacancy clusters (3D-VCs) in cascades was observed under neutron irradiation, the concentration of 3D-VCs increases with increasing dose level. 3D-VCs collapse into secondary-type clusters (stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs), and vacancy loops) during stepwise annealing at 350-450 K. It is shown that the thermal stability of SFTs grow with increasing dose level, probably, it is due to growth of the average SFT size during annealing. The results of annealing experiments on electron-irradiated Ni at 300 K are indicated in the paper, for comparison. We also have briefly discussed the positron response to the SFT-like structures.

  12. Welding-induced mechanical properties in austenitic stainless steels before and after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, R.; Schäublin, R.; Gavillet, D.; Baluc, N.

    2007-03-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of welded joints made of austenitic stainless steels have been investigated. The materials are welded AISI 304 and AISI 347, so-called test weld materials, irradiated with neutrons at 573 K to doses of 0.3 and 1.0 dpa. In addition, an AISI 304 from a decommissioned pressurised water reactor, so-called in-service material, which had accumulated a maximum dose of 0.35 dpa at about 573 K, was investigated. The mechanical properties of heat-affected zones and base materials were analysed before and after irradiation. Tensile parameters were determined at room temperature and at 573 K, for all materials and irradiation conditions. In the test weld materials it is found that radiation hardening is lower and loss of ductility is higher in the heat-affected zone than in the base material. In the in-service material radiation hardening is about the same in heat-affected zone and base material. After irradiation, deformation takes place by stacking faults and twins, at both room temperature and high temperature, contrary to unirradiated materials, where deformation takes place by twinning at room temperature and by dislocation cells at high temperature. No defect free channels are observed.

  13. The effect of alloying elements on the defect structural evolution in neutron irradiated Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Xu, Q.; Satoh, Y.; Ohkubo, H.; Kiritani, M.

    2000-12-01

    The effect of alloying elements, Si (-5.8%: the volume size factor in Ni), Ge (+14.76%) and Sn (+74.08%), on void swelling in neutron irradiated Ni at 573 K was studied by transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation and positron annihilation lifetime measurement. Neutron irradiation dose was changed widely from 0.001 to 0.4 dpa using two reactors, the Kyoto University reactor (KUR) and the Japan materials testing reactor (JMTR). Voids were observed in pure Ni by TEM even after very small irradiation dose of 0.001 dpa. With increasing dose, the density of voids did not change much while their size increased. The same tendency was observed in Ni-2at.%Ge. In Ni-2at.%Sn and Ni-2at.%Si, however, no voids were observed by TEM at a damage dose of 0.4 dpa. But positron lifetime measurement revealed the existence of microvoids at a medium dose of irradiation. When irradiation dose increased to 0.4 dpa in Ni-2at.%Si and 0.13 dpa in Ni-2at.%Sn, their existence was not detected. Suppression of microvoids in these alloys is discussed from the standpoint of solute point defect interactions.

  14. Study of neutron irradiation-induced colors in Brazilian topaz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, A. S.; Krambrock, K.; Ribeiro, L. G. M.; Menezes, M. Â. B. C.; Vermaercke, P.; Sneyers, L.

    2007-09-01

    In this work, preliminary results of the investigation of the coloring mechanisms in topaz from different regions of Brazil, irradiated by the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 and BR1 nuclear reactors of the CDTN/CNEN (Brazil) and SCK.CEN(Belgium), respectively, are presented . The samples were analyzed by the k0-NAA method for impurities and total activity. The color and color centers were investigated by optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The total integrated flux dependence of the induced blue colors and color centers is discussed.

  15. Low-temperature properties of neutron irradiated CuGeO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladczuk, L.; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Dabkowska, H.; Baran, M.; Pytel, B.; Szymczak, R.; Szymczak, H.

    2000-07-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the magnetic properties of CuGeO3 single crystal which shows the spin-Peierls transition below T sp=14 K was investigated by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and susceptibility measurements. It was found that the irradiation led to a decrease of the spin-Peierls transition temperature and induced appreciable changes in the EPR signal intensity, resonance linewidth, g-factor and magnetic susceptibility of this material. These changes may be associated with a partial suppression of both the energy gap and the dimerization within the Cu chains.

  16. Detection of previous neutron irradiation and reprocessing of uranium materials for nuclear forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsolt; Surányi, Gergely

    2009-04-01

    The paper describes novel analytical methods developed for the detection of previous neutron irradiation and reprocessing of illicit nuclear materials, which is an important characteristic of nuclear materials of unknown origin in nuclear forensics. Alpha spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma sector-field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) using solution nebulization and direct, quasi-non-destructive laser ablation as sample introduction were applied for the measurement of trace-level (232)U, (236)U and plutonium isotopes deriving from previous neutron irradiation of uranium-containing nuclear materials. The measured radionuclides and isotope ratios give important information on the raw material used for fuel production and enable confirm the supposed provenance of illicit nuclear material. PMID:19179085

  17. Modeling of displacement damage in silicon carbide detectors resulting from neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorsandi, Behrooz

    There is considerable interest in developing a power monitor system for Generation IV reactors (for instance GT-MHR). A new type of semiconductor radiation detector is under development based on silicon carbide (SiC) technology for these reactors. SiC has been selected as the semiconductor material due to its superior thermal-electrical-neutronic properties. Compared to Si, SiC is a radiation hard material; however, like Si, the properties of SiC are changed by irradiation by a large fluence of energetic neutrons, as a consequence of displacement damage, and that irradiation decreases the life-time of detectors. Predictions of displacement damage and the concomitant radiation effects are important for deciding where the SiC detectors should be placed. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop computer simulation methods to estimate the number of various defects created in SiC detectors, because of neutron irradiation, and predict at what positions of a reactor, SiC detectors could monitor the neutron flux with high reliability. The simulation modeling includes several well-known---and commercial---codes (MCNP5, TRIM, MARLOWE and VASP), and two kinetic Monte Carlo codes written by the author (MCASIC and DCRSIC). My dissertation will highlight the displacement damage that may happen in SiC detectors located in available positions in the OSURR, GT-MHR and IRIS. As extra modeling output data, the count rates of SiC for the specified locations are calculated. A conclusion of this thesis is SiC detectors that are placed in the thermal neutron region of a graphite moderator-reflector reactor have a chance to survive at least one reactor refueling cycle, while their count rates are acceptably high.

  18. Irradiation tests of prototype self-powered gamma and neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeeren, L.; Carcreff, H.

    2011-07-01

    In the framework of the SCK.CEN-CEA Joint Instrumentation Laboratory, we are developing and optimizing a self-powered detector for selective in-core monitoring of the gamma field. Several prototypes with bismuth emitters were developed and tested in a pure gamma field (the PAGURE gamma irradiation facility at CEA) and in mixed neutron and gamma fields (in the OSIRIS reactor at CEA and in the BR2 reactor at SCK.CEN). Detailed MCNP modelling was performed to calculate the gamma and neutron sensitivities. Apart from a few failing prototypes, all detectors showed equilibrium signals proportional to the gamma field with a good long-term stability (under irradiation during several weeks). A tubular geometry design was finally selected as the most appropriate for in-core gamma detection, coupling a larger sensitivity with better response characteristics. In the same experiment in BR2 six prototype Self-Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs) with continuous sheaths (i.e. without any weld between the sensitive part and the cable) were extensively tested: two SPNDs with Co emitter, two with V emitter and two with Rh emitters, with varying geometries. All detector responses were verified to be proportional to the reactor power. The prompt and delayed response contributions were quantified. The signal contributions due to the impact of gamma rays were experimentally determined. The evolution of the signals was continuously followed during the full irradiation period. The signal-to-noise level was observed to be well below 1% in typical irradiation conditions. The absolute neutron and gamma responses for all SPNDs are consistent. (authors)

  19. Significant role of fissility in evaporation residue cross sections as a probe of presaddle nuclear dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2010-01-15

    Using a Langevin model, we explore the role of fissility in probing presaddle nuclear dissipation by calculating the excess of the evaporation residue cross section over its standard statistical-model value as a function of nuclear dissipation strength for nuclei {sup 190}Os and {sup 210}Po, which are taken as two representatives that have the same neutron-to-proton ratio (N/Z) but have a difference in fissility. We find that a large fissility not only amplifies the dissipation effects on the excess of evaporation residues, but also significantly increases the sensitivity of this excess to nuclear dissipation. The results suggest that in experiments, to obtain a more accurate information of nuclear dissipation inside the saddle point by measuring evaporation residue cross sections, it is best to populate among the various compound systems with equal N/Z those with high fissility.

  20. Recovery capacity of glial progenitors after in vivo fission-neutron or X irradiation: age dependence, fractionation and low-dose-rate irradiations.

    PubMed

    Philippo, H; Winter, E A M; van der Kogel, A J; Huiskamp, R

    2005-06-01

    Previous experiments on the radiosensitivity of O-2A glial progenitors determined for single-dose fission-neutron and X irradiation showed log-linear survival curves, suggesting a lack of accumulation of recovery of sublethal damage. In the present study, we addressed this question and further characterized the radiobiological properties of these glial stem cells by investigating the recovery capacity of glial stem cells using either fractionated or protracted whole-body irradiation. Irradiations were performed on newborn, 2-week-old or 12-week-old rats. Fractionated irradiations (four fractions) were performed with 24-h intervals, followed by cell isolations 16- 24 h after the last irradiation. Single-dose irradiations were followed by cell isolation 16-24 h after irradiation or delayed cell isolation (4 days after irradiation) of the O-2A progenitor cells from either spinal cord (newborns) or optic nerve (2- and 12-week-old rats). Results for neonatal progenitor cell survival show effect ratios for both fractionated fission-neutron and X irradiation of the order of 1.8 when compared with single-dose irradiation. A similar ratio was found after single-dose irradiation combined with delayed plating. Comparable results were observed for juvenile and adult optic nerve progenitors, with effect ratios of the order of 1.2. The present investigation clearly shows that fractionated irradiation regimens using X rays or fission neutrons and CNS tissue from rats of various ages results in an increase in O-2A progenitor cell survival while repair is virtually absent. This recovery of the progenitor pool after irradiation can be observed at all ages but is greatest in the neonatal spinal cord and can probably be attributed to repopulation. PMID:15913395

  1. Investigation of VLSI Bipolar Transistors Irradiated with Electrons, Ions and Neutrons for Space Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, P.; Fallica, G.; Galbiati, A.; Mangoni, R.; Modica, R.; Pensotti, S.; Rancoita, P. G.

    2006-04-01

    A systematic investigation of radiation effects on a BICMOS technology manufactured by STM has been undertaken. Bipolar transistors were irradiated by neutrons, C, Ar and Kr ions, and recently by electrons. Fast neutrons, as well as other types of particles, produce defects mainly by displacing silicon atoms from their lattice positions to interstitial locations, i.e. generating vacancy-interstitial pairs (the so-called Frenkel pairs). Although imparted doses differ largely, the experimental results indicate that the gain (β) variation is mostly related to the non-ionizing energy-loss (NIEL) deposition for neutrons, ions and electrons. The variation of the inverse of the gain degradation, Δ(1/β), is found to be linearly related (as predicted by the Messenger-Spratt equation for neutron irradiations) to the concentrations of the Frenkel pairs generated independently of the kind of incoming particle. For space applications, this linear dependence on the concentration of Frenkel pairs allows to evaluate the total amount of the gain degradation of VLSI components due to the flux of charged particles during the full life of operation of any pay-load. In fact, the total amount of expected Frenkel pairs can be estimated taking into account the isotopic spectra. It has to be point out that in cosmic rays there is relevant flux of electrons and isotopes up to Ni, which are within the range of particles presently investigated.

  2. Energy spectra of primary knock-on atoms under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. R.; Marian, J.; Sublet, J.-Ch.

    2015-12-01

    Materials subjected to neutron irradiation will suffer from a build-up of damage caused by the displacement cascades initiated by nuclear reactions. Previously, the main "measure" of this damage accumulation has been through the displacements per atom (dpa) index, which has known limitations. This paper describes a rigorous methodology to calculate the primary atomic recoil events (often called the primary knock-on atoms or PKAs) that lead to cascade damage events as a function of energy and recoiling species. A new processing code SPECTRA-PKA combines a neutron irradiation spectrum with nuclear recoil data obtained from the latest nuclear data libraries to produce PKA spectra for any material composition. Via examples of fusion relevant materials, it is shown that these PKA spectra can be complex, involving many different recoiling species, potentially differing in both proton and neutron number from the original target nuclei, including high energy recoils of light emitted particles such as α-particles and protons. The variations in PKA spectra as a function of time, neutron field, and material are explored. The application of PKA spectra to the quantification of radiation damage is exemplified using two approaches: the binary collision approximation and stochastic cluster dynamics, and the results from these different models are discussed and compared.

  3. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from graphite cylinders irradiated with D-T neutrons for validation of evaluated nuclear data.

    PubMed

    Luo, F; Han, R; Chen, Z; Nie, Y; Shi, F; Zhang, S; Lin, W; Ren, P; Tian, G; Sun, Q; Gou, B; Ruan, X; Ren, J; Ye, M

    2016-10-01

    A benchmark experiment for validation of graphite data evaluated from nuclear data libraries was conducted for 14MeV neutrons irradiated on graphite cylinder samples. The experiments were performed using the benchmark experimental facility at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from the surface of graphite (Φ13cm×20cm) at 60° and 120° and graphite (Φ13cm×2cm) at 60° were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. The obtained results were compared with the measurements made by the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with the ENDF/B-VII.1, CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. The results obtained from a 20cm-thick sample revealed that the calculation results with CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries showed good agreements with the experiments conducted in the whole energy region. However, a large discrepancy of approximately 40% was observed below the 3MeV energy region with the ENDF/B-VII.1 library. For the 2cm-thick sample, the calculated results obtained from the abovementioned three libraries could not reproduce the experimental data in the energy range of 5-7MeV. The graphite data in CENDL-3.1 were verified for the first time and were proved to be reliable. PMID:27620063

  4. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from graphite cylinders irradiated with D-T neutrons for validation of evaluated nuclear data.

    PubMed

    Luo, F; Han, R; Chen, Z; Nie, Y; Shi, F; Zhang, S; Lin, W; Ren, P; Tian, G; Sun, Q; Gou, B; Ruan, X; Ren, J; Ye, M

    2016-10-01

    A benchmark experiment for validation of graphite data evaluated from nuclear data libraries was conducted for 14MeV neutrons irradiated on graphite cylinder samples. The experiments were performed using the benchmark experimental facility at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from the surface of graphite (Φ13cm×20cm) at 60° and 120° and graphite (Φ13cm×2cm) at 60° were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. The obtained results were compared with the measurements made by the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with the ENDF/B-VII.1, CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. The results obtained from a 20cm-thick sample revealed that the calculation results with CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries showed good agreements with the experiments conducted in the whole energy region. However, a large discrepancy of approximately 40% was observed below the 3MeV energy region with the ENDF/B-VII.1 library. For the 2cm-thick sample, the calculated results obtained from the abovementioned three libraries could not reproduce the experimental data in the energy range of 5-7MeV. The graphite data in CENDL-3.1 were verified for the first time and were proved to be reliable.

  5. Tritium Retention and Permeation in Ion- and Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten under US-Japan PHENIX Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Taylor, Chase N.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Chikada, Takumi; Oya, Yasuhisa; Hatano, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    A critical challenge for long-term operation of ITER and beyond to a FNSF, a DEMO and future fusion reactor will be the development of plasma-facing components (PFCs) that demonstrate erosion resistance to intense heat and neutral/ion particle fluxes under the extreme fusion nuclear environment, while minimizing in-vessel inventories and ex-vessel permeation of tritium. Recent work at Tritium Plasma Experiment demonstrated that tritium diffuses in bulk tungsten at elevated temperatures, and can be trapped in radiation-induced trap site (up to 1 at. % T/W) in tungsten [M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. US-Japan PHENIX collaboration (2013-2019) investigates irradiation response on tritium behavior in tungsten, and performs one-of-a-kind neutron-irradiation with Gd thermal neutron shield at High Flux Isotope Reactor, ORNL. This presentation describes the challenge in elucidating tritium behavior in neutron-irradiated PFCs, the PHENIX plans for neutron-irradiation and post irradiation examination, and the recent findings on tritium retention and permeation in 14MeV neutron-irradiated and Fe ion irradiated tungsten. This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  6. Image processing analysis of nuclear track parameters for CR-39 detector irradiated by thermal neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jobouri, Hussain A.; Rajab, Mustafa Y.

    2016-03-01

    CR-39 detector which covered with boric acid (H3Bo3) pellet was irradiated by thermal neutrons from (241Am - 9Be) source with activity 12Ci and neutron flux 105 n. cm-2. s-1. The irradiation times -TD for detector were 4h, 8h, 16h and 24h. Chemical etching solution for detector was sodium hydroxide NaOH, 6.25N with 45 min etching time and 60 C˚ temperature. Images of CR-39 detector after chemical etching were taken from digital camera which connected from optical microscope. MATLAB software version 7.0 was used to image processing. The outputs of image processing of MATLAB software were analyzed and found the following relationships: (a) The irradiation time -TD has behavior linear relationships with following nuclear track parameters: i) total track number - NT ii) maximum track number - MRD (relative to track diameter - DT) at response region range 2.5 µm to 4 µm iii) maximum track number - MD (without depending on track diameter - DT). (b) The irradiation time -TD has behavior logarithmic relationship with maximum track number - MA (without depending on track area - AT). The image processing technique principally track diameter - DT can be take into account to classification of α-particle emitters, In addition to the contribution of these technique in preparation of nano- filters and nano-membrane in nanotechnology fields.

  7. Neutron-irradiation creep of silicon carbide materials beyond the initial transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai; Ozawa, Kazumi; Shimoda, Kazuya; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation creep beyond the transient regime was investigated for various silicon carbide (SiC) materials. The materials examined included polycrystalline or monocrystalline high-purity SiC, nanopowder sintered SiC, highly crystalline and near-stoichiometric SiC fibers (including Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno SA3, isotopically-controlled Sylramic and Sylramic-iBN fibers), and a Tyranno SA3 fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite fabricated through a nano-infiltration transient eutectic phase process. Neutron irradiation experiments for bend stress relaxation tests were conducted at irradiation temperatures ranging from 430 to 1180 °C up to 30 dpa with initial bend stresses of up to ∼1 GPa for the fibers and ∼300 MPa for the other materials. Initial bend stress in the specimens continued to decrease from 1 to 30 dpa. Analysis revealed that (1) the stress exponent of irradiation creep above 1 dpa is approximately unity, (2) the stress normalized creep rate is ∼1 × 10-7 [dpa-1 MPa-1] at 430-750 °C for the range of 1-30 dpa for most polycrystalline SiC materials, and (3) the effects on irradiation creep of initial microstructures-such as grain boundary, crystal orientation, and secondary phases-increase with increasing irradiation temperature.

  8. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Shimoda, K.; Kondo, S.; Hinoki, T.; Ozawa, K.; Katoh, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180 °C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. The apparent stress exponent of the irradiation creep slightly exceeded unity, and instantaneous creep coefficient at 380-790 °C was estimated to be ∼1 × 10-5 [MPa-1 dpa-1] at ∼0.1 dpa and 1 × 10-7 to 1 × 10-6 [MPa-1 dpa-1] at ∼1 dpa. The irradiation creep strain appeared greater than that for the high purity SiC. Microstructural observation and data analysis indicated that the grain-boundary sliding associated with the secondary phases contributes to the irradiation creep at 380-790 °C to 0.01-0.11 dpa.

  9. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-14

    The Fe Cr Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe Cr Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe Cr Al alloys with 10 18 wt % Cr and 2.9 4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition.more » Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2 111 and a 100 were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Furthermore, a structure property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α' precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.« less

  10. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-14

    The Fe Cr Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe Cr Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe Cr Al alloys with 10 18 wt % Cr and 2.9 4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2 111 and a 100 were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Furthermore, a structure property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α' precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  11. Nano-cluster stability following neutron irradiation in MA957 oxide dispersion strengthened material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribis, J.; Lozano-Perez, S.

    2014-01-01

    ODS steels are promising materials for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors since their fine distribution of nano-clusters confers excellent mechanical properties. However, the nano-feature stability needs to be assessed under neutron irradiation. Before irradiation, the characterizations show that nano-particles are finely distributed within the ferritic matrix and are identified to have a pyrochlore type structure. After irradiation of the MA957 alloy in the Phenix French reactor at 412 °C up to 50 dpa and 430 °C up to 75 dpa, transmission electron microscopy characterization reveals a very slight density fall but no distinguishable difference in nano-features size before and after irradiation. In addition, after both irradiations, the nano-oxides are still (Y, Ti, O) compounds with orientation relationship with the matrix. A multislice simulation of high resolution images suggests that nano-particles still have a fcc pyrochlore type structure after irradiation. A possible change of lattice parameter seems to be highlighted, possibly due to disordering by cascade effect.

  12. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-10-01

    The Fe-Cr-Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe-Cr-Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe-Cr-Al alloys with 10-18 wt % Cr and 2.9-4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 °C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2<111> and a<100> were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich α‧ is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. A structure-property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α‧ precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  13. Neutron-irradiation creep of silicon carbide materials beyond the initial transient

    DOE PAGES

    Katoh, Yutai; Ozawa, Kazumi; Shimoda, Kazuya; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance Lewis; Koyanagi, Takaaki

    2016-06-04

    Irradiation creep beyond the transient regime was investigated for various silicon carbide (SiC) materials. Here, the materials examined included polycrystalline or monocrystalline high-purity SiC, nanopowder sintered SiC, highly crystalline and near-stoichiometric SiC fibers (including Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno SA3, isotopically-controlled Sylramic and Sylramic-iBN fibers), and a Tyranno SA3 fiber–reinforced SiC matrix composite fabricated through a nano-infiltration transient eutectic phase process. Neutron irradiation experiments for bend stress relaxation tests were conducted at irradiation temperatures ranging from 430 to 1180 °C up to 30 dpa with initial bend stresses of up to ~1 GPa for the fibers and ~300 MPa for themore » other materials. Initial bend stress in the specimens continued to decrease from 1 to 30 dpa. Analysis revealed that (1) the stress exponent of irradiation creep above 1 dpa is approximately unity, (2) the stress normalized creep rate is ~1 × 10–7 [dpa–1 MPa–1] at 430–750 °C for the range of 1–30 dpa for most polycrystalline SiC materials, and (3) the effects on irradiation creep of initial microstructures—such as grain boundary, crystal orientation, and secondary phases—increase with increasing irradiation temperature.« less

  14. Apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid. [For neutron activation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Speir, L.G.; Adams, E.L.

    1982-05-13

    An apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid is disclosed. The apparatus consists of a housing having a spherical cavity and a spherical moderator containing a radiation source positioned within the spherical cavity. The spherical moderator is of lesser diameter than the spherical cavity so as to define a spherical annular volume around the moderator. The housing includes fluid intake and output conduits which open onto the spherical cavity at diametrically opposite positions. Fluid flows through the cavity around the spherical moderator and is uniformly irradiated due to the 4..pi.. radiation geometry. The irradiation source, for example a /sup 252/Cf neutron source, is removable from the spherical moderator through a radial bore which extends outwardly to an opening on the outside of the housing. The radiation source may be routinely removed without interrupting the flow of fluid or breaching the containment of the fluid.

  15. High dose effects in neutron irradiated face-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    During neutron irradiation, most face-centered cubic metals and alloys develop saturation or quasi-steady state microstructures. This, in turn, leads to saturation levels in mechanical properties and quasi-steady state rates of swelling and creep deformation. Swelling initially plays only a small role in determining these saturation states, but as swelling rises to higher levels, it exerts strong feedback on the microstructure and its response to environmental variables. The influence of swelling, either directly or indirectly via second order mechanisms, such as elemental segregation to void surfaces, eventually causes major changes, not only in irradiation creep and mechanical properties, but also on swelling itself. The feedback effects of swelling on irradiation creep are particularly complex and lead to problems in applying creep data derived from highly pressurized creep tubes to low stress situations, such as fuel pins in liquid metal reactors.

  16. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing

  17. Neutron and Proton Radiation Damage and Isothermal Annealing of Irradiated SiC Schottky Power Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Blue, Thomas E.

    2009-03-16

    NASA is exploring the potential use of nuclear reactors as power sources for future missions. These missions will require semiconductor switches to be placed in close vicinity to the reactor, in the midst of a high neutron and gamma radiation field. Cree SiC Schottky diodes, part number CSD10120A, rated at 10 A and 1200 V, were chosen as the test articles for this radiation-hardness study, since SiC is a wide bandgap semiconductor that has exhibited tolerance for such high radiation environments. As an extension of previous work regarding the degradation of SiC Schottky diodes in the presence of a neutron and gamma radiation field, isothermal annealing experiments were performed on these diodes after they were irradiated in The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR). The experimental results demonstrate that even at an anneal temperature of only 175 C, a noticeable improvement in the electrical performance of the diodes, in the form of decreased series resistance, may be readily observed from I-V curve measurements. Also, since electrical components used for space applications will also be exposed to charged particle radiation from space, such as high energy protons in the Van Allen Radiation Belts surrounding earth, it is important that, in studying the effects of radiation-induced displacement damage, the effects of both neutron and charged particle radiation are considered. Therefore, the data obtained from this study were compared with the data obtained from previous 203 MeV proton irradiations, for which the same diode model was tested. To develop neutron-proton equivalencies which are relevant to the radiation electronics hardening community and the materials science community, comparisons of the degradation of the diodes for proton and neutron irradiation are made in two ways 1) on the basis of displacement damage dose, D{sub d} for protons and neutrons; and 2) on the basis of initially induced vacancies per atom (at a temperature of 0 K)(IIVPA0) for

  18. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutronmore » irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.« less

  19. Comparison of properties and microstructures of Trefimetaux and Hycon 3HP{trademark} after neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Eldrup, M.

    1998-09-01

    The precipitation strengthened CuNiBe alloys are among three candidate copper alloys being evaluated for application in the first wall, divertor, and limiter components of ITER. Generally, CuNiBe alloys have higher strength but poorer conductivity compared to CuCrZr and CuAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloys. Brush-Wellman Inc. has manufactured an improved version of their Hycon CuNiBe alloy that has higher conductivity while maintaining a reasonable level strength. It is of interest, therefore, to investigate the effect of radiation on the physical and mechanical properties of this alloy. In the present work the authors have investigated the physical and mechanical properties of the Hycon 3HP{trademark} alloy both before and after neutron irradiation and have compared its microstructure and properties with the European CuNiBe candidate alloy manufactured by Trefirmetaux. Tensile specimens of both alloys were irradiated in the DR-3 reactor at Risoe to displacement dose levels up to 0.3 dpa at 100, 250 and 350 C. Both alloys were tensile tested in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions at 100, 250 and 350 C. Both pre- and post-irradiation microstructures of the alloys were investigated in detail using transmission electron microscopy. Fracture surfaces were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Electrical resistivity measurements were made on tensile specimens before and after irradiation; all measurements were made at 23 C. At this point it seems unlikely that CuNiBe alloys can be recommended for applications in neutron environments where the irradiation temperature exceeds 200 C. Applications at temperatures below 200 C might be plausible, but only after careful experiments have determined the dose dependence of the mechanical properties and the effect of sudden temperature excursions on the material to establish the limits on the use of the alloy.

  20. Startup of the Fission Converter Epithermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at the MIT Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Thomas H. Jr.; Riley, Kent J.; Binns, Peter J.; Kohse, Gordon E.; Hu Linwen; Harling, Otto K.

    2002-08-15

    A new epithermal neutron irradiation facility, based on a fission converter assembly placed in the thermal column outside the reactor core, has been put into operation at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR). This facility was constructed to provide a high-intensity, forward-directed beam for use in neutron capture therapy with an epithermal flux of [approximately equal to]10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}.s at the medical room entrance with negligible fast neutron and gamma-ray contamination. The fission converter assembly consists of 10 or 11 MITR fuel elements placed in an aluminum tank and cooled with D{sub 2}O. Thermal-hydraulic criteria were established based on heat deposition calculations. Various startup tests were performed to verify expected neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behavior. Flow testing showed an almost flat flow distribution across the fuel elements with <5% bypass flow. The total reactivity change caused by operation of the facility was measured at 0.014 {+-} 0.002% {delta}K/K. Thermal power produced by the facility was measured to be 83.1 {+-} 4.2 kW. All of these test results satisfied the thermal-hydraulic safety criteria. In addition, radiation shielding design measurements were made that verified design calculations for the neutronic performance.

  1. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of neutron and gamma rays on the electrical and switching characteristics of power semiconductor switches must be known and understood by the designer of the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. The SP-100 radiation requirements at 25 m from the nuclear source are a neutron fluence of 10(exp 13) n/sq cm and a gamma dose of 0.5 Mrads. Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are presented. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  2. PGNAA system preliminary design and measurement of In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator for boron concentration measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zizhu; Chong, Yizheng; Chen, Xinru; Jin, Congjun; Yang, Lijun; Liu, Tong

    2015-12-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system has been recently developed at the 30-kW research reactor In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator (IHNI) in Beijing. Neutrons from the specially designed thermal neutron beam were used. The thermal flux of this beam is 3.08×10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) at a full reactor power of 30 kW. The PGNAA system consists of an n-type high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector of 40% efficiency, a digital spectrometer, and a shielding part. For both the detector shielding part and the neutron beam shielding part, the inner layer is composed of (6)Li2CO3 powder and the outer layer lead. The boron-10 sensitivity of the PGNAA system is approximately 2.5 cps/ppm. Two calibration curves were produced for the 1-10 ppm and 10-50 ppm samples. The measurement results of the control samples were in accordance with the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) results.

  3. Fusion neutron yield from a laser-irradiated heavy-water spray

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Hilscher, D.; Jahnke, U.; Busch, S.; Nickles, P.V.; Sandner, W.

    2005-01-01

    The fusion neutron yield from a laser-irradiated heavy-water (D{sub 2}O) spray target was studied. Heavy-water droplets of about 150 nm diameter in the spray were exposed to 35 fs laser pulses at an intensity of 1x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Due to the 10-50 times bigger size of the spray droplets compared to usual cluster sizes, deuterons are accelerated to considerably higher kinetic energies of up to 1 MeV. Neutrons are generated by the deuterons escaping from the plasma and initiating a fusion reaction within the surrounding cold plume of the spray jet. For each 0.6 J of laser pulse energy, 6x10{sup 3} neutrons are produced by about 10{sup 11} accelerated deuterons. This corresponds to a D(d,n) reaction probability of about 6x10{sup -8}. Compared to cluster targets, the reaction probability in the spray target is found to be two orders of magnitude larger. This finding apparently is due to both the considerably higher deuteron energies and the larger effective target thickness in the spray target. The measured neutron yield per accelerated deuteron [i.e., the D(d,n) reaction probability], is employed to compare and extrapolate the neutron emission characteristics from different target arrangements.

  4. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, G.E.; Frasca, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the electrical and switching characteristics of power semiconductor switches must be known and understood by the designer of the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. The SP-100 radiation requirements at 25 m from the nuclear source are a neutron fluence of 10{sup 13} n/cm {sup 2} and a gamma dose of 0.5 Mrads. Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are given in this paper. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  5. Scanning transient current study of the I-V stabilization phenomena in silicon detectors irradiated by fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Li, Z.; Sidorov, A.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstrom, G.

    1996-03-01

    Investigation of the I-V stabilization phenomena in neutron irradiated silicon detectors has been carried out using scanning transient current technique (STCT) on non-irradiated PP{sup +}-p-n{sup +} detectors. The PP{sup +}-p-n{sup +} detectors were used to simulate the PP{sup +}-n-n{sup +} detectors irradiated beyond the space charge sign inversion (SCSI). Two mechanisms partially responsible for the I- V stabilization have been identified.

  6. Effect of neutron irradiation on Tc of Pb-doped BiSrCaCuO superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Young-Hoi; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Chan-Joong; Lee, Hee-Gyoun; Kim, Chun-Taik

    1989-09-01

    A Pb-doped BiSrCaCuO superconductor was irradiated in a TRIGA MARK III reactor up to a neutron fluence of 7.6 x 10 to the 17th n/sq cm. The measured superconducting transition temperature (Tc) after irradiation was decreased to 92.5 K from nonirradiated data of 102 K. The fractional decrease of the Tc was compared with results for other superconducting materials. Some recovery of irradiation-induced Tc decrease was observed.

  7. RhG-CSF improves radiation-induced myelosuppression and survival in the canine exposed to fission neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zu-Yin; Li, Ming; Han, A-Ru-Na; Xing, Shuang; Ou, Hong-Ling; Xiong, Guo-Lin; Xie, Ling; Zhao, Yan-Fang; Xiao, He; Shan, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Zhen-Hu; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Cong, Yu-Wen; Luo, Qing-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Fission-neutron radiation damage is hard to treat due to its critical injuries to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal systems, and so far few data are available on the therapeutic measures for neutron-radiation syndrome. This study was designed to test the effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) in dogs which had received 2.3 Gy mixed fission-neutronirradiation with a high ratio of neutrons (~90%). Following irradiation, rhG-CSF treatment induced 100% survival versus 60% in controls. Only two of five rhG-CSF-treated dogs experienced leukopenia (white blood cells [WBC] count < 1.0 × 10(9)/L) and neutropenia (neutrophil [ANC] count < 0.5 × 10(9)/L), whereas all irradiated controls displayed a profound period of leukopenia and neutropenia. Furthermore, administration of rhG-CSF significantly delayed the onset of leukopenia and reduced the duration of leucopenia as compared with controls. In addition, individual dogs in the rhG-CSF-treated group exhibited evident differences in rhG-CSF responsiveness after neutron-irradiation. Finally, histopathological evaluation of the surviving dogs revealed that the incidence and severity of bone marrow, thymus and spleen damage decreased in rhG-CSF-treated dogs as compared with surviving controls. Thus, these results demonstrated that rhG-CSF administration enhanced recovery of myelopoiesis and survival after neutron-irradiation. PMID:21785235

  8. Generation of peanut mutants by fast neutron irradiation combined with in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Shan; Sui, Jiong-Ming; Xie, Yong-Dun; Guo, Hui-Jun; Qiao, Li-Xian; Zhao, Li-Lan; Yu, Shan-Lin; Liu, Lu-Xiang

    2015-05-01

    Induced mutations have played an important role in the development of new plant varieties. In this study, we investigated the effects of fast neutron irradiation on somatic embryogenesis combined with plant regeneration in embryonic leaflet culture to develop new peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) germplasm for breeding. The dry seeds of the elite cultivar Luhua 11 were irradiated with fast neutrons at dosages of 9.7, 14.0 and 18.0 Gy. The embryonic leaflets were separated and incubated in a medium with 10.0-mg/l 2,4-D to induce somatic embryogenesis. Next, they were incubated in a medium with 4.0-mg/l BAP for plant regeneration. As the irradiation dosage increased, the frequency of both somatic embryo formation and plantlet regeneration decreased. The regenerated plantlets were grafted onto rootstocks and were transplanted into the field. Later, the mature seeds of the regenerated plants were harvested. The M2 generation plants from most of the regenerated cultivars exhibited variations and segregation in vigor, plant height, branch and pod number, pod size, and pod shape. To determine whether the phenotypes were associated with genomic modification, we compared the DNA polymorphisms between the wild-type plants and 19 M3-generation individuals from different regenerated plants. We used 20 pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers and detected polymorphisms between most of the mutants and the wild-type plants (Luhua 11). Our results indicate that using a combination of fast neutron irradiation and tissue culture is an effective approach for creating new peanut germplasm.

  9. Generation of peanut mutants by fast neutron irradiation combined with in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Shan; Sui, Jiong-Ming; Xie, Yong-Dun; Guo, Hui-Jun; Qiao, Li-Xian; Zhao, Li-Lan; Yu, Shan-Lin; Liu, Lu-Xiang

    2015-05-01

    Induced mutations have played an important role in the development of new plant varieties. In this study, we investigated the effects of fast neutron irradiation on somatic embryogenesis combined with plant regeneration in embryonic leaflet culture to develop new peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) germplasm for breeding. The dry seeds of the elite cultivar Luhua 11 were irradiated with fast neutrons at dosages of 9.7, 14.0 and 18.0 Gy. The embryonic leaflets were separated and incubated in a medium with 10.0-mg/l 2,4-D to induce somatic embryogenesis. Next, they were incubated in a medium with 4.0-mg/l BAP for plant regeneration. As the irradiation dosage increased, the frequency of both somatic embryo formation and plantlet regeneration decreased. The regenerated plantlets were grafted onto rootstocks and were transplanted into the field. Later, the mature seeds of the regenerated plants were harvested. The M2 generation plants from most of the regenerated cultivars exhibited variations and segregation in vigor, plant height, branch and pod number, pod size, and pod shape. To determine whether the phenotypes were associated with genomic modification, we compared the DNA polymorphisms between the wild-type plants and 19 M3-generation individuals from different regenerated plants. We used 20 pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers and detected polymorphisms between most of the mutants and the wild-type plants (Luhua 11). Our results indicate that using a combination of fast neutron irradiation and tissue culture is an effective approach for creating new peanut germplasm. PMID:25653418

  10. Effects of irradiation - fast neutrons and implantation on sintered Y sbnd Ba sbnd Cu sbnd O superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. V.; PuŹniak, R.; Chen, D.-X.; Karpe, N.; Baran, M.; Wiśniewski, A.; Pytel, K.; Szymczak, H.; Dyrbye, K.; Bøttiger, J.

    1988-06-01

    Effects of irradiation damage by fast neutrons, and nitrogen implantation on magnetic and electrical properties of Y sbnd Ba sbnd Cu sbnd O materials have been studied. The samples were subjected to a fluence of 2 × 10 17 and 1 × 10 17 neutrons / cm 2. In the implantation studies dosages of 10 15 and 10 16ions/ cm 2 of N + were used. Here we will report on the detailed changes in the magnetic hysteresis loop due to irradiation. It is found that the transport inter-grain critical current decreases with irradiation, while the critical current inside the grains is enhanced.

  11. Emission properties of InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with quantum wells and dots after irradiation with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Baidus, N. V.; Vikhrova, O. V. Zvonkov, B. N.; Malysheva, E. I.; Trufanov, A. N.

    2015-03-15

    The effect of neutron radiation on the luminescence of InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with quantum wells and quantum dots is studied. It is found that neutron radiation results both in the formation of defects and in the radiation-induced annealing of growth-related defects. Quantum dots are more stable to neutron radiation in comparison with quantum wells. It is shown that the layer of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots located near the surface is less sensitive to irradiation with neutrons compared with a similar layer located in the bulk. In the first case, one can observe an increase in the photoluminescence and electroluminescence intensities after irradiation with neutrons, which is related to the effects of radiation-induced annealing. The pronounced effect of elastic strains in the InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells on the extent of quenching of the photoluminescence intensity upon irradiation with neutrons is revealed. In heterostructures with quantum wells, the effect of radiation-induced annealing manifests itself in a shift of the photoluminescence peak to longer wavelengths as a result of a decrease in elastic strains upon irradiation with neutrons. Doping of the GaAs buffer layer with silicon also reduces the value of this spectral shift.

  12. [Split-course neutron and photon irradiation of experimental tumors: the importance of the sequence and interval lengths].

    PubMed

    Carl, U M; Bahnsen, J

    1989-09-01

    In a split course mixed beam experiment we have investigated the influence of the interval and beam-quality on tumour growth delay. Fast growing sarcomas (SaF) in grey CBA-mice were irradiated with different sequences of neutrons (N) and photons (X) varying the length of time interval from 0 up to 300 minutes between two doses. The tumours were treated with isoeffective doses of X-rays and/or neutrons (XX, NN, NX, XN). In order to achieve a homogeneous radiosensitive cell population, tumours were reversibly made hypoxic by clamping ten minutes prior and during irradiation. Tumour growth delay is dependent on the sequence and on the interval. As expected the growth delay in tumours treated with neutrons only was less dependent on the interval than after pure photon irradiation. Beyond an interval of 30 minutes in the mixed beam schedules the one giving neutrons first was more effective than the one giving photons first.

  13. [Effect of rhG-CSF on blood coagulation in beagles irradiated by 2.3 Gy neutron].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Han, Qin-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Xing, Shuang; Xiong, Guo-Lin; Xie, Ling; Zhao, Yan-Fang; Yu, Zu-Yin; Ding, Yi-Bo; Zhao, Zhen-Hu; Cong, Yu-Wen; Luo, Qing-Liang

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recombinant human granulocyte stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on blood coagulation of beagles irradiated by 2.3 Gy neutron so as to provide new therapy for blood coagulation disorder after neutron irradiation. 10 beagles were exposed to 2.3 Gy neutron, and then randomly assigned into supportive care group and rhG-CSF-treated group. The rhG-CSF-treated cohorts were injected subcutaneously with rhG-CSF (10 µg/kg·d) beginning at the day of exposure for 21 consecutive days. Peripheral blood platelet counts were examined once every two days. In vitro platelet aggregation test, thromboelastography and blood clotting tetrachoric tests were also performed. The results indicated that the blood clotting system of irradiated dogs was in hypercoagulable state in the early days after 2.3 Gy neutron irradiation, and became hypocoagulable at crisis later and were mainly on intrinsic coagulation pathway. Blood fibrinogen increased markedly during the course of disease, while platelet counts and aggregation function were decreased remarkably. rhG-CSF administered daily could correct hypercoagulable state induced by 2.3 Gy neutron irradiation at the early time post exposure, shortened the thromboplastin generation time and clotting formation, down-regulated the abnormal high fibrinogen in blood, and improved platelet aggregation function. It is concluded that rhG-CSF can improve coagulation disorders of irradiated dogs.

  14. Fissile solution dynamics: Student research

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    There are two research projects in criticality safety at the University of Arizona: one in dynamic simulation of hypothetical criticality accidents in fissile solutions, and one in criticality benchmarks using transport theory. We have used the data from nuclear excursions in KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE to help in building models for solution excursions. An equation of state for liquids containing gas bubbles has been developed and coupled to point-reactor dynamics in an attempt to predict fission rate, yield, pressure, and kinetic energy. It appears that radiolytic gas is unimportant until after the first peak, but that it does strongly affect the shape of the subsequent power decrease and also the dynamic pressure.

  15. Random effects of fissile lumps in molten salt reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.; Prinja, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The problem of the effect of fissile lumps spatially appearing in a random fashion inside a fluid fuel reactor is addressed. The effect on reactivity is evaluated by means of first-order perturbation theory. The analysis is carried out in diffusion theory with the presence of delayed neutron emissions in one dimensional plane geometry. The estimation of the mean value and standard deviation of the reactivity inserted is performed by Monte Carlo simulations and a deterministic quadrature approach, to compare the methods in terms of computational effort and the accuracy of the results. The results presented show that the effects constitute an important issue in the assessment of these innovative systems. (authors)

  16. Fissile mass-multiplication factor correlation for Pu measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ming-Shih; Teichmann, T.; De Ridder, P.; Verrecchia, G.P.D.; Chare, P.; Vocino, V.

    1993-06-01

    An empirical correlation between the fissile mass and the leakage multiplication factor, as determined by High Level Neutron Coincidence (HLNC) counting, was developed based on available measurement data. This correlation has been used successfully for the simulation of HLNC counting. With the singles count rate (totals), the correlation can be used to obtain a quick estimate of the plutonium mass of the sample in less time than required to measure the real coincidence count rate. The correlation can also be used to evaluate samples contaminated with ({alpha},n) sources such as fluorine.

  17. Simulation of the kinetics of defect accumulation in copper under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinisch, H. L.; Singh, B. N.

    Stochastic annealing simulations were originally developed for and successfully used to describe the short-term annealing stage of defect evolution within individual displacement cascades. Applied to a sufficiently large volume with periodic boundaries, stochastic annealing simulations can also provide a description of the evolution of defects produced during continuous irradiation. The irradiation is simulated by successive introduction of collections of defects representing the primary damage state of individual cascades placed in the simulation volume randomly in time and space. Cascade energies and the rate of their occurrence are chosen to approximate the damage due to the neutron flux of the 14 MeV neutron source Rotating Target Neutron Source-II (RTNS-II). The cascades are chosen from a library of cascades generated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for recoil energies from 5 to 25 keV. The numbers of each type of defect, defect cluster size distributions, as well as the positions of the defects within the crystal, are monitored as a function of time. Simulated defect cluster densities as a function of dose up to 0.1 dpa at room temperature are compared to experimental results. The simulated cluster densities are within about a factor of two of the experimental results over several orders of magnitude of dose. The effects on damage accumulation due to dose, dose rate, cascade overlap and interstitial cluster mobilities are demonstrated with examples.

  18. Investigation of laser ion acceleration inside irradiated solid targets by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Origins and acceleration directions of accelerated ions inside solid LiF, CH-LiF, and LiF-CH targets irradiated by a 450 fs, 20 J, 1053 nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been investigated by neutron spectroscopy. The irradiated targets generate neutrons through the reaction {sup 7}Li (p,n){sup 7}Be between accelerated protons and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. The produced neutron spectra observed from two different observation angles 20 deg. and 120 deg. to the target rear-side normal. From the measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, the total number, and the slope temperature of the accelerated ions are investigated. The results indicate that ions are not only accelerated from the front surface toward the rear surface, but also from the rear surface toward the front surface with comparable maximum energy and higher number.

  19. Mechanical Behaviour of Cyanate Ester/epoxy Blends after Reactor Irradiation to High Neutron Fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  20. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF CYANATE ESTER/EPOXY BLENDS AFTER REACTOR IRRADIATION TO HIGH NEUTRON FLUENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-03

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  1. Pathologic findings in canine brain irradiated with fractionated fast neutrons or photons

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, B.C.; Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-12-01

    Thirty-seven adult male purebred beagles received total doses of 1333, 2000, 3000, or 4500 rad of fast neutrons (15 MeV av) in 4 fractions/week for 7 weeks to the entire brain. Nineteen dogs received 4000, 6000, or 9000 rad of photons (/sup 60/Co) in an identical fractionation pattern. Dogs receiving 4500, 3000, and 2000 rad of neutrons and 9000 rad of photons developed neurologic signs and died or were euthanatized when moribund followed irradiation. Cerebrospinal fluid contained excess protein and erythrocytes during and sometimes before the generally brief course. The onset of neurologic symptoms was usually followed by a moribund state in less than 48 h. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as measured by onset of neurologic symptoms and mortality was greater than 4.5. Gross changes included hemorrhage, edema, and malacia primarily in the white matter, especially the corona radiata, cerebellar white matter, corpus callosum, and corpus fornicis. One beagle developed a brain tumor and died 1207 days following 1333-rad neutron irradiation.

  2. Absorption and photoluminescence study of Al 2O 3 single crystal irradiated with fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izerrouken, M.; Benyahia, T.

    2010-10-01

    Colour centers formation in Al 2O 3 by reactor neutrons were investigated by optical measurements (absorption and photoluminescence). The irradiation's were performed at 40 °C, up to fast neutron ( E n > 1.2 MeV) fluence of 1.4 × 10 18 n cm -2. After irradiation the coloration of the sample increases with the neutron fluence and absorption band at about 203, 255, 300, 357 and 450 nm appear in the UV-visible spectrum. The evolution of each absorption bands as a function of fluence and annealing temperature is presented and discussed. The results indicate that at higher fluence and above 350 °C the F + center starts to aggregate to F center clusters (F 2, F 2+ and F22+). These aggregates disappear completely above 650 °C whereas the F and F + centers persist even after annealing at 900 °C. It is clear also from the results that the absorption band at 300 nm is due to the contribution of both F 2 center and interstitial Ali+ ions.

  3. The effect of fast neutron and gamma irradiation on thermal, structural and colorant properties of 2,6-diaminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hassangholi; Hassanzadeh, Ali; Khodabakhsh, Rasol

    2010-10-01

    The variation in structural, thermal and colorant properties of 2,6-diaminopyridine were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-visible, NMR spectroscopies and powder X-ray diffraction techniques, before and after fast neutrons irradiation with 2.12 and 3.50 kGy and gamma irradiation with 136.16 Gy doses. Under fast neutron irradiation, the sample enthalpy values, and melting and boiling temperatures were varied with increase in the irradiation dose. But the variation in boiling temperature was more pronounced than that of the melting point. However, there was no drastic change in these transition temperatures. The kinetic parameters were calculated using free isoconversional and Kissinger analysis methods. Moreover, UV-visible spectra showed that fast neutron and gamma irradiations had destroyed the color of the title compound. The gamma irradiation showed similar effect on structural and thermal properties. Results are also shown where the intensity of XRD patterns strongly depends on the irradiation dose. According to the NMR results, it seems that the collision occurs between para-hydrogen of 2,6-DAP and fast neutrons.

  4. A state-of-the-art epithermal neutron irradiation facility for neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, K. J.; Binns, P. J.; Harling, O. K.

    2004-08-01

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) the first fission converter-based epithermal neutron beam (FCB) has proven suitable for use in clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The modern facility provides a high intensity beam together with low levels of contamination that is ideally suited for use with future, more selective boron delivery agents. Prescriptions for normal tissue tolerance doses consist of 2 or 3 fields lasting less than 10 min each with the currently available beam intensity, that are administered with an automated beam monitoring and control system to help ensure safety of the patient and staff alike. A quality assurance program ensures proper functioning of all instrumentation and safety interlocks as well as constancy of beam output relative to routine calibrations. Beam line shutters and the medical room walls provide sufficient shielding to enable access and use of the facility without affecting other experiments or normal operation of the multipurpose research reactor at MIT. Medical expertise and a large population in the greater Boston area are situated conveniently close to the university, which operates the research reactor 24 h a day for approximately 300 days per year. The operational characteristics of the facility closely match those established for conventional radiotherapy, which together with a near optimum beam performance ensure that the FCB is capable of determining whether the radiobiological promise of NCT can be realized in routine practice.

  5. A state-of-the-art epithermal neutron irradiation facility for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Harling, O K

    2004-08-21

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) the first fission converter-based epithermal neutron beam (FCB) has proven suitable for use in clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The modern facility provides a high intensity beam together with low levels of contamination that is ideally suited for use with future, more selective boron delivery agents. Prescriptions for normal tissue tolerance doses consist of 2 or 3 fields lasting less than 10 min each with the currently available beam intensity, that are administered with an automated beam monitoring and control system to help ensure safety of the patient and staff alike. A quality assurance program ensures proper functioning of all instrumentation and safety interlocks as well as constancy of beam output relative to routine calibrations. Beam line shutters and the medical room walls provide sufficient shielding to enable access and use of the facility without affecting other experiments or normal operation of the multipurpose research reactor at MIT. Medical expertise and a large population in the greater Boston area are situated conveniently close to the university, which operates the research reactor 24 h a day for approximately 300 days per year. The operational characteristics of the facility closely match those established for conventional radiotherapy, which together with a near optimum beam performance ensure that the FCB is capable of determining whether the radiobiological promise of NCT can be realized in routine practice.

  6. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Data on the microstructural development of tungsten (W) and tungsten rhenium (Re) alloys were obtained after neutron irradiation at 400-800 °C in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), the experimental fast test reactor Joyo, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for irradiation damage levels in the range of 0.09-1.54 displacement per atom (dpa). Microstructural observations showed that a small amount of Re (3-5%) in W-Re alloys is effective in suppressing void formation. In W-Re alloys with Re concentrations greater than 10%, acicular precipitates are the primary structural defects. In the HFIR-irradiated specimen, in which a large amount of Re was expected to be produced by the nuclear transmutation of W to Re because of the reactor's high thermal neutron flux, voids were not observed even in pure W. The synergistic effects of displacement damage and solid transmutation elements on microstructural development are discussed, and the microstructural development of tungsten materials utilized in fusion reactors is predicted.

  7. Dimensional isotropy of 6H and 3C SiC under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Terrani, Kurt; Specht, Eliot D.

    2016-04-01

    This investigation experimentally determines the as-irradiated crystal axes dimensional change of the common polytypes of SiC considered for nuclear application. Single crystal α-SiC (6H), β-SiC (3C), CVD β-SiC, and single crystal Si have been neutron irradiated near 60 °C from 2 × 1023 to 2 × 1026 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), or about 0.02-20 dpa, in order to study the effect of irradiation on bulk swelling and strain along independent crystalline axes. Single crystal, powder diffractometry and density measurement have been carried out. For all neutron doses where the samples remained crystalline all SiC materials demonstrated equivalent swelling behavior. Moreover the 6H-SiC expanded isotropically. The magnitude of the swelling followed a ∼0.77 power law against dose consistent with a microstructure evolution driven by single interstitial (carbon) mobility. Extraordinarily large ∼7.8% volume expansion in SiC was observed prior to amorphization. Above ∼0.9 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) all SiC materials became amorphous with an identical swelling: a 11.7% volume expansion, lowering the density to 2.84 g/cm3. The as-amorphized density was the same at the 2 × 1025 and 2 × 1026 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) dose levels.

  8. Investigation of the combined effect of neutron irradiation and electron beam exposure on pure tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Renterghem, W.; Uytdenhouwen, I.

    2016-08-01

    Pure tungsten samples were neutron irradiated in the BR2 reactor of SCK·CEN to fluences of 1.47 × 1020 n/cm2 and 4.74 × 1020 n/cm2 at 300 °C under Helium atmosphere and exposed to the electron beam of the Judith 1 installation The effect of these treatments on the defect structure was studied with transmission electron microscopy. In the irradiated samples the defect structure in the bulk is compared to the structure at the surface. The neutron irradiation created a large amount of a/2‹111› type dislocation loops forming dislocation rafts. The loop density increased from 8.5 × 1021/m³ to 9 × 1022/m³ with increasing dose, while the loop size decreased from 5.2 nm to 3.5 nm. The electron beam exposure induced significant annealing of the defects and almost all of the dislocation loops were removed. The number of line dislocations in that area increased as a result of the thermal stresses from the thermal shock.

  9. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium: Kinetics, long-time annealing and effect or crack formation

    SciTech Connect

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H.

    1995-09-01

    Since beryllium is considered as one of the best neutron multiplier materials in the blanket of the next generation fusion reactors, several studies have been started to evaluate its behaviour under irradiation during both operating and accidental conditions. Based on safety considerations, tritium produced in beryllium during neutron irradiation represents one important issue, therefore it is necessary to investigate tritium transport processes by using a comprehensive mathematical model and comparing its predictions with well characterized experimental tests. Because of the difficulties in extrapolating the short-time tritium release tests to a longer time scale, also long-time annealing experiments with beryllium samples from the SIBELIUS irradiation. have been carried out at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Samples were annealed up to 12 months at temperatures up to 650{degrees}C. The inventory after annealing was determined by heating the samples up to 1050{degrees}C with a He+0.1 vo1% H{sub 2} purge gas. Furthermore, in order to investigate the likely effects of cracks formation eventually causing a faster tritium release from beryllium, the behaviour of samples irradiated at low temperature (40-50{degrees}C) but up to very high fast neutron fluences (0.8-3.9{center_dot}10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}, E{sub n}{ge}1 MeV) in the BR2 reactor has been investigated. Tritium was released by heating the beryllium samples up to 1050{degrees}C and purging them with He+0.1 vo1% H{sub 2}. Tritium release from high-irradiated beryllium samples showed a much faster kinetics than from the low-irradiated ones, probably because of crack formation caused by thermal stresses in the brittle material and/or by helium bubbles migration. The obtained experimental data have been compared with predictions of the code ANFIBE with the goal to better understand the physical mechanisms governing tritium behaviour in beryllium and to assess the prediction capabilities of the code.

  10. Subtask 12F2: Microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti during neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Gazda, J.; Loomis, B.A.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize the microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy during irradiation by fast neutrons, and thereby to provide a better understanding of long-term performance of the alloy under fusion conditions. Microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy recently shown to exhibit excellent tensile and creep properties, virtual immunity to irradiation embrittlement, and good resistance to swelling, was characterized after irradiation in a lithium environment in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) (a sodium-cooled fast reactor located in Richland, Washington) at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C to 24-34 dpa. The primary feature of microstructural evolution during irradiation at 520 and 600{degrees}C was high-density formation of ultrafine Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} precipitates and short dislocations. For irradiation at 420{degrees}C, precipitation of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} was negligible, and {open_quotes}black-dot{close_quotes} defects and dislocations were observed in significantly higher densities. In spite of their extremely high densities, neither the {open_quotes}black-dot{close_quotes} defects nor Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} precipitates are overly detrimental to ductility and toughness of the alloy, yet they very effectively suppress irradiation-induced swelling. Therefore, these features, normally observed in V-base alloys containing Ti and Si, are considered stable. Unstable microstructural modifications that are likely to degrade mechanical properties significantly were not observed, e.g., irradiation-induced formation of fine oxides, carbides, nitrides, or Cr-rich clusters. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The role of dislocation channeling in IASCC initiation of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Kale Jennings

    The objective of this study was to understand the role of dislocation channeling in the initiation of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel using a novel four-point bend test. Stainless steels used in this study were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C, and included a commercial purity 304L stainless steel irradiated to 5.5, 10.2, and 47.5 dpa, and two high purity stainless steels, Fe-18Cr-12Ni and Fe-18Cr-25Ni, irradiated to ~10 dpa. The four-point bend test produced the same relative IASCC susceptibility as constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments performed on the same irradiated alloys in boiling water reactor normal water chemistry. The cracking susceptibility of the CP 304L alloy was high at all irradiation dose levels, enhanced by the presence of MnS inclusions in the alloy microstructure, which dissolve in the NWC environment. Dissolution of the MnS inclusion results in formation of an oxide cap that occludes the inclusion site, creating a crevice condition with a high propensity for crack initiation. Crack initiation at these locations was induced by stress concentration at the intersecting grain boundary, resulting from the intersection of a discontinuous dislocation channels (DC). Stress to initiate an IASCC crack decreased with dose due earlier DC initiation. The HP Fe-18Cr-12Ni alloy had low susceptibility to IASCC, while the high Ni alloy exhibited no cracking susceptibility. The difference in susceptibility among these conditions was attributed to the propensity for DCs to transmit across grain boundaries, which controls stress accumulation at DC -- grain boundary intersections.

  12. Nuclear microprobe analysis of 7Li profile induced in HfB 2 by a neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeone, D.; Deschanels, X.; Gosset, D.; Bonal, J. P.; Berthoumieux, E.

    2001-09-01

    HfB 2, a solid poor in boron, was irradiated by thermal neutrons in an experimental reactor. Using a nuclear microprobe, we have tracked lithium atoms produced by the 10B( n, α) 7Li reaction and compared the calculated and measured 7Li profiles in HfB 2 irradiated samples. This comparison shows that Li atoms do not diffuse during irradiation (323 K). The comparison of non-annealed and annealed irradiated HfB 2 plates clearly shows that lithium atoms do not migrate out of samples even at high temperatures (1273 K). These results associated to previous transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations seem to show that lithium atoms are trapped by dislocation loops created by displacement cascades during neutron irradiation.

  13. Degradation of Nylon 6,6 Fire-Suppression Casing from Plutonium Glove Boxes Under Alpha and Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Millsap, Donald W.; Cournoyer, Michael E.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Tesmer, Joseph R.; Wang, Matthew Y.

    2015-04-23

    Nylon 6,6 tensile specimens, conforming to the casing for self-contained fire extinguisher systems, have been irradiated using both an accelerator He++ ion beam and a 5-Ci PuBe neutron source to model the radiation damage these systems would likely incur over a lifetime of operation within glove boxes. Following irradiation, these samples were mechanically tested using standard practices as described in ASTM D638. The results of the He++ study indicate that the tensile strength of the nylon specimens undergoes some slight (<10%) degradation while other properties of the samples, such as elongation and tangent modulus, appear to fluctuate with increasing dose levels. The He++-irradiated specimens also have a noticeable level of discoloration corresponding to increasing levels of dose. The neutron-irradiated samples show a higher degree of mechanical degradation than the He++-irradiated samples.

  14. Degradation of Nylon 6,6 Fire-Suppression Casing from Plutonium Glove Boxes Under Alpha and Neutron Irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Millsap, Donald W.; Cournoyer, Michael E.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Tesmer, Joseph R.; Wang, Matthew Y.

    2015-04-23

    Nylon 6,6 tensile specimens, conforming to the casing for self-contained fire extinguisher systems, have been irradiated using both an accelerator He++ ion beam and a 5-Ci PuBe neutron source to model the radiation damage these systems would likely incur over a lifetime of operation within glove boxes. Following irradiation, these samples were mechanically tested using standard practices as described in ASTM D638. The results of the He++ study indicate that the tensile strength of the nylon specimens undergoes some slight (<10%) degradation while other properties of the samples, such as elongation and tangent modulus, appear to fluctuate with increasing dosemore » levels. The He++-irradiated specimens also have a noticeable level of discoloration corresponding to increasing levels of dose. The neutron-irradiated samples show a higher degree of mechanical degradation than the He++-irradiated samples.« less

  15. ALARA considerations for the whole body neutron irradiation facility source removal project at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick T

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the activities that were involved with the safe removal of fourteen PuBe sources from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Whole Body Neutron Irradiation Facility (WBNIF). As part of a Department of Energy and BNL effort to reduce the radiological inventory, the WBNIF was identified as having no future use. In order to deactivate the facility and eliminate the need for nuclear safety management and long-term surveillance, it was decided to remove the neutron sources and dismantle the facility. In addition, the sources did not have DOT Special Form documentation so they would need to be encapsulated once removed for offsite storage or disposal. The planning and the administrative as well as engineering controls put in place enabled personnel to safely remove and encapsulate the sources while keeping exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). PMID:16404183

  16. The comparison of microstructure and nanocluster evolution in proton and neutron irradiated Fe-9%Cr ODS steel to 3 dpa at 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel was irradiated with protons or neutrons to a dose of 3 displacements per atom (dpa) at a temperature of 500 °C, enabling a direct comparison of ion to neutron irradiation effects at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions. The irradiated microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography including cluster analysis. Both proton and neutron irradiations produced a comparable void and dislocation loop microstructure. However, the irradiation response of the Ti-Y-O oxide nanoclusters varied. Oxides remained stable under proton irradiation, but exhibited dissolution and an increase in Y:Ti composition ratio under neutron irradiation. Both proton and neutron irradiation also induced varying extents of Si, Ni, and Mn clustering at existing oxide nanoclusters. Protons are able to reproduce the void and loop microstructure of neutron irradiation carried out to the same dose and temperature. However, since nanocluster evolution is controlled by both diffusion and ballistic impacts, protons are rendered unable to reproduce the nanocluster evolution of neutron irradiation at the same dose and temperature.

  17. Extraction of protactinium-233 and separation from thermal neutron-irradiated thorium-232 using crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Jalhoom, Moayyed G.; Mohammed, Dawood A.; Khalaf, Jumah S.

    2008-07-01

    A new method was developed for the extraction and separation of {sup 233}Pa from thermal neutron-irradiated {sup 232}Th. Solutions of Pa{sup 233} were prepared in LiCI-HCl solutions from which appreciable extraction was obtained using dibenzo-18-crown-6 in 1,2-dichloroethane. The effects of cavity size, substitutions on the crown ring, type of the organic solvent, and temperature on extraction are discussed. Very high separation factors were obtained for the pairs {sup 233}Pa/{sup 232}Th (>105), {sup 233}Pa/{sup 233}U (> 1000), and {sup 232}U/{sup 232}Th (>60). (authors)

  18. Dislocation sweeping of defects in neutron- and electron-irradiated niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Otero, M.P.

    1983-10-01

    The glide of dislocations in a (441)-oriented Nb single crystal irradiated at 325 K with 5.5 x 10/sup 21/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) is shown for increasing time of tensile elongation (2 x 10/sup -4/ mm/s) in the High Voltage Electron Microscope at Argonne National Laboratory. The dimensions of the tensile specimen in the guage length were approximately 2 mm x 0.5 mm x 0.0001 mm. An electron energy of 900 keV was used during the simultaneous deformation and TEM observation.

  19. Neutron and X-ray irradiation of silicon based Mach-Zehnder modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Nasr-Storey, S. S.; Détraz, S.; Olanterä, L.; Sigaud, C.; Soós, C.; Pezzullo, G.; Troska, J.; Vasey, F.; Zeiler, Marcel

    2015-03-01

    We report on our recent investigation into the potential for using silicon-based Mach-Zehnder modulators in the harshest radiation environments of the High-Luminosity LHC. The effect of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the performance of the devices have been investigated using the 20 MeV neutron beam line at the Cyclotron Resource Centre in Louvain-La-Neuve and the X-ray irradiation facility in the CERN PH department. The devices were exposed to a total fluence and ionizing dose of 1.2×1015 n cm-2 and 1.3 MGy respectively.

  20. Defect-induced magnetism in neutron irradiated 6H-SiC single crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Gang; Wang, Shunchong; Yang, Jianhui; Chen, Liang; Qin, Xiubo; Song, Bo; Wang, Baoyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2011-02-25

    Defect-induced magnetism is firstly observed in neutron irradiated SiC single crystals. We demonstrated that the intentionally created defects dominated by divacancies (V(Si)V(C)) are responsible for the observed magnetism. First-principles calculations revealed that defect states favor the formation of local moments and the extended tails of defect wave functions make long-range spin couplings possible. Our results confirm the existence of defect-induced magnetism, implying the possibility of tuning the magnetism of wide band-gap semiconductors by defect engineering.

  1. Neutron beam irradiation study of workload dependence of SER in a microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, Sarah E; Graves, Todd L; Hong, Ted; Ackaret, Jerry; Sonny, Rao; Subhasish, Mitra; Pia, Sanda

    2009-01-01

    It is known that workloads are an important factor in soft error rates (SER), but it is proving difficult to find differentiating workloads for microprocessors. We have performed neutron beam irradiation studies of a commercial microprocessor under a wide variety of workload conditions from idle, performing no operations, to very busy workloads resembling real HPC, graphics, and business applications. There is evidence that the mean times to first indication of failure, MTFIF defined in Section II, may be different for some of the applications.

  2. Observation of neutron spectrum from deuterated plastic irradiated by 100 picosecond and sub-picosecond ultra-intense laser.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Miyoshi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Habara, H.; Kodama, R.; Sentoku, S.; Fujita, H.; Kitagawa, Y.; Katou, Y.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.

    1998-11-01

    For understanding of the fundamental physics of the fast ignition, it is crucial to investigate the fast ion production in a high density plasma irradiated by an ultra-intense laser. The energy spectrum of the neutrons produced in the deuterated target reflects the energy spectrum of fast deuterons accelerated in the interacting region. Due to high penetration ability of fast neutron, the neutron spectra directly bring out the information of the hot ions from the high density plasma. We have observed 10^6 of the DD neutrons produced in a deuterated polystyrene (C8D8)x target irradiated by the 500-fs intense laser (up to 10^19 W/cm^2). The fast neutron spectra were measured by multi-channel time-of-flight neutron spectrometer (MANDALA) at the GEKKO XII laser facility of Osaka University. The spectrometer has two sets of 421 channel detector arrays which were located at 90 and 54.7 degrees with respect to the irradiation axis. The observed spectral width of DD neutrons were 1.35 MeV in full width of half maximum. This spectrum result from the fusion reaction created by accelerated ions which have energy about 300 keV. We report the details of the experimental results and the quantitative analysis using particle in cell code.

  3. Effect of neutron-irradiation on the microstructure of a Fe-12at.%Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenko, V.; Pareige, C.; Genevois, C.; Cuvilly, F.; Roussel, M.; Pareige, P.

    2011-08-01

    A nanoscale description of the microstructure in a Fe-12at%Cr model alloy of low purity which has been neutron irradiated at 300°C up to 0.6 dpa, has been performed owing to atom probe tomography (APT). APT investigations have shown that the impurities are also involved in the microstructural evolution under irradiation. Two different populations of clusters have been observed: Cr-enriched and NiSiPCr-enriched clusters. As expected with a process of enhanced precipitation, Cr-enriched clusters are homogeneously distributed inside grains and certainly not correlated to dislocation loops. The NiSiPCr-enriched clusters, which are probably radiation induced segregations, are independent of the Cr-enriched clusters and are also homogeneously distributed. A quantitative description of these objects is presented in this paper and results are compared to SANS data of the literature obtained for the same model alloy.

  4. Hardness of Carburized Surfaces in 316LN Stainless Steel after Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, TS

    2005-01-31

    A proprietary surface carburization treatment is being considered to minimize possible cavitation pitting of the inner surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the SNS. The treatment gives a large supersaturation of carbon in the surface layers and causes substantial hardening of the surface. To answer the question of whether such a hardened layer will remain hard and stable during neutron irradiation, specimens of the candidate materials were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to an atomic displacement level of 1 dpa. Considerable radiation hardening occurred in annealed 316LN stainless steel and 20% cold rolled 316LN stainless steel, and lesser radiation hardening in Kolsterised layers on these materials. These observations coupled with optical microscopy examinations indicate that the carbon-supersaturated layers did not suffer radiation-induced decomposition and softening.

  5. The effects of neutron irradiation on fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.

    1999-05-21

    Austenitic stainless steels are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor pressure vessel internal components because of their superior fracture toughness properties. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods leads to significant reduction in the fracture resistance of these steels. This paper presents results of fracture toughness J-R curve tests on four heats of Type 304 stainless steel that were irradiated to fluence levels of {approx}0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E >1 MeV) at {approx}288 C in a helium environment in the Halden heavy water boiling reactor. The tests were performed on 1/4-T compact tension specimens in air at 288 C; crack extensions were determined by both DC potential and elastic unloading compliance techniques.

  6. Microstructure and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated V-20Ti alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiguchi, Y.; Kayano, H.; Morozumi, S.

    1985-08-01

    Neutron irradiation damage and its effects on mechanical properties were studied for V-20Ti alloy with three different fluences: 5 × 10 24, 2 × 10 24 and 1× 10 23 n m -2 ( E > l MeV) , named A-, B- and C-specimens, respectively. Radiation-induced precipitates (RIP) were observed in A and B specimens and no voids in all specimens. It was clear from the detailed investigation that the precipitates are circular and planar coherent particles lying on (100) planes and have the fee structures. The mechanisms for suppression of void formation and for softening the irradiation effects on the mechanical properties were suggested based on the relation with radiation-induced precipitates (RIP) which were considered as a non-stoichiometric suboxide and contained many vacancies at lattice sites.

  7. Influence of nickel and beryllium content on swelling behavior of copper irradiated with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.; Edwards, D.J.; Evans, J.H.

    1996-10-01

    In the 1970`s, the effects of nickel content on the evolution of dislocation microstructures and the formation and growth of voids in Cu-Ni alloys were studied using 1 MeV electrons in a high voltage electron microscope. The swelling rate was found to decrease rapidly with increasing nickel content. The decrease in the swelling rate was associated with a decreasing void growth rate with increasing nickel content at irradiation temperatures up to 450{degrees}C. At 500{degrees}C, both void size and swelling rate were found to peak at 1 and 2% Ni, respectively, and then to decrease rapidly with increasing nickel content. However, recent work has demonstrated that the swelling behavior of Cu-5%Ni irradiated with fission neutrons is very similar for that of pure copper. The present experiments were designed to investigate this apparent discrepancy.

  8. Rat mammary-cell survival following irradiation with 14. 3-MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, P.A.; Gould, M.N.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Clifton, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    The survival of rat mammary gland cells irradiated in situ with either single or split doses of 14.3-MeV neutrons was determined by an in vivo transplantation assay. The single-dose data are best fit to the multitarget single-hit model by the parameters D/sub 0/ = 97 cGy and n = 0.6 while the split-dose data are best fit by the parameters D/sub 0/ = 100 cGy and n = 1.2. Analysis of the combined data sets suggests that the two survival curves are not identical. Comparison of these data with previously published results following irradiation with 250-kVp x-rays is reported.

  9. Rat mammary cell survival following irradiation with 14. 3-MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, P.A.; Gould, M.N.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Clifton, K.H.

    1982-08-01

    The survival of rat mammary gland cells irradiated in situ with either single or split doses of 14.3-MeV neutrons was determined by an in vivo transplantation assay. The single-dose data are best fit to the multitarget single-hit model by the parameters D/sub o/ = 97 cGy and n = 0.6 while the split-dose data are best fit by the parameters D/sub o/ = 100 cGy and n = 1.2.Analysis of the combined data sets suggests that the two survival curves are not identical. Comparison of these data with previously published results following irradiation with 250-kVp X rays is reported.

  10. The observation of damage regions produced by neutron irradiation in lithium-doped silicon solar cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Sargent, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study regions of lattice disorder produced in lithium-doped float-zone melted n/p-type silicon solar cells by irradiation with monoenergetic neutrons at doses between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 13th per cu cm. The defect regions were revealed by chemically etching the surface of the solar cells and by observing carbon replicas in an electron microscope. It was found that the defect density increased with increasing irradiation dose and increased lithium content, whereas the average defect diameter was found to decrease. From thermal annealing experiments it was found that in the lithium-doped material the defect structure was stable at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. This was found to be in contrast to the undoped material where at the lowest doses considerable annealing was observed to occur. These results are discussed in terms of the theoretical predictions and models of defect clusters proposed by Gossick (1959) and Crawford and Cleland (1959).

  11. Micromechanisms of Twin Nucleation in TiAl: Effects of Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hishinuma, A.; Yoo, M.H.

    1999-01-28

    The so-called radiation-induced ductility (RID) reported in neutron-irradiated 47at%Al alloys is attributed to the formation of effective twin embryos in the presence of interstitial-type Frank loops in {gamma}-TiAl and the subsequent nucleation and growth of microtwins during post-irradiation tensile deformation. The stability of large faulted Frank loops is explained in terms of the repulsive interaction between Shockley and Frank partials. Interaction of only six ordinary slip dislocations with a Frank loop can facilitate a pole mechanism for twin formation to work. The relative ease of heterogeneous twin nucleation is the reason for the RID and the lack of changes in yield strength and work hardening.

  12. Initial increase, ''peaking effect'', in the internal friction of copper following pulsed neutron and electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H.M.; Parkin, D.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Hemsky, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Under certain experimental conditions the internal friction in metals can first increase and following prolonged irradiation decrease. Many models have been proposed to account for this ''peaking effect''; however, in many of the cases, no effort is made to distinguish between the influence of interstitials and/or vacancies. To determine the nature of the point defect responsible for the peaking effect in high purity copper, we have performed a series of pulsed irradiations using neutrons and electrons. In all of the experiments an initial very rapid rise in the internal friction and Young's modulus was observed. These data show that a fast diffusing defect is responsible for the peaking effect: i.e. the interstitial.

  13. Irradiation of nuclear track emulsions with thermal neutrons, heavy ions, and muons

    SciTech Connect

    Artemenkov, D. A. Bradnova, V.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Zarubin, P. I.; Zarubina, I. G.; Kattabekov, R. R.; Mamatkulov, K. Z.; Rusakova, V. V.

    2015-07-15

    Exposures of test samples of nuclear track emulsion were analyzed. Angular and energy correlations of products originating from the thermal-neutron-induced reaction n{sub th} +{sup 10} B → {sup 7} Li + (γ)+ α were studied in nuclear track emulsions enriched in boron. Nuclear track emulsions were also irradiated with {sup 86}Kr{sup +17} and {sup 124}Xe{sup +26} ions of energy about 1.2 MeV per nucleon. Measurements of ranges of heavy ions in nuclear track emulsionsmade it possible to determine their energies on the basis of the SRIM model. The formation of high-multiplicity nuclear stars was observed upon irradiating nuclear track emulsions with ultrarelativistic muons. Kinematical features studied in this exposure of nuclear track emulsions for events of the muon-induced splitting of carbon nuclei to three alpha particles are indicative of the nucleardiffraction interaction mechanism.

  14. Subtask 12F1: Effect of neutron irradiation on swelling of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the density change, void distribution, and microstructural evolution of vanadium-base alloys. Swelling behavior and microstructural evolution of V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti, and V-Ti-Si alloys were investigated after irradiation at 420-600{degrees}C up to 114 dpa. The alloys exhibited swelling maxima between 30 and 80 dpa and swelling decreased on irradiation to higher dpa. This is in contrast to the monotonically increasing swelling of binary alloys that contain Fe, Ni, Cr, Mo, W, and Si. Precipitation of dense Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} promotes good resistance to swelling of the Ti-containing alloys, and it was concluded that Ti of >3 wt.% and 400-1000 wppm Si are necessary to effectively suppress swelling. Swelling was minimal in V-4Cr-4Ti, identified as the most promising alloy based on good mechanical properties and superior resistance to irradiation embrittlement. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties and microstructures of dispersion and precipitation hardened copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. N.; Edwards, D. J.; Toft, P.

    1996-11-01

    Tensile specimens of Cusbnd Al2O3, CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were irradiated with fission neutrons to fluences of 5 × 1022, 5 × 1023and1 × 1024n/m2 (E > 1MeV) at 47°C. Tensile properties and Vickers hardness were determined at 22°C. Microstructures of irradiated as well as unirradiated specimens were examined using a transmission electron microscope and the fractured surfaces were investigated in a scanning electron microscope. The most significant effect of irradiation is a drastic decrease in the ductility of copper alloys at a dose level as low as 0.2 dpa. The loss of ductility appears to be related to the intrinsic hardness of the grain interior and not to the grain boundary embrittlement. It is suggested that the irradiation-induced hardening and the lack of uniform elongation may be understood in terms of difficulty in dislocation generation due to pinning of grown-in dislocation by defect clusters (loops) and/or impurity atoms.

  16. Effects of neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of nickel-base fastener alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Kammenzind, B.F.; Burke, M.G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture behavior and deformation microstructure of high-strength nickel-base alloy fastener materials, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625. Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition, and Alloy 625 in the direct aged condition were irradiated to a fluence of 2.4x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} at 264 C in the Advanced Test Reactor. Deformation structures at low strains were examined. It was previously shown that Alloy X-750 undergoes hardening, a significant degradation in ductility and an increase in intergranular fracture. In contrast, Alloy 625 had shown softening with a concomitant increase in ductility and transgranular failure after irradiation. The deformation microstructures of the two alloys were also different. Alloy X-750 deformed by a planar slip mechanism with fine microcracks forming at the intersections of slip bands with grain boundaries. Alloy 625 showed much more homogeneous deformation with fine, closely spaced slip bands and an absence of microcracks. The mechanism(s) of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) are discussed.

  17. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, John T.; Kunz, Walter E.; Cates, Michael R.; Franks, Larry A.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fissions are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for .sup.239 Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  18. Ionizing/displacement synergistic effects induced by gamma and neutron irradiation in gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenhui; Chen, Wei; Yao, Zhibin; Jin, Xiaoming; Liu, Yan; Yang, Shanchao; Wang, Zhikuan

    2016-09-01

    A kind of gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistor has been specially designed to do experimental validations and studies on the ionizing/displacement synergistic effects in the lateral PNP bipolar transistor. The individual and mixed irradiation experiments of gamma rays and neutrons are accomplished on the transistors. The common emitter current gain, gate sweep characteristics and sub-threshold sweep characteristics are measured after each exposure. The results indicate that under the sequential irradiation of gamma rays and neutrons, the response of the gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistor does exhibit ionizing/displacement synergistic effects and base current degradation is more severe than the simple artificial sum of those under the individual gamma and neutron irradiation. Enough attention should be paid to this phenomenon in radiation damage evaluation.

  19. Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1997-03-01

    A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Examining the stability of thermally fissile Th and U isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bharat; Biswal, S. K.; Singh, S. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of recently predicted thermally fissile Th and U isotopes are studied within the framework of the relativistic mean-field approach using the axially deformed basis. We calculate the ground, first intrinsic excited state for highly neutron-rich thorium and uranium isotopes. The possible modes of decay such as α decay and β decay are analyzed. We found that neutron-rich isotopes are stable against α decay, however, they are very unstable against β decay. The lifetime of these nuclei is predicted to be tens of seconds against β decay. If these nuclei are utilized before their decay time, a lot of energy can be produced with the help of multifragmentation fission. Also, these nuclei have great implications from the astrophysical point of view. In some cases, we found that the isomeric states with energy range from 2 to 3 MeV and three maxima in the potential energy surface of Th-230228 and U-234228 isotopes.

  1. Nuclear waste actinides as fissile fuel in hybrid blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, S.; Al-Kusayer, T.A.

    1983-12-01

    The widespread use of the present LWRs produces substantial quantities of nuclear waste materials. Among those, actinide nuclear waste poses a serious problem of stockage because the associated half life times for actinides is measured in terms of geological time periods (several millions of years) so that no waste disposal guarantee over such time intervals can be given, except for space disposal. On the other hand, these nuclear waste actinides are very good fissionable materials for high energetic (D,T) fusion neutrons. It is therefore worthwhile to investigate their quality as potential nuclear fuel in hybrid blankets. The present study investigates the neutronic performance of hybrid blankets containing Np/sup 237/ and Cm/sup 244/ as fissile materials. The isotopic composition of Americium has been adjusted to the spent fuel isotope composition of a LWR. The geometrical design has been made, according to the AYMAN fussion-fission (hybrid) experimental facility, now in the very early phase of planning.

  2. Spectrum and density of neutron flux in the irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E. P.; Verkhoglyadov, A. E.; Bulavin, M. V.; Rogov, A. D.; Kulagin, E. N.; Kulikov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Methodology and results of measuring the differential density of the neutron flux in irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor using neutron activation analysis (NAA) are presented in the paper. The results are compared to the calculation performed on the basis of the 3D MCNP model. The data that are obtained are required to determine the integrated radiation dose of the studied samples at various distances from the reactor.

  3. Neutron irradiation effects on domain wall mobility and reversibility in lead zirconate titanate thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Joseph T.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Ferreira, Paulo; Small, Leo; Duquette, David; Apblett, Christopher; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2013-03-28

    The effects of neutron-induced damage on the ferroelectric properties of thin film lead zirconate titanate (PZT) were investigated. Two sets of PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} films of varying initial quality were irradiated in a research nuclear reactor up to a maximum 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of (5.16 {+-} 0.03) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. Changes in domain wall mobility and reversibility were characterized by polarization-electric field measurements, Rayleigh analysis, and analysis of first order reversal curves (FORC). With increasing fluence, extrinsic contributions to the small-signal permittivity diminished. Additionally, redistribution of irreversible hysterons towards higher coercive fields was observed accompanied by the formation of a secondary hysteron peak following exposure to high fluence levels. The changes are attributed to the radiation-induced formation of defect dipoles and other charged defects, which serve as effective domain wall pinning sites. Differences in damage accumulation rates with initial film quality were observed between the film sets suggesting a dominance of pre-irradiation microstructure on changes in macroscopic switching behavior.

  4. Neutron irradiation damage effect on superconducting and normal state properties of the YBa 2Cu 3O 7 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przysłupski, P.; Wiśniewski, A.; Koleśnik, S.; Dobrowolski, W.; Pajączkowska, A.; Pytel, K.; Pytel, B.

    1988-06-01

    Effect of irradiation by fast neutrons on superconducting and normal state properties of the YBa 2Cu 3O 7 samples is presented. Transport measurements showed a degradation of all superconducting parameters, especially the transport critical current density. Critical current densities obtained from magnetization data exhibited a substantial increase / about 15 times at 77 K and H = 10 kOe/ after the irradiation with the fluence in the range 2.4·10 17 ÷ 8.7 · 10 17 n/cm 2. Such an anomalous bahavior is explained in terms of neutron created defects at intergrain regions and improved intragrain pinning.

  5. X-ray diffraction study of BaTiO3 single crystals before and after fast-neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stash, A. I.; Ivanov, S. A.; Stefanovich, S. Yu.; Mosunov, A. V.; Boyko, V. M.; Ermakov, V. S.; Korulin, A. V.; Kalyukanov, A. I.; Isakova, N. N.

    2015-09-01

    The neutron irradiation of ferroelectrics is efficiently used to form structural states that cannot be obtained by conventional technologies. To date, the effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of BaTiO3 has been studied for only ceramic materials. We have considered the influence of fast-neutron irradiation ( F = 1 × 1017 cm-2) on the structure and properties of BaTiO3 single crystals for the first time. The structural changes occurring in irradiated BaTiO3 and their correlation with the behavior of dielectric and nonlinear optical characteristics are analyzed with the aid of a specially developed method for taking into account the experimental correction to diffuse scattering. Neutron irradiation to the aforementioned dose retains the polar structure of the material and only slightly changes atomic displacements. The radiationinduced structural changes occur according to the high-temperature type to form a structure similar to the cubic modification of unirradiated BaTiO3 crystal.

  6. Effects of neutron irradiation on pinning force scaling in state-of-the-art Nb3Sn wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, T.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Flükiger, R.; Scheuerlein, C.; Bottura, L.

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive irradiation study involving five state-of-the-art Nb3Sn wires which were subjected to sequential neutron irradiation up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.6 × 1022 m-2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The volume pinning force of short wire samples was assessed in the temperature range from 4.2 to 15 K in applied fields of up to 7 T by means of SQUID magnetometry in the unirradiated state and after each irradiation step. Pinning force scaling computations revealed that the exponents in the pinning force function differ significantly from those expected for pure grain boundary pinning, and that fast neutron irradiation causes a substantial change in the functional dependence of the volume pinning force. A model is presented, which describes the pinning force function of irradiated wires using a two-component ansatz involving a point-pinning contribution stemming from radiation induced pinning centers. The dependence of this point-pinning contribution on fast neutron fluence appears to be a universal function for all examined wire types.

  7. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGES

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  8. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  9. Neutron irradiation of bacteria in the presence and absence of secondary charged-particle equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Lunec, J.; Cramp, W.A.; Hornsey, S.

    1980-09-01

    The survival rate of Shigella flexneri has been measured for irradiation with 7-MeV neutrons in the presence and absence of secondary charged-particle equilibrium. The data were analyzed to assess the separate response of the cells to the knock-on proton and ..cap alpha..-particle plus heavy-recoil components. A detailed consideration of the frequency of ..cap alpha..-particle and heavy-recoil traversals of the cell has been made to explain our results, and in addition we have applied this approach to analyze the earlier results obtained with mammalian cells. We conclude that of the secondary charged-particles produced by the Hammersmith neutron beam, the highest LET particles, the heavy-recoil nuclei, contribute a minor proportion of damage to bacteria but form a major contribution of damage in mammalian cells. The reduction in oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) with neutrons compared with low LET radiation for mammalian cells is due almost entirely to the influence of the heavy recoils and the contribution of the ..cap alpha..-particle and knock-on protons to the reduction of the OER is relatively minor. For Shigella flexneri the ..cap alpha.. particles and heavy recoils make approximately equal contributions to the reduction in OER.

  10. Investigation of X-ray spectral response of D-T fusion produced neutron irradiated PIPS detectors for plasma X-ray diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwara Raja, P.; Narasimha Murty, N. V. L.; Rao, C. V. S.; Abhangi, Mitul

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the fusion-produced neutron irradiation induced changes in the X-ray spectral response of commercially available Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detectors using the accelerator based D-T generator. After 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation up to a fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, the energy resolution (i.e. FWHM) of the detectors at room temperature is found to degrade by about 3.8 times that of the pre-irradiated value. From the X-ray spectral characteristics, it has been observed that the room temperature spectral response of PIPS detectors is too poor even at low neutron fluences. Irradiation is also carried out with Am-Be neutron source for studying the effect of scattered neutrons from the reactor walls on the detector performance. Comparative studies of the damage caused by 14.1 MeV neutrons and Am-Be source produced neutrons at the same neutron fluence are carried out by analyzing the irradiated detector characteristics. The degradation in the energy resolution of the detectors is attributed to the radiation induced changes in the detector leakage current. No considerable changes in the full depletion voltage and the effective doping concentration up to the neutron fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, are observed from the measured C-V characteristics. Partial recovery of the neutron irradiated detector characteristics is discussed.

  11. Contribution To Degradation Study, Behavior Of Unsaturated Polyester Resin Under Neutron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellache, D.; Lounis, A.; Taïbi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Applications of unsaturated polyester thermosetting resins are numerous in construction sector, in transport, electric spare parts manufactures, consumer goods, and anticorrosive materials. This survey reports the effect of thermosetting polymer degradation (unsaturated polyester): degradation by neutrons irradiation. In order to evaluate the deterioration of our material, some comparative characterizations have been done between standard samples and damaged ones. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultrasonic scanning, hardness test (Shore D) are the techniques which have been used. The exposure to a neutrons flux is carried out in the column of the nuclear research reactor of Draria (Algiers-Algeria). The energetic profile of the incidental fluxes is constituted of fast neutrons (ΦR = 3.1012n.cm-2.s-1, E = 2 Mev) of thermal neutrons (ΦTH = 1013n.cm-2.s-1; E = 0.025 ev) and epithermal neutrons (Φepi = 7.1011 n.cm-2.s-1; E>4,9 ev). The received dose flow is 0,4 Kgy. We notice only a few scientific investigations can be found in this field. In comparison with the standard sample (no exposed) it is shown that the damage degree is an increasing process with the exposure. Concerning the description of irradiation effects on polymers, we can advance that several reactions are in competition : reticulation, chain break, and oxidation by radical mechanism. In our case the incidental particle of high energy fast neutrons whose energy is greater or equal to 2 Mev, is braked by the target with a nuclear shock during which the incidental particle transmits a part of its energy to an atom. If the energy transfer is sufficient, the nuclear shock permits to drive out an atom of its site the latter will return positioning interstitially, the energy that we used oversteps probably the energy threshold (displacement energy). This fast neutrons collision with target cores proceeds to an indirect ionization by the preliminary creation of excited secondary species that will

  12. Contribution To Degradation Study, Behavior Of Unsaturated Polyester Resin Under Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Abellache, D.; Lounis, A.; Taiebi, K.

    2010-01-05

    Applications of unsaturated polyester thermosetting resins are numerous in construction sector, in transport, electric spare parts manufactures, consumer goods, and anticorrosive materials. This survey reports the effect of thermosetting polymer degradation (unsaturated polyester): degradation by neutrons irradiation. In order to evaluate the deterioration of our material, some comparative characterizations have been done between standard samples and damaged ones. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultrasonic scanning, hardness test (Shore D) are the techniques which have been used. The exposure to a neutrons flux is carried out in the column of the nuclear research reactor of Draria (Algiers-Algeria). The energetic profile of the incidental fluxes is constituted of fast neutrons (PHI{sub R} = 3.10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1}, E = 2 Mev) of thermal neutrons (PHI{sub TH} = 10{sup 13} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1}; E = 0.025 ev) and epithermal neutrons (PHI{sub epi} = 7.10{sup 11} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1}; E>4,9 ev). The received dose flow is 0,4 Kgy. We notice only a few scientific investigations can be found in this field. In comparison with the standard sample (no exposed) it is shown that the damage degree is an increasing process with the exposure. Concerning the description of irradiation effects on polymers, we can advance that several reactions are in competition: reticulation, chain break, and oxidation by radical mechanism. In our case the incidental particle of high energy fast neutrons whose energy is greater or equal to 2 Mev, is braked by the target with a nuclear shock during which the incidental particle transmits a part of its energy to an atom. If the energy transfer is sufficient, the nuclear shock permits to drive out an atom of its site the latter will return positioning interstitially, the energy that we used oversteps probably the energy threshold (displacement energy). This fast neutrons collision with target cores proceeds to an indirect

  13. Investigation of Effects of Neutron Irradiation on Tantalum Alloys for Radioisotope Power System Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Talnagi, Joseph

    2007-01-30

    Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for space nuclear power systems such as Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. A number of tantalum alloys have been developed over the years to increase high-temperature strength (Ta-10%W) and to reduce creep strain (T-111). These tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive the increasing high pressures of the RTG's operating environment resulting from the alpha decay of the 238-plutonium dioxide fuel. However, 238-plutonium is also a powerful neutron source. Therefore, the RTG operating environment produces large amounts of 3-helium and neutron displacement damage over the 30 year life of the RTG. The literature to date shows that there has been very little work focused on the mechanical properties of irradiated tantalum and tantalum alloys and none at the fluence levels associated with a RTG operating environment. The minimum, reactor related, work that has been reported shows that these alloys tend to follow trends seen in the behavior of other BCC alloys under irradiation. An understanding of these mechanisms is important for the confident extrapolation of mechanical-property trends to the higher doses and gas levels corresponding to actual service lifetimes. When comparing the radiation effects between samples of Ta-10%W and T-111 (Ta-8%W-2%Hf) subjected to identical neutron fluences and environmental conditions at temperatures <0.3Tm ({approx}700 deg. C), evidence suggests the possibility that T-111 will exhibit higher levels of internal damage accumulation and degradation of mechanical properties compared to Ta-10%W.

  14. Low cycle fatigue properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels after high-dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, E.; Petersen, C.; Aktaa, J.; Povstyanko, A.; Prokhorov, V.; Diegele, E.; Lässer, R.

    2011-08-01

    This paper focuses on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated to a displacement damage dose of up to 70 dpa at 330-337 °C in the BOR 60 reactor within the ARBOR 2 irradiation programme. The influence of neutron irradiation on the fatigue behaviour was determined for the as-received EUROFER97, pre-irradiation heat-treated EUROFER97 HT and F82H-mod steels. Strain-controlled push-pull loading was performed using miniaturized cylindrical specimens at a constant temperature of 330 °C with total strain ranges between 0.8% and 1.1%. Comparison of the LCF behaviour of irradiated and reference unirradiated specimens was performed for both the adequate total and inelastic strains. Neutron irradiation-induced hardening may have various effects on the fatigue behaviour of the steels. The reduction of inelastic strain in the irradiated state compared with the reference unirradiated state at common total strain amplitudes may increase fatigue lifetime. The increase in the stress at the adequate inelastic strain, by contrast, may accelerate fatigue damage accumulation. Depending on which of the two effects mentioned dominates, neutron irradiation may either extend or reduce the fatigue lifetime compared with the reference unirradiated state. The results obtained for EUROFER97 and EUROFER97 HT confirm these considerations. Most of the irradiated specimens show fatigue lifetimes comparable to those of the reference unirradiated state at adequate inelastic strains. Some irradiated specimens, however, show lifetime reduction or increase in comparison with the reference state at adequate inelastic strains.

  15. High Dose Neutron Irradiation of Hi-Nicalon Type S Silicon Carbide Composites, Part 2. Mechanical and Physical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Ozawa, Kazumi; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Porter, Wallace D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-01-07

    Nuclear-grade silicon carbide (SiC) composite material was examined for mechanical and thermophysical properties following high-dose neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at a temperature range of 573–1073 K. Likewise, the material was chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC-matrix composite with a two-dimensional satin weave Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC fiber reinforcement and a multilayered pyrocarbon/SiC interphase. Moderate (1073 K) to very severe (573 K) degradation in mechanical properties was found after irradiation to >70 dpa, whereas no evidence was found for progressive evolution in swelling and thermal conductivity. The swelling was found to recover upon annealing beyond the irradiation temperature, indicating the irradiation temperature, but only to a limited extent. Moreover, the observed strength degradation is attributed primarily to fiber damage for all irradiation temperatures, particularly a combination of severe fiber degradation and likely interphase damage at relatively low irradiation temperatures.

  16. High-dose neutron irradiation of Hi-Nicalon Type S silicon carbide composites. Part 2: Mechanical and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao; Ozawa, Kazumi; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Porter, Wally; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear-grade silicon carbide (SiC) composite material was examined for mechanical and thermophysical properties following high-dose neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at a temperature range of 573-1073 K. The material was chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC-matrix composite with a two-dimensional satin weave Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC fiber reinforcement and a multilayered pyrocarbon/SiC interphase. Moderate (1073 K) to very severe (573 K) degradation in mechanical properties was found after irradiation to >70 dpa, whereas no evidence was found for progressive evolution in swelling and thermal conductivity. The swelling was found to recover upon annealing beyond the irradiation temperature, indicating the irradiation temperature, but only to a limited extent. The observed strength degradation is attributed primarily to fiber damage for all irradiation temperatures, particularly a combination of severe fiber degradation and likely interphase damage at relatively low irradiation temperatures.

  17. Dimensional isotropy of 6H and 3C SiC under neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Terrani, Kurt A.; Specht, Eliot D.

    2016-01-16

    This investigation experimentally determines the as-irradiated crystal axes dimensional change of the common polytypes of SiC considered for nuclear application. Single crystal α-SiC (6H), β-SiC (3C), CVD β-SiC, and single crystal Si have been neutron irradiated near 60 °C from 2 × 1023 to 2 × 1026 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), or about 0.02–20 dpa, in order to study the effect of irradiation on bulk swelling and strain along independent crystalline axes. Single crystal, powder diffractometry and density measurement have been carried out. For all neutron doses where the samples remained crystalline all SiC materials demonstrated equivalent swelling behavior.more » Moreover the 6H–SiC expanded isotropically. The magnitude of the swelling followed a ~0.77 power law against dose consistent with a microstructure evolution driven by single interstitial (carbon) mobility. Extraordinarily large ~7.8% volume expansion in SiC was observed prior to amorphization. Above ~0.9 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) all SiC materials became amorphous with an identical swelling: a 11.7% volume expansion, lowering the density to 2.84 g/cm3. As a result, the as-amorphized density was the same at the 2 × 1025 and 2 × 1026 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) dose levels.« less

  18. Effect of pulsed dose in simultaneous and sequential irradiation of V-79 cells by 14. 8-MeV neutrons and /sup 60/Co photons

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Gould, M.N.

    1984-09-01

    The effect of irradiating V-79 Chinese hamster cells with a mixture of 40% 14.8-MeV neutrons and 60% /sup 69/Co photons with simultaneous or sequential exposures is investigated. Sample doses are obtained by irradiating cells with alternating 3-min pulses of neutrons and photons (in the sequential case) or with mixed neutrons and photons followed by equal beam-off periods to ensure equal total exposure times for sequential and simultaneous irradiations. Differences between the survival results under each beam configuration that are consistent with previous observations with nonpulsed irradiations are observed.

  19. Tritium removal from various lithium aluminates irradiated by fast and thermal neutrons (COMPLIMENT experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvani, C.; Carconi, P. L.; Casadio, S.; Moauro, A.

    1994-02-01

    Within the frame of the COMPLIMENT experiment, γ-LiAlO 2 specimens with different microstructures (grain size distributions) were tested in the same environmental conditions to compare the effects caused by 6Li(n, α)T reaction and by fast neutron scattering, the damaging dose being held at about the same level (1.6-1.8 dpa). The tritium retention times were obtained by the tritium removal of isothermal annealing under He + 0.1% H 2 sweeping gas. In spite of the different Li burnups (2.5% and 0.25%) and the residual tritium concentrations which were found in the irradiated specimens (4.3 Ci/g and 0.09 Ci/g, respectively, for specimens held at 450°C during the irradiations), the kinetics of tritium removal was not found to be discriminated by the two different irradiations. Moreover, the results were found to agree with those previously obtained by the "in-situ" TEQUILA experiment, performed on the same type of Li ceramics. Hence, the apparent first order desorption mechanism has been confirmed to control the kinetics of tritium removal from the porous fine grain γ-LiAlO 2 ceramics.

  20. Fracture properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of stainless steel cladding to increase the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws depends greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). 10 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Ion, X-ray, UV and Neutron Microbeam Systems for Cell Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, A W; Randers-Pehrson, G; Garty, G; Geard, C R; Xu, Y; Harken, A D; Johnson, G W; Brenner, D J

    2010-08-01

    The array of microbeam cell-irradiation systems, available to users at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF), Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, is expanding. The HVE 5MV Singletron particle accelerator at the facility provides particles to two focused ion microbeam lines: the sub-micron microbeam II and the permanent magnetic microbeam (PMM). Both the electrostatic quadrupole lenses on the microbeam II system and the magnetic quadrupole lenses on the PMM system are arranged as compound lenses consisting of two quadrupole triplets with "Russian" symmetry. Also, the RARAF accelerator is a source for a proton-induced x-ray microbeam (undergoing testing) and is projected to supply protons to a neutron microbeam based on the (7)Li(p, n)(7)Be nuclear reaction (under development). Leveraging from the multiphoton microscope technology integrated within the microbeam II endstation, a UV microspot irradiator - based on multiphoton excitation - is available for facility users. Highlights from radiation-biology demonstrations on single living mammalian cells are included in this review of microbeam systems for cell irradiation at RARAF.

  2. Strain hardening and plastic instability properties of austenitic stainless steels after proton and neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Farrell, K.; Lee, E. H.; Hunn, J. D.; Mansur, L. K.

    2001-10-01

    Strain hardening and plastic instability properties were analyzed for EC316LN, HTUPS316, and AL6XN austenitic stainless steels after combined 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses up to 10.7 dpa. The steels retained good strain-hardening rates after irradiation, which resulted in significant uniform strains. It was found that the instability stress, the stress at the onset of necking, had little dependence on the irradiation dose. Tensile fracture stress and strain were calculated from the stress-strain curve data and were used to estimate fracture toughness using an existing model. The doses to plastic instability and fracture, the accumulated doses at which the yield stress reaches instability stress or fracture stress, were predicted by extrapolation of the yield stress, instability stress, and fracture stress to higher dose. The EC316LN alloy required the highest doses for plastic instability and fracture. Plastic deformation mechanisms are discussed in relation to the strain-hardening properties of the austenitic stainless steels.

  3. Fission meter and neutron detection using poisson distribution comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Mark S; Snyderman, Neal J

    2014-11-18

    A neutron detector system and method for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. Comparison of the observed neutron count distribution with a Poisson distribution is performed to distinguish fissile material from non-fissile material.

  4. Fissile Nuclei Rotation Effect in 235U(n,γf) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyan, Gevorg; Granz, Peter; Klenke, Jens; Krakhotin, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Valery; Mezei, Ferenz; Novitsky, Vadim; Pavlov, Valery; Russina, Margarita; Shatalov, Pavel; Wilpert, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A small shift of an angular distribution of prompt γ-rays relative to the fission axis of 236U* 235U(n,γf) process is presented. This effect has been observed in the experiment at BER-II reactor of BENSC/HMI (Berlin). The sign of the shift depends on the direction of the incident neutron beam polarization. This phenomena can be explained by the rotation of fissile nucleus 236U*, like the effect that has been observed recently at ILL in ternary fission of 235U by cold polarized neutrons. The main surprise of this result is the detection of scission gamma-rays radiated by a fissile nucleus during the time interval of the order of 10-21 s before or after the moment of the neck rupture. Detailed measurements of trigger γ-rays energy dependence are in progress at the neutron beam "MEPHISTO" of FRM-II reactor (Garching).

  5. Development for fissile assay in recycled fuel using lead slowing down spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yong Deok; Je Park, C.; Kim, Ho-Dong; Song, Kee Chan

    2013-07-01

    A future nuclear energy system is under development to turn spent fuels produced by PWRs into fuels for a SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) through the pyrochemical process. The knowledge of the isotopic fissile content of the new fuel is very important for fuel safety. A lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS) is under development to analyze the fissile material content (Pu{sup 239}, Pu{sup 241} and U{sup 235}) of the fuel. The LSDS requires a neutron source, the neutrons will be slowed down through their passage in a lead medium and will finally enter the fuel and will induce fission reactions that will be analysed and the isotopic content of the fuel will be then determined. The issue is that the spent fuel emits intense gamma rays and neutrons by spontaneous fission. The threshold fission detector screens the prompt fast fission neutrons and as a result the LSDS is not influenced by the high level radiation background. The energy resolution of LSDS is good in the range 0.1 eV to 1 keV. It is also the range in which the fission reaction is the most discriminating for the considered fissile isotopes. An electron accelerator has been chosen to produce neutrons with an adequate target through (e{sup -},γ)(γ,n) reactions.

  6. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Juergen; Aaron, A. M.; Bell, Gary L.; Burgess, Thomas W.; Ellis, Ronald James; Giuliano, D.; Howard, R.; Kiggans, James O.; Lessard, Timothy L.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Perkins, Dale E.; Varma, Venugopal Koikal

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  7. Evaluation of neutron flux parameters in irradiation sites of research reactor using the Westcott-formalism for the k0 neutron activation analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasban, H.; Hamid, Ashraf

    2015-12-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using k0 (k0-INAA) method has been used to determine a number of elements in sediment samples collected from El-Manzala Lake in Egypt. k0-INAA according to Westcott's formalism has been implemented using the complete irradiation kit of the fast pneumatic rabbit and some selected manually loaded irradiation sites for short and long irradiation at Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2). Zr-Au and Co sets as neutron flux monitors are used to determine the neutron flux parameters (f and α) in each irradiation sites. Two reference materials IAEA Soil-7 samples have been inserted and implemented for data validation and an internal monostandard multi monitor used (k0 based IM-NAA). It was given a good agreement between the experimental analyzed values and that obtained of the certified values. The major and trace elements in the sediment samples have been evaluated with the use of Co as an internal and Au as an external monostandard comparators. The concentrations of the elements (Cr, Mn and Zn) in the sediment samples of the present work are discussed regarding to those obtained from other sites.

  8. Neutron and X-ray diffraction analysis of the effect of irradiation dose and temperature on microstructure of irradiated HT-9 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosbrucker, P. L.; Brown, D. W.; Anderoglu, O.; Balogh, L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sisneros, T. A.; Almer, J.; Tulk, E. F.; Morgenroth, W.; Dippel, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    Material harvested from several positions within a nuclear fuel duct (the ACO-3 duct) used in a 6-year irradiation of a fuel assembly in the Fast Flux Test Reactor Facility (FFTF) was examined using neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction. Samples with a wide range of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature history, reaching doses of up to 147 dpa and temperatures of up to 777 K, were examined. The response of various microstructural characteristics such as the weight fraction of M23C6 carbides, the dislocation density and character, and the crystallographic texture were determined using whole profile analysis of the diffraction data and related to the macroscopic mechanical behavior. For instance, the dislocation density was observed to be intimately linked with observed flow strength of the irradiated materials, following the Taylor law. In general, at the high doses studied in this work, the irradiation temperature is the predominant controlling factor of the dislocation density and, thus, the flow strength of the irradiated material. The results, representing some of the first diffraction work done on samples exposed to such a high received dose, demonstrate how non-destructive and stand-off diffraction techniques can be used to characterize irradiation induced microstructure and at least estimate mechanical properties in irradiated materials without exposing workers to radiation hazards.

  9. Mechanical behavior of AISI 304SS determined by miniature test methods after neutron irradiation to 28 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Ellen M. Rabenberg; Brian J. Jaques; Bulent H. Sencer; Frank A. Garner; Paula D. Freyer; Taira Okita; Darryl P. Butt

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated for over a decade in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) were measured using miniature mechanical testing methods. The shear punch method was used to evaluate the shear strengths of the neutron-irradiated steel and a correlation factor was empirically determined to predict its tensile strength. The strength of the stainless steel slightly decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and significantly increased with increasing dose until it saturated above approximately 5 dpa. Ferromagnetic measurements were used to observe and deduce the effects of the stress-induced austenite to martensite transformation as a result of shear punch testing.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATION AT LOW TEMPERATURES ON THE DIELECTRIC PARAMETERS OF 3C-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    J.A.A. Engelbrecht; G. Deyzel; E. Minnaar; W.E. Goosen; I. J. van Rooyen

    2014-04-01

    3C-SiC wafers were irradiated with neutrons of various fluences and at low (200 - 400 ?C) irradiation temperatures. Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectra were obtained for the samples, and the spectra used to extract the dielectric parameters for each specimen, using statistical curve-fitting procedures. Analysis of all data revealed trends in reflectance peak heights as well as in the dielectric parameters. The surface roughness of the irradiated samples was measured by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and certain trends could be ascribed to surface roughness.

  11. Comparison of Calculated and Measured Neutron Fluence in Fuel/Cladding Irradiation Experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James

    2011-01-01

    A recently-designed thermal neutron irradiation facility has been used for a first series of irradiations of PWR fuel pellets in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since June 2010, irradiations of PWR fuel pellets made of UN or UO{sub 2}, clad in SiC, have been ongoing in the outer small VXF sites in the beryllium reflector region of the HFIR, as seen in Fig. 1. HFIR is a versatile, 85 MW isotope production and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light-water-cooled and -moderated, flux-trap type reactor that uses highly enriched (in {sup 235}U) uranium (HEU) as the fuel. The reactor core consists of a series of concentric annular regions, each about 2 ft (0.61 m) high. A 5-in. (12.70-cm)-diam hole, referred to as the flux trap, forms the center of the core. The fuel region is composed of two concentric fuel elements made up of many involute-shaped fuel plates: an inner element that contains 171 fuel plates, and an outer element that contains 369 fuel plates. The fuel plates are curved in the shape of an involute, which provides constant coolant channel width between plates. The fuel (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermet) is nonuniformly distributed along the arc of the involute to minimize the radial peak-to-average power density ratio. A burnable poison (B{sub 4}C) is included in the inner fuel element primarily to reduce the negative reactivity requirements of the reactor control plates. A typical HEU core loading in HFIR is 9.4 kg of {sup 235}U and 2.8 g of {sup 10}B. The thermal neutron flux in the flux trap region can exceed 2.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s while the fast flux in this region exceeds 1 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The inner and outer fuel elements are in turn surrounded by a concentric ring of beryllium reflector approximately 1 ft (0.30 m) thick. The beryllium reflector consists of three regions

  12. High order statistical signatures from source-driven measurements of subcritical fissile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, John Kelly

    1998-11-01

    This research focuses on the development and application of high order statistical analyses applied to measurements performed with subcritical fissile systems driven by an introduced neutron source. The signatures presented are derived from counting statistics of the introduced source and radiation detectors that observe the response of the fissile system. It is demonstrated that successively higher order counting statistics possess progressively higher sensitivity to reactivity. Consequently, these signatures are more sensitive to changes in the composition, fissile mass, and configuration of the fissile assembly. Furthermore, it is shown that these techniques are capable of distinguishing the response of the fissile system to the introduced source from its response to any internal or inherent sources. This ability combined with the enhanced sensitivity of higher order signatures indicates that these techniques will be of significant utility in a variety of applications. Potential applications include enhanced radiation signature identification of weapons components for nuclear disarmament and safeguards applications and augmented nondestructive analysis of spent nuclear fuel. In general, these techniques expand present capabilities in the analysis of subcritical measurements.

  13. Radiation damage induced in Al2O3 single crystal sequentially irradiated with reactor neutrons and 90 MeV Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirour, H.; Izerrouken, M.; Sari, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present investigation reports the effect of 90 MeV Xe ion irradiation on neutron irradiated Al2O3 single crystals. Three irradiation experiments were performed, with neutrons only, 90 MeV Xe ions only and with neutrons followed by 90 MeV Xe ions. Neutron and 90 MeV Xe ion irradiations were performed at NUR research reactor, Algiers, Algeria and at GANIL accelerator, Caen, France respectively. After irradiation, the radiation damage was investigated by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), optical absorption measurements, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Raman technique revealed that the concentration of the defects formed in Al2O3 samples subsequently irradiated with neutrons and 90 MeV Xe ions is lower than that formed in Al2O3 samples which were irradiated only with neutrons. This reveals the occurrence of ionization-induced recovery of the neutron damage. Furthermore, as revealed by XRD analysis, a new peak is appeared at about 2θ = 38.03° after irradiation at high fluence (>3 × 1013 Xe/cm2). It can be assigned to the formation of new lattice plane.

  14. Inverse magnetocaloric effect in Ce(Fe0.96Ru0.04)2: Effect of fast neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, V.; Mishra, P. K.; Rajarajan, A. K.; Prajapat, C. L.; Sastry, P. U.; Thakare, S. V.; Singh, M. R.; Ravikumar, G.

    2013-02-01

    We have shown the effect of fast neutron irradiation on the magnetic phase transition and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in a doped Ce(Fe0.96Ru0.04)2, intermettalic. We show that this leads to suppression of MCE and a to a disordered ferromagnetic phase.

  15. Atom Probe Tomography Characterization of the Solute Distributions in a Neutron-Irradiated and Annealed Pressure Vessel Steel Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.

    2001-01-30

    A combined atom probe tomography and atom probe field ion microscopy study has been performed on a submerged arc weld irradiated to high fluence in the Heavy-Section Steel irradiation (HSSI) fifth irradiation series (Weld 73W). The composition of this weld is Fe - 0.27 at. % Cu, 1.58% Mn, 0.57% Ni, 0.34% MO, 0.27% Cr, 0.58% Si, 0.003% V, 0.45% C, 0.009% P, and 0.009% S. The material was examined after five conditions: after a typical stress relief treatment of 40 h at 607 C, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 2 x 10{sup 23} n m{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV), and after irradiation and isothermal anneals of 0.5, 1, and 168 h at 454 C. This report describes the matrix composition and the size, composition, and number density of the ultrafine copper-enriched precipitates that formed under neutron irradiation and the change in these parameters with post-irradiation annealing treatments.

  16. Neutron reflectometry and spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) after irradiation at 172 nm.

    PubMed

    Graubner, Vera-Maria; Clemens, Daniel; Gutberlet, Thomas; Kötz, Rüdiger; Lippert, Thomas; Nuyken, Oskar; Schnyder, Bernhard; Wokaun, Alexander

    2005-09-13

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was irradiated under ambient conditions in air with a Xe2-excimer lamp. The formation of atomic oxygen and ozone during irradiation in air by V-UV photons results in the transformation of PDMS to silicon oxide. The irradiated surfaces were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and neutron reflectometry. The measurements revealed the formation of a rough, i.e., between 11 and 20 nm, oxidized surface layer and a decrease of the total layer thickness. The thickness of the oxidized layer decreased for a given PDMS thickness when the polymer was irradiated for longer times and/or higher intensities. The composition of the oxidized layer after irradiation was not uniform through the layer and consisted of a mixture of original polymer and silicon bonded to three or four oxygen atoms (SiOx). The refractive index n determined by ellipsometry reaches a value similar to values reported for SiO2.

  17. Simulation of the neutron flux in the irradiation facility at RA-3 reactor.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Pinto, J M; Thorp, S I; Farias, R O; Soto, M S; Sztejnberg, M; Pozzi, E C C; Gonzalez, S J; Gadan, M A; Bellino, A N; Quintana, J; Altieri, S; Miller, M

    2011-12-01

    A facility for the irradiation of a section of patients' explanted liver and lung was constructed at RA-3 reactor, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Argentina. The facility, located in the thermal column, is characterized by the possibility to insert and extract samples without the need to shutdown the reactor. In order to reach the best levels of security and efficacy of the treatment, it is necessary to perform an accurate dosimetry. The possibility to simulate neutron flux and absorbed dose in the explanted organs, together with the experimental dosimetry, allows setting more precise and effective treatment plans. To this end, a computational model of the entire reactor was set-up, and the simulations were validated with the experimental measurements performed in the facility.

  18. Effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Shiba, K.

    1996-04-01

    An austenitic stainless steel, designated 316LN-IG, has been chosen for the first wall/shield (FW/S) structure for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The proposed operational temperature range for the structure (100 to 250{degree}C) is below the temperature regimes for void swelling (400-600{degree}C) and for helium embrittlement (500-700{degree}C). However, the proposed neutron dose is such that large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, and strain hardening capacity could be encountered which could significantly affect fracture properties. Definition of the irradiation regimes in which this phenomenon occurs is essential to the establishment of design rules to protect against various modes of failure.

  19. Pixel pitch and particle energy influence on the dark current distribution of neutron irradiated CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Belloir, Jean-Marc; Goiffon, Vincent; Virmontois, Cédric; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Molina, Romain; Magnan, Pierre; Gilard, Olivier

    2016-02-22

    The dark current produced by neutron irradiation in CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) is investigated. Several CIS with different photodiode types and pixel pitches are irradiated with various neutron energies and fluences to study the influence of each of these optical detector and irradiation parameters on the dark current distribution. An empirical model is tested on the experimental data and validated on all the irradiated optical imagers. This model is able to describe all the presented dark current distributions with no parameter variation for neutron energies of 14 MeV or higher, regardless of the optical detector and irradiation characteristics. For energies below 1 MeV, it is shown that a single parameter has to be adjusted because of the lower mean damage energy per nuclear interaction. This model and these conclusions can be transposed to any silicon based solid-state optical imagers such as CIS or Charged Coupled Devices (CCD). This work can also be used when designing an optical imager instrument, to anticipate the dark current increase or to choose a mitigation technique.

  20. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Stainless steel weld overlay cladding was fabricated using the three-wire, series-arc method. Three layers of cladding were applied to a pressure vessel plate to provide adequate thickness for fabrication of test specimens. Since irradiation of the stainless steel cladding to 5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV) was conducted at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h, tensile, Charpy V-notch (CVN), precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN), and compact fracture toughness specimens were thermally aged at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. Additional specimens are being aged to 20,000 and 50,000 h. Thermal aging of three-wire, series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1604 h resulted in appreciable decrease (16%) in the CVN upper-shelf energy, but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect, following neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>MeV), was a 22% reduction in the CVN upper-shelf energy and a 29{degrees}C shift at the 41-J level. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small or negligible. However, the combined effect after neutron irradiation was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) and no apparent change in ultimate strength and total elongation. Also, neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging. However, irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. The effects of long-term thermal exposure times (20,000 and 50,000 h) will be investigated when the specimen become available.

  1. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1991-12-31

    Stainless steel weld overlay cladding was fabricated using the three-wire, series-arc method. Three layers of cladding were applied to a pressure vessel plate to provide adequate thickness for fabrication of test specimens. Since irradiation of the stainless steel cladding to 5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV) was conducted at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h, tensile, Charpy V-notch (CVN), precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN), and compact fracture toughness specimens were thermally aged at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. Additional specimens are being aged to 20,000 and 50,000 h. Thermal aging of three-wire, series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1604 h resulted in appreciable decrease (16%) in the CVN upper-shelf energy, but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect, following neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>MeV), was a 22% reduction in the CVN upper-shelf energy and a 29{degrees}C shift at the 41-J level. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small or negligible. However, the combined effect after neutron irradiation was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) and no apparent change in ultimate strength and total elongation. Also, neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging. However, irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. The effects of long-term thermal exposure times (20,000 and 50,000 h) will be investigated when the specimen become available.

  2. EPR study of gamma and neutron irradiation effects on KU1, KS-4V and Infrasil 301 silica glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomacini, Juan C.; Bravo, David; León, Mónica; Martín, Piedad; Ibarra, Ángel; Martín, Agustín; López, Fernando J.

    2011-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies have been carried out on KU1 and KS-4V high purity quartz glasses and commercial silica Infrasil 301, irradiated with gamma rays up to a dose of 11.6 MGy and neutron fluences of 10 21 and 10 22 n/m 2. Gamma irradiations produce a much higher concentration of defect centres (mainly E', POR and NBOHC) for KU1 and I301 than for KS-4V silica. In contrast, neutron irradiation at the highest fluence produces similar concentrations in all silica types. These results agree to a good extent with those obtained in previous optical absorption measurements. Moreover, oxygen-related centres (POR and NBOHC) have been well characterized by means of electron paramagnetic resonance.

  3. Simultaneous impact of neutron irradiation and sputtering on the surface structure of self–damaged ITER–grade tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaeva, A. I. Savchenko, A. A.; Galuza, A. A.; Kolenov, I. V.

    2014-07-15

    Simultaneous effects of neutron irradiation and long–term sputtering on the surface relief of ITER–grade tungsten were studied. The effects of neutron–induced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W{sup 6+} ions of 20 MeV energy. Ar{sup +} ions with energy 600 eV were used as imitation of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The surface relief was studied after each sputtering act. The singularity in the WJ–IG surface relief was ascertained experimentally at the first time, which determines the law of roughness extension under sputtering. As follows from the experimental data, the neutron irradiation has not to make a decisive additional contribution in the processes developing under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  4. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for investigating deuterium decorated voids in neutron-irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. N.; Shimada, M.; Merrill, B. J.; Akers, D. W.; Hatano, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The present work is a continuation of a recent research to develop and optimize positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) for characterizing neutron-irradiated tungsten. Tungsten samples were exposed to neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and damaged to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa. Subsequently, they were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory. The implanted deuterium was desorbed through sample heating to 900 °C, and Doppler broadening (DB)-PAS was performed both before and after heating. Results show that deuterium impregnated tungsten is identified as having a smaller S-parameter. The S-parameter increases after deuterium desorption. Microstructural changes also occur during sample heating. These effects can be isolated from deuterium desorption by comparing the S-parameters from the deuterium-free back face with the deuterium-implanted front face. The application of using DB-PAS to examine deuterium retention in tungsten is examined.

  5. Nuclear archaeology: Verifying declarations of fissile-material production

    SciTech Connect

    Fetter, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Controlling the production of fissile material is an essential element of nonproliferation policy. Similarly, accounting for the past production of fissile material should be an important component of nuclear disarmament. This paper describes two promising techniques that make use of physical evidence at reactors and enrichment facilities to verify the past production of plutonium and highly enriched uranium. In the first technique, the concentrations of long-lived radionuclides in permanent components of the reactor core are used to estimate the neutron fluence in various regions of the reactor, and thereby verify declarations of plutonium production in the reactor. In the second technique, the ratio of the concentration of U-235 to that of U-234 in the tails is used to determine whether a given container of tails was used in the production of low- enriched uranium, which is suitable for reactor fuel, or highly enriched uranium, which can be used in nuclear weapons. Both techniques belong to the new field of [open quotes]nuclear archaeology,[close quotes] in which the authors attempt to document past nuclear weapons activities and thereby lay a firm foundation for verifiable nuclear disarmament. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Implementation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Source Verification and Confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, Taner; March-Leuba, Jose A; Powell, Danny H; Nelson, Dennis; Radev, Radoslav

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the verification procedure for neutron sources installed in U.S. Department of Energy equipment used to measure fissile material flow. The Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment determines the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow of UF{sub 6} gas streams by using {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas and by measuring the fission products in the flow. The {sup 252}Cf sources in each FMFM are typically replaced every 2 to 3 years due to their relatively short half-life ({approx} 2.65 years). During installation of the new FMFM sources, the source identity and neutronic characteristics provided by the manufacturer are verified with the following equipment: (1) a remote-control video television (RCTV) camera monitoring system is used to confirm the source identity, and (2) a neutron detection system (NDS) is used for source-strength confirmation. Use of the RCTV and NDS permits remote monitoring of the source replacement process and eliminates unnecessary radiation exposure. The RCTV, NDS, and the confirmation process are described in detail in this report.

  7. Fissile material holdup measurement systems: an historical review of hardware and software

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Smith, Steven E; Rowe, Nathan C

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of fissile material holdup is accomplished by passively measuring the energy-dependent photon flux and/or passive neutron flux emitted from the fissile material deposited within an engineered process system. Both measurement modalities--photon and neutron--require the implementation of portable, battery-operated systems that are transported, by hand, from one measurement location to another. Because of this portability requirement, gamma-ray spectrometers are typically limited to inorganic scintillators, coupled to photomultiplier tubes, a small multi-channel analyzer, and a handheld computer for data logging. For neutron detection, polyethylene-moderated, cadmium-back-shielded He-3 thermal neutron detectors are used, coupled to nuclear electronics for supplying high voltage to the detector, and amplifying the signal chain to the scaler for counting. Holdup measurement methods, including the concept of Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH), are well presented by T. Douglas Reilly in LA-UR-07-5149 and P. Russo in LA-14206, yet both publications leave much of the evolutionary hardware and software to the imagination of the reader. This paper presents an historical review of systems that have been developed and implemented since the mid-1980s for the nondestructive assay of fissile material, in situ. Specifications for the next-generation holdup measurements systems are conjectured.

  8. Effect of Neutron Irradiation on Properties of Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3-PbTiO3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Il; Choi, Namkyoung; Kim, Geunwoo; Lee, Yun-Hee; Baek, Kwang-Sae; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2015-11-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the electrical and piezoelectric properties of a PMN-PT [(Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3-PbTiO3)] single crystal such as permittivity, electrical impedance and piezoelectric constant d33 has been investigated at 1 kHz. The changes of d33 and permittivity depending on the dose of neutron irradiation for all samples of PMN-PT single crystal were found. In all samples, the permittivity, and piezoelectric constant d33 decreased with the increase of irradiation dose. Changes of XRD patterns depending on the dose of neutron irradiation for all samples were found. From the results of XRDs for analyzing the formation of the PMN-PT single crystals in single phase, the neutron irradiation will affect the crystallinity of PMN-PT single crystals. PMID:26726526

  9. Characterization of irradiated AISI 316L stainless steel disks removed from the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Vevera, Bradley J; Hyres, James W; McClintock, David A; Riemer, Bernie

    2014-01-01

    Irradiated AISI 316L stainless steel disks were removed from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) for post-irradiation examination (PIE) to assess mechanical property changes due to radiation damage and erosion of the target vessel. Topics reviewed include high-resolution photography of the disk specimens, cleaning to remove mercury (Hg) residue and surface oxides, profile mapping of cavitation pits using high frequency ultrasonic testing (UT), high-resolution surface replication, and machining of test specimens using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM), tensile testing, Rockwell Superficial hardness testing, Vickers microhardness testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effectiveness of the cleaning procedure was evident in the pre- and post-cleaning photography and permitted accurate placement of the test specimens on the disks. Due to the limited amount of material available and the unique geometry of the disks, machine fixturing and test specimen design were critical aspects of this work. Multiple designs were considered and refined during mock-up test runs on unirradiated disks. The techniques used to successfully machine and test the various specimens will be presented along with a summary of important findings from the laboratory examinations.

  10. Re-weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steels studied by multi-pass TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Oishi, M.; Koshiishi, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Anzai, H.; Saito, Y.; Kono, W.

    2002-12-01

    Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) has been studied by multi-pass bead-on-plate and build-up tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, simulating the repair-welding of reactor components. Specimens were submerged arc welding (SAW) joint of Type 304 SS containing 0.5 appm helium (1.8 appm in the SAW weld metal). Sound welding could be obtained by one- to three-pass welding on the plates at weld heat inputs less than 1 MJ/m in the irradiated 304 SS base metal. In the case of the build-up welding of a groove, no visible defects appeared in the specimen at a heat input as low as 0.4 MJ/m. However, build-up welding at a high heat input of 1 MJ/m was prone to weld cracking, owing to the formation of helium bubbles on grain boundaries of the base metal or dendrite boundaries of pre-existing SAW weld metal, in the area within 0.6 mm from the fusion line.

  11. Microdosimetric measurements in the thermal neutron irradiation facility of LENA reactor.

    PubMed

    Colautti, P; Moro, D; Chiriotti, S; Conte, V; Evangelista, L; Altieri, S; Bortolussi, S; Protti, N; Postuma, I

    2014-06-01

    A twin TEPC with electric-field guard tubes has been constructed to be used to characterize the BNCT field of the irradiation facility of LENA reactor. One of the two mini TEPC was doped with 50ppm of (10)B in order to simulate the BNC events occurring in BNCT. By properly processing the two microdosimetric spectra, the gamma, neutron and BNC spectral components can be derived with good precision (~6%). However, direct measurements of (10)B in some doped plastic samples, which were used for constructing the cathode walls, point out the scarce accuracy of the nominal (10)B concentration value. The influence of the Boral(®) door, which closes the irradiation channel, has been measured. The gamma dose increases significantly (+51%) when the Boral(®) door is closed. The crypt-cell-regeneration weighting function has been used to measure the quality, namely the RBEµ value, of the radiation field in different conditions. The measured RBEµ values are only partially consistent with the RBE values of other BNCT facilities.

  12. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    DOE PAGES

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-02-24

    We investigated dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation in situ in a neutron irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Channel formation was observed at 70% of the formal tensile yield stress for both alloys. It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the yield stress, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For amore » single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young modulus) in the channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in soft grains with a high Schmid factor located near stiff grains with high elastic stiffness. Moreover, the spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. Finally, it was shown that in the AISI 304 steel, channels were twin-free in grains oriented close to [001] and [101] of standard unit triangle; [111]-grains and grains oriented close to Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.« less

  13. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-02-24

    We investigated dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation in situ in a neutron irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Channel formation was observed at 70% of the formal tensile yield stress for both alloys. It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the yield stress, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For a single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young modulus) in the channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in soft grains with a high Schmid factor located near stiff grains with high elastic stiffness. Moreover, the spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. Finally, it was shown that in the AISI 304 steel, channels were twin-free in grains oriented close to [001] and [101] of standard unit triangle; [111]-grains and grains oriented close to Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.

  14. Characterization of neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites of a 37 GBq 241Am-Be isotopic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Haluk; Budak, Mustafa Guray; Karadag, Mustafa; Yüksel, Alptuğ Özer

    2014-11-01

    For the applicability of instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique, an irradiation unit with a 37 GBq 241Am-Be neutron source was installed at Institute of Nuclear Sciences of Ankara University. Design and configuration properties of the irradiation unit are described. It has two different sample irradiation positions, one is called site #1 having a pneumatic sample transfer system and the other is site #2 having a location for manual use. In order to characterize neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites, the measurement results were obtained for thermal (Фth) and epithermal neutron fluxes (Фepi), thermal to epithermal flux ratio (f) and epithermal spectrum shaping factors (α) by employing cadmium ratios of gold (Au) and molybdenum (Mo) monitors. The activities produced in these foils were measured by using a p-type, 44.8% relative efficiency HPGe well detector. For the measured γ-rays, self-absorption and true coincidence summing effects were taken into account. Additionally, thermal neutron self-shielding and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in the measured results. For characterization of site #1, the required parameters were found to be Фth = (2.11 ± 0.05) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (3.32 ± 0.17) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 63.6 ± 1.5, α = 0.045 ± 0.009, respectively. Similarly, those parameters were measured in site #2 as Фth = (1.49 ± 0.04) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (2.93 ± 0.15) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 50.9 ± 1.3 and α = 0.038 ± 0.008. The results for f-values indicate that good thermalization of fast neutrons on the order of 98% was achieved in both sample irradiation sites. This is because an optimum combination of water and paraffin moderator is used in the present configuration. In addition, the shielding requirements are met by using natural boron oxide powder (5.5 cm) and boron loaded paraffin layers against neutrons, and a 15 cm thick lead bricks against gamma-rays from source and its

  15. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of the microstructure of Fe-Cr alloys induced by neutron and ion irradiation at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Heintze, C.; Oñorbe, E.

    2016-06-01

    Four Fe-Cr binary alloys, with Cr content from 2.5 up to 12wt%, were neutron or ion irradiated up to a dose of 0.6 dpa at 300 °C. The microstructural response to irradiation has been characterised using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Both, neutrons and ions, gave rise to the formation of dislocation loops. The most striking difference between ion and neutron irradiation is the distribution of these loops in the sample. Except for the lowest Cr content, loops are distributed mainly along grain boundaries and dislocations in the neutron irradiated samples. The inhomogeneous distribution of dislocation loops could be related to the presence of α‧ precipitates in the matrix. In contrast, a homogeneous distribution is observed in all ion irradiated samples. This important difference is attributed to the orders of magnitude difference in dose rate between these two irradiation conditions. Moreover, the density of loops depends non-monotonically on Cr content in case of neutron irradiation, while it seems to increase with Cr content for ion implantation. Differences are also observed in terms of cluster size, with larger sizes for neutron irradiation than for ion implantation, again pointing towards an effect of the dose rate.

  16. FISSION NEUTRON IRRADIATION EFFECT ON INTERLAMINAR SHEAR STRENGTH OF CYANATE ESTER RESIN GFRP AT RT AND 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, A.; Izumi, Y.; Nishijima, S.; Hemmi, T.; Koizumi, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Shikama, T.

    2010-04-08

    A glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) with cyanate ester resin was fabricated and neutron irradiation tests up to 1x10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} of fast neutron with over 0.1 MeV energy were carried out in fission reactor. The fabrication process of cyanate ester GFRP was established and a collaboration network to perform investigations on irradiation effect of superconducting magnet materials was constructed. Three kinds of samples were fabricated. The first was CTD403 GFRP made by NIFS, the second was (cyanate ester+epoxy) GFRP provided by Toshiba, and the last was CTD403 GFRP made by Toshiba. The irradiation was carried out at JRR-3 in Japan Atomic Energy Agency using Rabbit capsules.After the irradiation, short beam tests were conducted at room temperature and 77 K and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) was evaluated. The irradiation of 1x10{sup 21} n/m{sup 2} increased ILSS a little but 1x10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} irradiation decreased ILSS to around 50 MPa. These tendencies were observed in all three kinds of GFRPs.

  17. Fission Neutron Irradiation Effect on Interlaminar Shear Strength of Cyanate Ester Resin Gfrp at RT and 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, A.; Izumi, Y.; Nishijima, S.; Hemmi, T.; Koizumi, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Shikama, T.

    2010-04-01

    A glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) with cyanate ester resin was fabricated and neutron irradiation tests up to 1×1022 n/m2 of fast neutron with over 0.1 MeV energy were carried out in fission reactor. The fabrication process of cyanate ester GFRP was established and a collaboration network to perform investigations on irradiation effect of superconducting magnet materials was constructed. Three kinds of samples were fabricated. The first was CTD403 GFRP made by NIFS, the second was (cyanate ester+epoxy) GFRP provided by Toshiba, and the last was CTD403 GFRP made by Toshiba. The irradiation was carried out at JRR-3 in Japan Atomic Energy Agency using Rabbit capsules. After the irradiation, short beam tests were conducted at room temperature and 77 K and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) was evaluated. The irradiation of 1×1021 n/m2 increased ILSS a little but 1×1022 n/m2 irradiation decreased ILSS to around 50 MPa. These tendencies were observed in all three kinds of GFRPs.

  18. Subtask 12F4: Effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Up-to-date results on the effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of V, V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti and V-Ti-Si alloys are presented in this paper, with an emphasis on the behavior of the U.S. reference alloys V-4Cr-4Ti containing 500-1000 wppm Si. Database on impact energy and cluctile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been established from Charpy impact tests of one-third-size specimens irradiated at 420{degrees}C-600{degrees}C up to {approx}50 dpa in lithium environment in fast fission reactors. To supplement the Charpy impact tests fracture behavior was also characterized by quantitative SEM fractography on miniature tensile and disk specimens that were irradiated to similar conditions and fractured at -196{degrees}C to 200{degrees}C by multiple bending. For similar irradiation conditions irradiation-induced increase in DBTT was influenced most significantly by Cr content, indicating that irradiation-induced clustering of Cr atoms takes place in high-Cr (Cr {ge} 7 wt.%) alloys. When combined contents of Cr and Ti were {le}10 wt.%, effects of neutron irradiation on impact properties and fracture behavior were negligible. For example, from the Charpy-impact and multiple-bend tests there was no indication of irradiation-induced embrittlement for V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si and the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr-4Ti after irradiation to {approx}34 dpa at 420{degrees}C to 600{degrees}C, and only ductile fracture was observed for temperatures as low as -196{degrees}C. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Effect of pulsed dose in simultaneous and sequential irradiation of V-79 cells by 14. 8 MeV neutrons and /sup 60/Co photons

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Gould, M.N.; Schell, M.C.; Pearson, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of irradiating V-79 Chinese hamster ovary cells with a mixture of 40% 14.8-MeV neutrons and 60% /sup 60/Co photons with simultaneous or sequential exposures is investigated. Target doses are obtained by irradiating cell samples with 3-minute-long pulses of alternating neutrons and photons (in the sequential case) or with mixed neutrons and photons followed by equal beam-off periods to insure equal total-exposure times for sequenced and simultaneous irradiations. We observe qualitative differences between the survival results under each beam configuration that confirms earlier observations.

  20. Irradiation effects in 6H-SiC induced by neutron and heavy ions: Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Qijie; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Xiankun; Tang, Bin; Li, Jiangbo; Xue, Jianming; Peng, Shuming

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation effects of neutron and 3 MeV C+, Si+ in 6H-SiC were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD. The total disorder values of neutron irradiated SiC agree well with that of samples irradiated by ions at the same doses respectively. On the other hand, high-resolution XRD results shows that the lattice strain rate caused by neutron irradiation is 6.8%/dpa, while it is only 2.6%/dpa and 4.2%/dpa for Si+ and C+ irradiations respectively. Our results illustrate that the total disorder in neutron irradiated SiC can be accurately simulated by MeV Si+ or C+ irradiations at the same dose, but for the lattice strain and strain-related properties like surface hardness, the depth profile of irradiation damages induced by energetic ions must be considered. This research will contribute to a better understanding of the difference in irradiation effects between neutron and heavy ions.

  1. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Johnson, Perry; Jokisch, Derek W.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-11-01

    Spongiosa in the adult human skeleton consists of three tissues—active marrow (AM), inactive marrow (IM) and trabecularized mineral bone (TB). AM is considered to be the target tissue for assessment of both long-term leukemia risk and acute marrow toxicity following radiation exposure. The total shallow marrow (TM50), defined as all tissues lying within the first 50 µm of the bone surfaces, is considered to be the radiation target tissue of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. For irradiation by sources external to the body, kerma to homogeneous spongiosa has been used as a surrogate for absorbed dose to both of these tissues, as direct dose calculations are not possible using computational phantoms with homogenized spongiosa. Recent micro-CT imaging of a 40 year old male cadaver has allowed for the accurate modeling of the fine microscopic structure of spongiosa in many regions of the adult skeleton (Hough et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309-46). This microstructure, along with associated masses and tissue compositions, was used to compute specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for protons originating in axial and appendicular bone sites (Jokisch et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6857-72). These proton SAFs, bone masses, tissue compositions and proton production cross sections, were subsequently used to construct neutron dose-response functions (DRFs) for both AM and TM50 targets in each bone of the reference adult male. Kerma conditions were assumed for other resultant charged particles. For comparison, AM, TM50 and spongiosa kerma coefficients were also calculated. At low incident neutron energies, AM kerma coefficients for neutrons correlate well with values of the AM DRF, while total marrow (TM) kerma coefficients correlate well with values of the TM50 DRF. At high incident neutron energies, all kerma coefficients and DRFs tend to converge as charged-particle equilibrium is established across the bone site. In the range of 10 eV to 100 Me

  2. Physics concept on the constellation type fissile fuels and its application to the prospective Th-{sup 233}U reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jiahua Zhange

    1994-12-31

    In contrast with the conventional nuclear reactor which usually fuelled with one single fissile nuclide, a constellation type fissile fuels reactor consists of a parent nuclide such as {sup 232}Th or {sup 238}U and its whole family of neutron generated daughter nuclides. All of them are regarded as fissile fuels but of quite different fission ability. The concentration of each daughter nuclide is determined by its saturate concentration ratio with the parent nuclide. In such fuel system, the whole fuel consumed by neutron reaction almost completely results in fission production. In this article, some interesting properties of such fuel system, determination of the saturate concentration of each daughter nuclide and applicability to Th-{sup 233}U reactor will be discussed.

  3. Effect of irradiation of wheat grains with fast neutrons on the grain yield and other characteristics of the plants.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Magda S; Mohamed, Hanan A

    2014-04-01

    The effects of fast neutrons from a (252)Cf source in the fluence range 10(5)-10(8)n/cm(2) on the Egyptian wheat cultivar (Sakha 92) were studied. The experiment was conducted for three successive seasons (2008/2009, 2009/2010, and 2010/2011) to study the effect of the irradiation on the plant growth, grain yield, and physiological changes of three generations of plants produced by irradiated moisturized grains. A low fast-neutron fluence 2 × 10(6)n/cm(2) increased the yield throughout the three mutagenic generations considerably. It also increased concentrations of the total chlorophyll, sugars, and crude protein. These changes improve the quantity and quality of the grain. Also, a study of the effect of salinity of the irrigation water on the characteristics of the third-generation grains produced by neutron-irradiated grains was performed. With increasing concentration of sodium chloride in the irrigation water in the range 0.5-1.5%, concentrations of osmoprotectants, namely, reducing sugars and proline amino acids, increased. The concentration of Na(+) in the grains increased in parallel with the salinity of the irrigation water regardless of irradiation, while the concentrations of Ca(2+) and K(+) decreased. PMID:24509363

  4. Neutron irradiation and frequency effects on the electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseynov, Elchin

    2016-09-01

    In this present work nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC) has been irradiated with neutron flux (∼ 2 ×1013 ncm-2s-1) up to 20 hours at different periods. Electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles (∼18 nm) is comparatively analyzed before and after neutron irradiation. The frequency dependencies of electrical conductivity of 3C-SiC nanoparticles is reviewed at 100 K-400 K temperature range before and after irradiation. The measurements were carried out at 0.1 Hz-2.5 MHz frequency ranges and at different temperatures. Radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) was observed in the nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles after neutron irradiation and this conductivity study as a function of frequency are presented. The type of conductivity has been defined based on the interdependence between real and imaginary parts of electrical conductivity function. Based on the obtained results the mechanism behind the electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles is explained in detail.

  5. Effect of irradiation of wheat grains with fast neutrons on the grain yield and other characteristics of the plants.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Magda S; Mohamed, Hanan A

    2014-04-01

    The effects of fast neutrons from a (252)Cf source in the fluence range 10(5)-10(8)n/cm(2) on the Egyptian wheat cultivar (Sakha 92) were studied. The experiment was conducted for three successive seasons (2008/2009, 2009/2010, and 2010/2011) to study the effect of the irradiation on the plant growth, grain yield, and physiological changes of three generations of plants produced by irradiated moisturized grains. A low fast-neutron fluence 2 × 10(6)n/cm(2) increased the yield throughout the three mutagenic generations considerably. It also increased concentrations of the total chlorophyll, sugars, and crude protein. These changes improve the quantity and quality of the grain. Also, a study of the effect of salinity of the irrigation water on the characteristics of the third-generation grains produced by neutron-irradiated grains was performed. With increasing concentration of sodium chloride in the irrigation water in the range 0.5-1.5%, concentrations of osmoprotectants, namely, reducing sugars and proline amino acids, increased. The concentration of Na(+) in the grains increased in parallel with the salinity of the irrigation water regardless of irradiation, while the concentrations of Ca(2+) and K(+) decreased.

  6. Helium and hydrogen generation in pure metals irradiated with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons in LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, B. M.; James, M. R.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    High-power spallation neutron sources will require accurate estimates of cross-sections for generation of He and H in structural materials. At high-proton energies, very high levels of gas atoms are generated in all constituents of typical iron-based and nickel-based structural alloys, with He typically ˜150 appm/dpa and H at levels ˜3-5 times higher. Improved estimates of these cross-sections have been derived from a series of irradiations conducted at relatively low temperatures (<100 °C) in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center as part of a test program supporting the Accelerator Production of Tritium Program. Pure metal dosimetry foils were irradiated in two different spectra ranging from ˜800 MeV protons to a mixed distribution of both protons and spallation neutrons. Most of the gas production was due to spallation reactions with the proton beam, although gas and especially damage production from lower-energy spallation neutrons became more significant at the mixed proton/neutron location. The measured He concentrations are similar to those derived in other proton environments, but larger by about a factor of two than those calculated using the LAHET/MCNPX code system. Unlike He, the measured H retention levels are affected by diffusional losses, but H is still retained at rather high concentrations, allowing a lower bound estimate of the H generation cross-sections.

  7. Characterization of Neutron and Gamma Dose in the Irradiation Cell of Texas A and M University Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Latha; Reece, Warren D.; Chirayath, Sunil S.; Aghara, Sukesh

    2011-07-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to develop a three dimensional computational model of the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) operating against the irradiation (dry cell) at steady state thermal power of 1 MW. The geometry of the NSCR core and the dry cell were modeled in detail. NSCR is used for a wide variety of experiments that utilizes the dry cell for neutron as well as gamma irradiation of samples. Information on the neutron and gamma radiation environment inside the dry cell is required to facilitate irradiation of samples. This paper presents the computed neutron flux, neutron and gamma dose rate, and foil reaction rates in the dry cell, obtained through MCNP5 simulations of the NSCR core. The neutron flux was measured using foil activation method and the reaction rates obtained from {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}){sup 198}Au and {sup 54}Fe(n,p){sup 54}Mn were compared with the model and they showed agreement within {approx} 20%. The gamma dose rate at selected locations inside the dry cell was measured using radiochromic films and the results indicate slightly higher dose rates than predicted from the model. This is because the model calculated only prompt gamma dose rates during reactor operation while the radiochromic films measured gammas from activation products and fission product decayed gammas. The model was also used to calculate the neutron energy spectra for the energy range from 0.001 eV- 20 MeV. (authors)

  8. Neutron spectrum effect on pressure vessel embrittlement: Dosimetry and qualification of irradiation locations in OSIRIS and SILOE reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Alberman, A.; Bourdet, L.; Carcreff, H.; Beretz, D.

    1994-12-31

    Two irradiation experiments have been undertaken in OSIRIS (Saclay) and SILOE (Grenoble) reactors, in order to establish the correlation between the embrittlement of pressure vessel steels and neutron spectrum. Target fluence is 0.1 dpa for both experiments. This damage fluence corresponds to a fluence of 7.5 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup {minus}2} E > 1 MeV (7.5 10{sup 15} n.m{sup {minus}2}) in the case of a well moderated light water spectrum, but only 45 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup {minus}2} in the case of the specially designed SILOE irradiation location. One irradiation run is now completed, the second one is underway. This paper presents the experimental dosimetry data and irradiation parameters obtained in the preliminary qualification program, needed to assess this damage correlation.

  9. Anisotropic swelling and microcracking of neutron irradiated Ti3AlC2-Ti5Al2C3 materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ang, Caen K.; Silva, Chinthaka M.; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2015-12-17

    Mn + 1AXn (MAX) phase materials based on Ti–Al–C have been irradiated at 400 °C (673 K) with fission neutrons to a fluence of 2 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), corresponding to ~ 2 displacements per atom (dpa). We report preliminary results of microcracking in the Al-containing MAX phase, which contained the phases Ti3AlC2 and Ti5Al2C3. Equibiaxial ring-on-ring tests of irradiated coupons showed that samples retained 10% of pre-irradiated strength. Volumetric swelling of up to 4% was observed. Phase analysis and microscopy suggest that anisotropic lattice parameter swelling caused microcracking. Lastly, variants of titanium aluminum carbide may bemore » unsuitable materials for irradiation at light water reactor-relevant temperatures.« less

  10. Measurement of the neutron sensitivity of TLD-300 irradiated in a tissue equivalent phantom by d(48.5) + Be neutrons.

    PubMed

    Angelone, M; Yudelev, M; Kota, C; Maughan, R L

    1998-04-01

    The neutron sensitivities of the total response (kT) as well as of separate peaks 3 (k3) and 5 (k5) on the glow curve were measured for CaF2:Tm (TLD-300) thermoluminescent dosimeters. The TLD-300 were encapsulated in A-150 TE plastic and located at different depths in the water phantom. The phantom was irradiated with neutrons produced by the d(48.5) + Be reaction at the superconducting cyclotron of the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center at Harper Hospital. A set of measurements, based on the use of a TE ionization chamber and Geiger-Müller (GM) counter was used to measure the neutron (Dn) and gamma (D gamma) dose at these locations. The neutron sensitivities of the TLDs were thus derived by comparison with the results obtained with the twin detector method. The average neutron sensitivities relative to gamma of the total response and the responses of single peaks 3 or 5 are 0.215 +/- 0.016, 0.126 +/- 0.010, and 0.357 +/- 0.014, respectively. A linear relationship was found between the ratio of the areas under peak 3 to that under peak 5 and the ratio of the gamma dose to the total dose.

  11. Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

    2011-09-01

    Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

  12. Holmium-loaded PLLA nanoparticles for intratumoral radiotherapy via the TMT technique: preparation, characterization, and stability evaluation after neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hamoudeh, Misara; Fessi, Hatem; Salim, Hani; Barbos, Dumitru

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the preparation of biocompatible radioactive holmium-loaded particles with appropriate nanoscale size for radionuclide intratumoral administration by the targeted multitherapy (TMT) technique. For this objective, holmium acetylacetonate has been encapsulated in poly-L-lactide (PLLA)-based nanoparticles (NP) by oil-in-water emulsion-solvent evaporation method. NP sizes ranged between 100 and 1,100 m being suitable for the TMT administration method. Elemental holmium loading was found to be around 18% wt/wt and the holmium acetylacetonate trihydrate (HoAcAc) encapsulation efficacy was about 90%. Different experiments demonstrated an amorphous state of HoAcAc after incorporation in NPs. The NPs were irradiated in a nuclear reactor with a neutron flux of 1.1 x 10(13) n/cm(2)/s for 1 h, which yielded a specific activity of about 27.4 GBq/g of NPs being sufficient for our desired application. Microscopic analysis of irradiated NPs showed some alteration after neutron irradiation as some NPs looked partially coagglomerated and a few pores appeared at their surface because of the locally released heat in the irradiation vials. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicated a clear decrease in PLLA melting point and melting enthalpy reflecting a decrease in polymer crystallinity. This was accompanied by a clear decrease in polymer molecular weights, which can be ascribed to a radiation-induced chain scission mechanism. However, interestingly, other experiments confirmed the chemical identity retention of both HoAcAc and PLLA in irradiated NPs despite this detected decrease in the polymer crystallinity and molecular weight. Although neutron irradiation has induced some NPs damage, these NPs kept out their overall chemical composition, and their size distribution remained suitable for the TMT administration technique. Coupled with the TMT technique, these NPs may represent a novel potential radiopharmaceutical agent for

  13. In vivo skin leptin modulation after 14 MeV neutron irradiation: a molecular and FT-IR spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Cestelli Guidi, M; Mirri, C; Fratini, E; Licursi, V; Negri, R; Marcelli, A; Amendola, R

    2012-09-01

    This paper discusses gene expression changes in the skin of mice treated by monoenergetic 14 MeV neutron irradiation and the possibility of monitoring the resultant lipid depletion (cross-validated by functional genomic analysis) as a marker of radiation exposure by high-resolution FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) imaging spectroscopy. The irradiation was performed at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG), which is specifically dedicated to biological samples. FNG is a linear electrostatic accelerator that produces up to 1.0 × 10(11) 14-MeV neutrons per second via the D-T nuclear reaction. The functional genomic approach was applied to four animals for each experimental condition (unirradiated, 0.2 Gy irradiation, or 1 Gy irradiation) 6 hours or 24 hours after exposure. Coregulation of a subclass of keratin and keratin-associated protein genes that are physically clustered in the mouse genome and functionally related to skin and hair follicle proliferation and differentiation was observed. Most of these genes are transiently upregulated at 6 h after the delivery of the lower dose delivered, and drastically downregulated at 24 h after the delivery of the dose of 1 Gy. In contrast, the gene coding for the leptin protein was consistently upregulated upon irradiation with both doses. Leptin is a key protein that regulates lipid accumulation in tissues, and its absence provokes obesity. The tissue analysis was performed by monitoring the accumulation and the distribution of skin lipids using FT-IR imaging spectroscopy. The overall picture indicates the differential modulation of key genes during epidermis homeostasis that leads to the activation of a self-renewal process at low doses of irradiation.

  14. Experimental validation of the new nanodosimetry-based cell survival model for mixed neutron and gamma-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, C-K Chris; Zhang, Xin; Gifford, Ian; Burgett, Eric; Adams, Vince; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

    2007-09-01

    The new nanodosimetry-based linear-quadratic (LQ) formula has been reviewed for mixed-LET irradiation. V-79 Chinese hamster cells have been irradiated with a mixed-LET field of fission neutrons and gamma rays at the University of Maryland Training Reactor (MUTR). The results show that the experimental survival curve agrees well with that predicted by the new nanodosimetry-based LQ model. The experimental study described in this note, therefore, serves as a validation for the new model to be used for mixed-LET radiotherapies, e.g. 252Cf brachytherapy.

  15. Experimental validation of the new nanodosimetry-based cell survival model for mixed neutron and gamma-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.-K. Chris; Zhang, Xin; Gifford, Ian; Burgett, Eric; Adams, Vince; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

    2007-09-01

    The new nanodosimetry-based linear-quadratic (LQ) formula has been reviewed for mixed-LET irradiation. V-79 Chinese hamster cells have been irradiated with a mixed-LET field of fission neutrons and gamma rays at the University of Maryland Training Reactor (MUTR). The results show that the experimental survival curve agrees well with that predicted by the new nanodosimetry-based LQ model. The experimental study described in this note, therefore, serves as a validation for the new model to be used for mixed-LET radiotherapies, e.g. 252Cf brachytherapy.

  16. Neutron irradiation of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the BOR-60 fast reactor: Description of the fusion-1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Tsai, H.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    The FUSION-1 irradiation capsule was inserted in Row 5 of the BOR-60 fast reactor in June 1995. The capsule contains a collaborative RF/U.S. experiment to investigate the irradiation performance of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the temperature range 310 to 350{degrees}C. This report describes the capsule layout, specimen fabrication history, and the detailed test matrix for the U.S. specimens. A description of the operating history and neutronics will be presented in the next semiannual report.

  17. Experimental verification of equilibrium para-hydrogen levels in hydrogen moderators irradiated by spallation neutrons at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshigawara, M.; Harada, M.; Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Takada, H.; Futakawa, M.; Ikeda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    By sampling gaseous hydrogen from a circulating liquid hydrogen loop for Laser Raman spectroscopy, we measured the para-/ortho-hydrogen fractions in liquid hydrogen under neutron irradiation for the first time to identify whether irradiated hydrogen has an elevated ortho-hydrogen fraction. This measurement indicates that para-hydrogen equilibrium persists at 300 kW proton power in the presence of an iron(III) oxide hydroxide [Fe(OH)3] catalyst. The measurements will be repeated as the power at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) increases to the MW level.

  18. Temper and neutron irradiation embrittlement in 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels for pressure vessels of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.; Fukaya, K.; Kodaira, T.; Oku, T.

    1984-09-01

    A 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel is a promising candidate material for structural components of the pressure vessel of the experimental very high temperature gascooled reactor (VHTR) in Japan. Since the service temperature of such components is expected to be about 400/sup 0/C, the behavior of the temper and neutron irradiation embrittlements in these chromium-molybdenum steels should be confirmed from the viewpoint of structural integrity. The experimental verification on the degree of the embrittlement due to thermal aging, including the effect of applied stress and neutron irradiation, is described. Steel containing substantial amounts (about 100 ppm) of phosphorus atoms, which are believed to cause the temper embrittlement, showed that applied stress enhanced the embrittlement due to thermal aging. Embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation appears to be minimal in the case of the material containing <1000 ppm of copper as impurity with neutrons irradiated at about 400/sup 0/C.

  19. Simultaneous {sup 233}U and{sup 235}U characterization through the assay of delayed neutron temporal behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Kelly, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Aqueous solutions containing dissolved uranium-233 and uranium-235 were irradiated for 60's in the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada. The temporal behavior of the delayed neutrons produced was recorded by the Facility's Delayed Neutron Counting (DNC) system. The percentage of uranium-233 as a function of total fissile mass present in each sample ranged from 0 to 100% and was predicted by the DNC system with average absolute errors of {+-} 4%. Future work will upgrade the system electronics and software to reduce both uncertainties in timings and electrical noise. Mixture analysis will also be expanded to include plutonium-239 and fissile materials contained in non-aqueous matrices. (authors)

  20. THE EFFECT OF POST-IRRADATION ANNEALING ON STACKING FAULT TETRAHEDRA IN NEUTRON-IRRADIATED OFHC COPPER

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Danny J.; Singh, Bachu N.; Eldrup, M.

    2003-09-03

    Two irradiation experiments have been completed wherein two sets of tensile specimens of OFHC copper were irradiated with fission neutrons, one set at 200 degrees C and the other at 250 degrees C. Post-irradiation annealing in vacuum was then used to evaluate the change in the defect microstructure, including vacancy-type SFT, voids, and dislocation loops. Individual samples within each set were given one annealing exposure at 300, 350, 400, 450, 500, or 550 degrees C for 2 hours. The fine-scale defect microstructure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to compare the defect size and spatial distribution at each annealing temperature and reference the results to that measured in the as-irradiated condition. Based on the change in the SFT size distributions, post-irradiation annealing led to a preferential removal of the smaller sized SFT, but did not lead to a general coarsening as might be expected from an Oswald ripening scenario. The issue of whether the SFT produced during irradiation are all structurally perfect is still being investigated at the time of this report, however, the images of the SFT appeared more perfect after annealing at 300 degrees C and higher. Further analysis is being performed to determine whether intermediate stages of SFT formation exist in the as-irradiated condition.

  1. Positron annihilation lifetime measurement of Fe, Fe-10% Cr and Mo irradiated by fission and fusion neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, E.; Kikuchi, N.; Takenaka, M.

    1988-07-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed at room temperature in the isochronal annealing experiments for high-purity Fe, Fe-10% Cr and Mo specimens irradiated by fission (KUR) and fusion (RTNS-II) neutrons. The difference between fission and fusion neutron irradiated high-purity Fe was observed in the recovery behaviour of the second component I 2 (interstitial clusters), namely I 2 in the latter (fusion) is more resistant to recovery at high temperatures. The same behaviour was observed in the case of the Mo specimen. These are explained by the high thermal stability of microvoids (the third component I 3) at high temperatures in the fusion case due to the absorption of gas atoms (He and H) produced by nuclear transmutation. In the case of the Fe-10% Cr alloy specimen this tendency was not clearly observed.

  2. On the electronic properties of GaSb irradiated with reactor neutrons and its charge neutrality level

    SciTech Connect

    Boiko, V. M.; Brudnii, V. N.; Ermakov, V. S.; Kolin, N. G.; Korulin, A. V.

    2015-06-15

    The electronic properties and the limiting position of the Fermi level in p-GaSb crystals irradiated with full-spectrum reactor neutrons at up to a fluence of 8.6 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −2} are studied. It is shown that the irradiation of GaSb with reactor neutrons results in an increase in the concentration of free holes to p{sub lim} = (5−6) × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and in pinning of the Fermi level at the limiting position F{sub lim} close to E{sub V} + 0.02 eV at 300 K. The effect of the annealing of radiation defects in the temperature range 100–550°C is explored.

  3. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: A review of current work. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Ledney, G.D.; Madonna, G.S.; Elliott, T.B.; Moore, M.M.; Jackson, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, the authors developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60 (Co sources). Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections.

  4. Fissile material measurements using the differential die-away self interrogation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Schear, Melissa A; Menlove, Howard O; Tobin, Stephen J; Evans, Louise G; Lee, S Y

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is substantial research effort focused on quantifying plutonium (Pu) mass in spent fuel using non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques. Of the several techniques being investigated for this purpose, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation (DDSI) is a recently proposed, neutron-based NDA technique capable of quantifying the total fissile content in an assembly. Unlike the conventional Differential Die-Away (DDA) technique, DOSI does not require an external neutron source for sample interrogation, but rather, uses the spontaneous fission neutrons originating from {sup 244}Cm within the spent fuel for self-interrogation. The essence of the technique lies in the time separation between the detection of spontaneous fission neutrons from {sup 244}Cm and the detection of induced fission neutrons at a later time. The DDSI detector design imposes this time separation by optimizing the die-away times ({tau}) of the detector and sample interrogation regions to obtain an early and late neutron distribution respectively. The ratio of the count rates in the late gate to the early gate for singles, doubles, and triples is directly proportional to the fissile content present in the sample, which has already been demonstrated for simplified fuel cases using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The current work applies the DDSI concept to more complex samples, specifically spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies with varying isotopics resulting from a range of initial enrichment, bumup, and cooling time. We assess the feasibility of using the late gate to early gate ratio as a reliable indicator of overall fissile mass for a range of assemblies by defining a {sup 239}Pu effective mass which indicates the mass of {sup 239}Pu that would yield the same DDSI signal as the combined mass of major fissile isotopes present in the sample. This work is important for assessing the individual capability of the DDSI instrument in quantifying fissile mass in

  5. Study on Compatibility between Silicon Carbide and Solid Breeding Materials under Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Katsui, Hirokazu; Hasegawa, Akira; Katoh, Yutai; Hatano, Yuji; Tanaka, T.; Nogami, Shuhei; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Shikama, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    Compatibility of monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) with ternary lithium ceramics (Li{sub 1-x}AlO{sub 2-y}, Li{sub 2-x}TiO{sub 3-y}, Li{sub 2-x}ZrO{sub 3-y} and Li{sub 4-x}SiO{sub 4-y}) under irradiation of neutrons at high temperatures was studied. Disk samples of SiC in contact with sintered ternary lithium ceramics were irradiated in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 800 C to 5.9 displacements per atom (dpa). Chemical reactions of SiC as determined by appearance of the surface were relatively less significant for the systems of SiC/Li{sub 1-x}AlO{sub 2-y} and SiC/Li{sub 2-x}TiO{sub 3-y}, whereas some bonding likely due to chemical reaction between SiC and the lithium ceramics and broken samples were observed in the systems of SiC/Li{sub 2-x}ZrO{sub 3-y} and SiC/Li{sub 4-x}SiO{sub 4-y}. The effect of lithium burnup due to the (n, {alpha}) nuclear reaction was also examined by using samples of lithium ceramics whose lithium ratio was hypo-stoichiometric in the fabrication process. More reaction products were observed on the surface of {beta}-SiC in contact with Li{sub 1-x}AlO{sub 2-y} having the lower lithium ratio (Li/Al). It was considered that the formation of LiAl{sub 5}O{sub 8} phase due to lithium loss could deteriorate the compatibility of the SiC - Li{sub 1-x}AlO{sub 2-y} system.

  6. Experimental plan for irradiation experiment HRB-21

    SciTech Connect

    Goodin, D. T.; Kania, M. J.; Patton, B. W.

    1989-04-01

    Irradiation experiment HRB-21 is the first in a series of test capsules that are designed to provide a fuel-performance data base to be used for the validation of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) coated-particle fuel performance models under MHTGR normal operating conditions and specific licensing basis events. Capsule HRB-21 will contain an advanced TRISO-P UCO/ThO{sub 2} - coated-particle fuel system with demonstrated low defective-particle fraction ({le}5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}) and a heavy metal-contamination fraction ({le}1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}) that meets MHTGR quality specifications. The coated particles and fuel compacts were fabricated in laboratory-scale facilities using MHTGR reference procedures at General Atomics (GA). Nearly 150,000 fissile and fertile particles will be irradiated in capsule HRB-21 at a mean volumetric fuel temperature of 975{degree}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 26% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) while accumulating a fast neutron fluence of about 4.5 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. This experiment is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The participants are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), GA, and the Tokai Research Establishment. Capsule HRB-21 will contain the US MHTGR fuel specimens, and a companion capsule, HRB-22, will contain the JAERI fuel. The irradiation will take place in the removable beryllium reflector facility of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The performance of the fuel during irradiation will be closely monitored through on-line fission gas release measurements. Detailed postirradiation examination and conduction cooldown simulation testing will be performed on the irradiated fuel compacts from both the HRB-21 and HRB-22 capsules. 5 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Neutron irradiation tests on B4C/epoxy composite for neutron shielding application and the parameters assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeli, Ruhollah; Shirmardi, Seyed Pezhman; Ahmadi, Seyed Javad

    2016-10-01

    In this investigation, epoxy resin with a low viscosity amine-based curing agent was chosen as matrix and additives were added to epoxy resin using low speed stirring with ultrasonic waves approach. The chemical stability of resin during fabrication of composites was studied with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effect of B4C particle size (20 and 150 μm) on neutron shielding was investigated. Besides, in order to develop the high performance composites, the effect of ATH (flame retardant) and WO3 powders (for shielding from against gamma rays) on neutron shielding property is considered. The neutron experiments were based on foil activation analysis in thermal column of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). According to experimental data, required shield thickness (B4C, 150 μm, 3 wt%) for 80% absorption of neutron fluence was calculated about 9.8 mm. Consequently, data show thermal neutron absorption is dependent also on the size of the boron compound filler and show a significant enhancement in shielding performance when using smaller particle size of B4C filler. Furthermore, data obviously show that the neutron attenuation coefficient of reinforced composites increases to 0.345 cm-1 for B4C (20 μm, 5 wt%)/ Epoxy composite shield. As clearly data indicate, adding WO3 and ATH additive had a significant influence on the thermal neutron attenuation property and hybrid shield shows an enhancement of more than 60% in shielding performance.

  8. Fission reactor based epithermal neutron irradiation facilities for routine clinical application in BNCT--Hatanaka memorial lecture.

    PubMed

    Harling, Otto K

    2009-07-01

    Based on experience gained in the recent clinical studies at MIT/Harvard, the desirable characteristics of epithermal neutron irradiation facilities for eventual routine clinical BNCT are suggested. A discussion of two approaches to using fission reactors for epithermal neutron BNCT is provided. This is followed by specific suggestions for the performance and features needed for high throughput clinical BNCT. An example of a current state-of-the-art, reactor based facility, suited for routine clinical use is discussed. Some comments are provided on the current status of reactor versus accelerator based epithermal neutron sources for BNCT. This paper concludes with a summary and a few personal observations on BNCT by the author.

  9. Evaluation of the dark signal performance of different SiPM-technologies under irradiation with cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durini, Daniel; Degenhardt, Carsten; Rongen, Heinz; Feoktystov, Artem; Schlösser, Mario; Palomino-Razo, Alejandro; Frielinghaus, Henrich; van Waasen, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we report the results of the assessment of changes in the dark signal delivered by three silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detector arrays, fabricated by three different manufacturers, when irradiated with cold neutrons (wavelength λn=5 Å or neutron energy of En=3.27 meV) up to a neutron dose of 6×1012 n/cm2. The dark signals as well as the breakdown voltages (Vbr) of the SiPM detectors were monitored during the irradiation. The system was characterized at room temperature. The analog SiPM detectors, with and without a 1 mm thick Cerium doped 6Li-glass scintillator material located in front of them, were operated using a bias voltage recommended by the respective manufacturer for a proper detector performance. Iout-Vbias measurements, used to determine the breakdown voltage of the devices, were repeated every 30 s during the first hour and every 300 s during the rest of the irradiation time. The digital SiPM detectors were held at the advised bias voltage between the respective breakdown voltage and dark count mappings repeated every 4 min. The measurements were performed on the KWS-1 instrument of the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ) in Garching, Germany. The two analog and one digital SiPM detector modules under investigation were respectively fabricated by SensL (Ireland), Hamamatsu Photonics (Japan), and Philips Digital Photon Counting (Germany).

  10. Comparison of pka energy spectra, gas-atom production and damage energy deposition in neutron irradiation at various facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, R.; Shimomura, Y.; Hahn, P. A.; Guinan, M. W.; Kiritani, M.

    1991-03-01

    By dividing neutron-energy spectrum into four energy groups, (I) <10 eV, (II) 10 eV to 0.1 MeV, (III) 0.1 MeV to 10 MeV and (IV) > 10 MeV, contributions to damage parameters (PKA spectrum, damage energy and gas-atom production) from each of the energy group were calculated for neutron irradiations at various facilities with the SPECTER code developed by Greenwood and Smither [1]. The normalized PKA spectra and the gas-atom productions were compared to examine differences in damage parameters. Such comparisons were carried out among (1) irradiations at various positions in different fission reactors (i.e. KUR, JOYO and FFTF-MOTA), and among (2) those at various fission reactors. Damage parameters were also calculated at STARFIRE fusion reactor and RTNS-II. A possible method to correlate damages at different fission reactors is discussed. It is suggested that damages in fusion reactor can be simulated by the superposition of irradiations with fission and D-T neutrons.

  11. Application of backscatter electrons for large area imaging of cavities produced by neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastukhov, V. I.; Averin, S. A.; Panchenko, V. L.; Portnykh, I. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Giannuzzi, L. A.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that with proper optimization, backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope can produce images of cavity distribution in austenitic steels over a large specimen surface for a depth of ∼500-700 nm, eliminating the need for electropolishing or multiple specimen production. This technique is especially useful for quantifying cavity structures when the specimen is known or suspected to contain very heterogeneous distributions of cavities. Examples are shown for cold-worked EK-164, a very heterogeneously-swelling Russian fast reactor fuel cladding steel and also for AISI 304, a homogeneously-swelling Western steel used for major structural components of light water cooled reactors. This non-destructive overview method of quantifying cavity distribution can be used to direct the location and number of required focused ion beam prepared transmission electron microscopy specimens for examination of either neutron or ion-irradiated specimens. This technique can also be applied in stereo mode to quantify the depth dependence of cavity distributions.

  12. A target station for plasma exposure of neutron irradiated fusion material samples to reactor relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Juergen; Giuliano, Dominic; Ellis, Ronald; Howard, Richard; Lore, Jeremy; Lumsdaine, Arnold; Lessard, Timothy; McGinnis, William; Meitner, Steven; Owen, Larry; Varma, Venugopal

    2015-11-01

    The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a device planned to address scientific and technological gaps for the development of viable plasma facing components for fusion reactor conditions (FNSF, DEMO). It will have to address the relevant plasma conditions in a reactor divertor (electron density, electron temperature, ion fluxes) and it needs to be able to expose a-priori neutron irradiated samples. A pre design of a target station able to handle activated materials will be presented. This includes detailed MCNP as well as SCALE and MAVRIC calculations for all potential plasma-facing materials to estimate dose rates. Details on the remote handling schemes for the material samples will be presented. 2 point modeling of the linear plasma transport has been used to scope out the parameter range of the anticipated power fluxes to the target. This has been used to design the cooling capability of the target. The operational conditions of surface temperatures, plasma conditions, and oblique angle of incidence of magnetic field to target surface will be discussed. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  13. Radiation tolerance survey of selected silicon photomultipliers to high energy neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Fernando J.; McKisson, John E.; Qiang, Yi; Steinberger, William; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl J.

    2012-11-01

    A key feature of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) that can hinder their wider use in medium and high energy physics applications is their relatively high sensitivity to high energy background radiation, with particular regard to high energy neutrons. Dosages of 1010 neq/cm2 can damage them severely. In this study, some standard versions along with some new formulations are irradiated with a high intensity 241AmBe source up to a total dose of 5 × 109 neq/cm2. Key parameters monitored include dark noise, photon detection efficiency (PDE), gain, and voltage breakdown. Only dark noise was found to change significantly for this range of dosage. Analysis of the data indicates that within each vendor's product line, the change in dark noise is very similar as a function of increasing dose. At present, the best strategy for alleviating the effects of radiation damage is to cool the devices to minimize the effects of increased dark noise with accumulated dose.

  14. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Cates, M.R.; Franks, L.A.

    1982-07-07

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fission are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for /sup 239/Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  15. The measurement of material degradation in neutron irradiated Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels using magnetic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kee-Ok; Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Taek-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Lee, Sam-Lai

    1999-12-01

    To examine the application of magnetic method to the evaluation of radiation damage and thermal recovery in Mn-Mo-Ni reactor pressure vessel(RPV) steels, changes in the magnetic parameters and Vickers microhardness(Hv) due to neutron irradiation and heat treatment were measured and compared for RPV surveillance specimens which were irradiated to the neutron fluence of 2.4×1019n/cm2 (E⩾1.0 MeV) in a typical pressurized water reactor environment at 288 °C. Results show that the coercivity(Hc) increased due to irradiation, whereas susceptibility and Barkhausen noise energy(BNE) decreased. Saturation magnetization(Ms) remained unchanged while Vickers microhardness increased. For isothermally heat treated specimens, both the magnetic parameters and Vickers microhardness returned to the unirradiated condition: Thus, the BNE and susceptibility increased while the coercivity and Vickers microhardness decreased. From the comparison of irradiated base metal and weld metal, it is found that the susceptibility and BNE of the weld metal were smaller than those of base metal and the microhardness and coercivity of weld metal were larger than those of base metal. All these consistent changes in magnetic parameters show a possibility that magnetic techniques may be used for the evaluation of material degradation.

  16. Enhancement of critical current density in fast neutron irradiated melt-textured YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puźniak, R.; Wiśniewski, A.; Baran, M.; Szymczak, H.; Pingxiang, Zhang; Jingrong, Wang; Lian, Zhou; Pytel, K.; Pytel, B.

    The critical current density in melt-textured samples obtained by the powder melting process was determined from magnetization measurements. Linear dependence between the width of the hysteresis loop and sample size was observed for both unirradiated and irradiated samples. This indicates that the critical current is circulating through the whole sample and is not disconnected by weak links, even when a magnetic field is applied in the irradiated sample. After fast neutron irradiation with fluences from 5 × 10 16 to 6 × 10 17 n cm -2 ( E > 0.5 MeV), significant enhancement of the critical current density, jc, was observed. Critical current density, determined from magnetization measurements, for magnetic field perpendicular to the a-b plane, jcab, reaches - 10 5 A cm 42 at 77 K in 1 T. For H parallel to the a-b plane, jcc along the c-axis reaches 5 × 10 3 A cm -2. An increase in the anisotropy of the critical current was observed after fast neutron irradiation in the temperature range 60 - 80 K.

  17. Continuous gamma and neutron irradiation at low doses can increase the number of stromal progenitor cell (CFU-F) in mouse bone marrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E. I.; Tsetlin, V. V.; Bueverova, E. I.; Payushina, O. I.; Butorina, N. N.; Khrushchov, N. G.; Starostin, V. I.

    Experimental groups of male and female F1 (CBA × C57Bl/6) mice at the age of 3-4 months were exposed for 10 days to gamma irradiation (total dose 1.5 cGy, dose rate 0.15 cGy/day) or neutron irradiation (neutrons at average energy of 4.5 MeV at a total neutron flux ranging from 10 5 to 10 6 cm -2 and neutron flux density from 1 to 30 cm -2 s -1). These radiation doses were chosen so as to correspond to those received aboard spacecraft. [Mitrikas, V.G., Tsetlin, V.V., 2000. Radiation control onboard the MIR orbital manned station during the 22th solar cycle. Kosm. Issled. 38(2), 113-118.] Gamma irradiation stimulated the proliferation of femoral CFU-F, and their number increased by a factor of 1.5-4.5. The ectopic marrow grafts from γ-irradiated donors also increased in size. However, no changes in CFU-S proliferation rate and their number were observed. Neutron irradiation at a total absorbed dose of 2 × 10 -1 cGy (total neutron flux 2.8 × 10 7 cm -2) produced a 1.5-3-fold increase in the number of femoral CFU-F, but that of CFU-S remained unchanged. At a lower total absorbed dose 0.82 × 10 -2 cGy, total neutron flux 1.3 × 10 6 cm -2, the number of CFU-F remained at the control level. Therefore, the effect of radiation hormesis caused by neutron irradiation was observed at doses much lower than those of gamma irradiation.

  18. High Dose Neutron Irradiation of Hi-Nicalon Type S Silicon Carbide Composites, Part 2. Mechanical and Physical Properties

    DOE PAGES

    Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Ozawa, Kazumi; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Porter, Wallace D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-01-07

    Nuclear-grade silicon carbide (SiC) composite material was examined for mechanical and thermophysical properties following high-dose neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at a temperature range of 573–1073 K. Likewise, the material was chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC-matrix composite with a two-dimensional satin weave Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC fiber reinforcement and a multilayered pyrocarbon/SiC interphase. Moderate (1073 K) to very severe (573 K) degradation in mechanical properties was found after irradiation to >70 dpa, whereas no evidence was found for progressive evolution in swelling and thermal conductivity. The swelling was found to recover upon annealing beyond the irradiation temperature, indicating themore » irradiation temperature, but only to a limited extent. Moreover, the observed strength degradation is attributed primarily to fiber damage for all irradiation temperatures, particularly a combination of severe fiber degradation and likely interphase damage at relatively low irradiation temperatures.« less

  19. Effect of compensating filters on the isodose charts of rat and guinea-pig phantoms irradiated with "fission-neutrons".

    PubMed

    Zaránd, P

    1976-01-01

    Isodose charts were calculated for rat and guinea-pig phantoms exposed to a modified fission spectrum with a most probable energy of 1.3 MeV. Infinite tissue equivalent cylinders (r = 2.5 and 3.3 cm) and a plane source emitting neutrons according to a cosine distribution were assumed and an albedo code was used. Combined effect of (tissue-equivalent or polyethylene) compensating filters (or simply filters) and a bilateral irradiation or rotation was studied. Bilateral irradiation and the use of a filter resulted in a uniform irradiation of a rat phantom (Dmax/Dmin less than 1.15), while a uniform irradiation of a guinea-pig phantom could be obtained by the combined use of filters and rotation. If rotation is possible a Dmax/Dmin less than 1.05 ratio can be achieved. Filters + rotation should be used in all circumstances when geometrical restrictions do not prevent the installation of a rotation equipment. In this case bilateral irradiation + compensating filters are advisable. Unilateral irradiation of small laboratory animals (mouse, rat, guinea-pig) should be avoided. PMID:1007885

  20. Distinguishing Pu Metal From Pu Oxide Using Fast Neutron Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J M; Chapline, G F; Nakae, L; Wurtz, R; Sheets, S

    2012-05-29

    We describe a method for simultaneously determining the {alpha}-ratio and k{sub eff} for fissile materials using fast neutrons. Our method is a generalization of the Hage-Cifarrelli method for determining k{sub eff} for fissile assemblies which utilizes the shape of the fast neutron spectrum. In this talk we illustrate the method using Monte Carlo simulations of the fast neutrons generated in PuO{sub 2} to calculate the fast neutron spectrum and Feynman correlations.

  1. Gamma- and neutron continuous irradiations at low doses can increase stromal progenitor cell (cfu-f) number in mouse bone marrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E.; Tsetlin, V.; Bueverova, E.; Payushina, O.; Butorina, N.; Starostin, V.

    Low doses of continuous gamma and neutron irradiation chosen in these experiments corresponded to those aboard a spacecraft (Mitricas, Tsetlin, 2000). F1 (CBAxC57Bl/6) male and female mice at the age of 3-4 months were used. The experimental groups of mice were exposed for 10 days to gamma irradiation (total dose 1.5 cGy, dose rate 0.15 cGy/day) or neutron irradiation (neutrons with energy of 4 MeV at flow in the range from 10-5 to 10-6 n/cm2, flow densities from 1 to 30 n/cm2sec). Gamma irradiation stimulated the proliferative rate of femoral CFU-F and raised their number 1,5-4,5-fold. The size of ectopic marrow transplants from gamma irradiated donors also increased. However, no changes in CFU-S proliferative rate and their number were observed. Neutron irradiation at total absorbed dose of 48x10-3 cGy (total neutron flow 2,8x106 n/cm2) produced a 3-fold increase of femoral CFU-F number, but CFU-S number remained unchanged. If total absorbed dose was lowered to 7x10-3 cGy (total neutron flow 1,3x105 n/cm2) CFU-F number remained at the control level. Therefore, the effect of radiation hormesis that caused by the neutron irradiation was observed at doses much lower than those of gamma irradiation. Supported in part by Russian Ministry of Education (projects ``Scientific Schools'' - 1629.2003.4).

  2. Irradiation of 4''x4'' NaI(Tl) detector by the 14 MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Sudac, D; Valkovic, V

    2010-01-01

    Within the EURopean Illicit TRAfficking Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) project, a new Tagged Neutron Inspection System (TNIS) has been developed and installed in the Port of Rijeka in Croatia. The system was based on the examination of sea containers with the 14 MeV neutron beam. During the operation the characteristic gamma rays were produced and measured by several 5''x5''x10'' NaI(Tl) detectors. During this procedure some of the detectors were exposed to an intensive neutron beam radiation. It was necessary to check for possible radiation damage of the NaI(Tl) scintillator during the gamma detector selection phase of the project. The 4''x4'' NaI(Tl) detector was exposed to 14 MeV neutrons for 20 h. From the presented results on energy resolution and activation measurements it could be concluded that there are no significant differences in energy resolution before and after the irradiation by 4.7x10(11) of 14 MeV neutrons. The only problem could be the high level of medium and long term induced activity in the energy region below 2 MeV.

  3. Radiation cataractogenesis induced by neutron or gamma irradiation in the rat lens is reduced by vitamin E

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.M.; Creighton, M.O.; Trevithick, J.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Although cataract of the eye lens is a known late effect of ionizing radiation exposure, most of the experimental work to date has concentrated on single, acute high doses or multiple, fractionated, chronic exposures. Many papers have dealt with biochemical alterations in metabolism and cellular components, with microscopic and electron microscopic lesions to the epithelial and cortical layers, and with clinical cataract formation. However, the minimum cataractogenic dose for rats has for many years been considered to be about 2 Gy for a single, acute dose of low LET radiation. Our purpose in designing this pilot study was three fold: firstly, to determine whether any physical damage could be detected after low, acute exposure to neutron radiation (10 and 100 cGy); secondly, to compare the relative effectiveness of fast (14 MeV) neutrons with gamma-rays; and thirdly, to investigate the possibility that vitamin E could protect the lenses from radiation damage. The results revealed that morphological damage was already discernible within minutes after exposure to neutrons or gamma-rays, that it became greater after 24 hours, that neutrons were more damaging than gamma-rays, and that vitamin E could effectively reduce the cataractogenic damage induced by ionizing radiation. Control, non-irradiated lenses with or without vitamin E, either in vivo or in vitro, showed no damage. Also, it appeared that in vitro irradiation was more damaging to lenses than in vivo irradiation, so this culture technique may prove to be a sensitive tool for assessing early damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  4. Swelling, irradiation creep and growth of pure rhenium irradiated with fast neutrons at 1030-1330 degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B. ); Greenwood, Lawrence R. ); Eiholzer, Cheryl R. ); Paxton, M M.; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of two series of experiments conducted on pure hcp rhenium in the EBR-II and FFTF fast reactors. In FFTF, density change data were derived from open tubes and solid rods irradiated at temperatures and fluences in the range of 1020-1250?C and 4.4-8.3?1022 n cm-2, respectively (E > 0.1 MeV). Both density change and diametral change data were obtained from pressurized tubes irradiated in EBR-II to 0.65 and 5.1?1022 n cm-2 at temperatures between 1030?C and 1330?C. Analysis of the data shows that four concurrent processes contribute to the radiation-induced strains observed in these experiments. These are void swelling, transmutation-induced densification via production of osmium, irradiation creep and irradiation growth.

  5. Effect of neutron irradiation on defect evolution in Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Kohse, Gordon; Sindelar, Robert L.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we report on the characterization of defects formed in polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples exposed to neutron irradiation - up to 0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350 ± 40 °C or 695 ± 25 °C, and up to 0.4 dpa at 350 ± 40 °C. Black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC after irradiation to both 0.1 and 0.4 dpa at 350 °C. After irradiation to 0.1 dpa at 695 °C, small basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = 1/2 [0001] are observed in both materials. At 9 ± 3 and 10 ± 5 nm, the loop diameters in the Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples, respectively, were comparable. At 1 × 1023 loops/m3, the dislocation loop density in Ti2AlC was ≈1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in Ti3SiC2, at 3 × 1021 loops/m3. After irradiation at 350 °C, extensive microcracking was observed in Ti2AlC, but not in Ti3SiC2. The room temperature electrical resistivities increased as a function of neutron dose for all samples tested, and appear to saturate in the case of Ti3SiC2. The MAX phases are unequivocally more neutron radiation tolerant than the impurity phases TiC and Al2O3. Based on these results, Ti3SiC2 appears to be a more promising MAX phase candidate for high temperature nuclear applications than Ti2AlC.

  6. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of three-wire stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-05-01

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect of aging and neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29{degrees}C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) but no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging alone. Irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. Other results from tensile, CVN, and fracture toughness specimens showed that the effects of thermal aging at 288 or 343{degrees}C for 20,000 h each were very small and similar to those at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. The effects of long-term thermal exposure time (50,000 h and greater) at 288{degrees}C will be investigated as the specimens become available in 1996 and beyond.

  7. Effect of neutron irradiation on defect evolution in Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC

    DOE PAGES

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Kohse, Gordon; Sindelar, Robert L.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2015-10-23

    Here, we report on the characterization of defects formed in polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples exposed to neutron irradiation – up to 0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350 ± 40 °C or 695 ± 25 °C, and up to 0.4 dpa at 350 ± 40 °C. Black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC after irradiation to both 0.1 and 0.4 dpa at 350 °C. After irradiation to 0.1 dpa at 695 °C, small basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = 1/2 [0001] are observed in both materials. At 9 ± 3 and 10 ±more » 5 nm, the loop diameters in the Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples, respectively, were comparable. At 1 × 1023 loops/m3, the dislocation loop density in Ti2AlC was ≈1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in Ti3SiC2, at 3 x 1021 loops/m3. After irradiation at 350 °C, extensive microcracking was observed in Ti2AlC, but not in Ti3SiC2. The room temperature electrical resistivities increased as a function of neutron dose for all samples tested, and appear to saturate in the case of Ti3SiC2. The MAX phases are unequivocally more neutron radiation tolerant than the impurity phases TiC and Al2O3. Based on these results, Ti3SiC2 appears to be a more promising MAX phase candidate for high temperature nuclear applications than Ti2AlC.« less

  8. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  9. Temperature Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Candidate SNS Target Container Materials after Proton and Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T.S.

    2001-11-09

    This report presents the tensile properties of EC316LN austenitic stainless steel and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel after 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses in the range 0.54 to 2.53 dpa. Irradiation temperatures were in the range 30 to 100 C. Tensile testing was performed at room temperature (20 C) and 164 C to study the effects of test temperature on the tensile properties. Test materials displayed significant radiation-induced hardening and loss of ductility due to irradiation. The EC316LN stainless steel maintained notable strain-hardening capability after irradiation, while the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel posted negative strain hardening. In the EC316LN stainless steel, increasing the test temperature from 20 C to 164 C decreased the strength by 13 to 18% and the ductility by 8 to 36%. The tensile data for the EC316LN stainless steel irradiated in spallation conditions were in line with the values in a database for 316 stainless steels for doses up to 1 dpa irradiated in fission reactors at temperatures below 200 C. However, extra strengthening induced by helium and hydrogen contents is evident in some specimens irradiated to above about 1 dpa. The effect of test temperature for the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel was less significant than for the EC316LN stainless steel. In addition, strain-hardening behaviors were analyzed for EC316LN and 316L stainless steels. The strain-hardening rate of the 316 stainless steels was largely dependent on test temperature. It was estimated that the 316 stainless steels would retain more than 1% true stains to necking at 164 C after irradiation to 5 dpa. A calculation using reduction of area (RA) measurements and stress-strain data predicted positive strain hardening during plastic instability.

  10. A comparative study of the neutron flux spectra in the MNSR irradiation sites for the HEU and LEU cores using the MCNP4C code.

    PubMed

    Dawahra, S; Khattab, K; Saba, G

    2015-10-01

    A comparative study for fuel conversion from the HEU to LEU in the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) has been performed in this paper using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy and lethargy flux spectra in the first inner and outer irradiation sites of the MNSR reactor for the existing HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched) and the potential LEU fuels (U3Si2-Al, U3Si-Al, U9Mo-Al, 19.75% enriched and UO2, 12.6% enriched) were investigated using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy flux spectra for each group was calculated by dividing the neutron flux by the width of each energy group. The neutron flux spectra per unit lethargy was calculated by multiplying the neutron energy flux spectra for each energy group by the average energy of each group. The thermal neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.0 to 0.625 eV, the fast neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV for the existing HEU and potential LEU fuels. Good agreements have been noticed between the flux spectra for the potential LEU fuels and the existing HEU fuels with maximum relative differences less than 10% and 8% in the inner and outer irradiation sites.

  11. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  12. Neutron field measurements of the CRNA OB26 irradiator using a Bonner sphere spectrometer for radiation protection purposes.

    PubMed

    Mazrou, H; Allab, M

    2012-08-01

    The present work deals with the Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) measurements performed, to support the authors' Monte-Carlo calculations, to estimate accurately the main characteristics of the neutron field of the (241)Am-Be-based OB26 irradiator acquired for radiation protection purposes by the Nuclear Research Centre of Algiers. The measurements were performed at a reference irradiation position selected at 150 cm from the geometrical centre of the neutron source. The spectrometric system in use is based on a central spherical (3)He thermal neutron proportional counter. The response matrix of the present spectrometer has been taken to be similar to the original Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) (Braunschweig, Germany) BSS's response matrix, with a five bins per decade energy group structure, as there is no significant difference in the BSS's physical characteristics. Thereafter, the authors' BSS measurements were used together with MCNP5 results to unfold the neutron spectrum by means of MAXED and GRAVEL computer codes from the U.M.G. 3.3 package, developed at PTB. Besides, sensitivity analysis has been performed to test the consistency of the unfolding procedure. It reveals that no significant discrepancy was observed in the total neutron fluence and total ambient dose values following the perturbation of some pertinent unfolding parameters except for the case where a 10 bins energy structure was assumed for the guess spectrum. In this latter case, a 5 % difference was observed in the ambient dose equivalent compared with the reference case. Finally, a comparative study performed between different counting systems together with MCNP5 and predictive formulas results shows that they were globally satisfactory, highlighting thereby the relevance of the unfolding procedure and the reliability of the obtained results.

  13. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor.

    PubMed

    Yavar, A R; Sarmani, S B; Wood, A K; Fadzil, S M; Radir, M H; Khoo, K S

    2011-05-01

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f(fast)) and fast neutron flux (ϕ(fast)) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f(fast) and subsequently ϕ(fast) were determined using the absolute method. The f(fast) ranged from 48 to 155, and the ϕ(fast) was found in the range 1.03×10(10)-4.89×10(10) n cm(-2) s(-1). These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  14. Differential die-away technique for determination of the fissile contents in spent fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tachoon; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Nartyn T; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the differential die-away (DDA) technique to quantify its capability to measure the fissile contents in spent fuel assemblies of 64 different cases in terms of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. The DDA count rate varies according to the contents of fissile isotopes such as {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu contained in the spent fuel assembly. The effective {sup 239}Pu concept was introduced to quantify the total fissile mass of spent fuel by weighting the relative signal contributions of {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu compared to that of {sup 239}Pu. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that the count rate of the DDA instrument for a spent fuel assembly of 4% initial enrichment, 45 GWD/MTU burnup, and 5 year cooling time is {approx} 9.8 x 10{sup 4} counts per second (c/s) with the 100-Hz repeated interrogation pattern of 0 to 10 {micro}s interrogation, 0.2 ms to 1 ms counting time, and 1 x 10{sup 9} n/s neutron source. The {sup 244}Cm neutron background count rate for this counting time scheme is {approx} 1 x 10{sup 4} c/s, and thus the signal to background ratio is {approx}10.

  15. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation. PMID:26272165

  16. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation.

  17. Study of the VMM1 read-out chip in a neutron irradiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Fanourakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kokkoris, M.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Papageorgiou, K.; Tsipolitis, G.

    2016-05-01

    Within 2015, the LHC operated close to the design energy of √s = 13-14 TeV delivering instantaneous luminosities up to Script L = 5 × 1033 cm-2s-1. The ATLAS Phase-I upgrade in 2018/19 will introduce the MicroMEGAS detectors in the area of the small wheel at the end caps. Accompanying new electronics are designed and built such as the VMM front end ASIC, which provides energy, timing and triggering information and allows fast data read-out. The first VMM version (VMM1) has been widely produced and tested in various test beams, whilst the second version (VMM2) is currently being tested. This paper focuses on the VMM1 single event upset studies and more specifically on the response of the configuration registers under harsh radiation environments. Similar conditions are expected at Run III with Script L = 2 × 1034 cm-2s-1 and a mean of 55 interactions per bunch crossing. Two VMM1s were exposed in a neutron irradiation environment using the TANDEM Van Der Graaff accelerator at NSCR Demokritos, Athens, Greece. The results showed a rate of SEU occurrences at a measured cross section of (4.1±0.8)×10-14 cm2/bit for each VMM. Consequently, when extrapolating this value to the luminosity expected in Run III, the occurrence is roughly 6 SEUs/min in all the read-out system comprising 40,000 VMMs installed during the Phase-I upgrade.

  18. Study of the VMM1 read-out chip in a neutron irradiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Fanourakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kokkoris, M.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Papageorgiou, K.; Tsipolitis, G.

    2016-05-01

    Within 2015, the LHC operated close to the design energy of √s = 13–14 TeV delivering instantaneous luminosities up to Script L = 5 × 1033 cm‑2s‑1. The ATLAS Phase-I upgrade in 2018/19 will introduce the MicroMEGAS detectors in the area of the small wheel at the end caps. Accompanying new electronics are designed and built such as the VMM front end ASIC, which provides energy, timing and triggering information and allows fast data read-out. The first VMM version (VMM1) has been widely produced and tested in various test beams, whilst the second version (VMM2) is currently being tested. This paper focuses on the VMM1 single event upset studies and more specifically on the response of the configuration registers under harsh radiation environments. Similar conditions are expected at Run III with Script L = 2 × 1034 cm‑2s‑1 and a mean of 55 interactions per bunch crossing. Two VMM1s were exposed in a neutron irradiation environment using the TANDEM Van Der Graaff accelerator at NSCR Demokritos, Athens, Greece. The results showed a rate of SEU occurrences at a measured cross section of (4.1±0.8)×10‑14 cm2/bit for each VMM. Consequently, when extrapolating this value to the luminosity expected in Run III, the occurrence is roughly 6 SEUs/min in all the read-out system comprising 40,000 VMMs installed during the Phase-I upgrade.

  19. Microstructural investigations of as-fabricated, long-term thermally aged and neutron irradiated RPV materials: An atom probe study

    SciTech Connect

    Pareige, P.J.; Miller, M.K.; Stoller, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    Atom probe field ton microscopy (APFIM) investigations of the microstructure of as-fabricated, long-term thermally aged ({approximately}100,000h. at 540{degrees}F (282{degrees}C)) and neutron-irradiated (6.6{times}10{sup 18} and 3.47{times}10{sup 19} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E>1 MeV) at {approximately}550{degrees}F (288{degrees}C)) surveillance materials from commercial reactor pressure vessel steels were performed This combination of materials and conditions permitted the investigation of potential thermal aging effects as well as the neutron-induced effects. The microstructural study focused on the quantification of the matrix chemistry and the detection and characterization of radiation-induced precipitates. The APFIM results indicate that there was no microstructural evolution after a long term-thermal exposure in weld (0.28 wt% Cu), plate (0.13 wt% Cu) or forging (0.02 wt% Cu) materials. Conversely, matrix depletion of copper and phosphorus solutes and the presence of Cu. P, Ni, Mn and Si rich clusters were observed in the neutron-irradiated weld material. These APFIM comparisons of materials in all three conditions are consistent with the measured change in mechanical properties (transition temperature shift).

  20. The effect of neutron irradiation and annealing temperature on the electrical properties and lattice constant of epitaxial gallium nitride layers

    SciTech Connect

    Boyko, V. M.; Verevkin, S. S.; Kolin, N. G. Korulin, A. V.; Merkurisov, D. I.; Polyakov, A. Y.; Chevychelov, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    Effect of irradiation with high reactor-neutron fluences ({Phi} = 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}) and subsequent heat treatments in the temperature range 100-1000 Degree-Sign C on the electrical properties and lattice constant of epitaxial GaN layers grown on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate is considered. It is shown that, with the neutron fluence increasing to (1-2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}, the resistivity of the material grows to values of about 10{sup 10} {Omega} cm because of the formation of radiation defects, and, with the fluence raised further, the resistivity passes through a maximum and then decreases to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} {Omega} cm at 300 K, which is accounted for by the appearance of a hopping conductivity via deep defects in the overlapping outer parts of disordered regions. With the neutron fluence raised to 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}, the lattice constant c increases by 0.38% at a nearly unchanged parameter a. Heat treatment of irradiated samples at temperatures as high as 1000 Degree-Sign C does not fully restore the lattice constant and the electrical parameters of the material.

  1. High dose neutron irradiations of Hi-Nicalon Type S silicon carbide composites, Part 1: Microstructural evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Bergquist, Alex G.; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Leonard, Keith J.; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2014-07-01

    Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in the development of silicon carbide (SiC) composites, composed of near-stoichiometric SiC fibers embedded in a crystalline SiC matrix, to the point that such materials can now be considered nuclear grade. Recent neutron irradiation studies of Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites showed excellent radiation response at damage levels of 30-40 dpa at temperatures of 300-800 °C. However, more recent studies of these same fiber composites irradiated to damage levels of >70 dpa at similar temperatures showed a marked decrease in ultimate flexural strength, particularly at 300 °C. Here, electron microscopy is used to analyze the microstructural evolution of these irradiated composites in order to investigate the cause of the degradation. While minimal changes were observed in Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites irradiated at 800 °C, substantial microstructural evolution is observed in those irradiated at 300° C. Furthermore, carbonaceous particles in the fibers grew by 25% compared to the virgin case, and severe cracking occurred at interphase layers.

  2. Charpy toughness and tensile properties of a neutron irradiated stainless steel submerged-arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of stainless steel cladding increasing the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws is highly dependent upon the irradiated properties of the cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged-arc, single-wire, oscillating electrode method. Three layers of cladding were applied to provide a cladding thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. There was considerable dilution of the type 309 in the first layer of cladding as a result of excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens for the irradiation study were taken from near the base plate/cladding interface and also from the upper layers of cladding. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to neutron fluences of 2 x 10/sup 23/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 1 MeV). When irradiated, both types 308 and 309 cladding showed a 5 to 40% increase in yield strength accompanied by a slight increase in ductility in the temperature range from 25 to 288/sup 0/C. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during impact testing.

  3. Evaluation of ferritic alloy Fe-2-1/4Cr-1Mo after neutron irradiation - microstructure development

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1984-05-01

    Microstructural examinations are reported for nine specimen conditions of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel which had been irradiated by fast neutrons over the temperature range 390 to 510/sup 0/C. Two heats of material were involved, each with a different preirradiation heat treatment, one irradiated to a peak fluence of 5.1 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) or 24 dpa and the other to 2.4 x 10/sup 23/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) or 116 dpa. Void swelling is found following irradiation at 400/sup 0/C in both conditions and to 480/sup 0/C in the higher fluence conditions. Concurrently dislocation structure and precipitation formed. Peak void swelling, void density, dislocation density and precipitate number density developed at the lowest temperature, approx. 400/sup 0/C, whereas mean void size, and mean precipitate size increased with increasing irradiation temperature. The examination results are used to provide interpretation of in-reactor creep, density change and post irradiation tensile behavior.

  4. High dose neutron irradiations of Hi-Nicalon Type S silicon carbide composites, Part 1: Microstructural evaluations

    DOE PAGES

    Perez-Bergquist, Alex G.; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Leonard, Keith J.; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2014-07-01

    Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in the development of silicon carbide (SiC) composites, composed of near-stoichiometric SiC fibers embedded in a crystalline SiC matrix, to the point that such materials can now be considered nuclear grade. Recent neutron irradiation studies of Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites showed excellent radiation response at damage levels of 30-40 dpa at temperatures of 300-800 °C. However, more recent studies of these same fiber composites irradiated to damage levels of >70 dpa at similar temperatures showed a marked decrease in ultimate flexural strength, particularly at 300 °C. Here, electron microscopy ismore » used to analyze the microstructural evolution of these irradiated composites in order to investigate the cause of the degradation. While minimal changes were observed in Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites irradiated at 800 °C, substantial microstructural evolution is observed in those irradiated at 300° C. Furthermore, carbonaceous particles in the fibers grew by 25% compared to the virgin case, and severe cracking occurred at interphase layers.« less

  5. Effect of neutron irradiation and postradiation annealing on the microstructure and properties of an Al-Mg-Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimkin, O. P.; Tsai, K. V.; Rofman, O. V.; Sil'nyagina, N. S.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of long-term neutron irradiation and postradiation thermal-induced aging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an aluminum-based reactor Al-Mg-Si alloy grade SAV-1 has been studied. The material under study is the shell of an automatic fine-control rod used to control the reactivity of the core of a VVR-K research reactor. Successive 1-h annealings of specimens of the SAV-1 alloy irradiated to doses of 0.001 and 5 dpa in the temperature range of 100-550°C have been carried out. The evolution of the fine structure of the material and changes in its mechanical characteristics have been studied. The phenomenon of the acceleration of the aging of the SAV-1 alloy under the effect of a high neutron fluence at an irradiation temperature of 80°C has been observed, which involves the formation of numerous lineage (stitch) Guinier-Preston zones in the alloy. It has been shown that the strength characteristics of the SAV-1 alloy depend significantly on the degree of its radiation- and thermal-induced aging.

  6. A replica technique for extracting precipitates from neutron-irradiated or thermal-aged vanadium alloys for TEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, K.; Iwasaki, M.

    2014-06-01

    A carbon replica technique has been developed to extract precipitates from vanadium alloys. Using this technique, precipitation phases can be extracted from neutron-irradiated or thermal-aged V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. Precipitate identification using EDS X-ray analysis and electron diffraction was facilitated. Only NaCl type of Ti(OCN) precipitate was formed in the thermal-aged V-4Cr-4Ti alloys at 600 °C for 20 h and cation sub-lattice was only occupied by Ti atoms. However, the thin plate of precipitates with NaCl type of crystallographic structure could be seen in the V-4Cr-4Ti alloys irradiated at 593 °C in the JOYO fast reactor. The precipitate contained chromium and vanadium atoms on the cation sub-lattice as well as titanium atoms. It is considered that the phase of MX type (M = Ti, V, Cr and X = O, N, C) is a metastable phase under neutron irradiation.

  7. Heat-to-heat variability of irradiation creep and swelling of HT9 irradiated to high neutron fluence at 400-600{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation creep data on ferritic/martensitic steels are difficult and expensive to obtain, and are not available for fusion-relevant neutron spectra and displacement rates. Therefore, an extensive creep data rescue and analysis effort is in progress to characterize irradiation creep of ferritic/martensitic alloys in other reactors and to develop a methodology for applying it to fusion applications. In the current study, four tube sets constructed from three nominally similar heats of HT9 subjected to one of two heat treatments were constructed as helium-pressurized creep tubes and irradiated in FFTF-MOTA at four temperatures between 400 and 600{degrees}C. Each of the four heats exhibited a different stress-free swelling behavior at 400{degrees}C, with the creep rate following the swelling according to the familiar B{sub o} + DS creep law. No stress-free swelling was observed at the other three irradiation temperatures. Using a stress exponent of n = 1.0 as the defining criterion, {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} irradiation creep was found at all temperatures, but, only over limited stress ranges that decreased with increasing temperature. The creep coefficient B{sub o} is a little lower ({approx}50%) than that observed for austenitic steel, but the swelling-creep coupling coefficient D is comparable to that of austenitic steels. Primary transient creep behavior was also observed at all temperatures except 400{degrees}C, and thermal creep behavior was found to dominate the deformation at high stress levels at 550 and 600{degrees}C.

  8. Fatigue behavior of Type 316 stainless steel following neutron irradiation inducing helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Liu, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    Since a tokamak reactor operates in a cyclic mode, thermal stresses will result in fatigue in structural components, especially in the first wall and blanket. There has been limited work on fatigue in irradiated alloys but none on irradiated materials containing significant amounts of irradiation-induced helium. To provide scoping data and to study the effects of irradiation on fatigue behavior, 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel from the MFE reference heat was studied.

  9. Clinical observations of early and late normal tissue injury in patients receiving fast neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ornitz, R.D.; Bradley, E.W.; Mossman, K.L.; Fender, F.M.; Schell, M.C.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-03-01

    This communication describes early and late normal tissue effects in 177 patients treated totally or in part by 15 MeV neutrons from the Naval Research Laboratory Cyclotron in Washington, D.C. between October 1973 and December 1976. Late normal tissue reactions were found to be greater than would be expected from careful observation of the early clinical responses to neutron treatment. Neutron prescriptions must be written based on the late effect tolerance level experience which is being accumulated at several neutron therapy facilities.

  10. Recent results on the neutron irradiation of ITER candidate copper alloys irradiated in DR-3 at 250{degrees}C to 0.3 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Eldrup, M.

    1997-04-01

    Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing and bonding thermal treatment with additional specimens re-aged and given a reactor bakeout treatment at 350{degrees}C for 100 h. CuAl-25 was also heat treated to simulate the effects of a bonding thermal cycle on the material. A number of heat treated specimens were neutron irradiated at 250{degrees}C to a dose level of {approximately}0.3 dpa in the DR-3 reactor as Riso. The main effect of the bonding thermal cycle heat treatment was a slight decrease in strength of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. The strength of CuAl-25, on the other hand, remained almost unaltered. The post irradiation tests at 250{degrees}C showed a severe loss of ductility in the case of the CuNiBe alloy. The irradiated CuAl-25 and CuCrZr specimens exhibited a reasonable amount of uniform elongation, with CuCrZr possessing a lower strength.

  11. Technologies for Fissile Material Detection and Prevention of Fissile Material Introduction into International Shipping

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J

    2003-07-01

    Prevention of the introduction of fissile materials into international shipping, and hence into a given country, is a complex problem. Some pieces of the solution to the puzzle are conceptually well defined, but lack definition of a technical pathway and/or operational implementation. Other elements are a little more fuzzy, and some elements are probably undefined at this point in time. This paper reviews the status of the more well-defined elements, and suggests needed additional measures to enhance the probability that fissile materials are not illicitly introduced into distant countries. International commerce proceeds through a number of steps from point of origin to final destination. Each step offers the possibility of a well-defined choke point to monitor and interdict the illicit shipment of fissile materials. However, because there are so many potential points and venues of entry into a large country such as the United States (e.g., air cargo, shipping containers, truck and rail transport, private vehicles, boats and planes, commercial passenger travel), it behooves the world to ensure that fissile material does not illicitly leave its point of origin.

  12. Atom probe study of irradiation-enhanced α' precipitation in neutron-irradiated Fe–Cr model alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei -Ying; Miao, Yinbin; Wu, Yaqiao; Tomchik, Carolyn A.; Mo, Kun; Gan, Jian; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-07-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) was performed to study the effects of Cr concentrations, irradiation doses and irradiation temperatures on a' phase formation in Fe-Cr model alloys (10-16 at.%) irradiated at 300 and 450°C to 0.01, 0.1 and 1 dpa. For 1 dpa specimens, α' precipitates with an average radius of 1.0-1.3 nm were observed. The precipitate density varied significantly from 1.1x10²³ to 2.7x10²⁴ 1/m³, depending on Cr concentrations and irradiation temperatures. The volume fraction of α' phase in 1 dpa specimens qualitatively agreed with the phase diagram prediction. For 0.01 dpa and 0.1 dpa, frequency distribution analysis detected slight Cr segregation in high-Cr specimens, but not in Fe-10Cr specimens. Proximity histogram analysis showed that the radial Cr concentration was highest at the center of a' precipitates. For most precipitates, the Cr contents were significantly lower than that predicted by the phase diagram. The Cr concentration at precipitate center increased with increasing precipitate size.

  13. The proposed spallation neutron source and modernized reactor as possible sites for a low temperature irradiation facility in Germany*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böning, K.; Gläser, W.; Golub, R.; Meier, J.

    1982-07-01

    A feasibility study for a Spallation Neutron Source (SNQ) in Germany was completed in June 1981. In this project an intensity-modulated LINAC (100 pps) would provide a proton beam of energy 1100 MeV and time-average current Īp = 5 mA . Spallation neutrons are produced in the lead material of a rotating target wheel and moderated in a hybrid arrangement consisting of both a small H 2O volume and a large D 2O tank. Here the maximum values of the peak and time-average thermal fluxes are ̂gf th ≈ 1.3 × 10 16 cm -2 s -1 and ¯gf th ≈ 6.5 × 10 14 cm -2 s -1, respectively. A low temperature irradiation facility (LTIF) has been proposed to allow irradiations in the temperature range of 4.5 to 450 K with either thermal neutrons ( ¯gf th ≈ 1 × 10 14 cm -2 s -1) or fast neutrons ( ¯gf f ≈ 2 × 10 13 cm -2 s -1). The advantages and disadvantages of having this LTIF at the SNQ are discussed with respect to the alternative of installing it at a fission reactor. Finally, the example of a possible modernization and upgrading of the Munich research reactor FRM is used to discuss the performance of such a reactor and the concept of a LTIF in this case, and to point out the complementarity of an optimized SNQ (high- ̂gf applications) and such a modernized reactor (high- ¯gf applications).

  14. Effects of neutron irradiation on dimensional stability and on mechanical properties of SiC/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Henager, C.H. Jr.; Senor, J.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the development and the performance of continuous fiber SiC{sub f}/SiC composites as a structural material for advanced fusion reactor application. The dimensional stability and some mechanical properties of two similar 2D 0-90{degree} weave SiC{sub f}/SiC composites made with Nacalon{trademark} ceramic-grade fiber were characterized and compared after neutron irradiation to those properties for {beta}-SiC. The major difference between these two composites was that one had a thin (150 nm) and the other a thick (1000 nm) graphite interface layer. The irradiation conditions consisted of relatively high doses (4.3 to 26 dpa-SiC) at high temperature (430-1200{degree}C).

  15. Flux pinning and flux creep in neutron irradiated (Y,Gd)Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, J.O. Superconductivity Research Lab., Tokyo ); Sickafus, K.E.; Peterson, D.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Powder samples of Y{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} were irradiated with mixed spectrum ({approximately}50% E<0.5eV, 50% E>0.5eV) neutrons with most interactions expected to occur at the Gd site. As a function of fluence the samples showed increased ({approximately}X3-X8) magnetically measured critical current densities J{sub c} at low fluences, falling off at the highest values. An analysis of magnetic relaxation data, which allows for a nonlinear pinning potential U vs J relationship, revealed substantial increases in U at constant J, indicating that the irradiation introduced more effective pinning centers than those originally present. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. STEM-EDS analysis of fission products in neutron-irradiated TRISO fuel particles from AGR-1 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, B.; van Rooyen, I. J.; Wu, Y. Q.; Szlufarska, I.; Sridharan, K.

    2016-07-01

    Historic and recent post-irradiation-examination from the German AVR and Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Project have shown that 110 m Ag is released from intact tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. Although TRISO fuel particle research has been performed over the last few decades, little is known about how metallic fission products are transported through the SiC layer, and it was not until March 2013 that Ag was first identified in the SiC layer of a neutron-irradiated TRISO fuel particle. The existence of Pd- and Ag-rich grain boundary precipitates, triple junction precipitates, and Pd nano-sized intragranular precipitates in neutron-irradiated TRISO particle coatings was investigated using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy analysis to obtain more information on the chemical composition of the fission product precipitates. A U-rich fission product honeycomb shape precipitate network was found near a micron-sized precipitate in a SiC grain about ∼5 μm from the SiC-inner pyrolytic carbon interlayer, indicating a possible intragranular transport path for uranium. A single Ag-Pd nano-sized precipitate was found inside a SiC grain, and this is the first research showing such finding in irradiated SiC. This finding may possibly suggest a possible Pd-assisted intragranular transport mechanism for Ag and may be related to void or dislocation networks inside SiC grains. Preliminary semi-quantitative analysis indicated the micron-sized precipitates to be Pd2Si2U with carbon existing inside these precipitates. However, the results of such analysis for nano-sized precipitates may be influenced by the SiC matrix. The results reported in this paper confirm the co-existence of Cd with Ag in triple points reported previously.

  17. Parallel computation safety analysis irradiation targets fission product molybdenum in neutronic aspect using the successive over-relaxation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susmikanti, Mike; Dewayatna, Winter; Sulistyo, Yos

    2014-09-01

    One of the research activities in support of commercial radioisotope production program is a safety research on target FPM (Fission Product Molybdenum) irradiation. FPM targets form a tube made of stainless steel which contains nuclear-grade high-enrichment uranium. The FPM irradiation tube is intended to obtain fission products. Fission materials such as Mo99 used widely the form of kits in the medical world. The neutronics problem is solved using first-order perturbation theory derived from the diffusion equation for four groups. In contrast, Mo isotopes have longer half-lives, about 3 days (66 hours), so the delivery of radioisotopes to consumer centers and storage is possible though still limited. The production of this isotope potentially gives significant economic value. The criticality and flux in multigroup diffusion model was calculated for various irradiation positions and uranium contents. This model involves complex computation, with large and sparse matrix system. Several parallel algorithms have been developed for the sparse and large matrix solution. In this paper, a successive over-relaxation (SOR) algorithm was implemented for the calculation of reactivity coefficients which can be done in parallel. Previous works performed reactivity calculations serially with Gauss-Seidel iteratives. The parallel method can be used to solve multigroup diffusion equation system and calculate the criticality and reactivity coefficients. In this research a computer code was developed to exploit parallel processing to perform reactivity calculations which were to be used in safety analysis. The parallel processing in the multicore computer system allows the calculation to be performed more quickly. This code was applied for the safety limits calculation of irradiated FPM targets containing highly enriched uranium. The results of calculations neutron show that for uranium contents of 1.7676 g and 6.1866 g (× 106 cm-1) in a tube, their delta reactivities are the still

  18. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    DOE PAGES

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7more » × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain

  19. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn

  20. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2016-03-01

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m-2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ∼289 °C (∼552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m-3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m-3 of Ni-, Mn- Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m-3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m-3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain boundary in the low fluence

  1. Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

  2. Genome resilience and prevalence of segmental duplications following fast neutron irradiation of soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fast neutron radiation has been used as a mutagen to develop extensive mutant collections. However, the genome-wide structural consequences of fast neutron radiation are not well understood. Here, we examine the genome-wide structural variants observed among 264 soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) pl...

  3. A spectral effect on phase evolution in neutron-irradiated aluminum?

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.

    1994-12-31

    It is proposed that the spatial distribution of transmutation-produced silicon precipitates formed in aluminum by capture of thermal neutrons is systematically modified by the fast neutron portion of the spectrum, and the tensile strength is altered accordingly. The concept is used to rationalize some previously erratic tensile data.

  4. The effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on the properties of a fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, S.; Burchell, T. D.; Strizak, J. P.; Eto, M.

    1996-05-01

    A fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite (IG-110), manufactured from a petroleum coke, was irradiated to a total neutron dose of 3.8 × 10 26 n/m 2 or 25 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600°C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge: National Laboratory (ORNL). The effect of irradiation and the influence of post-irradiation thermal annealing on the properties of the graphite were evaluated. Volume change turnaround was clearly observed at 15—20 dpa and the return to original volume ( {ΔV}/{V 0} = 0 ) can be estimated to occur at ˜ 30 dpa. Strength and elastic moduli of the irradiated graphite increased by a factor of 2-3, and maximums in the {δ}/{δ 0}, and {E}/{E o} curves were at ˜20 dpa at 600°C. Recovery of volume, fracture strength and thermal conductivity by thermal annealing were found., and thermal conductivity returned to better than about 30% of the unirradiated value after 1200°C thermal annealing.

  5. Laser excited novel near-infrared photoluminescence bands in fast neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad Saliqur; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Xu, Qiu; Evslin, Jarah; Cinausero, Marco

    2016-08-01

    New near-infrared photoluminescence bands were observed in neutron-irradiated spinel single crystal upon excitation by a 532 nm laser. The surface morphology of the unirradiated and fast neutron-irradiated samples was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. Fast neutron-irradiated samples show a strong emission peak at 1685 nm along with weak bands at 1065 and 2365 nm. The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence intensity was also measured. At lower temperatures, the dominant peak at 1685 nm shifts toward lower energy whereas the other peaks remain fixed. Activation energies of luminescence quenching were estimated to be 5.7 and 54.6 meV for the lower and higher temperature regions respectively.

  6. Effect of neutron irradiation on the London penetration depth for polycrystalline Bi(1.8)Pb(0.3)Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossandon, J. G.; Thompson, J. R.; Sun, Yang Ren; Christen, D. K.; Chakoumakos, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetization studies of polycrystalline Bi(1.8)Pb(0.3)Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 superconductor, prior to and after neutron irradiation, showed an increase in J(sub c) due to irradiation damage. Analysis of the equilibrium magnetization revealed significant increases in other more fundamental properties. In particular, the London penetration depth increased by approximately 15 percent following irradiation with 8 x 10(exp 16) neutrons/sq cm. Corresponding changes were observed in the upper critical magnetic field H(sub c2). However, the most fundamental thermodynamic property, the superconductive condensation energy F(sub c), was unaffected by the moderate level of neutron-induced damage.

  7. Recovery behavior of high purity cubic SiC polycrystals by post-irradiation annealing up to 1673 K after low temperature neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Mohd Idzat; Yamazaki, Saishun; Yoshida, Katsumi; Yano, Toyohiko

    2015-10-01

    Two kinds of high purity cubic (β) SiC polycrystals, PureBeta-SiC and CVD-SiC, were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (Belgium) up to a fluence of 2.0-2.5 × 1024 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 333-363 K. Changes in macroscopic lengths were examined by post-irradiation thermal annealing using a precision dilatometer up to 1673 K with a step-heating method. The specimen was held at each temperature step for 6 h and the change in length of the specimen was recorded during each isothermal annealing step from 373 K to 1673 K with 50 K increments. The recovery curves were analyzed with the first order model, and rate constants at each annealing step were obtained. Recovery of defects, induced by neutron irradiation in high purity β-SiC, has four stages of different activation energies. At 373-573 K, the activation energy of PureBeta-SiC and CVD-SiC was in the range of 0.17-0.24 eV and 0.12-0.14 eV; 0.002-0.04 eV and 0.006-0.04 eV at 723-923 K; 0.20-0.27 eV and 0.26-0.31 eV at 923-1223 K; and 1.37-1.38 eV and 1.26-1.29 eV at 1323-1523 K, respectively. Below ∼1223 K the recombination occurred possibly for closely positioned C and Si Frenkel pairs, and no long range migration is deemed essential. Nearly three-fourths of recovery, induced by neutron irradiation, occur by this mechanism. In addition, at 1323-1523 K, recombination of slightly separated C Frenkel pairs and more long-range migration of Si interstitials may have occurred for PureBeta-SiC and CVD-SiC specimens. Migration of both vacancies may be restricted up to ∼1523 K. Comparing to hexagonal α-SiC, high purity β-SiC recovered more quickly in the lower annealing temperature range of less than 873 K, in particular less than 573 K.

  8. Influence of temperature histories during reactor startup periods on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Shigeki; Kitsunai, Yuji; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-11-01

    This paper addresses influence of two different temperature profiles during startup periods in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor and a boiling water reactor upon microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons to about 1 dpa and 3 dpa. One of the temperature profiles was that the specimens experienced neutron irradiation in both reactors, under which the irradiation temperature transiently increased to 290 °C from room temperature with increasing reactor power during reactor startup periods. Another was that the specimens were pre-heated to about 150 °C prior to the irradiation to suppress the transient temperature increase. Tensile tests at 290 °C and Vickers hardness tests at room temperature were carried out, and their microstructures were observed by FEG-TEM. Difference of the temperature profiles was observed obviously in interstitial cluster formation, in particular, growth of Frank loops. Although influence of neutron irradiation involving transient temperature increase to 290 °C from room temperature on the yield strength and the Vickers hardness is buried in the trend curves of existing data, the influence was also found certainly in increment of in yield strength, existence of modest yield drop, and loss of strain hardening capacity and ductility. As a result, Frank loops, which were observed in austenitic stainless steel irradiated at doses of 1 dpa or more, seemed to have important implications regarding the interpretation of not irradiation hardening, but deformation of the austenitic stainless steel.

  9. The microstructure of neutron irradiated type-348 stainless steel and its relation to creep and hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. E.; Beeston, J. M.

    1982-06-01

    Annealed type-348 stainless steel specimens irradiated to 33 to 39 dpa at 350°C were examined by transmission electron microscopy to determine the cause of pronounced irradiation creep and hardening. The irradiation produced very high densities of 1-2 nm diameter helium bubbles, 2-20 nm diameter faulted (Frank) dislocation loops and 10 nm diameter precipitate particles. These defects account for the observed irradiation hardening but do not explain the creep strains. Too few point defects survive as faulted dislocation loops for significant creep by the stress-induced preferential absorption (SIPA) mechanism and there are not enough unfaulted dislocations for creep by climb-induced glide. Also, the irradiation-induced precipitates are face-centred cubic G-phase (a niobium nickel suicide), and cannot cause creep. It is suggested that the irradiation creep occurs by a grain-boundary movement mechanism such as diffusion accomodated grain-boundary sliding.

  10. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel neutron-irradiated up to 145 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, S; Toloczko, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to high doses was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. These specimens were from the ACO-3 fuel duct wall of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), in which irradiation doses were in the range of 3.2 144.8 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 380.4 502.6 oC. A miniature specimen reuse technique has been established for this investigation: the specimens used were the tested halves of miniature Charpy impact specimens (~13 3 4 mm) with diamond-saw cut in the middle. The fatigue precracking for specimens and fracture resistance (J-R) tests were carried out in a MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a vacuum furnace following the standard procedure described in the ASTM Standard E 1820-09. For each of five irradiated and one archive conditions, 7 to 9 J-R tests were performed at selected temperatures ranging from 22 C to 600 C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated HT9 steel was strongly dependent on irradiation temperatures rather than irradiation dose. When the irradiation temperature was below about 430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa m at 350 450 C and then decreased with test temperature. When the irradiation temperature 430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged until about 450 C and decreased with test temperature in higher temperature range. Similar test temperature dependence was observed for the archive material although the highest toughness values are lower after irradiation. Ductile stable crack growth occurred except for a few cases where both the irradiation temperature and test temperature are relatively low.

  11. Extensions to Dynamic System Simulation of Fissile Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Bernardin, John David; Kimpland, Robert Herbert; Spernjak, Dusan

    2015-08-24

    Previous reports have documented the results of applying dynamic system simulation (DSS) techniques to model a variety of fissile solution systems. The SUPO (Super Power) aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) was chosen as the benchmark for comparison of model results to experimental data for steadystate operation.1 Subsequently, DSS was applied to additional AHR to verify results obtained for SUPO and extend modeling to prompt critical excursions, ramp reactivity insertions of various magnitudes and rate, and boiling operations in SILENE and KEWB (Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler).2 Additional models for pressurized cores (HRE: Homogeneous Reactor Experiment), annular core geometries, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADAHR) were developed and results reported.3 The focus of each of these models is core dynamics; neutron kinetics, thermal hydraulics, radiolytic gas generation and transport are coupled to examine the time-based evolution of these systems from start-up through transition to steady-state. A common characteristic of these models is the assumption that (a) core cooling system inlet temperature and flow and (b) plenum gas inlet pressure and flow are held constant; no external (to core) component operations that may result in dynamic change to these parameters are considered. This report discusses extension of models to include explicit reference to cooling structures and radiolytic gas handling. The accelerator-driven subcritical generic system model described in References 3 and 4 is used as a basis for this extension.

  12. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Day, Christy M.; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  13. Survival of parenchymal hepatocytes irradiated with 14. 3 MeV neutrons. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jirtle, R.L.; DeLuca, P.M.; Hinshaw, W.M.; Gould, M.N.

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to estimate the RBE of neutrons for parenchymal hepatocytes as a function of neutron dose and to determine the ability of liver cells to repair potentially lethal damage (PLD) after neutron exposure. Hepatocyte reproductive survival was used as the biological end point in these studies and hepatocyte survival was determined with an in vivo transplantation clonogenic assay system. The estimated survival data for neutron exposed hepatocytes were best described by a single hit-single target model. In contrast to the results obtained with /sup 60/Co, hepatocytes exposed to neutrons are unable to repair PLD. The RBE value, when the reproductive survival was estimated 30 min after radiation exposure, is independent of neutron dose and equal to 1.6 +/- 0.1. In contrast, when the reproductive survival was estimated 24 hrs after radiation exposure, the RBE was found to increase with decreasing neutron dose and equal 4.2 +/- 0.5 at 50 cGy.

  14. Comparison of material irradiation conditions for fusion, spallation, stripping and fission neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, P.; Möslang, A.

    2004-08-01

    Selection and development of materials capable of sustaining irradiation conditions expected for a future fusion power reactor remain a big challenge for material scientists. Design of other nuclear facilities either in support of the fusion materials testing program or for other scientific purposes presents a similar problem of irradiation resistant material development. The present study is devoted to an evaluation of the irradiation conditions for IFMIF, ESS, XADS, DEMO and typical fission reactors to provide a basis for comparison of the data obtained for different material investigation programs. The results obtained confirm that no facility, except IFMIF, could fit all user requirements imposed for a facility for simulation of the fusion irradiation conditions.

  15. Dimensional stability and strength of neutron-irradiated SiC-based fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Brimhall, J.L.; Trimble, D.J.; Newsome, G.A.; Woods, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A variety of SiC-based fibers were characterized by measuring their length, density, and tensile strength in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to a dose of 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal irradiation temperature of 1000{degree}C. The annealed specimens were held at 1010{degree}C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. In general, the results of this study indicate the fibers that perform best in an irradiation environment are those that approach stoichiometric and crystalline SiC. Hi-Nicalon exhibited negligible densification, accompanied by an increase in tensile strength after irradiation. Nicalon CG possessed a higher tensile strength than Hi-Nicalon in the unirradiated condition, but was significantly weakened in the annealed and irradiated conditions. In addition, Nicalon CG exhibited unacceptable irradiation-induced shrinkage. While the irradiation stability of Hi-Nicalon was promising, other fibers with compositions closer to stoichiometric SiC may perform even better. This potential was suggested by the MER99 fiber, which displayed excellent dimensional stability. The principal drawback for the fully crystalline and stoichiometric fibers such as MER99 and Crystalline SiC is their low strength and flexibility caused by high flaw concentrations. 6 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. 49 CFR 173.477 - Approval of packagings containing greater than 0.1 kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. 173.477 Section 173.477 Transportation... non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. (a) Each offeror of a package containing more than 0.1 kg of uranium hexafluoride must maintain on file for at least one year after the...

  17. 49 CFR 173.477 - Approval of packagings containing greater than 0.1 kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. 173.477 Section 173.477 Transportation... non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. (a) Each offeror of a package containing more than 0.1 kg of uranium hexafluoride must maintain on file for at least one year after the...

  18. 49 CFR 173.477 - Approval of packagings containing greater than 0.1 kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. 173.477 Section 173.477 Transportation... non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. (a) Each offeror of a package containing more than 0.1 kg of uranium hexafluoride must maintain on file for at least one year after the...

  19. 49 CFR 173.477 - Approval of packagings containing greater than 0.1 kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. 173.477 Section 173.477 Transportation... non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. (a) Each offeror of a package containing more than 0.1 kg of uranium hexafluoride must maintain on file for at least one year after the...

  20. 49 CFR 173.477 - Approval of packagings containing greater than 0.1 kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. 173.477 Section 173.477 Transportation... non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. (a) Each offeror of a package containing more than 0.1 kg of uranium hexafluoride must maintain on file for at least two years after the...