Science.gov

Sample records for neutron reference field

  1. Characterization of a measurement reference standard and neutron fluence determination method in IRSN monoenergetic neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressier, V.; Lacoste, V.; Martin, A.; Pepino, M.

    2014-10-01

    The variation in the response of instruments with neutron energy has to be determined in well-characterized monoenergetic neutron fields. The quantities associated with these fields are the neutron fluence and the mean energy of the monoenergetic neutron peak needed to determine the related dosimetric quantities. At the IRSN AMANDE facility, the reference measurement standard for neutron fluence is based on a long counter calibrated in the IRSN reference 252Cf neutron field. In this paper, the final characterization of this device is presented as well as the method used to determine the reference fluence at the calibration point in monoenergetic neutron fields.

  2. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR Free-Field Environment (ACRR-FF-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity free-field reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  3. Characterization of neutron reference fields at US Department of Energy calibration fields.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Mallett, M W; Seagraves, D T; Gadd, M S; Markham, Robin L; Murphy, R O; Devine, R T

    2007-01-01

    The Health Physics Measurements Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has initiated a study of neutron reference fields at selected US Department of Energy (DOE) calibration facilities. To date, field characterisation has been completed at five facilities. These fields are traceable to the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) through either a primary calibration of the source emission rate or through the use of a secondary standard. However, neutron spectral variation is caused by factors such as room return, scatter from positioning tables and fixtures, source anisotropy and spectral degradation due to source rabbits and guide tubes. Perturbations from the ideal isotropic point source field may impact the accuracy of instrument calibrations. In particular, the thermal neutron component of the spectrum, while contributing only a small fraction of the conventionally true dose, can contribute a significant fraction of a dosemeter's response with the result that the calibration becomes facility-specific. A protocol has been developed to characterise neutron fields that relies primarily on spectral measurements with the Bubble Technology Industries (BTI) rotating neutron spectrometer (ROSPEC) and the LANL Bonner sphere spectrometer. The ROSPEC measurements were supplemented at several sites by the BTI Simple Scintillation Spectrometer probe, which is designed to extend the ROSPEC upper energy range from 5 to 15 MeV. In addition, measurements were performed with several rem meters and neutron dosemeters. Detailed simulations were performed using the LANL MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the magnitude of source anisotropy and scatter factors.

  4. Quasi-monoenergetic neutron reference fields in the energy range from thermal to 200 MeV.

    PubMed

    Nolte, R; Allie, M S; Böttger, R; Brooks, F D; Buffler, A; Dangendorf, V; Friedrich, H; Guldbakke, S; Klein, H; Meulders, J P; Schlegel, D; Schuhmacher, H; Smit, F D

    2004-01-01

    Well-characterised neutron fields are a prerequisite for the investigation of neutron detectors. Partly in collaboration with external partners, the PTB neutron metrology group makes available for other users neutron reference fields covering the full energy range from thermal to 200 MeV. The specification of the neutron fluence in these beams is traceable to primary standard cross sections.

  5. Validation of IRDFF in 252Cf standard and IRDF-2002 reference neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Stanislav; Capote Noy, Roberto; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Kahler, Albert; Pronyaev, Vladimir; Trkov, A.; Zolotarev, K. I.

    2016-05-02

    The results of validation of the latest release of International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File, IRDFF-1.03, in the standard 252Cf(s.f.) and reference 235U(nth,f) neutron benchmark fields are presented. The spectrum-averaged cross sections were shown to confirm the recommended spectrum for 252Cf spontaneous fission source; that was not the case for the current recommended spectra for 235U(nth,f). IRDFF was also validated in the spectra of the research reactor facilities ISNF, Sigma-Sigma and YAYOI, which are available in the IRDF- 2002 collection. Before this analysis, the ISFN spectrum was resimulated to remove unphysical oscillations in spectrum. IRDFF-1.03 was shown to reasonably reproduce the spectrum-averaged data measured in these fields except for the case of YAYOI.

  6. Validation of IRDFF in 252Cf Standard and IRDF-2002 Reference Neutron Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Stanislav; Capote, Roberto; Greenwood, Lawrence; Griffin, Patrick; Kahler, Albert; Pronyaev, Vladimir; Trkov, Andrej; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2016-02-01

    The results of validation of the latest release of International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File, IRDFF-1.03, in the standard 252Cf(s.f.) and reference 235U(nth,f) neutron benchmark fields are presented. The spectrum-averaged cross sections were shown to confirm IRDFF-1.03 in the 252Cf standard spontaneous fission spectrum; that was not the case for the current recommended spectra for 235U(nth,f). IRDFF was also validated in the spectra of the research reactor facilities ISNF, Sigma-Sigma and YAYOI, which are available in the IRDF-2002 collection. The ISNF facility was re-simulated to remove unphysical oscillations in the spectrum. IRDFF-1.03 was shown to reproduce reasonably well the spectrum-averaged data measured in these fields except for the case of YAYOI.

  7. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specifications: ACRR Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) Bucket Environment (ACRR-PLG-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parm, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 37 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  8. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR 44 Inch Lead-Boron (LB44) Bucket Environment (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the 44 inch Lead-Boron (LB44) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  9. Testing a newly developed single-sphere neutron spectrometer in reference monochromatic fields from 147 keV to 14.8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Pola, A.; Introini, M. V.; Bortot, D.; Gentile, A.; Esposito, A.; Mazzitelli, G.; Buonomo, B.; Quintieri, L.; Foggetta, L.

    2013-06-01

    A new neutron spectrometer, designed to simultaneously respond from the thermal domain up to hundreds of MeV neutrons, was designed and built in the framework of the INFN project NESCOFI@BTF. It has been called SP2 (SPherical SPectrometer) and it consists of 31 thermal neutron detectors embedded in a 25 cm diameter polyethylene sphere with an internal 1 cm thick lead shell. The new spectrometer shows similar performance as the Bonner sphere spectrometer, but has the notable advantage of requiring only one exposure to determine the whole spectrum. The SP2 response matrix, previously calculated with MCNP, has been experimentally evaluated with monochromatic reference neutron fields from 147 keV to 14.8 MeV at PTB Braunschweig. As suitable thermal neutron detectors, Dysprosium activation foils were adopted at this stage. The results of the experiment confirmed the correctness of the response matrix within an overall uncertainty of ±3%. The next phase of the NESCOFI@BTF project will be the replacement of passive detectors with active counters, thus leading to a real-time spectrometric monitor that is expected to significantly innovate the neutron control task in neutron-producing facilities, such as the beam-lines for industrial irradiation or condensed matter studies.

  10. Evaluation of the characteristics of the neutron reference field using D2O-moderated 252Cf source.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, M; Fujii, K; Takahashi, M; Yoshizawa, M; Shimizu, S; Kawasaki, K; Yamaguchi, Y

    2007-01-01

    The ambient/personal dose equivalent per fluence for D(2)O moderated (252)Cf neutron source was determined by measurement. An appropriate subtraction of the scattered neutrons is required for the accurate measurement of direct neutrons. A cubic shadow object was used for the subtraction of the scattered neutrons from the surroundings. The scattered neutrons to be subtracted vary with the position of the shadow object due to the large volume of the source. Using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4C, the optimum positions of the shadow object were surveyed for subtracting the scattered neutrons. The energy spectra of direct neutrons were measured in the optimum position. The dosimetric parameters for the D(2)O moderated (252)Cf neutron source were reasonable, taking into account the uncertainties of the parameters.

  11. Neutron field for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the development of an epithermal neutron source has been required by medical doctors for deeper neutron penetrations, which is to be used for deep tumor treatment and diagnosis of metastasis. Several attempts have already been made to realize an epithermal neutron field, such as the undermoderated neutron beam, the filtered neutron beam, and the use of a fission plate. At present, these facilities can not be used for actual therapy. For the treatment of deep tumor, another method has been also proposed in normal water in the body is replaced by heavy water to attain a deeper neutron penetration. At Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute, almost all physics problems have been settled relative to thermal neutron capture therapy that has been used for treating brain tumors and for biological experiments on malignant melanoma. Very recently feasibility studies to use heavy water have been started both theoretically and experimentally. The calculation shows the deeper penetration of neutrons as expected. Two kinds of experiments were done by using the KUR guide tube: 1. Thermal neutron penetration measurement. 2. Heavy water uptake in vitro sample. In addition to the above experiment using heavy water, the development of a new epithermal neutron source using a large fission plate is in progress, which is part of a mockup experiment of an atomic bomb field newly estimated.

  12. Experimental test of a newly developed single-moderator, multi-detector, directional neutron spectrometer in reference monochromatic fields from 144 keV to 16.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Pola, A.; Bortot, D.; Gentile, A.; Introini, M. V.; Buonomo, B.; Lorenzoli, M.; Mazzitelli, M.; Sacco, D.

    2015-05-01

    A new directional neutron spectrometer called CYSP (CYlindrical SPectrometer) was developed within the NESCOFI@BTF (2011-2013) collaboration. The device, composed by seven active thermal neutron detectors located along the axis of a cylindrical moderator, was designed to simultaneously respond from the thermal domain up to hundreds of MeV neutrons. The new spectrometer condenses the performance of the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer in a single moderator; thus requiring only one exposure to determine the whole spectrum. The CYSP response matrix, determined with MCNP, has been experimentally evaluated with monochromatic reference neutron fields from 144 keV to 16.5 MeV, plus a 252Cf source, available at NPL (Teddington, UK). The results of the experiment confirmed the correctness of the response matrix within an overall uncertainty of ±2.5%. The new active spectrometer CYSP offers an innovative option for real-time monitoring of directional neutron fields as those produced in neutron beam-lines.

  13. Photon doses in NPL standard neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Roberts, N J; Horwood, N A; McKay, C J

    2014-10-01

    Standard neutron fields are invariably accompanied by a photon component due to the neutron-generating reactions and secondary neutron interactions in the surrounding environment. A set of energy-compensated Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and electronic personal dosemeters (EPDs) have been used to measure the photon dose rates in a number of standard radionuclide and accelerator-based neutron fields. The GM tubes were first characterised in standard radioisotope and X-ray photon fields and then modelled using MCNP to determine their photon dose response as a function of energy. Values for the photon-to-neutron dose equivalent ratios are presented and compared with other published values.

  14. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, D.; Pons, J. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Rea, N.

    2015-05-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  15. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  16. Magnetic field decay in isolated neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, Peter; Reisenegger, Andreas

    1992-01-01

    Three mechanisms that promote the loss of magnetic flux from an isolated neutron star - Ohmic decay, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall drift - are investigated. Equations of motions are solved for charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and a fixed background of neutrons, while allowing for the creation and destruction of particles by weak interactions. Although these equations apply to normal neutrons and protons, the present interpretations of their solutions are extended to cover cases of neutron superfluidity and proton superconductivity. The equations are manipulated to prove that, in the presence of a magnetic force, the charged particles cannot be simultaneously in magnetostatic equilibrium and chemical equilibrium with the neutrons. The application of the results to real neutron stars is discussed.

  17. Characterization of a Pulse Neutron Source Yield under Field Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip C.; Hopper, Lindsay

    2009-03-10

    Technique of rapid evaluation of a pulse neutron sources such as neutron generators under field conditions has been developed. The phoswich sensor and pulse-shape discrimination techniques have been used for the simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons. The sensor has been calibrated using activation neutron detectors and a pulse deuterium-tritium fusion neutron source.

  18. Polarized neutron reflectometry in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    2005-11-15

    A simple method is described to maintain the polarization of a neutron beam on its way through the large magnetic stray fields produced by a vertical field of a cryomagnet with a split-coil geometry. The two key issues are the proper shielding of the neutron spin flippers and an additional radial field component in order to guide the neutron spin through the region of the null point (i.e., point of reversal for the vertical field component). Calculations of the neutron's spin rotation as well as polarized neutron reflectometry experiments on an ErFe{sub 2}/DyFe{sub 2} multilayer show the perfect performance of the used setup. The recently commissioned cryomagnet M5 with a maximum vertical field of up to 7.2 T in asymmetric mode for polarized neutrons and 9 T in symmetric mode for unpolarized neutrons was used on the C5 spectrometer in reflectometry mode, at the NRU reactor in Chalk River, Canada.

  19. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  20. One directional polarized neutron reflectometry with optimized reference layer method

    SciTech Connect

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Jahromi, Saeed S.

    2012-09-01

    In the past decade, several neutron reflectometry methods for determining the modulus and phase of the complex reflection coefficient of an unknown multilayer thin film have been worked out among which the method of variation of surroundings and reference layers are of highest interest. These methods were later modified for measurement of the polarization of the reflected beam instead of the measurement of the intensities. In their new architecture, these methods not only suffered from the necessity of change of experimental setup but also another difficulty was added to their experimental implementations. This deficiency was related to the limitations of the technology of the neutron reflectometers that could only measure the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam. As the instruments are limited, the theory has to be optimized so that the experiment could be performed. In a recent work, we developed the method of variation of surroundings for one directional polarization analysis. In this new work, the method of reference layer with polarization analysis has been optimized to determine the phase and modulus of the unknown film with measurement of the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam.

  1. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresana, M.; Denker, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Golnik, N.; Hohmann, E.; Leuschner, A.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Manessi, G.; Mayer, S.; Ott, K.; Röhrich, J.; Silari, M.; Trompier, F.; Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M.

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  2. FIELD CALIBRATION OF A TLD ALBEDO DOSEMETER IN THE HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRON FIELD OF CERF.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Kleinau, P; Haninger, S

    2016-07-15

    The new albedo dosemeter-type AWST-TL-GD 04 has been calibrated in the CERF neutron field (Cern-EU high-energy Reference Field). This type of albedo dosemeter is based on thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and used by the individual monitoring service of the Helmholtz Zentrum München (AWST) since 2015 for monitoring persons, who are exposed occupationally against photon and neutron radiation. The motivation for this experiment was to gain a field specific neutron correction factor Nn for workplaces at high-energy particle accelerators. Nn is a dimensionless factor relative to a basic detector calibration with (137)Cs and is used to calculate the personal neutron dose in terms of Hp(10) from the neutron albedo signal. The results show that the sensitivity of the albedo dosemeter for this specific neutron field is not significantly lower as for fast neutrons of a radionuclide source like (252)Cf. The neutron correction factor varies between 0.73 and 1.16 with a midrange value of 0.94. The albedo dosemeter is therefore appropriate to monitor persons, which are exposed at high-energy particle accelerators.

  3. Anomalies of neutron field of the Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, Natalia

    This work is devoted to the researches of time and spatial heterogeneity of thermal neurtron flux (Fn) density in the troposphere of the Earth. We had already received the values of thermal neutron flux density on the surface of the Earth in the European part of Russia. The large-scale monitoring of thermal neutron flux density was carried out on structural cross-section from Drake Strait in the Atlantic Ocean to the high latitudes of Arctic. We observe the increase of Fn from 44о N to 59о N, from 0,4 to 2,9 •10-3 н/(c•cм2). The values of Fn were received in latitude Novorossiysk (0,4•10-3 n/(c•sm2)) , Moskow (0,7-1,5•10-3 n/(c•sm2)), Arhangelsk (1,3•10-3 n/(c•sm2)). High-rise dependance of the thermal neutron flux density on the surface of the Earth and in troposphere during transcontinental flights was researched. With the increasing of height from 0 to 8000 m the thermal neutron flux density rises to 180•10-3 н/(c•cм2) The measurements were carried out in latitude of Spitsbergen. The value of thermal neutron flux density on the North pole was measured. Fn is equal to 0,7•10-3 n/(c•sm2)) 890 20/ in North latitude. Recently it has been shown, that thermal neutrons render appreciable influence on alive organisms [Matveeva and etc., 2004, Masunaga S., 2001]. Abmormal increases of thermal neutron flux density are revealed in flora biogeocenosis. Daily background Fn demonstrate the specific abnormal flares for every biocenosis or biotope long-lasting (for tens of minutes) Fn - meaning during the «flares» in biogeocenosis depends on the contains of flora community and can reach 104 n/(с m2). [Plotnikova N.V., Siroeshkin A.V., 2005]. The researches of the neutron field in the World Ocean were received at the time of transatlantic expedition by the programme of RAS «Meridian» (2006, 2008). Abnormal increasing Fn had being observed in the area of equator and between 310N to 540N and 330S to 530S Moreover, the coordinates of these

  4. Physics in Strong Magnetic Fields Near Neutron Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the behaviors of particles and energies in the magnetic fields of neutron stars. Different types of possible research using neutron stars as a laboratory for the study of strong magnetic fields are proposed. (CW)

  5. Dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, I.

    1998-04-01

    The gamma field accompanying neutrons may, in certain circumstances, play an important role in the analysis of neutron dosimetry and even in the interpretation of radiation induced steel embrittlement. At the High Flux Isotope Reactor pressure vessel the gamma induced reactions dominate the responses of {sup 237}Np and {sup 238}U dosimeters, and {sup 9}Be helium accumulation fluence monitors. The gamma induced atom displacement rate in steel is higher than corresponding neutron rate, and is the cause of ``accelerated embrittlement`` of HFIR materials. In a large body of water, adjacent to a fission plate, photofissions contribute significantly to the responses of fission monitors and need to be taken into account if the measurements are used for the qualification of the transport codes and cross-section libraries.

  6. Experimental and numerical characterization of the neutron field produced in the n@BTF Frascati photo-neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Quintieri, L.; Buonomo, B.; Esposito, A.; Mazzitelli, G.; Foggetta, L.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    A photo-neutron irradiation facility is going to be established at the Frascati National Laboratories of INFN on the base of the successful results of the n@BTF experiment. The photo-neutron source is obtained by an electron or positron pulsed beam, tuneable in energy, current and in time structure, impinging on an optimized tungsten target located in a polyethylene-lead shielding assembly. The resulting neutron field, through selectable collimated apertures at different angles, is released into a 100 m2 irradiation room. The neutron beam, characterized by an evaporation spectrum peaked at about 1 MeV, can be used in nuclear physics, material science, calibration of neutron detectors, studies of neutron hardness, ageing and study of single event effect. The intensity of the neutron beam obtainable with 510 MeV electrons and its fluence energy distribution at a point of reference in the irradiation room were predicted by Monte Carlo simulations and experimentally determined with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS). Due to the large photon contribution and the pulsed time structure of the beam, passive photon-insensitive thermal neutron detectors were used as sensitive elements of the BSS. For this purpose, a set of Dy activation foils was used. This paper presents the numerical simulations and the measurements, and compares their results in terms of both neutron spectrum and total neutron fluence.

  7. Magnetic field evolution of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, Y. N.; Semerikov, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of a matter, accreting on to a magnetized neutron star, is accompanied by an electric current. The closing of the electric current occurs in the crust of a neutron stars in the polar region across the magnetic field. But the conductivity of the crust along the magnetic field greatly exceeds the conductivity across the field, so the current penetrates deep into the crust down up to the superconducting core. The magnetic field, generated by the accretion current, increases greatly with the depth of penetration due to the Hall conductivity of the crust is also much larger than the transverse conductivity. As a result, the current begins to flow mainly in the toroidal direction, creating a strong longitudinal magnetic field, far exceeding an initial dipole field. This field exists only in the narrow polar tube of r width, narrowing with the depth, i.e. with increasing of the crust density ρ, r ∝ ρ-1/4. Accordingly, the magnetic field B in the tube increases with the depth, B∝ρ1/2, and reaches the value of about 1017 Gauss in the core. It destroys superconducting vortices in the core of a star in the narrow region of the size of the order of 10 cm. Because of generated density gradient of vortices, they constantly flow into this dead zone and the number of vortices decreases, the magnetic field of a star decreases as well. The attenuation of the magnetic field is exponential, B = B0(1 + t/τ)-1. The characteristic time of decreasing of the magnetic field τ is equal to τ ≃ 103 yr. Thus, the magnetic field of accreted neutron stars decreases to values of 108-109 Gauss during 107-106 yr.

  8. AMANDE: a new facility for monoenergetic neutron fields production between 2 keV and 20 MeV.

    PubMed

    Gressier, V; Guerre-Chaley, J F; Lacoste, V; Lebreton, L; Pelcot, G; Pochat, J L; Bolognese-Milstajn, T; Champion, D

    2004-01-01

    The variation of the response of the instruments with the neutron energy has to be determined in well-characterized monoenergetic neutron fields. The AMANDE facility will deliver such neutron fields between 2 keV and 20 MeV in an experimental hall designed with metallic walls for neutron scattering minimisation. The neutrons will be produced by nuclear interaction of accelerated protons or deuterons on thin targets of selected materials. The measuring devices to be characterised will be accurately placed with a fully automated detector transport system. The energy of the neutron field will be validated by time-of-flight experiments and a large set of standard detectors and fluence monitors will be used to determine the neutron fluence references. The scattered neutron fluence and dose equivalent were calculated by the MCNP Monte Carlo code at several measuring points in order to determine their contribution to the neutron field.

  9. Neutron field measurements for alara purposes around a Van de Graaff accelerator building.

    PubMed

    Kockerols, P; Lebacq, A L; Gasparro, J; Hult, M; Janssens, H; Lövestam, G; Vanhavere, F

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements operates a 7.0 MV Van de Graaff accelerator to generate monoenergetic neutron radiation for experimental applications. Owing to increased intensities of generated neutron fields and the more stringent regulation related to the maximum dose for the public, a concrete shielding wall surrounding the experimental building was constructed. This paper presents a study aiming at evaluating the effect of the shielding on the neutron field outside the wall. For this purpose, the following measurements were carried out around the building: (1) cartography of the neutron field for different experimental conditions; (2) measurement of neutron spectra using multiple Bonner spheres; (3) activation measurements using gold discs followed by low-level gamma spectrometry. From the measurements, it can be concluded that the wall fulfils its purpose to reduce the neutron dose rate to the surrounding area to an acceptable level.

  10. Characterization of neutron calibration fields at the TINT's 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liamsuwan, T.; Channuie, J.; Ratanatongchai, W.

    2015-05-01

    Reliable measurement of neutron radiation is important for monitoring and protection in workplace where neutrons are present. Although Thailand has been familiar with applications of neutron sources and neutron beams for many decades, there is no calibration facility dedicated to neutron measuring devices available in the country. Recently, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) has set up a multi-purpose irradiation facility equipped with a 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator. The facility is planned to be used for research, nuclear analytical techniques and, among other applications, calibration of neutron measuring devices. In this work, the neutron calibration fields were investigated in terms of neutron energy spectra and dose equivalent rates using Monte Carlo simulations, an in-house developed neutron spectrometer and commercial survey meters. The characterized neutron fields can generate neutron dose equivalent rates ranging from 156 μSv/h to 3.5 mSv/h with nearly 100% of dose contributed by neutrons of energies larger than 0.01 MeV. The gamma contamination was less than 4.2-7.5% depending on the irradiation configuration. It is possible to use the described neutron fields for calibration test and routine quality assurance of neutron dose rate meters and passive dosemeters commonly used in radiation protection dosimetry.

  11. Neutrons in strong magnetic fields and equation of state of neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigdeli, Mohsen

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, I investigate the influence of neutron mass reduction due to magnetic field on the equation of state of neutron matter using the lowest-order constraint variational (LOCV) method with the A V18 potential.

  12. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the third generation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    In August 1981 the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy revised the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). It is the second revision since the inception of the IGRF in 1968. The revision extends the earlier series of IGRF models from 1980 to 1985, introduces a new series of definitive models for 1965-1976, and defines a provisional reference field for 1975- 1980. The revision consists of: 1) a model of the main geomagnetic field at 1980.0, not continuous with the earlier series of IGRF models together with a forecast model of the secular variation of the main field during 1980-1985; 2) definitive models of the main field at 1965.0, 1970.0, and 1975.0, with linear interpolation of the model coefficients specified for intervening dates; and 3) a provisional reference field for 1975-1980, defined as the linear interpolation of the 1975 and 1980 main-field models.-from Author

  13. Neutron stars. [quantum mechanical processes associated with magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical processes associated with the presence of high magnetic fields and the effect of such fields on the evolution of neutron stars are reviewed. A technical description of the interior of a neutron star is presented. The neutron star-pulsar relation is reviewed and consideration is given to supernovae explosions, flux conservation in neutron stars, gauge-invariant derivation of the equation of state for a strongly magnetized gas, neutron beta-decay, and the stability condition for a neutron star.

  14. Neutron dose in and out of 18MV photon fields.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, A O; Studenski, M T

    2017-04-01

    In radiation therapy, neutron contamination is an undesirable side effect of using high energy photons to treat patients. Neutron contamination requires adjustments to the shielding requirements of the linear accelerator vault and contributes to the risk of secondary malignancies in patients by delivering dose outside of the primary treatment field. Using MCNPX, an established Monte Carlo code, manufacturer blueprints, and the most up to date ICRP neutron dose conversion factors, the neutron spectra, neutron/photon dose ratio, and the neutron capture gamma ray dose were calculated at different depths and off axis distances in a tissue equivalent phantom. Results demonstrated that the neutron spectra and dose are dependent on field size, depth in the phantom, and off-axis distance. Simulations showed that because of the low neutron absorption cross section of the linear accelerator head materials, the contribution to overall patient dose from neutrons can be up to 1000 times the photon dose out of the treatment field and is also dependent on field size and depth. Beyond 45cm off-axis, the dependence of the neutron dose on field size is minimal. Neutron capture gamma ray dose is also field size dependent and is at a maximum at a depth of about 7cm. It is important to remember that when treating with high energy photons, the dose from contamination neutrons must be considered as it is much greater than the photon dose.

  15. Magnetic field homogeneity for neutron EDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is an observable which, if non-zero, would violate time-reversal symmetry, and thereby charge-parity symmetry of nature. New sources of CP violation beyond those found in the standard model of particle physics are already tightly constrained by nEDM measurements. Our future nEDM experiment seeks to improve the precision on the nEDM by a factor of 30, using a new ultracold neutron (UCN) source that is being constructed at TRIUMF. Systematic errors in the nEDM experiment are driven by magnetic field inhomogeneity and instability. The goal field inhomogeneity averaged over the experimental measurement cell (order of 1 m) is 1 nT/m, at a total magnetic field of 1 microTesla. This equates to roughly 10-3 homogeneity. A particularly challenging aspect of the design problem is that nearby magnetic materials will also affect the magnetic inhomogeneity, and this must be taken into account in completing the design. This poster will present the design methodology and status of the main coil for the experiment where we use FEA software (COMSOL) to simulate and analyze the magnetic field. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

  16. Response of six neutron survey meters in mixed fields of fast and thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Kim, B H; Chang, I; Lee, J I; Kim, J L; Pradhan, A S

    2013-10-01

    Calibration neutron fields have been developed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) to study the responses of commonly used neutron survey meters in the presence of fast neutrons of energy around 10 MeV. The neutron fields were produced by using neutrons from the (241)Am-Be sources held in a graphite pile and a DT neutron generator. The spectral details and the ambient dose equivalent rates of the calibration fields were established, and the responses of six neutron survey meters were evaluated. Four single-moderator-based survey meters exhibited an under-responses ranging from ∼9 to 55 %. DINEUTRUN, commonly used in fields around nuclear reactors, exhibited an over-response by a factor of three in the thermal neutron field and an under-response of ∼85 % in the mixed fields. REM-500 (tissue-equivalent proportional counter) exhibited a response close to 1.0 in the fast neutron fields and an under-response of ∼50 % in the thermal neutron field.

  17. Characterization of Bonner sphere systems at monoenergetic and thermal neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, V; Gressier, V; Pochat, J-L; Fernández, F; Bakali, M; Bouassoule, T

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the GFR, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB) use Bonner spheres (BS) for neutron spectrometry at workplaces. The two systems, equipped with similar cylindrical 3He proportional counters, were simulated with the MCNP Monte-Carlo code to determine the response to neutrons of different energies for each polyethylene sphere. The BS systems were characterized at monoenergetic and thermal neutron fields. Measurements were performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) standard laboratories, and with the newly characterized IRSN 'SIGMA' thermal neutron facility. The energy distribution of the reference neutron fluence was folded with the response functions for comparison purposes with the experimental data. In almost all cases related to monoenergetic neutrons, a good agreement between the experimental and the calculated count rates was found, and some discrepancies of a few per cent were observed in the thermal region.

  18. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, J.; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    Adopting the hypothesis of accretion-induced magnetic field decay in neutron stars, the consequent evolution of a neutron star's spin and magnetic field are calculated. The results are consistent with observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Thermomagnetic effects could provide a possible physical mechanism for such accretion-induced field decay.

  19. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Love, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    This is a set of five world charts showing the declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, vertical component, and total intensity of the Earth's magnetic field at mean sea level at the beginning of 2005. The charts are based on the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) main model for 2005 and secular change model for 2005-2010. The IGRF is referenced to the World Geodetic System 1984 ellipsoid. Additional information about the USGS geomagnetism program is available at: http://geomag.usgs.gov/

  20. Calibration Of A 14 MeV Neutron Generator With Reference To NBS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Heimbach, Craig R.

    2011-06-01

    NBS-1 is the US national neutron reference source. It has a neutron emission rate (June 1961) of 1.257x10{sup 6} n/s{sup 1,2,3} with an uncertainty of 0.85%(k = 1). Neutron emission-rate calibrations performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are made in comparison to this source, either directly or indirectly. To calibrate a commercial 14 MeV neutron generator, NIST performed a set of comparison measurements to evaluate the neutron output relative to NBS-1. The neutron output of the generator was determined with an uncertainty of about 7%(k = 1). The 15-hour half-life of one of the reactions used also makes possible off-site measurements. Consideration is given to similar calibrations for a 2.5 MeV neutron generator.

  1. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  2. The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D N; Atkinson, D P; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Felker, B; Frank, M; Liddick, S N; Moran, M J; Roberson, G P; Weiss, P B; Grim, G P; Aragonez, R J; Archuleta, T N; Batha, S H; Clark, D D; Clark, D J; Danly, C R; Day, R D; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Gallegos, R A; Guler, N; Hsu, A H; Jaramillo, S A; Loomis, E N; Mares, D; Martinson, D D; Merrill, F E; Morgan, G L; Munson, C; Murphy, T J; Oertel, J A; Polk, P J; Schmidt, D W; Tregillis, I L; Valdez, A C; Volegov, P L; Wang, T F; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Buckles, R A; Cradick, J R; Kaufman, M I; Lutz, S S; Malone, R M; Traille, A

    2011-10-24

    We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n') reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system will be presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system will be presented. We will also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  3. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, Jacob; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    The recent discovery of cyclotron lines from gamma-ray bursts indicates that the strong magnetic fields of isolated neutron stars might not decay. The possible inverse correlation between the strength of the magnetic field and the mass accreted by the neutron star suggests that mass accretion itself may lead to the decay of the magnetic field. The spin and magnetic field evolution of the neutron star was calculated under the hypothesis of the accretion-induced field decay. It is shown that the calculated results are consistent with the observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars.

  4. Personnel neutron dose assessment upgrade: Volume 2, Field neutron spectrometer for health physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Reece, W.D.; Miller, S.D.; Endres, G.W.R.; Durham, J.S.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Tomeraasen, P.L.; Stroud, C.M.; Faust, L.G.; Vallario, E.J.

    1988-07-01

    Both the (ICRP) and the (NCPR) have recommended an increase in neutron quality factors and the adoption of effective dose equivalent methods. The series of reports entitled Personnel Neutron Dose Assessment Upgrade (PNL-6620) addresses these changes. Volume 1 in this series of reports (Personnel Neutron Dosimetry Assessment) provided guidance on the characteristics, use, and calibration of personnel neutron dosimeters in order to meet the new recommendations. This report, Volume 2: Field Neutron Spectrometer for Health Physics Applications describes the development of a portable field spectrometer which can be set up for use in a few minutes by a single person. The field spectrometer described herein represents a significant advance in improving the accuracy of neutron dose assessment. It permits an immediate analysis of the energy spectral distribution associated with the radiation from which neutron quality factor can be determined. It is now possible to depart from the use of maximum Q by determining and realistically applying a lower Q based on spectral data. The field spectrometer is made up of two modules: a detector module with built-in electronics and an analysis module with a IBM PC/reg sign/-compatible computer to control the data acquisition and analysis of data in the field. The unit is simple enough to allow the operator to perform spectral measurements with minimal training. The instrument is intended for use in steady-state radiation fields with neutrons energies covering the fission spectrum range. The prototype field spectrometer has been field tested in plutonium processing facilities, and has been proven to operate satisfactorily. The prototype field spectrometer uses a /sup 3/He proportional counter to measure the neutron energy spectrum between 50 keV and 5 MeV and a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) to measure absorbed neutron dose.

  5. Icy Schwedeneck field may provide reference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Situated in an icy region of the Baltic Sea, Germany's first offshore field may provide the nation with the reference needed to encroach the arctic market. Production began last winter from one platform in the Schwedeneck-See field, located about three miles off the Baltic Coast. Total reserves have been estimated at more than 18 million bbl. Yearly production by the end of 1986 has been estimated at 294,000 bbl. The first two production platforms were installed in late 1983 in water depths ranging from 50 to 80 ft. Because of the ice hazards inherent in the Baltic, the platforms are concrete designed with steel decks.

  6. Reference data file for neutron spectrum adjustment and related radiation damage calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zsolnay, E.M. ); Nolthenius, H.J.; Greenwood, L.R.; Szondi, E.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The REAL-88 interlaboratory exercise organized by IAEA resulted in a neutron metrology file. (NMF-90) comprising problem dependent data for benchmark neutron fields, furthermore, nuclear data and computer programs for neutron spectrum adjustment and radiation damage parameter calculations for the service life assessment of nuclear facilities. Calculation results of some experienced laboratories are also present. This paper describes and analyses the content of the neutron metrology file and outlines the most important problems and tasks to be solved in the field of radiation damage parameter calculations. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Ionization signals from diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Griesmayer, E.; Kavrigin, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel analysis technique for measurements with single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields. This method exploits the unique electronic property of sCVD diamond sensors that the signal shape of the detector current is directly proportional to the initial ionization profile. In fast-neutron fields the diamond sensor acts simultaneously as target and sensor. The interaction of neutrons with the stable isotopes 12 C and 13 C is of interest for fast-neutron diagnostics. The measured signal shapes of detector current pulses are used to identify individual types of interactions in the diamond with the goal to select neutron-induced reactions in the diamond and to suppress neutron-induced background reactions as well as γ-background. The method is verified with experimental data from a measurement in a 14.3 MeV neutron beam at JRC-IRMM, Geel/Belgium, where the 13C(n, α)10Be reaction was successfully extracted from the dominating background of recoil protons and γ-rays and the energy resolution of the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction was substantially improved. The presented analysis technique is especially relevant for diagnostics in harsh radiation environments, like fission and fusion reactors. It allows to extract the neutron spectrum from the background, and is particularly applicable to neutron flux monitoring and neutron spectroscopy.

  8. A Neutron Radiography System for Field Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    made isotope Californium -252 has been the most successful radioactive neutron source for radiological use to date. It has a half-life of 2.65 years...requirement. Heat generation by Californium -252 is particularly low. A summary of neutron source characteristics is given in Table 1. 3 Table 1. SOME AVERAGE

  9. Rotational and magnetic field instabilities in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2014-01-14

    In this short review we present recent results on the dynamics of neutron stars and their magnetic fields. We discuss the progress that has been made, during the last 5 years, in understanding the rotational instabilities with emphasis to the one due to the f-mode, the possibility of using gravitational wave detection in constraining the parameters of neutron stars and revealing the equation of state as well as the detectability of gravitational waves produced during the unstable phase of a neutron star’s life. In addition we discuss the dynamics of extremely strong magnetic fields observed in a class of neutron stars (magnetars). Magnetic fields of that strength are responsible for highly energetic phenomena (giant flares) and we demonstrate that the analysis of the emitted electromagnetic radiation can lead in constraining the parameters of neutron stars. Furthermore, we present our results from the study of such violent phenomena in association with the emission of gravitational radiation.

  10. Paired Ion Chamber Constants for Fission Gamma-Neutron Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    energy E. For neutrons with energies distributed over a spectrum, the above theory must be extended to define a spectrum-averaged neutron W-value...733, 1979. 21. DLC-31/(DPL-1/FEWG1), 37- neutrOn , 21-gamma ray coupled, P3, multigroup library in ANISN Format. ORNL/TM-4840. Oak Ridge National...ragMD©/^ ^i[p@^¥ Paired ion chamber constants for fission gamma- neutron fields G. H.Zeman K. P. Ferlic DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY ARMED FORCES

  11. Characteristics of the simulated workplace neutron fields using a 252Cf source surrounded with cylindrical moderators.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Yoshida, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors established the simulated workplace neutron fields using a 252Cf source surrounded with cylindrical moderators at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Tokai Works. The moderators are annular cylinders made of polymethyl methacrylate and steel. The neutron energy spectrum at the reference calibration point was evaluated from the calculations by MCNP-4B and the measurements by the Bonner multisphere spectrometer and the hydrogen-filled proportional counters. The calculated neutron spectra were in good agreements with the measured ones. These fields can provide the realistic neutron spectra similar to those encountered around the glove-boxes of the fabrication process of MOX (PuO2-UO2 mixed oxide) fuel.

  12. Design of a new IRSN thermal neutron field facility using Monte-Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, V

    2007-01-01

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety owns a graphite-moderated AmBe neutron field facility, SIGMA, that has to be reconstructed. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to study the design of a new thermal facility based on IRSN existing facilities. Studies related to an update version of SIGMA concerned the enhancement of the thermal neutrons contribution to the dose equivalent. Calculations were mainly performed for a (252)Cf neutron source distribution located at the centre of a graphite moderator block. A quasi-pure thermal neutron field was obtained with a 2.4 x 2.4 x 2.4-m(3) block of graphite. A second acceptable neutron field was obtained with 3.3-MeV mono-energetic neutrons created by a 400-kV accelerator coupled to a graphite assembly of 1.5 x 1.5 x 1.5 m(3). The characteristics of the studied thermal fields with the requirement for a reference calibration field are compared, and the advantages and drawbacks of the different producing methods are discussed.

  13. Investigation of Workplace-like Calibration Fields via a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) Neutron Generator.

    PubMed

    Mozhayev, Andrey V; Piper, Roman K; Rathbone, Bruce A; McDonald, Joseph C

    2017-04-01

    Radiation survey meters and personal dosimeters are typically calibrated in reference neutron fields based on conventional radionuclide sources, such as americium-beryllium (Am-Be) or californium-252 (Cf), either unmodified or heavy-water moderated. However, these calibration neutron fields differ significantly from the workplace fields in which most of these survey meters and dosimeters are being used. Although some detectors are designed to yield an approximately dose-equivalent response over a particular neutron energy range, the response of other detectors is highly dependent upon neutron energy. This, in turn, can result in significant over- or underestimation of the intensity of neutron radiation and/or personal dose equivalent determined in the work environment. The use of simulated workplace neutron calibration fields that more closely match those present at the workplace could improve the accuracy of worker, and workplace, neutron dose assessment. This work provides an overview of the neutron fields found around nuclear power reactors and interim spent fuel storage installations based on available data. The feasibility of producing workplace-like calibration fields in an existing calibration facility has been investigated via Monte Carlo simulations. Several moderating assembly configurations, paired with a neutron generator using the deuterium tritium (D-T) fusion reaction, were explored.

  14. Hall-drift induced magnetic field instability in neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Rheinhardt, M; Geppert, U

    2002-03-11

    In the presence of a strong magnetic field and under conditions as realized in the crust and the superfluid core of neutron stars, the Hall drift dominates the field evolution. We show by a linear analysis that, for a sufficiently strong large-scale background field depending at least quadratically on position in a plane conducting slab, an instability occurs which rapidly generates small-scale fields. Their growth rates depend on the choice of the boundary conditions, increase with the background field strength, and may reach 10(3) times the Ohmic decay rate. The effect of that instability on the rotational and thermal evolution of neutron stars is discussed.

  15. Characterization of Neutron Field in the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Takashi; Maeda, Shigetaka; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2003-06-01

    In order to assure the reliability and accuracy of neutron flux and related characteristics such as dpa, helium production and fuel power in the irradiation test of JOYO, reactor dosimetry and neutronic calculation have been developed. The detailed calculation was conducted using transport and Monte Carlo codes with the core subassembly composition obtained by three dimensional diffusion theory. Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitor (HAFM) were also used to measure the neutron fluence. The calculation method was verified by the comparison of measured fuel power based on the PIE data and adjusted neutron flux using measured reaction rates. As a result, it was confirmed that the calculation with experimental correction can characterize the JOYO neutron field precisely and meet the specified accuracy set for each irradiation test.

  16. The acceleration of a neutron in a static electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelletti, R. L.

    2012-06-01

    We show that when a non-relativistic neutron travels in a static electric field, the acceleration vector operator is perpendicular to the velocity operator. Kinetic energy is conserved. A spin-dependent field term in the canonical momentum gives rise to a non-dispersive contribution to the quantum mechanical (Aharonov-Casher) phase. This motion differs from that in a static magnetic field which has no field term in the canonical momentum and no conservation of kinetic energy. For the geometry of the Aharonov-Casher effect, there is no acceleration, while in Mott-Schwinger scattering, the acceleration causes a spin-dependent change in neutron direction.

  17. Possibility of using Curium-248 for the development of the reference neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, B.M.; Batenkov, O.I.; Blinov, M.V.

    1993-12-31

    Neutron sources on the base of {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission are widely used. They have great specific neutron yields and comparative low gamma-ray background. But their half-lifes are rather short. The spectrum of {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission neutrons was recommended by IAEA as an international standard spectrum. {sup 248}Cm is of special interest for a preparation on its base long-lived reference neutron sources. On the one hand its half-life (3.5 10{sup 5} years) is essentially greater than that of {sup 252}Cf (2.7 years), and on the other hand the intensity of {sup 248}Cm spontaneous fission is high enough (10{sup 4} fiss/mg s) which enables to use it in various scientific and practical purposes. For {sup 248}Cm there is practically information only about the middle energy of the spectrum. In this report the {sup 248}Cm spontaneous fission neutron spectrum measurement results are presented for the determination of the possibility of the use of this isotope as international standard and for purposes of a development of reference long-lived neutron sources on {sup 248}Cm base.

  18. Relativistic mean field calculations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharya, Madhubrata; Roy, Subinit

    2014-08-14

    Relativistic mean field calculations have been employed to study neutron rich nuclei. The Lagrange's equations have been solved in the co-ordinate space. The effect of the continuum has been effectively taken into account through the method of resonant continuum. It is found that BCS approximation performs as well as a more involved Relativistic Continuum Hartree Bogoliubov approach. Calculations reveal the possibility of modification of magic numbers in neutron rich nuclei. Calculation for low energy proton scattering cross sections shows that the present approach reproduces the density in very light neutron rich nuclei.

  19. Extensive population synthesis of isolated neutron stars with field decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.; Boldin, P. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Pons, J. A.; Posselt, B.

    2011-09-01

    We perform population synthesis studies of different types of neutron stars (thermally emitting isolated neutron stars, normal radio pulsars, magnetars) taking into account the magnetic field decay and using results from the most recent advances in neutron star cooling theory. For the first time, we confront our results with observations using simultaneously the Log N--Log S distribution for nearby isolated neutron stars, the Log N--Log L distribution for magnetars, and the distribution of radio pulsars in the P--Ṗ diagram. For this purpose, we fix a baseline neutron star model (all microphysics input), and other relevant parameters to standard values (velocity distribution, mass spectrum, etc.), only allowing to vary the initial magnetic field strength. We find that our theoretical model is consistent with all sets of data if the initial magnetic field distribution function follows a log-normal law with < log(B0/[G])>~13.25 and σlog B0~0.6. The typical scenario includes about 10% of neutron stars born as magnetars, significant magnetic field decay during the first million years of a NS life (only about a factor of 2 for low field neutron stars but more than an order of magnitude for magnetars), and a mass distribution function dominated by low mass objects. This model explains satisfactorily all known populations. Evolutionary links between different subclasses may exist, although robust conclusions are not yet possible. We apply the obtained field distribution and the model of decay to study long-term evolution of neuton stars till the stage of accretion from the interstellar medium. It is shown that though the subsonic propeller stage can be relatively long, initially highly magnetized neutron stars (B0>~1013 G) reach the accretion regime within the Galactic lifetime if their kick velocities are not too large. The fact that in previous studies made >10 years ago, such objects were not considered results in a slight increase of the Accretor fraction in

  20. Results of field trials using the NPL simulated reactor neutron field facility.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G C; Thomas, D J; Bennett, A

    2007-01-01

    The NPL simulated reactor neutron field facility provides neutron spectra similar to those found in the environs of UK gas-cooled reactors. Neutrons are generated by irradiating a thick lithium-alloy target with monoenergetic protons between 2.5 and 3.5 MeV (depending on the desired spectrum), and then moderated by a 40-cm diameter sphere of heavy water. This represents an extremely soft workplace field, with a mean neutron energy of 25 keV and, more significantly, a mean fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient of the order of 20 pSv cm(2), approximately 20 times lower than those of the ISO standard calibration sources (252)Cf and (241)Am-Be. Results of field trials are presented, including readings from neutron spectrometers, personal dosimeters (active and passive) and neutron area survey meters, and issues with beam monitoring are discussed.

  1. Neutron Limit on the Strongly-Coupled Chameleon Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    One of the major open questions of cosmology is the physical origin of the dark energy. There are a few sets of theories which might explain this origin that could be tested experimentally. The chameleon dark energy theory postulates self-interacting scalar field that couples to matter. This coupling induces a screening mechanism chosen so that the field amplitude is nonzero in empty space but is greatly suppressed in regions of terrestrial matter density. On behalf of the INDEX collaboration, I will report the most stringent upper bound on the free neutron-chameleon coupling in the strongly-coupled limit of the chameleon theory using neutron interferometric techniques. In our experiment we measure neutron phase induced by chameleon field. We report a 95 % confidence level upper bound on the neutron-chameleon coupling ranging from β < 4 . 7 ×106 for a Ratra-Peebles index of n = 1 in the nonlinear scalar field potential to β < 2 . 4 ×107 for n = 6 , one order of magnitude more sensitive than the most recent free neutron limit for intermediate n. This work was supported by NIST; NSF Grants: PHY-1205342, PHY-1068712, PHY-1307426; DOE award DE-FG02-97ER41042; NSERC CREATE and DISCOVERY programs; CERC; IUCSS and IU FRS program.

  2. A compact neutron scatter camera for field deployment

    DOE PAGES

    Goldsmith, John E. M.; Gerling, Mark D.; Brennan, James S.

    2016-08-23

    Here, we describe a very compact (0.9 m high, 0.4 m diameter, 40 kg) battery operable neutron scatter camera designed for field deployment. Unlike most other systems, the configuration of the sixteen liquid-scintillator detection cells are arranged to provide omnidirectional (4π) imaging with sensitivity comparable to a conventional two-plane system. Although designed primarily to operate as a neutron scatter camera for localizing energetic neutron sources, it also functions as a Compton camera for localizing gamma sources. In addition to describing the radionuclide source localization capabilities of this system, we demonstrate how it provides neutron spectra that can distinguish plutonium metalmore » from plutonium oxide sources, in addition to the easier task of distinguishing AmBe from fission sources.« less

  3. A compact neutron scatter camera for field deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, John E. M.; Gerling, Mark D.; Brennan, James S.

    2016-08-23

    Here, we describe a very compact (0.9 m high, 0.4 m diameter, 40 kg) battery operable neutron scatter camera designed for field deployment. Unlike most other systems, the configuration of the sixteen liquid-scintillator detection cells are arranged to provide omnidirectional (4π) imaging with sensitivity comparable to a conventional two-plane system. Although designed primarily to operate as a neutron scatter camera for localizing energetic neutron sources, it also functions as a Compton camera for localizing gamma sources. In addition to describing the radionuclide source localization capabilities of this system, we demonstrate how it provides neutron spectra that can distinguish plutonium metal from plutonium oxide sources, in addition to the easier task of distinguishing AmBe from fission sources.

  4. Gamma-ray bursts and neutron star field decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter; Blumenthal, George; Chuang, Kuan-Wen; Hurley, Kevin; Kargatis, Vincent; Liang, Edison; Linder, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Assuming a Galactic origin of gamma-ray bursts, we use pulsar data to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron stars and determine the sampling depths of current detectors. Based on these distance limits, we calculate the corresponding age distribution of Galactic neutron stars and apply an exponential field decay model to test whether the observed high incidence rate of cyclotron lines is consistent with suggested field decay time scales of order 10 exp 7 years. We find that the properties of the observed population of gamma-ray bursts are inconsistent with the idea that bursts originate at arbitrary times on neutron stars whose fields decay on time scales shorter than about 10 exp 9 years. Possible interpretations of this inconsistency are discussed.

  5. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  6. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  7. Neutron limit on the strongly-coupled chameleon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Arif, M.; Cory, D. G.; Haun, R.; Heacock, B.; Huber, M. G.; Nsofini, J.; Pushin, D. A.; Saggu, P.; Sarenac, D.; Shahi, C. B.; Skavysh, V.; Snow, W. M.; Young, A. R.; Index Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The physical origin of the dark energy that causes the accelerated expansion rate of the Universe is one of the major open questions of cosmology. One set of theories postulates the existence of a self-interacting scalar field for dark energy coupling to matter. In the chameleon dark energy theory, this coupling induces a screening mechanism such that the field amplitude is nonzero in empty space but is greatly suppressed in regions of terrestrial matter density. However measurements performed under appropriate vacuum conditions can enable the chameleon field to appear in the apparatus, where it can be subjected to laboratory experiments. Here we report the most stringent upper bound on the free neutron-chameleon coupling in the strongly coupled limit of the chameleon theory using neutron interferometric techniques. Our experiment sought the chameleon field through the relative phase shift it would induce along one of the neutron paths inside a perfect crystal neutron interferometer. The amplitude of the chameleon field was actively modulated by varying the millibar pressures inside a dual-chamber aluminum cell. We report a 95% confidence level upper bound on the neutron-chameleon coupling β ranging from β <4.7 ×106 for a Ratra-Peebles index of n =1 in the nonlinear scalar field potential to β <2.4 ×107 for n =6 , one order of magnitude more sensitive than the most recent free neutron limit for intermediate n . Similar experiments can explore the full parameter range for chameleon dark energy in the foreseeable future.

  8. Estimate of the neutron fields in ATLAS based on ATLAS-MPX detectors data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchami, J.; Dallaire, F.; Gutiérrez, A.; Idarraga, J.; Král, V.; Leroy, C.; Picard, S.; Pospíšil, S.; Scallon, O.; Solc, J.; Suk, M.; Turecek, D.; Vykydal, Z.; Žemlièka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of different types of radiation. These detectors are covered with converting layers of 6LiF and polyethylene (PE) to increase their sensitivity to thermal and fast neutrons, respectively. These devices allow the measurement of the composition and spectroscopic characteristics of the radiation field in ATLAS, particularly of neutrons. These detectors can operate in low or high preset energy threshold mode. The signature of particles interacting in a ATLAS-MPX detector at low threshold are clusters of adjacent pixels with different size and form depending on their type, energy and incidence angle. The classification of particles into different categories can be done using the geometrical parameters of these clusters. The Medipix analysis framework (MAFalda) — based on the ROOT application — allows the recognition of particle tracks left in ATLAS-MPX devices located at various positions in the ATLAS detector and cavern. The pattern recognition obtained from the application of MAFalda was configured to distinguish the response of neutrons from other radiation. The neutron response at low threshold is characterized by clusters of adjoining pixels (heavy tracks and heavy blobs) left by protons and heavy ions resulting from neutron interactions in the converting layers of the ATLAS-MPX devices. The neutron detection efficiency of ATLAS-MPX devices has been determined by the exposure of two detectors of reference to radionuclide sources of neutrons (252Cf and 241AmBe). With these results, an estimate of the neutrons fields produced at the devices locations during ATLAS operation was done.

  9. Neutron spin turners with a rotating magnetic field: first experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnarchuk, V. I.; Kraan, W. H.; Rekveldt, M. T.; Ioffe, A.

    2008-03-01

    Spin turners are the key elements of a neutron spin-echo spectrometer with rotating magnetic fields. Here we describe the results of experiments with thin-film spin turners made of 25 µm amorphous ferromagnetic foils, whose in-plane magnetization is rotated by a weak external rotating field. The behaviour of the polarization vector of a 0.2 nm neutron beam is analysed in 3D after transmission through such a foil and, apart from a non-negligible depolarization, the results show that they are in good accordance with simulations. This observed depolarization is due to a domain structure with a net magnetization.

  10. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  11. Measurements of neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma-rays mixed field using imaging plate for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    The imaging plate (IP) technique is tried to be used as a handy method to measure the spatial neutron distribution via the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction for neutron capture therapy (NCT). For this purpose, IP is set in a water phantom and irradiated in a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays. The Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator is utilized for this experiment. The neutrons are moderated with 20-cm-thick D(2)O to obtain suitable neutron field for NCT. The signal for IP doped with Gd as a neutron-response enhancer is subtracted with its contribution by gamma-rays, which was estimated using IP without Gd. The gamma-ray response of Gd-doped IP to non-Gd IP is set at 1.34, the value measured for (60)Co gamma-rays, in estimating the gamma-ray contribution to Gd-doped IP signal. Then measured distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate agrees within 10% with the calculated value based on the method that has already been validated for its reproducibility of Au activation. However, the evaluated distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate is so sensitive to gamma-ray energy, e.g. the discrepancy of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate between measurement and calculation becomes 30% for the photon energy change from 33keV to 1.253MeV.

  12. A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Arun; Waldmann, Ole; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali; Schenkel, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron sources is pursued. Arrays of carbon nano-fibers promise the high field-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of field emitters with a density up to 10(6) tips∕cm(2) and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. The critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

  13. Deformed neutron stars due to strong magnetic field in terms of relativistic mean field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanase, Kota; Yoshinaga, Naotaka

    2014-09-01

    Some observations suggest that magnetic field intensity of neutron stars that have particularly strong magnetic field, magnetars, reaches values up to 1014-15G. It is expected that there exists more strong magnetic field of several orders of magnitude in the interior of such stars. Neutron star matter is so affected by magnetic fields caused by intrinsic magnetic moments and electric charges of baryons that masses of neutron stars calculated by using Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation is therefore modified. We calculate equation of state (EOS) in density-dependent magnetic field by using sigma-omega-rho model that can reproduce properties of stable nuclear matter in laboratory Furthermore we calculate modified masses of deformed neutron stars.

  14. Magnetic fields in mixed neutron-star-plus-wormhole systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aringazin, Ascar; Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta E-mail: v.dzhunushaliev@gmail.com E-mail: b.kleihaus@uni-oldenburg.de

    2015-04-01

    We consider mixed configurations consisting of a wormhole filled by a strongly magnetized isotropic or anisotropic neutron fluid. The nontrivial topology of the spacetime is allowed by the presence of exotic matter. By comparing these configurations with ordinary magnetized neutron stars, we clarify the question of how the presence of the nontrivial topology influences the magnetic field distribution inside the fluid. In the case of an anisotropic fluid, we find new solutions describing configurations, where the maximum of the fluid density is shifted from the center. A linear stability analysis shows that these mixed configurations are unstable.

  15. Neutron Field Measurements in Phantom with Foil Activation Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-29

    jI25 Ii III uumu ullli~ S....- - Lb - w * .qJ’ AD-A 192 122 ulJ. IL (pj DNA-TR-87- 10 N EUTRON FIELD MEASUREMENTS IN PHANTOM WITH FOIL ACTIVATION...SAND II Measurements in Phantom 6 4 The 5-Foil Neutron Dosimetry Method 29 5 Comparison of SAND II and Simple 5-Foil Dosimetry Method 34 6 Thermal ...quite reasonable. The monkey phantom spectrum differs from the NBS U-235 fission spectrum in that the former has a I/E tail plus thermal -neutron peak

  16. International geomagnetic reference field 1965.0 in dipole coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.

    1970-01-01

    Computer program transforming spherical harmonic coefficients into arbitrarily tilted coordinate systems, tabulating coefficients of International Geomagnetic Reference Field 1965 in dipole coordinate system

  17. Second Research Coordination Meeting on Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis -- Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B.; Kellett, Mark A.

    2008-03-19

    The second meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Project on"Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis" was held at the IAEA, Vienna from 7-9 May, 2007. A summary of the presentations made by participants is given, along with reports on specifically assigned tasks and subsequent discussions. In order to meet the overall objectives of this CRP, the outputs have been reiterated and new task assignments made.

  18. Neutron activation analysis for reference determination of the implantation dose of cobalt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, R.P.H.; Bubert, H.; Palmetshofer, L.

    1992-05-15

    The authors prepared depth profilling reference materials by cobalt ion implantation at an ion energy of 300 keV into n-type silicon. The implanted Co dose was then determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) giving an analytical dynamic range of almost 5 decades and uncertainty of 1.5%. This form of analysis allows sources of error (beam spreading, misalignment) to be corrected. 70 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Determination of Cd and Cr in an ABS candidate reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangwon; Kang, Namgoo; Cho, Kyunghaeng; Lee, Jounghae

    2008-12-01

    In order to practically better cope with technical barriers to trade (TBT) of a great number of resin goods, our research presents first-ever results for the determination of Cd and Cr in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) candidate reference material using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) recently recognized as a candidate primary ratio method with a particular attention to the estimation of involved measurement uncertainties.

  20. A comparative neutron activation analysis study of common generic manipulated and reference medicines commercialized in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Leal, A S; Menezes, M A B C; Rodrigues, R R; Andonie, O; Vermaercke, P; Sneyers, L

    2008-10-01

    In this work, a comparative study of neutron activation analysis (NAA) was performed by the nuclear institutes: CDTN/CNEN-Brazil, CCHEN-Chile and the SCK.CEN-Belgium aiming to investigate some generic, manipulated and reference medicines largely commercialized in Brazil. Some impurities such as: As, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Eu, Fe, Hf, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ti and Zn were found, and the heterogeneity of the samples pointed out the lack of an efficient public system of quality control.

  1. Predicting neutron star properties based on chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laduke, Alison; Sammarruca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    The energy per nucleon as a function of density, known as the nuclear equation of state, is the crucial input in the structure equations of neutron stars and thus establishes the connection between nuclear physics and compact astrophysical objects. More precisely, the pressure which supports the star against gravitational collapse is mostly determined by the nature of the equation of state of highly neutron-rich matter. In this contribution, we will report on our work in progress to calculate neutron star masses and radii. The equation of state is obtained microscopically from Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations based on state-of-the-art nuclear forces which have been developed within the framework of chiral effective field theory. The latter has become popular in recent years as a fundamental and systematic approach firmly connected to low-energy quantum chromodynamics. Supported by the Hill Undergraduate Fellowship and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. EPR dosimetry in a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field.

    PubMed

    Trompier, F; Fattibene, P; Tikunov, D; Bartolotta, A; Carosi, A; Doca, M C

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for criticality dosimetry was evaluated for tooth enamel, mannose and alanine pellets during the 'international intercomparison of criticality dosimetry techniques' at the SILENE reactor held in Valduc in June 2002, France. These three materials were irradiated in neutron and gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions in order to evaluate their neutron sensitivity. The neutron response was found to be around 10% for tooth enamel, 45% for mannose and between 40 and 90% for alanine pellets according their type. According to the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of criticality accident absorbed dose, analyzed results show the EPR potentiality and complementarity with regular criticality techniques.

  3. Evaluation of homogeneity of a certified reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, B.; Duke, M.J.M.; Ng, D.

    1986-01-01

    The homogeneity of the marine reference material TORT-1, a spray-dried and acetone-extracted hepatopancreatic material from the lobster, was tested for 26 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Through a one-way analysis of variance based on six analyses on each of six bottles of TORT-1, it was concluded that the between-bottle heterogeneity is no greater than the within-bottle heterogeneity. The analytical results for those elements for which values were provided by NRC agree with the NRC values within 95% confidence limits. 8 references, 6 tables.

  4. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  5. Field calibration of reference reflectance panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Ray D.; Moran, M. Susan; Slater, Philip N.; Biggar, Stuart F.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for calibrating reference reflectance panels using the sun as the radiation source and a pressed-polytetrafluoroethylene powder standard is described. The directional/directional reflectance factor and the directional/hemispheric reflectance factor are examined. Directional/directional voltage responses for pressed-halon are analyzed. Three painted BaSO4 and one painted halon were calibrated using the proposed procedure. The effects of diffuse irradiance on reflectance-factor measurements are investigated. It is determined that the method has an accuracy on the order of 1 percent. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are discussed.

  6. Neutron interference in the gravitational field of a ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Robert D.; Mallett, Ronald L.

    2015-07-01

    The neutron split-beam interferometer has proven to be particularly useful in measuring Newtonian gravitational effects such as those studied by Colella, Overhauser, and Werner (COW). The development of the ring laser has led to numerous applications in many areas of physics including a recent general relativistic prediction of frame dragging in the gravitational field produced by the electromagnetic radiation in a ring laser. This paper introduces a new general technique based on a canonical transformation of the Dirac equation for the gravitational field of a general linearized spacetime. Using this technique it is shown that there is a phase shift in the interference of two neutron beams due to the frame-dragging nature of the gravitational field of a ring laser.

  7. Search for strongly coupled Chameleon scalar field with neutron interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Arif, M.; Cory, D.; Haun, R.; Heacock, B.; Huber, M.; Nsofini, J.; Pushin, D. A.; Saggu, P.; Sarenac, D.; Shahi, C.; Skavysh, V.; Snow, M.; Young, A.

    2015-04-01

    The dark energy proposed to explain the observed accelerated expansion of the universe is not understood. A chameleon scalar field proposed as a dark energy candidate can explain the accelerated expansion and evade all current gravity experimental bounds. It features an effective range of the chameleon scalar field that depends on the local mass density. Hence a perfect crystal neutron interferometer, that measures relative phase shift between two paths, is a prefect tool to search for the chameleon field. We are preparing a two-chamber helium gas cell for the neutron interferometer. We can lower the pressure in one cell so low that the chameleon field range expands into the cell and causes a measurable neutron phase shift while keeping the pressure difference constant. We expect to set a new upper limit of the Chameleon field by at least one order of magnitude. This work is supported by NSF Grant 1205977, DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER41042, Canadian Excellence Research Chairs program, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and Collaborative Research and Training Experience Program

  8. GCR Simulator Reference Field and a Spectral Approach for Laboratory Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara; Walker, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, an approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed and weighed against alternative simulation strategies. The neutron component and track structure characteristics of the simulated field are discussed in this context.

  9. Relativistic mean field models for finite nuclei and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Chia

    In this dissertation we have created theoretical models for finite nuclei, nuclear matter, and neutron stars within the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, and we have used these models to investigate the elusive isovector sector and related physics, in particular, the neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei, the nuclear symmetry energy, and the properties of neutron stars. To build RMF models that incorporate collective excitations in finite nuclei in addition to their ground-state properties, we have extended the non-relativistic sum rule approach to the relativistic domain. This allows an efficient estimate of giant monopole energies. Moreover, we have combined an exact shell-model-like approach with the mean-field calculation to describe pairing correlations in open-shell nuclei. All the ingredients were then put together to establish the calibration scheme. We have also extended the transformation between model parameters and pseudo data of nuclear matter within the RMF context. Performing calibration in this pseudo data space can not only facilitate the searching algorithm but also make the pseudo data genuine model predictions. This calibration scheme is also supplemented by a covariance analysis enabling us to extract the information content of a model, including theoretical uncertainties and correlation coefficients. A series of RMF models subject to the same isoscalar constraints but one differing isovector assumption were then created using this calibration scheme. By comparing their predictions of the nuclear matter equation of state to both experimental and theoretical constraints, we found that a small neutron skin of about 0.16 fm in Pb208 is favored, indicating that the symmetry energy should be soft. To obtain stronger evidence, we proceeded to examine the evolution of the isotopic chains in both oxygen and calcium. Again, it was found that the model with such small neutron skin and soft symmetry energy can best describe both isotopic

  10. Implications of Intense Magnetic Fields on Neutron-Star Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyl, Jeremy Samuel

    1998-08-01

    In this thesis, I will examine how intense magnetic fields influence physical processes in the vicinity of and inside neutron stars. An intense magnetic field can have dramatic effects on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation and the structure of a dipole field. We first derive a compact analytic form for the effective Lagrangian of quantum electrodynamics (QED) with an external field. An intense field modifies the propagators of the virtual electron-positron pairs formed as a photon travels. We first treat the effects of QED as an effective magnetic permeability and electric permittivity. We derive compact expressions for the index of refraction of a low-frequency photon traveling through an electric or magnetic field. We examine the one-loop corrections to a macroscopic magnetic dipole and find that the nonlinear paramagnetic properties of the vacuum result in dipole, hexapole, 2n-pole moments which are a function of distance from the dipole. The speed of light in a magnetized vacuum is a function of the strength of the fields. We propose an experiment using the existing LIGO testbed interferometer which can measure this effect with a signal-to-noise ratio of twenty. We expect an intense magnetic field to affect the propagation of an electromagnetic wave. We treat the electromagnetic field as a relativistic fluid and derive the equations for the characteristics. The characteristics of the wave begin to cross after a number of wavelengths. A shock forms. The energy of the wave dissipates into electron-positron pairs shortly thereafter. We next discuss how an intense magnetic field affects atomic structure. We find that the bound electron shields the nucleus quite effectively and that the cross section for nuclear fusion reactions is dramatically increased. We then develop both an analytic and a numerical technique to study the properties of simple atoms and molecules in an intense magnetic field. We increase the scale from atomic physics to solid

  11. Neutron resonance spin echo with longitudinal DC fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautloher, Maximilian; Kindervater, Jonas; Keller, Thomas; Häußler, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    We report on the design, construction, and performance of a neutron resonance spin echo (NRSE) instrument employing radio frequency (RF) spin flippers combining RF fields with DC fields, the latter oriented parallel (longitudinal) to the neutron propagation direction (longitudinal NRSE (LNRSE)). The advantage of the longitudinal configuration is the inherent homogeneity of the effective magnetic path integrals. In the center of the RF coils, the sign of the spin precession phase is inverted by a π flip of the neutron spins, such that non-uniform spin precession at the boundaries of the RF flippers is canceled. The residual inhomogeneity can be reduced by Fresnel- or Pythagoras-coils as in the case of conventional spin echo instruments (neutron spin echo (NSE)). Due to the good intrinsic homogeneity of the B0 coils, the current densities required for the correction coils are at least a factor of three less than in conventional NSE. As the precision and the current density of the correction coils are the limiting factors for the resolution of both NSE and LNRSE, the latter has the intrinsic potential to surpass the energy resolution of present NSE instruments. Our prototype LNRSE spectrometer described here was implemented at the resonance spin echo for diverse applications (RESEDA) beamline at the MLZ in Garching, Germany. The DC fields are generated by B0 coils, based on resistive split-pair solenoids with an active shielding for low stray fields along the beam path. One pair of RF flippers at a distance of 2 m generates a field integral of ˜0.5 Tm. The LNRSE technique is a future alternative for high-resolution spectroscopy of quasi-elastic excitations. In addition, it also incorporates the MIEZE technique, which allows to achieve spin echo resolution for spin depolarizing samples and sample environments. Here we present the results of numerical optimization of the coil geometry and first data from the prototype instrument.

  12. Neutron resonance spin echo with longitudinal DC fields.

    PubMed

    Krautloher, Maximilian; Kindervater, Jonas; Keller, Thomas; Häußler, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    We report on the design, construction, and performance of a neutron resonance spin echo (NRSE) instrument employing radio frequency (RF) spin flippers combining RF fields with DC fields, the latter oriented parallel (longitudinal) to the neutron propagation direction (longitudinal NRSE (LNRSE)). The advantage of the longitudinal configuration is the inherent homogeneity of the effective magnetic path integrals. In the center of the RF coils, the sign of the spin precession phase is inverted by a π flip of the neutron spins, such that non-uniform spin precession at the boundaries of the RF flippers is canceled. The residual inhomogeneity can be reduced by Fresnel- or Pythagoras-coils as in the case of conventional spin echo instruments (neutron spin echo (NSE)). Due to the good intrinsic homogeneity of the B0 coils, the current densities required for the correction coils are at least a factor of three less than in conventional NSE. As the precision and the current density of the correction coils are the limiting factors for the resolution of both NSE and LNRSE, the latter has the intrinsic potential to surpass the energy resolution of present NSE instruments. Our prototype LNRSE spectrometer described here was implemented at the resonance spin echo for diverse applications (RESEDA) beamline at the MLZ in Garching, Germany. The DC fields are generated by B0 coils, based on resistive split-pair solenoids with an active shielding for low stray fields along the beam path. One pair of RF flippers at a distance of 2 m generates a field integral of ∼0.5 Tm. The LNRSE technique is a future alternative for high-resolution spectroscopy of quasi-elastic excitations. In addition, it also incorporates the MIEZE technique, which allows to achieve spin echo resolution for spin depolarizing samples and sample environments. Here we present the results of numerical optimization of the coil geometry and first data from the prototype instrument.

  13. Hydrogen in strong magnetic fields in neutron star surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salpeter, Edwin E.

    1998-12-01

    In magnetic fields of very much more than 0953-8984/10/49/017/img1 G, polyatomic hydrogen molecules, in the form of long chains, are stable. In neutron star surfaces, fields of 0953-8984/10/49/017/img2 G are commonplace and 0953-8984/10/49/017/img3 G has been reported. Liquid hydrogen can form at the higher field with a zero-pressure density of about 0953-8984/10/49/017/img4. At these densities, hydrogen can burn to helium by pycnonuclear reactions even at low temperatures - the `real cold fusion'.

  14. Accurate characterization of weak neutron fields by using a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Medkour Ishak-Boushaki, G; Allab, M

    2017-04-01

    A Bayesian analysis of data derived from neutron spectrometric measurements provides the advantage of determining rigorously integral physical quantities characterizing the neutron field and their respective related uncertainties. The first and essential step in a Bayesian approach is the parameterization of the investigated neutron spectrum. The aim of this paper is to investigate the sensitivity of the Bayesian results, mainly the neutron dose H(*)(10) required for radiation protection purposes and its correlated uncertainty, to the selected neutron spectrum parameterization.

  15. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering study of the NIST mAb reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Liu, Yun; Krueger, Susan; Curtis, Joseph

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of great interest to the biopharmaceutical industry because they can be engineered to target specific antigens. Due to their importance, the biomanufacturing initiative at NIST is developing an IgG1 mAb reference material `NIST mAb', which can be used by industry, academia, and regulatory authorities. As part of this collaborative effort, we aim at characterizing the reference material using neutron scattering techniques. We have studied the small-angle scattering profile of the NIST mAb in a histidine buffer at 0 and 150 mM NaCl. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate an ensemble of structures and calculate their theoretical scattering profile, which can be directly compared with experimental data. Moreover, we analyze the structure factor to understand the effect of solution conditions on the protein-protein interactions. Finally, we have measured the solution scattering of the NIST mAb, while simultaneously performing freeze/thaw cycles, in order to investigate if the solution structure was affected upon freezing. The results from neutron scattering not only support the development of the reference material, but also provide insights on its stability and guide efforts for its development under different formulations.

  16. Field Testing of an In-Situ Neutron Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, D. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Feldman, W. C.; Wiens, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to demonstrate the utility of using in-situ neutron spectroscopy to measure water content on planetary surfaces, we have developed a field site for carrying out neutron spectroscopy measurements. Specifically, our objectives in developing the field site are: 1) Demonstrate in-situ neutron measurements in a realistic field test scenario; 2) Demonstrate our ability to accurately model neutron measurements for various conditions and identify measurement factors that need to be controlled and/or accounted for such as detailed stratigraphy; 3) Provide a field test location for future in-situ neutron measurements using a variety of instrument and soil configurations.

  17. LUPIN, a new instrument for pulsed neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresana, M.; Ferrarini, M.; Manessi, G. P.; Silari, M.; Varoli, V.

    2013-06-01

    A number of studies focused in the last decades on the development of survey meters to be used in pulsed radiation fields. This is a topic attracting widespread interest for applications such as radiation protection and beam diagnostics in accelerators. This paper describes a new instrument specifically conceived for applications in pulsed neutron fields (PNF). The detector, called LUPIN, is a rem counter type instrument consisting of a 3He proportional counter placed inside a spherical moderator. It works in current mode with a front-end electronics consisting of a current-voltage logarithmic amplifier, whose output signal is acquired with an ADC and processed on a PC. This alternative signal processing allows the instrument to be used in PNF without being affected by saturation effects. Moreover, it has a measurement capability ranging over many orders of burst intensity. Despite the fact that it works in current mode, it can measure a single neutron interaction. The LUPIN was first calibrated in CERN's calibration laboratory with a PuBe source. Measurements were carried out under various experimental conditions at the Helmholtz-Zentrum in Berlin, in the stray field at various locations of the CERN Proton Synchrotron complex and around a radiotherapy linear accelerator at the S. Raffaele hospital in Milan. The detector can withstand single bursts with values of H*(10) up to 16 nSv/burst without showing any saturation effect. It efficiently works in pulsed stray fields, where a conventional rem-counter underestimates by a factor of 2. It is also able to reject the very intense and pulsed photon contribution that often accompanies the neutron field with good reliability.

  18. A proposed International Geomagnetic Reference Field for 1965- 1985.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Fabiano, E.B.

    1982-01-01

    A set of spherical harmonic models describing the Earth's main magnetic field from 1965 to 1985 has been developed and is proposed as the next revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). A tenth degree and order spherical harmonic model of the main field was derived from Magsat data. A series of eighth degree and order spherical harmonic models of the secular variation of the main field was derived from magnetic observatory annual mean values. Models of the main field at 1965, 1970, 1975, and 1980 were obtained by extrapolating the main-field model using the secular variation models.-Authors spherical harmonic models Earth main magnetic field Magsat data

  19. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-07

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h(-1). These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field.

  20. Temperature compensated current sensor using reference magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-10-09

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by a separate but identical magnetic field sensor and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  1. On accelerator-based neutron sources and neutron field characterization with low energy neutron spectrometer based on position sensitive 3He counter.

    PubMed

    Murata, I; Miyamaru, H; Kato, I; Mori, Y

    2009-07-01

    The development of new neutron sources for BNCT applications, based on particle accelerators is currently underway all over the world. Though nuclear reactors were used for a long time as the only neutron source available having the requested flux levels, the accelerator-based ones have recently been investigated on the other hand due to its easy-to-use and acceptable performances. However, when using an accelerator, various secondary particles would be emitted which forms a troublesome background. Moreover, the neutrons produced have usually an energy spectrum somewhat different from the requested one and thus should be largely moderated. An additional issue to be taken into account is the patient positioning, which should be close to the neutron source, in order to take advantage of a neutron flux level high enough to limit the BNCT treatment time within 1h. This implies that, inside a relatively narrow space, neutrons should be moderated, while unnecessary secondary particles should be shielded. Considering that a background-free neutron field from an accelerator-driven neutron source dedicated to BNCT application is generally difficult to be provided, the characterization of such a neutron field will have to be clearly assessed. In the present study, a low energy neutron spectrometer has been thus designed and is now being developed to measure the accelerator-based neutron source performance. The presently proposed spectrometer is based on a (3)He proportional counter, which is 50 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, with a gas pressure of 0.5 MPa. It is quite unique that the spectrometer is set up in parallel with the incident neutron beam and a reaction depth distribution is measured by it as a position sensitive detector. Recently, a prototype detector has been developed and the signal test is now underway. In this paper, the feature of the accelerator-based neutron sources is outlined and importance of neutron field characterization is discussed. And the developed

  2. Geant4 simulation of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility.

    PubMed

    Prokopovich, D A; Reinhard, M I; Cornelius, I M; Rosenfeld, A B

    2010-09-01

    The CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility is used for testing and calibrating both active and passive radiation dosemeters for radiation protection applications in space and aviation. Through a combination of a primary particle beam, target and a suitable designed shielding configuration, the facility is able to reproduce the neutron component of the high altitude radiation field relevant to the jet aviation industry. Simulations of the facility using the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) toolkit provide an improved understanding of the neutron particle fluence as well as the particle fluence of other radiation components present. The secondary particle fluence as a function of the primary particle fluence incident on the target and the associated dose equivalent rates were determined at the 20 designated irradiation positions available at the facility. Comparisons of the simulated results with previously published simulations obtained using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, as well as with experimental results of the neutron fluence obtained with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, are made.

  3. Construction of 144, 565 keV and 5.0 MeV monoenergetic neutron calibration fields at JAERI.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Y; Yoshizawa, M; Saegusa, J; Fujii, K; Shimizu, S; Yoshida, M; Shibata, Y; Uritani, A; Kudo, K

    2004-01-01

    Monoenergetic neutron calibration fields of 144, 565 keV and 5.0 MeV have been developed at the Facility of Radiation Standards of JAERI using a 4 MV Pelletron accelerator. The 7Li(p,n)7Be and 2H(d,n)3He reactions are employed for neutron production. The neutron energy was measured by the time-of-flight method with a liquid scintillation detector and calculated with the MCNP-ANT code. A long counter is employed as a neutron monitor because of the flat response. The monitor is set up where the influence of inscattered neutrons from devices and their supporting materials at a calibration point is as small as possible. The calibration coefficients from the monitor counts to the neutron fluence at a calibration point were obtained from the reference fluence measured with the transfer instrument of the primary standard laboratory (AIST), a 24.13 cm phi Bonner sphere counter. The traceability of the fields to AIST was established through the calibration.

  4. Instrument intercomparison in the high-energy mixed field at the CERN-EU reference field (CERF) facility.

    PubMed

    Caresana, Marco; Helmecke, Manuela; Kubancak, Jan; Manessi, Giacomo Paolo; Ott, Klaus; Scherpelz, Robert; Silari, Marco

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses an intercomparison campaign performed in the mixed radiation field at the CERN-EU (CERF) reference field facility. Various instruments were employed: conventional and extended-range rem counters including a novel instrument called LUPIN, a bubble detector using an active counting system (ABC 1260) and two tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs). The results show that the extended range instruments agree well within their uncertainties and within 1σ with the H*(10) FLUKA value. The conventional rem counters are in good agreement within their uncertainties and underestimate H*(10) as measured by the extended range instruments and as predicted by FLUKA. The TEPCs slightly overestimate the FLUKA value but they are anyhow consistent with it when taking the comparatively large total uncertainties into account, and indicate that the non-neutron part of the stray field accounts for ∼30 % of the total H*(10).

  5. Workplace characterisation in mixed neutron-gamma fields, specific requirements and available methods at high-energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Silari, Marco

    2007-01-01

    A good knowledge of the radiation field present outside the shielding of high-energy particle accelerators is very important to be able to select the type of detectors (active and/or passive) to be employed for area monitoring and the type of personal dosemeter required for estimating the doses received by individuals. Around high-energy electron and proton accelerators the radiation field is usually dominated by neutrons and photons, with minor contributions from other charged particles. Under certain circumstances, muon radiation in the forward beam direction may also be present. Neutron dosimetry and spectrometry are of primary importance to characterise the radiation field and thus to correctly evaluate personnel exposure. Starting from the beam parameters important for radiation monitoring, the paper first briefly reviews the stray radiation fields encountered around high-energy accelerators and then addresses the relevant techniques employed for their monitoring. Recent developments to increase the response of neutron measuring devices beyond 10-20 MeV are illustrated. Instruments should be correctly calibrated either in reference monoenergetic radiation fields or in a field similar to the field in which they are used (workplace calibration). The importance of the instrument calibration is discussed and available neutron calibration facilities are briefly reviewed.

  6. Neutron-activation analysis of several US Geological Survey and National Bureau of Standards reference materials

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    In this work, several US Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) and National Bureau of Standards (N.B.S.) reference samples have been analyzed in an effort to improve the quality of elemental concentration data available on these materials, so they can be used in a program of verification of factor analysis source resolution procedures. The analyses of these samples were performed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The samples analyzed were: U.S.G.S. Green River Shale, N.B.S. 45b Homogeneous River Sediment, U.S.G.S. Analyzed Peridotite N.B.S. 1579 Powdered Lead-based Paint, U.S.G.S. Hawaian Basalt U.S.G.S. Marine Mud, U.S.G.S. Analyzed Cody Shale U.S.G.S. Glass Mountain Rhyolite, N.B.S. Argillaceous Limestone No. 1, and a sample of Spex ultrapure graphite. Neutron activation analysis was employed because of the high sensitivity that can be attained in determining elemental concentrations. Although INAA is a relatively simple method and the reproducibility of the data is good, the method shows some inaccuracies. The basic theory and technique are reviewed in an attempt to show where problems can arise and how they can be dealt with.

  7. Magnetic field component demonstration for a neutron electric dipole moment search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsky, Simon

    2016-09-01

    A neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) search at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will probe with a sensitivity of < 5 ×10-28 e-cm. Trapped, polarized ultracold neutrons will precess in a constant magnetic field and variable electric field, and a non-zero neutron EDM will appear as a variation in the precession frequency correlated with the electric field. Magnetic field gradients must be kept below 10 pT/cm to mitigate false EDMs produced by the geometric phase effect and to maximize the neutron spin-relaxation lifetime. I will discuss a prototype magnetic shielding system, including a nearly-hermetic superconducting lead shield, built to demonstrate the required gradients at 1/3-scale of the final experiment. Additionally, the system will evaluate the eddy current heating due to RF fields produced by a proposed neutron-``spin-dressing'' technique.

  8. High Field Pulsed Magnets for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granroth, G. E.; Lee, J.; Fogh, E.; Christensen, N. B.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Nojiri, H.

    2015-03-01

    A High Field Pulsed Magnet (HFPM) setup, is in use at the Spallation Nuetron Source(SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. With this device, we recently measured the high field magnetic spin structure of LiNiPO4. The results of this study will be highlighted as an example of possible measurements that can be performed with this device. To further extend the HFPM capabilities at SNS, we have learned to design and wind these coils in house. This contribution will summarize the magnet coil design optimization procedure. Specifically by varying the geometry of the multi-layer coil, we arrive at a design that balances the maximum field strength, neutron scattering angle, and the field homogeneity for a specific set of parameters. We will show that a 6.3kJ capacitor bank, can provide a magnetic field as high as 30T for a maximum scattering angle around 40° with homogeneity of +/- 4 % in a 2mm diameter spherical volume. We will also compare the calculations to measurements from a recently wound test coil. This work was supported in part by the Lab Directors' Research and Development Fund of ORNL.

  9. Measurement and modeling of polarized specular neutron reflectivity in large magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Maranville, Brian B.; Kirby, Brian J.; Grutter, Alexander J.; ...

    2016-06-09

    The presence of a large applied magnetic field removes the degeneracy of the vacuum energy states for spin-up and spin-down neutrons. For polarized neutron reflectometry, this must be included in the reference potential energy of the Schrödinger equation that is used to calculate the expected scattering from a magnetic layered structure. For samples with magnetization that is purely parallel or antiparallel to the applied field which defines the quantization axis, there is no mixing of the spin states (no spin-flip scattering) and so this additional potential is constant throughout the scattering region. When there is non-collinear magnetization in the sample,more » however, there will be significant scattering from one spin state into the other, and the reference potentials will differ between the incoming and outgoing wavefunctions, changing the angle and intensities of the scattering. In conclusion, the theory of the scattering and recommended experimental practices for this type of measurement are presented, as well as an example measurement.« less

  10. Measurement and modeling of polarized specular neutron reflectivity in large magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Maranville, Brian B.; Kirby, Brian J.; Grutter, Alexander J.; Kienzle, Paul A.; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Liu, Yaohua; Dennis, Cindi L.

    2016-06-09

    The presence of a large applied magnetic field removes the degeneracy of the vacuum energy states for spin-up and spin-down neutrons. For polarized neutron reflectometry, this must be included in the reference potential energy of the Schrödinger equation that is used to calculate the expected scattering from a magnetic layered structure. For samples with magnetization that is purely parallel or antiparallel to the applied field which defines the quantization axis, there is no mixing of the spin states (no spin-flip scattering) and so this additional potential is constant throughout the scattering region. When there is non-collinear magnetization in the sample, however, there will be significant scattering from one spin state into the other, and the reference potentials will differ between the incoming and outgoing wavefunctions, changing the angle and intensities of the scattering. In conclusion, the theory of the scattering and recommended experimental practices for this type of measurement are presented, as well as an example measurement.

  11. Simulated magnetic field expulsion in neutron star cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfritz, J. G.; Pons, J. A.; Rea, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Viganò, D.

    2016-03-01

    The study of long-term evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields is key to understanding the rich diversity of NS observations, and to unifying their nature despite the different emission mechanisms and observed properties. Such studies in principle permit a deeper understanding of the most important parameters driving their apparent variety, e.g. radio pulsars, magnetars, X-ray dim isolated NSs, gamma-ray pulsars. We describe, for the first time, the results from self-consistent magnetothermal simulations considering not only the effects of the Hall-driven field dissipation in the crust, but also adding a complete set of proposed driving forces in a superconducting core. We emphasize how each of these core-field processes drive magnetic evolution and affect observables, and show that when all forces are considered together in vectorial form, the net expulsion of core magnetic flux is negligible, and will have no observable effect in the crust (consequently in the observed surface emission) on megayear time-scales. Our new simulations suggest that strong magnetic fields in NS cores (and the signatures on the NS surface) will persist long after the crustal magnetic field has evolved and decayed, due to the weak combined effects of dissipation and expulsion in the stellar core.

  12. Characterisation of laboratory-produced CANDU-like workplace neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Nunes, J C; Faught, R T

    2001-01-01

    Two neutron fields were produced in the Neutron Irradiation Facility (NIF) at the Chalk River Laboratories of the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. by directing (d,D) neutrons from a 150 kV neutron generator through a specially designed moderator assembly. Bonner sphere and proton recoil spectrometry systems were used to characterise these fields to determine whether they were CANDU-like*, i.e. whether they resembled neutron fields found in workplaces around pressurised heavy-water moderated power reactors such as CANDU reactors. Similarities were found between the distributions in energy of neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent of the neutron fields produced in the NIF and those measured previously in power plants. In addition, there was agreement between theoretical (Monte Carlo) data and measured data, thereby validating continued use of Monte Carlo modelling for field characterisations in the NIF. The CANDU-like fields add to the repertoire of neutron fields available in the NIF and are expected to be useful for evaluating neutron dosemeters.

  13. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate determination of the ambient dose equivalent in the mixed neutron-photon fields encountered around high-energy particle accelerators still represents a challenging task. The main complexity arises from the extreme variability of the neutron energy, which spans over 10 orders of magnitude or more. Operational survey instruments, which response function attempts to mimic the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient up to GeV neutrons, are available on the market, but their response is not fully reliable over the entire energy range. Extended range rem counters (ERRC) do not require the exact knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron field and the calibration can be done with a source spectrum. If the actual neutron field has an energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum, the measurement is affected by an added uncertainty related to the partial overlap of the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion curve and the response function. For this reason their operational use should always be preceded by an "in-field" calibration, i.e. a calibration made against a reference instrument exposed in the same field where the survey-meter will be employed. In practice the extended-range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only device which can serve as reference instrument in these fields, because of its wide energy range and the possibility to assess the neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) values with the appropriate accuracy. Nevertheless, the experience gained by a number of experimental groups suggests that mandatory conditions for obtaining accurate results in workplaces are: (1) the use of a well-established response matrix, thus implying validation campaigns in reference monochromatic neutrons fields, (2) the expert and critical use of suitable unfolding codes, and (3) the performance test of the whole system (experimental set-up, elaboration and unfolding procedures) in a well

  14. Monte Carlo Calculations for Neutron and Gamma Radiation Fields on a Fast Neutron Irradiation Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, A.; Ramalho, A.; Gonçalves, I. C.; Fernandes, A.; Barradas, N.; Marques, J. G.; Prata, J.; Chaussy, Ch.

    We used the Monte Carlo program MCNP to calculate the neutron and gamma fluxes on a fast neutron irradiation facility being installed on the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI). The purpose of this facility is to provide a fast neutron beam for irradiation of electronic circuits. The gamma dose should be minimized. This is achieved by placing a lead shield preceded by a thin layer of boral. A fast neutron flux of the order of 109 n/cm2s is expected at the exit of the tube, while the gamma radiation is kept below 20 Gy/h. We will present results of the neutron and gamma doses for several locations along the tube and different thickness of the lead shield. We found that the neutron beam is very collimated at the end of the tube with a dominant component on the fast region.

  15. Application of the TLD albedo technique for monitoring and interpretation of neutron stray radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piesch, E.; Burgkhardt, B.

    1980-09-01

    A single sphere albedo technique with TLD 600/TLD 700 detectors has been applied in neutron monitoring to calibrate albedo dosimeters and to interpret neutron stray radiation fields in terms of neutron dose equivalent separated for the energy groups below 0.4 eV, 0.4-10 keV and 10 keV-10 MeV, and Eeff for fast neutrons. The paper describes the technique for field and personnel monitoring under the aspect of an on-line computer program for data recording and processing.

  16. A Reference Field for GCR Simulation and an LET-Based Implementation at NSRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Walker, Steven A.; Norbury, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) on long duration deep space missions presents a serious health risk to astronauts, with large uncertainties connected to the biological response. In order to reduce the uncertainties and gain understanding about the basic mechanisms through which space radiation initiates cancer and other endpoints, radiobiology experiments are performed. Some of the accelerator facilities supporting such experiments have matured to a point where simulating the broad range of particles and energies characteristic of the GCR environment in a single experiment is feasible from a technology, usage, and cost perspective. In this work, several aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is within physical uncertainties, allowing a single reference field for deep space missions to be defined. Third, an approach for simulating the reference field at NSRL is presented. The approach allows for the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum of the reference field to be approximately represented with discrete ion and energy beams and implicitly maintains a reasonably accurate charge spectrum (or, average quality factor). Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed and weighed against alternative simulation strategies. The neutron component and track structure characteristics of the proposed strategy are discussed in this context.

  17. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas; Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-03-01

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth.

  18. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the twelfth generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thebault, Erwan; Finlay, Christopher; The IGRF Working Group

    2015-04-01

    The IGRF is an internationally-agreed reference model of the Earth's magnetic field produced under the auspices of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy. The IGRF-12 is the latest update of this well-known model which is used each year by many thousands of users for both industrial and scientific purposes. In October 2014, ten institutions worldwide have made contributions to the IGRF. These models were evaluated and the twelfth generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014. In this presentation, we will report on the IGRF activities, briefly describe the candidate models, summarize the evaluation of models performed by different independent teams, show how the IGRF-12 models were calculated and finally discuss some of the main magnetic features of this new model.

  19. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Christopher C.; Beggan, Ciarán D.; Alken, Patrick; Aubert, Julien; Barrois, Olivier; Bertrand, Francois; Bondar, Tatiana; Boness, Axel; Brocco, Laura; Canet, Elisabeth; Chambodut, Aude; Chulliat, Arnaud; Coïsson, Pierdavide; Civet, François; Du, Aimin; Fournier, Alexandre; Fratter, Isabelle; Gillet, Nicolas; Hamilton, Brian; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Hulot, Gauthier; Jager, Thomas; Korte, Monika; Kuang, Weijia; Lalanne, Xavier; Langlais, Benoit; Léger, Jean-Michel; Lesur, Vincent; Lowes, Frank J.; Macmillan, Susan; Mandea, Mioara; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Maus, Stefan; Olsen, Nils; Petrov, Valeriy; Ridley, Victoria; Rother, Martin; Sabaka, Terence J.; Saturnino, Diana; Schachtschneider, Reyko; Sirol, Olivier; Tangborn, Andrew; Thomson, Alan; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Vigneron, Pierre; Wardinski, Ingo; Zvereva, Tatiana

    2015-05-01

    The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2010.0, a main field model for epoch 2015.0, and a linear annual predictive secular variation model for 2015.0-2020.0. Here, we present the equations defining the IGRF model, provide the spherical harmonic coefficients, and provide maps of the magnetic declination, inclination, and total intensity for epoch 2015.0 and their predicted rates of change for 2015.0-2020.0. We also update the magnetic pole positions and discuss briefly the latest changes and possible future trends of the Earth's magnetic field.

  20. Secondary photon fields produced in accelerator-based sources for neutron generation.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, S; Cesana, A; Garlati, L; Pola, A; Terrani, M

    2005-01-01

    Neutrons can be produced with low-energy ion accelerators for many applications, such as the characterisation of neutron detectors, the irradiation of biological samples and the study of the radiation damage in electronic devices. Moreover, accelerator-based neutron sources are under development for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Thin targets are used for generating monoenergetic neutrons, while thick targets are usually employed for producing more intense neutron fields. The associated photon field produced by the target nuclei may have a strong influence on the application under study. For instance, these photons can play a fundamental role in the design of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT. This work focuses on the measurement of the photon field associated with neutrons that are produced by 4.0-6.8 MeV protons striking both a thin 7LiF target (for generating monoenergetic neutrons) and a thick beryllium target. In both cases, very intense photon fields are generated with energy distribution extending up to several MeV.

  1. Internal composition of proto-neutron stars under strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzon, B.; Dexheimer, V.; Schramm, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study the effects of magnetic fields and rotation on the structure and composition of proto-neutron stars. A hadronic chiral SU(3) model is applied to cold neutron stars and proto-neutron stars with trapped neutrinos and at fixed entropy per baryon. We obtain general relativistic solutions for neutron and proto-neutron stars endowed with a poloidal magnetic field by solving Einstein-Maxwell field equations in a self-consistent way. As the neutrino chemical potential decreases in value over time, this alters the chemical equilibrium and the composition inside the star, leading to a change in the structure and in the particle population of these objects. We find that the magnetic field deforms the star and significantly alters the number of trapped neutrinos in the stellar interior, together with strangeness content and temperature in each evolution stage.

  2. Applications of Bonner sphere detectors in neutron field dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, M.; Sanna, R.S.

    1983-09-01

    The theory of neutron moderation and spectroscopy are briefly reviewed, and moderators that are useful for Bonner sphere spectrometers are discussed. The choice of the neutron detector for a Bonner sphere spectrometer is examined. Spectral deconvolution methods are briefly reviewed, including derivative, parametric, quadrature, and Monte Carlo methods. Calibration is then discussed. (LEW)

  3. Radiation fields from neutron generators shielded with different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, D. L.; Blackburn, B. W.

    2007-08-01

    As a general guide for assessing radiological conditions around a DT neutron generator numerical modeling has been performed to assess neutron and photon dose profiles for a variety of shield materials ranging from 1 to 100 cm thick. In agreement with accepted radiation safety practices high-Z materials such as bismuth and lead have been found to be ineffective biological shield materials, owing in part to the existence of (n,2n) reaction channels available with 14.1 MeV DT neutrons, while low-Z materials serve as effective shields for these sources. Composite materials such as a mixture of polyethylene and bismuth, or regular concrete, are ideal shield materials for neutron generator radiation because of their ability to attenuate internally generated photon radiation resulting from neutron scattering and capture within the shields themselves.

  4. Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generator using a novel field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, J. L. Falabella, S.; Sanchez, J.; Tang, V.; Wang, H.

    2014-11-21

    Active interrogation using neutrons is an effective method for detecting shielded nuclear material. A lightweight, lunch-box-sized, battery-operated neutron source would enable new concepts of operation in the field. We have developed at-scale components for a highly portable, completely self-contained, pulsed Deuterium-Tritium (DT) neutron source producing 14 MeV neutrons with average yields of 10{sup 7} n/s. A gated, field ionization ion source using etched electrodes has been developed that produces pulsed ion currents up to 500 nA. A compact Cockcroft-Walton high voltage source is used to accelerate deuterons into a metal hydride target for neutron production. The results of full scale DT tests using the field ionization source are presented.

  5. Gamma ray bursts from comet neutron star magnetosphere interaction, field twisting and E sub parallel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Consider the problem of a comet in a collision trajectory with a magnetized neutron star. The question addressed in this paper is whether the comet interacts strongly enough with a magnetic field such as to capture at a large radius or whether in general the comet will escape a magnetized neutron star. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  6. A method for comparing degradation of boron trifluoride and helium detectors in neutron and gamma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, T.; Tonner, P.; Keller, N.; Buyers, W.J.L.

    1998-06-01

    A method developed to measure the degradation of neutron detectors in neutron and gamma fields has been applied to five models of boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}) detectors from major suppliers, and to a special helium ({sup 3}He) detector model. The detectors tested all have about the same nominal thermal neutron sensitivity and overall dimensions. The results showed widely different neutron and gamma durability for BF{sub 3} models, an undesirable time-dependent gamma degradation followed by recovery for some BF{sub 3} models, and very robust performance of the modified {sup 3}He detector.

  7. Interdigitated Extended Gate Field Effect Transistor Without Reference Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ghusoon M.

    2017-02-01

    An interdigitated extended gate field effect transistor (IEGFET) has been proposed as a modified pH sensor structure of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET). The reference electrode and the extended gate in the conventional device have been replaced by a single interdigitated extended gate. A metal-semiconductor-metal interdigitated extended gate containing two multi-finger Ni electrodes based on zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film as a pH-sensitive membrane. ZnO thin film was grown on a p-type Si (100) substrate by the sol-gel technique. The fabricated extended gate is connected to a commercial metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor device in CD4007UB. The experimental data show that this structure has real time and linear pH voltage and current sensitivities in a concentration range between pH 4 and 11. The voltage and current sensitivities are found to be about 22.4 mV/pH and 45 μA/pH, respectively. Reference electrode elimination makes the IEGFET device simple to fabricate, easy to carry out the measurements, needing a small volume of solution to test and suitable for disposable biosensor applications. Furthermore, this uncomplicated structure could be extended to fabricate multiple ions microsensors and lab-on-chip devices.

  8. Time-dependent neutron and photon dose-field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Hasani Omar

    2005-11-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The code Pandemonium, originally designed to determine flux and dose rates only, has been improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. The photon model has been significantly enhanced by expanding the energy range to 10 MeV to include fission photons, and by including a set of new buildup factors, the result of an extensive study into the previously unknown "purely-angular effect" on photon buildup. Purely-angular photon buildup factors are determined using discrete ordinates and coupled electron-photon cross sections to account for coherent and incoherent scattering and secondary photon effects of bremsstrahlung and florescence. Improvements to Pandemonium result in significant modeling capabilities for processing facilities using intense neutron and photon sources, and the code obtains comparable results to Monte Carlo calculations but within a fraction of the time required to run such codes as MCNPX.

  9. Quantification of the sensitivity range in neutron dark-field imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, B.; Harti, R. P.; Hovind, J.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Strobl, M.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2015-12-15

    In neutron grating interferometry, the dark-field image visualizes the scattering properties of samples in the small-angle and ultra-small-angle scattering range. These angles correspond to correlation lengths from several hundred nanometers up to several tens of micrometers. In this article, we present an experimental study that demonstrates the potential of quantitative neutron dark-field imaging. The dark-field signal for scattering from different particle sizes and concentrations of mono-dispersive polystyrene particles in aqueous solution is compared to theoretical predictions and the good agreement between measurements and calculations underlines the quantitative nature of the measured values and reliability of the technique with neutrons.

  10. Characterisation of the IRSN graphite moderated Americium-Beryllium neutron field.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, V; Gressier, V; Muller, H; Lebreton, L

    2004-01-01

    The SIGMA facility was set up at IRSN to provide thermal neutrons for metrology and dosimetry purposes. SIGMA consists of six Am-Be radioactive sources located in a 1.5 x 1.5 x 1.5 m3 graphite moderator block. The neutron field at the calibration position, situated at 50 cm from the west surface of the assembly was characterised experimentally and by Monte Carlo calculations. The thermal neutron fluence was determined by the activation of gold foils; the neutron fluence energy distribution above 240 keV was measured with proton recoil spectrometers and the neutron fluence energy distribution from thermal energies to 20 MeV was measured with a Bonner spheres spectrometer. A Monte Carlo simulation of the SIGMA assembly was undertaken using the MCNP4C code, and the calculated neutron fluence energy distribution was compared with the measurements. As a whole, the experimental data and the MCNP calculation are in a good agreement.

  11. Neutron Star Structure in the Presence of Conformally Coupled Scalar Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-01-01

    Neutron star models are studied in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, using two different numerical equations of state (EoS) representing different degrees of stiffness. In both cases we obtain a complete solution by matching the interior numerical solution of the coupled Einstein-scalar field hydrostatic equations, with an exact metric on the surface of the star. These are then used to find the effect of the scalar field and its coupling to geometry, on the neutron star structure, particularly the maximum neutron star mass and radius. We show that in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, neutron stars are less dense and have smaller masses and radii than their counterparts in the minimally coupled case, and the effect increases with the magnitude of the scalar field at the center of the star.

  12. Skyrme model study of proton and neutron properties in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bing-Ran

    2017-02-01

    The proton and neutron properties in a uniform magnetic field are investigated. The Gell-Mann-Nishijima formula is shown to be satisfied for baryon states. It is found that with increasing magnetic field strength, the proton mass first decreases and then increases, while the neutron mass always increases. The ratio between magnetic moment of proton and neutron increases with the increase of the magnetic field strength. With increasing magnetic field strength, the size of proton first increases and then decreases, while the size of neutron always decreases. The present analysis implies that in the core part of the magnetar, the equation of state depend on the magnetic field, which modifies the mass limit of the magnetar.

  13. The CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility for dosimetry at commercial flight altitudes and in space.

    PubMed

    Mitaroff, A; Cern, M Silari

    2002-01-01

    A reference facility for the calibration and intercomparison of active and passive detectors in broad neutron fields has been available at CERN since 1992. A positively charged hadron beam (a mixture of protons and pions) with momentum of 120 GeV/c hits a copper target, 50 cm thick and 7 cm in diameter. The secondary particles produced in the interaction traverse a shield, at 90 degrees with respect to the direction of the incoming beam. made of either 80 to 160 cm of concrete or 40 cm of iron. Behind the iron shield, the resulting neutron spectrum has a maximum at about 1 MeV, with an additional high-energy component. Behind the 80 cm concrete shield, the neutron spectrum has a second pronounced maximum at about 70 MeV and resembles the high-energy component of the radiation field created by cosmic rays at commercial flight altitudes. This paper describes the facility, reports on the latest neutron spectral measurements, gives an overview of the most important experiments performed by the various collaborating institutions over recent years and briefly addresses the possible application of the facility to measurements related to the space programme.

  14. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations of neutron matter in chiral effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Wlazłowski, G; Holt, J W; Moroz, S; Bulgac, A; Roche, K J

    2014-10-31

    We present variational Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron matter equation of state using chiral nuclear forces. The ground-state wave function of neutron matter, containing nonperturbative many-body correlations, is obtained from auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations of up to about 340 neutrons interacting on a 10(3) discretized lattice. The evolution Hamiltonian is chosen to be attractive and spin independent in order to avoid the fermion sign problem and is constructed to best reproduce broad features of the chiral nuclear force. This is facilitated by choosing a lattice spacing of 1.5 fm, corresponding to a momentum-space cutoff of Λ=414  MeV/c, a resolution scale at which strongly repulsive features of nuclear two-body forces are suppressed. Differences between the evolution potential and the full chiral nuclear interaction (Entem and Machleidt Λ=414  MeV [L. Coraggio et al., Phys. Rev. C 87, 014322 (2013).

  15. Calculation verification of the utilization of LR-0 for reference neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ján, Milčák; Michal, Košťál; Marie, Švadlenková; Michal, Koleška; Vojtěch, Rypar

    2014-11-01

    Well-defined neutron spectrum is crucial for calibration and testing of detectors for spectrometry and dosimetry purposes. As a possible source of neutrons nuclear reactors can be utilized. In reactor core most of the neutrons are originated from fission and neutron spectra is usually some form of moderated spectra of fast neutrons. The reactor LR-0 is an experimental light-water zero-power pool-type reactor originally designed for research of the VVER type reactor cores, spent-fuel storage lattices and benchmark experiments. The main reactor feature that influences the performance of experiments is the flexible arrangement of the core. Special types of the possible core arrangements on the reactor LR-0 can provide different neutron spectra in special experimental channels. These neutron spectra are modified by inserting different materials around the channel and whole core is driven by standard fuel assemblies. Fast, epithermal or thermal spectra can be simulated using graphite, H2O, D2O insertions, air, Cd foils or fuel with different enrichment.

  16. A high-field adiabatic fast passage ultracold neutron spin flipper for the UCNA experiment.

    PubMed

    Holley, A T; Broussard, L J; Davis, J L; Hickerson, K; Ito, T M; Liu, C-Y; Lyles, J T M; Makela, M; Mammei, R R; Mendenhall, M P; Morris, C L; Mortensen, R; Pattie, R W; Rios, R; Saunders, A; Young, A R

    2012-07-01

    The UCNA collaboration is making a precision measurement of the β asymmetry (A) in free neutron decay using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). A critical component of this experiment is an adiabatic fast passage neutron spin flipper capable of efficient operation in ambient magnetic fields on the order of 1 T. The requirement that it operate in a high field necessitated the construction of a free neutron spin flipper based, for the first time, on a birdcage resonator. The design, construction, and initial testing of this spin flipper prior to its use in the first measurement of A with UCN during the 2007 run cycle of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's 800 MeV proton accelerator is detailed. These studies determined the flipping efficiency of the device, averaged over the UCN spectrum present at the location of the spin flipper, to be ̅ε=0.9985(4).

  17. A high-field adiabatic fast passage ultracold neutron spin flipper for the UCNA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, A. T.; Broussard, L. J.; Davis, J. L.; Hickerson, K.; Ito, T. M.; Liu, C.-Y.; Lyles, J. T. M.; Makela, M.; Mammei, R. R.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R.; Pattie, R. W.; Rios, R.; Saunders, A.; Young, A. R.

    2012-07-01

    The UCNA collaboration is making a precision measurement of the β asymmetry (A) in free neutron decay using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). A critical component of this experiment is an adiabatic fast passage neutron spin flipper capable of efficient operation in ambient magnetic fields on the order of 1 T. The requirement that it operate in a high field necessitated the construction of a free neutron spin flipper based, for the first time, on a birdcage resonator. The design, construction, and initial testing of this spin flipper prior to its use in the first measurement of A with UCN during the 2007 run cycle of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's 800 MeV proton accelerator is detailed. These studies determined the flipping efficiency of the device, averaged over the UCN spectrum present at the location of the spin flipper, to be overline{ɛ }=0.9985(4).

  18. Fission converter and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor study of thermal neutron flux distribution in an epithermal neutron therapy beam.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G I; Rosenfeld, A B; Allen, B J; Coderre, J A; Liu, H B

    1999-09-01

    The depth distribution of the thermal neutron flux is a major factor in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in determining the efficiency of cell sterilization. In this paper the fission detector method is developed and applied to measure the in-phantom thermal neutron flux depth distribution. Advantages of the fission detector include small size, direct measurement of thermal neutron flux in a mixed radiation field of BNCT beam, self-calibration, and the possibility of on-line measurement. The measurements were performed at epithermal a BNCT facility. The experimental results were compared with the thermal neutron flux calculated by the Monte Carlo method and found to be in good agreement.

  19. Periodic magnetic field as a polarized and focusing thermal neutron spectrometer and monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Williams, D. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Gary, C. K.; Piestrup, M. A.; Pantell, R. H.; Feinstein, J.; Flocchini, R. G.; Boussoufi, M.; Egbert, H. P.; Kloh, M. D.; Walker, R. B.

    2010-01-15

    A novel periodic magnetic field (PMF) optic is shown to act as a prism, lens, and polarizer for neutrons and particles with a magnetic dipole moment. The PMF has a two-dimensional field in the axial direction of neutron propagation. The PMF alternating magnetic field polarity provides strong gradients that cause separation of neutrons by wavelength axially and by spin state transversely. The spin-up neutrons exit the PMF with their magnetic spins aligned parallel to the PMF magnetic field, and are deflected upward and line focus at a fixed vertical height, proportional to the PMF period, at a downstream focal distance that increases with neutron energy. The PMF has no attenuation by absorption or scatter, as with material prisms or crystal monochromators. Embodiments of the PMF include neutron spectrometer or monochromator, and applications include neutron small angle scattering, crystallography, residual stress analysis, cross section measurements, and reflectometry. Presented are theory, experimental results, computer simulation, applications of the PMF, and comparison of its performance to Stern-Gerlach gradient devices and compound material and magnetic refractive prisms.

  20. Time-Dependent Neutron and Photon Dose-Field Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, Hasani Omar

    2005-08-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The Pandemonium code, originally designed to determine flux and dose-rates only, is improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. A primary benefit of this work has been an extensive analysis and improvement of the photon model that is not limited to the application described in this thesis. The photon model has been extended in energy range to 10 MeV to include photons from fission and new photon buildup factors have been included that account for the effects of photon buildup at slant-path thicknesses as a function of angle, where the mean free path thickness has been preserved. The overall system of codes is user-friendly and it is directly applicable to facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where high-intensity neutron and photon emitters are regularly used. The codes may be used to determine a priori doses for given work scenarios in an effort to supply dose information to process models which will in turn assist decision makers on ensuring as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) compliance. In addition, coupling the computational results of these tools with the process model visualization tools will help to increase worker safety and radiological safety awareness.

  1. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D-T fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 (252Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D2O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuteriumtritium (D-T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252Cf. To be viable, the 14 MeV D-T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2-5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered.

  2. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D–T fusion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 (252Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D2O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252Cf. To be viable, the 14.6 MeV D-T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2 to 5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered.

  3. Development of a compact neutron source based on field ionization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Allen, Ian; Dickinson, Michael R.; Schenkel, Thomas; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2010-11-25

    The authors report on the use of carbon nanofiber nanoemitters to ionize deuterium atoms for the generation of neutrons in a deuterium-deuterium reaction in a preloaded target. Acceleration voltages in the range of 50-80 kV are used. Field emission of electrons is investigated to characterize the emitters. The experimental setup and sample preparation are described and first data of neutron production are presented. Ongoing experiments to increase neutron production yields by optimizing the field emitter geometry and surface conditions are discussed.

  4. Response of a lithium gadolinium borate scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Williams, A M; Beeley, P A; Spyrou, N M

    2004-01-01

    Accurate estimation of neutron dose requires knowledge of the neutron energy distribution in the working environment. Existing neutron spectrometry systems, Bonner spheres for example, are large and bulky, and require long data acquisition times. A portable system that could indicate the approximate neutron energy spectrum in a short time would be extremely useful in radiation protection. A composite scintillator, consisting of lithium gadolinium borate crystals in a plastic scintillator matrix, produced by Photogenics is being tested for this purpose. A prototype device based on this scintillator and digital pulse processing electronics has been calibrated using quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields at the low-scatter facility of the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Energies selected were 144, 250, 565, 1400, 2500 and 5000 keV, with correction for scattered neutrons being made using the shadow cone technique. Measurements were also made in the NPL thermal neutron field. Pulse distributions collected with the digitiser in capture-gated mode are presented, and detection efficiency and energy resolution derived. For comparison, neutron spectra were also collected using the commercially available Microspec N-Probe from Bubble Technology Industries, which consists of an NE213 scintillator and a 3He proportional counter.

  5. The effects of intense magnetic fields on Landau levels in a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. F.; Wang, N.; Song, D. L.; Yuan, J. P.; Chou, C.-K.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, an approximate method of calculating the Fermi energy of electrons ( E F ( e)) in a high-intensity magnetic field, based on the analysis of the distribution of a neutron star magnetic field, has been proposed. In the interior of a neutron star, different forms of intense magnetic field could exist simultaneously and a high electron Fermi energy could be generated by the release of magnetic field energy. The calculation results show that: E F ( e) is related to density ρ, the mean electron number per baryon Y e and magnetic field strength B.

  6. Neutron field measurements of the CRNA OB26 irradiator using a Bonner sphere spectrometer for radiation protection purposes.

    PubMed

    Mazrou, H; Allab, M

    2012-08-01

    The present work deals with the Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) measurements performed, to support the authors' Monte-Carlo calculations, to estimate accurately the main characteristics of the neutron field of the (241)Am-Be-based OB26 irradiator acquired for radiation protection purposes by the Nuclear Research Centre of Algiers. The measurements were performed at a reference irradiation position selected at 150 cm from the geometrical centre of the neutron source. The spectrometric system in use is based on a central spherical (3)He thermal neutron proportional counter. The response matrix of the present spectrometer has been taken to be similar to the original Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) (Braunschweig, Germany) BSS's response matrix, with a five bins per decade energy group structure, as there is no significant difference in the BSS's physical characteristics. Thereafter, the authors' BSS measurements were used together with MCNP5 results to unfold the neutron spectrum by means of MAXED and GRAVEL computer codes from the U.M.G. 3.3 package, developed at PTB. Besides, sensitivity analysis has been performed to test the consistency of the unfolding procedure. It reveals that no significant discrepancy was observed in the total neutron fluence and total ambient dose values following the perturbation of some pertinent unfolding parameters except for the case where a 10 bins energy structure was assumed for the guess spectrum. In this latter case, a 5 % difference was observed in the ambient dose equivalent compared with the reference case. Finally, a comparative study performed between different counting systems together with MCNP5 and predictive formulas results shows that they were globally satisfactory, highlighting thereby the relevance of the unfolding procedure and the reliability of the obtained results.

  7. Estimating field scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, A. M.; Helgason, W. D.; Ireson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to "field scale", integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a two year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 5002 m2 area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field scale surface soil moisture, but accounted for less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (1) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time stable neutron probe monitoring location, (2) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (3) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.004 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.012 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. It is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  8. Estimating field-scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Amber M.; Helgason, Warren D.; Ireson, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological, and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to field scale, integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field-scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth-scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a 2-year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 500 m × 500 m study area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field-scale surface soil moisture, but measurements represented less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (a) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time-stable neutron probe monitoring location, (b) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (c) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.005 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.014 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. Based upon its observed performance and its minimal data requirements, it is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  9. Development of monitoring method of spatial neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma rays mixed field using imaging plate for NCT--depression of the field.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun

    2011-12-01

    The degree of depression in the neutron field caused by neutron absorption in the materials of an imaging plate (IP) was investigated using MCNP-4C. Consequently, the IP doped with Gd, which reproduced the distribution of (157)Gd(n,γ)(158)Gd reaction rate in the previous study, depresses the relative distribution by about 50%. The depression for the IP in which Gd is replaced with similar amount of B atoms was estimated to be about 10%. The signal intensity for this IP is estimated to be at a similar level with that for Gd-doped IP.

  10. Spin precession of slow neutrons in Einstein-Cartan gravity with torsion, chameleon, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze a spin precession of slow neutrons in the Einstein-Cartan gravity with torsion, chameleon and magnetic field. For the derivation of the Heisenberg equation of motion of the neutron spin we use the effective low-energy potential, derived by Ivanov and Wellenzohn [Phys. Rev. D 92, 125004 (2015)] for slow neutrons, coupled to gravitational, chameleon, and torsion fields to order 1 /m , where m is the neutron mass. In addition to these low-energy interactions we switch on the interaction of slow neutrons with a magnetic field. We show that to linear order approximation with respect to gravitational, chameleon, and torsion fields the Dirac Hamilton operator for fermions (neutrons), moving in spacetimes created by rotating coordinate systems, contains the anti-Hermitian operators of torsion-fermion (neutron) interactions, caused by torsion scalar and tensor space-space-time and time-space-space degrees of freedom. Such anti-Hermitian operators violate C P and T invariance. In the low-energy approximation the C P and T violating torsion-fermion (neutron) interactions appear only to order O (1 /m ). One may assume that in the rotating Universe and galaxies the obtained anti-Hermitian torsion-fermion interactions might be an origin of (i) violation of C P and T invariance in the Universe and (ii) of baryon asymmetry. We show that anti-Hermitian torsion-fermion interactions of relativistic fermions, violating C P and T invariance, (i) cannot be removed by nonunitary transformations of the Dirac fermion wave functions and (ii) are conformal invariant. According to general requirements of conformal invariance of massive particle theories in gravitational fields [see R. H. Dicke, Phys. Rev. 125, 2163 (1962) and A. J. Silenko, Phys. Rev. D 91, 065012 (2015)], conformal invariance of anti-Hermitian torsion-fermion interactions is valid only if the fermion mass is changed by a conformal factor.

  11. Evaluation of a PIN Photodiode Detector in Neutron-Gamma Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, José Patricio N.; Campos, Letícia L.; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2011-08-01

    Semiconductor detectors are suitable for applications in radiation dosimetry in nuclear research reactors and for radiation protection purposes. The performance of these detectors depends on the quality of their semiconductor. The aim of this work was to evaluate a commercial PIN Photodiode in the neutron-gamma fields of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor and from an AmBe neutron source. This semiconductor was studied as a neutron detector using some types of converters to determine a dose-to-counts conversion factor to dose equivalent. The results have shown that this component may be implemented for assessing the neutron spectra in some radiation fields and in dose equivalent in radiation protection routines.

  12. ON THE MAGNETIC FIELD OF PULSARS WITH REALISTIC NEUTRON STAR CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, R.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, R. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2015-01-20

    We have recently developed a neutron star model fulfilling global and not local charge neutrality, both in the static and in the uniformly rotating cases. The model is described by the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-Thomas-Fermi equations, in which all fundamental interactions are accounted for in the framework of general relativity and relativistic mean field theory. Uniform rotation is introduced following Hartle's formalism. We show that the use of realistic parameters of rotating neutron stars, obtained from numerical integration of the self-consistent axisymmetric general relativistic equations of equilibrium, leads to values of the magnetic field and radiation efficiency of pulsars that are very different from estimates based on fiducial parameters that assume a neutron star mass M = 1.4 M {sub ☉}, radius R = 10 km, and moment of inertia I = 10{sup 45} g cm{sup 2}. In addition, we compare and contrast the magnetic field inferred from the traditional Newtonian rotating magnetic dipole model with respect to the one obtained from its general relativistic analog, which takes into account the effect of the finite size of the source. We apply these considerations to the specific high-magnetic field pulsar class and show that, indeed, all of these sources can be described as canonical pulsars driven by the rotational energy of the neutron star, and have magnetic fields lower than the quantum critical field for any value of the neutron star mass.

  13. LiCaAlF6 scintillators in neutron and gamma radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Klupák, V.; Vinš, M.; Koleška, M.; Šoltés, J.; Yoshikawa, A.; Nikl, M.

    2016-09-01

    Intentionally doped LiCaAlF6 (LiCAF) single crystals are prospective scintillators, especially for thermal neutron detection through the 6Li(n,t)4He nuclear reaction. Four different LiCAF scintillator samples were tested in various neutron and gamma fields. Two of the tested samples were LiCAF:Eu and LiCAF:Eu,Na single crystals, and another two samples were made of LiCAF:Eu micro crystals dispersed in transparent rubber, with different rubber dimensions. All LiCAF samples contain lithium enriched to6Li. A plutonium-beryllium source was used as a neutron source. The neutron spectrum was modified by moderator and filter to get different ratios between thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The MCNP code was used for calculations of the fluence rates for different configurations. Radionuclides 137Cs and 60Co were applied as gamma radiation sources. The light signal from the scintillator was evaluated with a photomultiplier and a multichannel analyzer. The purpose of this work was to study the characteristics of LiCAF scintillators, especially the ability to discriminate signals from neutron and gamma radiation, which is the basic scintillator condition for neutron detection in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields. Generally, the discrimination can be done by the pulse height and/or the pulse shape of the evaluated signals. Both methods can be used for a LiCAF scintillator. However, only the pulse height discrimination method is discussed in this paper. The possibility of fast neutron detection with LiCAF scintillators was also tested.

  14. Dipole magnetic field of neutron stars in f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakirova, Elizat; Folomeev, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    The structure of an interior dipole magnetic field of neutron stars in f( R) gravity is considered. For this purpose, the perturbative approaches are used when both the deviations from general relativity and the deformations of spherically symmetric configurations associated with the presence of the magnetic field are assumed to be small. Solutions are constructed which describe relativistic, spherically symmetric configurations consisting of a gravitating magnetized perfect fluid modeled by a realistic equation of state. Comparing configurations from general relativity and modified gravity, we reveal possible differences in the structure of the magnetic field which occur in considering neutron stars in modified gravity.

  15. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    covered, particularly as a compendium of papers on spectrometry for radiation protection has been published relatively recently [1]. The CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA), whereby national measurement standards and certificates issued by different national metrology institutes (NMIs) can be recognized internationally, is covered only briefly, although the key comparisons which underpin the CIPM MRA are highlighted. The papers included in this issue concentrate on the primary physical quantities—neutron source emission rate and neutron fluence, papers on the latter quantity covering the wide range of neutron energies for which standards are required. Neutron cross sections are fundamental to neutron physics and their importance in neutron metrology is also covered. A large amount of work by acknowledged experts in neutron metrology has gone into the preparation of this special issue and we are indebted to them for their time and effort. The list of contributors begins with the authors of the papers but also includes the referees who provided invisible but invaluable input. We are grateful for the support and encouragement of Professor Georgio Moscati, president of the CCRI when the work was proposed, Dr Kim Carneiro the current president, and Dr Penny Allisy-Roberts the executive secretary of the CCRI. When this work was first proposed a list of potential topics was drawn up by the then chairman of Section (III) Dr Horst Klein. It is a measure of his insight and knowledge of the field that the resulting document matches almost exactly the original plan he drew up. This special issue is thus a tribute to his very extensive contribution to the field. We sincerely hope its contents provide an accurate picture of the present state of neutron metrology in view of Dr Klein's conviction of the importance in metrology of getting things right. Reference [1] Thomas D J and Klein H (ed) 2003 Neutron and photon spectrometry techniques for radiation protection Radiat

  16. Wedge factor dependence with depth and field size for fast neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Alina; Risler, Ruedi

    2003-07-21

    The dependence of the wedge factors (WFs) on field size (FS) and depth for a fast neutron beam has been investigated. In a previous study (Popescu et al 1999 Med. Phys. 26 541), a method was presented that allows a simple and accurate way of calculating the wedge-factor dependence on FS and depth in the case of a photon beam. The validity of a similar approach is tested in the present study for neutron beam dosimetry. The clinical neutron therapy system at the University of Washington (UW) has a flattening filter assembly consisting of two filters: a small field filter and a large field filter. Despite this complication, the approach presented in Popescu et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 541) can be used to describe the WF dependence on FS and depth (d).

  17. Possible theoretical explanations for occasional days of non-field-aligned diffusion at neutron monitor energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    It has been shown previously (Anath et al., 1973 and Kane, 1974) that 20 to 25% of days, the diffusion component of the cosmic-ray neutron diurnal anisotropy is directed more than 30 degrees away from the ecliptic projection of the interplanetary magnetic field averaged over the same 24 hours. A number of explanations for this deviation are discussed and it is concluded that transverse gradient drifts due to gradients perpendicular to the ecliptic are likely, that diurnal variations in the diffusion component of the neutron anisotropy may affect results from single stations and that the 24 hour mean interplanetary magnetic field may not be the field appropriate to the streaming equation at neutron monitor energies.

  18. Neutron study of crystal-field transitions in ErPO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Loong, C.-K.; Soderholm, L.; Hammonds, J.P.; Abraham, M.M.; Boatner, L.A.; Edelstein, N.M.

    1992-12-01

    The crystal-field splitting of the Er{sup 3+} ground multiplet, {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, in ErPO{sub 4} is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering. Four excitations from the {Gamma}{sub 7} ground state to the excited states and several transitions between the excited states have been identified. The observed transition energies and intensities are used to refine the parameters of the crystal-field potential. The calculated magnetic susceptibility, {chi}(T), agrees well with experimental values from single-crystal measurements. A comparison of the neutron data with optical absorption and both nonresonance and resonance Raman scattering measurements has been made.

  19. Neutron study of crystal-field transitions in ErPO[sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Loong, C.-K.; Soderholm, L.; Hammonds, J.P. ); Abraham, M.M.; Boatner, L.A. ); Edelstein, N.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The crystal-field splitting of the Er[sup 3+] ground multiplet, [sup 4]I[sub 15/2], in ErPO[sub 4] is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering. Four excitations from the [Gamma][sub 7] ground state to the excited states and several transitions between the excited states have been identified. The observed transition energies and intensities are used to refine the parameters of the crystal-field potential. The calculated magnetic susceptibility, [chi](T), agrees well with experimental values from single-crystal measurements. A comparison of the neutron data with optical absorption and both nonresonance and resonance Raman scattering measurements has been made.

  20. Summary Report: First Research Coordination Meeting on ReferenceDatabase for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B.; Trkov, Andrej

    2005-10-31

    Potential problems associated with nuclear data for neutronactivation analysis were identified, the scope of the work to beundertaken was defined together with its priorities, and tasks wereassigned to participants. Data testing and measurements refer to gammaspectrum peak evaluations, detector efficiency calibration, neutronspectrum characteristics and reference materials analysis.

  1. Summary Report: First Research Coordination Meeting on ReferenceDatabase for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B.; Trkov, Andrej

    2005-10-01

    Potential problems associated with nuclear data for neutronactivation analysis were identified, the scope of the work to beundertaken was defined together with its priorities, and tasks wereassigned to participants. Data testing and measurements refer to gammaspectrumpeak evaluations, detector efficiency calibration, neutronspectrum characteristics and reference materials analysis.

  2. Quantitative Neutron Dark-field Imaging through Spin-Echo Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, Markus; Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Kaestner, Anders; Pappas, Catherine; Habicht, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Neutron dark-field imaging constitutes a seminal progress in the field of neutron imaging as it combines real space resolution capability with information provided by one of the most significant neutron scattering techniques, namely small angle scattering. The success of structural characterizations bridging the gap between macroscopic and microscopic features has been enabled by the introduction of grating interferometers so far. The induced interference pattern, a spatial beam modulation, allows for mapping of small-angle scattering signals and hence addressing microstructures beyond direct spatial resolution of the imaging system with high efficiency. However, to date the quantification in the small angle scattering regime is severely limited by the monochromatic approach. To overcome such drawback we here introduce an alternative and more flexible method of interferometric beam modulation utilizing a spin-echo technique. This novel method facilitates straightforward quantitative dark-field neutron imaging, i.e. the required quantitative microstructural characterization combined with real space image resolution. For the first time quantitative microstructural reciprocal space information from small angle neutron scattering becomes available together with macroscopic image information creating the potential to quantify several orders of magnitude in structure sizes simultaneously. PMID:26560644

  3. Four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars in the weak-field limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, Joseph; Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    The opportunity to study physics at supra-nuclear densities through x-ray observations of neutron stars has led to in-depth investigations of certain approximately universal relations that can remove degeneracies in pulse profile models. One such set of relations, the three-hair relations, were found to hold in neutron stars that rotate rigidly, but neutron stars can also rotate differentially, as is the case for proto-neutron stars and hypermassive transient remnants of binary mergers. We extend the three-hair relations to differentially rotating stars for the first time with a generic rotation law using two approximations: a weak-field scheme (an expansion in powers of the neutron star compactness) and a perturbative differential rotation scheme (an expansion about rigid rotation). The resulting relations include the fourth moment, hence deemed the four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars, and are found to be approximately independent of the equation of state to a higher degree than the three-hair relations for uniformly rotating stars. Our results can be instrumental in the development of four-hair relations for rapidly differentially rotating stars in full general relativity using numerical simulations.

  4. A Search For Neutron Star Precession and Interstellar Magnetic Field Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. J.; Weisberg, J. M.; Despotes, J. T.; Everett, J. E.; Cordes, J. M.

    1995-12-01

    Pulsars' emissions are highly polarized, allowing us to measure various properties of the spinning neutron stars. The most important is the position angle of the linearly polarized emission, which is related to the orientation of the emission beam on the sky. The spin axis of an object will precess over time if the body is not distributed symmetrically with respect to the spin axis. This phenomenon is called free precession, and the resulting orientation changes will lead to secular changes in the polarized position angle. In a pulsar one would expect the cause of this precession to be an irregularity in the shape of the neutron star due to its cataclysmic birth. The highly polarized nature of pulsar radio signals also leads to the most direct way of measuring the interstellar magnetic field, via Faraday rotation. By examining the variations in position angle over time, one can determine the strength of the interstellar magnetic field variations. Over one hundred pulsars were observed at 21 cm with the Arecibo telescope in fifteen sessions during a four year period from 1989 to 1993. (See Weitz et al. contribution for details.) We determined full polarization parameters, including position angles, on all sufficiently strong pulsars. The position angles of several of the strongest pulsars were examined, and two of them, PSR B1929+10 and PSR B0540+23, were found to have steady position angles over short and long timescales. These two pulsars were used as position angle references for all of the other pulsars. We performed a search for variations in position angle with time over all the sessions. If a change was seen, it could be explained either by precession or by variations in the magnetized interstellar medium between the pulsar and the Earth. We saw no evidence for a significant time variation in the position angle in any of approximately eighty pulsars on which we had adequate data for two or more sessions. We use these results to place upper limits on the

  5. ATLAS-TPX: a two-layer pixel detector setup for neutron detection and radiation field characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, B.; Caicedo, I.; Leroy, C.; Pospisil, S.; Vykydal, Z.

    2016-10-01

    A two-layer pixel detector setup (ATLAS-TPX), designed for thermal and fast neutron detection and radiation field characterization is presented. It consists of two segmented silicon detectors (256 × 256 pixels, pixel pitch 55 μm, thicknesses 300 μm and 500 μm) facing each other. To enhance the neutron detection efficiency a set of converter layers is inserted in between these detectors. The pixelation and the two-layer design allow a discrimination of neutrons against γs by pattern recognition and against charged particles by using the coincidence and anticoincidence information. The neutron conversion and detection efficiencies are measured in a thermal neutron field and fast neutron fields with energies up to 600 MeV. A Geant4 simulation model is presented, which is validated against the measured detector responses. The reliability of the coincidence and anticoincidence technique is demonstrated and possible applications of the detector setup are briefly outlined.

  6. Magnetic Field R&D for the neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammei, Russell R.

    2014-09-01

    The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. Supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Canada Research Chairs program.

  7. The role of perceptual reference frames in visual field asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Robertson, L C; Lamb, M R

    1988-01-01

    The direct access model of hemispheric asymmetry was tested in a letter reflection (normal of reflected) judgement task. In the baseline condition letters were presented in their upright orientation, and reaction times were faster to letters presented in the right visual field than to those presented in the left visual field. In two other conditions the slides, and thus the letters, were rotated +90 degrees clockwise (Rotated +90) from upright or -90 degrees counterclockwise (Rotated -90). This resulted in the letters in both rotated conditions being shown in the upper or lower visual field through the sagittal plane but rotated 90 degrees. Despite this fact a "right field" advantage was again found when the right field was defined relative to the orientation of the tops of the rotated letters (lower visual field in the Rotated +90 condition and upper visual field in the Rotated -90 condition). These results demonstrate that the internal representation of locations in space is more important in predicting visual field asymmetries, at least in the present task, than the field of stimulus presentation relative to the fovea.

  8. Hypercritical Accretion onto a Newborn Neutron Star and Magnetic Field Submergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Cristian G.; Page, Dany; Lee, William H.

    2013-06-01

    We present magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the late post-supernova hypercritical accretion to understand its effect on the magnetic field of the newborn neutron star. We consider as an example the case of a magnetic field loop protruding from the star's surface. The accreting matter is assumed to be non-magnetized, and, due to the high accretion rate, matter pressure dominates over magnetic pressure. We find that an accretion envelope develops very rapidly, and once it becomes convectively stable, the magnetic field is easily buried and pushed into the newly forming neutron star crust. However, for low enough accretion rates the accretion envelope remains convective for an extended period of time and only partial submergence of the magnetic field occurs due to a residual field that is maintained at the interface between the forming crust and the convective envelope. In this latter case, the outcome should be a weakly magnetized neutron star with a likely complicated field geometry. In our simulations we find the transition from total to partial submergence to occur around \\dot{M} \\sim 10\\, M_\\odot yr-1. Back-diffusion of the submerged magnetic field toward the surface, and the resulting growth of the dipolar component, may result in a delayed switch-on of a pulsar on timescales of centuries to millennia.

  9. Tidal deformability of neutron and hyperon stars within relativistic mean field equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bharat; Biswal, S. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    We systematically study the tidal deformability for neutron and hyperon stars using relativistic mean field equations of state (EOSs). The tidal effect plays an important role during the early part of the evolution of compact binaries. Although, the deformability associated with the EOSs has a small correction, it gives a clean gravitational wave signature in binary inspiral. These are characterized by various Love numbers kl(l =2 ,3 ,4 ), that depend on the EOS of a star for a given mass and radius. The tidal effect of star could be efficiently measured through an advanced LIGO detector from the final stages of an inspiraling binary neutron star merger.

  10. Constraints on Neutron Star Radii Based on Chiral Effective Field Theory Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hebeler, K.; Lattimer, J. M.; Pethick, C. J.; Schwenk, A.

    2010-10-15

    We show that microscopic calculations based on chiral effective field theory interactions constrain the properties of neutron-rich matter below nuclear densities to a much higher degree than is reflected in commonly used equations of state. Combined with observed neutron star masses, our results lead to a radius R=9.7-13.9 km for a 1.4M{sub {center_dot}} star, where the theoretical range is due, in about equal amounts, to uncertainties in many-body forces and to the extrapolation to high densities.

  11. Development and application of setup for ac magnetic field in neutron scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Klimko, Sergey; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P; Zabel, Hartmut

    2010-10-01

    We report on a new setup developed for neutron scattering experiments in periodically alternating magnetic fields at the sample position. The assembly consisting of rf generator, amplifier, wide band transformer, and resonance circuit. It allows to generate homogeneous ac magnetic fields over a volume of a few cm(3) and variable within a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. The applicability of the device is exemplified by ac polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR): a new method established to probe remagnetization kinetics in soft ferromagnetic films. Test experiments with iron films demonstrate that the ac field within the accessible range of frequencies and amplitudes produces a dramatic effect on the PNR signal. This shows that the relevant ac field parameters generated by the device match well with the scales involved in the remagnetization processes. Other possible applications of the rf unit are briefly discussed.

  12. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H *(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy-1 was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H *(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy-1 at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to thermal

  13. Four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars in the weak-field limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, Joseph; Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2015-10-01

    The opportunity to study physics at supra-nuclear densities through x-ray observations of neutron stars has led to in-depth investigations of certain approximately universal relations that can remove degeneracies in pulse profile models. One such set of relations determines all of the multipole moments of a neutron star just from the first three (the mass monopole, the current dipole and the mass quadrupole moment) approximately independently of the equation of state. These three-hair relations were found to hold in neutron stars that rotate rigidly, as is the case in old pulsars, but neutron stars can also rotate differentially, as is the case for proto-neutron stars and hypermassive transient remnants of binary mergers. We here extend the three-hair relations to differentially rotating stars for the first time with a generic rotation law using two approximations: a weak-field scheme (an expansion in powers of the neutron star compactness) and a perturbative differential rotation scheme (an expansion about rigid rotation). These approximations allow us to analytically derive approximately universal relations that allow us to determine all of the multipole moments of a (perturbative) differentially rotating star in terms of only the first four moments. These new four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars are found to be approximately independent of the equation of state to a higher degree than the three-hair relations for uniformly rotating stars. Our results can be instrumental in the development of four-hair relations for rapidly differentially rotating stars in full general relativity using numerical simulations.

  14. Experimental setup for the determination of the correction factors of the neutron doseratemeters in fast neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Elena; Bercea, Sorin; Dudu, Dorin; Celarel, Aurelia

    2013-12-16

    The use of the U-120 Cyclotron of the IFIN-HH allowed to perform a testing bench with fast neutrons in order to determine the correction factors of the doseratemeters dedicated to neutron measurement. This paper deals with researchers performed in order to develop the irradiation facility testing the fast neutrons flux generated at the Cyclotron. This facility is presented, together with the results obtain in determining the correction factor for a doseratemeter dedicated to the neutron dose equivalent rate measurement.

  15. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    MAKISHIMA, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1–7) × 108 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states. PMID:27169348

  16. Neutron field parameter measurements on the JET tokamak by means of super-heated fluid detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gherendi, M.; Craciunescu, T.; Pantea, A.; Zoita, V. L.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Baltog, I.; Edlington, T.; Kiptily, V.; Popovichev, S.; Murari, A.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    The neutron field parameters (fluence and energy distribution) at a specific location outside the JET Torus Hall have been measured by means of super-heated fluid detectors (or 'bubble detectors') in combination with an independent, time-of-flight, technique. The bubble detector assemblies were placed at the end of a vertical line of sight at about 16 m from the tokamak mid plane. Spatial distributions of the neutron fluence along the radial and toroidal directions have been obtained using two-dimensional arrays of bubble detectors. Using a set of three bubble detector spectrometers the neutron energy distribution was determined over a broad energy range, from about 10 keV to above 10 MeV, with an energy resolution of about 30% at 2.5 MeV. The very broad energy response allowed for the identification of energy features far from the main fusion component (around 2.45 MeV for deuterium discharges).

  17. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makishima, K.

    2016-05-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1?7) × 10^8 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states.

  18. Building Relativistic Mean-Field Models for Atomic Nuclei and Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear energy density functional (EDF) theory has been quite successful in describing nuclear systems such as atomic nuclei and nuclear matter. However, when building new models, attention is usually paid to the best-fit parameters only. In recent years, focus has been shifted to the neighborhood around the minimum of the chi-square function as well. This powerful covariance analysis is able to provide important information bridging experiments, observations, and theories. In this work, we attempt to build a specific type of nuclear EDFs, the relativistic mean-field models, which treat atomic nuclei, nuclear matter, and neutron stars on the same footing. The application of covariance analysis can reveal correlations between observables of interest. The purpose is to elucidate the alleged relations between the neutron skin of heavy nuclei and the size of neutron stars, and to develop insight into future investigations.

  19. The design of the inelastic neutron scattering mode for the Extreme Environment Diffractometer with the 26 T High Field Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowiak, Maciej; Stüßer, Norbert; Prokhnenko, Oleksandr

    2015-10-01

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer is a neutron time-of-flight instrument, designed to work with a constant-field hybrid magnet capable of reaching fields over 26 T, unprecedented in neutron science; however, the presence of the magnet imposes both spatial and technical limitations on the surrounding instrument components. In addition to the existing diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering modes, the instrument will operate also in an inelastic scattering mode, as a direct time-of-flight spectrometer. In this paper we present the Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations, the results of which illustrate the performance of the instrument in the inelastic-scattering mode. We describe the focussing neutron guide and the chopper system of the existing instrument and the planned design for the instrument upgrade. The neutron flux, neutron spatial distribution, divergence distribution and energy resolution are calculated for standard instrument configurations.

  20. Partial sound field decomposition in multireference near-field acoustical holography by using optimally located virtual references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Joe; Bolton, J. Stuart; Kwon, Hyu-Sang

    2004-04-01

    It has been shown previously that the multiple reference and field signals recorded during a scanning acoustical holography measurement can be used to decompose the sound field radiated by a composite sound source into mutually incoherent partial fields. To obtain physically meaningful partial fields, i.e., fields closely related to particular component sources, the reference microphones should be positioned as close as possible to the component physical sources that together comprise the complete source. However, it is not always possible either to identify the optimal reference microphone locations prior to performing a holographic measurement, or to place reference microphones at those optimal locations, even if known, owing to physical constraints. Here, post-processing procedures are described that make it possible both to identify the optimal reference microphone locations and to place virtual references at those locations after performing a holographic measurement. The optimal reference microphone locations are defined to be those at which the MUSIC power is maximized in a three-dimensional space reconstructed by holographic projection. The acoustic pressure signals at the locations thus identified can then be used as optimal ``virtual'' reference signals. It is shown through an experiment and numerical simulation that the optimal virtual reference signals can be successfully used to identify physically meaningful partial sound fields, particularly when used in conjunction with partial coherence decomposition procedures.

  1. DOSIMETRIC response of a REM-500 in low energy neutron fields typical of nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Matysiak, W; Atanackovic, J; Waker, A J

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the response of a REM-500 to assess neutron quality factor and dose equivalent in low energy neutron fields, which are commonly encountered in the workplace environment of nuclear power stations. The McMaster University 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility was used to measure the response of the instrument in monoenergetic neutron fields in the energy range 51 to 727 keV by bombarding a thin LiF target with 1.93-2.50 MeV protons. The energy distribution of the neutron fields produced in the facility was measured by a (3)He filled gas ionization chamber. The MCA mode of the REM-500 instrument was used to collect lineal energy distributions at varying neutron energies and to calculate the frequency and dose-mean lineal energies. The effective quality factor, Q-, was also calculated using the values of Q(y)listed in the REM-500 operation manual and compared with those of ICRP 60. The authors observed a continuously increasing trend in y - F, y-D, and Q-with an increase in neutron energy. It is interesting to note that standard tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) filled with tissue equivalent(TE) gas give rise to a similar trend for these microdosimetric quantities of interest in the same energy range; however, the averages calculated in this study are larger by about 15%compared to a TEPC filled with propane-based TE gas probably because of the larger stopping power of protons in propane compared to TE gas. These somewhat larger event sizes did not result in any significant increase in the Q-compared to those obtained from a TEPC filled with TE gas and were found to be in good agreement with other measurements reported earlier at corresponding neutron energies. The instrument quality factor response, R(Q), defined as the ratio of measured quality factor to the calculated quality factor in an ICRU tissue sphere,was found to vary with neutron energy. The instrument response,R(Q), was ~0.6 at 727 keV, which deteriorates further to

  2. Multipolar electromagnetic fields around neutron stars: exact vacuum solutions and related properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2015-06-01

    The magnetic field topology in the surrounding of neutron stars is one of the key questions in pulsar magnetospheric physics. A very extensive literature exists about the assumption of a dipolar magnetic field but very little progress has been made in attempts to include multipolar components in a self-consistent way. In this paper, we study the effect of multipolar electromagnetic fields anchored in the star. We give exact analytical solutions in closed form for any order l and apply them to the retarded point quadrupole (l = 2), hexapole (l = 3) and octopole (l = 4), a generalization of the retarded point dipole (l = 1). We also compare the Poynting flux from each multipole and show that the spin-down luminosity depends on the ratio R/rL, R being the neutron star radius and rL the light-cylinder radius. Therefore the braking index also depends on R/rL. As such multipole fields possess very different topology, most importantly smaller length scales compared to the dipolar field, especially close to the neutron star, we investigate the deformation of the polar caps induced by these multipolar fields. Such fields could have a strong impact on the interpretation of the pulsed radio emission suspected to emanate from these polar caps as well as on the inferred geometry deduced from the high-energy light-curve fitting and on the magnetic field strength. Discrepancies between the two-pole caustic model and our new multipole caustic model are emphasized with the quadrupole field. To this respect, we demonstrate that working with only a dipole field can be very misleading.

  3. The Application of Experimental Microdosimetry to Mixed-Field Neutron-Gamma Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bayati, Saad Najm

    Absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays were measured by using both a tissue-equivalent walled counter (TEPC) and a graphite-walled low pressure proportional counter (GPC) in the Am-Be neutron source facility at UOIT. A series of measurements were performed with the counters filled with propane-based TE gas (55.1% C3H8, 39.5% CO2 and 5.4% N2) at operating gas pressures corresponding to tissue spheres 2.0, 4.0 and 8.0 µm in diameter. The results of these measurements indicated satisfactory performance of counters to measure microdosimetric spectra extending down to event-sizes that cover the gamma component of a mixed field. The spectra and the related mean values y F and yD are compared with other similar work but with monoenergetic neutrons of different energy range, the agreement between them is good. An assessment of the performance of different size TEPC has been done. An excellent agreement between their event size spectra was found and the proton edge appears at the same position on the lineal energy scale and differences in microdosimetric parameters y F and yD is not exceeding 3%, which is in the region of counting statistics. In Am-Be neutron field, the efficiency of the TEPCs was measured to have an average value of 250 counts per µSv or equivalently about 4.17 counts per minutes per µSv/hr. This efficiency is reasonable for dose equivalent measurements but needs a long integration period. The measurements showed that the dose equivalent which depends on the measurement of energy deposition by the secondary charged particles was originated mainly from elastic collisions of the incident neutrons with hydrogen atoms. Moreover the number of events in the sensitive gas is dominated by proton recoils. A non-negligible fraction of the dose equivalent resulted from gamma

  4. INVESTIGATION OF THE EXTENDED RANGE REM-COUNTER SMARTREM-LINUS IN REFERENCE AND WORKPLACE FIELDS EXPECTED AROUND HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Eike; Trovati, S; Strauch, U; Mayer, S

    2016-09-01

    Radiation survey instrumentation is adequate for the use around high-energy accelerators if capable to measure the dose arising from neutrons with energies ranging from thermal up to a few gigaelectronvolts. The SmartREM-LINUS is a commercial extended range rem-counter, consisting of a central (3)He-proportional counter surrounded by a spherical moderator made of borated polyethylene with an internal shield made of lead. The dose rate indicated by the SmartREM-LINUS was investigated for two different irradiation conditions. The linearity and the angular dependence of the indicated dose rate were investigated using reference neutron fields produced by (241)AmBe and (252)Cf. Additional measurements were performed in two different workplace fields with a component of neutrons with energies >20 MeV, namely the CERN-EU high-energy reference field and near the beam dump of the SwissFEL injector test facility. The measured dose rates were compared to a commercial rem-counter (WENDI2) and the results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. TEPC performance for a reference standard.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Wang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yina; Li, Chunjuan; Xiao, Xuefu; Luo, Hailong; Chen, Jun; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A portable tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC)-based system was developed, which will be used as a reference standard in the neutron mixed field for radiation protection. In this paper, microdosimetry of the TEPC system was studied both in neutron ((252)Cf and (241)Am-Be sources) and gamma ((137)Cs and (60)Co sources) reference radiation fields. The measured neutron and gamma-dose equivalent rates were, respectively, compared with those of the reference ambient dose equivalent rate H(*)(10). And the measured microdosimetric spectra were compared with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA simulated results. All of the comparisons primarily agreed well.

  6. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B.

    2012-10-23

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  7. Neutron Matter at Next-to-Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tews, I.; Krüger, T.; Hebeler, K.; Schwenk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Neutron matter presents a unique system for chiral effective field theory because all many-body forces among neutrons are predicted to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO). We present the first complete N3LO calculation of the neutron matter energy. This includes the subleading three-nucleon forces for the first time and all leading four-nucleon forces. We find relatively large contributions from N3LO three-nucleon forces. Our results provide constraints for neutron-rich matter in astrophysics with controlled theoretical uncertainties.

  8. Use of a spherical albedo system for correcting the readings of albedo dosimeters in JINR phasotron neutron radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.

    2014-03-01

    Results of calibrating a spherical albedo system in the radiation fields of a Pu-Be radionuclide neutron source are presented. It is shown that it can be used for correcting the readings of the DVGN-01 albedo dosimeter. The results of measurements with the system in JINR phasotron neutron fields for the purpose of correcting the DVGN-01 readings in these fields are given. The values of the correction factors for DVGN-01 albedo dosimeters when used in personnel neutron dosimetry (PD) on the JINR phasotron are determined.

  9. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  10. Comparison of different MC techniques to evaluate BNCT dose profiles in phantom exposed tovarious neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Durisi, E; Koivunoro, H; Visca, L; Borla, O; Zanini, A

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose in BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) consists of several radiation components with different physical properties and biological effectiveness. In order to assess the clinical efficacy of the beams, determining the dose profiles in tissues, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used. This paper presents a comparison between dose profiles calculated in different phantoms using two techniques: MC radiation transport code, MCNP-4C2 and BNCT MC treatment planning program, SERA (simulation environment for radiotherapy application). In this study MCNP is used as a reference tool. A preliminary test of SERA is performed using six monodirectional and monoenergetic beams directed onto a simple water phantom. In order to deeply investigate the effect of the different cross-section libraries and of the dose calculation methodology, monoenergetic and monodirectional beams directed toward a standard Snyder phantom are simulated. Neutron attenuation curves and dose profiles are calculated with both codes and the results are compared.

  11. Interrupted Magnetic First Order Transitions and Kinetic Arrest probed with In-field Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siruguri, V.; Kaushik, S. D.; Rayaprol, S.; Babu, P. D.; Chaddah, P.; Sampathkumaran, E. V.; Hoser, A.; Ritter, C.

    2016-09-01

    In-field neutron diffraction studies were carried out on two compounds that exhibit magnetic first order phase transitions (FOPT). It is shown that the FOPT can be interrupted by an external magnetic field, resulting in a coexistence of kinetically arrested metastable states and equilibrium phases. Use of a novel protocol CHUF (Cooling and Heating under Unequal Fields) helps to determine the coexisting phase fractions and also to observe the devitrification of the kinetically arrested phase into the equilibrium phase, in a manner similar to that found in structural glassy systems.

  12. Hall attractor in axially symmetric magnetic fields in neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N; Cumming, Andrew

    2014-05-02

    We find an attractor for an axially symmetric magnetic field evolving under the Hall effect and subdominant Ohmic dissipation, resolving the question of the long-term fate of the magnetic field in neutron star crusts. The electron fluid is in isorotation, analogous to Ferraro's law, with its angular velocity being approximately proportional to the poloidal magnetic flux, Ω∝Ψ. This equilibrium is the long-term configuration of a magnetic field evolving because of the Hall effect and Ohmic dissipation. For an initial dipole-dominated field, the attractor consists mainly of a dipole and an octupole component accompanied by an energetically negligible quadrupole toroidal field. The field dissipates in a self-similar way: Although higher multipoles should decay faster, the toroidal field mediates transfer of energy into them from the lower ones, leading to an advection diffusion equilibrium and keeping the ratio of the poloidal multipoles almost constant. This has implications for the structure of the intermediate-age neutron stars, suggesting that their poloidal field should consist of a dipole and an octupole component accompanied by a very weak toroidal quadrupole. For initial conditions that have a higher multipole ℓ structure, the attractor consists mainly of ℓ and ℓ+2 poloidal components.

  13. General relativistic simulations of black-hole-neutron-star mergers: Effects of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah B.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2012-03-01

    As a neutron star (NS) is tidally disrupted by a black hole (BH) companion at the end of a black-hole-neutron-star (BHNS) binary inspiral, its magnetic fields will be stretched and amplified. If sufficiently strong, these magnetic fields may impact the gravitational waveforms, merger evolution and mass of the remnant disk. Formation of highly-collimated magnetic field lines in the disk+spinning BH remnant may launch relativistic jets, providing the engine for a short-hard GRB. We analyze this scenario through fully general relativistic, magnetohydrodynamic BHNS simulations from inspiral through merger and disk formation. Different initial magnetic field configurations and strengths are chosen for the NS interior for both nonspinning and moderately spinning (aBH/MBH=0.75) BHs aligned with the orbital angular momentum. Only strong interior (Bmax⁡˜1017G) initial magnetic fields in the NS significantly influence merger dynamics, enhancing the remnant disk mass by 100% and 40% in the nonspinning and spinning BH cases, respectively. However, detecting the imprint of even a strong magnetic field may be challenging for Advanced LIGO. Though there is no evidence of mass outflows or magnetic field collimation during the preliminary simulations we have performed, higher resolution, coupled with longer disk evolutions and different initial magnetic field configurations, may be required to definitively assess the possibility of BHNS binaries as short-hard gamma-ray burst progenitors.

  14. Hydrogen Concentration and Strain Fields Near Fatigue Cracks in Pipeline Steel Measured Via Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Matthew; Slifka, Andrew; Drexler, Elizabeth; Hydrogen Pipeline Safety Team

    Hydrogen (H2) is desirable for energy storage as it is cleaner burning and can store a larger amount of energy than an equal mass of gasoline. One problem in the development of a hydrogen economy is to find or develop materials that ensure the safe, reliable, and cost-effective flow of energy from the source to the user. It is expected steels will be needed to serve this function. However, the existing network of natural gas pipeline, for example, is constructed of ferrous materials which are susceptible to embrittlement and subsequent increased fatigue crack growth rates after exposure to hydrogen. In order to improve current modeling efforts, experimental determination of hydrogen concentration, hydrogen diffusion rates, and strain fields are required to inform and validate the model. Here we report neutron imaging measurements of the hydrogen concentration near a fatigue crack and the corresponding strain field, measured via neutron transmission Bragg edge spectroscopy. Nist Materials Measurement Laboratory, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division.

  15. The freedom to choose neutron star magnetic field equilibria: Table 1.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Lasky, Paul D.

    2016-12-01

    Our ability to interpret and glean useful information from the large body of observations of strongly magnetized neutron stars rests largely on our theoretical understanding of magnetic field equilibria. We answer the following question: is one free to arbitrarily prescribe magnetic equilibria such that fluid degrees of freedom can balance the equilibrium equations? We examine this question for various models for neutron star matter; from the simplest single-fluid barotrope to more realistic non-barotropic multifluid models with superfluid/superconducting components, muons and entropy. We do this for both axi- and non-axisymmetric equilibria, and in Newtonian gravity and general relativity. We show that, in axisymmetry, the most realistic model allows complete freedom in choosing a magnetic field equilibrium whereas non-axisymmetric equilibria are never completely arbitrary.

  16. Supplemental Summary of Cutoff Rigidities Calculated Using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field for Various Epochs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    Rigidities Calculated Using the International -Geomagnetic Reference Field for Various Epochs M.A. SHEA D.F. SMART 1 NOVEMBER 1982 Approved for publie...SUMMARY OF CUTOFF Scientific. Interim. RIGIDITIES CALCULATED USING THE INTER -_ _________ NATIONAL GEOMAGNETIC REFERENCE FIELD 6 PERFORMING 01G. REPORT...n-b.’I Cosmic rays Cutoff rigidities Geomagnetic field 20 ABSTRACT (ContinuC0 e o, sid. it ---. 0, -,d id- 5,.- 550,5- Tables of cosmic-ray cutoff

  17. Effects of neutrino emissivity on the cooling of neutron stars in the presence of a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, Eduardo Lenho; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanço

    2015-12-17

    One of the most interesting kind of neutron stars are the pulsars, which are highly magnetized neutron stars with fields up to 10{sup 14} G at the surface. The strength of magnetic field in the center of a neutron star remains unknown. According to the scalar virial theorem, magnetic field in the core could be as large as 10{sup 18} G. In this work we study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the cooling of neutron stars coming from direct Urca process. Direct Urca process is an extremely efficient mechanism for cooling a neutron star after its formation. The matter is described using a relativistic mean-field model at zero temperature with eight baryons (baryon octet), electrons and muons. We obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density for different magnetic fields. We calculate numerically the cooling of neutron stars for a parametrized magnetic field and compare the results for the case without a magnetic field.

  18. Use of D-T-produced fast neutrons for in vivo body composition analysis: a reference method for nutritional assessment in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kehayias, J J

    2004-05-01

    Body composition has become the main outcome of many nutritional intervention studies including osteoporosis, malnutrition, obesity, AIDS, and aging. Traditional indirect body composition methods developed with healthy young adults do not apply to the elderly or diseased. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used to assess in vivo elements characteristic of specific body compartments. Non-bone phosphorus for muscle is measured by the (31)P(n, alpha)(28)Al reaction, and nitrogen for protein via the (14)N(n,2n)(13)N fast neutron reaction. Inelastic neutron scattering is used to measure total body carbon and oxygen. Body fat is derived from carbon after correcting for contributions from protein, bone, and glycogen. Carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) is used to measure the distribution of fat and lean tissue in the body and to monitor small changes of lean mass. A sealed, D-T neutron generator is used for the production of fast neutrons. Carbon and oxygen mass and their ratio are measured in vivo at a radiation exposure of less than 0.06 mSv. Gamma-ray spectra are collected using large BGO detectors and analyzed for the 4.43 MeV state of carbon and 6.13 MeV state of oxygen, simultaneously with the irradiation. P and N analysis by delayed fast neutron activation is performed by transferring the patient to a shielded room equipped with an array of NaI(Tl) detectors. A combination of measurements makes possible the assessment of the "quality" of fat-free mass. The neutron generator system is used to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments, to study mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging, and to investigate methods for preserving function and quality of life in the elderly. It is also used as a reference method for the validation of portable instruments of nutritional assessment.

  19. Fluence measurement of fast neutron fields with a highly efficient recoil proton telescope using active pixel sensors.

    PubMed

    Taforeau, J; Higueret, S; Husson, D; Kachel, M; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High-Energy Neutron metrology Applications) is being developed at the LNE-IRSN and aims at characterising energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a recoil proton telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50-µm-thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for proton tracking and a 3-mm-thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode, owing to a large detection solid angle, increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of 10 compared with conventional designs. The ability of the spectrometer to determine the neutron energy was demonstrated and reported elsewhere. This paper focuses on the fluence measurement of monoenergetic neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. Experimental investigations, performed at the AMANDE facility, indicate a good estimation of neutron fluence at various energies. In addition, a complete description of uncertainties budget is presented in this paper and a Monte Carlo propagation of uncertainty sources leads to a fluence measurement with a precision ∼3-5 % depending on the neutron energy.

  20. Nonrotating and rotating neutron stars in the extended field theoretical model

    SciTech Connect

    Dhiman, Shashi K.; Kumar, Raj; Agrawal, B. K.

    2007-10-15

    We study the properties of nonrotating and rotating neutron stars for a new set of equations of state (EOSs) with different high-density behavior obtained using the extended field theoretical model. The high-density behavior for these EOSs are varied by varying the {omega}-meson self-coupling and hyperon-meson couplings in such a way that the quality of fit to the bulk nuclear observables, nuclear matter incompressibility coefficient, and hyperon-nucleon potential depths remain practically unaffected. We find that the largest value for maximum mass for the nonrotating neutron star is 2.1M{sub {center_dot}}. The radius for a neutron star with canonical mass is 12.8-14.1 km, provided only those EOSs are considered for which the maximum mass is larger than 1.6M{sub {center_dot}}, the lower bound on the maximum mass measured so far. Our results for the very recently discovered fastest rotating neutron star indicate that this star is supramassive with mass 1.7M{sub {center_dot}}-2.7M{sub {center_dot}} and circumferential equatorial radius 12-19 km.

  1. Neutron stars in a perturbative f(R) gravity model with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Güngör, Can; Keleş, Vildan; Ryu, C.Y.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: cemsinan@msgsu.edu.tr E-mail: kelesvi@itu.edu.tr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    In Kaluza-Klein electromagnetism it is natural to associate modified gravity with strong electromagnetic fields. Hence, in this paper we investigate the combined effects of a strong magnetic field and perturbative f(R) gravity on the structure of neutron stars. The effect of an interior strong magnetic field of about 10{sup 17−18} G on the equation of state is derived in the context of a quantum hadrodynamics (QHD) equation of state (EoS) including effects of the magnetic pressure and energy along with occupied Landau levels. Adopting a random orientation of interior field domains, we solve the modified spherically symmetric hydrostatic equilibrium equations derived for a gravity model with f(R) = R+αR{sup 2}. Effects of both the finite magnetic field and the modified gravity are detailed for various values of the magnetic field and the perturbation parameter α along with a discussion of their physical implications. We show that there exists a parameter space of the modified gravity and the magnetic field strength, in which even a soft equation of state can accommodate a large ( > 2 M{sub s}un) maximum neutron star mass.

  2. Advances in Neutron Spectroscopy and High Magnetic Field Instrumentation for studies of Correlated Electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Granroth, Garrett E

    2011-01-01

    Neutron Spectroscopy has provided critical information on the magnetism in correlated electron systems. Specifically quantum magnets, superconductors, and multi-ferroics are areas of productive research. A discussion of recent measurements on the SEQUOIA spectrometer will provide examples of how novel instrumentation concepts are used on the latest generation of spectrometers to extend our knowledge in such systems. The now ubiquitous function of sample rotation allows for full mapping of volumes of $Q$ and $\\omega$ space. An instrument focused on low angles could extend these maps to cover more of the first Brillioun zone. Innovative chopper cascades allow two unique modes of operation. Multiplexed measurements allow the simultaneous measurement of high and low energy features in an excitation spectrum. Alternatively by limiting the neutron bandwidth incident on the Fermi Chopper, background from subsequent time frames is removed, enabling the observation of weak, large energy transfer features. Finally the implementation of event-based detection for neutron experiments is time correlated experiments. Diffraction studies of the high field spin states in MnWO$_4$ using magnetic fields up to 30 T, provided by a pulsed magnet, illustrate this method. Expanding the high field studies to spectroscopy will require a novel instrument, focused around a world class DC magnet, like Zeemans proposed for the SNS.

  3. Spin-Down Mechanisms in Neutron Stars with ``Anomalous'' Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Energy losses from isolated neutron stars are attributed to a number of factors, the most common assumption being the emission of electromagnetic radiation from a rotating point-like magnetic dipole in vacuum. This energy loss mechanism predicts a braking index n = 3, which is not observed in highly magnetized neutron stars. Despite this fact, the assumptions of a dipole field and rapid early rotation are often assumed a priori. This typically causes a discrepancy in the characteristic age of these objects and the age of their associated Supernova Remnants (SNRs). In this work we consider neutron stars with ``anomalous'' magnetic fields - namely magnetars, high-B radio pulsars, and the Central Compact Objects (proposed to be `anti-magnetars’) that are securely associated with SNRs. Without making any assumptions about the initial spin periods of these objects and by constraining the SNR ages to match their associated pulsar ages, we compare the predictions of distinct energy loss mechanisms, such as field decay and the emission of relativistic winds using all observed data on the braking indices. This study has important implications on the proposed emission models for these exotic objects and helps in resolving the PSR-SNR age discrepancy.

  4. Theory of inelastic neutron scattering in a field-induced spin-nematic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerald, Andrew; Ueda, Hiroaki T.; Shannon, Nic

    2015-05-01

    We develop a theory of spin excitations in a field-induced spin-nematic state, and use it to show how a spin-nematic order can be indentified using inelastic neutron scattering. We concentrate on two-dimensional frustrated ferromagnets, for which a two-sublattice, bond-centered spin-nematic state is predicted to exist over a wide range of parameters. First, to clarify the nature of spin-excitations, we introduce a soluble spin-1 model, and use this to derive a continuum field theory, applicable to any two-sublattice spin-nematic state. We then parameterize this field theory, using diagrammatic calculations for a realistic microscopic model of a spin-1/2 frustrated ferromagnet, and show how it can be used to make predictions for inelastic neutron scattering. As an example, we show quantitative predictions for inelastic scattering of neutrons from BaCdVO(PO 4)2 , a promising candidate to realize a spin-nematic state at an achievable h ˜4 T. We show that in this material it is realistic to expect a ghostly Goldstone mode, signalling spin-nematic order, to be visible in experiment.

  5. Arrangement of high-energy neutron irradiation field and shielding experiment using 4 m concrete at KENS.

    PubMed

    Nakao, N; Yashima, H; Kawai, M; Oishi, K; Nakashima, H; Masumoto, K; Matsumura, H; Sasaki, S; Numajiri, M; Sanami, T; Wang, Q; Toyoda, A; Takahashi, K; Iijima, K; Eda, K; Ban, S; Hirayama, H; Muto, S; Nunomiya, T; Yonai, S; Rasolonjatovo, D R H; Terunuma, K; Yamauchi, K; Sarkar, P K; Kim, E; Nakamura, T; Maruhashi, A

    2005-01-01

    An irradiation field of high-energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from a thick tungsten target bombarded by 500 MeV protons was arranged at the KENS spallation neutron source facility. In this facility, shielding experiment was performed with an ordinary concrete shield of 4 m thickness assembled in the irradiation room, 2.5 m downstream from the target centre. Activation detectors of bismuth, aluminium, indium and gold were inserted into eight slots inside the shield and attenuations of neutron reaction rates were obtained by measurements of gamma-rays from the activation detectors. A MARS14 Monte Carlo simulation was also performed down to thermal energy, and comparisons between the calculations and measurements show agreements within a factor of 3. This neutron field is useful for studies of shielding, activation and radiation damage of materials for high-energy neutrons, and experimental data are useful to check the accuracies of the transmission and activation calculation codes.

  6. The effects of magnetic field topology on secondary neutron spectra in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Pecover, J.; Chittenden, J.

    2017-03-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept involves the compression of a magnetized fuel such that the stagnated fuel contains a magnetic field that can suppress heat flow losses and confine α particles. Magnetic confinement of α particles reduces the fuel ρR required for ignition. Recent work [1,2] has demonstrated that the magnitude of the magnetic field in deuterium fuel can be inferred from the yields and spectra of secondary DT neutrons. In this work we investigate the potential for using the shape of the secondary neutron spectra to diagnose the magnetic field topology in the stagnated fuel. Three different field topologies that could possibly occur in MagLIF experiments are studied: (1) a cylindrical fuel column containing axial and azimuthal magnetic field components, (2) a fuel column which is pinched at the ends to form a magnetic mirror and (3) a fuel column that has a helical tube shape with magnetic field lines following the helical path of the tube's axis. Each topology is motivated by observations from experimental or simulated MagLIF data. For each topology we use a multi-physics model to investigate the shapes of the secondary neutron spectra emitted from a steady-state stagnated fuel column. It is found that the azimuthal and helical topologies are more suitable than the mirror topology for reproducing an asymmetry in the axial spectra that was observed in experiments. Gorgon MHD simulations of the MagLIF implosion in 1D are also carried out. These show that sufficient azimuthal magnetic field can penetrate from the liner into the fuel to qualitatively reproduce the observed spectral asymmetry.

  7. Anomalous Neutron Capture and Plastic Deformation of cu and pd Cathodes during Electrolysis in a Weak Thermalized Neutron Field:. Evidence of Nuclei-Lattice Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, A. G.; Miley, G. H.; Lipson, A. G.

    2006-02-01

    Anomalous neutron capture and plastic deformation in the hardened Cu and Pd cathodes has been established under combined action of electrolysis and a weak thermalized neutron field (WTNF) with a flux in the range of 180-400 n/s cm2. Experiments with these cathodes showed ~7.0% decrease in the 2224 keV n-D gamma peak accompanying thermalized neutron capture inside the PE cavity during electrolysis vs. experiments with annealed Cu and Pd as well as with the background runs (i.e., no electrolysis). The anomalous neutron capture and plastic deformation of Cu and Pd cathodes under combined action of electrolysis and WTNF may be explained energetically by assuming a selective radiationless thermalized neutron capture at high-internal strain concentration sites in the hardened cathodes. The results of these experiments provide straightforward (avoids the Coulomb barrier penetration issue) evidence that nuclei-lattice energy exchange can result in an increase in neutron capture probability and radiationless de-excitation of the resulting compound nuclei.

  8. Constraints on Non-Newtonian Gravity From the Experiment on Neutron Quantum States in the Earth's Gravitational Field.

    PubMed

    Nesvizhevsky, V V; Protasov, K V

    2005-01-01

    An upper limit to non-Newtonian attractive forces is obtained from the measurement of quantum states of neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field. This limit improves the existing constraints in the nanometer range.

  9. Determination of tungsten in geochemical reference material basalt Columbia River 2 by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Samuel S.; Beck, Chelsie L.; Bowen, James M.; Eggemeyer, Tere A.; Hines, C. Corey; Leizers, Martin; Metz, Lori A.; Morley, Shannon M.; Restis, Kaitlyn R.; Snow, Mathew S.; Wall, Donald E.; Clark, Sue B.; Seiner, Brienne N.

    2016-10-06

    Environmental tungsten (W) analyses are inhibited by a lack of reference materials and practical methods to remove isobaric and radiometric interferences. We present a method that evaluates the potential use of commercially available sediment, Basalt Columbia River-2 (BCR-2), as a reference material using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and mass spectrometry. Tungsten concentrations using both methods are in statistical agreement at the 95% confidence interval (92 ± 4 ng/g for NAA and 100 ±7 ng/g for mass spectrometry) with recoveries greater than 95%. These results indicate that BCR-2 may be suitable as a reference material for future studies.

  10. Temperature compensated and self-calibrated current sensor using reference magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-10-09

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by the magnetic field sensors and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  11. Neutron scattering studies of crude oil viscosity reduction with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Enpeng

    topic. Dr. Tao with his group at Temple University, using his electro or magnetic rheological viscosity theory has developed a new technology, which utilizes electric or magnetic fields to change the rheology of complex fluids to reduce the viscosity, while keeping the temperature unchanged. After we successfully reduced the viscosity of crude oil with field and investigated the microstructure changing in various crude oil samples with SANS, we have continued to reduce the viscosity of heavy crude oil, bunker diesel, ultra low sulfur diesel, bio-diesel and crude oil and ultra low temperature with electric field treatment. Our research group developed the viscosity electrorheology theory and investigated flow rate with laboratory and field pipeline. But we never visualize this aggregation. The small angle neutron scattering experiment has confirmed the theoretical prediction that a strong electric field induces the suspended nano-particles inside crude oil to aggregate into short chains along the field direction. This aggregation breaks the symmetry, making the viscosity anisotropic: along the field direction, the viscosity is significantly reduced. The experiment enables us to determine the induced chain size and shape, verifies that the electric field works for all kinds of crude oils, paraffin-based, asphalt-based, and mix-based. The basic physics of such field induced viscosity reduction is applicable to all kinds of suspensions.

  12. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  13. Astronomers Use X-Rays To Probe Gravitational Field Of A Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    With NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have detected features that may be the first direct evidence of the effect of gravity on radiation from a neutron star. This finding, if confirmed, could enable scientists to measure the gravitational field of neutron stars and determine whether they contain exotic forms of matter not seen on Earth. A team led by George Pavlov of Penn State University in University Park observed 1E 1207.4-5209, a neutron star in the center of a supernova remnant about 7,000 light years from Earth. The results were presented on June 6, 2002, at the American Astronomical Society in Albuquerque, NM. Pavlov's group found two dips, or absorption features, in the spectrum of X-rays from the star. If these dips are due to the absorption of X-rays near the star by helium ions in a strong magnetic field, they indicate that the gravitational field reduces the energies of X-rays escaping from near the surface of a neutron star. "This interpretation is consistent with the data," said Pavlov, "but the features may be a blend of many other features. More precise measurements, preferably with Chandra's grating spectrometer, are needed." "These absorption features may be the first evidence of the effect of gravity on radiation near the surface of an isolated neutron star," said Pavlov. "This is particularly important because it would allow us to set limits on the type of matter that comprises this star." Neutron stars are formed when a massive star runs out of fuel and its core collapses. A supernova explosion occurs and the collapsed core is compressed to a hot object about 12 miles in diameter, with a thin atmosphere of hydrogen and possibly heavier ions in a gravitational field 100 billion times as strong as Earth's. These objects, which have a density of more than 1 billion tons per teaspoonful, are called neutron stars because they have been thought to be composed mostly of neutrons. Although neutron stars have been studied extensively for

  14. Observable pulsed fractions of thermal emission from neutron stars with toroidal magnetic fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Jillian Anne

    The observed spectra of many thermally emitting neutron stars ("The Magnificent Seven", High-Field Pulsars, etc.) suggest that the surface temperature distribution can be described by hot polar regions surrounded by a cooler equatorial belt. The hotter polar "caps" produce pulsed fractions (P F ) in the x-ray emission that, in some cases, can be quite high (e.g. PSR J1119-6127 with P F = 74 ± 14%, Gonzalez et al. 2007). In neutron stars, such a temperature distribution can be explained by the presence of a strong toroidal field in the crust (Perez-Azorin et al. 2006; Geppert et al. 2006). An elegant description of the relationship between pulsed fraction and rg /R for compact stars with hot spots was first given by Beloborodov 2002. In this study, the relationship between pulsed fraction and stellar radius (P F vs. R) for various configurations of hot spot position, beaming factor and observer angle for a 1.4 solar mass neutron star is explored. The pertinence of spot temperature and size is also examined.

  15. A new Recoil Proton Telescope for energy and fluence measurement of fast neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lebreton, Lena; Bachaalany, Mario

    2015-07-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High Energy Neutron metrology Applications), is being developed at the IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons) and aims at characterizing energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a Recoil Proton Telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5 to 20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50{sub m} thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for the proton tracking and a 3 mm thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. This first prototype used CMOS sensors called MIMOSTAR, initially developed for heavy ion physics. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of ten compared with conventional designs. The first prototype has already been done and was a successful study giving the results it offered in terms of energy and fluence measurements. For mono energetic beams going from 5 to 19 MeV, the telescope offered an energy resolution between 5 and 11% and fluence difference going from 5 to 7% compared to other home standards. A second and final prototype of the detector is being designed. It will hold upgraded CMOS sensors called FastPixN. These CMOS sensors are supposed to run 400 times faster than the older version and therefore give the telescope the ability to support neutron flux in the order of 107 to 108cm{sup 2}:s{sup 1}. The first prototypes results showed that a 50 m pixel size is enough for a precise scattering angle reconstruction. Simulations using MCNPX and GEANT4 are already in place for further improvements. A DeltaE diode will replace the third CMOS sensor and will be installed right before the silicon diode for a better recoil proton selection. The final prototype with

  16. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta, with non-spherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp. Predictions of light curves for the low mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust). This research was supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  17. Disordered Nuclear Pasta, Magnetic Field Decay, and Crust Cooling in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pasta, with nonspherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low-conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp . Predictions of light curves for the low-mass x-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore, observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust).

  18. A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, R; Andreo, P; Capote, R; Huq, M Saiful; Kilby, W; Kjäll, P; Mackie, T R; Palmans, H; Rosser, K; Seuntjens, J; Ullrich, W; Vatnitsky, S

    2008-11-01

    The use of small fields in radiotherapy techniques has increased substantially, in particular in stereotactic treatments and large uniform or nonuniform fields that are composed of small fields such as for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This has been facilitated by the increased availability of standard and add-on multileaf collimators and a variety of new treatment units. For these fields, dosimetric errors have become considerably larger than in conventional beams mostly due to two reasons; (i) the reference conditions recommended by conventional Codes of Practice (CoPs) cannot be established in some machines and (ii) the measurement of absorbed dose to water in composite fields is not standardized. In order to develop standardized recommendations for dosimetry procedures and detectors, an international working group on reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields has been established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in cooperation with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Therapy Physics Committee. This paper outlines a new formalism for the dosimetry of small and composite fields with the intention to extend recommendations given in conventional CoPs for clinical reference dosimetry based on absorbed dose to water. This formalism introduces the concept of two new intermediate calibration fields: (i) a static machine-specific reference field for those modalities that cannot establish conventional reference conditions and (ii) a plan-class specific reference field closer to the patient-specific clinical fields thereby facilitating standardization of composite field dosimetry. Prior to progressing with developing a CoP or other form of recommendation, the members of this IAEA working group welcome comments from the international medical physics community on the formalism presented here.

  19. Surface temperature of a magnetized neutron star and interpretation of the ROSAT data. 1: Dipole fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Dany

    1995-01-01

    We model the temperature distribution at the surface of a magnetized neutron star and study the effects on the observed X-ray spectra and light curves. Generalrelativistic effects, i.e., redshift and lensing, are fully taken into account. Atmospheric effects on the emitted spectral flux are not included: we consider only blackbody emission at the local effective temperature. In this first paper we restrict ourselves to dipole fields. General features are studied and compared with the ROSAT data from the pulsars 0833 - 45 (Vela), 0656 + 14, 0630 + 178 (Geminga), and 1055 - 52, the four cases for which there is strong evidence that thermal radiation from the stellar surface is detected. The composite spectra we obtain are not very different from a blackbody spectrum at the star's effective temperature. We conclude that, as far as blackbody spectra are considered, temperature estimates using single-temperature models give results practically identical to our composite models. The change of the (composite blackbody) spectrum with the star's rotational phase is also not very large and may be unobservable inmost cases. Gravitational lensing strongly suppresses the light curve pulsations. If a dipole field is assumed, pulsed fractions comparable to the observed ones can be obtained only with stellar radii larger than those which are predicted by current models of neutron star struture, or with low stellar masses. Moreover, the shapes of the theoretical light curves with dipole fields do not correspond to the observations. The use of magnetic spectra may raise the pulsed fraction sufficiently but will certainly make the discrepancy with the light curve shapes worse: dipole fields are not sufficient to interpret the data. Many neutron star models with a meson condensate or hypersons predict very small radii, and hence very strong lensing, which will require highly nondipolar fields to be able to reproduce the observed pulsed fractions, if possible at all: this may be a new

  20. Construction of monoenergetic neutron calibration fields using 45Sc(p, n)45Ti reaction at JAEA.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Y; Saegusa, J; Shikaze, Y; Tsutsumi, M; Shimizu, S; Yoshizawa, M

    2007-01-01

    The 8 and 27 keV monoenergetic neutron calibration fields have been developed by using (45)Sc(p, n)(45)Ti reaction. Protons from a 4-MV Pelletron accelerator are used to bombard a thin scandium target evaporated onto a platinum disc. The proton energies are finely adjusted to the resonance to generate the 8 and 27 keV neutrons by applying a high voltage to the target assemblies. The neutron energies were measured using the time-of-flight method with a lithium glass scintillation detector. The neutron fluences at a calibration point located at 50 cm from the target were evaluated using Bonner spheres. A long counter was placed at 2.2 m from the target and at 60 degrees to the direction of the proton beam in order to monitor the fluence at the calibration point. Fluence and dose equivalent rates at the calibration point are sufficient to calibrate many types of the neutron survey metres.

  1. The effects of superhigh magnetic fields on the equations of state of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. F.; Wang, N.; Xu, Y.; Shan, H.; Li, X.-D.

    2015-11-01

    By introducing Dirac's δ-function in superhigh magnetic fields, we deduce a general formula for the pressure of degenerate and relativistic electrons, Pe, which is suitable for superhigh magnetic fields, discuss the quantization of Landau levels of electrons, and consider the quantum electrodynamic(QED) effects on the equations of states (EOSs) for different matter systems. The main conclusions are as follows: the stronger the magnetic field strength, the higher the electron pressure becomes; compared with a common radio pulsar, a magnetar could be a more compact oblate spheroid-like deformed neutron star due to the anisotropic total pressure; and an increase in the maximum mass of a magnetar is expected because of the positive contribution of the magnetic field energy to the EoS of the star. Since this is an original work in which some uncertainties could exist, modifications and improvements of our theory should be considered in our future studies.

  2. Impact of the revision of 10CFR835 with regard to neutron field surveys.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G

    2008-08-01

    The compliance requirements for Department of Energy facilities are codified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835. The regulation was recently revised to adopt the 1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Although the impacts of this change include areas other than neutron dosimetry, the intent of this text is to outline the new regulation's effect on neutron instrument calibrations and field surveys. A significant change as a result of the adoption of the ICRP 60 recommendations is the change in the quality factor applied to operational quantities including the quantity used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations, notably the ambient dose equivalent, H*(d). Since the definitions of the operational quantities were not changed, the absorbed dose values for these quantities remain consistent with previous recommendations so the only adjustment necessary is to account for the revised quality factors. For this work, commonly encountered neutron spectra were folded with energy dependent conversion coefficients, h*(10)(E), determined using the old and new quality factors to compute conversion coefficients for the various sources. Additionally, the effect on a single point calibration for the widely used "Rem ball" is discussed. In general, the change in conversion coefficients under the newer guidelines results in a 5 to 15% increase in H*(10), which will require modifications to instrument calibrations.

  3. AN ASSESSMENT OF GROUND TRUTH VARIABILITY USING A "VIRTUAL FIELD REFERENCE DATABASE"

    EPA Science Inventory



    A "Virtual Field Reference Database (VFRDB)" was developed from field measurment data that included location and time, physical attributes, flora inventory, and digital imagery (camera) documentation foy 1,01I sites in the Neuse River basin, North Carolina. The sampling f...

  4. Neutron distribution, electric dipole polarizability and weak form factor of 48Ca from chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Kyle

    2016-03-01

    How large is the 48Ca nucleus? While the electric charge distribution of this nucleus was accurately measured decades ago, both experimental and ab initio descriptions of the neutron distribution are deficient. We address this question using ab initio calculations of the electric charge, neutron, and weak distributions of 48Ca based on chiral effective field theory. Historically, chiral effective field theory calculations of systems larger than 4 nucleons have been plagued by strong systematic errors which result in theoretical descriptions that are too dense and over bound. We address these errors using a novel approach that permits us to accurately reproduce binding energy and charge radius of 48Ca, and to constrain electroweak observables such as the neutron radius, electric dipole polarizability, and the weak form factor. For a full list of contributors to this work, please see ``Neutron and weak-charge distributions of the 48Ca nucleus,'' Nature Physics (2015) doi:10.1038/nphys3529.

  5. Determination of canine dose conversion factors in mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.A.; Bhatt, R.C.; Myska, J.C.; Holland, B.K.

    1996-07-01

    The primary objective of mixed-field neutron/gamma radiation dosimetry in canine irradiation experiments conducted at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is to determine the absorbed midline tissue dose (MLT) at the region of interest in the canine. A dose conversion factor (DCF) can be applied to free-in-air (FIA) dose measurements to estimate the MLT doses to canines. This report is a summary of the measured DCFs that were used to determine the MLT doses in canines at AFRRI from 1979 to 1992.

  6. Magnetic field evolution in neutron stars: one-dimensional multi-fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, J.; Reisenegger, A.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: This paper is the first in a series that aims to understand the long-term evolution of neutron star magnetic fields. Methods: We model the stellar matter as an electrically neutral and lightly-ionized plasma composed of three moving particle species: neutrons, protons, and electrons; these species can be converted into each other by weak interactions (beta decays), suffer binary collisions, and be affected by each other's macroscopic electromagnetic fields. Since the evolution of the magnetic field occurs over thousands of years or more, compared to dynamical timescales (sound and Alfvén) of milliseconds to seconds, we use a slow-motion approximation in which we neglect the inertial terms in the equations of motion for the particles. This approximation leads to three nonlinear partial-differential equations describing the evolution of the magnetic field, as well as the movement of two fluids: the charged particles (protons and electrons) and the neutrons. These equations are first rather than second order in time (involving the velocities of the three species but not their accelerations). Results: In this paper, we restrict ourselves to a one-dimensional geometry in which the magnetic field points in one Cartesian direction, but varies only along an orthogonal direction. We study the evolution of the system in three different ways: (i) estimating timescales directly from the equations, guided by physical intuition; (ii) a normal-mode analysis in the limit of a nearly uniform system; and (iii) a finite-difference numerical integration of the full set of nonlinear partial-differential equations. We find good agreement between our analytical normal-mode solutions and the numerical simulations. We show that the magnetic field and the particles evolve through successive quasi-equilibrium states, on timescales that can be understood by physical arguments. Depending on parameter values, the magnetic field can evolve by ohmic diffusion or by ambipolar diffusion, the

  7. ESR response of CFQ-Gd2O3 dosimeters to a mixed neutron-gamma field: Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Hoseininaveh, M; Ranjbar, A H

    2015-11-01

    Clear fused quartz (CFQ) may be considered a suitable material for electron and gamma dose measurements using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. Research has been ongoing to optimize the neutron capture therapy (NCT) mechanism and its effects in cancer treatment. Neutron sources of the mixed neutron-gamma field are a challenge for this treatment method. A reliable dosimetric measurement and treatment should be able to determine various components of this mixed field. In this study, the ESR response of cylindrical and spherical shells of CFQ dosimeters, filled with Gd2O3, when exposed to a thermal neutron beam, has been investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. In order to maximize the ESR response, the dimensions of the outer and inner parts of the samples have been chosen as variables, and the amount of energy deposited in the samples has been determined. The optimum size of the samples has been determined, and the capability of discriminating gamma and neutron dose in a mixed neutron-gamma field regarding the CFQ-Gd2O3 dosimeter has also been widely studied.

  8. Thunderstorms' atmospheric electric field effects in the intensity of cosmic ray muons and in neutron monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.; Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Ne'Eman, Y.; Pustil'Nik, L. A.; Signoretti, F.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    2003-05-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the influence of thunderstorms' atmospheric electric field on cosmic ray secondary components are presented. On the basis of the approach proposed by [1987], theoretical models for a correct numerical evaluation of these effects on hard muon, soft muon, and neutron monitor component are developed. For hard and soft muons the validity of the models are checked by their comparison with experimental results of the Baksan muon detector. For the first time, the effect of thunderstorms' atmospheric electric field on cosmic rays is investigated by simultaneous measurements of one-minute neutron monitor intensity and of atmospheric electric field at the Emilio Segre' Observatory on Mt. Hermon (Israel). A series of large thunderstorms during February 2000 is investigated; for each thunderstorm the maximum atmospheric electric field intensity was ranging from 10 to about 100 kV/m. Clear correlation between field intensity and neutron monitor intensity variations is presented for total intensity and for different detected multiplicity channels. This correlation is quantitatively in agreement with the developed model which takes into account the formation of short-living meso-atoms by the capture of slow negative muons in the lead of the monitor. The effect is relevant only for neutron events with detected multiplicity m = 1 and evident for multiplicity m = 2; the other multiplicity channels are not influenced by neutrons from meso-atoms.

  9. THE HIDDEN MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE YOUNG NEUTRON STAR IN KESTEVEN 79

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaltas, Natalia; Lai Dong

    2012-04-01

    Recent observations of the central compact object in the Kesteven 79 supernova remnant show that this neutron star (NS) has a weak dipole magnetic field (a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} G) but an anomalously large ({approx}64%) pulse fraction in its surface X-ray emission. We explore the idea that a substantial sub-surface magnetic field exists in the NS crust, which produces diffuse hot spots on the stellar surface due to anisotropic heat conduction, and gives rise to the observed X-ray pulsation. We develop a general-purpose method, termed 'Temperature Template with Full Transport' (TTFT), that computes the synthetic pulse profile of surface X-ray emission from NSs with arbitrary magnetic field and surface temperature distributions, taking into account magnetic atmosphere opacities, beam pattern, vacuum polarization, and gravitational light bending. We show that a crustal toroidal magnetic field of order a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} G or higher, varying smoothly across the crust, can produce sufficiently distinct surface hot spots to generate the observed pulse fraction in the Kes 79 NS. This result suggests that substantial sub-surface magnetic fields, much stronger than the 'visible' dipole fields, may be buried in the crusts of some young NSs, and such hidden magnetic fields can play an important role in their observational manifestations. The general TTFT tool we have developed can also be used for studying radiation from other magnetic NSs.

  10. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-07-08

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases.

  11. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-07-01

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases. PACS number(s): 87

  12. The magnetic field of an isolated neutron star from X-ray cyclotron absorption lines.

    PubMed

    Bignami, G F; Caraveo, P A; De Luca, A; Mereghetti, S

    2003-06-12

    Isolated neutron stars are highly magnetized, fast-rotating objects that form as an end point of stellar evolution. They are directly observable in X-ray emission, because of their high surface temperatures. Features in their X-ray spectra could in principle reveal the presence of atmospheres, or be used to estimate the strength of their magnetic fields through the cyclotron process, as is done for X-ray binaries. Almost all isolated neutron star spectra observed so far appear as featureless thermal continua. The only exception is 1E1207.4-5209 (refs 7-9), where two deep absorption features have been detected, but with insufficient definition to permit unambiguous interpretation. Here we report a long X-ray observation of the same object in which the star's spectrum shows three distinct features, regularly spaced at 0.7, 1.4 and 2.1 keV, plus a fourth feature of lower significance, at 2.8 keV. These features vary in phase with the star's rotation. The logical interpretation is that they are features from resonant cyclotron absorption, which allows us to calculate a magnetic field strength of 8 x 10(10) G, assuming the absorption arises from electrons.

  13. Electrical conductivity of a warm neutron star crust in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Arus; Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-08-01

    We study the electrical conductivity of finite-temperature crust of a warm compact star which may be formed in the aftermath of a supernova explosion or a binary neutron star merger as well as when a cold neutron star is heated by accretion of material from a companion. We focus on the temperature-density regime where plasma is in the liquid state and, therefore, the conductivity is dominated by the electron scattering off correlated nuclei. The dynamical screening of this interaction is implemented in terms of the polarization tensor computed in the hard-thermal-loop effective field theory of QED plasma. The correlations of the background ionic component are accounted for via a structure factor derived from Monte Carlo simulations of one-component plasma. With this input we solve the Boltzmann kinetic equation in relaxation time approximation taking into account the anisotropy of transport due to the magnetic field. The electrical conductivity tensor is studied numerically as a function of temperature and density for carbon and iron nuclei as well as density-dependent composition of zero-temperature dense matter in weak equilibrium with electrons. We also provide accurate fit formulas to our numerical results as well as supplemental tables which can be used in dissipative magneto-hydrodynamics simulations of warm compact stars.

  14. Reference field specification and preliminary beam selection strategy for accelerator-based GCR simulation.

    PubMed

    Slaba, Tony C; Blattnig, Steve R; Norbury, John W; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities and possible biological considerations. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, a preliminary approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. This approach is not a final design for the GCR simulator, but rather a single step within a broader design strategy. It is shown that the beam selection methodology is tied directly to the reference environment, allows facility constraints to be incorporated, and may be adjusted to account for additional constraints imposed by biological or animal care considerations. The major biology questions are not addressed herein but are discussed in a companion paper published in the present issue of this journal. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed

  15. Reference field specification and preliminary beam selection strategy for accelerator-based GCR simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities and possible biological considerations. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, a preliminary approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. This approach is not a final design for the GCR simulator, but rather a single step within a broader design strategy. It is shown that the beam selection methodology is tied directly to the reference environment, allows facility constraints to be incorporated, and may be adjusted to account for additional constraints imposed by biological or animal care considerations. The major biology questions are not addressed herein but are discussed in a companion paper published in the present issue of this journal. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed

  16. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) method for measurements of soil moisture in cropped fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres Rivera Villarreyes, Carlos; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. This study evaluates the applicability of the Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for integral quantification of seasonal soil moisture in the root zone at the scale of a field or small watershed, making use of the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator relative to other landscape materials. GANS measurements were performed at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations and seasonal conditions. Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a lowland Bornim farmland (Brandenburg) cropped with sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. At both sites depth profiles of soil moisture were measured at several locations in parallel by frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) for comparison and calibration. Initially, calibration parameters derived from a previous study with corn cover were tested under sunflower and winter rye periods at the same farmland. GANS soil moisture based on these parameters showed a large discrepancy compared to classical soil moisture measurements. Therefore, two new calibration approaches and four different ways of integration the soil moisture profile to an integral value for GANS were evaluated in this study. This included different sets of calibration parameters based on different growing periods of sunflower. New calibration parameters showed a good agreement with FDR network during sunflower period (RMSE = 0.023 m3 m-3), but they underestimated soil moisture in the winter rye period. The GANS approach resulted to be highly affected by temporal changes of biomass and crop types which suggest the need of neutron corrections for long-term observations with crop rotation. Finally

  17. The new high field photoexcitation muon spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, K; Lord, J S; Murahari, P; Wang, K; Dunstan, D J; Waller, S P; McPhail, D J; Hillier, A D; Henson, J; Harper, M R; Heathcote, P; Drew, A J

    2016-12-01

    A high power pulsed laser system has been installed on the high magnetic field muon spectrometer (HiFi) at the International Science Information Service pulsed neutron and muon source, situated at the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The upgrade enables one to perform light-pump muon-probe experiments under a high magnetic field, which opens new applications of muon spin spectroscopy. In this report we give an overview of the principle of the HiFi laser system and describe the newly developed techniques and devices that enable precisely controlled photoexcitation of samples in the muon instrument. A demonstration experiment illustrates the potential of this unique combination of the photoexcited system and avoided level crossing technique.

  18. Ernst formulation of axisymmetric fields in f (R ) gravity: Applications to neutron stars and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, Arthur George; Melatos, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The Ernst formulation of the Einstein equations is generalized to accommodate f (R ) theories of gravity. It is shown that, as in general relativity, the axisymmetric f (R ) field equations for a vacuum spacetime that is either stationary or cylindrically symmetric reduce to a single, nonlinear differential equation for a complex-valued scalar function. As a worked example, we apply the generalized Ernst equations to derive a f (R ) generalization of the Zipoy-Voorhees metric, which may be used to describe the gravitational field outside of an ellipsoidal neutron star. We also apply the theory to investigate the phase speed of large-amplitude gravitational waves in f (R ) gravity in the context of solitonlike solutions that display shock-wave behavior across the causal boundary.

  19. Neutron scattering study of the field-induced tricritical point in MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindervater, J.; Bauer, A.; Garst, M.; Janoschek, M.; Martin, N.; Mühlbauer, S.; Häussler, W.; Böni, P.; Pfleiderer, C.

    The intermetallic compound MnSi attracts great scientific interest due to two unusual phase transitions, namely the transition from the conical phase to a skyrmion lattice in small fields and the transition from the helical to the paramagnetic phase without external magnetic field that was recently identified to be a fluctuation induced first-order transition, i.e. a so called Brazovskii-transition. Recent measurements of the specific heat provide striking evidence for a tricritical point (TCP), were the first order transition alters to second order. We report neutron spin echo measurements using the MIEZE technique. The recorded quasi elastic linewidth shows a change of the characteristic spin fluctuations at the TCP. The combination with additional SANS measurements and a generalized Brazovskii theory establishes a consistent picture of the statics and dynamics of the transition. Financial support by ERC-AdG (291079 TOPFIT) and through DFG TRR80 is greatfully acknowledged.

  20. Realistic exact solution for the exterior field of a rotating neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Sanabria-Gómez, José D.

    2006-05-01

    A new six-parametric, axisymmetric, and asymptotically flat exact solution of Einstein-Maxwell field equations having reflection symmetry is presented. It has arbitrary physical parameters of mass, angular momentum, mass-quadrupole moment, current octupole moment, electric charge, and magnetic dipole, so it can represent the exterior field of a rotating, deformed, magnetized, and charged object; some properties of the closed-form analytic solution such as its multipolar structure, electromagnetic fields, and singularities are also presented. In the vacuum case, this analytic solution is matched to some numerical interior solutions representing neutron stars, calculated by Berti and Stergioulas [E. Berti and N. Stergioulas, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc.MNRAA40035-8711 350, 1416 (2004)10.1111/j.1365-2966.2004.07740.x], imposing that the multipole moments be the same. As an independent test of accuracy of the solution to describe exterior fields of neutron stars, we present an extensive comparison of the radii of innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) obtained from the Berti and Stergioulas numerical solutions, the Kerr solution [R. P. Kerr, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 11, 237 (1963)10.1103/PhysRevLett.11.237], the Hartle and Thorne solution [J. B. Hartle and K. S. Thorne, Astrophys. J.ASJOAB0004-637X 153, 807 (1968)10.1086/149707], an analytic series expansion derived by Shibata and Sasaki [M. Shibata and M. Sasaki, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 58, 104011 (1998)10.1103/PhysRevD.58.104011], and our exact solution. We found that radii of ISCOs from our solution fits better than others with realistic numerical interior solutions.

  1. In-situ neutron scattering studies of magnetic shape memory alloys under stress, temperature, and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W; Sisneros, Thomas A; Kabra, Saurabh; Schlagel, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized the SMARTS engineering neutron diffractometer to study the crystallographic orientation and phase transformations in the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni 2MnGa under conditions of temperature (200-600K), stress (500MPa), and magnetic field (2T). Neutrons are uniquely suited to probe the crystallographic response of materials to external stimuli because of their high penetration, which allows them to sample the bulk of the material (as opposed to the surface) as well as pass through environmental chambers. A single crystal of Ni{sub 5}MnGa was repeatedly thermally cycled through the Austenitic-Martensitic phase transformation under varying conditions of applied stress, magnetic field or both. In-situ neutron diffraction was used to quantitatively monitor the population of the crystallographic variants in the martensitic phase as a function of the external stimuli during cooling. Neutron diffraction was used to monitor variant selection in the Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloy Ni{sub 2}Mn Ga during austenitic to martensitic transformation under varying conditions of externally applied stress and magnetic field. Qualitatively, the results were to be expected in this simple example. The shorter and magnetically soft c-axis of the tetragonal martensitic phase aligned with the compressive stress or magnetic field. However, neutron diffraction proved useful in directly quantifying the selection of the preferred variant by external influence. For instance, by quantifying the variant selection, the neutron diffraction results made apparent that the sample 'remembered' a loading cycle following a 'reset' cycle with no external applied stress. Moreover, the power of in-situ neutron diffraction will become more apparent when applied to more complex, less understood, samples such as polycrystalline samples or composite samples.

  2. High energy neutron response characteristics of a passive survey instrument for the determination of cosmic radiation fields in aircraft.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D T; Tanner, R J; Hager, L G

    2002-01-01

    A passive survey instrument has been developed for the determination of cosmic radiation fields in aircraft. The instrument contains 30 TLDs and 36 PADC etched track detectors in order to obtain the required precision and an isotropic response. Two active electronic personal dosemeters are included to record the time profile of the field intensity. The instrument is robust and reliable, and is particularly useful to verify values of route doses based on calculations. The energy of the neutron component of the field to be determined extends to over 500 MeV, but with the majority of the dose equivalent below 200 MeV. The results are reported of measurements at Uppsala University and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt of the response characteristics of the instrument to quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range 60 to 180 MeV and for monoenergetic neutrons of energy from 70 keV to 14.7 MeV.

  3. Photon dose mixed in monoenergetic neutron calibration fields using 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Y; Tsutsumi, M; Yoshizawa, M

    2014-10-01

    The ambient dose equivalents H*(10) of photons mixed in the 144, 250 and 565 keV monoenergetic neutron fields were evaluated using measurements from an NaI(Tl) detector and calculations done using the MCNP-ANT code. It was found that H*(10) of the photons produced in the target assembly dominates the dose, particularly near the target. The H*(10) of the photons produced in other materials in the field increases with the increase in distance from the target and could not be neglected at a large distance from the target. The ratios of the H*(10) of the mixed photons to that of the monoenergetic neutrons for 144, 250 and 565 keV neutron fields, were evaluated to be below 5.5, 6.9 and 1.5 %, respectively. The ratios were calculated at calibration points between 100 and 500 cm from the target.

  4. Neutron crystalline-electric-field spectroscopy of ? (R = Ce, Pr, Nd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönni, A.; Furrer, A.; Kitazawa, H.; Zolliker, M.

    1997-07-01

    The ternary intermetallic compounds 0953-8984/9/27/019/img9 (R = light rare earth) crystallize in the hexagonal 0953-8984/9/27/019/img10-type structure, like the heavy-fermion superconductor 0953-8984/9/27/019/img11. In this paper we present powder neutron scattering and single-crystal magnetic susceptibility experiments on 0953-8984/9/27/019/img12, which provide sufficient information for us to unambiguously determine the crystalline-electric-field (CEF) splitting 0953-8984/9/27/019/img13 of the 0953-8984/9/27/019/img14 multiplet of 0953-8984/9/27/019/img15. The CEF parameters obtained for 0953-8984/9/27/019/img12 are extrapolated to those for 0953-8984/9/27/019/img17 and 0953-8984/9/27/019/img18. For 0953-8984/9/27/019/img17, the powder neutron scattering measurement of the two strongest CEF excitations confirms the reliability of the extrapolated CEF level diagram 0953-8984/9/27/019/img20 with an accuracy of better than 10% for the excitation energies. For 0953-8984/9/27/019/img18, with a rather strong Kondo effect, the extrapolation yields a CEF level sequence 0953-8984/9/27/019/img22 similar to that derived from single-crystal susceptibility data, and the predicted 0953-8984/9/27/019/img23 excitation energy lies well inside the width of the broad inelastic magnetic peak observed by neutron scattering. The CEF parameters yield a magnetic anisotropy which is compatible with the magnetic structures observed in 0953-8984/9/27/019/img18 and 0953-8984/9/27/019/img12, and predict no magnetic ordering for 0953-8984/9/27/019/img17 down to the lowest temperatures.

  5. Reference dosimetry in the presence of magnetic fields: conditions to validate Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Hugo; de Pooter, Jacco; Bielajew, Alex; Duane, Simon

    2015-09-01

    With the advent of MRI-guided radiotherapy, reference dosimetry must be thoroughly addressed to account for the effects of the magnetic field on absorbed dose to water and on detector dose response. While Monte Carlo plays an essential role in reference dosimetry, it is also crucial for determining quality correction factors in these new conditions. The Fano cavity test is recognized as fundamental to validate Monte Carlo transport algorithms. In the presence of magnetic fields, it is necessary to define special conditions under which such a test can be performed. The present theoretical study proposes two conditions in which the validity of Fano’s theorem is demonstrated in the presence of a magnetic field and the analytic expression of energy deposition is verified. It is concluded that the proposed conditions form a valid basis for two types of Fano cavity tests in the presence of a magnetic field.

  6. Cosmic Rays and Clouds, 2. Atmospheric Electric Field Effect In Different Neutron Multiplicities According To Emilio Segre' Observatory One Minute Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.; Iucci, N.; Ne'Eman, Yu.; Pustil'Nik, L. A.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospheric electric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS of Emilio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-off rigidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine the atmospheric electric field effect in CR for total neutron intensity and for multiplicities m=1, m=2, m=3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison and excluding primary CR variations we use also one minute data on neutron multiplicities obtained by NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). In February 2000 were observed 14 periods of thun- derstorms with different durations (up to about 1000 min), the maximum strength of electric field was 110 kV/m. Thunderstorms were observed also in March 2000 (6 pe- riods with maximal field 112 kV/m), in April 2000 (9; 70 kV/m), in May 2000 (4; 10 kV/m), in October 2000 (10; 70 kV/m), in November 2000 (5; 50 kV/m), in De- cember 2000 (7; 88 kV/m), in January 2001 (12; 62 kV/m), in February 2001 (10; 88 kV/m). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (1995) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by captchuring of slow negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping few neutrons. As it was shown in Dorman et al. (1999), the biggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicity m=1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We will control this conclusion on the basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I. and Dorman I.V., 1995. "Cosmic-ray atmospheric electric field effects". Canadian J. of Physics, Vol. 73, pp. 440-443. L.I. Dorman, I.V. Dorman, N. Iucci, M. Parisi, G. Villoresi, and I.G. Zuk- erman, 1999. "Emilio Segre' Observatory and Expected Time-Variations of Neutron Monitor Total and Multiplicities Counting Rates Caused by Cosmic Ray Particle

  7. Neutron study of crystal field excitations in single crystal CeCu2Ge2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenhaupt, Michael; Faulhaber, Enrico; Schneidewind, Astrid; Deppe, Micha; Hradil, Klaudia

    2010-03-01

    CeCu2Ge2 is the counterpart of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2. CeCu2Ge2 is a magnetically ordering (TN= 4.1 K) Kondo lattice with a moderate Sommerfeld coefficient of 140 mJ/molK^2 [1]. Inelastic neutron measurements on a polycrystalline sample revealed a doublet ground state and a quasi-quartet at 16.5 meV [1] though a splitting of the 4f^1 (J=5/2) ground state multiplet into 3 doublets is expected from the point symmetry of the Ce^3+ ions. We performed detailed inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA at FRM II at temperatures between 10 K and 300 K and for different crystallographic directions from low to high momentum transfers. In this way we obtained a reliable separation of magnetic and phonon contributions. From our results we infer that the quasi-quartet consists in fact of two doublets at 17 and 18 meV which exhibit a strong directional dependence of their transition matrix elements to the ground state doublet. Finally we will present a new set of crystal field parameters and their implications on other magnetic properties. [1] G. Knopp et al., Z. Physik B 77 (1989) 95

  8. Neutron electric dipole moment with external electric field method in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, E.; Kanaya, K.; Aoki, S.; Ishizuka, N.; Kuramashi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Kikukawa, Y.; Okawa, M.

    2007-02-01

    We discuss a possibility that the neutron electric dipole moment (NEDM) can be calculated in lattice QCD simulations in the presence of the CP-violating {theta} term. In this paper we measure the energy difference between spin-up and spin-down states of the neutron in the presence of a uniform and static external electric field. We first test this method in quenched QCD with the renormalization group improved gauge action on a 16{sup 3}x32 lattice at a{sup -1}{approx_equal}2 GeV, employing two different lattice fermion formulations, the domain-wall fermion and the clover fermion for quarks, at relatively heavy quark mass (m{sub PS}/m{sub V}{approx_equal}0.85). We obtain nonzero values of the NEDM from calculations with both fermion formulations. We next consider some systematic uncertainties of our method for the NEDM, using 24{sup 3}x32 lattice at the same lattice spacing only with the clover fermion. We finally investigate the quark mass dependence of the NEDM and observe a nonvanishing behavior of the NEDM toward the chiral limit. We interpret this behavior as a manifestation of the pathology in the quenched approximation.

  9. Gravel-pack field examples of a new pulsed-neutron-activation logging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Caroll, J.F.; Smith, B.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Gravel packs traditionally have been evaluated with gamma/gamma density and neutron logging tools. These logging tools, particularly the density tools, do an acceptable job in most logging environments but have some limitations that affect their measurement resolution in attempts to define gravel-pack quality. The presence of high-density completion fluids significantly reduces the dynamic range of the conventional measurements. Low-contrast logging resolution is also encountered with the new matched-density gravel-pack systems that use matrix materials with densities near those of the completion fluids. This paper presents an alternative measurement of gravel-pack quality that is unaffected by the type of completion fluid present. The authors also present six field examples that demonstrate this new technique. Each example presents a different logging condition, e.g., heavy borehole fluid in a conventional gravel pack, gravel pack with sintered bauxite, two completions with Isopac gravel of different screen sizes, and multiple gravel-pack logs recorded before and after wireline repair work. Several of these examples show that neutron activation can be a useful method of gravel-pack analysis in some logging environments.

  10. Development of a µ-TPC detector as a standard instrument for low-energy neutron field characterisation.

    PubMed

    Maire, D; Billard, J; Bosson, G; Bourrion, O; Guillaudin, O; Lamblin, J; Lebreton, L; Mayet, F; Médard, J; Muraz, J F; Richer, J P; Riffard, Q; Santos, D

    2014-10-01

    In order to measure the energy and fluence of neutron fields, in the energy range of 8 to 1 MeV, a new primary standard is being developed at the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). This project, Micro Time Projection Chamber (µ-TPC), carried out in collaboration with the Laboratoire de Physqique Subatomique et de Cosmologie (LPSC), is based on the nucleus recoil detector principle. The measurement strategy requires track reconstruction of recoiling nuclei down to a few kiloelectronvolts, which can be achieved using a micro-pattern gaseous detector. A gas mixture, mainly isobutane, is used as an n-p converter to detect neutrons within the detection volume. Then electrons, coming from the ionisation of the gas by the proton recoil, are collected by the pixelised anode (2D projection). A self-triggered electronics system is able to perform the anode readout at a 50-MHz frequency in order to give the third dimension of the track. Then, the scattering angle is deduced from this track using algorithms. The charge collection leads to the proton energy, taking into account the ionisation quenching factor. This article emphasises the neutron energy measurements of a monoenergetic neutron field produced at 127 keV. The fluence measurement is not shown in this article. The measurements are compared with Monte Carlo simulations using realistic neutron fields and simulations of the detector response. The discrepancy between experiments and simulations is 5 keV mainly due to the calibration uncertainties of 10 %.

  11. FIELD PERFORMANCE OF PM 2.5 FEDERAL REFERENCE METHOD SAMPLERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of several research field studies were evaluated to estimate the precision and bias of various designated PM2.5 Federal Reference Method (FRM) samplers. Precision was high in three carefully conducted research studies where all operational activities were strictly ...

  12. Religious Studies: The Shaping of a Field and a Guide to Reference Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippy, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the development of religious studies as an academic discipline. Examines the work of leading thinkers in the field, including anthropologists Sir James Fraser and Edward Burnett Taylor, sociologist Max Weber, and psychologist Erik Erikson. Identifies some of the many reference works that deal with religious studies. (SG)

  13. Medical reference databases used by Army primary care physicians in field environments.

    PubMed

    Harris, M D; Johnson, B; Patience, T; Miser, F

    1998-11-01

    A cross-sectional survey of U.S. Army primary care physicians was done to answer two questions: (1) which medical reference materials are Army primary care physicians currently using when deployed to a field environment? and (2) what would they like to have for medical reference in a field environment? Of 740 surveys delivered to their intended recipients, 445 (60%) were returned. Currently, 96% of primary care physicians use books, 37% use journals, and 11% use computer software in their medical reference database. Of those now using books, 72% were satisfied with them, compared with 61% of those using journals and 45% of those using software. The most common book used was the Merck Manual. The most important characteristics desired in a field medical database were broad coverage, ease of use, and light weight. The majority of respondents believe that a good medial reference database is important but that current medical databases limit the quality of the medicine they practice in the field.

  14. Researching Refugee and Forced Migration Studies: An Introduction to the Field and the Reference Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Elisa

    1999-01-01

    Describes the evolution of refugee and forced migration studies, identifies factors that render it a challenging field to research, and highlights a variety of Internet-based and other electronic resources that can be used to locate monographs, periodicals, grey literature, and current information. Provides a bibliography of reference materials in…

  15. Evaluation of models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) comprises a definitive main-field model for 1985.0, a main-field model for 1990.0, and a forecast secular-variation model for the period 1990-1995. The five 1985.0 main-field models and five 1990.0 main-field models that were proposed have been evaluated by comparing them with one another, with magnetic observatory data, and with Project MAGNET aerial survey data. The comparisons indicate that the main-field models proposed by IZMIRAN, and the secular-variation model proposed jointly by the British Geological Survey and the US Naval Oceanographic Office, should be assigned relatively lower weight in the derivation of the new IGRF models. -Author

  16. Comparison of Reference Values in Whole Blood of DMDmdx/J and C57BL/6J Mice Using Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metairon, S.; Zamboni, C. B.; Suzuki, M. F.; Júnior, C. R. B.; Sant'Anna, O. A.

    2011-08-01

    The Br, Ca, Cl, K, Na and S concentrations in whole blood of DMDmdx/J and C57BL/6J mice were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis technique. Reference values obtained from twenty one whole blood samples of these strains were analyzed in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN (São Paulo, Brasil). These data contribute for applications in veterinary medicine related to biochemistry analyses using whole blood as well as to evaluate the performance of treatments in muscular dystrophy.

  17. Modeling the structure of magnetic fields in Neutron Stars: from the interior to the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantini, Niccolò; Pili, Antonio G.; Del Zanna, Luca

    2016-05-01

    The phenomenology of the emission of pulsars and magnetars depends dramatically on the structure and properties of their magnetic field. In particular it is believed that the outbursting and flaring activity observed in AXPs and SRGs is strongly related to their internal magnetic field. Recent observations have moreover shown that charges are present in their magnetospheres supporting the idea that their magnetic field is tightly twisted in the vicinity of the star. In principle these objects offer a unique opportunity to investigate physics in a regime beyond what can be obtained in the laboratory. We will discuss the properties of equilibrium models of magnetized neutron stars, and we will show how internal and external currents can be related. These magnetic field configurations will be discussed considering also their stability, relevant for their origin and possibly connected to events like SNe and GRBs. We will also show what kind of deformations they induce in the star, that could lead to emission of gravitational waves. In the case of a twisted magnetosphere we will show how the amount of twist regulates their general topology. A general formalism based on the simultaneous numerical solution of the general relativistic Grad-Shafranov equation and Einstein equations will be presented.

  18. Pulse-shape discrimination of the new plastic scintillators in neutron-gamma mixed field using fast digitizer card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jančář, A.; Kopecký, Z.; Dressler, J.; Veškrna, M.; Matěj, Z.; Granja, C.; Solar, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently invented plastic scintillator EJ-299-33 enables pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and thus measurement of neutron and photon spectra in mixed fields. In this work we compare the PSD properties of EJ-299-33 plastic and the well-known NE-213 liquid scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator using the 3H(d, n)4He reaction. Pulses from the scintillators are processed by a newly developed digital measuring system employing the fast digitizer card. This card contains two AD converters connected to the measuring computer via 10 Gbps optical ethernet. The converters operate with a resolution of 12 bits and have two differential inputs with a sampling frequency 1 GHz. The resulting digital channels with different gains are merged into one composite channel with a higher digital resolution in a wide dynamic range of energies. Neutron signals are fully discriminated from gamma signals. Results are presented.

  19. In vivo Observation of Tree Drought Response with Low-Field NMR and Neutron Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. These results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment. PMID:27200037

  20. Field test and evaluation of the passive neutron coincidence collar for prototype fast reactor fuel subassemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Keddar, A.

    1982-08-01

    The passive neutron Coincidence Collar, which was developed for the verification of plutonium content in fast reactor fuel subassemblies, has been field tested using Prototype Fast Reactor fuel. For passive applications, the system measures the /sup 240/Pu-effective mass from the spontaneous fission rate, and in addition, a self-interrogation technique is used to determine the fissile content in the subassembly. Both the passive and active modes were evaluated at the Windscale Works in the United Kingdom. The results of the tests gave a standard deviation 0.75% for the passive count and 3 to 7% for the active measurement for a 1000-s counting time. The unit will be used in the future for the verification of plutonium in fresh fuel assemblies.

  1. In vivo observation of tree drought response with low-field NMR and neutron imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; ...

    2016-05-06

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature inmore » the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. Lastly, these results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment.« less

  2. Modulation of the neutron field in the multiplying condensed matter and coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Vodyanitskii, A. A.; Slyusarenko, Yu. V.

    2009-12-14

    The spatial damping of acoustic, neutron and thermal branches of oscillations are found in neutron multiplying medium with coolant. All three branches give additive contribution to the neutron density oscillations. However, their wave numbers and coefficients of spatial damping (at the same frequency) differ greatly from the sound with its high phase velocity and small attenuation to the neutron wave with the damping length, which is comparable with its wavelength. A spatial growth of neutron density oscillations is found in the case of large frequency of neutron capture and weak coupling of neutron density and temperature branches of oscillations. This fact is of importance for the noise diagnostics of the multiplying medium with coolant. The results can be applied to the development of the methods of noise diagnostics of the in core reactor equipment.

  3. Generalized reference fields and source interpolation for the difference formulation of radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Thomas; Brooks, Eugene D.; Szőke, Abraham

    2010-03-01

    In the difference formulation for the transport of thermally emitted photons the photon intensity is defined relative to a reference field, the black body at the local material temperature. This choice of reference field combines the separate emission and absorption terms that nearly cancel, thereby removing the dominant cause of noise in the Monte Carlo solution of thick systems, but introduces time and space derivative source terms that cannot be determined until the end of the time step. The space derivative source term can also lead to noise induced crashes under certain conditions where the real physical photon intensity differs strongly from a black body at the local material temperature. In this paper, we consider a difference formulation relative to the material temperature at the beginning of the time step, or in cases where an alternative temperature better describes the radiation field, that temperature. The result is a method where iterative solution of the material energy equation is efficient and noise induced crashes are avoided. We couple our generalized reference field scheme with an ad hoc interpolation of the space derivative source, resulting in an algorithm that produces the correct flux between zones as the physical system approaches the thick limit.

  4. Neutron Scattering Study of Magnetic Field Effect on the Stripe Order in LBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Xu, Guangyong; Hücker, Markus; Tranquada, John; Gu, Genda

    2009-03-01

    We have been investigating the relationship of stripe order to high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates. In particular, our neutron scattering results indicate that spin-stripe order is present in La2-xBaxCuO4 (LBCO) over a substantial range of doping about x = 1/8, where the bulk superconductivity is anomalously suppressed. Focusing on the x = 1/8 composition, we have recently studied the impact on stripe order of a magnetic field applied along the c-axis [1]. Applying a field up to 7 T, we observed a small enhancement of the intensity of the incommensurate antiferromagnetic superlattice peaks and a slight increase in the ordering temperature. In measurements of the spin dynamics, the field had no significant impact on the small spin gap (˜ 0.5 meV) found in the ordered phase [2]. [1] Jinsheng Wen et al., arXiv:0810.4085. [2] J.M. Tranquada et al., arXiv:0809.0711. Work supported by Office of Science, U.S. DOE, under Contract No. DEAC02-98CH10886

  5. Magnetic-field-dependent small-angle neutron scattering on random anisotropy ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Andreas; Weissmüller, Jörg

    2008-06-01

    We report on the recently developed technique of magnetic-field-dependent small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), with attention to bulk ferromagnets exhibiting random magnetic anisotropy. In these materials, the various magnetic anisotropy fields (magnetocrystalline, magnetoelastic, and/or magnetostatic in origin) perturb the perfectly parallel spin alignment of the idealized ferromagnetic state. By varying the applied magnetic field, one can control one of the ordering terms which competes with the above-mentioned perturbing fields. Experiments which explore the ensuing reaction of the magnetization will therefore provide information not only on the field-dependent spin structure but, importantly, on the underlying magnetic interaction terms. This strategy, which underlies conventional studies of hysteresis loops in magnetometry, is here combined with magnetic SANS. While magnetometry generally records only a single scalar quantity, the integral magnetization, SANS provides access to a vastly richer data set, the Fourier spectrum of the response of the spin system as a function of the magnitude and orientation of the wave vector. The required data-analysis procedures have recently been established, and experiments on a number of magnetic materials, mostly nanocrystalline or nanocomposite metals, have been reported. Here, we summarize the theory of magnetic-field-dependent SANS along with the underlying description of random anisotropy magnets by micromagnetic theory. We review experiments which have explored the magnetic interaction parameters, the value of the exchange-stiffness constant as well as the Fourier components of the magnetic anisotropy field and of the magnetostatic stray field. A model-independent approach, based on the experimental autocorrelation function of the spin misalignment, provides access to the characteristic length of the spin misalignment. The field dependence of this quantity is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of

  6. Measurement of axisymmetric temperature fields using reference beam and shearing interferometry for application to flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, A.; Guj, G.; Giammartini, S.

    A unified methodology for the application of reference beam and shearing interferometry to measure axisymmetric temperature fields within flames is proposed. Sensitivity and accuracy of the techniques are analyzed basing on interferograms of reference temperature profiles and CARS measurements obtained in test laminar flames. The rapid decay of temperature measurements accuracy with increasing both intensity of errors sources and uncertainty on independent parameters is assessed. The spatial variation of mixture composition in diffusive combusting flows requires the application of complementary methods to obtain a satisfactory accuracy, while flow fields with lean premixed combustion can be treated as optically-homogeneous media. The temperature maps resulting from the investigation of the test laminar flames are presented and discussed. The capability to disclose the thermal structure and to provide reliable quantitative data is demonstrated.

  7. Consistent Feature Extraction From Vector Fields: Combinatorial Representations and Analysis Under Local Reference Frames

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Harsh

    2015-05-01

    This dissertation presents research on addressing some of the contemporary challenges in the analysis of vector fields—an important type of scientific data useful for representing a multitude of physical phenomena, such as wind flow and ocean currents. In particular, new theories and computational frameworks to enable consistent feature extraction from vector fields are presented. One of the most fundamental challenges in the analysis of vector fields is that their features are defined with respect to reference frames. Unfortunately, there is no single “correct” reference frame for analysis, and an unsuitable frame may cause features of interest to remain undetected, thus creating serious physical consequences. This work develops new reference frames that enable extraction of localized features that other techniques and frames fail to detect. As a result, these reference frames objectify the notion of “correctness” of features for certain goals by revealing the phenomena of importance from the underlying data. An important consequence of using these local frames is that the analysis of unsteady (time-varying) vector fields can be reduced to the analysis of sequences of steady (timeindependent) vector fields, which can be performed using simpler and scalable techniques that allow better data management by accessing the data on a per-time-step basis. Nevertheless, the state-of-the-art analysis of steady vector fields is not robust, as most techniques are numerical in nature. The residing numerical errors can violate consistency with the underlying theory by breaching important fundamental laws, which may lead to serious physical consequences. This dissertation considers consistency as the most fundamental characteristic of computational analysis that must always be preserved, and presents a new discrete theory that uses combinatorial representations and algorithms to provide consistency guarantees during vector field analysis along with the uncertainty

  8. Structure and crystal fields of PrBr3 and PrCl3: A neutron study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, B.; Hälg, B.; Furrer, A.; Urland, W.; Kremer, R.

    1987-04-01

    The crystal structures of PrX3 (X=Br, Cl) and particularly the detailed coordination of the halides X have been studied by neutron diffraction on polycrystalline samples in the temperature range between 4.2 and 293 K. Furthermore, the crystalline electric fields (CEF) in the two compounds have been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering experiments on single-crystal samples. The observed CEF transitions have been identified according to the transition matrix elements and the polarization factor in the neutron cross section, which allowed an unambiguous determination of the four CEF parameters for hexagonal symmetry. The energetic ordering of the CEF levels in PrBr3 and PrCl3 are considerably different which can be understood in terms of the different geometric coordination of the halides determined from the diffraction results.

  9. Evaluation of the spectrometric and dose characteristics of neutron fields inside the Russian segment of the ISS by fission detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, V. A.; Vorob'ev, I. B.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Lyagushin, V. I.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Kushin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring the dose and the energy spectrum of neutrons inside the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) from March 21 until November 10, 2002 are presented. Statistically reliable results of measurement are obtained by using thorium- and uranium-based fission detectors with cadmium and boron filters. The kits of the detectors with filters have been arranged in three compartments within assembled passive detectors in the BRADOS space experiment. The ambient dose rate H* = 139 μSv day and an energy spectrum of neutrons in the range of 10-2-104 MeV is obtained as average for the ISS compartments and is compared with the measurements carried out inside the compartments of the MIR space station. Recommendations on how to improve the procedure for using the fission detectors to measure the characteristics of neutron fields inside the compartments of space stations are formulated.

  10. Neutron measurements in the stray field produced by 158 GeV c(-1) per nucleon lead ion beams.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, S; Birattari, C; Foglio Para, A; Nava, E; Silari, M; Ulrici, L

    1998-12-01

    This paper discusses measurements carried out at CERN in the stray radiation field produced by 158 GeV c(-1) per nucleon 208Pb82+ ions. The purpose was to test and intercompare the response of several detectors, mainly neutron measuring devices, and to determine the neutron spectral fluence as well as the microdosimetric (absorbed dose and dose equivalent) distributions in different locations around the shielding. Both active instruments and passive dosimeters were employed, including different types of Andersson-Braun rem counters, a tissue equivalent proportional counter, a set of superheated drop detectors, a Bonner sphere system, and different types of ion chambers. Activation measurements with 12C plastic scintillators and with 32S pellets were also performed to assess the neutron yield of high energy lead ions interacting with a thin gold target. The results are compared with previous measurements and with measurements made during proton runs.

  11. Risk of Developing Second Cancer From Neutron Dose in Proton Therapy as Function of Field Characteristics, Organ, and Patient Age

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharatou Jarlskog, Christina; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the risk of a second malignancy after treatment of a primary brain cancer using passive scattered proton beam therapy. The focus was on the cancer risk caused by neutrons outside the treatment volume and the dependency on the patient's age. Methods and Materials: Organ-specific neutron-equivalent doses previously calculated for eight different proton therapy brain fields were considered. Organ-specific models were applied to assess the risk of developing solid cancers and leukemia. Results: The main contributors (>80%) to the neutron-induced risk are neutrons generated in the treatment head. Treatment volume can influence the risk by up to a factor of {approx}2. Young patients are subject to significantly greater risks than are adult patients because of the geometric differences and age dependency of the risk models. Breast cancer should be the main concern for females. For males, the risks of lung cancer, leukemia, and thyroid cancer were significant for pediatric patients. In contrast, leukemia was the leading risk for an adult. Most lifetime risks were <1% (70-Gy treatment). The only exceptions were breast, thyroid, and lung cancer for females. For female thyroid cancer, the treatment risk can exceed the baseline risk. Conclusion: The risk of developing a second malignancy from neutrons from proton beam therapy of a brain lesion is small (i.e., presumably outweighed by the therapeutic benefit) but not negligible (i.e., potentially greater than the baseline risk). The patient's age at treatment plays a major role.

  12. Lattice calculation of thermal properties of low-density neutron matter with pionless NN effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, T.; Seki, R.

    2009-05-15

    Thermal properties of low-density neutron matter are investigated by determinantal quantum Monte Carlo lattice calculations on 3+1 dimensional cubic lattices. Nuclear effective field theory (EFT) is applied using the pionless single- and two-parameter neutron-neutron interactions, determined from the {sup 1}S{sub 0} scattering length and effective range. The determination of the interactions and the calculations of neutron matter are carried out consistently by applying EFT power counting rules. The thermodynamic limit is taken by the method of finite-size scaling, and the continuum limit is examined in the vanishing lattice filling limit. The {sup 1}S{sub 0} pairing gap at T{approx_equal}0 is computed directly from the off-diagonal long-range order of the spin pair-pair correlation function and is found to be approximately 30% smaller than BCS calculations with the conventional nucleon-nucleon potentials. The critical temperature T{sub c} of the normal-to-superfluid phase transition and the pairing temperature scale T* are determined, and the temperature-density phase diagram is constructed. The physics of low-density neutron matter is clearly identified as being a BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation crossover.

  13. The Efficiency of the BC-720 Scintillator in a High-Energy (20--800 MeV) Accelerator Neutron Field

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Leslie H.

    2005-12-01

    High-energy neutron doses (>20 MeV) are of little importance to most radiation workers. However, space and flight crews, and people working around medical and scientific accelerators receive over half of their radiation dose from high-energy neutrons. Unfortunately, neutrons are difficult to measure, and no suitable dosimetry has yet been developed to measure this radiation. In this paper, basic high-energy neutron interactions, characteristics of high-energy neutron environments, present neutron dosimetry, and quantities used in neutron dosimetry are discussed before looking into the potential of the BC-720 scintillator to improve dosimetry. This research utilized 800 MeV protons impinging upon the WNR Facility spallation neutron source at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Time-of-flight methods and a U-238 Fission Chamber were used to aid evaluation of the efficiency of the BC-720. Results showed that the efficiency is finite over the 20–650 MeV energy region studied, although it decreases by a factor of ten between 40 and 100 MeV. This limits the use of this dosimeter to measure doses at sitespecific locations. It also encourages modifications to use this dosimeter for any unknown neutron field. As such, this dosimeter has the potential for a small, lightweight, real-time dose measurement, which could impact neutron dosimetry in all high-energy neutron environments.

  14. Frequency-Induced Bulk Magnetic Domain-Wall Freezing Visualized by Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-08-01

    We use neutron dark-field imaging to visualize and interpret the response of bulk magnetic domain walls to static and dynamic magnetic excitations in (110)-Goss textured iron silicon high-permeability steel alloy. We investigate the domain-wall motion under the influence of an external alternating sinusoidal magnetic field. In particular, we perform scans combining varying levels of dcoffset (0 - 30 A /m ) , oscillation amplitude Aac (0 - 1500 A /m ) , and frequency fac ((0 - 200 Hz ) . By increasing amplitude Aac while maintaining constant values of dcoffset and fac , we record the transition from a frozen domain-wall structure to a mobile one. Vice versa, increasing fac while keeping Aac and dcoffset constant led to the reverse transition from a mobile domain-wall structure into a frozen one. We show that varying both Aac and fac shifts the position of the transition region. Furthermore, we demonstrate that higher frequencies require higher oscillation amplitudes to overcome the freezing phenomena. The fundamental determination and understanding of the frequency-induced freezing process in high-permeability steel alloys is of high interest to the further development of descriptive models for bulk macromagnetic phenomena. Likewise, the efficiency of transformers can be improved based on our results, since these alloys are used as transformer core material.

  15. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, M. T. Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Dávila, J.

    2015-07-23

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (∼1.6 10{sup 4} neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  16. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, M. T.; Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Dávila, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2015-07-01

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e'n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction 10B(n,α)7Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (˜1.6 104 neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  17. SU-E-T-560: Monte Carlo Simulation of the Neutron Radiation Field Around a Medical 18 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, F; Czarnecki, D; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Today the majority of radiation therapy treatments are performed at medical electron linear accelerators (linacs). The accelerated electrons are used for the generation of bremsstrahlung photons. The use of higher electron respectively photon energies has some advantages over lower energies such as the longer dose build-up. However photons with energies higher than ∼7 MeV can additionally to the interaction with bound electrons undergo inelastic reactions with nuclei. These photonuclear reactions lead to the emission of fast neutrons which contaminate the primary photon field. The neutrons might penetrate through the collimators and deliver out-of-field dose to the patient. Furthermore the materials inside the linac head as well as the air inside the treatment room get activated which might deliver dose to the medical employees even when the linac is not in operation. A detailed knowledge of these effects is essential for adequate radiation protection of the employees and an optimal patient treatment. Methods: It is a common method to study the radiation fields of such linacs by means of Monte Carlo simulations. For the investigation of the effects caused by photonuclear reactions a typical linac in high energy mode (Varian Clinac 18 MV-X) as well as the surrounding bunker were modelled and simulated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA which includes extensive nuclear reaction and neutron transport models additional to electron-photon transport as well as capabilities for a detailed study of effective dose distributions and activation yields. Results: Neutron spectra as well as neutron effective dose distributions within the bunker were obtained, reaching up to some mSv/Gy in the patient’s plane. The results are normalized per Gy in the depth dose maximum at 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size. Therefore an absolute interpretation is possible. Conclusion: The obtained data gives a better understanding of the photonuclear reaction caused effects.

  18. Different resistance patterns of reference and field strains of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karina L; Dorneles, Elaine M S; Poester, Fernando P; Martins Filho, Paulo S; Pauletti, Rebeca B; Lage, Andrey P

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth of the B. abortus reference strains and field isolates on media containing different inhibitor agents. Reference strains were seeded on tryptose agar containing: i-erythritol (1.0 mg/mL), fuchsin (20 μg/mL and 80 μg/mL), thionin (2.5 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL), rifampicin (200 μg/mL) and safranin O (200 μg/mL). Field isolates were tested only on media containing i-erythritol, rifampicin and thionin. Furthermore, each suspension was also inoculated on tryptose agar incubated in air, to test its ability to grow without CO 2 . Sensitivity to fuchsin was similar among reference strains evaluated. Growth of S19, 544 and 2308 but not RB51 were inhibited on media containing rifampicin. Medium with safranin O showed no inhibition for RB51, 544 and 2308, but it partially inhibited the S19 growth as well as medium containing i-erythritol. Treatment/control growth ratio for 2308 on tryptose agar containing thionin (2.5 μg/mL) was approximatelly 1.0, whereas S19 and RB51 showed 0.85 and 0.89 ratios, respectively. Growth of 544, S19 and RB51 but not 2308 was completely inhibited on medium with thionin (10 μg/mL). All field strains grew on medium containing i-erythritol, but were completelly inhibited by rifampicin. With exception of A1 ( B. abortus biovar 3) all field isolates grew on medium with thionin, although some strains showed a treatment/control growth ratio of 0.75-0.80 (10 μg/mL). These results showed that tryptose agar with thionin, i-erythritol or rifampicin could be useful for differentiating vaccine, challenge and field strains of B. abortus.

  19. Neutron Damage in Mechanically-Cooled High-Purity Germanium Detectors for Field-Portable Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey; J.B. McCabe; C. DeW. Van Siclen

    2013-10-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) systems require the use of a gamma-ray spectrometer to record the gamma-ray spectrum of an object under test and allow the determination of the object’s composition. Field-portable systems, such as Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS system, have used standard liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to perform this function. These detectors have performed very well in the past, but the requirement of liquid-nitrogen cooling limits their use to areas where liquid nitrogen is readily available or produced on-site. Also, having a relatively large volume of liquid nitrogen close to the detector can impact some assessments, possibly leading to a false detection of explosives or other nitrogen-containing chemical. Use of a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector is therefore very attractive for PGNAA applications where nitrogen detection is critical or where liquid-nitrogen logistics are problematic. Mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors constructed from p-type germanium, such as Ortec’s trans-SPEC, have been commercially available for several years. In order to assess whether these detectors would be suitable for use in a fielded PGNAA system, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been performing a number of tests of the resistance of mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors to neutron damage. These detectors have been standard commercially-available p-type HPGe detectors as well as prototype n-type HPGe detectors. These tests compare the performance of these different detector types as a function of crystal temperature and incident neutron fluence on the crystal.

  20. Characteristics of the Neutron Irradiation Facilities of the PSI Calibration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hoedlmoser, H.; Schuler, Ch.; Butterweck, G.; Mayer, S.

    2011-12-13

    The neutron radiation fields of the Calibration Laboratory at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) are traceable to the national standards of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. A Berthold LB6411 neutron dose rate meter for neutron radiation is used as a secondary standard. Recently, a thorough characterization of the neutron irradiation fields of the {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 252}Cf sources by means of reference measurements and a detailed MCNPX simulation of the irradiation facility has been initiated. In this work, the characteristics of the neutron radiation fields are summarized and presented together with model equations and an uncertainty analysis. MCNPX results are shown for the {sup 241}Am-Be source. A comparison of measured and simulated data shows an excellent agreement. From the simulation, valuable information about the neutron fields like the contribution of scattered neutrons in the fields and the energy spectra could be obtained.

  1. Efficient magnetic-field amplification due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in binary neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    We explore magnetic-field amplification due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability during binary neutron star mergers. By performing high-resolution general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations with a resolution of 17.5 m for 4-5 ms after the onset of the merger on the Japanese supercomputer "K", we find that an initial magnetic field of moderate maximum strength 1013 G is amplified at least by a factor of ≈103. We also explore the saturation of the magnetic-field energy and our result shows that it is likely to be ≳4 ×1050 erg , which is ≳0.1 % of the bulk kinetic energy of the merging binary neutron stars.

  2. Neutron cameras for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P.

    1998-12-31

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from {sup 16}N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with {sup 16}N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins.

  3. Magnetic field instability in a neutron star driven by the electroweak electron-nucleon interaction versus the chiral magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B.

    2015-03-01

    We show that the Standard Model electroweak interaction of ultrarelativistic electrons with nucleons (the e N interaction) in a neutron star (NS) permeated by a seed large-scale helical magnetic field provides its growth up to ≳1 015 G during a time comparable with the ages of young magnetars ˜1 04 yr . The magnetic field instability originates from the parity violation in the e N interaction entering the generalized Dirac equation for right and left massless electrons in an external uniform magnetic field. We calculate the average electric current given by the solution of the modified Dirac equation containing an extra current for right and left electrons (positrons), which turns out to be directed along the magnetic field. Such a current includes both a changing chiral imbalance of electrons and the e N potential given by a constant neutron density in a NS. Then we derive the system of the kinetic equations for the chiral imbalance and the magnetic helicity which accounts for the e N interaction. By solving this system, we show that a sizable chiral imbalance arising in a neutron protostar due to the Urca process eL-+p →N +νeL diminishes very rapidly because of a huge chirality-flip rate. Thus the e N term prevails over the chiral effect, providing a huge growth of the magnetic helicity and the helical magnetic field.

  4. The Depolarization Probability of Ultracold Neutrons in Collision with Material Guide Tubes in a Varying Ambient Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearmitt, Damien; Holley, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) are defined as having an energy of 100 neV. Polarized β-decay experiments using UCN require consideration of material depolarization for maximizing statistics as well as for understanding and controlling systematic effects. The Los Alamos National Lab UCN team performed an experiment in which UCN were polarized using a 6T longitudinal field. The resulting high-field-seeking spin state neutrons were then introduced into a material test guide. UCN which depolarize become trapped between the high-field region and a shutter, while high-field seeking UCN return through the magnet and are upscattered on a plastic foil. After loading the system with UCN and monitoring the incoming flux, the depolarization probability per bounce can be determined by opening the shutter and counting the population of trapped depolarized neutrons. A determination from this dataset of depolarization per bounce as a function of the ambient magnetic field in guide tubes made of unpolished, mechanically polished, and electropolished Cu, diamond-like carbon coated Cu, and stainless steel will be presented.

  5. Cosmic rays, thunderstorm clouds, and possible influence on climate, 2. Atmospheric electric field effect in different neutron multiplicities according to Emilio Segre Observatory one minute data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L.; Dorman, I.; Iucci, N.; Eman, Y. Ne; Parisi, M.; Pustil Nik, L.; Signoretti, F.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I.

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospheric electric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS of Emilio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-off rigidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine the atmospheric electric field effect in CR fortotal neutron intensity and for multiplicities m 1, m 2, m 3, m 4, m 5, m 6, m7, and m8, as well as for m=1, m=2, m=3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison and excluding primary CR variations we use also one minute data on neutron multiplicities obtained by NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). In February 2000 were observed 14 periods of thunderstorms with different durations (up to about 1000 min), the maximum strength of electric field was 110 kV/m. Thunderstorms were observed also in March 2000 (6 periods with maximal field 112 kV/m), in April 2000 (9; 70 kV/m), in May 2000 (4; 10 kV/m), in October 2000 (10; 70 kV/m), in November 2000 (5; 50 kV/m), in December 2000 (7; 88 kV/m), in January 2001 (12; 62 kV/m), in February 2001 (10; 88 kV/m). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (2002) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by captchuring of slow negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping few neutrons. As it was shown in Dorman and Dorman (2002), the biggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicity m=1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We control this conclusion on the basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field. We consider also the possible influence of CR air ionization (especially by secondary energetic electrons) on thunderstorms and lightnings, and through this - on climate. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I. and Dorman I.V., 2002. Report on COSPAR2002

  6. Assessment of models proposed for the 1985 revision of the international geomagnetic reference field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Zunde, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Geomagnetic measurements from land, marine and aerial surveys conducted in the years 1945-1964 were used to test the 14 models proposed as additions, for that period, to the series of definitive geomagnetic reference field (DGRF) models. Overall, NASA's 'SFAS' models and the BGS (British Geological Survey) models agree best with these data. Comparisons of the two proposed definitive main-field models for 1980.0, with each other and with the existing IGRF 1980 main-field model, show mostly close agreement, with the greatest absolute differences (several tens of nanotesla) occurring in the region of Antarctica. Comparison of the the three proposed forecast secular-variation models for 1985-1990 with estimates of recent rates of change at 148 magnetic observatories shows that the IZMIRAN (U.S.S.R.) and USGS models are in closest agreement with these data. ?? 1987.

  7. SILENE, a new radiation reference source

    SciTech Connect

    Rozain, J.P.; Barbry, F.

    1994-12-31

    Originally designed to study criticality accidents, the SILENE reactor today is also a reference source able to meet the expectation of a great number of researchers in the fields of physics, neutronics, biology or dosimetry. The latest technical developments and its multiple operating possibilities enable this CEA Nuclear Protection and Safety Institute experimental reactor to provide a reproducible range of calibrated neutron and gamma radiation.

  8. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  9. Crystal electric field excitations in quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pinaki; Flint, R.; Kong, T.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; de Boissieu, M.; Lory, P.-F.; Beutier, G.; Hiroto, T.

    All of the known quasicrystals with local moments exhibit frustration and spin glass-like behavior at low temperature. The onset of the spin freezing temperature is believed to be affected by the crystal electric field (CEF) splitting of the local moments. The quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 and its related icosahedral quasicrystal phase, i-Tb-Cd, form a set of model systems to explore how magnetism evolves from a conventional lattice (approximant phase) to an aperiodic quasicrystal. Though TbCd6 shows long-range antiferromagnetic ordering (TN = 24 K), only spin glass like behavior is observed in i-Tb-Cd with a spin freezing temperature of TF = 6 K. To investigate further, we have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of TbCd6 and observed two distinct CEF excitations at low energies which points to a high degeneracy of the CEF levels related to the Tb surrounding with almost icosahedral symmetry. Work at Ames Laboratory was supported by the DOE, BES, Division of Materials Sciences & Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. This research used resources at Institut Laue-Langevin, France.

  10. Molecular dynamics force-field refinement against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Lynch, Vickie E.

    2015-11-23

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) is one of the experimental techniques of choice for probing the dynamics at length and time scales that are also in the realm of full-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This overlap enables extension of current fitting methods that use time-independent equilibrium measurements to new methods fitting against dynamics data. We present an algorithm that fits simulation-derived incoherent dynamical structure factors against QENS data probing the diffusive dynamics of the system. We showcase the difficulties inherent to this type of fitting problem, namely, the disparity between simulation and experiment environment, as well as limitations in the simulation due to incomplete sampling of phase space. We discuss a methodology to overcome these difficulties and apply it to a set of full-atom MD simulations for the purpose of refining the force-field parameter governing the activation energy of methyl rotation in the octa-methyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane molecule. Our optimal simulated activation energy agrees with the experimentally derived value up to a 5% difference, well within experimental error. We believe the method will find applicability to other types of diffusive motions and other representation of the systems such as coarse-grain models where empirical fitting is essential. In addition, the refinement method can be extended to the coherent dynamic structure factor with no additional effort.

  11. Molecular dynamics force-field refinement against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data

    DOE PAGES

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Lynch, Vickie E.

    2015-11-23

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) is one of the experimental techniques of choice for probing the dynamics at length and time scales that are also in the realm of full-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This overlap enables extension of current fitting methods that use time-independent equilibrium measurements to new methods fitting against dynamics data. We present an algorithm that fits simulation-derived incoherent dynamical structure factors against QENS data probing the diffusive dynamics of the system. We showcase the difficulties inherent to this type of fitting problem, namely, the disparity between simulation and experiment environment, as well as limitations in the simulationmore » due to incomplete sampling of phase space. We discuss a methodology to overcome these difficulties and apply it to a set of full-atom MD simulations for the purpose of refining the force-field parameter governing the activation energy of methyl rotation in the octa-methyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane molecule. Our optimal simulated activation energy agrees with the experimentally derived value up to a 5% difference, well within experimental error. We believe the method will find applicability to other types of diffusive motions and other representation of the systems such as coarse-grain models where empirical fitting is essential. In addition, the refinement method can be extended to the coherent dynamic structure factor with no additional effort.« less

  12. Determination of Bulk Magnetic Volume Properties by Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünzweig, Christian; Siebert, René; Betz, Benedikt; Rauscher, Peter; Schäfer, Rudolf; Lehmann, Eberhard

    For the production of high-class electrical steel grades a deeper understanding of the magnetic domain interaction with induced mechanical stresses is strongly required. This holds for non-oriented (NO) as well as grain-oriented (GO) steels. In the case of non-oriented steels the magnetic property degeneration after punching or laser cutting is essential for selecting correct obstructing material grades and designing efficient electrical machines. Until now these effects stay undiscovered due to the lack of adequate investigation methods that reveal local bulk information on processed laminations. Here we show how the use of a non-destructive testing method based on a neutron grating interferometry providing the dark-field image contrast delivers spatially-resolved transmission information about the local bulk domain arrangement and domain wall density. With the help of this technique it is possible to visualize magnetization processes within the NO laminations. Different representative manufacturing techniques are compared in terms of magnetic flux density deterioration such as punching, mechanically cutting by guillotine as well as laser fusion cutting using industrial high power laser beam sources. For GO steel laminations the method is applicable on the one hand to visualize the internal domain structure without being hindered by the coating layer. On the other hand, we can show the influence of the coating layer onto the underlying domain structure.

  13. Photon and neutron fluence-to-kerma conversion factors for ICRP-1975 reference man using improved elemental compositions for bone and marrow of the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.

    1982-11-01

    A twelve-element approximation of the total-body, soft-tissue and skeletal components of ICRP-1975 Reference Man is used to investigate particle fluence-to-kerma conversion factors for photons with energies between 1 keV and 20 MeV and neutrons with energies between 0.0253 eV and 20 MeV. Several recent ICRP revisions to the elemental composition of Reference Man, which have not been included in other kerma-factor calculations, are taken into account. This work suggests some additional revisions to the major-element content (i.e., H, C, N, and O) and to the mineral and trace-element content (i.e., Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe) of various total-body, soft-tissue, and skeletal components of Reference Man. The revisions to the bone and red marrow of the skeleton offer significant new refinements in red-bone-marrow dosimetry.

  14. Limits on the monopole polarization magnetic field from measurements of the electric dipole moments of atoms, molecules, and the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.

    1997-03-01

    A radial magnetic field can induce a time-invariance-violating electric-dipole moment (EDM) in quantum systems. The EDMs of the Tl, Cs, Xe, and Hg atoms and the neutron that are produced by such a field are estimated. The contributions of such a field to the constants, χ of the T, P-odd interactions χeN.s/s and χNN.I/I are also estimated for the TlF, HgF, and YbF molecules [where s (I) is the electron (nuclear) spin and N is the molecular axis]. The best limit on the contact monopole field can be obtained from the measured value of the Tl EDM. The possibility of such a field being produced from polarization of the vacuum of electrically charged magnetic monopoles (dyons) by a Coulomb field is discussed, as well as the limit on these dyons. An alternative mechanism involves chromomagnetic and chromoelectric fields in QCD.

  15. Phase transitions of dense neutron matter with generalized Skyrme interaction to superfluid states with triplet pairing in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. N.

    2012-12-01

    A generalized non-relativistic Fermi-liquid approach was used to find analytical formulas for temperatures Tc1(n, H) and Tc2(n, H) (which are functions nonlinear of density n and linear of magnetic field H) of phase transitions in spatially uniform dense pure neutron matter from normal to superfluid states with spin-triplet p-wave pairing (similar to anisotropic superfluid phases 3He-A1 and 3He-A2) in steady and homogeneous strong magnetic field (but |μn| H ll Ec < ɛF(n), where μn is the magnetic dipole moment of a neutron, Ec is the cutoff energy and ɛF(n) is the Fermi energy in neutron matter). General formulas for Tc1, 2 (n, H) (valid for arbitrary parameterization of the effective Skyrme interaction in neutron matter) are specified here for generalized BSk18 parameterization of the Skyrme forces (with additional terms dependent on density n) on the interval 0.3 n0 < n < nc (BSk18) ≍ 2.7952 · n0, where n0 = 0.17 fm-3 is nuclear density and at critical density nc(BSk18) triplet superfluidity disappears, Tc0(n, cH = 0) = 0. Expressions for phase transition temperatures Tc0(n)<0.09MeV (at Ec = 10MeV) and Tc1, 2(n, H) are realistic non-monotone functions of density n for BSk18 parameterization of the Skyrme forces (contrary to their monotone increase for all previous BSk parameterizations). Phase transitions to superfluid states of such type might occur in liquid outer core of magnetars (strongly magnetized neutron stars).

  16. Estimation of effective soil hydraulic properties at field scale via ground albedo neutron sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-04-01

    Upscaling of soil hydraulic parameters is a big challenge in hydrological research, especially in model applications of water and solute transport processes. In this contest, numerous attempts have been made to optimize soil hydraulic properties using observations of state variables such as soil moisture. However, in most of the cases the observations are limited at the point-scale and then transferred to the model scale. In this way inherent small-scale soil heterogeneities and non-linearity of dominate processes introduce sources of error that can produce significant misinterpretation of hydrological scenarios and unrealistic predictions. On the other hand, remote-sensed soil moisture over large areas is also a new promising approach to derive effective soil hydraulic properties over its observation footprint, but it is still limited to the soil surface. In this study we present a new methodology to derive soil moisture at the intermediate scale between point-scale observations and estimations at the remote-sensed scale. The data are then used for the estimation of effective soil hydraulic parameters. In particular, ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS) was used to derive non-invasive soil water content in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth of few decimeters. This approach is based on the crucial role of hydrogen compared to other landscape materials as neutron moderator. As natural neutron measured aboveground depends on soil water content, the vertical footprint of the GANS method, i.e. its penetration depth, does also. Firstly, this study was designed to evaluate the dynamics of GANS vertical footprint and derive a mathematical model for its prediction. To test GANS-soil moisture and its penetration depth, it was accompanied by other soil moisture measurements (FDR) located at 5, 20 and 40 cm depths over the GANS horizontal footprint in a sunflower field (Brandenburg, Germany). Secondly, a HYDRUS-1D model was set up with monitored values of crop

  17. Improvement of Neutron/gamma Field Evaluation for Restart of Jmtr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu; Niimi, Motoji; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    2009-08-01

    The calculated neutron flux/fluence was verified against measurements of irradiated fluence monitors. With regard to gamma dose, calculated gamma heating rates were verified against measurements of the nuclear heating evaluation capsule which was developed in order to measure the nuclear heating rate. It was confirmed that the calculated fast and thermal neutron flux/fluence agreed with measurements within ±10%, ±30%, respectively, and the calculated gamma dose agreed within -3 ~ +21%. As the results of sensitive analysis, it was confirmed that difference of thermal S(α,β) libraries was not did not have effect on the evaluation of thermal neutron fluxes.

  18. The fields of reference stars for optical positional observations of astrometric extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dement'eva, A. A.; Ryl'Kov, V. P.

    The Pulkovo programme (Pul ERS) and the techniques used to create a catalogue of coordinates and magnitudes for more than 7000 faint stars in 73 small fields around extragalactic radiosources (ERS) are described. Accurate positions of stars in the fields around ERS 2200+420 and ERS 2021+614 are given. The catalogue containing 223 stars is presented. The errors of coordinate reductions in the system of reference stars from the CMC catalogue are found to be 1.5-2.0 times smaller than for those in the system of the PPM catalogue. This programme (Pul ERS) is required for quick identification of the extragalactic radio sources and for obtaining their characteristics from observations with large telescopes and CCD detectors.

  19. Simultaneous soil moisture and properties estimation for a drip irrigated field by assimilating cosmic-ray neutron intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xujun; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Jiménez Bello, Miguel Ángel; Rosolem, Rafael; Bogena, Heye; Alzamora, Fernando Martínez; Chanzy, André; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-08-01

    Neutron intensity measured by the aboveground cosmic-ray neutron intensity probe (CRP) allows estimating soil moisture content at the field scale. In this work, synthetic neutron intensities were used to remove the bias of simulated soil moisture content or update soil hydraulic properties (together with soil moisture) in the Community Land Model (CLM) using the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter. The cosmic-ray forward model COSMIC was used as the non-linear measurement operator which maps between neutron intensity and soil moisture. The novel aspect of this work is that synthetically measured neutron intensity was used for real time updating of soil states and soil properties (or soil moisture bias) and posterior use for the real time scheduling of irrigation (data assimilation based real-time control approach). Uncertainty of model forcing and soil properties (sand fraction, clay fraction and organic matter density) were considered in the ensemble predictions of the soil moisture profiles. Horizontal and vertical weighting of soil moisture was introduced in the data assimilation in order to handle the scale mismatch between the cosmic-ray footprint and the CLM grid cell. The approach was illustrated in a synthetic study with the real-time irrigation scheduling of fields of citrus trees. After adjusting soil moisture content by assimilating neutron intensity, the irrigation requirements were calculated based on the water deficit method. Model bias was introduced by using coarser soil texture in the data assimilation experiments than in reality. A series of experiments was done with different combinations of state, parameter and bias estimation in combination with irrigation scheduling. Assimilation of CRP neutron intensity improved soil moisture characterization. Irrigation requirement was overestimated if biased soil properties were used. The soil moisture bias was reduced by 35% after data assimilation. The scenario of joint state-parameter estimation

  20. Argon/propane ionization-chamber dosimetry for mixed x-ray/neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R J

    1978-01-01

    The photoneutrons produced by high-energy x-ray machines can diffuse through the mazes usually employed at the treatment-room entrance and readily penetrate the lead-lined doors used for x-ray shielding. The measurement of these neutrons in the presence of x-rays and the determination of dose equivalent poses a problem for which there is currently no standard method of solution. In order to separate x-ray dose from neutron dose, the author employed an ionization chamber alternately filled with argon or propane. The response characteristics of this chamber to x-ray and neutrons are described. Quality factors were determined from a calculated neutron spectrum. As a result of these measurements, a 10-in. polyethylene door was added to the entranceway of a 25-MV linear accelerator.

  1. Measurement of human energy expenditure, with particular reference to field studies: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Roy J; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi

    2012-08-01

    Over the years, techniques for the study of human movement have ranged in complexity and precision from direct observation of the subject through activity diaries, questionnaires, and recordings of body movement, to the measurement of physiological responses, studies of metabolism and indirect and direct calorimetry. This article reviews developments in each of these domains. Particular reference is made to their impact upon the continuing search for valid field estimates of activity patterns and energy expenditures, as required by the applied physiologist, ergonomist, sports scientist, nutritionist and epidemiologist. Early observers sought to improve productivity in demanding employment. Direct observation and filming of workers were supplemented by monitoring of heart rates, ventilation and oxygen consumption. Such methods still find application in ergonomics and sport, but many investigators are now interested in relationships between habitual physical activity and chronic disease. Even sophisticated questionnaires still do not provide valid information on the absolute energy expenditures associated with good health. Emphasis has thus shifted to use of sophisticated pedometer/accelerometers, sometimes combining their output with GPS and other data. Some modern pedometer/accelerometers perform well in the laboratory, but show substantial systematic errors relative to laboratory reference criteria such as the metabolism of doubly labeled water when assessing the varied activities of daily life. The challenge remains to develop activity monitors that are sufficiently inexpensive for field use, yet meet required accuracy standards. Possibly, measurements of oxygen consumption by portable respirometers may soon satisfy part of this need, although a need for valid longer term monitoring will remain.

  2. Digitized two-parameter spectrometer for neutron-gamma mixed field

    SciTech Connect

    Matej, Z.; Cvachovec, J.; Prenosil, V.; Cvachovec, F.; Zaritski, S.

    2011-07-01

    This paper shows the results of digital processing of output pulses from combined photon-neutron detector using a commercially available digitizer ACQUIRIS DP 210. The advantage of digital processing is reduction of the apparatus in weight and size, acceleration of measurement, and increased resistance to pile-up of pulses. The neutron and photon spectrum of radionuclide source {sup 252}Cf is presented. (authors)

  3. Neutron metrology laboratory facility simulation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mariana; Salgado, Ana P; Filho, Aidano S; Pereira, Walsan W; Patrão, Karla C S; Fonseca, Evaldo S

    2014-10-01

    The Neutron Low Scattering Laboratory in Brazil has been completely rebuilt. Evaluation of air attenuation parameters and neutron component scattering in the room was done using Monte Carlo simulation code. Neutron fields produced by referenced neutron source were used to calculate neutron scattering and air attenuation.

  4. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  5. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  6. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  7. A novel fast neutron dosemeter based on fission chambers. Part I: Principles of operation and theoretical response in neutron therapy radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Porter, D; Lawson, R C; Hannan, W J

    1975-05-01

    A novel method is proposed of accurately measuring fast neutron doses of interest in radiotherapy. The technique, which utilizes calculated neutron fluence-to-kerma conversion factors, is based upon the combination of measurements with calibrated neptunium-237 and uranium-238 pulse fission chambers to obtain a response which matches the variation of kerma with neutron energy. The theoretical performance of a practical instrument has been assessed for a variety of neutron spectra to evaluate the spectrum dependence of the dosemeter. The overall systematic uncertainty using this absolute method of determining the neutron dose under charged particle equilibrium conditions is comparable to that encountered with ionization chamber techniques.

  8. The fission track detector revisited: application to individual neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Prêtre, S; Aroua, A; Boschung, M; Grecescu, M; Valley, J F; Wernli, C

    1996-08-01

    A system based on fission fragment tracks had previously been developed for individual neutron dosimetry. The dosimeter detects both fast neutrons by means of the 232Th(n,f) reaction, and thermal and albedo neutrons by means of the 235U(n,f) reaction. The fission tracks produced in a plastic foil are chemically etched and counted by spark discharges. The response of the dosimeter has recently been re-investigated in 36 different neutron fields: monoenergetic beams, reference fields near isotopic sources, and radiation fields encountered in a variety of situations inside nuclear power plants. The results obtained have been compared to those computed by convolution of the neutron spectra with the energy response functions of the dosimeters. In practical situations, it is essential to know the shape of the neutron spectrum, approximately at least, in order to perform an acceptably accurate dose evaluation. For that purpose, the neutron fields encountered inside nuclear power plants have been grouped into four categories, for which algorithms for dose evaluation have been developed. Concerning the neutron equivalent dose, the error associated with this approach does not exceed a factor of 2, a performance which is comparable to other detection systems used in the field of individual neutron dosimetry.

  9. Magnetic Order and Crystal Field Excitations in Er2Ru2O7: A Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Gardner, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic pyrochlore Er{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been studied with neutron scattering and susceptibility measurements down to a base temperature of 270 mK. For the low temperature phase in which the Er sublattice orders, new magnetic Bragg peaks are reported which can be indexed with integer (hkl) for a face centered cubic cell. Inelastic measurements reveal a wealth of crystal field levels of the Er ion and a copious amount of magnetic scattering below 15 meV. The three lowest groups of crystal field levels are at 6.7, 9.1 and 18.5 meV.

  10. Crystal field states of Tb3 + in the pyrochlore spin liquid Tb2Ti2O7 from neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Princep, A. J.; Walker, H. C.; Adroja, D. T.; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A. T.

    2015-06-01

    We report time-of-flight neutron scattering measurements of the magnetic spectrum of Tb3 + in Tb2Ti2O7 . The data, which extend up to 120 meV and have calibrated intensity, enable us to consolidate and extend previous studies of the single-ion crystal field spectrum. We successfully refine a model for the crystal field potential in Tb2Ti2O7 without relying on data from other rare-earth titanate pyrochlores, and we confirm that the ground state is a non-Kramers doublet with predominantly |±4 > components. We compare the model critically with earlier models.

  11. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Lord, J S; McKenzie, I; Baker, P J; Blundell, S J; Cottrell, S P; Giblin, S R; Good, J; Hillier, A D; Holsman, B H; King, P J C; Lancaster, T; Mitchell, R; Nightingale, J B; Owczarkowski, M; Poli, S; Pratt, F L; Rhodes, N J; Scheuermann, R; Salman, Z

    2011-07-01

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  12. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  13. Counting neutrons from the spontaneous fission of {sup 238}U using scintillation detectors and mixed field analysers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Helen M. O'D.; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Jones, Ashley

    2015-07-01

    It is well documented that {sup 238}U decays by spontaneous fission, and that it is the main component of most nuclear fuels. As nuclear fuels are largely classed as Special Nuclear Material (SNM), they have to be fully accounted for by owners and processing facilities. One possible method for verifying declared amounts of SNM is to count the spontaneous neutrons produced from {sup 238}U. Using four EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors and a mixed field analyser, spontaneous neutrons from 16.4 g of depleted uranium (0.3% enrichment) have been assayed. The assay method shows promising results and this proof of principle will be researched further in order for it to be applied in an industrial setting. (authors)

  14. Genetic variability among Chlamydia trachomatis reference and clinical strains analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, P; Allardet-Servent, A; de Barbeyrac, B; Ramuz, M; Bebear, C

    1994-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was applied to Chlamydia trachomatis reference strains representing each of the 18 serovars and to 29 clinical isolates from genital specimens collected in Bordeaux, France, or Malmö, Sweden. Comparison of the fingerprint patterns of the reference strains revealed a high level of polymorphism of the total DNA when SmaI was used (14 profiles), whereas the other enzymes, Sse8387I and ApaI, showed fewer differences. Some serovars, considered to be closely related on the basis of their antigenic determinants located on the major outer membrane protein (MOMP), such as D and Da or I and Ia, were shown to be different after PFGE of their genomic DNAs. However, serovars B and Ba and serovars L2 and L2a had identical patterns after analysis with the three endonucleases. When applied to clinical isolates, which were typed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the MOMP gene, PFGE allowed the detection of intragenotype polymorphisms and showed the identity of two strains successively isolated from the same patient. This technique seems to be an efficient tool for epidemiological studies when used in addition to serotyping or genotyping by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the MOMP gene. Images PMID:7883878

  15. Does the Earth's Magnetic Field Serve as a Reference for Alignment of the Honeybee Waggle Dance?

    PubMed Central

    Lambinet, Veronika; Hayden, Michael E.; Bieri, Marco; Gries, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    The honeybee (Apis mellifera) waggle dance, which is performed inside the hive by forager bees, informs hive mates about a potent food source, and recruits them to its location. It consists of a repeated figure-8 pattern: two oppositely directed turns interspersed by a short straight segment, the “waggle run”. The waggle run consists of a single stride emphasized by lateral waggling motions of the abdomen. Directional information pointing to a food source relative to the sun's azimuth is encoded in the angle between the waggle run line and a reference line, which is generally thought to be established by gravity. Yet, there is tantalizing evidence that the local (ambient) geomagnetic field (LGMF) could play a role. We tested the effect of the LGMF on the recruitment success of forager bees by placing observation hives inside large Helmholtz coils, and then either reducing the LGMF to 2% or shifting its apparent declination. Neither of these treatments reduced the number of nest mates that waggle dancing forager bees recruited to a feeding station located 200 m north of the hive. These results indicate that the LGMF does not act as the reference for the alignment of waggle-dancing bees. PMID:25541731

  16. Using a Tandem Pelletron accelerator to produce a thermal neutron beam for detector testing purposes.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Praena, J; Fernández, B; Macías, M; Bedogni, R; Terrón, J A; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Arias de Saavedra, F; Porras, I; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-01-01

    Active thermal neutron detectors are used in a wide range of measuring devices in medicine, industry and research. For many applications, the long-term stability of these devices is crucial, so that very well controlled neutron fields are needed to perform calibrations and repeatability tests. A way to achieve such reference neutron fields, relying on a 3 MV Tandem Pelletron accelerator available at the CNA (Seville, Spain), is reported here. This paper shows thermal neutron field production and reproducibility characteristics over few days.

  17. Potential and Reality at the Reference Desk: Reflections on a "Return to the Field."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Charles A.

    1984-01-01

    Reports reflections of library school reference teacher who practiced for year as day-to-day reference librarian. Highlights include ideal reference librarianship; concepts helpful in explaining low morale; changes in basic reference service elements (information resources, clients, librarians); current coping strategies; and ways in which to cope…

  18. Neutron diffraction study of the magnetic-field-induced transition in Mn{sub 3}GaC

    SciTech Connect

    Çakir, Ö.; Acet, M.; Farle, M.; Senyshyn, A.

    2014-01-28

    The antiperovskite Mn{sub 3}GaC undergoes an isostructural cubic–cubic first order transition from a low-temperature, large-cell-volume antiferromagnetic state to a high-temperature, small-cell-volume ferromagnetic state at around 160 K. The transition can also be induced by applying a magnetic field. We study here the isothermal magnetic-field-evolution of the transition as ferromagnetism is stabilized at the expense of antiferromagnetism. We make use of the presence of the two distinct cell volumes of the two magnetic states as a probe to observe by neutron diffraction the evolution of the transition, as the external magnetic field carries the system from the antiferromagnetic to the ferromagnetic state. We show that the large-volume antiferromagnetic and the small-volume ferromagnetic states coexist in the temperature range of the transition. The ferromagnetic state is progressively stabilized as the field increases.

  19. In situ neutron diffraction studies of a commercial, soft lead zirconate titanate ceramic: response to electric fields and mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanick, Abhijit; Prewitt, Anderson D.; Cottrell, Michelle A.; Lee, Wayne; Studer, Andrew J.; An, Ke; Hubbard, Camden R.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2010-06-01

    Structural changes in commercial lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics (EC-65) under the application of electric fields and mechanical stress were measured using neutron diffraction instruments at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The structural changes during electric-field application were measured on the WOMBAT beamline at ANSTO and include non-180° domain switching, lattice strains and field-induced phase transformations. Using time-resolved data acquisition capabilities, lattice strains were measured under cyclic electric fields at times as short as 30 μs. Structural changes including the (002) and (200) lattice strains and non-180° domain switching were measured during uniaxial mechanical compression on the NRSF2 instrument at ORNL. Contraction of the crystallographic polarization axis, (002), and reorientation of non-180° domains occur at lowest stresses, followed by (200) elastic strains at higher stresses.

  20. Comparison of the performance of different instruments in the stray neutron field around the CERN Proton Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Aza, Eleni; Caresana, Marco; Cassell, Christopher; Colombo, Valeria; Damjanovic, Sanja; Gilardoni, Simone; Manessi, Giacomo Paolo; Pangallo, Michel; Perrin, Daniel; Silari, Marco

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses an intercomparison campaign carried out in several locations around the CERN Proton Synchrotron. The locations were selected in order to perform the measurements in different stray field conditions. Various neutron detectors were employed: ionisation chambers, conventional and extended range rem counters, both commercial and prototype ones, including a novel instrument called LUPIN, specifically conceived to work in pulsed fields. The attention was focused on the potential differences in the instrument readings due to dead-time losses that are expected to affect most commercial units. The results show that the ionisation chambers and LUPIN agree well with the expected H*(10) values, as derived from FLUKA simulations, showing no relevant underestimations even in strongly pulsed fields. On the contrary, the dead-time losses of the other rem counters induced an underestimation in pulsed fields that was more important for instruments characterised by a higher dead time.

  1. Dynamic stabilization of the magnetic field surrounding the neutron electric dipole moment spectrometer at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Afach, S.; Fertl, M.; Franke, B. E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch; Kirch, K.; Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Daum, M.; Henneck, R.; Lauss, B. E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch; Meier, M.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G.; Bodek, K.; Zejma, J.; Grujic, Z.; Kasprzak, M.; Weis, A.; Hélaine, V.; Koch, H.-C.; and others

    2014-08-28

    The Surrounding Field Compensation (SFC) system described in this work is installed around the four-layer Mu-metal magnetic shield of the neutron electric dipole moment spectrometer located at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The SFC system reduces the DC component of the external magnetic field by a factor of about 20. Within a control volume of approximately 2.5 m × 2.5 m × 3 m, disturbances of the magnetic field are attenuated by factors of 5–50 at a bandwidth from 10{sup −3} Hz up to 0.5 Hz, which corresponds to integration times longer than several hundreds of seconds and represent the important timescale for the neutron electric dipole moment measurement. These shielding factors apply to random environmental noise from arbitrary sources. This is achieved via a proportional-integral feedback stabilization system that includes a regularized pseudoinverse matrix of proportionality factors which correlates magnetic field changes at all sensor positions to current changes in the SFC coils.

  2. Neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice; Menelle, Alain

    2015-10-01

    The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples) and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  3. Proper shielding for NaI(Tl) detectors in combined neutronfields using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, M. H. Hadizadeh; Mowlavi, A. A.; Thompson, M. N.; Hakimabad, H. Miri

    2004-04-01

    The importance of reducing the activation of NaI(Tl) detectors when used to detect γ-rays in the presence of an intense neutron environment is discussed. Monte-Carlo calculations are used to design proper shielding for these NaI(Tl) detectors. These results are compared with the experimental measurements.

  4. Gravity field recovery in the framework of a Geodesy and Time Reference in Space (GETRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauk, Markus; Schlicht, Anja; Pail, Roland; Murböck, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The study ;Geodesy and Time Reference in Space; (GETRIS), funded by European Space Agency (ESA), evaluates the potential and opportunities coming along with a global space-borne infrastructure for data transfer, clock synchronization and ranging. Gravity field recovery could be one of the first beneficiary applications of such an infrastructure. This paper analyzes and evaluates the two-way high-low satellite-to-satellite-tracking as a novel method and as a long-term perspective for the determination of the Earth's gravitational field, using it as a synergy of one-way high-low combined with low-low satellite-to-satellite-tracking, in order to generate adequate de-aliasing products. First planned as a constellation of geostationary satellites, it turned out, that an integration of European Union Global Navigation Satellite System (Galileo) satellites (equipped with inter-Galileo links) into a Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) constellation would extend the capability of such a mission constellation remarkably. We report about simulations of different Galileo and Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) satellite constellations, computed using time variable geophysical background models, to determine temporal changes in the Earth's gravitational field. Our work aims at an error analysis of this new satellite/instrument scenario by investigating the impact of different error sources. Compared to a low-low satellite-to-satellite-tracking mission, results show reduced temporal aliasing errors due to a more isotropic error behavior caused by an improved observation geometry, predominantly in near-radial direction within the inter-satellite-links, as well as the potential of an improved gravity recovery with higher spatial and temporal resolution. The major error contributors of temporal gravity retrieval are aliasing errors due to undersampling of high frequency signals (mainly atmosphere, ocean and ocean tides). In this context, we investigate adequate methods to reduce these errors. We

  5. Mineralogy and instrumental neutron activation analysis of seven National Bureau of Standards and three Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas clay reference samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosterman, John W.; Flanagan, F.J.; Bragg, Anne; Doughten, M.W.; Filby, R.H.; Grimm, Catherine; Mee, J.S.; Potts, P.J.; Rogers, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of 3 oxides and 29 elements in 7 National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and 3 Instituto de Pesquisas Techno16gicas (IPT) reference clay samples were etermined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The analytical work was designed to test the homogeneity of constituents in three new NBS reference clays, NBS-97b, NBS-98b, and NBS-679. The analyses of variance of 276 sets of data for these three standards show that the constituents are distributed homogeneously among bottles of samples for 94 percent of the sets of data. Three of the reference samples (NBS-97, NBS-97a, and NBS-97b) are flint clays; four of the samples (NBS-98, NBS-98a, NBS-98b, and IPT-32) are plastic clays, and three of the samples (NBS-679, IPT-28, and IPT-42) are miscellaneous clays (both sedimentary and residual). Seven clays are predominantly kaolinite; the other three clays contain illite and kaolinite in the approximate ratio 3:2. Seven clays contain quartz as the major nonclay mineral. The mineralogy of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri (NBS-97a and NBS-98a) differs markedly from that of the flint and plastic clays from Pennsylvania (NBS-97, NBS-97b, NBS-98, and NBS-98b). The flint clay NBS-97 has higher average chromium, hafnium, lithium, and zirconium contents than its replacement, reference sample NBS-97b. The differences between the plastic clay NBS-98 and its replacement, NBS-98b, are not as pronounced. The trace element contents of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri, NBS-97a and NBS-98a, differ significantly from those of the clays from Pennsylvania, especially the average rare earth element (REE) contents. The trace element contents of clay sample IPT-32 differ from those of the other plastic clays. IPT-28 and IPT-42 have some average trace element contents that differ not only between these two samples but also from all the other clays. IPT-28 has the highest summation of the average REE contents of the 10 samples. The uranium content of NBS-98a, 46

  6. Comparison of Haemophilus parasuis reference strains and field isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and protein profiles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer’s disease and is a pathogen of swine in high-health status herds. Reports on serotyping of field strains from outbreaks describe that approximately 30% of them are nontypeable and therefore cannot be traced. Molecular typing methods have been used as alternatives to serotyping. This study was done to compare random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles and whole cell protein (WCP) lysate profiles as methods for distinguishing H. parasuis reference strains and field isolates. Results The DNA and WCP lysate profiles of 15 reference strains and 31 field isolates of H. parasuis were analyzed using the Dice and neighbor joining algorithms. The results revealed unique and reproducible DNA and protein profiles among the reference strains and field isolates studied. Simpson’s index of diversity showed significant discrimination between isolates when three 10mer primers were combined for the RAPD method and also when both the RAPD and WCP lysate typing methods were combined. Conclusions The RAPD profiles seen among the reference strains and field isolates did not appear to change over time which may reflect a lack of DNA mutations in the genes of the samples. The recent field isolates had different WCP lysate profiles than the reference strains, possibly because the number of passages of the type strains may affect their protein expression. PMID:22703293

  7. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons calculated using the PHITS code and ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Niita, Koji

    2009-04-07

    The fluence to organ-dose and effective-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons with energies up to 100 GeV was calculated using the PHITS code coupled to male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which are to be released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. For the calculation, the radiation and tissue weighting factors, w(R) and w(T), respectively, as revised in ICRP Publication 103 were employed. The conversion coefficients for effective dose equivalents derived using the radiation quality factors of both Q(L) and Q(y) relationships were also estimated, utilizing the functions for calculating the probability densities of the absorbed dose in terms of LET (L) and lineal energy (y), respectively, implemented in PHITS. By comparing these data with the corresponding data for the effective dose, we found that the numerical compatibilities of the revised w(R) with the Q(L) and Q(y) relationships are fairly established. The calculated data of these dose conversion coefficients are indispensable for constructing the radiation protection systems based on the new recommendations given in ICRP103 for aircrews and astronauts, as well as for workers in accelerators and nuclear facilities.

  8. Simulation of neutron production using MCNPX+MCUNED.

    PubMed

    Erhard, M; Sauvan, P; Nolte, R

    2014-10-01

    In standard MCNPX, the production of neutrons by ions cannot be modelled efficiently. The MCUNED patch applied to MCNPX 2.7.0 allows to model the production of neutrons by light ions down to energies of a few kiloelectron volts. This is crucial for the simulation of neutron reference fields. The influence of target properties, such as the diffusion of reactive isotopes into the target backing or the effect of energy and angular straggling, can be studied efficiently. In this work, MCNPX/MCUNED calculations are compared with results obtained with the TARGET code for simulating neutron production. Furthermore, MCUNED incorporates more effective variance reduction techniques and a coincidence counting tally. This allows the simulation of a TCAP experiment being developed at PTB. In this experiment, 14.7-MeV neutrons will be produced by the reaction T(d,n)(4)He. The neutron fluence is determined by counting alpha particles, independently of the reaction cross section.

  9. Old and new neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M.

    1984-09-01

    The youngest known radiopulsar in the rapidly spinning magnetized neutron star which powers the Crab Nebula, the remnant of the historical supernova explosion of 1054 AD. Similar neutron stars are probably born at least every few hundred years, but are less frequent than Galactic supernova explosions. They are initially sources of extreme relativistic electron and/or positron winds (approx.10/sup 38/s/sup -1/ of 10/sup 12/ eV leptons) which greatly decrease as the neutron stars spin down to become mature pulsars. After several million years these neutron stars are no longer observed as radiopulsars, perhaps because of large magnetic field decay. However, a substantial fraction of the 10/sup 8/ old dead pulsars in the Galaxy are the most probable source for the isotropically distributed ..gamma..-ray burst detected several times per week at the earth. Some old neutron stars are spun-up by accretion from companions to be resurrected as rapidly spinning low magnetic field radiopulsars. 52 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Trapping induced N{sub eff} and electrical field transformation at different temperatures in neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, V.; Li, Z.; Iljashenko, I.

    1994-02-01

    The trapping of both non-equilibrium electrons and holes by neutron induced deep levels in high resistivity silicon planar detectors have been observed. In the experiments Transient Current and Charge Techniques, with short laser light pulse excitation have been applied at temperature ranges of 77--300 k. Light pulse illumination of the front (p{sup +}) and back (n{sup +}) contacts of the detectors showed effective trapping and detrapping, especially for electrons. At temperatures lower than 150 k, the detrapping becomes non-efficient, and the additional negative charge of trapped electrons in the space charge region (SCR) of the detectors leads to dramatic transformations of the electric field due to the distortion of the effective space charge concentration N{sub eff}. The current and charge pulses transformation data can be explained in terms of extraction of electric field to the central part of the detector from the regions near both contacts. The initial field distribution may be recovered immediately by dropping reverse bias, which injects both electrons and holes into the space charge region. In the paper, the degree of the N{sub eff} distortions among various detectors irradiated by different neutron fluences are compared.

  11. Neutron Emission Generated in the Collision of Plasma Flows in the Presence of an External Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Dudkin, G.N.; Nechaev, B.A.; Padalko, V.N.; Bystritsky, V.M.; Gerasimov, V.V.; Kublikov, R.V.; Parzhitsky, S.S.; Stolupin, V.L.; Vozniak, J.; Veretel'nik, V.I.; Furman, E.G.

    2005-12-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the neutron emission generated in the collision of deuterium plasma flows produced in discharges in crossed E x H fields and propagating in opposite directions in a neutral gas across an external magnetic field. It is shown that the interaction of oppositely propagating deuterium plasma flows gives rise to the generation of soft X-ray emission and neutron emission from the dd reaction (dd {yields} {sup 3}He + n) and is accompanied by an almost complete depolarization of the flows and rapid variations in the magnetic field (at a rate of {approx}10{sup 11} G/s). The measurements were performed at energies and velocities of the flows of up to 600 J and 3.5 x 10{sup 7} cm/s, respectively. The plasma density in each flow was {approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. The upper estimates for the astrophysical S factor and the effective cross sections of the dd reaction obtained from our measurements are compared to theoretical calculations and to the results of experiments performed in the MIG high-current accelerator (Institute of High-Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk)

  12. POPULATION SYNTHESIS OF YOUNG ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS: THE EFFECT OF FALLBACK DISK ACCRETION AND MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Lei; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2013-10-01

    The spin evolution of isolated neutron stars (NSs) is dominated by their magnetic fields. The measured braking indices of young NSs show that the spin-down mechanism due to magnetic dipole radiation with constant magnetic fields is inadequate. Assuming that the NS magnetic field is buried by supernova fallback matter and re-emerges after accretion stops, we carry out a Monte Carlo simulation of the evolution of young NSs, and show that most of the pulsars have braking indices ranging from –1 to 3. The results are compatible with the observational data of NSs associated with supernova remnants. They also suggest that the initial spin periods of NSs might occupy a relatively wide range.

  13. Neutron spectroscopic study of crystalline electric field excitations in stoichiometric and lightly stuffed Yb2Ti2O7

    DOE PAGES

    Gaudet, J.; Maharaj, D. D.; Sala, G.; ...

    2015-10-27

    Time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy has been used to determine the crystalline electric field Hamiltonian, eigenvalues and eigenvectors appropriate to the J=7/2 Yb3+ ion in the candidate quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7. The precise ground state of this exotic, geometrically frustrated magnet is known to be sensitive to weak disorder associated with the growth of single crystals from the melt. Such materials display weak “stuffing,” wherein a small proportion, approximately 2%, of the nonmagnetic Ti4+ sites are occupied by excess Yb3+. We have carried out neutron spectroscopic measurements on a stoichiometric powder sample of Yb2Ti2O7, as well as a crushed singlemore » crystal with weak stuffing and an approximate composition of Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y with x = 0.046. All samples display three crystalline electric field transitions out of the ground state, and the ground state doublet itself is identified as primarily composed of mJ = ±1/2, as expected. However, stuffing at low temperatures in Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y induces a similar finite crystalline electric field lifetime as is induced in stoichiometric Yb2Ti2O7 by elevated temperature. In conclusion, an extended strain field exists about each local “stuffed” site, which produces a distribution of random crystalline electric field environments in the lightly stuffed Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y, in addition to producing a small fraction of Yb ions in defective environments with grossly different crystalline electric field eigenvalues and eigenvectors.« less

  14. Neutron Spectrometer Prospecting in the Mojave Volatiles Project Analog Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Heldmann, J. L.; Colaprete, A.; Hunt, D. R.; Deans, M. C.; Lim, D. S.; Foil, G.; Fong, T.

    2015-01-01

    We know that volatiles are sequestered at the poles of the Moon. While we have evidence of water ice and a number of other compounds based on remote sensing, the detailed distribution, and physical and chemical form are largely unknown. Additional orbital studies of lunar polar volatiles may yield further insights, but the most important next step is to use landed assets to fully characterize the volatile composition and distribution at scales of tens to hundreds of meters. To achieve this range of scales, mobility is needed. Because of the proximity of the Moon, near real-time operation of the surface assets is possible, with an associated reduction in risk and cost. This concept of operations is very different from that of rovers on Mars, and new operational approaches are required to carry out such real-time robotic exploration. The Mojave Volatiles Project (MVP) was a Moon-Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA) program project aimed at (1) determining effective approaches to operating a real-time but short-duration lunar surface robotic mission, and (2) performing prospecting science in a natural setting, as a test of these approaches. Here we describe some results from the first such test, carried out in the Mojave Desert between 16 and 24 October, 2014. The test site was an alluvial fan just E of the Soda Mountains, SW of Baker, California. This site contains desert pavements, ranging from the late Pleistocene to early-Holocene in age. These pavements are undergoing dissection by the ongoing development of washes. A principal objective was to determine the hydration state of different types of desert pavement and bare ground features. The mobility element of the test was provided by the KREX-2 rover, designed and operated by the Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA Ames Research Center. The rover-borne neutron spectrometer measured the neutron albedo at both thermal and epithermal energies. Assuming uniform geochemistry and material bulk density, hydrogen as

  15. Ionisation chamber containing boron as a neutron detector in medical accelerator fields.

    PubMed

    Zielczynski, M; Gryzinski, M A; Golnik, N; Tulik, P

    2007-01-01

    A combination of the recombination principle of H(10) measurements with the use of the ionisation chambers containing boron has been presented, in order to increase the relative sensitivity of the chamber to neutrons by a factor close to the radiation quality factor of photoneutrons. Three types of the chambers were investigated. Two of them were filled with BF(3) and the third one contained electrodes covered with B(4)C. All the chambers were placed in paraffin moderators. The response of the chambers was investigated, depending on gas pressure and polarising voltage. The results showed that it was possible to obtain nearly the same response of the chamber to H(10) for photons and neutrons in a restricted energy range; however, further investigations are needed to make an optimum design.

  16. Development of a quasi-monoenergetic neutron field and measurements of the response function of an organic liquid scintillator for the neutron energy range from 66 to 206 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Noriaki; Kurosawa, Tadahiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Uwamino, Yoshitomo

    2002-01-01

    A quasi-monoenergetic neutron field was developed using a thin 7Li target bombarded by protons in the energy range from 70 to 210 MeV at the RIKEN ring cyclotron facility. The neutron energy spectra were measured with an NE213 organic liquid scintillator using the TOF method. The absolute peak neutron yields were obtained by measurements of 478 keV γ-rays from 7Be nuclei produced in a 7Li target through the 7Li( p,n) 7Be (g.s.+0.429 MeV) reaction. Using the neutron field, the absolute values of the neutron response functions of a 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm long NE213 organic liquid scintillator were measured, and were compared with calculations using a Monte Carlo code developed by Cecil et al. The measured response functions without any wall-effect events were also obtained, and compared with calcualtions using a modified Monte Carlo code. Comparisons between a measurement and a calculation both with and without any wall-effect events gave a good agreement.

  17. A review on the relativistic effective field theory with parameterized couplings for nuclear matter and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, C. A. Zen

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear science has developed many excellent theoretical models for many-body systems in the domain of the baryon-meson strong interaction for the nucleus and nuclear matter at low, medium and high densities. However, a full microscopic understanding of nuclear systems in the extreme density domain of compact stars is still lacking. The aim of this contribution is to shed some light on open questions facing the nuclear many-body problem at the very high density domain. Here we focus our attention on the conceptual issue of naturalness and its role in shaping the baryon-meson phase space dynamics in the description of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and neutrons stars. In particular, in order to stimulate possible new directions of research, we discuss relevant aspects of a recently developed relativistic effective theory for nuclear matter within Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD) with genuine many-body forces and derivative natural parametric couplings. Among other topics we discuss in this work the connection of this theory with other known effective QHD models of the literature and its potentiality in describing a new physics for dense matter. The model with parameterized couplings exhausts the whole fundamental baryon octet (n, p, Σ-, Σ0, Σ+, Λ, Ξ-, Ξ0) and simulates n-order corrections to the minimal Yukawa baryon couplings by considering nonlinear self-couplings of meson fields and meson-meson interaction terms coupled to the baryon fields involving scalar-isoscalar (σ, σ∗), vector-isoscalar (ω, ɸ), vector-isovector (ϱ) and scalar-isovector (δ) virtual sectors. Following recent experimental results, we consider in our calculations the extreme case where the Σ- experiences such a strong repulsion that its influence in the nuclear structure of a neutron star is excluded at all. A few examples of calculations of properties of neutron stars are shown and prospects for the future are discussed.

  18. Development of neutron measurement in high gamma field using new nuclear emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kawarabayashi, J.; Ishihara, K.; Takagi, K.; Tomita, H.; Iguchi, T.; Naka, T.; Morishima, K.; Maeda, S.

    2011-07-01

    To precisely measure the neutron emissions from a spent fuel assembly of a fast breeder reactor, we formed nuclear emulsions based on a non-sensitized Oscillation Project with Emulsion tracking Apparatus (OPERA) film with AgBr grain sizes of 60, 90, and 160 nm. The efficiency for {sup 252}Cf neutron detection of the new emulsion was calculated to be 0.7 x 10{sup -4}, which corresponded to an energy range from 0.3 to 2 MeV and was consistent with a preliminary estimate based on experimental results. The sensitivity of the new emulsion was also experimentally estimated by irradiating with 565 keV and 14 MeV neutrons. The emulsion with an AgBr grain size of 60 nm had the lowest sensitivity among the above three emulsions but was still sensitive enough to detect protons. Furthermore, the experimental data suggested that there was a threshold linear energy transfer of 15 keV/{mu}m for the new emulsion, below which no silver clusters developed. Further development of nuclear emulsion with an AgBr grain size of a few tens of nanometers will be the next stage of the present study. (authors)

  19. Isotope-Identifying neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitenko, Yu. V. Petrenko, A. V.; Gundorin, N. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2015-07-15

    The possibilities of an isotope-indentifying study of layered structures in different regimes of a neutron wave field are considered. The detection of specularly reflected neutrons and secondary radiation (caused by neutron capture) in the form of charged particles, γ quanta, and nuclear fission fragments, as well as neutrons spin-flipped in a noncollinear magnetic field and on nuclei of elements with spin, makes it possible to implement isotope-indentifying neutron reflectometry.

  20. Estimating mixed field effects: an application supporting the lack of a non-linear component for chromosome aberration induction by neutrons.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Biaggi, M; Edwards, A; Ferrari, A; Ottolenghi, A; Pelliccioni, M; Scannicchio, D

    2003-01-01

    The action of neutron fields on biological structures was investigated on the basis of chromosome aberration induction in human cells. Available experimental data on aberration induction by neutrons and their interaction products were reviewed. Present criteria adopted in neutron radiation protection were discussed. The linear coefficient alpha and the quadratic coefficient beta describing dose-response curves for dicentric chromosomes induced by neutrons of different energies were calculated via integration of experimental data on dicentric induction by photons and charged particles into the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA. The predicted values of the linear coefficients for neutron beams of different energies showed good agreement with the corresponding experimental values, whereas the data themselves indicated that the neutron quadratic coefficient cannot be obtained by 'averaging' the beta values of recoil ions and other nuclear reaction products. This supports the hypothesis that neutron induced aberrations increase substantially linearly with dose, a question that has been object of debate for a long time and is still open.

  1. Development of a quasi-monoenergetic neutron field using the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in the energy range from 250 to 390 MeV at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, S; Nakao, N; Nakamura, T; Yashima, H; Iwamoto, Y; Satoh, D; Nakane, Y; Nakashima, H; Itoga, T; Tamii, A; Hatanaka, K

    2007-01-01

    A quasi-monoenergetic neutron field using the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction has been developed at the ring cyclotron facility at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. Neutrons were generated from a 10-mm-thick Li target injected by 250, 350 and 392 MeV protons and neutrons produced at 0 degrees were extracted into the time-of-flight (TOF) room of 100-m length through the concrete collimator of 10 x 12 cm aperture and 150 cm thickness. The neutron energy spectra were measured by a 12.7-cm diam x 12.7-cm long NE213 organic liquid scintillator using the TOF method. The peak neutron fluence was 1.94 x 10(10), 1.07 x 10(10) and 1.50 x 10(10) n sr(-1) per muC of 250, 350 and 392 MeV protons, respectively. The neutron spectra generated from various thick (stopping length) targets of carbon, aluminium, iron and lead, bombarded by 250 and 350 MeV protons, were also measured with the TOF method. Although these measurements were performed to obtain thick target neutron yields, they are also used as a continuous energy neutron field. These neutron fields are very useful for characterising neutron detectors, measuring neutron cross sections, testing irradiation effects for various materials and performing neutron shielding experiments.

  2. Dipolar structures in magnetite ferrofluids studied with small-angle neutron scattering with and without applied magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Klokkenburg, M.; Erne, B. H.; Petukhov, A. V.; Philipse, A. P.; Wiedenmann, A.

    2007-05-15

    Field-induced structure formation in a ferrofluid with well-defined magnetite nanoparticles with a permanent magnetic dipole moment was studied with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a function of the magnetic interactions. The interactions were tuned by adjusting the size of the well-defined, single-magnetic-domain magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) particles and by applying an external magnetic field. For decreasing particle dipole moments, the data show a progressive distortion of the hexagonal symmetry, resulting from the formation of magnetic sheets. The SANS data show qualitative agreement with recent cryogenic transmission electron microscopy results obtained in 2D [Klokkenburg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 185702 (2006)] on the same ferrofluids.

  3. Organ dose conversion coefficients for pediatric reference computational phantoms in external photon radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lienard A.

    In the event of a radiological accident or attack, it is important to estimate the organ doses to those exposed. In general, it is difficult to measure organ dose directly in the field and therefore dose conversion coefficients (DCC) are needed to convert measurable values such as air kerma to organ dose. Previous work on these coefficients has been conducted mainly for adults with a focus on radiation protection workers. Hence, there is a large gap in the literature for pediatric values. This study coupled a Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code with International Council of Radiological Protection (ICRP)-adopted University of Florida and National Cancer Institute pediatric reference phantoms to calculate a comprehensive list of dose conversion coefficients (mGy/mGy) to convert air-kerma to organ dose. Parameters included ten phantoms (newborn, 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year old male and female), 28 organs over 33 energies between 0.01 and 20 MeV in six (6) irradiation geometries relevant to a child who might be exposed to a radiological release: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right-lateral (RLAT), left-lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). Dose conversion coefficients to the red bone marrow over 36 skeletal sites were also calculated. It was hypothesized that the pediatric organ dose conversion coefficients would follow similar trends to the published adult values as dictated by human anatomy, but be of a higher magnitude. It was found that while the pediatric coefficients did yield similar patterns to that of the adult coefficients, depending on the organ and irradiation geometry, the pediatric values could be lower or higher than that of the adult coefficients.

  4. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Lin, Y; Tsai, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  5. New Hyperon Equations of State for Supernovae and Neutron Stars in Density-dependent Hadron Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Sarmistha; Hempel, Matthias; Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2014-10-01

    We develop new hyperon equation of state (EoS) tables for core-collapse supernova simulations and neutron stars. These EoS tables are based on a density-dependent relativistic hadron field theory where baryon-baryon interaction is mediated by mesons, using the parameter set DD2 for nucleons. Furthermore, light and heavy nuclei along with interacting nucleons are treated in the nuclear statistical equilibrium model of Hempel and Schaffner-Bielich which includes excluded volume effects. Of all possible hyperons, we consider only the contribution of Λs. We have developed two variants of hyperonic EoS tables: in the npΛphi case the repulsive hyperon-hyperon interaction mediated by the strange phi meson is taken into account, and in the npΛ case it is not. The EoS tables for the two cases encompass a wide range of densities (10-12 to ~1 fm-3), temperatures (0.1 to 158.48 MeV), and proton fractions (0.01 to 0.60). The effects of Λ hyperons on thermodynamic quantities such as free energy per baryon, pressure, or entropy per baryon are investigated and found to be significant at higher densities. The cold, β-equilibrated EoS (with the crust included self-consistently) results in a 2.1 M ⊙ maximum mass neutron star for the npΛphi case, whereas that for the npΛ case is 1.95 M ⊙. The npΛphi EoS represents the first supernova EoS table involving hyperons that is directly compatible with the recently measured 2 M ⊙ neutron stars.

  6. NEW HYPERON EQUATIONS OF STATE FOR SUPERNOVAE AND NEUTRON STARS IN DENSITY-DEPENDENT HADRON FIELD THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Banik, Sarmistha; Hempel, Matthias; Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2014-10-01

    We develop new hyperon equation of state (EoS) tables for core-collapse supernova simulations and neutron stars. These EoS tables are based on a density-dependent relativistic hadron field theory where baryon-baryon interaction is mediated by mesons, using the parameter set DD2 for nucleons. Furthermore, light and heavy nuclei along with interacting nucleons are treated in the nuclear statistical equilibrium model of Hempel and Schaffner-Bielich which includes excluded volume effects. Of all possible hyperons, we consider only the contribution of Λs. We have developed two variants of hyperonic EoS tables: in the npΛφ case the repulsive hyperon-hyperon interaction mediated by the strange φ meson is taken into account, and in the npΛ case it is not. The EoS tables for the two cases encompass a wide range of densities (10{sup –12} to ∼1 fm{sup –3}), temperatures (0.1 to 158.48 MeV), and proton fractions (0.01 to 0.60). The effects of Λ hyperons on thermodynamic quantities such as free energy per baryon, pressure, or entropy per baryon are investigated and found to be significant at higher densities. The cold, β-equilibrated EoS (with the crust included self-consistently) results in a 2.1 M {sub ☉} maximum mass neutron star for the npΛφ case, whereas that for the npΛ case is 1.95 M {sub ☉}. The npΛφ EoS represents the first supernova EoS table involving hyperons that is directly compatible with the recently measured 2 M {sub ☉} neutron stars.

  7. New calculations of the atmospheric cosmic radiation field--results for neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Clem, J M; De Angelis, G; Goldhagen, P; Wilson, J W

    2004-01-01

    The propagation of primary cosmic rays through the Earth's atmosphere and the energy spectra of the resulting secondary particles have been calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA with several novel auxiliary methods. Solar-modulated primary cosmic ray spectra were determined through an analysis of simultaneous proton and helium measurements made on spacecraft or high-altitude balloon flights. Primary protons and helium ions are generated within the rigidity range of 0.5 GV-20 TV, uniform in cos2theta. For a given location, primaries above the effective angle-dependent geomagnetic cut-off rigidity, and re-entrant albedo protons, are transported through the atmosphere. Helium ions are initially transported using a separate transport code called HEAVY to simulate fragmentation. HEAVY interfaces with FLUKA to provide interaction starting points for each nucleon originating from a helium nucleus. Calculated cosmic ray neutron spectra and consequent dosimetric quantities for locations with a wide range of altitude (atmospheric depth) and geomagnetic cut-off are presented and compared with measurements made on a high-altitude aeroplane. Helium ion propagation using HEAVY and inclusion of re-entrant albedo protons with the incident primary spectra significantly improved the agreement of the calculated cosmic ray neutron spectra with measured spectra. These cosmic ray propagation calculations provide the basis for a new atmospheric ionising radiation (AIR) model for air-crew dosimetry, calculation of effects on microelectronics, production of cosmogenic radionuclides and other uses.

  8. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs.

    PubMed

    Pomp, S; Bartlett, D T; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Röttger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-10-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe.

  9. SUPER STRONG MAGNETIC FIELDS OF NEUTRON STARS IN BE X-RAY BINARIES ESTIMATED WITH NEW TORQUE AND MAGNETOSPHERE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-11-10

    We re-estimate the surface magnetic fields of neutron stars (NSs) in Be X-ray binaries (BeXBs) with different models of torque, improved beyond Klus et al. In particular, a new torque model is applied to three models of magnetosphere radius. Unlike the previous models, the new torque model does not lead to divergent results for any fastness parameter. The inferred surface magnetic fields of these NSs for the two compressed magnetosphere models are much higher than that for the uncompressed magnetosphere model. The new torque model using the compressed magnetosphere radius leads to unique solutions near spin equilibrium in all cases, unlike other models that usually give two branches of solutions. Although our conclusions are still affected by the simplistic assumptions about the magnetosphere radius calculations, we show several groups of possible surface magnetic field values with our new models when the interaction between the magnetosphere and the infalling accretion plasma is considered. The estimated surface magnetic fields for NSs BeXBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Milk Way are between the quantum critical field and the maximum “virial” value by the spin equilibrium condition.

  10. Comparison of out-of-field photon doses in 6 MV IMRT and neutron doses in proton therapy for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, Basit S.; Bednarz, Bryan; Seco, Joao; Hancox, Cindy; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess lateral out-of-field doses in 6 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) and compare them with secondary neutron equivalent dose contributions in proton therapy. We simulated out-of-field photon doses to various organs as a function of distance, patient's age, gender and treatment volumes based on 3, 6, 9 cm field diameters in the head and neck and spine region. The out-of-field photon doses to organs near the field edge were found to be in the range of 2, 5 and 10 mSv Gy-1 for 3 cm, 6 cm and 9 cm diameter IMRT fields, respectively, within 5 cm of the field edge. Statistical uncertainties calculated in organ doses vary from 0.2% to 40% depending on the organ location and the organ volume. Next, a comparison was made with previously calculated neutron equivalent doses from proton therapy using identical field arrangements. For example, out-of-field doses for IMRT to lung and uterus (organs close to the 3 cm diameter spinal field) were computed to be 0.63 and 0.62 mSv Gy-1, respectively. These numbers are found to be a factor of 2 smaller than the corresponding out-of-field doses for proton therapy, which were estimated to be 1.6 and 1.7 mSv Gy-1 (RBE), respectively. However, as the distance to the field edge increases beyond approximately 25 cm the neutron equivalent dose from proton therapy was found to be a factor of 2-3 smaller than the out-of-field photon dose from IMRT. We have also analyzed the neutron equivalent doses from an ideal scanned proton therapy (assuming not significant amount of absorbers in the treatment head). Out-of-field doses were found to be an order of magnitude smaller compared to out-of-field doses in IMRT or passive scattered proton therapy. In conclusion, there seem to be three geometrical areas when comparing the out-of-target dose from IMRT and (passive scattered) proton treatments. Close to the target (in-field, not analyzed here) protons offer a distinct advantage due to the lower

  11. Neutron spectroscopic study of Crystal-field excitation in Yb2 (Ti2 - x Ybx) O7 -x/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudet, Jonathan; Maharaj, Dalini; Kermarrec, Edwin; Granroth, Garrett; Ross, Kate; Dabowska, Hanna; Gaulin, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Among the rare-earth titanate pyrochlores, Yb2 Ti2O7 has attracted much attention as a potential realization of a quantum spin ice. While strong quantum effects are absent in classical spin ice compounds, they are thought to be significant in Yb2 Ti2O7 because of its effective spin S=1/2 and its XY spin anisotropy, quantities both determined by the Crystal-Electric Field (CEF) levels. However, a thorough neutron spectroscopy study of the CEF levels is still lacking. Here, we report time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Yb2 Ti2O7 . Our results lead to the unambiguous determination of the CEF levels, the ground-state wavefunction and therefore the nature of the spin anisotropy of the J=7/2 Yb3+ . A significant sample dependence in the low temperature heat capacity has been reported and attributed to an excess of Yb3+ (''stuffing'') in the structure. Our measurements, carried out on two well-characterized samples with different levels of stuffing, allow us to discuss the impact of such disorder on the CEF levels.

  12. Crystal electric field excitations in the quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Pinaki; Lory, P. -F.; Flint, R.; ...

    2017-02-07

    Here, we have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of the quasicrystal approximant, TbCd6, grown using isotopically enriched 112Cd. Both quasielastic scattering and distinct inelastic excitations were observed below 3 meV. The intensity of the quasielastic scattering measured in the paramag- netic phase diverges as TN ~ 22 K is approached from above. The inelastic excitations, and their evolution with temperature, are well characterized by the leading term, Bmore » $$0\\atop{2}$$O$$0\\atop{2}$$, of the crystalline electric field (CEF) level scheme for local pentagonal symmetry for the rare-earth ions [1] indicating that the Tb moment is directed primarily along the unique local pseudo-five-fold axis of the Tsai-type clusters. We also find good agreement between the inverse susceptibility determined from magnetization measurements using a magnetically diluted Tb0.05Y0.95Cd6 sample and that calculated using the CEF level scheme determined from the neutron measurements.« less

  13. Crystal electric field excitations in the quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pinaki; Lory, P.-F.; Flint, R.; Kong, T.; Hiroto, T.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; de Boissieu, M.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2017-02-01

    We have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of the quasicrystal approximant, TbCd6, grown using isotopically enriched 112Cd. Both quasielastic scattering and distinct inelastic excitations were observed below 3 meV. The intensity of the quasielastic scattering measured in the paramagnetic phase diverges as TN˜22 K is approached from above. The inelastic excitations, and their evolution with temperature, are well characterized by the leading term, B20O20 , of the crystal electric field (CEF) level scheme for local pentagonal symmetry for the rare-earth ions [S. Jazbec et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 054208 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.054208] indicating that the Tb moment is directed primarily along the unique local pseudofivefold axis of the Tsai-type clusters. We also find good agreement between the inverse susceptibility determined from magnetization measurements using a magnetically diluted Tb0.05Y0.95Cd6 sample and that calculated using the CEF level scheme determined from the neutron measurements.

  14. Crystal field excitations in CeCu2Ge2: Revisited employing a single crystal and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenhaupt, Michael; Faulhaber, Enrico; Schneidewind, Astrid; Deppe, Micha; Hradil, Klaudia

    2012-04-01

    The intermetallic compound, CeCu2Ge2, is the counterpart of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2. CeCu2Ge2 is a magnetically ordering (TN = 4.1K) Kondo lattice with a moderate Sommerfeld coefficient of 140 mJ/ molK2. Earlier inelastic neutron measurements on a polycrystalline sample revealed a doublet ground state and a quasi-quartet excited state at 16.5 meV, although a splitting of the 4f1 (J = 5/2) ground state multiplet into 3 doublets is expected from the point symmetry of the Ce3+ ions. We performed detailed inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a single crystal at the thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA at FRM II for different crystallographic directions. From our results we infer that the quasi-quartet, in fact, consists of two doublets at 17.0 and 18.3 meV which exhibit a strong directional dependence of their transition matrix elements to the ground state doublet. Finally, we will present a new set of crystal field parameters.

  15. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  16. Charge and matter form factors of two-neutron halo nuclei in halo effective field theory at next-to-leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2017-02-01

    By using halo effective field theory (EFT), an expansion in Rcore/Rhalo , where Rcore is the radius of the core and Rhalo the radius of the halo nucleus, the charge and neutron form factors of the two-neutron halo nuclei 11Li, 14Be, and 22C are calculated to next-to-leading order (NLO) by treating them as an effective three-body system. From the form factors, the point-charge and point-matter radii, inter-neutron distances, and neutron opening angles are extracted. Agreement is found with existing experimental extractions. Results are given for the point-charge and point-matter radii for arbitrary neutron core scattering effective range ρc n, which can be used for predictions once ρc n is measured. Estimates for ρc n are also used to make NLO predictions. Finally, the point-charge radii of this work are compared with other halo-EFT predictions, and setting the core mass equal to the neutron mass the point-charge radius is found to agree with an analytical prediction in the unitary limit.

  17. Magnetic tunnel junction based out-of-plane field sensor with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in reference layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Chao, C. T.; Li, L. C.; Suen, Y. W.; Horng, Lance; Wu, Te-Ho; Chang, C. R.; Wu, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    A magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with orthogonal magnetic anisotropy and consisting of Ta X/Co40Fe40B20 1.2 (reference)/MgO 2.0/Co20Fe60B20 2.3 (sensing)/Ta 5/Ru 5 (thickness in nanometers), where X ranges from 15 to 30, is proposed and investigated in response to the demand for out-of-plane field sensors. The reference layer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) demonstrates tuneable coercivity ranging from 72 Oe to 175 Oe. The sensing layer exhibits in-plane anisotropy with the avoidance of exchange coupling from the PMA reference layer because of a thick MgO barrier layer. The magnetization reversal behavior of micron scale devices not only corresponds well to the sheet film, but is also independent in terms of shape and size. The magnetoresistance curve exhibits a ratio of ˜27% in the presence of a perpendicular field and is insensitive to the in-plane field. For perpendicular field sensing, the dynamic range with a sensitivity of ˜0.3%/Oe can achieve ±25 Oe with a coercive field of less than 3 Oe. Additionally, even when bias is applied up to 9.1 mV, magnetic fluctuation still stays below 0.15 mOe.

  18. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Tessa, C La; Berger, T; Kaderka, R; Schardt, D; Burmeister, S; Labrenz, J; Reitz, G; Durante, M

    2014-04-21

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient's body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm³ cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence ⁶LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and ⁷LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ≤ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 < E < 10 MeV during the treatment with scanned carbon ions. The highest yield of thermal neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same

  19. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Tessa, C.; Berger, T.; Kaderka, R.; Schardt, D.; Burmeister, S.; Labrenz, J.; Reitz, G.; Durante, M.

    2014-04-01

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient’s body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm3 cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence 6LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and 7LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ⩽ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 < E < 10 MeV during the treatment with scanned carbon ions. The highest yield of thermal neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order

  20. In vivo observation of tree drought response with low-field NMR and neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-05-06

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. Lastly, these results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment.

  1. Neutron spectroscopic study of crystalline electric field excitations in stoichiometric and lightly stuffed Yb2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudet, J.; Maharaj, D. D.; Sala, G.; Kermarrec, E.; Ross, K. A.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Granroth, G. E.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2015-10-01

    Time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy has been used to determine the crystalline electric field (CEF) Hamiltonian, eigenvalues and eigenvectors appropriate to the J =7 /2 Yb3 + ion in the candidate quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7 . The precise ground state (GS) of this exotic, geometrically frustrated magnet is known to be sensitive to weak disorder associated with the growth of single crystals from the melt. Such materials display weak "stuffing," wherein a small proportion, ≈2 % , of the nonmagnetic Ti4 + sites are occupied by excess Yb3 +. We have carried out neutron spectroscopic measurements on a stoichiometric powder sample of Yb2Ti2O7 , as well as a crushed single crystal with weak stuffing and an approximate composition of Yb2 +xTi2 -xO7 +y with x =0.046 . All samples display three CEF transitions out of the GS, and the GS doublet itself is identified as primarily composed of mJ=±1 /2 , as expected. However, stuffing at low temperatures in Yb2 +xTi2 -xO7 +y induces a similar finite CEF lifetime as is induced in stoichiometric Yb2Ti2O7 by elevated temperature. We conclude that an extended strain field exists about each local "stuffed" site, which produces a distribution of random CEF environments in the lightly stuffed Yb2 +xTi2 -xO7 +y , in addition to producing a small fraction of Yb ions in defective environments with grossly different CEF eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  2. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2012-07-01

    account the shielding of the core potential for outer electrons by inner electrons, and an optimal finite-element decomposition of each individual longitudinal wave function. These measures largely enhance the convergence properties compared to the previous code, and lead to speed-ups by factors up to two orders of magnitude compared with the implementation of the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method used by Engel and Wunner in [D. Engel, G. Wunner, Phys. Rev. A 78 (2008) 032515]. New version program summaryProgram title: HFFER II Catalogue identifier: AECC_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: v 55 130 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 293 700 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 Computer: Cluster of 1-13 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Linux Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI directives. RAM: 1 GByte per node Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, BLAS, FMlib (included in the package) Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECC_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 302 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Quantitative modellings of features observed in the X-ray spectra of isolated magnetic neutron stars are hampered by the lack of sufficiently large and accurate databases for atoms and ions up to the last fusion product, iron, at strong magnetic field strengths. Our code is intended to provide a powerful tool for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of medium-Z atoms and ions at neutron star magnetic field strengths with sufficient accuracy in a routine way to create such databases. Solution method: The

  3. A review on the relativistic effective field theory with parameterized couplings for nuclear matter and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcellos, C. A. Zen

    2015-12-17

    Nuclear science has developed many excellent theoretical models for many-body systems in the domain of the baryon-meson strong interaction for the nucleus and nuclear matter at low, medium and high densities. However, a full microscopic understanding of nuclear systems in the extreme density domain of compact stars is still lacking. The aim of this contribution is to shed some light on open questions facing the nuclear many-body problem at the very high density domain. Here we focus our attention on the conceptual issue of naturalness and its role in shaping the baryon-meson phase space dynamics in the description of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and neutrons stars. In particular, in order to stimulate possible new directions of research, we discuss relevant aspects of a recently developed relativistic effective theory for nuclear matter within Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD) with genuine many-body forces and derivative natural parametric couplings. Among other topics we discuss in this work the connection of this theory with other known effective QHD models of the literature and its potentiality in describing a new physics for dense matter. The model with parameterized couplings exhausts the whole fundamental baryon octet (n, p, Σ{sup −}, Σ{sup 0}, Σ{sup +}, Λ, Ξ{sup −}, Ξ{sup 0}) and simulates n-order corrections to the minimal Yukawa baryon couplings by considering nonlinear self-couplings of meson fields and meson-meson interaction terms coupled to the baryon fields involving scalar-isoscalar (σ, σ∗), vector-isoscalar (ω, Φ), vector-isovector (ϱ) and scalar-isovector (δ) virtual sectors. Following recent experimental results, we consider in our calculations the extreme case where the Σ{sup −} experiences such a strong repulsion that its influence in the nuclear structure of a neutron star is excluded at all. A few examples of calculations of properties of neutron stars are shown and prospects for the future are discussed.

  4. Study of microdosimetric energy deposition patterns in tissue-equivalent medium due to low-energy neutron fields using a graphite-walled proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Waker, A J; Aslam

    2011-06-01

    To improve radiation protection dosimetry for low-energy neutron fields encountered in nuclear power reactor environments, there is increasing interest in modeling neutron energy deposition in metrological instruments such as tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs). Along with these computational developments, there is also a need for experimental data with which to benchmark and test the results obtained from the modeling methods developed. The experimental work described in this paper is a study of the energy deposition in tissue-equivalent (TE) medium using an in-house built graphite-walled proportional counter (GPC) filled with TE gas. The GPC is a simple model of a standard TEPC because the response of the counter at these energies is almost entirely due to the neutron interactions in the sensitive volume of the counter. Energy deposition in tissue spheres of diameter 1, 2, 4 and 8 µm was measured in low-energy neutron fields below 500 keV. We have observed a continuously increasing trend in microdosimetric averages with an increase in neutron energy. The values of these averages decrease as we increase the simulated diameter at a given neutron energy. A similar trend for these microdosimetric averages has been observed for standard TEPCs and the Rossi-type, TE, spherical wall-less counter filled with propane-based TE gas in the same energy range. This implies that at the microdosimetric level, in the neutron energy range we employed in this study, the pattern of average energy deposited by starter and insider proton recoil events in the gas is similar to those generated cumulatively by crosser and stopper events originating from the counter wall plus starter and insider recoil events originating in the sensitive volume of a TEPC.

  5. Magnetic Transitions in Iron Porphyrin Halides by Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Ab-initio Studies of Zero-Field Splittings

    DOE PAGES

    Stavretis, Shelby E.; Atanasov, Mihail; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; ...

    2015-10-02

    Zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters of nondeuterated metalloporphyrins [Fe(TPP)X] (X = F, Br, I; H2TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin) are determined by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The ZFS values are D = 4.49(9) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)F], and D = 8.8(2) cm–1, E = 0.1(2) cm–1 and D = 13.4(6) cm–1, E = 0.3(6) cm–1 for monoclinic polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Br] and [Fe(TPP)I], respectively. Along with our recent report of the ZFS value of D = 6.33(8) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Cl], these data provide a rare, complete determination of ZFS parameters in a metalloporphyrin halide series. The electronic structure of [Fe(TPP)X] (X =more » F, Cl, Br, I) has been studied by multireference ab initio methods: the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and the N-electron valence perturbation theory (NEVPT2) with the aim of exploring the origin of the large and positive zero-field splitting D of the 6A1 ground state. D was calculated from wave functions of the electronic multiplets spanned by the d5 configuration of Fe(III) along with spin–orbit coupling accounted for by quasi degenerate perturbation theory. Results reproduce trends of D from inelastic neutron scattering data increasing in the order from F, Cl, Br, to I. A mapping of energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the S = 3/2 excited states on ligand field theory was used to characterize the σ- and π-antibonding effects decreasing from F to I. This is in agreement with similar results deduced from ab initio calculations on CrX63- complexes and also with the spectrochemical series showing a decrease of the ligand field in the same directions. A correlation is found between the increase of D and decrease of the π- and σ-antibonding energies eλX (λ = σ, π) in the series from X = F to I. Analysis of this correlation using second-order perturbation theory expressions in terms of angular overlap parameters rationalizes the experimentally deduced trend

  6. Relativistic dynamics of superfluid-superconducting mixtures in the presence of topological defects and an electromagnetic field with application to neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakov, M. E.; Dommes, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    The relativistic dynamic equations are derived for a superfluid-superconducting mixture coupled to an electromagnetic field. For definiteness, and bearing in mind possible applications of our results to neutron stars, it is assumed that the mixture is composed of superfluid neutrons, superconducting protons, and normal electrons. We analyze the proton superconductivity of both types I and II and allow for the possible presence of neutron and proton vortices (or magnetic domains in the case of type-I proton superconductivity). The derived equations neglect all dissipative effects except for the mutual friction dissipation and are valid for arbitrary temperatures (i.e., they do not imply that all nucleons are paired), which is especially important for magnetar conditions. It is demonstrated that these general equations can be substantially simplified for typical neutron stars, for which a kind of magnetohydrodynamic approximation is justified. Our results are compared to the nonrelativistic formulations existing in the literature, and a number of discrepancies are found. In particular, it is shown that, generally, the electric displacement D does not coincide with the electric field E , contrary to what is stated in previous works. The relativistic framework developed here is easily extendable to account for more sophisticated microphysics models, and it provides the necessary basis for realistic modeling of neutron stars.

  7. Advantages of passive detectors for the determination of the cosmic ray induced neutron environment.

    PubMed

    Hajek, M; Berger, T; Schöner, W; Vana, N

    2002-01-01

    Due to the pronounced energy dependence of the neutron quality factor, accurate assessment of the biologically relevant dose requires knowledge of the spectral neutron fluence rate. Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) are the only instruments which provide a sufficient response over practically the whole energy range of the cosmic ray induced neutron component. Measurements in a 62 MeV proton beam at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, and in the CERN-EU high-energy reference field led to the assumption that conventional active devices for the detection of thermal neutrons inside the BSS, e.g. 6Lil(Eu) scintillators, also respond to charged particles when used in high-energy mixed radiation fields. The effects of these particles cannot be suppressed by amplitude discrimination and are subsequently misinterpreted as neutron radiation. In contrast, paired TLD-600 and TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosemeters allow the determination of a net thermal neutron signal.

  8. Field Characterization of Potential Reference Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico: Chemical and Biological Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Jed G. Campbell, Peggy S. Harris, Darrin D. Dantin, Steve S. Foss, Robert L. Quarles, James C. Moore and Cynthia A. Chancy. Submitted. Characterization of Potential Reference Areas in the Gulf of Mexico: Near-Coastal Sediment Chemical and Biological Quality. En...

  9. Efficient Location of Research Reference Sources in the Field of Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Pat; Jay, Danielle

    More than 45 basic dance reference research sources that would be useful to students, scholars, teachers, historians, and therapists are discussed in this bibliographic essay. Aspects of dance covered include choreography, criticism, teaching principles, aesthetic theory, dance therapy, and history. Sources are grouped by type: dictionaries and…

  10. Field-Tested Reference Materials: A Survey of What Has Worked Best.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Brenda; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 33 reference items--including several CD-ROM products--published during 1991-92 that were recommended by librarians. Materials are listed in the following areas: general works; business, science, and technology; fine arts; history and genealogy; medicine and health; and social sciences and humanities. A…

  11. Good Medical Practice for Drugs. Definition, Guidelines, References, Field of Action and Applications.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    Proper use of drugs can be defined as the use of the right product, in a correct dosage, during an adequate length of time, for a given patient and provided he has no serious side effects. It is virtually impossible, with such a number of drugs, such a number of clinical situations to prescribe adequately without using references or guidelines. References may lead to a unique choice, when the diagnosis is certain and the drug to be given is unique. With a good initial and continuous medical education, doctors can take easily this type of decision. The Summary of Products Characteristics (SPC) helps them; by sticking to this fundamental reference, prescription might be more precise and safe. In a lot of clinical situations the choice between a large numbers of therapeutic strategies necessitates use of a guideline based on scientific knowledge. Finally, a given therapeutic strategy can be as effective as and considerably less expensive than another. In such cases, payers can drive doctors to the prescription of the less expensive strategy. Some difficulties are common to all references and guidelines.

  12. Sc and neutron-capture abundances in Galactic low- and high-α field halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishlock, C. K.; Yong, D.; Karakas, A. I.; Alves-Brito, A.; Meléndez, J.; Nissen, P. E.; Kobayashi, C.; Casey, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    We determine relative abundance ratios for the neutron-capture elements Zr, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu for a sample of 27 Galactic dwarf stars with -1.5 < [Fe/H] <-0.8. We also measure the iron-peak element Sc. These stars separate into three populations (low- and high-α halo and thick-disc stars) based on the [α/Fe] abundance ratio and their kinematics as discovered by Nissen & Schuster. We find differences between the low- and high-α groups in the abundance ratios of [Sc/Fe], [Zr/Fe], [La/Zr], [Y/Eu], and [Ba/Eu] when including Y and Ba from Nissen & Schuster. For all ratios except [La/Zr], the low-α stars have a lower abundance compared to the high-α stars. The low-α stars display the same abundance patterns of high [Ba/Y] and low [Y/Eu] as observed in present-day dwarf spheroidal galaxies, although with smaller abundance differences, when compared to the high-α stars. These distinct chemical patterns have been attributed to differences in the star formation rate between the two populations and the contribution of low-metallicity, low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to the low-α population. By comparing the low-α population with AGB stellar models, we place constraints on the mass range of the AGB stars.

  13. Fringe field interference of neighbor magnets in China spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Kang, W.; Wu, X.; Deng, C. D.; Li, S.; Yang, M.; Zhou, J. X.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wu, Y. W.

    2016-12-01

    In CSNS accelerator construction, the field measurement of all RCS magnets have been finished and the magnets have been installed in the tunnel before the end of 2015. The electromagnetic quadrupoles have a large aperture and the core-to-core distance between magnets is rather short in some places. The corrector magnet or the sextupole magnet is closer to one of the quadrupole magnets which caused certain interference. The interference caused by magnetic fringe field has been appeared and it becomes a significant issue in beam dynamics for beam loss control in this high-intensity proton accelerator. We have performed 3D computing simulations to study integral field distributions between the quadrupole and the corrector magnets, and the sextupole and the other quadrupole magnets. The effect of the magnetic fringe field and the interference has been investigated with different distances of the neighbor magnets. The simulation and the field measurement results will be introduced in this paper.

  14. Methodology and Determination of Field of View of Neutron and Gamma Detectors in the Atucha Spent Fuel Storage Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W; Wenner, M; Haghighat, A; Sitaraman, S; Ham, Y S

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we seek to create a model by determining the field of view (FOV) of a detector (i.e. which assemblies contribute to the detector response) in the Atucha-I spent fuel pool. The FOV is determined by solving the adjoint transport equation using the 3-D, parallel PENTRAN (Parallel Environment Neutral-particle TRANsport) Sn code, with the detector cross section as the adjoint source. If this adjoint function is coupled with the source spectrum, then the contribution to the detector from each assembly can be determined. First, the reactor criticality was modeled using the MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) Monte Carlo code in order to determine the power distribution in each assembly. Using the power distribution data, the assemblies were divided and homogenized into 8 axial and 3 radial zones for burnup analysis. Depletion calculations were performed for each zone using the ORIGEN-ARP (Automatic Rapid Processing) utility from the SCALE 5.1 (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code package. Spent fuel pool and detector were modeled in 2-D in PENTRAN as the detector plus 3 fuel assemblies along both x and y axes. Using the resulting adjoint function combined with the source spectrum, they have determined the FOVs of the fission chamber neutron detector that was used at Atucha, and concluded that 2 assemblies along x and y axes are needed for both cases (i.e. the 4 adjacent assemblies plus the next surrounding 12). For the neutron detector, 88% of the response comes from the nearest 4 assemblies, with 99% from the nearest 16. Results for a uniformly sensitive gamma detector indicate that 2 assemblies in both directions are also needed, with 89% of the response coming from the adjacent assemblies. A Monte Carlo calculation using MCNP was performed to benchmark the neutron result, giving a similar result (87% MCNP vs. 88% PENTRAN). Based on these studies, we have developed a database of FOVs as a function of burnup and decay conditions for

  15. Study of the effect of high dose rate on tissue equivalent proportional counter microdosimetric measurements in mixed photon and neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam; Qashua, N.; Waker, A. J.

    2011-10-01

    This study describes the measurement of lineal energy spectra carried out with a 5.1 cm (2 in.) diameter spherical tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) simulating 2 μm tissue equivalent (TE) site diameter in low energy mixed photon-neutron fields with varying dose rates generated by employing the McMaster University 1.25 MV double stage Tandetron accelerator. The 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction was employed to generate a variety of mixed fields of photons and low energy neutrons using proton beam energy ranging 1.89-2.56 MeV. The dose rate at a given beam energy was varied by changing the beam current. Dose rates that resulted in dead times as high as 75% were employed to study the effect of dose rate on quality, microdosimetric averages ( y¯F and y¯D), absorbed dose and dose equivalent. We have observed that high dose rates due to both photons and neutrons in a mixed field of radiation result in pile up of pulses and distort the lineal energy spectrum measured under these conditions. The pile up effect and hence the distortion in the lineal energy spectrum becomes prominent with dose rates, which result in dead times larger than 25% for the high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation component. Intense neutron fields, which may amount to 75% dead time, could result in a 50% or even larger increase in the values of the microsdosimetric averages and the neutron quality factor. This study demonstrates moderate dose rates that do not result in dead times of more than 20-25% due to either of the component radiation or due to both components of mixed field radiation generate results that are acceptable for radiation monitoring.

  16. New developments in APSTNG neutron probe diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) show potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and can yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. The gamma-ray dector and neutron generator can be located on the same side of the interrogated object, so spaces behind walls and other confirmed areas can be inspected. No collimators or radiation shielding are needed, the neutron generator is relatively simple and small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. A complete system could be transported in an automotive van. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Inspection applications have been investigated for presence of cocaine in propane tanks, uranium and plutonium smuggling, and radioactive and toxic waste characterization. An advanced APSTNG tube is being designed and constructed that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux.

  17. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global

  18. [Dietary reference intakes of trace elements for Japanese and problems in clinical fields].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    In the dietary reference intakes, EAR(estimated average requirement), RDA(recommended dietary allowance), AL(adequate intake), DG(tentative dietary goal for preventing life style related diseases) and UL(tolerable upper intake level) of eight types of trace elements (iron: Fe, zinc: Zn, copper: Cu, manganese: Mn, iodine: I, selenium: Se, chromium: Cr, molybdenum: Mo) have been set. However, in the meals of hospitals, only iron of which has been taken into account. The content of these trace elements in the enteral nutrient released after 2000 was determined by considering the content of dietary reference intakes of trace elements for Japanese and considered so not fall into deficiency. However, enteral nutrient must be used considering the content of Zn, Cu and the Zn/Cu ratio, the selenium content, and the route of administration, in order to avoid falling into deficiency.

  19. Phase space representation of neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field in relation to solar activity in cycles 21 and 22.

    PubMed

    Silva, H G; Lopes, I

    Heliospheric modulation of galactic cosmic rays links solar cycle activity with neutron monitor count rate on earth. A less direct relation holds between neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field because different atmospheric processes, including fluctuations in the ionosphere, are involved. Although a full quantitative model is still lacking, this link is supported by solid statistical evidence. Thus, a connection between the solar cycle activity and atmospheric electric field is expected. To gain a deeper insight into these relations, sunspot area (NOAA, USA), neutron monitor count rate (Climax, Colorado, USA), and atmospheric electric field (Lisbon, Portugal) are presented here in a phase space representation. The period considered covers two solar cycles (21, 22) and extends from 1978 to 1990. Two solar maxima were observed in this dataset, one in 1979 and another in 1989, as well as one solar minimum in 1986. Two main observations of the present study were: (1) similar short-term topological features of the phase space representations of the three variables, (2) a long-term phase space radius synchronization between the solar cycle activity, neutron monitor count rate, and potential gradient (confirmed by absolute correlation values above ~0.8). Finally, the methodology proposed here can be used for obtaining the relations between other atmospheric parameters (e.g., solar radiation) and solar cycle activity.

  20. Out-of-field neutron and leakage photon exposures and the associated risk of second cancers in high-energy photon radiotherapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Takam, R; Bezak, E; Marcu, L G; Yeoh, E

    2011-10-01

    Determination and understanding of out-of-field neutron and photon doses in accelerator-based radiotherapy is an important issue since linear accelerators operating at high energies (>10 MV) produce secondary radiations that irradiate parts of the patient's anatomy distal to the target region, potentially resulting in detrimental health effects. This paper provides a compilation of data (technical and clinical) reported in the literature on the measurement and Monte Carlo simulations of peripheral neutron and photon doses produced from high-energy medical linear accelerators and the reported risk and/or incidence of second primary cancer of tissues distal to the target volume. Information in the tables facilitates easier identification of (1) the various methods and measurement techniques used to determine the out-of-field neutron and photon radiations, (2) reported linac-dependent out-of-field doses, and (3) the risk/incidence of second cancers after radiotherapy due to classic and modern treatment methods. Regardless of the measurement technique and type of accelerator, the neutron dose equivalent per unit photon dose ranges from as low as 0.1 mSv/Gy to as high as 20.4 mSv/Gy. This radiation dose potentially contributes to the induction of second primary cancer in normal tissues outside the treated area.

  1. Phase space representation of neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field in relation to solar activity in cycles 21 and 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H. G.; Lopes, I.

    2016-07-01

    Heliospheric modulation of galactic cosmic rays links solar cycle activity with neutron monitor count rate on earth. A less direct relation holds between neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field because different atmospheric processes, including fluctuations in the ionosphere, are involved. Although a full quantitative model is still lacking, this link is supported by solid statistical evidence. Thus, a connection between the solar cycle activity and atmospheric electric field is expected. To gain a deeper insight into these relations, sunspot area (NOAA, USA), neutron monitor count rate (Climax, Colorado, USA), and atmospheric electric field (Lisbon, Portugal) are presented here in a phase space representation. The period considered covers two solar cycles (21, 22) and extends from 1978 to 1990. Two solar maxima were observed in this dataset, one in 1979 and another in 1989, as well as one solar minimum in 1986. Two main observations of the present study were: (1) similar short-term topological features of the phase space representations of the three variables, (2) a long-term phase space radius synchronization between the solar cycle activity, neutron monitor count rate, and potential gradient (confirmed by absolute correlation values above ~0.8). Finally, the methodology proposed here can be used for obtaining the relations between other atmospheric parameters (e.g., solar radiation) and solar cycle activity.

  2. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  3. Children and adults exposed to low-frequency magnetic fields at the ICNIRP reference levels: theoretical assessment of the induced electric fields.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J F; Paulides, M M; Neufeld, E; Christ, A; Chen, X L; Kuster, N; van Rhoon, G C

    2012-04-07

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects, the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined reference levels for time varying magnetic fields. Restrictions on the electric fields induced in the human body are provided based on biological response data for peripheral nerve stimulation and the induction of phosphenes. Numerical modeling is commonly used to assess the induced electric fields for various exposure configurations. The objective of this study was to assess the variations of the electric fields induced in children and adults and to compare the exposure at reference levels with the basic restrictions as function of anatomy. We used the scalar potential finite element method to calculate the induced electric fields in six children and two adults when exposed to uniform magnetic fields polarized in three orthogonal directions. We found that the induced electric fields are within the ICNIRP basic restrictions in nearly all cases. In PNS tissues, we found electric fields up to 95% (upper uncertainty limit due to discretization errors, k = 2) of the ICNIRP basic restrictions for exposures at the general public reference levels. For occupational reference levels, we found an over-exposure of maximum 79% (k = 2) in PNS tissues. We further found that the ICNIRP recommendations on spatial averaging in 2 × 2 × 2 mm³ contiguous tissue volumes and removal of peak values by the 99th percentile cause the results to depend strongly on the grid discretization step (i.e. an uncertainty of more than 50% at 2 mm) and the number of distinguished tissues in the anatomical models. The computational results obtained by various research institutes should be robust for different discretization settings and various anatomical models. Therefore, we recommend considering alternative routines for small anatomical structures such as non-contiguous averaging without taking the 99th percentile in future guidelines leading to consistent

  4. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; van Asselen, B.; Kok, J. G. M.; Aalbers, A. H. L.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  5. Retrospective dosimetry after criticality accidents using low-frequency EPR: a study of whole human teeth irradiated in a mixed neutron and gamma-radiation field.

    PubMed

    Zdravkova, M; Crokart, N; Trompier, F; Asselineau, B; Gallez, B; Gaillard-Lecanu, E; Debuyst, R

    2003-08-01

    In the context of accidental or intentional radiation exposures (nuclear terrorism), it is essential to separate rapidly those individuals with substantial exposures from those with exposures that do not constitute an immediate threat to health. Low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy provides the potential advantage of making accurate and sensitive measurements of absorbed radiation dose in teeth without removing the teeth from the potential victims. Up to now, most studies focused on the dose-response curves obtained for gamma radiation. In radiation accidents, however, the contribution of neutrons to the total radiation dose should not be neglected. To determine how neutrons contribute to the apparent dose estimated by EPR dosimetry, extracted whole human teeth were irradiated at the SILENE reactor in a mixed neutron and gamma-radiation field simulating criticality accidents. The teeth were irradiated in free air as well as in a paraffin head phantom. Lead screens were also used to eliminate to a large extent the contribution of the gamma radiation to the dose received by the teeth. The EPR signals, obtained with a low-frequency (1.2 GHz) spectrometer, were compared to dosimetry measurements at the same location. The contribution of neutrons to the EPR dosimetric signal was negligible in the range of 0 to 10 Gy and was rather small (neutron/gamma-ray sensitivity in the range 0-0.2) at higher doses. This indicates that the method essentially provides information on the dose received from the gamma-ray component of the radiation.

  6. Performance of the UAB and the INFN-LNF Bonner sphere spectrometers in quasi monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Bedogni, R; Esposito, A; Domingo, C; Fernández, F; Garcia, M J; Angelone, M

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of collaboration between the Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona and the INFN Frascati National Laboratories, an experimental Bonner Sphere neutron spectrometry exercise has been performed in the 2.5 MeV and 14.2 MeV quasi monoenergetic neutron beams of the ENEA Fast Neutron Generator. The neutron spectra at given distances from the accelerator target have been determined, taking advantage of the new unfolding FRUIT code, recently developed by the LNF group. The results show a good coherence between the two spectrometers, and between the measured and simulated data.

  7. [Good medical practice for drugs. Definition, guidelines, references, field of action and applications].

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Proper use of drugs can be defined as the use of the right product, in a correct dosage, during an adequate length of time, for a given patient and provided he has no serious side effects.It is virtually impossible, with such a number of drugs, such a number of clinical situations to prescribe adequately without using references or guidelines. References may lead to a unique choice, when the diagnosis is certain and the drug to be given is unique. With a good initial and continuous medical education, doctors can take easily this type of decision. The Summary of Products Characteristics (SPC) helps them; by sticking to this fundamental reference, prescription might be more precise and safe. In a lot of clinical situations the choice between a large numbers of therapeutic strategies necessitates use of a guideline based on scientific knowledge. Finally, a given therapeutic strategy can be as effective as and considerably less expensive than another. In such cases, payers can drive doctors to the prescription of the less expensive strategy.Some difficulties are common to all references and guidelines: 1. A lot of clinical situations are not covered by guidelines. 2. Guidelines should be updated each time there is a modification of knowledge: it is extremely difficult to do. 3. A great number of guidelines exist, issued by scientific community, health authorities or the payers. Sometime you can find a proposition in a guideline and the reverse in another guideline. It could be confusing. 4. Guidelines should be evaluated rigorously to know if they fulfil their goals. 5. Some of those guidelines simply cannot help doctors. They are too complex or do not take into account practical situations.We have made an inventory of those various guidelines and their weaknesses and we propose some solutions to increase their utility. We propose an analysis of the situation and some solutions to improve the quality and the relevance of the guidelines: to create groups of coordination

  8. Atmospheric electric field effect in different neutron multiplicities according to Emilio Segre Obervatory one minute data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.; Iucci, N.; Ne'eman, Yu.; Pustilnik, L. A.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    2001-08-01

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospherice lectric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS ofE milio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-offr igidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine thea tmospheric electric field effect in CR for total neutroni ntensity and for multiplicities m ≥1, m ≥2, m ≥3, m ≥4,m ≥5, m ≥6, m ≥7, and m ≥8, as well as for m=1, m=2,m =3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison ande xcluding primary CR variations we use also data obtainedb y NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (1995) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by catching ofs low negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping fewn eutrons. As it was shown in Dorman et al. (1999), theb iggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicitym =1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We will control this conclusion ont he basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field._

  9. An assessment of the near-surface accuracy of the international geomagnetic reference field 1980 model of the main geomagnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Zunde, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The new International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model of the main geomagnetic field for 1980 is based heavily on measurements from the MAGSAT satellite survey. Assessment of the accuracy of the new model, as a description of the main field near the Earth's surface, is important because the accuracy of models derived from satellite data can be adversely affected by the magnetic field of electric currents in the ionosphere and the auroral zones. Until now, statements about its accuracy have been based on the 6 published assessments of the 2 proposed models from which it was derived. However, those assessments were either regional in scope or were based mainly on preliminary or extrapolated data. Here we assess the near-surface accuracy of the new model by comparing it with values for 1980 derived from annual means from 69 magnetic observatories, and by comparing it with WC80, a model derived from near-surface data. The comparison with observatory-derived data shows that the new model describes the field at the 69 observatories about as accurately as would a model derived solely from near-surface data. The comparison with WC80 shows that the 2 models agree closely in their description of D and I near the surface. These comparisons support the proposition that the new IGRF 1980 main-field model is a generally accurate description of the main field near the Earth's surface in 1980. ?? 1985.

  10. Characterization of melted fuel by neutron resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heyse, J.; Becker, B.; Kopecky, S.; Paradela, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Tsuchiya, H.

    2015-07-01

    Neutrons can be used as a tool to study properties of materials and objects. An evolving activity in this field focusses on neutron induced reaction cross sections. The probability that a neutron interacts with nuclei strongly depends on the energy of the neutron. The cross sections reveal the presence of resonance structures, the energy and width of which are isotope specific. As such, these resonance structures can be used as fingerprints to determine the elemental and isotopic composition of materials and objects. They are the basis of two analytical methods which have been developed at Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC-IRMM): Neutron Resonance Capture Analysis (NRCA) and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA). The first technique is based on the detection of gamma rays emitted during a neutron capture reaction in the sample being studied; the latter determines the fraction of neutrons transmitted through a sample positioned in a neutron beam. In the past both techniques have been applied to determine the composition of archaeological objects and to characterize nuclear reference materials. More recently a combination of NRTA and NRCA is being studied as a non-destructive method to determine the heavy metal content of particle-like debris of melted fuel that is formed in severe nuclear accidents such as the one which occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. This study is part of a collaboration between the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and ECJRC- IRMM and is a spin-off from the core activity of IRMM, i.e. the production of nuclear data for nuclear technology applications. This contribution focusses on a newly developed NRTA measurement station that has been set up recently at one of the flight paths of the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA at the EC-JRC-IRMM. The basic principles of NRTA and first results of measurements at the new set up will be

  11. Magnetic Transitions in Iron Porphyrin Halides by Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Ab-initio Studies of Zero-Field Splittings

    SciTech Connect

    Stavretis, Shelby E.; Atanasov, Mihail; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Hunter, Seth C.; Neese, Frank; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2015-10-02

    Zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters of nondeuterated metalloporphyrins [Fe(TPP)X] (X = F, Br, I; H2TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin) are determined by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The ZFS values are D = 4.49(9) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)F], and D = 8.8(2) cm–1, E = 0.1(2) cm–1 and D = 13.4(6) cm–1, E = 0.3(6) cm–1 for monoclinic polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Br] and [Fe(TPP)I], respectively. Along with our recent report of the ZFS value of D = 6.33(8) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Cl], these data provide a rare, complete determination of ZFS parameters in a metalloporphyrin halide series. The electronic structure of [Fe(TPP)X] (X = F, Cl, Br, I) has been studied by multireference ab initio methods: the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and the N-electron valence perturbation theory (NEVPT2) with the aim of exploring the origin of the large and positive zero-field splitting D of the 6A1 ground state. D was calculated from wave functions of the electronic multiplets spanned by the d5 configuration of Fe(III) along with spin–orbit coupling accounted for by quasi degenerate perturbation theory. Results reproduce trends of D from inelastic neutron scattering data increasing in the order from F, Cl, Br, to I. A mapping of energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the S = 3/2 excited states on ligand field theory was used to characterize the σ- and π-antibonding effects decreasing from F to I. This is in agreement with similar results deduced from ab initio calculations on CrX63- complexes and also with the spectrochemical series showing a decrease of the ligand field in the same directions. A correlation is found between the increase of D and decrease of the π- and σ-antibonding energies eλX (λ = σ, π) in the series from X = F to I. Analysis of this

  12. Measurement of Linear Energy Transfer Distribution at CERN-EU High-Energy Reference Field Facility with Real-Time Radiation Monitoring Device III and Its Comparison with Dosimetric Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doke, Tadayoshi; Fuse, Tetsuhito; Hara, Kenichiro; Hayashi, Takayoshi; Kikuchi, Jun; Suzuki, Satoshi; Terasawa, Kazuhiro

    2004-06-01

    The distributions of linear energy transfer for LET (LETwater) in front of the 80-cm-thick concrete side shield at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility were measured with a Si detector telescope named real-time radiation monitoring device-III (RRMD-III) covered with and without a 1 cm-thick acrylic plate. In these measurements, a difference of about 20% in the absorbed dose between the two LETwater distributions was observed as a result of protons, deuterons and tritons recoiled by neutrons. The LETwater distribution obtained using RRMD-III without the 1-cm-thick acrylic plate is compared with lineal energy distributions obtained using the dosimetric telescope (DOSTEL) detector under the same conditions. These dose equivalents are also compared with that obtained using HANDI TEPC which is used as the standard at the CERF facility.

  13. Intercomparison of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes to model TEPC response in low-energy neutron and gamma-ray fields.

    PubMed

    Ali, F; Waker, A J; Waller, E J

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) can potentially be used as a portable and personal dosemeter in mixed neutron and gamma-ray fields, but what hinders this use is their typically large physical size. To formulate compact TEPC designs, the use of a Monte Carlo transport code is necessary to predict the performance of compact designs in these fields. To perform this modelling, three candidate codes were assessed: MCNPX 2.7.E, FLUKA 2011.2 and PHITS 2.24. In each code, benchmark simulations were performed involving the irradiation of a 5-in. TEPC with monoenergetic neutron fields and a 4-in. wall-less TEPC with monoenergetic gamma-ray fields. The frequency and dose mean lineal energies and dose distributions calculated from each code were compared with experimentally determined data. For the neutron benchmark simulations, PHITS produces data closest to the experimental values and for the gamma-ray benchmark simulations, FLUKA yields data closest to the experimentally determined quantities.

  14. Snow water equivalent measured with cosmic-ray neutrons: reviving a little known but highly successful field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desilets, D.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary cosmic-ray neutrons are attenuated strongly by water in either solid or liquid form, suggesting a method for measuring snow water equivalent that has several advantages over alternative technologies. The cosmic-ray attenuation method is passive, portable, highly adaptable, and operates over an exceptionally large range of snow pack thicknesses. But despite promising initial observations made in the 1970s, the technique today remains practically unknown to snow hydrologists. Side-by-side measurements performed over the past several years with a snow pillow and a submerged cosmic-ray probe demonstrate that the cosmic-ray attenuation method merits consideration for a wide range of applications—especially those where alternative methods are made problematic by dense vegetation, rough terrain, deep snowpack or a lack of vehicular access. During the snow-free season, the instrumentation can be used to monitor soil moisture, thus providing another widely sought field measurement. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. With main facilities in Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, C.A., Sandia has major R&D responsibilities in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and economic competitiveness.

  15. Measurement of residual stress fields in FHPP welding: a comparison between DSPI combined with hole-drilling and neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Matias R.; Albertazzi, Armando; Staron, Peter; Pisa, Marcelo

    2013-04-01

    This paper shows a portable device to measure mainly residual stress fields outside the optical bench. This system combines the traditional hole drilling technique with Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry. The novel feature of this device is the high degree of compaction since only one base supports simultaneously the measurement module and the hole-drilling device. The portable device allows the measurement of non-uniform residual stresses in accordance with the ASTM standard. In oil and gas offshore industries, alternative welding procedures among them, the friction hydro pillar processing (FHPP) is highlighted and nowadays is an important maintenance tool since it has the capability to produce structure repairs without risk of explosions. In this process a hole is drilled and filled with a consumable rod of the same material. The rod, which could be cylindrical or conical, is rotated and pressed against the hole, leading to frictional heating. In order to assess features about the residual stress distribution generated by the weld into the rod as well as into the base material around the rod, welded samples were evaluated by neutron diffraction and by the hole drilling technique having a comparison between them. For the hole drilling technique some layers were removed by using electrical discharge machining (EDM) after diffraction measurements in order to assess the bulk stress distribution. Results have shown a good agreement between techniques.

  16. Vertical Field of View Reference Point Study for Flight Path Control and Hazard Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. Raymond, Jr.; Rudisill, Marianne; Kramer, Lynda J.; Busquets, Anthony M.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers within the eXternal Visibility System (XVS) element of the High-Speed Research (HSR) program developed and evaluated display concepts that will provide the flight crew of the proposed High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) with integrated imagery and symbology to permit path control and hazard avoidance functions while maintaining required situation awareness. The challenge of the XVS program is to develop concepts that would permit a no-nose-droop configuration of an HSCT and expanded low visibility HSCT operational capabilities. This study was one of a series of experiments exploring the 'design space' restrictions for physical placement of an XVS display. The primary experimental issues here was 'conformality' of the forward display vertical position with respect to the side window in simulated flight. 'Conformality' refers to the case such that the horizon and objects appear in the same relative positions when viewed through the forward windows or display and the side windows. This study quantified the effects of visual conformality on pilot flight path control and hazard avoidance performance. Here, conformality related to the positioning and relationship of the artificial horizon line and associated symbology presented on the forward display and the horizon and associated ground, horizon, and sky textures as they would appear in the real view through a window presented in the side window display. No significant performance consequences were found for the non-conformal conditions.

  17. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-02

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data.

  18. Neutron diffraction study of magnetic field induced behavior in the heavy Fermion Ce3Co4Sn13

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Andrew D; Goremychkin, E. A.; Gardner, J. S.; Kang, H. J.; Chung, J.-H.; Manuel, P.; Thompson, J. D.; Sarrao, J. L.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The specific heat of Ce3Co4Sn13 exhibits a crossover from heavy Fermion behavior with antiferromagnetic correlations at low field to single impurity Kondo behavior above 2 T. We have performed neutron diffraction measurements in magnetic fields up to 6 Tesla on single crystal samples. The (001) position shows a dramatic increase in intensity in field which appears to arise from static polarization of the 4f level and which at 0.14 K also exhibits an anomaly near 2T reflecting the crossover to single impurity behavior.

  19. A SEARCH FOR NEUTRON STAR PRECESSION AND INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD VARIATIONS VIA MULTIEPOCH PULSAR POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, J. M.; Everett, J. E.; Morgan, J. J.; Brisbin, D. G.; Cordes, J. M.

    2010-10-01

    In order to study precession and interstellar magnetic field variations, we measured the polarized position angle of 81 pulsars at several-month intervals for four years. We show that the uncertainties in a single-epoch measurement of position angle are usually dominated by random pulse-to-pulse jitter of the polarized subpulses. Even with these uncertainties, we find that the position angle variations in 19 pulsars are significantly better fitted (at the 3{sigma} level) by a sinusoid than by a constant. Such variations could be caused by precession, which would then indicate periods of {approx}(200-1300) days and amplitudes of {approx}(1-12) degrees. We narrow this collection to four pulsars that show the most convincing evidence of sinusoidal variation in position angle. Also, in a handful of pulsars, single discrepant position angle measurements are observed which may result from the line of sight passing across a discrete ionized, magnetized structure. We calculate the standard deviation of position angle measurements from the mean for each pulsar and relate these to limits on precession and interstellar magnetic field variations.

  20. METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1964-01-14

    This patent relates to a method of producing neutrons in which there is produced a heated plasma containing heavy hydrogen isotope ions wherein heated ions are injected and confined in an elongated axially symmetric magnetic field having at least one magnetic field gradient region. In accordance with the method herein, the amplitude of the field and gradients are varied at an oscillatory periodic frequency to effect confinement by providing proper ratios of rotational to axial velocity components in the motion of said particles. The energetic neutrons may then be used as in a blanket zone containing a moderator and a source fissionable material to produce heat and thermal neutron fissionable materials. (AEC)

  1. Italian neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, M.; Alloni, D.; De Felice, P.; Palomba, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M.; Quintieri, L.; Santagata, A.; Valente, P.

    2014-11-01

    Many research activities, instrumental analysis, studies of radiation damage, etc., require neutron sources. The main neutron sources present in Italy are described in three different sections: nuclear research reactors, accelerator driven, and metrology stations. The nuclear research reactors of LENA (University of Pavia) and ENEA Casaccia are described in terms of irradiation facilities available, neutron flux for each of them and the main activities carried out by each research centre. In the second section, the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG), the Frascati Beam-Test Facility (BTF) and their main features are reported. In the last section there is a detailed description of the institutional role and the main activities carried out in the field of neutron metrology by the National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (INMRI) with a brief description of neutron sources of which the institute is endowed.

  2. Toward order-by-order calculations of the nuclear and neutron matter equations of state in chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammarruca, F.; Coraggio, L.; Holt, J. W.; Itaco, N.; Machleidt, R.; Marcucci, L. E.

    2015-05-01

    We calculate the nuclear and neutron matter equations of state from microscopic nuclear forces at different orders in chiral effective field theory and with varying momentum-space cutoff scales. We focus attention on how the order-by-order convergence depends on the choice of resolution scale and the implications for theoretical uncertainty estimates on the isospin asymmetry energy. Specifically we study the equations of state using consistent NLO and N2LO (next-to-next-to-leading order) chiral potentials where the low-energy constants cD and cE associated with contact vertices in the N2LO chiral three-nucleon force are fitted to reproduce the binding energies of H3 and He3 as well as the beta-decay lifetime of H3 . At these low orders in the chiral expansion there is little sign of convergence, while an exploratory study employing the N3LO two-nucleon force together with the N2LO three-nucleon force give first indications for (slow) convergence with low-cutoff potentials and poor convergence with higher-cutoff potentials. The consistent NLO and N2LO potentials described in the present work provide the basis for estimating theoretical uncertainties associated with the order-by-order convergence of nuclear many-body calculations in chiral effective field theory.

  3. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: A review of current work. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Ledney, G.D.; Madonna, G.S.; Elliott, T.B.; Moore, M.M.; Jackson, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, the authors developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60 (Co sources). Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections.

  4. Evaluation of a personal and environmental dosemeter based on CR-39 track detectors in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M; Parravicini, A; Sashala Naik, A

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the evaluation of the dosimetric capability of a detector based on a CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector coupled to a 1 cm thickness of PMMA radiator was made with the aim of understanding the applicability of this technique to personal and environmental neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has been exposed to monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at PTB in Braunschweig, Germany and at Ithemba Laboratories, in Faure, South Africa, with peak energies ranging from 0.565 to 100 MeV. The results showed a response that is almost independent of the neutron energy in the whole energy range.

  5. Measurement of the neutron fields produced by a 62 MeV proton beam on a PMMA phantom using extended range Bonner sphere spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amgarou, K.; Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Carinci, G.; Russo, S.

    2011-10-01

    The experimental characterization of the neutron fields produced as parasitic effect in medical accelerators is assuming an increased importance for either the patient protection or the facility design aspects. Medical accelerators are diverse in terms of particle type (electrons or hadrons) and energy, but the radiation fields around them have in common (provided that a given threshold energy is reached) the presence of neutrons with energy span over several orders of magnitude. Due to the large variability of neutron energy, field or dosimetry measurements in these workplaces are very complex, and in general, cannot be performed with ready-to-use commercial instruments. In spite of its poor energy resolution, the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) is the only instrument able to simultaneously determine all spectral components in such workplaces. The energy range of this instrument is limited to E<20 MeV if only polyethylene spheres are used, but can be extended to hundreds of MeV by including metal-loaded spheres (extended range BSS, indicated with ERBSS). With the aim of providing useful data to the scientific community involved in neutron measurements at hadron therapy facilities, an ERBSS experiment was carried out at the Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate (CATANA) of INFN—LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud), where a proton beam routinely used for ophthalmic cancer treatments is available. The 62 MeV beam was directed towards a PMMA phantom, simulating the patient, and two neutron measurement points were established at 0° and 90° with respect to the beam-line. Here the ERBSS of UAB (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona— Grup de Física de les Radiacions) and INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati) were exposed to characterize the "forward" and "sideward" proton-induced neutron fields. The use of two ERBSS characterized by different set of spheres, central detectors, and independently established and

  6. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  7. Utility of galaxy catalogs for following up gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers with wide-field telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Chad; Mandel, Ilya; Vousden, Will E-mail: imandel@star.sr.bham.ac.uk

    2014-03-20

    The first detections of gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers with advanced LIGO and Virgo observatories are anticipated in the next five years. These detections could pave the way for multi-messenger gravitational-wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) astronomy if GW triggers are successfully followed up with targeted EM observations. However, GW sky localization is relatively poor, with expected localization areas of ∼10-100 deg{sup 2}; this presents a challenge for following up GW signals from compact binary mergers. Even for wide-field instruments, tens or hundreds of pointings may be required. Prioritizing pointings based on the relative probability of successful imaging is important since it may not be possible to tile the entire gravitational-wave localization region in a timely fashion. Galaxy catalogs were effective at narrowing down regions of the sky to search in initial attempts at joint GW/EM observations. The relatively limited range of initial GW instruments meant that few galaxies were present per pointing and galaxy catalogs were complete within the search volume. The next generation of GW detectors will have a 10-fold increase in range thereby increasing the expected number of galaxies per unit solid angle by a factor of ∼1000. As an additional complication, catalogs will be highly incomplete. Nevertheless, galaxy catalogs can still play an important role in prioritizing pointings for the next era of GW searches. We show how to quantify the advantages of using galaxy catalogs to prioritize wide-field follow-ups as a function of only two parameters: the three-dimensional volume within the field of view of a telescope after accounting for the GW distance measurement uncertainty, and the fraction of the GW sky localization uncertainty region that can be covered with telescope pointings. We find that the use of galaxy catalogs can improve the probability of successful imaging by ∼10% to ∼300% relative to follow-up strategies that

  8. Utility of Galaxy Catalogs for Following up Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers with Wide-field Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Chad; Mandel, Ilya; Vousden, Will

    2014-03-01

    The first detections of gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers with advanced LIGO and Virgo observatories are anticipated in the next five years. These detections could pave the way for multi-messenger gravitational-wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) astronomy if GW triggers are successfully followed up with targeted EM observations. However, GW sky localization is relatively poor, with expected localization areas of ~10-100 deg2; this presents a challenge for following up GW signals from compact binary mergers. Even for wide-field instruments, tens or hundreds of pointings may be required. Prioritizing pointings based on the relative probability of successful imaging is important since it may not be possible to tile the entire gravitational-wave localization region in a timely fashion. Galaxy catalogs were effective at narrowing down regions of the sky to search in initial attempts at joint GW/EM observations. The relatively limited range of initial GW instruments meant that few galaxies were present per pointing and galaxy catalogs were complete within the search volume. The next generation of GW detectors will have a 10-fold increase in range thereby increasing the expected number of galaxies per unit solid angle by a factor of ~1000. As an additional complication, catalogs will be highly incomplete. Nevertheless, galaxy catalogs can still play an important role in prioritizing pointings for the next era of GW searches. We show how to quantify the advantages of using galaxy catalogs to prioritize wide-field follow-ups as a function of only two parameters: the three-dimensional volume within the field of view of a telescope after accounting for the GW distance measurement uncertainty, and the fraction of the GW sky localization uncertainty region that can be covered with telescope pointings. We find that the use of galaxy catalogs can improve the probability of successful imaging by ~10% to ~300% relative to follow-up strategies that do not utilize

  9. Children and adults exposed to electromagnetic fields at the ICNIRP reference levels: theoretical assessment of the induced peak temperature increase.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J F; Paulides, M M; Neufeld, E; Christ, A; Kuster, N; van Rhoon, G C

    2011-08-07

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels. Restrictions on induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR(wb)) are provided to keep the whole-body temperature increase (T(body, incr)) under 1 °C during 30 min. Additional restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR(10g)) are provided to prevent excessive localized tissue heating. The objective of this study is to assess the localized peak temperature increase (T(incr, max)) in children upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite-difference time-domain modeling was used to calculate T(incr, max) in six children and two adults exposed to orthogonal plane-wave configurations. We performed a sensitivity study and Monte Carlo analysis to assess the uncertainty of the results. Considering the uncertainties in the model parameters, we found that a peak temperature increase as high as 1 °C can occur for worst-case scenarios at the ICNIRP reference levels. Since the guidelines are deduced from temperature increase, we used T(incr, max) as being a better metric to prevent excessive localized tissue heating instead of localized peak SAR. However, we note that the exposure time should also be considered in future guidelines. Hence, we advise defining limits on T(incr, max) for specified durations of exposure.

  10. Children and adults exposed to electromagnetic fields at the ICNIRP reference levels: theoretical assessment of the induced peak temperature increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, J. F.; Paulides, M. M.; Neufeld, E.; Christ, A.; Kuster, N.; van Rhoon, G. C.

    2011-08-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels. Restrictions on induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SARwb) are provided to keep the whole-body temperature increase (Tbody, incr) under 1 °C during 30 min. Additional restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR10g) are provided to prevent excessive localized tissue heating. The objective of this study is to assess the localized peak temperature increase (Tincr, max) in children upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite-difference time-domain modeling was used to calculate Tincr, max in six children and two adults exposed to orthogonal plane-wave configurations. We performed a sensitivity study and Monte Carlo analysis to assess the uncertainty of the results. Considering the uncertainties in the model parameters, we found that a peak temperature increase as high as 1 °C can occur for worst-case scenarios at the ICNIRP reference levels. Since the guidelines are deduced from temperature increase, we used Tincr, max as being a better metric to prevent excessive localized tissue heating instead of localized peak SAR. However, we note that the exposure time should also be considered in future guidelines. Hence, we advise defining limits on Tincr, max for specified durations of exposure.

  11. [A social-health care coordination reference in the fields of mental health and child abuse].

    PubMed

    García-Panal, Leticia; García-Panal, Javier; Delgado-Mata, Eulalia

    2016-01-01

    The intervention in families with children at risk of abuse stays as a clear example of the need for intersectional coordination mechanisms within the socio-health care framework. Different health services (such as primary care, paediatrics, mental health, community and social services, family support teams and schools) create a network in order to link their main goals in the interest of ensuring children's welfare and improving familieś situation. This essay aims at describing a performance based on the mentioned guidelines, even though there is no accepted and widespread protocol in this regard. We start our research with a one parent family with two children. The mother suffers from a mental health disorder and she fails to adhere to treatment. Both the father of the two children and his family took advantage of this situation to discredit the mother's capability of taking care of her children. This perception had a great impact in her self-esteem and therefore in her willingness and strength to recover. Meetings were held to share relevant information about both the family's general situation, the children's quality of life and the mother's health. Based on this information, the main goals were set in each professional field in order to develop the intervention project. This example of intersectional coordination shows the importance of its standardization for the sake of ensuring a comprehensive attention towards situations that involve initially individuals but that ends up affecting the whole family.

  12. Criteria for personal dosimetry in mixed radiation fields in space. [analyzing trapped protons, tissue disintegration stars, and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    The complexity of direct reading and passive dosimeters for monitoring radiation is studied to strike the right balance of compromise to simplify the monitoring procedure. Trapped protons, tissue disintegration stars, and neutrons are analyzed.

  13. Mapping of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure levels in outdoor environment and comparing with reference levels for general public health.

    PubMed

    Cansiz, Mustafa; Abbasov, Teymuraz; Kurt, M Bahattin; Celik, A Recai

    2016-11-02

    In this study, radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure levels were measured on the main streets in the city center of Diyarbakır, Turkey. Measured electric field levels were plotted on satellite imagery of Diyarbakır and were compared with exposure guidelines published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). Exposure measurements were performed in dense urban, urban and suburban areas each day for 7 consecutive days. The measurement system consisted of high precision and portable spectrum analyzer, three-axis electric field antenna, connection cable and a laptop which was used to record the measurement samples as a data logger. The highest exposure levels were detected for two places, which are called Diclekent and Batıkent. It was observed that the highest instantaneous electric field strength value for Batıkent was 7.18 V/m and for Diclekent was 5.81 V/m. It was statistically determined that the main contributor band to the total exposure levels was Universal Mobile Telecommunications System band. Finally, it was concluded that all measured exposure levels were lower than the reference levels recommended by ICNIRP for general public health.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 2 November 2016; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.64.

  14. Determination of the response function for two personal neutron dosemeter designs based on PADC.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S; Assenmacher, F; Boschung, M

    2014-10-01

    Since 1998 neutron dosimetry based on PADC (poly allyl diglycol carbonate) is done with a so-called original Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) design at PSI. The original design (i.e. holder) was later changed. Both designs are optimised for use in workplaces around high-energy accelerators, where the neutron energy spectra are dominated by fast neutrons ranging up to some 100 MeV. In addition to the change of the dosemeter design a new evaluation method based on a microscope scanning technique has been introduced and the etching conditions have been optimised. In the present work, the responses obtained with the original and the new dosemeter designs are compared for fields of radionuclide sources and monoenergetic reference fields using the new evaluation method. The response curves in terms of the personal dose equivalent for normally incident neutrons were built as functions of the incident neutron energy.

  15. TESTING MODELS OF MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION OF NEUTRON STARS WITH THE STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THEIR SPIN EVOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shuangnan; Xie Yi

    2012-10-01

    We test models for the evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields (B). Our model for the evolution of the NS spin is taken from an analysis of pulsar timing noise presented by Hobbs et al.. We first test the standard model of a pulsar's magnetosphere in which B does not change with time and magnetic dipole radiation is assumed to dominate the pulsar's spin-down. We find that this model fails to predict both the magnitudes and signs of the second derivatives of the spin frequencies ({nu}-double dot). We then construct a phenomenological model of the evolution of B, which contains a long-term decay (LTD) modulated by short-term oscillations; a pulsar's spin is thus modified by its B-evolution. We find that an exponential LTD is not favored by the observed statistical properties of {nu}-double dot for young pulsars and fails to explain the fact that {nu}-double dot is negative for roughly half of the old pulsars. A simple power-law LTD can explain all the observed statistical properties of {nu}-double dot. Finally, we discuss some physical implications of our results to models of the B-decay of NSs and suggest reliable determination of the true ages of many young NSs is needed, in order to constrain further the physical mechanisms of their B-decay. Our model can be further tested with the measured evolutions of {nu}-dot and {nu}-double dot for an individual pulsar; the decay index, oscillation amplitude, and period can also be determined this way for the pulsar.

  16. Level crossings and zero-field splitting in the {Cr8}-cubane spin-cluster studied using inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Vaknin, D.; Garlea, Vasile O; Demmel, F.; Mamontov, Eugene; Nojiri, H; Martin, Catalin; Chiorescu, Irinel; Qiu, Y.; Luban, M.; Kogerler, P.; Fielden, J.; Engelhardt, L; Rainey, C

    2010-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in variable magnetic field and high-field magnetization measurements in the millikelvin temperature range were performed to gain insight into the low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum and the field-induced level crossings in the molecular spin cluster {Cr8}-cubane. These complementary techniques provide consistent estimates of the lowest level-crossing field. The overall features of the experimental data are explained using an isotropic Heisenberg model, based on three distinct exchange interactions linking the eight CrIII paramagnetic centers (spins s = 3/2), that is supplemented with a relatively large molecular magnetic anisotropy term for the lowest S = 1 multiplet. It is noted that the existence of the anisotropy is clearly evident from the magnetic field dependence of the excitations in the INS measurements, while the magnetization measurements are not sensitive to its effects.

  17. Level crossings and zero-field splitting in the {Cr8}-cubane spin cluster studied using inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization.

    PubMed

    Vaknin, D; Garlea, V O; Demmel, F; Mamontov, E; Nojiri, H; Martin, C; Chiorescu, I; Qiu, Y; Kögerler, P; Fielden, J; Engelhardt, L; Rainey, C; Luban, M

    2010-11-24

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in variable magnetic field and high-field magnetization measurements in the millikelvin temperature range were performed to gain insight into the low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum and the field-induced level crossings in the molecular spin cluster {Cr(8)}-cubane. These complementary techniques provide consistent estimates of the lowest level-crossing field. The overall features of the experimental data are explained using an isotropic Heisenberg model, based on three distinct exchange interactions linking the eight Cr(III) paramagnetic centers (spins s = 3/2), that is supplemented with a relatively large molecular magnetic anisotropy term for the lowest S = 1 multiplet. It is noted that the existence of the anisotropy is clearly evident from the magnetic field dependence of the excitations in the INS measurements, while the magnetization measurements are not sensitive to its effects.

  18. Instantaneous and daily values of the surface energy balance over agricultural fields using remote sensing and a reference field in an arid environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kustas, W.P.; Moran, M.S.; Jackson, R. D.; Gay, L.W.; Duell, L.F.W.; Kunkel, K.E.; Matthias, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    Remotely sensed surface temperature and reflectance in the visible and near infrared wavebands along with ancilliary meteorological data provide the capability of computing three of the four surface energy balance components (i.e., net radiation, soil heat flux, and sensible heat flux) at different spatial and temporal scales. As a result, under nonadvective conditions, this enables the estimation of the remaining term (i.e., the latent heat flux). One of the practical applications with this approach is to produce evapotranspiration (ET) maps for agricultural regions which consist of an array of fields containing different crops at varying stages of growth and soil moisture conditions. Such a situation exists in the semiarid southwest at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center, south of Phoenix. For one day (14 June 1987), surface temperature and reflectance measurements from an aircraft 150 m above ground level (agl) were acquired over fields from zero to nearly full cover at four times between 1000 MST and 1130 MST. The diurnal pattern of the surface energy balance was measured over four fields, which included alfalfa at 60% cover, furrowed cotton at 20% and 30% cover, and partially plowed what stubble. Instantaneous and daily values of ET were estimated for a representative area around each flux site with an energy balance model that relies on a reference ET. This reference value was determined with remotely sensed data and several meteorological inputs. The reference ET was adjusted to account for the different surface conditions in the other fields using only remotely sensed variables. A comparison with the flux measurements suggests the model has difficulties with partial canopy conditions, especially related to the estimation of the sensible heat flux. The resulting errors for instantaneous ET were on the order of 100 W m-2 and for daily values of order 2 mm day-1. These findings suggest future research should involve development of methods to

  19. Response characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Fix, J.J.; Hadley, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Yoder, R.C.; Roberson, P.L.; Endres, G.W.R.; Nichols, L.L.; Schwartz, R.B.

    1983-09-01

    Performance characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters in current use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were determined from their evaluation of neutron dose equivalent received after irradiations with specific neutron sources at either the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) or the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The characteristics assessed included: lower detection level, energy response, precision and accuracy. It was found that when all of the laboratories employed a common set of calibrations, the overall accuracy was approximately +-20%, which is within uncertainty expected for these dosimeters. For doses above 80 mrem, the accuracy improved to better than 10% when a common calibration was used. Individual differences found in this study may reflect differences in calibration technique rather than differences in the dose rates of actual calibration standards. Second, at dose rates above 100 mrem, the precision for the best participants was generally below +-10% which is also within expected limits for these types of dosimeters. The poorest results had a standard deviation of about +-25%. At the lowest doses, which were sometimes below the lower detection limit, the precision often approached or exceeded +-100%. Third, the lower level of detection for free field /sup 252/Cf neutrons generally ranged between 20 and 50 mrem. Fourth, the energy dependence study provided a characterization of the response of the dosimeters to neutron energies far from the calibration energy. 11 references, 22 figures, 26 tables.

  20. Determination of sulfur in fly ash and fuel oil standard reference materials by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Filby, R.H.

    1983-12-01

    Sulfur was determined in NBS Coal Fly Ash (SRM 1633) and Residual Fuel Oils (SRM's 1619, 1620a, 1634a) by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (NAA) using the /sup 34/S(n,..gamma..)/sup 35/S reaction. The /sup 35/S was separated from solutions of the standards by either cation-anion exchange on Dowex 50W-X8/Dowex 1-X8 or by adsorption on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Liquid scintillation counting of aqueous solutions was used for /sup 35/S measurement. The /sup 35/Cl(n,p)/sup 35/S interference was corrected for by measurement of chlorine by instrumental NAA. The method may be applied to very small samples of fly ash or air particulates (<10/sup -3/ g). 1 figure, 5 tables.

  1. Certification of Total Arsenic in Blood and Urine Standard Reference Materials by Radiochemical Neutron Activation Analysis and Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rick L; Davis, W Clay; Yu, Lee; Murphy, Karen E; Guthrie, William F; Leber, Dennis D; Bryan, Colleen E; Vetter, Thomas W; Shakirova, Gulchekhra; Mitchell, Graylin; Kyle, David J; Jarrett, Jeffery M; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Jones, Robert L; Eckdahl, Steven; Wermers, Michelle; Maras, Melissa; Palmer, C D; Verostek, M F; Geraghty, C M; Steuerwald, Amy J; Parsons, Patrick J

    2014-03-01

    A newly developed procedure for determination of arsenic by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) was used to measure arsenic at four levels in SRM 955c Toxic Elements in Caprine Blood and at two levels in SRM 2668 Toxic Elements in Frozen Human Urine for the purpose of providing mass concentration values for certification. Samples were freeze-dried prior to analysis followed by neutron irradiation for 3 h at a fluence rate of 1×10(14)cm(-2)s(-1). After sample dissolution in perchloric and nitric acids, arsenic was separated from the matrix by extraction into zinc diethyldithiocarbamate in chloroform, and (76)As quantified by gamma-ray spectroscopy. Differences in chemical yield and counting geometry between samples and standards were monitored by measuring the count rate of a (77)As tracer added before sample dissolution. RNAA results were combined with inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) values from NIST and collaborating laboratories to provide certified values of (10.81 ± 0.54) μg/kg and (213.1 ± 0.73) μg/kg for SRM 2668 Levels I and II, and certified values of (21.66 ± 0.73) μg/kg, (52.7 ± 1.1) μg/kg, and (78.8 ± 4.9) μg/kg for SRM 955c Levels 2, 3, and 4 respectively. Because of discrepancies between values obtained by different methods for SRM 955c Level 1, an information value of < 5 μg/kg was assigned for this material.

  2. Detection of a Bacteriophage Gene Encoding a Mu-like Portal Protein in Haemophilus parasuis Reference Strains and Field Isolates by Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nested PCR assay was developed to determine the presence of a gene encoding a bacteriophage Mu-like portal protein, gp29, in 15 reference strains and 31 field isolates of Haemophilus parasuis. Specific primers, based on the gene’s sequence, were utilized. A majority of the virulent reference strai...

  3. Hard-tail emission in the soft state of low-mass X-ray binaries and their relation to the neutron star magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Mastuoka, Masaru; Sugizaki, Mutsumi

    2016-08-01

    Average hard-tail X-ray emission in the soft state of nine bright Atoll low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) are investigated by using the light curves of MAXI/GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope). Two sources (4U 1820-30 and 4U 1735-44) exhibit a large hardness ratio (15-50 keV/2-10 keV: HR >0.1), while the other sources distribute at HR ≲ 0.1. In either case, HR does not depend on the 2-10 keV luminosity. Therefore the difference of HR is due to the 15-50 keV luminosity, which is Comptonized emission. The Compton cloud is assumed to be around the neutron star. The size of the Compton cloud would affect the value of HR. Although the magnetic field of an NS-LMXB is weak, we could expect a larger Alfvén radius than the innermost stable circular orbit or the neutron star radius in some sources. In such cases, the accretion inflow is stopped at the Alfvén radius and would create a relatively large Compton cloud. This would result in the observed larger Comptonized emission. By attributing the difference of the size of Compton cloud to the Alfvén radius, we can estimate the magnetic fields of neutron stars. The obtained lower/upper limits are consistent with the previous results.

  4. Microarray-based comparative genomic profiling of reference strains and selected Canadian field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gouré, Julien; Findlay, Wendy A; Deslandes, Vincent; Bouevitch, Anne; Foote, Simon J; MacInnes, Janet I; Coulton, James W; Nash, John HE; Jacques, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, is a highly contagious respiratory pathogen that causes severe losses to the swine industry worldwide. Current commercially-available vaccines are of limited value because they do not induce cross-serovar immunity and do not prevent development of the carrier state. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridizations (M-CGH) were used to estimate whole genomic diversity of representative Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains. Our goal was to identify conserved genes, especially those predicted to encode outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins because of their potential for the development of more effective vaccines. Results Using hierarchical clustering, our M-CGH results showed that the majority of the genes in the genome of the serovar 5 A. pleuropneumoniae L20 strain were conserved in the reference strains of all 15 serovars and in representative field isolates. Fifty-eight conserved genes predicted to encode for outer membrane proteins or lipoproteins were identified. As well, there were several clusters of diverged or absent genes including those associated with capsule biosynthesis, toxin production as well as genes typically associated with mobile elements. Conclusion Although A. pleuropneumoniae strains are essentially clonal, M-CGH analysis of the reference strains of the fifteen serovars and representative field isolates revealed several classes of genes that were divergent or absent. Not surprisingly, these included genes associated with capsule biosynthesis as the capsule is associated with sero-specificity. Several of the conserved genes were identified as candidates for vaccine development, and we conclude that M-CGH is a valuable tool for reverse vaccinology. PMID:19239696

  5. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, M.; Meyerovich, A. E.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide.

  6. Field Artillery Reference Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    wrist 1 Test set elec tube7 Camouflage screen sys (2) SURVEY SECTIONS 1 Tool kit elec equip 1 Carrier CP 1 TIr 11/2T 7 Camouflage screen spt sys Personnel...units. SUMMARY - MAJOR ITEMS OF EQUIPMEN TRANSPORTATION 0 Carrier, cargo, tracked, 6-ton 4 Cable, tel, WD-1/TT, DR-8, 1/4 mi 131-. Carrier, CP , It tracked...regen repeater 3 Pwr sup assy 4 Tel set TA-312 6 Radio set GRC-1 60 2 TIr 1AT 9 Radio set PRC-77 2 Trk 1AT 3 Radio set VRC-47 2 Carrier CP 6 Radio

  7. A TPD and AR based comparison of accelerator neutron irradiation fields between (7)Li and W targets for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Yonai, Shunsuke; Baba, Mamoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2014-06-01

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension was investigated for the usage of (7)Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.3-2.8MeV protons and W(p,n) neutrons by 50MeV protons. The indexes were the treatable protocol depth (TPD) and advantage depth (AD). Consequently, a configuration for W target with the Fe filter, Fluental moderator, Pb reflector showed the TPD of 5.8cm and AD of 9.3cm. Comparable indexes were found for the Li target in a geometry with the MgF2 moderator and Teflon reflector.

  8. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-01

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  9. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling.

    PubMed

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-21

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  10. Measurements of neutron radiation in aircraft.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Poje, M; Varga, M; Radolić, V; Miklavcić, I; Faj, D; Stanić, D; Planinić, J

    2010-12-01

    Radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of the solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles created in an interaction of galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of the Earth's atmosphere. A radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. In order to measure a neutron component of the cosmic radiation, we investigated a few combinations of a track etch detector (CR-39, LR-115) with a plastic converter or boron foil. Detector calibration was performed on neutrons coming from the nuclear reactor, as well as in the CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility. From November 2007 to September 2008, the neutron dose equivalent was measured by the track detectors during five aircraft flights, in the north geographical latitude from 21° to 58°; the respective average dose rate, determined by using the D-4 detector (CR-39/B), was Ḣ(n)=5.9 μSv/h. The photon dose rate, measured by the electronic dosimeter RAD-60 SE, had the average value of Ḣ(f)=1.4 μSv/h.

  11. Quinolone and Glycopeptide Therapy for Infection in Mouse Following Exposure to Mixed-Field Neutron-Gamma-Photon Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    gamma-hemolytic streptococcus, HeN mouse treated with L-ofloxacin and vancomycin. five E. faecalis and four S. aureus) (Table 4). More...S’nierworca faecalis resistant to vancomycin (3 of 5). ’Exteroeacusfaecalis resistant to vancomycin (2 of 7). Therapy of infection after neutron irradiation 777

  12. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  13. Spectrum of neutrons emitted from a thick beryllium target bombarded with 7 MeV deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.; Guenther, P.; Micklich, B.

    1988-01-01

    The spectrum of neutrons emitted from a thick beryllium target bombarded with 7 MeV deuterons is measured at 25 reaction angles distributed between 0/sup 0/ and 158/sup 0/, and over the neutron energy range approx. =<0.8 to >11.0 MeV. The spectrum is determined relative to the standard /sup 252/Cf prompt-fission-neutron-spectrum using fast time-of-flight techniques. The results are presented as angle-energy differential distributions and as relative numerical group cross sections suitable for establishing a reference field for applied studies. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Californium-252: A New Isotopic Source for Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, W.C.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses a new isotopic source for neutron radiography, Californium-252. Nuclear reactors are the usual source of neutrons for radiography, primarily because of their intense neutron beams. If neutron radiography is to have widespread use, intense transportable neutron sources are required that can be used in plants, in laboratories and in the field.

  15. New PTB thermal neutron calibration facility: first results.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Reginatto, M; Wershofen, H; Wiegel, B; Zimbal, A

    2014-10-01

    A new thermal neutron calibration facility based on a moderator assembly has been set up at PTB. It consists of 16 (241)Am-Be radionuclide sources mounted in a graphite block, 1.5 m wide, 1.5 m high and 1.8 m deep. The sources are distributed to eight different positions, at a mean distance of ∼1.25 m from the front face of the moderator. The neutron field at the reference position, 30 cm in front of the moderator device and 75 cm above the floor, has been characterised using calculations, Bonner sphere measurements and gold foil activation. First results are shown. The field is highly thermalised: 99 % in terms of fluence. It is quite homogenous within a 20 cm×20 cm area, but the absolute value of the thermal neutron fluence rate is small and yields an ambient dose equivalent rate of 3 µSv h(-1).

  16. METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1964-02-01

    A method for producing neutrons is described in which there is employed a confinement zone defined between longitudinally spaced localized gradient regions of an elongated magnetic field. Changed particles and neutralizing electrons, more specifically deuterons and tritons and neutralizng electrons, are injected into the confinement field from ion sources located outside the field. The rotational energy of the parrticles is increased at the gradients by imposing an oscillating transverse electrical field thereacross. The imposition of such oscillating transverse electrical fields improves the reflection capability of such gradient fielda so that the reactive particles are retained more effectively within the zone. With the attainment of appropriate densities of plasma particles and provided that such particles are at a sufficiently high temperature, neutron-producing reactions ensue and large quantities of neutrons emerge from the containment zone. (AEC)

  17. Design and characterization of an SRAM-based neutron detector for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ytre-Hauge, Kristian S.; Velure, Arild; Larsen, Eivind F.; Stokkevåg, Camilla H.; Röhrich, Dieter; Brekke, Njål; Odland, Odd Harald

    2015-12-01

    A neutron detector based on registration of radiation effects in Static Random Access Memories (SRAMs) has been developed at the University of Bergen for applications in particle therapy. Nine different SRAMs were tested and a 16 Mibit SRAM from Cypress was chosen for the final detector. The SRAMs were irradiated in beam lines at PTB Braunschweig, the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory, The Svedberg Laboratory, The Institute for Energy Technology (IFE, Kjeller) and the CERN-EU high-energy reference field. The results from the measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using the selected SRAMs for neutron detection. The results indicate low or no sensitivity to thermal neutrons while the cross section for fast neutrons increases with neutron energy before reaching a more stable level at energies of several tenths of MeV.

  18. Analysis of geomagnetic secular variation during 1980-1985 and 1985- 1990, and geomagnetic models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The secular variation of the main geomagnetic field during the periods 1980-1985 and 1985-1990 was analyzed in terms of spherical harmonics up to the eighth degree and order. Data from worldwide magnetic observatories and the Navy's Project MAGNET aerial surveys were used. The resulting pair of secular-variation models was used to update the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) model for 1980, resulting in new mainfield models for 1985.0 and 1990.0. These, along with the secular-variation model for 1985-1990, were proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). -Author

  19. Variational calculation of ground-state energy of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields. [at neutron star surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, E. G.; Ruderman, M. A.; Lee, J.-F.; Sutherland, P. G.; Hillebrandt, W.; Mueller, E.

    1977-01-01

    Variational calculations of the binding energies of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields (greater than 10 to the 12th gauss). These calculations include the electron exchange energy. The cohesive energy of the condensed matter, which is the difference between these two binding energies, is of interest in pulsar theories and in the description of the surfaces of neutron stars. It is found that the cohesive energy ranges from 2.6 keV to 8.0 keV.

  20. Reconstruction from small-angle neutron scattering measurements of the real space magnetic field distribution in the mixed state of Sr2RuO4.

    PubMed

    Kealey, P G; Riseman, T M; Forgan, E M; Galvin, L M; Mackenzie, A P; Lee, S L; Paul, D M; Cubitt, R; Agterberg, D F; Heeb, R; Mao, Z Q; Maeno, Y

    2000-06-26

    We have measured the diffracted neutron scattering intensities from the square magnetic flux lattice in the perovskite superconductor Sr2RuO4, which is thought to exhibit p-wave pairing with a two-component order parameter. The relative intensities of different flux lattice Bragg reflections over a wide range of field and temperature have been shown to be inconsistent with a single component Ginzburg-Landau theory but qualitatively agree with a two-component p-wave Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  1. Fruits of neutron research

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, C.

    1994-12-31

    Car windshields that don`t break during accidents and jets that fly longer without making a refueling stop. Compact discs, credit cards, and pocket calculators. Refrigerator magnets and automatic car window openers. Beach shoes, food packaging, and bulletproof vests made of tough plastics. The quality and range of consumer products have improved steadily since the 1970s. One of the reasons: neutron research. Industries, employing neutron scattering techniques, to study materials properties, to act as diagnostics in tracing system performance, or as sources for radioactive isotopes used in medical fields for diagnostics or treatment, have all benefited from the fruits of advanced work with neutron sources.

  2. Poroelastic references

    SciTech Connect

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on the Biot theory (forward and inverse approaches), the double-porosity and dual-permeability theory, and seismic wave propagation in fracture porous media, in RIS format, to approach seismic monitoring in a complex fractured porous medium such as Brady?s Geothermal Field.

  3. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  4. k0-INAA quality assessment by analysis of soil reference material GBW07401 using the comparator and neutron flux monitor approaches.

    PubMed

    Menezes, M A B C; Jaćimović, R

    2011-07-01

    It is possible to apply the k(0)-method using a simplified equation for concentration calculations using Excel spreadsheet, using comparators without making corrections. The objective of this study was to confirm that the k(0)-standardization method is more efficient and accurate than this "k(0)-comparator" procedure, applying suitable software that takes into account several corrections. The reference material GBW07401 soil was analyzed in this study. Relative Bias and u-score tests were used in order to evaluate the overall results.

  5. Matter accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the fundamental neutron star parameters, such as the mass and the magnetic field strength, were experimentally determined in accreting neutron star systems. Some of the relevant data and the models used to derive useful information from them, are reviewed concentrating mainly on X-ray pulsars. The latest advances in our understanding of the radiation mechanisms and the transfer in the strongly magnetized polar cap regions are discussed.

  6. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  7. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  8. Spatial distribution of thorium fission rate in a fast spallation and fission neutron field: An experimental and Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borger, J. J.; Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Alexiev, D.; Brandt, R.; Westmeier, W.; Thomauske, B.; Adam, J.; Kadykov, M.; Tiutiunnikov, S.

    2012-02-01

    The Energy plus Transmutation (EpT) set-up of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia is composed of a lead spallation target surrounded by a blanket of natural uranium. The resultant neutron spectrum is a combination of spallation and fission spectra, modified by a reflective external layer of polyethylene and an internal absorbing layer of cadmium. The EpT set-up was irradiated with a beam of 4 GeV deuterons from the Nuclotron Accelerator at JINR. The spatial distribution of thorium fission rate within the assembly was determined experimentally, using a fission track detector technique, and compared with Monte Carlo predictions of the MCNPX code. Contributions of neutrons, protons, deuterons, photons and pions to total fission were taken into account. Close agreement between the experimental and calculated results was found.

  9. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  10. Holography with a neutron interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarenac, Dusan; Cory, David G.; Pushin, Dmitry A.; Heacock, Benjamin; Huber, Michael G.; Arif, M.; Clark, Charles W.; Shahi, Chandra B.; Cfref Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the first neutron hologram of a macroscopic object. Using a Mach-Zehnder neutron interferometer in a configuration similar to the optical setup of Bazhenov et al., our reference beam passes through a fused silica prism that provides a linear phase gradient, and our object beam beam passes through an aluminum spiral phase plate with a topological charge of l = 2 , which was recently used in studies of neutron orbital angular momentum. Interference of reference and object beams in a two-dimensional imaging detector produces the hologram, which is a fork dislocation structure similar to those used to generate atomic and electronic vortex beams. Our neutron hologram is made in an interferometer in which at most one neutron is present at any given time.

  11. Direction sensitive neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Ahlen, Steven; Fisher, Peter; Dujmic, Denis; Wellenstein, Hermann F.; Inglis, Andrew

    2017-01-31

    A neutron detector includes a pressure vessel, an electrically conductive field cage assembly within the pressure vessel and an imaging subsystem. A pressurized gas mixture of CF.sub.4, .sup.3He and .sup.4He at respective partial pressures is used. The field cage establishes a relatively large drift region of low field strength, in which ionization electrons generated by neutron-He interactions are directed toward a substantially smaller amplification region of substantially higher field strength in which the ionization electrons undergo avalanche multiplication resulting in scintillation of the CF.sub.4 along scintillation tracks. The imaging system generates two-dimensional images of the scintillation patterns and employs track-finding to identify tracks and deduce the rate and direction of incident neutrons. One or more photo-multiplier tubes record the time-profile of the scintillation tracks permitting the determination of the third coordinate.

  12. Portable Neutron Sensors for Emergency Response Operations

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-06-24

    This article presents the experimental work performed in the area of neutron detector development at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews Operations (RSL-AO) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the last four years. During the 1950s neutron detectors were developed mostly to characterize nuclear reactors where the neutron flux is high. Due to the indirect nature of neutron detection via interaction with other particles, neutron counting and neutron energy measurements have never been as precise as gamma-ray counting measurements and gamma-ray spectroscopy. This indirect nature is intrinsic to all neutron measurement endeavors (except perhaps for neutron spin-related experiments, viz. neutron spin-echo measurements where one obtains μeV energy resolution). In emergency response situations generally the count rates are low, and neutrons may be scattered around in inhomogeneous intervening materials. It is also true that neutron sensors are most efficient for the lowest energy neutrons, so it is not as easy to detect and count energetic neutrons. Most of the emergency response neutron detectors are offshoots of nuclear device diagnostics tools and special nuclear materials characterization equipment, because that is what is available commercially. These instruments mostly are laboratory equipment, and not field-deployable gear suited for mobile teams. Our goal is to design and prototype field-deployable, ruggedized, lightweight, efficient neutron detectors.

  13. Urinary excretion of cyclic nucleotides, creatinine prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2 from mice exposed to whole-body irradiation from an enhanced neutron field

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, L.K.; Rafferty, M.A.; Wolfe, W.W.; Egan, J.E.; Kennedy, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Urine volume and excretion of cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and creatinine were evaluated as potential indicators of radiation damage in mice given 2-5 Gy to the whole body from an enhanced neutron field. In general, urinary cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, creatinine and urine volumes were positively correlated across time postexposure, for each radiation dose. TxB2 levels positively correlated with urine volume and cyclic AMP excretion only in animals given 2.0Gy. None of these parameters suggests their use as a prognostic indicator of the extent of radiation damage. Urinary excretion of PGE2 was negatively correlated with other urinary parameters. Biphasic increases in urinary PGE2 were also observed. The initial transient elevation 2-3 days postexposure was not correlated with the dose (2-5 Gy). The second elevation of PGE2 excretion occurred at 6-10 days. The magnitude of the latter increase suggests that urinary PGE2 excretion may be a useful indicator of whole-body or kidney exposure to neutron fields.

  14. Crystal field splittings of PrX 2 compounds (X=Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Ni) studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; De Jongh, L. J.; Huiskamp, W. J.; Furrer, A.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron inelastic scattering experiments have been performed on polycrystalline samples of the cubic Laves phase compounds PrX 2(X=Pt, Rh, Ir, Ni). Measurements in the paramagnetic state yield LLW parameters 0.6< x<1 and W<0. In this region various levels cross at an x value 0.86 and as a consequence the electronic ground state in the paramagnetic regime is either the singlet Γ 1, or the non-magnetic doublet Γ 3. Measurements in the ferromagnetic state support these conclusions. The crystal-field parameters obtained can be used in model calculations of some macroscopic quantities, in particular the specific heat and the spontaneous magnetization. The variation of the x values in the present series of Laves phase compounds evidences the presence of a contribution by conduction electrons to the crystal field.

  15. Personal neutron dosimetry in the space station MIR and the Space Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Matzke, M; Otto, T; Reitz, G; Schuhmacher, H

    1999-06-01

    A passive neutron dosemeter based on nuclear track detectors and TLD's was used in 1995 and 1997 on the MIR station and in Space Shuttle flights to MIR. As it is equipped with neutron converters and shieldings of different types the track detector system allows the neutron dose equivalent to be determined in rough energy intervals. The results of the measurements on the MIR station and in the Space Shuttle flights are presented and the influence of charged particles in the complex mixed radiation field in space is discussed. Improvements are possible by means of a new active neutron dosemeter which is under development at the PTB. First measurements with a prototype in the high-energy reference fields at CERN are presented and discussed.

  16. A reference radiation facility for dosimetry at flight altitude and in space.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A; Mitaroff, A; Silari, M

    2001-01-01

    A reference facility for the intercomparison of active and passive detectors in high-energy neutron fields is available at CERN since 1993. A positive charged hadron beam (a mixture of protons and pions) with momentum of 120 GeV/c hits a copper target, 50 cm thick and 7 cm in diameter. The secondary particles produced in the interaction are filtered by a shielding of either 80 cm of concrete or 40 cm of iron. Behind the iron shielding, the resulting neutron spectrum has a maximum at about 1 MeV, with an additional high-energy component. Behind the concrete shielding, the neutron spectrum has a pronounced maximum at about 70 MeV and resembles the high-energy component of the radiation field created by cosmic rays at commercial flight altitudes. The facility is used for a variety of investigations with active and passive neutron dosimeters. Its use for measurements related to the space programme is discussed.

  17. Neutron Velocity Selector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi, Enrico

    This Patent presents a detailed description of the construction and operation of a velocity selector for neutrons with velocities up to 6000÷7000 m/s. This apparatus employs a rotating shutter designed in such a way that neutrons are passed during a portion of each rotation of the shutter, the shutter blocking all neutron radiation at other times. The selector is built up with alternate laminations of a material with high neutron capture cross section (such as, for example, cadmium, boron or gadolinium), and parallel laminations of a material with low capture probability (such as, for example, aluminium, magnesium or beryllium). This is required in order to provide a path through the shutter to the neutrons, which then pass into a ionization chamber. The timing mechanism, adopted to activate or deactivate the neutron detection, and measuring means at given times following each opening or closing of the shutter, is electronic (not mechanic), controlled by a photocell unit. The reference published article for the main topic of the present Patent is [Fermi (1947)].

  18. 1983 ORNL intercomparison of personnel neutron and gamma dosemeters

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Ninth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted during April 19-21, 1983, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dosemeters from 33 participating agencies were mounted on water-filled polyethylene elliptical phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (0.02-0.45 mSv gamma and 0.49-11.14 mSv neutron) which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor served as the radiation source for six separate exposures which used four different shield conditions: unshielded and shielded with steel, steel/concrete, and concrete. Results of the neutron measurements indicate that it is not unusual for dose equivalent estimates made under the same conditions by different agencies to differ by more than a factor of 2. Albedo systems, which were the most popular neutron monitors in this study, provided the most accurate results with CR-39 recoil track being least accurate. Track and film neutron systems exhibited problems providing measurable indication of neutron exposure at dose equivalents of about 0.50 mSv. Gamma measurements showed that TLD and film systems generally overestimated dose equivalents in the mixed radiation fields with film exhibiting significant problems providing measurable indication of gamma exposure at dose equivalents lower than about 0.15 mSv. Under the conditions of this study in which exposures were carefully controlled and participants had information concerning exposure conditions and incident spectra prior to dosemeter analysis, only slightly more than half of all neutron and gamma dose equivalent estimates met regulatory accuracy standards relative to reference values. These results indicate that continued improvement of mixed-field personnel dosimetry is required by many participating organizations. 15 references, 30 tables.

  19. An investigation into the accuracy of the albedo dosimeter DVGN-01 in measuring personnel irradiation doses in the fields of neutron radiation at nuclear power installations of the joint institute for nuclear research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskrovnaya, L. G.; Goroshkova, E. A.; Mokrov, Yu. V.

    2010-05-01

    The calculated results of research into the accuracy of an individual albedo dosimeter DVGN-01 as it corresponds to the personal equivalent dose for neutrons H p (10) and to the effective dose for neutrons E eff in the neutron fields at Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Nuclear Power Installations (JNPI) upon different geometries of irradiations are presented. It has been shown that correction coefficients are required for the specific estimation of doses by the dosimeter. These coefficients were calculated using the energy sensitivity curve of the dosimeter and the known neutron spectra at JNPI. By using the correction factors, the uncertainties of both doses will not exceed the limits given to the personnel according to the standards.

  20. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated (252)Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements.

  1. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC

    PubMed Central

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated 252Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements. PMID:27274944

  2. Testing and linearity calibration of films of phenol compounds exposed to thermal neutron field for EPR dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Gallo, S; Panzeca, S; Longo, A; Altieri, S; Bentivoglio, A; Dondi, D; Marconi, R P; Protti, N; Zeffiro, A; Marrale, M

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results obtained by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements on films of IRGANOX® 1076 phenols with and without low content (5% by weight) of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) exposed in the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor of LENA (Laboratorio Energia Nucleare Applicata) of Pavia (Italy). Thanks to their size, the phenolic films here presented are good devices for the dosimetry of beams with high dose gradient and which require accurate knowledge of the precise dose delivered. The dependence of EPR signal as function of neutron dose was investigated in the fluence range between 10(11) cm(-2) and 10(14) cm(-2). Linearity of EPR response was found and the signal was compared with that of commercial alanine films. Our analysis showed that gadolinium oxide (5% by weight) can enhance the thermal neutron sensitivity more than 18 times. Irradiated dosimetric films of phenolic compound exhibited EPR signal fading of about 4% after 10 days from irradiation.

  3. Dynamics of quantum spin liquid and spin solid phases in IPA-CuCl3 under an applied magnetic field studied with neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, A.; Garlea, V. O.; Masuda, T.; Manaka, H.; Regnault, L.-P.; Ressouche, E.; Grenier, B.; Chung, J.-H.; Qiu, Y.; Habicht, K.; Kiefer, K.; Boehm, M.

    2007-08-01

    Inelastic and elastic neutron scattering is used to study spin correlations in the quasi-one-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet IPA-CuCl3 in strong applied magnetic fields. A condensation of magnons and commensurate transverse long-range ordering is observe at a critical field Hc=9.5T . The field dependencies of the energies and polarizations of all magnon branches are investigated both below and above the transition point. Their dispersion is measured across the entire one-dimensional Brillouin zone in magnetic fields up to 14T . The critical wave vector of magnon spectrum truncation [Masuda , Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 047210 (2006)] is found to shift from hc≈0.35 at HHc . A drastic reduction of magnon bandwidths in the ordered phase [Garlea , Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 167202 (2007)] is observed and studied in detail. New features of the spectrum, presumably related to this bandwidth collapse, are observed just above the transition field.

  4. Dynamics of quantum spin liquid and spin solid phases in IPA-CuCl3 under an applied magnetic field studied with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zheludev, Andrey I; Garlea, Vasile O; Masuda, T.; Manaka, H.; Regnault, L.-P.; Ressouche, E.; Grenier, B.; Chung, J.-H.; Qiu, Y.; Habicht, Klaus; Kiefer, K.; Boehm, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Inelastic and elastic neutron scattering is used to study spin correlations in the quasi-one-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet IPA-CuCl3 in strong applied magnetic fields. A condensation of magnons and commensurate transverse long-range ordering is observe at a critical field Hc=9.5 T. The field dependencies of the energies and polarizations of all magnon branches are investigated both below and above the transition point. Their dispersion is measured across the entire one-dimensional Brillouin zone in magnetic fields up to 14 T. The critical wave vector of magnon spectrum truncation Masuda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 047210 2006 is found to shift from hc0,35 at HHC to hc=0.25 for HHC. A drastic reduction of magnon bandwidths in the ordered phase Garlea et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 167202 2007 is observed and studied in detail. New features of the spectrum, presumably related to this bandwidth collapse, are observed just above the transition field.

  5. The null magnetic field as reference for the study of geomagnetic directional effects in animals and man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beischer, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Techniques for producing very low and zero magnetic fields are considered, giving attention to the compensation of the geomagnetic field by a Helmholtz coil system, approaches utilizing the shielding power of highly permeable alloys, and the complete exclusion of the geomagnetic field with the aid of a superconductive shield. Animal experiments in low magnetic fields are discussed, together with the exposure of man to 'null' magnetic fields and the Josephson junction as a possible biosensor of magnetic fields. It is found that neither the functions nor the behavior of man changes significantly during a two-week exposure to magnetic fields below 50 gammas.

  6. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  7. Neutron/Gamma-ray discrimination through measures of fit

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri, Moslem; Prenosil, Vaclav; Cvachovec, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Statistical tests and their underlying measures of fit can be utilized to separate neutron/gamma-ray pulses in a mixed radiation field. In this article, first the application of a sample statistical test is explained. Fit measurement-based methods require true pulse shapes to be used as reference for discrimination. This requirement makes practical implementation of these methods difficult; typically another discrimination approach should be employed to capture samples of neutrons and gamma-rays before running the fit-based technique. In this article, we also propose a technique to eliminate this requirement. These approaches are applied to several sets of mixed neutron and gamma-ray pulses obtained through different digitizers using stilbene scintillator in order to analyze them and measure their discrimination quality. (authors)

  8. The neutron star zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2013-12-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission.

  9. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Moon, S.; White, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron detector and additional analysis corrections lead to slightly changed neutron fluxes. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with the reported experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. The experimental fluxes obtained agree with those of Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV.

  10. Neutron Activation Analysis of Water - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, John D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent developments in this field are emphasized. After a brief review of basic principles, topics discussed include sources of neutrons, pre-irradiation physical and chemical treatment of samples, neutron capture and gamma-ray analysis, and selected applications. Applications of neutron activation analysis of water have increased rapidly within the last few years and may be expected to increase in the future.

  11. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2014-05-01

    Our previously published code for calculating energies and bound-bound transitions of medium- Z elements at neutron star magnetic field strengths [D. Engel, M. Klews, G. Wunner, Comp. Phys. Comm. 180, 3-2-311 (2009)] was based on the adiabatic approximation. It assumes a complete decoupling of the (fast) gyration of the electrons under the action of the magnetic field and the (slow) bound motion along the field under the action of the Coulomb forces. For the single-particle orbitals this implied that each is a product of a Landau state and an (unknown) longitudinal wave function whose B-spline coefficients were determined self-consistently by solving the Hartree-Fock equations for the many-electron problem on a finite-element grid. In the present code we go beyond the adiabatic approximation, by allowing the transverse part of each orbital to be a superposition of Landau states, while assuming that the longitudinal part can be approximated by the same wave function in each Landau level. Inserting this ansatz into the energy variational principle leads to a system of coupled equations in which the B-spline coefficients depend on the weights of the individual Landau states, and vice versa, and which therefore has to be solved in a doubly self-consistent manner. The extended ansatz takes into account the back-reaction of the Coulomb motion of the electrons along the field direction on their motion in the plane perpendicular to the field, an effect which cannot be captured by the adiabatic approximation. The new code allows for the inclusion of up to 8 Landau levels. This reduces the relative error of energy values as compared to the adiabatic approximation results by typically a factor of three (1/3 of the original error) and yields accurate results also in regions of lower neutron star magnetic field strengths where the adiabatic approximation fails. Further improvements in the code are a more sophisticated choice of the initial wave functions, which takes into

  12. Comparison of graphite, aluminum, and TransHab shielding material characteristics in a high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.; Thibeault, Sheila

    2002-01-01

    Space radiation transport models clearly show that low atomic weight materials provide a better shielding protection for interplanetary human missions than high atomic weight materials. These model studies have concentrated on shielding properties against charged particles. A light-weight, inflatable habitat module called TransHab was built and shown to provide adequate protection against micrometeoroid impacts and good shielding properties against charged particle radiation in the International Space Station orbits. An experiment using a tissue equivalent proportional counter, to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra with graphite, aluminum, and a TransHab build-up as shielding, was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. It is a continuation of a previous study using regolith and doped polyethylene materials. This paper describes the results and their comparison with the previous study. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  13. Comparison of graphite, aluminum, and TransHab shielding material characteristics in a high-energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Huff, H; Wilkins, R; Thibeault, Sheila

    2002-12-01

    Space radiation transport models clearly show that low atomic weight materials provide a better shielding protection for interplanetary human missions than high atomic weight materials. These model studies have concentrated on shielding properties against charged particles. A light-weight, inflatable habitat module called TransHab was built and shown to provide adequate protection against micrometeoroid impacts and good shielding properties against charged particle radiation in the International Space Station orbits. An experiment using a tissue equivalent proportional counter, to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra with graphite, aluminum, and a TransHab build-up as shielding, was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. It is a continuation of a previous study using regolith and doped polyethylene materials. This paper describes the results and their comparison with the previous study.

  14. In-field Calibration of a Fast Neutron Collar for the Measurement of Fresh PWR Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; De Baere, Paul

    2015-04-17

    A new neutron collar has been designed for the measurement of fresh LEU fuel assemblies. This collar uses “fast mode” measurement to reduce the effect of burnable poison rods on the assay and thus reduce the dependence on the operator’s declaration. The new collar design reduces effect of poison rods considerably. Instead of 12 pins of 5.2% Gd causing a 20.4% effect, as in the standard thermal mode collar, they only cause a 3.2% effect in the new collar. However it has higher efficiency so that reasonably precise measurements can be made in 25 minutes, rather than the 1 hour of previous collars. The new collar is fully compatible with the use of the standard data collection and analysis code INCC. This report describes the calibration that was made with a mock-up assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory and with actual assemblies at the AREVA Fuel fabrication Plant in Lingen, Germany.

  15. The Time Evolution of the Earth's Gravity Field Since 2002: Do we need to rethink geopotential-based reference systems in the GRACE era?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, R. S.; Hardy, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The gravity field of the Earth has changed dramatically over the last few decades as it responds to the melting of continental ice, depletion of groundwater, glacial isostatic adjustment, earthquakes, and other effects. The GRACE mission, launched in 2002, allows us to quantify these effects on gravity anomalies, geoid heights, deflections, and geopotential-based vertical reference systems at long wavelengths. We will examine these changes in different parts of the world and discuss the potential implications for different applications employing static (mean) gravity field models. We will furthermore show that GRACE and future satellite gravity missions can inform the changes in these vertical datums as the Earth's gravity field continues to evolve.

  16. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern science

  17. The energy release and temperature field in the ultracold neutron source of the WWR-M reactor at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Kislitsin, B. V.; Onegin, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Prudnikov, D. V.; Ilatovskiy, V. A.; Orlov, S. P.; Kirsanov, G. A.; Fomin, A. K.; Filchenkova, D. V.

    2016-12-01

    Results of calculations of energy releases and temperature fields in the ultracold neutron source under design at the WWR-M reactor are presented. It is shown that, with the reactor power of 18 MW, the power of energy release in the 40-L volume of the source with superfluid helium will amount to 28.5 W, while 356 W will be released in a liquid-deuterium premoderator. The lead shield between the reactor core and the source reduces the radiative heat release by an order of magnitude. A thermal power of 22 kW is released in it, which is removed by passage of water. The distribution of temperatures in all components of the vacuum structure is presented, and the temperature does not exceed 100°C at full reactor power. The calculations performed make it possible to go to design of the source.

  18. Neutron detector characterization for SCINTIA array

    SciTech Connect

    Matei, C.; Hambsch, F. J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2011-07-01

    SCINTIA is a new detector array of organic scintillators under development at the Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). The present design of SCINTIA includes NE213, p-terphenyl and Li glass neutron detectors positioned in a spherical configuration around the target. The properties of a novel p-terphenyl neutron detector to be used with SCINTIA have been investigated using photon sources and neutrons from a time tagged {sup 252}Cf(sf) source. The results show that the p-terphenyl crystal has better energy resolution, increased proton light output and neutron efficiency when compared to a similar size NE213 equivalent neutron detector. (authors)

  19. Ferromagnetism in neutron matter and its implication for the neutron star equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, J. P. W.; Scholtz, F. G.

    2011-09-21

    We investigate the possible contribution of the ferromagnetic phase of neutron matter in the neutron star interior to the star's magnetic field. We introduce a relativistic, self-consistent calculation of the ferromagnetic phase in neutron matter within the context of the relativistic mean-field approximation. The presence of the ferromagnetic phase stiffens the star's equation of state which implies a larger neutron star radius compared to the non-ferromagnetic case.

  20. Ferromagnetism in neutron matter and its implication for the neutron star equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, J. P. W.; Scholtz, F. G.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the possible contribution of the ferromagnetic phase of neutron matter in the neutron star interior to the star's magnetic field. We introduce a relativistic, self-consistent calculation of the ferromagnetic phase in neutron matter within the context of the relativistic mean-field approximation. The presence of the ferromagnetic phase stiffens the star's equation of state which implies a larger neutron star radius compared to the non-ferromagnetic case.

  1. Radii of neutron drops probed via the neutron skin thickness of nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, P. W.; Gandolfi, S.

    2016-10-10

    Multineutron systems are crucial to understanding the physics of neutron-rich nuclei and neutron stars. Neutron drops, neutrons confined in an external field, are investigated systematically in both nonrelativistic and relativistic density functional theories and with ab initio calculations. Here, we demonstrate a new strong linear correlation, which is universal in the realm of mean-field models, between the rms radii of neutron drops and the neutron skin thickness of 208 Pb and 48 Ca , i.e., the difference between the neutron and proton rms radii of a nucleus. This correlation can be used to deduce the radii of neutron drops frommore » the measured neutron skin thickness in a model-independent way, and the radii obtained for neutron drops can provide a useful constraint for realistic three-neutron forces, due to its high quality. Furthermore, we present a new correlation between the slope L of the symmetry energy and the radii of neutron drops, and provide the first validation of such a correlation by using density-functional models and ab initio calculations. These newly established correlations, together with more precise measurements of the neutron skin thicknesses of 208 Pb and 48 Ca and/or accurate determinations of L , will have an enduring impact on the understanding of multineutron interactions, neutron-rich nuclei, neutron stars, etc.« less

  2. Radii of neutron drops probed via the neutron skin thickness of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P. W.; Gandolfi, S.

    2016-10-10

    Multineutron systems are crucial to understanding the physics of neutron-rich nuclei and neutron stars. Neutron drops, neutrons confined in an external field, are investigated systematically in both nonrelativistic and relativistic density functional theories and with ab initio calculations. Here, we demonstrate a new strong linear correlation, which is universal in the realm of mean-field models, between the rms radii of neutron drops and the neutron skin thickness of 208 Pb and 48 Ca , i.e., the difference between the neutron and proton rms radii of a nucleus. This correlation can be used to deduce the radii of neutron drops from the measured neutron skin thickness in a model-independent way, and the radii obtained for neutron drops can provide a useful constraint for realistic three-neutron forces, due to its high quality. Furthermore, we present a new correlation between the slope L of the symmetry energy and the radii of neutron drops, and provide the first validation of such a correlation by using density-functional models and ab initio calculations. These newly established correlations, together with more precise measurements of the neutron skin thicknesses of 208 Pb and 48 Ca and/or accurate determinations of L , will have an enduring impact on the understanding of multineutron interactions, neutron-rich nuclei, neutron stars, etc.

  3. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1987-01-01

    The invention comprises a neutron detector (50) of very high temporal resolution that is particularly well suited for measuring the fusion reaction neutrons produced by laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets. The detector comprises a biased two-conductor traveling-wave transmission line (54, 56, 58, 68) having a uranium cathode (60) and a phosphor anode (62) as respective parts of the two conductors. A charge line and Auston switch assembly (70, 72, 74) launch an electric field pulse along the transmission line. Neutrons striking the uranium cathode at a location where the field pulse is passing, are enabled to strike the phosphor anode and produce light that is recorded on photographic film (64). The transmission line may be variously configured to achieve specific experimental goals.

  4. Activities of X-ray binaries accompanied by a neutron star with weak magnetic field: Cir X-1, Aql X-1 and 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Asai, Kazumi

    This paper is presented on X-ray activities of X-ray binaries accompanied by a neutron star with weak magnetic field. Neutron star low mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs) have been well studied so far, but there are still unknown problems concerning activities of outbursts and X-ray spectral features. We can define the soft and hard states which show different spectra created from each disk structure. These states depend on the gas accretion rate causing viscosity change in the disk, whereas we have pointed out an importance of magnetic field in NS-LMXB for X-ray activities (Matsuoka & Asai 2013). Thus, we have obtained decay features occurred by a propeller effect for Aql X-1 and 4U1608-52, and thus, we have defined the propeller effect levels of these sources (Asai et al. 2013). A companion star of Cir X-1 is a star of B5~A0 type, but it has X-ray spectral feature similar to NS-LMXB as well as it produced type I X-ray bursts. A long history over 40 years of X-ray observations has provided that Cir X-1 X-ray intensities have many varieties from continuous variable fluxes with Z-type feature of NS-LMXB to recurrent outburst fluxes with Atoll-type feature on a time scale of years. Recent MAXI observations have revealed a strange sudden decay feature in some outbursts. It is difficult to explain this decay feature by the simple picture which causes by ordinary mechanisms known in NS-LMXB such as a state transition, a propeller effect and a brink due to disk irradiation (Powell et al. 2007). Therefore, we introduced new type of instability of the accretion disk in relation to stellar wind stripping effect (Asai et al. 2014) which may be common to a system consisting of a compact star and an ordinary massive star.

  5. Emulation of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) components with the 3-shell head model and the problem of 'ghost potential fields' when using an average reference in brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, J E; Chalklin, V; Tomberg, C

    1990-01-01

    In brain topographic mapping, the putative location and orientation in the head space of neural generators are currently inferred from the features of negative and positive scalp potential fields. This procedure requires the use of a fairly neutral reference. The frequently advocated average reference creates problems because its effect is not merely to change a (steady) zero reference level, but to dynamically zero-center all scalp potentials at each latency. Ghost potential fields are thus created at the latencies for which the integral of scalp recorded potentials differs from zero. These distortions of brain mapping have been analyzed with a true 3-shell head model in conjunction with the emulation of SEP components. In the head model, surface potential fields generated by dipoles or dipole sheets of various depths and orientations were computed either over the north hemisphere, so as to emulate scalp recorded SEP components, or over the entire equivalent head sphere. The spurious effects of the average reference are shown to occur because it is computed from a limited number of (scalp) electrodes which fail to survey the bottom half of the head.

  6. Close binary neutron star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marronetti, Pedro

    1999-12-01

    We present a method to calculate solutions to the initial value problem in (3 + 1) general relativity corresponding to binary neutron-star systems (BNS) in irrotational quasi-equilibrium orbits. The initial value equations are solved using a conformally flat spatial metric tensor. The stellar fluid dynamics corresponds to that of systems with zero vorticity in the inertial reference frame. Irrotational systems like the ones analyzed in the present work are likely to resemble the final stages of the evolution of neutron-star binaries, thus providing insights on the inspiral process. The fluid velocity is derived from the gradient of a scalar potential. A numerical program was developed to solve the elliptic equations for the metric fields and the fluid velocity potential. We discuss the different numerical techniques employed to achieve high resolution across the stellar volume, as well as the methods used to find solutions to the Poisson-like equations with their corresponding boundary conditions. We present sequences of quasi-stable circular orbits which conserve baryonic mass. These sequences mimic the time evolution of the inspiral and are obtained without solving the complex evolution equations. They also provide sets of initial value data for future time evolution codes, which should be valid very close to the final merger. We evaluate the emission of gravitational radiation during the evolution through multipole expansions methods.

  7. The potential of detecting intermediate-scale biomass and canopy interception in a coniferous forest using cosmic-ray neutron intensity measurements and neutron transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, M.; Looms, M. C.; Bogena, H. R.; Desilets, D.; Zreda, M. G.; Sonnenborg, T. O.; Jensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The water stored in the various compartments of the terrestrial ecosystem (in snow, canopy interception, soil and litter) controls the exchange of the water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. Therefore, measurements of the water stored within these pools are critical for the prediction of e.g. evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. The detection of cosmic-ray neutron intensity is a novel non-invasive method for the quantification of continuous intermediate-scale soil moisture. The footprint of the cosmic-ray neutron probe is a hemisphere of a few hectometers and subsurface depths of 10-70 cm depending on wetness. The cosmic-ray neutron method offers measurements at a scale between the point-scale measurements and large-scale satellite retrievals. The cosmic-ray neutron intensity is inversely correlated to the hydrogen stored within the footprint. Overall soil moisture represents the largest pool of hydrogen and changes in the soil moisture clearly affect the cosmic-ray neutron signal. However, the neutron intensity is also sensitive to variations of hydrogen in snow, canopy interception and biomass offering the potential to determine water content in such pools from the signal. In this study we tested the potential of determining canopy interception and biomass using cosmic-ray neutron intensity measurements within the framework of the Danish Hydrologic Observatory (HOBE) and the Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO). Continuous measurements at the ground and the canopy level, along with profile measurements were conducted at towers at forest field sites. Field experiments, including shielding the cosmic-ray neutron probes with cadmium foil (to remove lower-energy neutrons) and measuring reference intensity rates at complete water saturated conditions (on the sea close to the HOBE site), were further conducted to obtain an increased understanding of the physics controlling the cosmic-ray neutron transport and the equipment used

  8. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  10. Direct Experimental Limit on Neutron-Mirror-Neutron Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, G.; Lefort, T.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Daum, M.; Henneck, R.; Heule, S.; Kasprzak, M.; Kirch, K.; Knecht, A.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Zsigmond, G.; Khomutov, N.; Knowles, P.; Rebetez, M.; Weis, A.; Plonka, C.

    2007-10-19

    In case a mirror world with a copy of our ordinary particle spectrum would exist, the neutron n and its degenerate partner, the mirror neutron n{sup '}, could potentially mix and undergo nn{sup '} oscillations. The interaction of an ordinary magnetic field with the ordinary neutron would lift the degeneracy between the mirror partners, diminish the n{sup '} amplitude in the n wave function and, thus, suppress its observability. We report an experimental comparison of ultracold neutron storage in a trap with and without superimposed magnetic field. No influence of the magnetic field is found and, assuming negligible mirror magnetic fields, a limit on the oscillation time {tau}{sub nn{sup '}}>103 s (95% C.L.) is derived.

  11. Annotated bibliography of selected references on shoreline barrier island deposits with emphasis on Patrick Draw Field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Schatzinger, R.A.

    1993-07-01

    This bibliography contains 290 annotated references on barrier island and associated depositional environments and reservoirs. It is not an exhaustive compilation of all references on the subject, but rather selected papers on barrier islands, and the depositional processes of formation. Papers that examine the morphology and internal architecture of barrier island deposits, exploration and development technologies are emphasized. Papers were selected that aid in understanding reservoir architecture and engineering technologies to help maximize recovery efficiency from barrier island oil reservoirs. Barrier islands from Wyoming, Montana and the Rocky Mountains basins are extensively covered.

  12. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  13. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  14. Estimation of neutron-equivalent dose in organs of patients undergoing radiotherapy by the use of a novel online digital detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Doblado, F.; Domingo, C.; Gómez, F.; Sánchez-Nieto, B.; Muñiz, J. L.; García-Fusté, M. J.; Expósito, M. R.; Barquero, R.; Hartmann, G.; Terrón, J. A.; Pena, J.; Méndez, R.; Gutiérrez, F.; Guerre, F. X.; Roselló, J.; Núñez, L.; Brualla-González, L.; Manchado, F.; Lorente, A.; Gallego, E.; Capote, R.; Planes, D.; Lagares, J. I.; González-Soto, X.; Sansaloni, F.; Colmenares, R.; Amgarou, K.; Morales, E.; Bedogni, R.; Cano, J. P.; Fernández, F.

    2012-10-01

    Neutron peripheral contamination in patients undergoing high-energy photon radiotherapy is considered as a risk factor for secondary cancer induction. Organ-specific neutron-equivalent dose estimation is therefore essential for a reasonable assessment of these associated risks. This work aimed to develop a method to estimate neutron-equivalent doses in multiple organs of radiotherapy patients. The method involved the convolution, at 16 reference points in an anthropomorphic phantom, of the normalized Monte Carlo neutron fluence energy spectra with the kerma and energy-dependent radiation weighting factor. This was then scaled with the total neutron fluence measured with passive detectors, at the same reference points, in order to obtain the equivalent doses in organs. The latter were correlated with the readings of a neutron digital detector located inside the treatment room during phantom irradiation. This digital detector, designed and developed by our group, integrates the thermal neutron fluence. The correlation model, applied to the digital detector readings during patient irradiation, enables the online estimation of neutron-equivalent doses in organs. The model takes into account the specific irradiation site, the field parameters (energy, field size, angle incidence, etc) and the installation (linac and bunker geometry). This method, which is suitable for routine clinical use, will help to systematically generate the dosimetric data essential for the improvement of current risk-estimation models.

  15. Estimation of neutron-equivalent dose in organs of patients undergoing radiotherapy by the use of a novel online digital detector.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Doblado, F; Domingo, C; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Muñiz, J L; García-Fusté, M J; Expósito, M R; Barquero, R; Hartmann, G; Terrón, J A; Pena, J; Méndez, R; Gutiérrez, F; Guerre, F X; Roselló, J; Núñez, L; Brualla-González, L; Manchado, F; Lorente, A; Gallego, E; Capote, R; Planes, D; Lagares, J I; González-Soto, X; Sansaloni, F; Colmenares, R; Amgarou, K; Morales, E; Bedogni, R; Cano, J P; Fernández, F

    2012-10-07

    Neutron peripheral contamination in patients undergoing high-energy photon radiotherapy is considered as a risk factor for secondary cancer induction. Organ-specific neutron-equivalent dose estimation is therefore essential for a reasonable assessment of these associated risks. This work aimed to develop a method to estimate neutron-equivalent doses in multiple organs of radiotherapy patients. The method involved the convolution, at 16 reference points in an anthropomorphic phantom, of the normalized Monte Carlo neutron fluence energy spectra with the kerma and energy-dependent radiation weighting factor. This was then scaled with the total neutron fluence measured with passive detectors, at the same reference points, in order to obtain the equivalent doses in organs. The latter were correlated with the readings of a neutron digital detector located inside the treatment room during phantom irradiation. This digital detector, designed and developed by our group, integrates the thermal neutron fluence. The correlation model, applied to the digital detector readings during patient irradiation, enables the online estimation of neutron-equivalent doses in organs. The model takes into account the specific irradiation site, the field parameters (energy, field size, angle incidence, etc) and the installation (linac and bunker geometry). This method, which is suitable for routine clinical use, will help to systematically generate the dosimetric data essential for the improvement of current risk-estimation models.

  16. Magnetization Response of the Bulk and Supplementary Magnetic Domain Structure in High-Permeability Steel Laminations Visualized In Situ by Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Irastorza-Landa, A.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Pomjakushina, E.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-08-01

    Industrial transformer cores are composed of stacked high-permeability steel laminations (HPSLs). The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the magnetic properties of each HPSL. In this article, we show how the neutron dark-field image (DFI) allows for the in situ visualization of the locally resolved response of the bulk and supplementary magnetic domain structures in HPSLs under the influence of externally applied magnetic fields. In particular, we investigate the domain formation and growth along the initial magnetization curve up to the saturated state. For decreasing field, we visualize the recurrence of the hysteretic domain structure down to the remanent state. Additionally, the DFI allows us to derive a correlation between the grain orientation and the corresponding volume and supplementary domain structure. Furthermore, we visualize the influence of the insulation coating, introducing desired tensile stresses on the domain structures. To compare our DFI findings to traditional methods, we perform complementary surface-sensitive magneto-optical Kerr-microscopy investigations.

  17. Extension of the LOPLS-AA Force Field for Alcohols, Esters, and Monoolein Bilayers and its Validation by Neutron Scattering Experiments.

    PubMed

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Morhenn, Humphrey; Lautner, Lisa; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Nemkovski, Kirill S; Unruh, Tobias; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2015-12-10

    The recently presented LOPLS-AA all-atom force field for long hydrocarbon chains, based on the OPLS-AA force field, was extended to alcohols, esters, and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) lipids as a model lipid. Dihedral angles were fitted against high level ab initio calculations, and ester charges were increased to improve their hydration properties. Additionally, the ester Lennard-Jones parameters were readjusted to reproduce experimental liquid bulk properties, densities, and heats of vaporization. This extension enabled the setup of LOPLS-AA parameters for GMO molecules. The properties of the lipid force field were tested for the liquid-crystalline phase of a GMO bilayer. The obtained area per lipid for GMO is in good agreement with experiment. Additionally, the lipid dynamics on the subpicosecond to the nanosecond time scale is in excellent agreement with results from time-of-flight (TOF) quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments on a multilamellar monoolein system, enabling here for the first time the critical evaluation of the short-time dynamics obtained from a molecular dynamics simulation of a membrane system.

  18. The influence of laser scribing on magnetic domain formation in grain oriented electrical steel visualized by directional neutron dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, P; Betz, B; Hauptmann, J; Wetzig, A; Beyer, E; Grünzweig, C

    2016-12-02

    The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the bulk magnetic properties of grain oriented electrical steel laminations. The core losses can be improved by post manufacturing methods, so-called domain refinement techniques. All these methods induce mechanical or thermal stress that refines the domain structure. The most commonly used technique is laser scribing due to the no-contact nature and the ease of integration in existing production systems. Here we show how directional neutron dark-field imaging allows visualizing the impact of laser scribing on the bulk and supplementary domain structure. In particular, we investigate the domain formation during magnetization of samples depending on laser treatment parameters such as laser energy and line distances. The directional dark-field imaging findings were quantitatively interpreted in the context with global magnetic hysteresis measurements. Especially we exploit the orientation sensitivity in the dark-field images to distinguish between different domain structures alignment and their relation to the laser scribing process.

  19. The influence of laser scribing on magnetic domain formation in grain oriented electrical steel visualized by directional neutron dark-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, P.; Betz, B.; Hauptmann, J.; Wetzig, A.; Beyer, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-12-01

    The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the bulk magnetic properties of grain oriented electrical steel laminations. The core losses can be improved by post manufacturing methods, so-called domain refinement techniques. All these methods induce mechanical or thermal stress that refines the domain structure. The most commonly used technique is laser scribing due to the no-contact nature and the ease of integration in existing production systems. Here we show how directional neutron dark-field imaging allows visualizing the impact of laser scribing on the bulk and supplementary domain structure. In particular, we investigate the domain formation during magnetization of samples depending on laser treatment parameters such as laser energy and line distances. The directional dark-field imaging findings were quantitatively interpreted in the context with global magnetic hysteresis measurements. Especially we exploit the orientation sensitivity in the dark-field images to distinguish between different domain structures alignment and their relation to the laser scribing process.

  20. The influence of laser scribing on magnetic domain formation in grain oriented electrical steel visualized by directional neutron dark-field imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rauscher, P.; Betz, B.; Hauptmann, J.; Wetzig, A.; Beyer, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-01-01

    The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the bulk magnetic properties of grain oriented electrical steel laminations. The core losses can be improved by post manufacturing methods, so-called domain refinement techniques. All these methods induce mechanical or thermal stress that refines the domain structure. The most commonly used technique is laser scribing due to the no-contact nature and the ease of integration in existing production systems. Here we show how directional neutron dark-field imaging allows visualizing the impact of laser scribing on the bulk and supplementary domain structure. In particular, we investigate the domain formation during magnetization of samples depending on laser treatment parameters such as laser energy and line distances. The directional dark-field imaging findings were quantitatively interpreted in the context with global magnetic hysteresis measurements. Especially we exploit the orientation sensitivity in the dark-field images to distinguish between different domain structures alignment and their relation to the laser scribing process. PMID:27910922