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Sample records for neutron reflectometry study

  1. Dynamics of pseudo-partial wetting studied by neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esibov, Levon; Sarkisov, Dmitry; Jeng, U.-Ser; Crow, M. L.; Steyerl, Albert

    The structural changes occurring in oil layers during condensation of deuterated octane (C 8D 18) on the surface of a solid (single-crystal silicon) and a liquid (water solution with low (0.08 wt%) concentration of a non-ionic surfactant (C 10E 4) have been studied by neutron reflectometry. The results demonstrate the presence of pseudo-partial wetting during condensation. The van der Waals attractive potential stabilizes a thin oil film coexisting with the residual droplet. We report a study of the growth dynamics of the residual droplet.

  2. Isotope-Identifying neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitenko, Yu. V. Petrenko, A. V.; Gundorin, N. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2015-07-15

    The possibilities of an isotope-indentifying study of layered structures in different regimes of a neutron wave field are considered. The detection of specularly reflected neutrons and secondary radiation (caused by neutron capture) in the form of charged particles, γ quanta, and nuclear fission fragments, as well as neutrons spin-flipped in a noncollinear magnetic field and on nuclei of elements with spin, makes it possible to implement isotope-indentifying neutron reflectometry.

  3. Temperature-controlled neutron reflectometry sample cell suitable for study of photoactive thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, Kevin G.; Tanchak, Oleh M.; Barrett, Christopher J.; Watson, Mike J.; Fritzsche, Helmut

    2006-04-15

    We describe a novel cell design intended for the study of photoactive materials using neutron reflectometry. The cell can maintain sample temperature and control of ambient atmospheric environment. Critically, the cell is built with an optical port, enabling light irradiation or light probing of the sample, simultaneous with neutron reflectivity measurements. The ability to measure neutron reflectivity with simultaneous temperature ramping and/or light illumination presents unique opportunities for measuring photoactive materials. To validate the cell design, we present preliminary results measuring the photoexpansion of thin films of azobenzene polymer.

  4. Neutron Reflectometry Studies Define Prion Protein N-terminal Peptide Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Le Brun, Anton P.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.; James, Michael; Boland, Martin P.; Collins, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP), widely recognized to misfold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the misfolding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various posttranslational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha- and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2, respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Our previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption. In the current study we aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, we used neutron reflectometry to define the structural details of this interaction in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with our previous studies, interaction was stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. This was most evident for the N1 peptide and suggests an induction of increased lipid order in the absence of phase transition. These observations stand in clear contrast to the findings of analogous studies of Ab and α-synuclein and thereby support the possibility of a functional role for such N-terminal fragment-membrane interactions. PMID:25418300

  5. Methanol Diffusion into Thin Ionomer Films: An in situ Study Using Neutron Reflectometry .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lilin

    2008-03-01

    THUSITHA, N. ETAMPAWALA DVORA, PERAHIA ^ Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 JAROSLAW MAJEWSKI, Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 CHRISTOPHER J. CORNELIUS^ Sandia National Laboratories, MS 0886, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0886 The penetration of solvent into a polymer that consists of incompatable groups is determined by the specific interactions with the guest molecule, where interfacial structure and dynamics of the polymer affect the onset of the process. The current work presents a neutron reflectometry study of the penetration of methanol into sulfonated polyphenlylene thin films. The ionomer films were exposed to saturated deuterated methanol vapor and reflectometry patterns were recorded until equilibrium was reached. The process incorporates two stages where the vapors first wet the surface and then penetrate into the film. Significant swelling takes place as soon as the film is exposed to the vapors. Similar to previous studied in water, the onset diffusion is Fickian followed by an anomalous diffusion process. The entire process however is faster than that observed for water.

  6. Polymers and surfactants at fluid interfaces studied with specular neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Braun, Larissa; Uhlig, Martin; von Klitzing, Regine; Campbell, Richard A

    2017-07-12

    This review addresses the advances made with specular neutron reflectometry in studies of aqueous mixtures of polymers and surfactants at fluid interfaces during the last decade (or so). The increase in neutron flux due to improvements in instrumentation has led to routine measurements at the air/water interface that are faster and involve samples with lower isotopic contrast than in previous experiments. One can now resolve the surface excess of a single deuterated component on the second time scale and the composition of a mixture on the minute time scale, and information about adsorption processes and dynamic rheology can also be accessed. Research areas addressed include the types of formed equilibrium surface structures, the link to foam film stability and the range of non-equilibrium effects that dominate the behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant mixtures, macroscopic film formation in like-charged polymer/surfactant mixtures, and the properties of mixtures of bio-polymers with surfactants and lipids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An X-ray and neutron reflectometry study of ‘PEG-like’ plasma polymer films

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, Donna J.; Nelson, Andrew; Shen, Hsin-Hui; McLean, Keith M.; Forsythe, John S.; Gengenbach, Thomas; Fong, Celesta; Muir, Benjamin W.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapour-deposited films of di(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether were analysed by a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), X-ray and neutron reflectometry (NR). The combination of these techniques enabled a systematic study of the impact of plasma deposition conditions upon resulting film chemistry (empirical formula), mass densities, structure and water solvation, which has been correlated with the films' efficacy against protein fouling. All films were shown to contain substantially less hydrogen than the original monomer and absorb a vast amount of water, which correlated with their mass density profiles. A proportion of the plasma polymer hydrogen atoms were shown to be exchangeable, while QCM-D measurements were inaccurate in detecting associated water in lower power films that contained loosely bound material. The higher protein resistance of the films deposited at a low load power was attributed to its greater chemical and structural similarity to that of poly(ethylene glycol) graft surfaces. These studies demonstrate the utility of using X-ray and NR analysis techniques in furthering the understanding of the chemistry of these films and their interaction with water and proteins. PMID:21957120

  8. Time-resolved neutron reflectometry and photovoltaic device studies on sequentially deposited PCDTBT-fullerene layers.

    PubMed

    Clulow, Andrew J; Tao, Chen; Lee, Kwan H; Velusamy, Marappan; McEwan, Jake A; Shaw, Paul E; Yamada, Norifumi L; James, Michael; Burn, Paul L; Gentle, Ian R; Meredith, Paul

    2014-09-30

    We have used steady-state and time-resolved neutron reflectometry to study the diffusion of fullerene derivatives into the narrow optical gap polymer poly[N-9″-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) to explore the sequential processing of the donor and acceptor for the preparation of efficient organic solar cells. It was found that when [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (60-PCBM) was deposited onto a thin film of PCDTBT from dichloromethane (DCM), a three-layer structure was formed that was stable below the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. When good solvents for the polymer were used in conjunction with DCM, both 60-PCBM and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (70-PCBM) were seen to form films that had a thick fullerene layer containing little polymer and a PCDTBT-rich layer near the interface with the substrate. Devices composed of films prepared by sequential deposition of the polymer and fullerene had efficiencies of up to 5.3%, with those based on 60-PCBM close to optimized bulk heterojunction (BHJ) cells processed in the conventional manner. Sequential deposition of pure components to form the active layer is attractive for large-area device fabrication, and the results demonstrate that this processing method can give efficient solar cells.

  9. Adsorption of cationic polyacrylamide at the cellulose-liquid interface: a neutron reflectometry study.

    PubMed

    Su, Jielong; Garvey, Christopher J; Holt, Stephen; Tabor, Rico F; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Batchelor, Warren; Garnier, Gil

    2015-06-15

    The layer thickness and density of high molecular weight cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) adsorbed at the cellulose-water interface was quantified by neutron reflectometry. The thickness of a full monolayer of CPAM of constant molecular weight (13 MD) but different charge densities, adsorbed with or without NaCl (10(-3) M), was studied. Thin cellulose films (40±7 Å) of roughness <10 Å were produced by spin coating a cellulose acetate-acetone solution and regenerating by alkaline hydrolysis. Film smoothness was greatly improved by controlling the concentration of cellulose acetate (0.13 wt%) and the hydrolysis time in sodium methoxide. The adsorption thickness of CPAM (40% charge 13 MD) at the solid-D2O interface was 43±4 Å on cellulose and 13±2 Å on silicon, an order of magnitude smaller than the CPAM radius of gyration. At constant molecular weight, the thickness of the CPAM layer adsorbed on cellulose increases with polymer charge density (10±1 Å at 5%). Addition of 10(-3) M NaCl decreased the thickness of CPAM layer already adsorbed on cellulose. However, the adsorption layer on cellulose of a CPAM solution equilibrated in 10(-3) M NaCl is much thicker (89±11 Å for 40% CPAM). For high molecular weight CPAMs adsorbed from solution under constant conditions, the adsorption layer can be varied by 1 order of magnitude via control of the variables affecting electrostatic intra- and inter-polymer chain interactions.

  10. Deuterium Labeling Strategies for Creating Contrast in Structure-Function Studies of Model Bacterial Outer Membranes Using Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Le Brun, Anton P; Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Holden, Peter J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-01-01

    Studying the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is challenging due to the complex nature of its structure. Therefore, simplified models are required to undertake structure-function studies of processes that occur at the outer membrane/fluid interface. Model membranes can be created by immobilizing bilayers to solid supports such as gold or silicon surfaces, or as monolayers on a liquid support where the surface pressure and fluidity of the lipids can be controlled. Both model systems are amenable to having their structure probed by neutron reflectometry, a technique that provides a one-dimensional depth profile through a membrane detailing its thickness and composition. One of the strengths of neutron scattering is the ability to use contrast matching, allowing molecules containing hydrogen and those enriched with deuterium to be highlighted or matched out against the bulk isotopic composition of the solvent. Lipopolysaccharides, a major component of the outer membrane, can be isolated for incorporation into model membranes. Here, we describe the deuteration of lipopolysaccharides from rough strains of Escherichia coli for incorporation into model outer membranes, and how the use of deuterated materials enhances structural analysis of model membranes by neutron reflectometry. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Early Stages of Oxidative Stress-Induced Membrane Permeabilization: A Neutron Reflectometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Hillary L.; Howland, Michael C.; Szmodis, Alan W.; Li, Qijuan; Daemen, Luke L.; Parikh, Atul N.; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2009-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry was used to probe in situ the structure of supported lipid bilayers at the solid–liquid interface during the early stages of UV-induced oxidative degradation. Single-component supported lipid bilayers composed of gel phase, dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), and fluid phase, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), phospholipids were exposed to low-dose oxidative stress generated by UV light and their structures were examined by neutron reflectometry. An interrupted illumination mode, involving exposures in 15 min increments with 2 h intervals between subsequent exposures, and a continuous mode involving a single 60 (or 90) min exposure period were employed. In both cases, pronounced differences in the structure of the lipid bilayer after exposure were observed. Interrupted exposure led to a substantial decrease in membrane coverage but preserved its total thickness at reduced scattering length densities. These results indicate that the initial phase during UV-induced membrane degradation involves the formation of hydrophilic channels within the membrane. This is consistent with the loss of some lipid molecules we observe and attendant reorganization of residual lipids forming hemimicellar edges of the hydrophilic channels. In contrast, continuous illumination produced a graded interface of continuously varied scattering length density (and hence hydrocarbon density) extending 100–150 Å into the liquid phase. Exposure of a DPPC bilayer to UV light in the presence of a reservoir of unfused vesicles showed low net membrane disintegration during oxidative stress, presumably because of surface back-filling from the bulk reservoir. Chemical evidence for membrane degradation was obtained by mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Further evidence for the formation of hydrophilic channels was furnished by fluorescence microscopy and imaging ellipsometry data. PMID:19275260

  12. Polarized neutron reflectometry of magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toperverg, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Among a number of methods employed to characterize various types of magnetic nano-structures Polarized Neutron Reflectometry (PNR) is shown to be a unique tool providing a scope of quantitative information on magnetization arrangement over relevant scales. Deeply penetrating into materials neutron spins are able to resolve vectorial profile of magnetic induction with accuracy of a fraction of Oersted over a fraction of nano-meters. This property is exploited in measurements of specular PNR which hence constitutes the method of depth resolved vector magnetometry widely used to examine magnetic states in exchange coupled magnetic superlattices, exchange bias systems, spin valves, exchange springs, superconducting/ferromagnetic heterostructure, etc. Off-specular polarized neutron scattering (OS-PNS) measures the in-plane magnetization distribution over scales from hundreds of nanoto hundreds of micrometers providing, in combination with specular PNR, access to lateral long range fluctuations of the magnetization vector and magnetic domains in these systems. OSPNS is especially useful in studies of co-operative magnetization reversal processes in various films and multilayers laterally patterned into periodic arrays of stripes, or islands of various dimentions, shapes, internal structures, etc., representing an interest for e.g. spintronics. Smaller sizes of 10?100 nm are accessed with the method of Polarized Neutrons Grazing Incidence Small Angle Scattering (PN-GISAS), which in a combination with specular PNR and OS-PNS is used to study self-assembling of magnetic nano-particles on flat surfaces, while Polarized Neutron Grazing Incidence Diffraction (PN-GID) complete the scope of magnetic information over wide range of scales in 3D space. The review of recent results obtained employing the methods listed above is preceded by the detailed theoretical consideration and exemplified by new developments addressing with PNR fast magnetic kinetics in nano-systems.

  13. Irreversible lithium storage during lithiation of amorphous silicon thin film electrodes studied by in-situ neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerliu, Bujar; Hüger, Erwin; Horisberger, Michael; Stahn, Jochen; Schmidt, Harald

    2017-08-01

    Amorphous silicon is a promising high-capacity anode material for application in lithium-ion batteries. However, a huge drawback of the material is that the large capacity losses taking place during cycling lead to an unstable performance. In this study we investigate the capacity losses occurring during galvanostatic lithiation of amorphous silicon thin film electrodes by in-situ neutron reflectometry experiments for the first ten cycles. As determined from the analysis of the neutron scattering length density and of the film thickness, the capacity losses are due to irreversible storage of lithium in the electrode. The amount of stored lithium increases during cycling to 20% of the maximum theoretical capacity after the 10th cycle. Possible explanations are discussed.

  14. Polarized neutron reflectometry in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    2005-11-15

    A simple method is described to maintain the polarization of a neutron beam on its way through the large magnetic stray fields produced by a vertical field of a cryomagnet with a split-coil geometry. The two key issues are the proper shielding of the neutron spin flippers and an additional radial field component in order to guide the neutron spin through the region of the null point (i.e., point of reversal for the vertical field component). Calculations of the neutron's spin rotation as well as polarized neutron reflectometry experiments on an ErFe{sub 2}/DyFe{sub 2} multilayer show the perfect performance of the used setup. The recently commissioned cryomagnet M5 with a maximum vertical field of up to 7.2 T in asymmetric mode for polarized neutrons and 9 T in symmetric mode for unpolarized neutrons was used on the C5 spectrometer in reflectometry mode, at the NRU reactor in Chalk River, Canada.

  15. Steric Effects in Ionic Pairing and Polyelectrolyte Interdiffusion within Multilayered Films: A Neutron Reflectometry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Li; Ankner, John Francis; Sukhishvili, Prof. Svetlana A.

    2011-01-01

    Using a series of polycations synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), we investigate the effects of the polymer charge density and hydrophobicity on salt-induced interdiffusion of polymer layers within polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films. Polycations with two distinct hydrophobicities and various quaternization degrees (QPDMA and QPDEA) were derived from parent polymers of matched molecular weights poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMA) and poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDEA) by quaternization with either methyl or ethyl sulfate. Multilayers of these polycations with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) were assembled in low-salt conditions, and annealed in NaCl solutions to induce layer intermixing. As revealed by neutron reflectometry (NR), polycations with lower charge density resulted in a faster decay of film structure with distance from the substrate. Interestingly, when comparing polymer mobility in QPDEA/PSS and QPDMA/PSS films, layer intermixing was faster in the case of more hydrophobic QPDEA as compared to QPDMA, because of the weaker ionic pairing (due to the presence of a bulky ethyl spacer) between QPDEA and PSS.

  16. Frozen O2 layer revealed by neutron reflectometry

    DOE PAGES

    Steffen, A.; Glavic, A.; Holderer, O.; ...

    2016-05-27

    We investigated a 63 thick film originating from frozen air on a solid substrate via neutron reflectometry. Furthermore, the experiment shows that neutron reflectometry allows performing chemical surface analysis by quantifying the composition of this frozen layer and identifies the film to be frozen oxygen.

  17. In Situ Studies of Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) Formation on Crystalline Carbon Surfaces by Neutron Reflectometry and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Steinhauer, Miriam; Stich, Michael; Kurniawan, Mario; Seidlhofer, Beatrix-Kamelia; Trapp, Marcus; Bund, Andreas; Wagner, Norbert; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2017-10-05

    The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is a complex and fragile passivation layer with crucial importance for the functionality of lithium-ion batteries. Due to its fragility and reactivity, the use of in situ techniques is preferable for the determination of the SEI's true structure and morphology during its formation. In this study, we use in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the SEI formation on a carbon surface. It was found that a lithium-rich adsorption layer is already present at the open circuit voltage on the carbon sample surface and that the first decomposition products start to deposit close to this potential. During the negative potential sweep, the growth of the SEI can be observed in detail by AFM and NR. This allows precise monitoring of the morphology evolution and the resulting heterogeneities of individual SEI features. NR measurements show a maximum SEI thickness of 192 Å at the lower cutoff potential (0.02 V vs Li/Li(+)), which slightly decreases during the positive potential scan. The scattering length density (SLD) obtained by NR provides additional information on the SEI's chemical nature and structural evolution.

  18. Neutron reflectometry of supported hybrid bilayers with inserted peptide

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew B.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Genzer, Jan; Lösche, Mathias; Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    The insertion of a synthetic amphiphilic, α-helical peptide into a supported hybrid bilayer membrane (HBM) was studied by neutron reflectometry to elucidate the resulting nanostructure. The HBM consisted of a self-assembled monolayer of perdeuterated octadecanethiol on gold and an overlying leaflet of acyl-deuterated phosphatidylcholine (d-DMPC). Using contrast variation, several reflectivity spectra were recorded for each step of film fabrication, and simultaneously modeled. This analysis indicated that peptide insertion into the DMPC lipid leaflet is the likeliest mode of incorporation. PMID:21274414

  19. Neutron Reflectometry and QCM-D Study of the Interaction of Cellulases with Films of Amorphous Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Liu, Zelin; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Jablin, Michael S.; Dubey, Manish; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Halbert, Candice E.; Browning, James F.; Ankner, John; Akgun, Bulent; Wang, Chao; Esker, Alan R.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake A.; Kent, Michael S.

    2011-06-13

    Improving the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the key technological hurdles to reduce the cost of producing ethanol and other transportation fuels from lignocellulosic material. A better understanding of how soluble enzymes interact with insoluble cellulose will aid in the design of more efficient enzyme systems. We report a study involving neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) of the interaction of a fungal enzyme extract (T. viride) and an endoglucanse from A. niger with amorphous cellulose films. The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by that the fact that several biomass pretreatments currently under investigation disrupt the native crystalline structure of cellulose and increase the amorphous content. NR reveals the profile of water through the film at nanometer resolution and is highly sensitive to interfacial roughness, whereas QCM-D provides changes in mass and film stiffness. NR can be performed using either H₂O- or D₂O-based aqueous reservoirs. NR measurement of swelling of a cellulose film in D₂O and in H₂O revealed that D/H exchange on the cellulose chains must be taken into account when a D₂O-based reservoir is used. The results also show that cellulose films swell slightly more in D₂O than in H₂O. Regarding enzymatic digestion, at 20 °C in H₂O buffer the T. viride cocktail rapidly digested the entire film, initially roughening the surface, followed by penetration and activity throughout the bulk of the film. In contrast, over the same time period, the endoglucanase was active mainly at the surface of the film and did not increase the surface roughness.

  20. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Junghans, Ann; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Zebda, Noureddine; Birukov, Konstantin; Viapiano, Mariano; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-12-10

    In this study, neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine various live cells' adhesion to quartz substrates under different environmental conditions, including flow stress. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with sub-nanometer resolution. In our first experiments, we examined live mouse fibroblast cells as opposed to past experiments using supported lipids, proteins, or peptide layers with no associated cells. We continued the NR studies of cell adhesion by investigating endothelial monolayers and glioblastoma cells under dynamic flow conditions. We demonstrated that neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool to study the strength of cellular layer adhesion in living tissues, which is a key factor in understanding the physiology of cell interactions and conditions leading to abnormal or disease circumstances. Continuative measurements, such as investigating changes in tumor cell — surface contact of various glioblastomas, could impact advancements in tumor treatments. In principle, this can help us to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness. Pursuit of these studies can have significant medical impact on the understanding of complex biological problems and their effective treatment, e.g. for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  1. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    JUNGHANS, ANN; WALTMAN, MARY JO; SMITH, HILLARY L.; POCIVAVSEK, LUKA; ZEBDA, NOUREDDINE; BIRUKOV, KONSTANTIN; VIAPIANO, MARIANO; MAJEWSKI, JAROSLAW

    2015-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine various live cells adhesion to quartz substrates under different environmental conditions, including flow stress. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with sub-nanometer resolution. In our first experiments, we examined live mouse fibroblast cells as opposed to past experiments using supported lipids, proteins, or peptide layers with no associated cells. We continued the NR studies of cell adhesion by investigating endothelial monolayers and glioblastoma cells under dynamic flow conditions. We demonstrated that neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool to study the strength of cellular layer adhesion in living tissues, which is a key factor in understanding the physiology of cell interactions and conditions leading to abnormal or disease circumstances. Continuative measurements, such as investigating changes in tumor cell – surface contact of various glioblastomas, could impact advancements in tumor treatments. In principle, this can help us to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness. Pursuit of these studies can have significant medical impact on the understanding of complex biological problems and their effective treatment, e.g. for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies. PMID:25705067

  2. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Ann; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Zebda, Noureddine; Birukov, Konstantin; Viapiano, Mariano; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-12-01

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine various live cells' adhesion to quartz substrates under different environmental conditions, including flow stress. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with sub-nanometer resolution. In our first experiments, we examined live mouse fibroblast cells as opposed to past experiments using supported lipids, proteins, or peptide layers with no associated cells. We continued the NR studies of cell adhesion by investigating endothelial monolayers and glioblastoma cells under dynamic flow conditions. We demonstrated that neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool to study the strength of cellular layer adhesion in living tissues, which is a key factor in understanding the physiology of cell interactions and conditions leading to abnormal or disease circumstances. Continuative measurements, such as investigating changes in tumor cell — surface contact of various glioblastomas, could impact advancements in tumor treatments. In principle, this can help us to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness. Pursuit of these studies can have significant medical impact on the understanding of complex biological problems and their effective treatment, e.g. for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  3. The study of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the magnetic sensors with linear sensitivity using polarized neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.

    2016-04-01

    The CoFeB sandwiched by Ta and MgO layers enables a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and provides a pathway for such application. In this paper, we reported the origin of PMA in CoFeB using the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR). From PNR experiments, we obtained the details of the magnetic and structural depth profiles inside the film. It is found that the PMA properties of CoFeB layers deposited above and under MgO layer are different and PNR measurements confirmed that a large PMA in the CoFeB above MgO layer is related to its low magnetization. Based on this PMA mechanism, we obtain a high sensitivity of AHE in the perpendicular CoFeB, which opens a new avenue to detect ultralow magnetic field.

  4. Neutron Reflectometry Studies of the Adsorbed Structure of the Amelogenin, LRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Perez-Salas, Ursula; Masica, David L.; Philo, John; Krueger, Susan; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-03-21

    Amelogenins make up over 90 percent of the protein present during enamel formation and have been demonstrated to be critical in proper enamel development, but the mechanism governing this control is not well understood. Leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the charged regions from the full protein thought to control crystal regulation. In this work, we utilized neutron reflectivity (NR) to investigate the structure and orientation of LRAP adsorbed from solutions onto molecularly smooth COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) surfaces. Sedimentation velocity experiments revealed that LRAP is primarily a monomer in saturated calcium phosphate (SCP) solutions (0.15 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. LRAP adsorbed as ~33 Å thick layers at ~70% coverage as determined by NR. Rosetta simulations of the dimensions of LRAP in solution (37 Å diameter) indicate that the NR determined z dimension is consistent with an LRAP monomer. Sedimentation velocity experiments and Rosetta simulation show that the LRAP monomer has an extended, asymmetric shape in solution. The NR data suggests that the protein is not completely extended on the surface, having some degree of structure away from the surface. A protein orientation with the C-terminal and inner N-terminal region (~8-24)) located near the surface is consistent with the higher scattering length density (SLD) and higher protein hydration found near the surface by NR. This work presents new information on the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP in solution and adsorbed onto surfaces. It also presents further evidence that the monomeric species may be an important functional form of amelogenin proteins.

  5. Neutron Reflectometry and QCM-D Study of the Interaction of Cellulase Enzymes with Films of Amorphous Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, Candice E; Ankner, John Francis; Kent, Michael S; Jaclyn, Murton K; Browning, Jim; Cheng, Gang; Liu, Zelin; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Supratim, Datta; Michael, Jablin; Bulent, Akgun; Alan, Esker; Simmons, Blake

    2011-01-01

    Improving the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the key technological hurdles to reduce the cost of producing ethanol and other transportation fuels from lignocellulosic material. A better understanding of how soluble enzymes interact with insoluble cellulose will aid in the design of more efficient enzyme systems. We report a study involving neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) of the interaction of a commercial fungal enzyme extract (T. viride), two purified endoglucanses from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima), and a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens) with amorphous cellulose films. The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. NR reveals the profile of water through the film at nm resolution, while QCM-D provides changes in mass and film stiffness. At 20 oC and 0.3 mg/ml, the T. viride cocktail rapidly digested the entire film, beginning from the surface followed by activity throughout the bulk of the film. For similar conditions, Cel9A and Cel5A were active for only a short period of time and only at the surface of the film, with Cel9A releasing 40 from the ~ 700 film and Cel5A resulting in only a slight roughening/swelling effect at the surface. Subsequent elevation of the temperature to the Topt in each case resulted in a very limited increase in activity, corresponding to the loss of an additional 60 from the film for Cel9A and 20 from the film for Cel5A, and very weak penetration into and digestion within the bulk of the film, before the activity again ceased. The results for Cel9A and Cel5A contrast sharply with results for Cel45A where very rapid and extensive penetration and digestion within the bulk of the film was observed at 20 C. We speculate that the large differences are due

  6. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    DOE PAGES

    Junghans, Ann; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; ...

    2014-12-10

    In this study, neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine various live cells' adhesion to quartz substrates under different environmental conditions, including flow stress. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with sub-nanometer resolution. In our first experiments, we examined live mouse fibroblast cells as opposed to past experiments using supported lipids, proteins, or peptide layers with no associated cells. We continued the NR studies of cell adhesion by investigating endothelial monolayers and glioblastoma cells under dynamic flow conditions. We demonstrated that neutronmore » reflectometry is a powerful tool to study the strength of cellular layer adhesion in living tissues, which is a key factor in understanding the physiology of cell interactions and conditions leading to abnormal or disease circumstances. Continuative measurements, such as investigating changes in tumor cell — surface contact of various glioblastomas, could impact advancements in tumor treatments. In principle, this can help us to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness. Pursuit of these studies can have significant medical impact on the understanding of complex biological problems and their effective treatment, e.g. for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.« less

  7. Characterisation of coated aerosols using optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. H.; Ward, A.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Thin organic films are believed to form naturally on the surface of aerosols [1,2] and influence aerosol properties. Cloud condensation nuclei formation and chemical reactions such as aerosol oxidation are effected by the presence of thin films [3]. There is a requirement to characterise the physical properties of both the core aerosol and its organic film in order to fully understand the contribution of coated aerosols to the indirect effect. Two complementary techniques have been used to study the oxidation of thin organic films on the surface of aerosols; laser optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry. Micron sized polystyrene beads coated in oleic acid have been trapped in air using two counter propagating laser beams. Polystyrene beads are used as a proxy for solid aerosol. The trapped aerosol is illuminated with a white LED over a broadband wavelength range and the scattered light collected to produce a Mie spectrum [4]. Analysis of the Mie spectrum results in determination of the core polystyrene bead radius, the oleic acid film thickness and refractive index dispersion of the core and shell [5]. A flow of ozone gas can then be introduced into the aerosol environment to oxidise the thin film of oleic acid and the reaction followed by monitoring the changes in the Mie spectrum. The results demonstrate complete removal of the oleic acid film. We conclude that the use of a counter propagating optical trap combined with white light Mie spectroscopy can be used to study a range of organic films on different types of aerosols and their oxidation reactions. Neutron reflectometry has been used as a complementary technique to study the oxidation of monolayer films at the air-water interface in order to gain information on reaction kinetics. The oxidation of an oleic acid film at the air-water interface by the common tropospheric oxidant ozone has been studied using a Langmuir trough. Results indicate complete removal of the oleic acid film with ozone in agreement

  8. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  9. Frozen O2 layer revealed by neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, A.; Glavic, A.; Holderer, O.; Frielinghaus, H.; Ambaye, H.; Pütter, S.; Brückel, T.

    2016-05-27

    We investigated a 63 thick film originating from frozen air on a solid substrate via neutron reflectometry. Furthermore, the experiment shows that neutron reflectometry allows performing chemical surface analysis by quantifying the composition of this frozen layer and identifies the film to be frozen oxygen.

  10. Surface physics with cold and thermal neutron reflectometry. Progress report, April 1, 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Steyerl, A.

    1993-09-01

    Within the past two and one half years of the project ``Surface Physics With Cold and Thermal Neutron Reflectometry`` a new thermal neutron reflectometer was constructed at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC). It was used to study various liquid and solid surfaces. Furthermore, neutron reflection experiments were be un at different laboratories in collaboration with Dr. G.P. Fetcher (at Argonne National Laboratory), Dr. T. Russell (IBM Almaden) and Drs. S.K. Satija and A. Karim (at the National Institute for Standards and Technology). The available resources allowed partial construction of an imaging system for ultracold neutrons. It is expected to provide an extremely high resolution in momentum and energy transfer in surface studies using neutron reflectometry. Much of the work reported here was motivated by the possibility of later implementation at the planned Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge. In a separate project the first concrete plans for an intense source of ultracold neutrons for the Advanced Neutron Source were developed.

  11. Association of anionic surfactant and physisorbed branched brush layers probed by neutron and optical reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Dedinaite, Andra; Nylander, Tommy; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Skoda, Maximilian; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2015-02-15

    Pre-adsorbed branched brush layers were formed on silica surfaces by adsorption of a diblock copolymer consisting of a linear cationic block and an uncharged bottle-brush block. The charge of the silica surface was found to affect the adsorption, with lower amounts of the cationic polyelectrolyte depositing on less charged silica. Cleaning under basic conditions rendered surfaces more negatively charged (more negative zeta-potential) than acid cleaning and was therefore used to increase polyelectrolyte adsorption. The structure of adsorbed layers of the diblock copolymer was as determined by neutron reflectometry found to be about 70 nm thick and very water rich (97%). Interactions between the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and such pre-adsorbed diblock polymer layers were studied by neutron reflectometry and by optical reflectometry. Optical reflectometry was also used for deducing interactions between the individual blocks of the diblock copolymer and SDS at the silica/aqueous interface. We find that SDS is readily incorporated in the diblock copolymer layer at low SDS concentrations, and preferentially co-localized with the cationic block of the polymer next to the silica surface. At higher SDS concentrations some desorption of polyelectrolyte/surfactant complexes takes place. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Morphological origin for the stratification of P3HT:PCBM blend film studied by neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Browning, James F.; Halbert, Candice E.; Xiao, Kai; Shao, Ming; Hong, Kunlun

    2013-11-25

    Understanding the origin for the film stratification of electron donor/acceptor blend is crucial for high efficiency organic photovoltaic cell. In this study, P3HT:PCBM blend is deposited onto hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrate to examine the film stratifications. The neutron reflectivity results show that, on the different surfaces, PCBM diffuses toward the two interfacial regions in an identical fashion during thermal annealing. This evidences that the film stratification is not affected by the substrates. Instead, since P3HT remains more amorphous in the interfacial regions and PCBM is miscible with amorphous P3HT, PCBM preferentially diffuses to the interfacial regions, resulting in the stratification.

  13. Morphological origin for the stratification of P3HT:PCBM blend film studied by neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Browning, Jim; Xiao, Kai; Shao, Ming; Hong, Kunlun; Halbert, Candice E

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the origin for the film stratification of electron donor/acceptor blend is crucial for high efficiency organic photovoltaic cell. In this study, P3HT:PCBM blend is deposited onto hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrate to examine the film stratifications. The neutron reflectivity results show that, on the different surfaces, PCBM diffuses toward the two interfacial regions in an identical fashion during thermal annealing. This evidences that the film stratification is not affected by the substrates. Instead, since P3HT remains more amorphous in the interfacial regions and PCBM is miscible with amorphous P3HT, PCBM preferentially diffuses to the interfacial regions, resulting in the stratification.

  14. Neutron reflectometry yields distance-dependent structures of nanometric polymer brushes interacting across water.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Scoppola, Ernesto; Bertinetti, Luca; Barbetta, Aurelio; Fragneto, Giovanna; Schneck, Emanuel

    2017-08-30

    The interaction between surfaces displaying end-grafted hydrophilic polymer brushes plays important roles in biology and in many wet-technological applications. In this context, the conformation of the brushes upon their mutual approach is crucial, because it affects interaction forces and the brushes' shear-tribological properties. While this aspect has been addressed by theory, experimental data on polymer conformations under confinement are difficult to obtain. Here, we study interacting planar brushes of hydrophilic polymers with defined length and grafting density. Via ellipsometry and neutron reflectometry we obtain pressure-distance curves and determine distance-dependent polymer conformations in terms of brush compression and reciprocative interpenetration. While the pressure-distance curves are satisfactorily described by the Alexander-de-Gennes model, the pronounced brush interpenetration as seen by neutron reflectometry motivates detailed simulation-based studies capable of treating brush interpenetration on a quantitative level.

  15. Neutron reflectometry on highly absorbing films and its application to 10B4C-based neutron detectors

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, F.; Khaplanov, A.; Devishvili, A.; Schmidt, S.; Höglund, C.; Birch, J.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Gutfreund, P.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Van Esch, P.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool used for studies of surfaces and interfaces. The absorption in the typical studied materials is neglected and this technique is limited only to the reflectivity measurement. For strongly absorbing nuclei, the absorption can be directly measured by using the neutron-induced fluorescence technique which exploits the prompt particle emission of absorbing isotopes. This technique is emerging from soft matter and biology where highly absorbing nuclei, in very small quantities, are used as a label for buried layers. Nowadays, the importance of absorbing layers is rapidly increasing, partially because of their application in neutron detection; a field that has become more active also due to the 3He-shortage. We extend the neutron-induced fluorescence technique to the study of layers of highly absorbing materials, in particular 10B4C. The theory of neutron reflectometry is a commonly studied topic; however, when a strong absorption is present the subtle relationship between the reflection and the absorption of neutrons is not widely known. The theory for a general stack of absorbing layers has been developed and compared to measurements. We also report on the requirements that a 10B4C layer must fulfil in order to be employed as a converter in neutron detection. PMID:26997902

  16. Quantification of magnetic domain disorder and correlations in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayers by neutron reflectometry

    PubMed

    Langridge; Schmalian; Marrows; Dekadjevi; Hickey

    2000-12-04

    The in-plane correlation lengths and angular dispersion of magnetic domains in a transition metal multilayer have been studied using off-specular neutron reflectometry techniques. A theoretical framework considering both structural and magnetic disorder has been developed, quantitatively connecting the observed scattering to the in-plane correlation length and the dispersion of the local magnetization vector about the mean macroscopic direction. The antiferromagnetic domain structure is highly vertically correlated throughout the multilayer. We are easily able to relate the neutron determined magnetic domain dispersion to magnetization and magnetoresistance experiments.

  17. One directional polarized neutron reflectometry with optimized reference layer method

    SciTech Connect

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Jahromi, Saeed S.

    2012-09-01

    In the past decade, several neutron reflectometry methods for determining the modulus and phase of the complex reflection coefficient of an unknown multilayer thin film have been worked out among which the method of variation of surroundings and reference layers are of highest interest. These methods were later modified for measurement of the polarization of the reflected beam instead of the measurement of the intensities. In their new architecture, these methods not only suffered from the necessity of change of experimental setup but also another difficulty was added to their experimental implementations. This deficiency was related to the limitations of the technology of the neutron reflectometers that could only measure the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam. As the instruments are limited, the theory has to be optimized so that the experiment could be performed. In a recent work, we developed the method of variation of surroundings for one directional polarization analysis. In this new work, the method of reference layer with polarization analysis has been optimized to determine the phase and modulus of the unknown film with measurement of the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam.

  18. The study of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB sandwiched by MgO and tantalum layers using polarized neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.; Yang, Y.; Yu, R. C.; Ambaye, H.; Lauter, V.; Xiao, J. Q.

    2012-05-01

    The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in CoFeB sandwiched by MgO and tantalum layers was investigated using anomalous Hall effect and polarized neutron reflectometry. It was found that a large PMA in the CoFeB above MgO layer was related to its low magnetization compared to the case of CoFeB under MgO layer. Using the sensitivity of neutrons to the absorption cross-section of boron, we unambiguously determined the depth profile of the boron distribution and showed that after annealing, most of the boron diffused to form a 2-nm-thick interface layer between the CoFeB and tantalum layers.

  19. Interaction of a cationic gemini surfactant with DNA and with sodium poly(styrene sulphonate) at the air/water interface: a neutron reflectometry study.

    PubMed

    Vongsetskul, T; Taylor, D J F; Zhang, J; Li, P X; Thomas, R K; Penfold, J

    2009-04-07

    The interactions between a dicationic gemini surfactant with a six-hydrocarbon spacer (1,2-bis(dodecyldimethyl-ammonio)hexane dibromide, C12C6C12Br2) and anionic polyelectrolyte DNA or sodium (polystyrene sulfonate) (NaPSS) at the air/solution interface have been studied and compared using neutron reflectometry together with surface tension. In the presence of the dichained cationic gemini surfactant, DNA and NaPSS display very different adsorption behaviors. The DNA/gemini mixtures show adsorption behavior very similar to that of DNA/C12TAB mixtures, with enhanced surfactant adsorption at low concentrations and thick structured layers at higher concentrations. However, for the NaPSS/gemini mixtures the amount of gemini at the surface is reduced relative to that in the absence of NaPSS at concentrations below the cmc. These differences in adsorption behavior are attributed to differences in the molecular structure and flexibility of the two polyanions. NaPSS is relatively hydrophobic and flexible enough to form bulk-phase polymer-micelle complexes with the gemini surfactant at low surfactant concentrations, whereas the adsorption of surface complexes is much less favorable because the dications on the gemini would require adjacent bulky pendant charges on the NaPSS to be oriented toward the surface. This would force the NaPSS to bend significantly whereas it is more favorable for the NaPSS to adopt an extended conformation at the surface. Thus, surfactant is actually removed from the surface to form bulk-phase complexes. In contrast with NaPSS, DNA has a far more rigid structure, and the charges on the backbone are at fixed intervals, factors that make the formation of surface DNA-monomer complexes much more favorable than bulk-phase DNA-micelle complexes. Finally, a short-chain sample of NaPSS consisting of only five to six segments adsorbs very strongly at the surface with the gemini to form more extensive layered structures than have previously been observed

  20. Structure analysis of aqueous ferrofluids at interface with silicon: neutron reflectometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapon, I. V.; Petrenko, V. I.; Bulavin, L. A.; Balasoiu, M.; Kubovcikova, M.; Zavisova, V.; Koneracka, M.; Kopcansky, P.; Chiriac, H.; Avdeev, M. V.

    2017-05-01

    Adsorption of nanoparticles from aqueous ferrofluids (FFs) on solid surface (crystalline silicon) was studied by neutron reflectometry (NR). Two kinds of FFs were considered. First kind was heavy water-based ferrofluids with magnetite nanoparticles coated by double layer of sodium oleate. Second one FF was cobalt ferrite nanoparticles stabilized by lauric acid/sodium n-dodecylsulphate layer and dispersed in water. It was obtained only a single adsorption layer for two types of ferrofluids. The impact of the magnetic nanoparticles concentration and geometry was considered in frame of the adsorption characteristic of FFs.

  1. The study of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and Boron diffusion in Ta--CoFeB--MgO--CoFeB--Ta magnetic tunnel junction using polarized neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauter, Valeria; Ambaye, H.; Zhu, T.; Yang, Y.; Yu, R. C.; Xiao, J. Q.

    2013-03-01

    The current-induced spin transfer torque (STT) plays an important role in spintronic devices. However, the level of current density needed to reorient the magnetization is presently too high for most commercial applications, and reducing the current density is the challenging basis for recent research in spintronics. The magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) enables a small critical current density for current-induced magnetization switching and provides a pathway for such STT devices. We investigated the origin of PMA in CoFeB sandwiched by MgO and Ti layers using the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR). It is found that the PMA properties of CoFeB layers deposited above and under MgO layer are different and PNR measurements confirmed that a large PMA in the CoFeB above MgO layer is related to its low magnetization. From PNR experiments, we obtained the details of the magnetic and structural depth profiles inside the film. Using the sensitivity of neutrons to the absorption cross-section of boron, we unambiguously determined the depth profile of the boron distribution and showed that after annealing, most of the boron diffused to form a 2-nm-thick interface layer between the CoFeB and tantalum layers. Research at ORNL SNS was sponsored by BES and DOE.

  2. Characterization of BPSG films using Neutron Depth Profiling and Neutron/X-ray Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Mayer, H. H.; Lamaze, G. P.; Satija, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    Borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) films with a nominal thickness of 200 nm on Si wafers have been characterized using Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) and neutron and x-ray reflectometry at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. NDP measures the total boron concentration and distribution. The x-ray reflectivity provides information on the thickness and density of the thin surface oxide layer and the density of the thick BPSG layer, whereas neutron reflectivity reveals the thickness of the BPSG layer. A more complete picture can be established to identify problems in semiconductor fabrication processes that cause undesirable dopant concentration and distribution, or density variations due to doping or implants. We report a first comparison of complementary information on the BPSG films obtained using the three techniques.

  3. The Multi-Blade Boron-10-based neutron detector for high intensity neutron reflectometry at ESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscitelli, F.; Messi, F.; Anastasopoulos, M.; Bryś, T.; Chicken, F.; Dian, E.; Fuzi, J.; Höglund, C.; Kiss, G.; Orban, J.; Pazmandi, P.; Robinson, L.; Rosta, L.; Schmidt, S.; Varga, D.; Zsiros, T.; Hall-Wilton, R.

    2017-03-01

    The Multi-Blade is a Boron-10-based gaseous detector introduced to face the challenge arising in neutron reflectometry at pulsed neutron sources. Neutron reflectometers are the most challenging instruments in terms of instantaneous counting rate and spatial resolution. This detector has been designed to cope with the requirements set for the reflectometers at the upcoming European Spallation Source (ESS) in Sweden. Based on previous results obtained at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in France, an improved demonstrator has been built at ESS and tested at the Budapest Neutron Centre (BNC) in Hungary and at the Source Testing Facility (STF) at the Lund University in Sweden. A detailed description of the detector and the results of the tests are discussed in this manuscript.

  4. An In Situ Electric Field Study of Magnetoelectric Coupling in PZT-LSMO Thin Film Heterostructures Using Polarized Neutron Reflectometry and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgeon, Steven; Sloppy, Jennifer; Huang, Esther; Vasudevan, Rama; Lofland, Samuel; Lauter, Valeria; Valanoor, Nagarajan; Taheri, Mitra

    2013-03-01

    The development of ``spintronics'' devices based on charge and spin transport has signaled a paradigm shift in the design of data storage and computing technologies. Magnetoelectric materials, which exhibit intrinsic coupling between electronic and magnetic order, are ideal for these applications. Unfortunately, single-phase magnetoelectrics are exceedingly rare in nature and attention has turned to composite heterostructures that display coupled functionalities at interfaces. A promising system in which to explore this coupling is a thin film oxide heterostructure of the piezoelectric Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 (PZT) and the half-metal La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO). We show that it is possible to construct a capacitor-type device structure from these materials that may form the basis for an electrically-switched magnetic memory. We conduct polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) measurements and measure changes in the magnetization depth profile throughout the composite under the reversal of an in situ electric field. We then correlate these PNR results to local strain and chemistry using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We find that a combination of charge doping and strain mechanisms governs coupling in this system.

  5. Effects of bulk colloidal stability on adsorption layers of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/sodium dodecyl sulfate at the air-water interface studied by neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard A; Yanez Arteta, Marianna; Angus-Smyth, Anna; Nylander, Tommy; Varga, Imre

    2011-12-29

    We show for the oppositely charged system poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/sodium dodecyl sulfate that the cliff edge peak in its surface tension isotherm results from the comprehensive precipitation of bulk complexes into sediment, leaving a supernatant that is virtually transparent and a depleted adsorption layer at the air/water interface. The aggregation and settling processes take about 3 days to reach completion and occur at bulk compositions around charge neutrality of the complexes which lack long-term colloidal stability. We demonstrate excellent quantitative agreement between the measured surface tension values and a peak calculated from the surface excess of surfactant in the precipitation region measured by neutron reflectometry, using the approximation that there is no polymer left in the liquid phase. The nonequilibrium nature of the system is emphasized by the production of very different interfacial properties from equivalent aged samples that are handled differently. We go on to outline our perspective on the "true equilibrium" state of this intriguing system and conclude with a comment on its practical relevance given that the interfacial properties can be so readily influenced by the handling of kinetically trapped bulk aggregates.

  6. Using Neutron Reflectometry to Discern the Structure of Fibrinogen Adsorption at the Stainless Steel/Aqueous Interface.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mary H; Browning, Kathryn L; Barker, Robert D; Clarke, Stuart M

    2016-06-23

    Neutron reflectometry has been successfully used to study adsorption on a stainless steel surface by means of depositing a thin steel film on silicon. The film was characterized using XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), TOF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry), and GIXRD (grazing incidence X-ray diffraction), demonstrating the retention both of the austenitic phase and of the required composition for 316L stainless steel. The adsorption of fibrinogen from a physiologically-relevant solution onto the steel surface was studied using neutron reflectometry and QCM (quartz crystal microbalance) and compared to that on a deposited chromium oxide surface. It was found that the protein forms an irreversibly bound layer at low concentrations, with maximum protein concentration a distance of around 20 Å from the surface. Evidence for a further diffuse reversibly-bound layer forming at higher concentrations was also observed. Both the structure of the layer revealed by the neutron reflectometry data and the high water retention predicted by the QCM data suggest that there is a significant extent of protein unfolding upon adsorption. A lower extent of adsorption was seen on the chromium surfaces, although the adsorbed layer structures were similar, suggesting comparable adsorption mechanisms.

  7. Comparative structure analysis of magnetic fluids at interface with silicon by neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeev, M. V.; Petrenko, V. I.; Gapon, I. V.; Bulavin, L. A.; Vorobiev, A. A.; Soltwedel, O.; Balasoiu, M.; Vekas, L.; Zavisova, V.; Kopcansky, P.

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of surfactant coated magnetic nanoparticles from highly stable magnetic fluids on crystalline functionalized silicon is studied by neutron reflectometry. Two types of magnetic fluids based on nanomagnetite dispersed and stabilized in non-polar organic solvent (deuterated benzene) and strongly polar solvent (heavy water) are considered. In both cases the interface shows the formation of just one well-defined adsorption layer of nanoparticles, which is insensitive to the effect of the external magnetic field. Still, the particle concentration in the benzene-based fluid is higher in the vicinity to the silicon surface as compared to the bulk distribution. Despite the presence of an aggregate fraction in the water-based system the width of the adsorption layer is consistent with the size of separated particles, thus showing the preferable adsorption of non-aggregated particles.

  8. Neutron Diffuse Reflectometry of Magnetic Thin Films with a 3He Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wangchun; O'Donovan, Kevin; Borchers, Julie

    2005-03-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) is a powerful probe that characterizes the magnetization depth profile and magnetic domains in magnetic thin films. Although the conventionally used supermirrors are well-matched for specular PNR, they have limited angular acceptance and hence are impractical for complete characterization of the magnetic off-specular scattering where polarization analysis for diffusely reflected neutrons is required. Polarized ^3He gas, produced by optical pumping, can be used to polarize or analyze neutron beams because of the strong spin dependence of the neutron absorption cross section for ^3He. Here we report efficient polarization analysis of diffusely reflected neutrons in a reflectometry geometry using a polarized ^3He analyzer in conjunction with a position-sensitive detector (PSD). We obtained spin-resolved two-dimensional Qx-Qz reciprocal space maps for a patterned array of Co antidots in both the saturated and the demagnetized states. The preliminary results for a patterned amorphous bilayer, Gd40Fe60/ Tb55Fe45, measured with a ^3He analyzer and a PSD will also be discussed. Using the spin exchange optical pumping method we have achieved record high ^3He polarizations of 76% on the neutron beam line where we measured an initial analyzing efficiency of 0.97 and a neutron transmission for the desired spin state of 0.45.

  9. Analysis of biosurfaces by neutron reflectometry: From simple to complex interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Junghans, Ann; Watkins, Erik B.; Barker, Robert D.; Singh, Saurabh; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2015-03-16

    Because of its high sensitivity for light elements and the scattering contrast manipulation via isotopic substitutions, neutron reflectometry (NR) is an excellent tool for studying the structure of soft-condensed material. These materials include model biophysical systems as well as in situ living tissue at the solid–liquid interface. The penetrability of neutrons makes NR suitable for probing thin films with thicknesses of 5–5000 Å at various buried, for example, solid–liquid, interfaces [J. Daillant and A. Gibaud, Lect. Notes Phys. 770, 133 (2009); G. Fragneto-Cusani, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13, 4973 (2001); J. Penfold, Curr. Opin. Colloid Interface Sci. 7, 139 (2002)]. Over the past two decades, NR has evolved to become a key tool in the characterization of biological and biomimetic thin films. Highlighted In the current report are some of the authors' recent accomplishments in utilizing NR to study highly complex systems, including in-situ experiments. Such studies will result in a much better understanding of complex biological problems, have significant medical impact by suggesting innovative treatment, and advance the development of highly functionalized biomimetic materials.

  10. Analysis of biosurfaces by neutron reflectometry: From simple to complex interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Junghans, Ann; Watkins, Erik B.; Barker, Robert D.; ...

    2015-03-16

    Because of its high sensitivity for light elements and the scattering contrast manipulation via isotopic substitutions, neutron reflectometry (NR) is an excellent tool for studying the structure of soft-condensed material. These materials include model biophysical systems as well as in situ living tissue at the solid–liquid interface. The penetrability of neutrons makes NR suitable for probing thin films with thicknesses of 5–5000 Å at various buried, for example, solid–liquid, interfaces [J. Daillant and A. Gibaud, Lect. Notes Phys. 770, 133 (2009); G. Fragneto-Cusani, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13, 4973 (2001); J. Penfold, Curr. Opin. Colloid Interface Sci. 7, 139 (2002)].more » Over the past two decades, NR has evolved to become a key tool in the characterization of biological and biomimetic thin films. Highlighted In the current report are some of the authors' recent accomplishments in utilizing NR to study highly complex systems, including in-situ experiments. Such studies will result in a much better understanding of complex biological problems, have significant medical impact by suggesting innovative treatment, and advance the development of highly functionalized biomimetic materials.« less

  11. Detection of helium bubble formation at fcc-bcc interfaces using neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinath, A.; Wang, P.; Majewski, J.; Baldwin, J. K.; Wang, Y. Q.; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    We use neutron reflectometry to find the critical helium (He) fluence required to form He bubbles at interfaces between fcc and bcc metals. Our findings are in agreement with previous experimental as well as modeling results and provide evidence for the presence of stable He platelets at fcc-bcc interfaces prior to bubble formation. The stable storage of He in interfacial platelets may provide the basis for the design of materials with increased resistance to He-induced degradation.

  12. Probing the spiral magnetic phase in 6 nm textured erbium using polarised neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satchell, N.; Witt, J. D. S.; Burnell, G.; Curran, P. J.; Kinane, C. J.; Charlton, T. R.; Langridge, S.; Cooper, J. F. K.

    2017-02-01

    We characterise the magnetic state of highly-textured, sputter deposited erbium for a film of thickness 6 nm. Using polarised neutron reflectometry it is found that the film has a high degree of magnetic disorder, and we present some evidence that the film’s local magnetic state is consistent with bulk-like spiral magnetism. This, combined with complementary characterisation techniques, show that thin film erbium is a strong candidate material for incorporation into device structures.

  13. Nanoscale structural and mechanical effects of beta-amyloid (1-42) on polymer cushioned membranes: a combined study by neutron reflectometry and AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dante, Silvia; Hauss, Thomas; Steitz, Roland; Canale, Claudio; Dencher, Norbert A

    2011-11-01

    The interaction of beta-amyloid peptides with lipid membranes is widely studied as trigger agents in Alzheimer's disease. Their mechanism of action at the molecular level is unknown and their interaction with the neural membrane is crucial to elucidate the onset of the disease. In this study we have investigated the interaction of water soluble forms of beta-amyloid Aβ(1-42) with lipid bilayers supported by polymer cushion. A reproducible protocol for the preparation of a supported phospholipid membrane with composition mimicking the neural membrane and in physiological condition (PBS buffer, pH=7.4) was refined by neutron reflectivity. The change in structure and local mechanical properties of the membrane in the presence of Aβ(1-42) was investigated by neutron reflectivity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Force Spectroscopy. Neutron reflectivity evidenced that Aβ(1-42) interacts strongly with the supported membrane, causing a change in the scattering length density profile of the lipid bilayer, and penetrates into the membrane. Concomitantly, the local mechanical properties of the bilayer are deeply modified by the interaction with the peptide as seen by AFM Force Spectroscopy. These results may be of great importance for the onset of the Alzheimer's disease, since a simultaneous change in the structural and mechanical properties of the lipid matrix could influence all membrane based signal cascades. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural characterization of membrane-bound human immunodeficiency virus-1 Gag matrix with neutron reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Eells, Rebecca; Barros, Marilia; Scott, Kerry M.; Karageorgos, Ioannis; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    The structural characterization of peripheral membrane proteins represents a tremendous challenge in structural biology due to their transient interaction with the membrane and the potential multitude of protein conformations during this interaction. Neutron reflectometry is uniquely suited to address this problem because of its ability to structurally characterize biological model systems nondestructively and under biomimetic conditions that retain full protein functionality. Being sensitive to only the membrane-bound fraction of a water-soluble peripheral protein, neutron reflectometry obtains a low-resolution average structure of the protein-membrane complex that is further refined using integrative modeling strategies. Here, the authors review the current technological state of biological neutron reflectometry exemplified by a detailed report on the structure determination of the myristoylated human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Gag matrix associated with phosphoserine-containing model membranes. The authors found that the HIV-1 Gag matrix is able to adopt different configurations at the membrane in a pH-dependent manner and that the myristate group orients the protein in a way that is conducive to PIP2-binding. PMID:28511544

  15. Non-standard Fickian self-diffusion of isotopically pure boron observed by neutron reflectometry and depth profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.M.; Wu, K.; Smith, G.S.; Hubbard, K.M.; Nastasi, M.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaze, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) studies of thin films of amorphous {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B on silicon indicate that a non-standard form of Fickian diffusion occurs across the boron interface upon annealing. In order to verify this observation, the samples were examined by neutron depth profiling (NDP). Comparison of the results from models of a step function, standard Fickian diffusion and Fickian diffusion with a fixed composition at the interface were made and compared to the previous NR results. The diffusion constant resulting from the non-standard Fickian model for the NDP data differs slightly from that obtained from the commonly used Fickian diffusion model and is not inconsistent with the NR results. This finding suggests that more information regarding diffusion at interfaces can be gained from these higher resolution neutron scattering techniques.

  16. Interaction of silica nano-particles with a flat silica surface through neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eunhyea; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Halbert, Candice E; Ankner, John Francis; Wang, Wei; Tsouris, Costas

    2012-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) was employed to study the interaction of nanosized silica particles with a flat silica surface in aqueous solutions. Unlike other experimental tools that are used to study surface interactions, NR can provide information on the particle density profile in the solution near the interface. Two types of silica particles (25 and 100 nm) were suspended in aqueous solutions of varying ionic strength. Theoretical calculations of the surface interaction potential between a particle and a flat silica surface using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory were compared to the experimental data. The theory predicts that the potential energy is highly dependent on the ionic strength. In high ionic strength solutions, NR reveals a high concentration of particles near the flat silica surface. Under the same conditions, theoretical calculations show an attractive force between a particle and a flat surface. For low ionic strength solutions, the particle concentration near the surface obtained from NR is the same as the bulk concentration, while depletion of particles near the surface is expected because of the repulsion predicted by the DLVO theory.

  17. Water uptake and swelling hysteresis in a nafion thin film measured with neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Kalisvaart, W Peter; Fritzsche, Helmut; Mérida, Walter

    2015-05-19

    Water uptake and swelling in a thin (∼15 nm) Nafion film on SiO2 native oxide on a Si wafer is studied as a function of relative humidity (8-97%) at room temperature and as a function of temperature (25-60 °C) at 97% relative humidity by neutron reflectometry. This is the first report on the behavior of thin Nafion films at elevated temperatures and high humidity. Large hysteresis is observed during the temperature cycle. The observed swelling strain in the film at 60 °C is 48% as compared to the as-deposited state, which is far above any previously observed trend at room temperature. A small decrease in the average SLD suggests that part of the additional swelling is due to thermal expansion, but the estimated D2O/SO3 ratio also increases by 70%. Half of the "excess" absorption and 73% of the additional swelling are retained during cooling back to room temperature. The results provide new insights into the dynamics of Nafion on nanometer scales under fuel cell operating conditions.

  18. Dynamics of silver photo-diffusion into Ge-chalcogenide films: time-resolved neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Y.; Asaoka, H.; Uozumi, Y.; Kawakita, Y.; Ito, T.; Kubota, M.; Yamazaki, D.; Soyama, K.; Ailavajhala, M.; Latif, M. R.; Wolf, K.; Mitkova, M.; Skoda, M. W. A.

    2015-06-01

    Silver diffuses into an amorphous (a-) chalcogenide layer while visible light illuminates Ag/a-chalcogenide films and neutron reflectometry is a suitable technique probing time evolution of the depth profiles without damaging the sample by the probe beam itself. In this paper, we report the results of time-resolved neutron reflectivity measurements of a-Ge40Se60/Ag/ Si films taken while the films are exposed to visible light. From the measurements, we found enormous changes in the neutron reflectivity profile, including a loss of total reflection region, with continuous illumination even after forming one homogeneous layer, which occurred about 50 min after starting illumination. At this stage, a clear off-specular scattering was observed by a linear detector and a surface roughness was observed with naked eyes.

  19. Focusing neutron reflectometry: Implementation and experience on the TOF-reflectometer Amor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahn, J.; Glavic, A.

    2016-06-01

    Neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool to investigate chemical and magnetic depth profiles near surfaces. The advantages of neutrons compared to x-rays are their sensitivity to isotopes, the high penetration capabilities and the high sensitivity to magnetic induction. The biggest disadvantage however is the low flux available, which leads to much longer counting times on much larger samples. In order to boost the performance of neutron reflectometers, a focusing guide system was developed and realised over recent years. Here we report on the application and performance of a down-scaled demonstrator of such a Selene guide, installed as an add-on on the time-of-flight (TOF) reflectometer Amor at the PSI. Due to the limited size of the guide, the flux is concentrated to a footprint of at most 2 mm width. It is thus possible to avoid illumination of contacts even on small samples. Despite the fact that typical samples measured on Amor with a size of 10 × 10mm2 are markedly under illuminated, the presented set-up leads to a reduction in counting time of 80%. The use of the demonstrator thus allows for in-situ or in-operando investigations with a time resolution of a few minutes for a qz range from 0.005Å-1 to 0.08Å-1. Besides a short recapitulation of the concept of focusing reflectometry, a detailed description of the data reduction and its quality is given, followed by an application example.

  20. Application of polarized neutron reflectometry and x-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry for determining the inhomogeneous magnetic structure in Fe/Gd multilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, E. A.; Haskel, D.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Jiang, J. S.; Kirby, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the magnetic structure of multilayer [Fe (35 {angstrom})/Gd (50 {angstrom}){sub 5}] with variation in temperature and an applied magnetic field was determined using a complementary approach combining polarized neutron and X-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry. Self-consistent simultaneous analysis of X-ray and neutron spectra allowed us to determine the elemental and depth profiles in the multilayer structure with unprecedented accuracy, including the identification of an inhomogeneous intralayer magnetic structure with near-atomic resolution.

  1. Characterization of Chemical Speciation in Ultra Thin Uranium Oxide Films by Neutron Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng

    2012-06-20

    Motivation for this project is due to more than 17 kg of HEU and 400 g of Pu have been interdicted through an international effort to control nuclear smuggling. Nuclear forensics - Detection and analysis of nuclear materials recovered from either the capture of unused materials or from the radioactive debris following a nuclear explosion or activities, which can contribute significantly for national security. Develop new nuclear forensic methods can be applied to: (a) Environmental swipes, (b) Small particulates, and (c) Thin films. Conclusions of the project are: (1) A unique approach: Neutron Reflectometry + Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy; and (2) Detection of chemical speciation with {angstrom}-level resolution.

  2. Motofit - integrating neutron reflectometry acquisition, reduction and analysis into one, easy to use, package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The efficient use of complex neutron scattering instruments is often hindered by the complex nature of their operating software. This complexity exists at each experimental step: data acquisition, reduction and analysis, with each step being as important as the previous. For example, whilst command line interfaces are powerful at automated acquisition they often reduce accessibility by novice users and sometimes reduce the efficiency for advanced users. One solution to this is the development of a graphical user interface which allows the user to operate the instrument by a simple and intuitive "push button" approach. This approach was taken by the Motofit software package for analysis of multiple contrast reflectometry data. Here we describe the extension of this package to cover the data acquisition and reduction steps for the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer. Consequently, the complete operation of an instrument is integrated into a single, easy to use, program, leading to efficient instrument usage.

  3. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Justin R; Rother, Gernot; Browning, Jim; Ankner, John Francis; Banuelos, Jose Leo; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David

    2012-01-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300 473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO2 in contact with quartz and Si/SiO2 wafers are also shown.

  4. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Justin R; Rother, Gernot; Browning, James F; Ankner, John F; Banuelos, Jose L; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R

    2012-04-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300-473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO(2) in contact with quartz and Si/SiO(2) wafers are also shown. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  5. Progress in the development of phase-sensitive neutron reflectometry methods.

    PubMed

    Majkrzak, C F; Berk, N F; Kienzle, P; Perez-Salas, U

    2009-04-07

    It has been a number of years since phase-sensitive specular neutron reflectometry (PSNR) methods employing reference layers were first introduced to help remove the ambiguity inherent in the reconstruction of scattering length density (SLD) depth profiles (Majkrzak, C. F.; Berk, N. F. Physica B 2003, 336, 27) from specular reflectivity measurements. Although a number of scientific applications of PSNR techniques have now been successfully realized (Majkrzak, C. F.; Berk, N. F.; Perez-Salas, U. A. Langmuir 2003, 19, 7796 and references therein), in certain cases practical difficulties remain. In this article, we describe possible solutions to two specific problems: (1) the need for explicit, detailed knowledge of the SLD profile of a given reference layer of finite thickness; and (2) for a reference layer of finite thickness in which only two density variations are possible, how to identify which of two mathematical solutions corresponds to the true physical structure.

  6. Magnetometry and transport data complement polarized neutron reflectometry in magnetic depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; He, Xi; Mukherjee, T.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Sahoo, S.; Binek, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Exchange coupled magnetic hard layer/soft layer thin films show a variety of complex magnetization reversal mechanisms depending on the hierarchy of interaction strengths within and between the films. Magnetization reversal can include uniform rotation, soft layer biasing, as well as exchange spring behavior. We investigate the magnetization reversal of a CoPt/Permalloy/Ta/Permalloy heterostructure. Here, Stoner-Wohlfarth-type uniform magnetization rotation of the virtually free Permalloy layer and exchange spring behavior of the strongly pinned Permalloy layer are found in the same sample. We investigate the complex magnetization reversal by polarized neutron reflectometry, magnetometry, and magneto-transport. The synergy of combining these experimental methods together with theoretical modeling is key to obtain the complete quantitative depth resolved information of the magnetization reversal processes for a multilayer of mesoscopic thickness.

  7. Feasibility study of ultrafast reflectometry for plasma position control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Masi, Gianluca; Cavazzana, Roberto; Finotti, Claudio; Martines, Emilio; Marchiori, Giuseppe; Moresco, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    The traditional and widely used O-mode microwave reflectometry diagnostics will be crucial for real-time plasma position control purposes in the next generation of tokamaks like ITER or DEMO. Different studies and experimental tests, demonstrated the reliability of such a system to complement and replace the magnetic measurements in order to estimate the plasma-wall gap with good temporal and spatial resolution. In RFX-mod, an innovative multiband reflectometry scheme, the ultrafast reflectometry technique, has been developed and successfully tested. This simplified scheme is based on a bidirectional frequency modulation (sweep time <1 μs) for each band and proved itself to be able to recover the position of the different cut-off density layers directly from the group delay analysis. In this contribution, we study the possibility of using this scheme for real-time plasma position control: we discuss both the reliability of correctly identifying the separatrix position starting from a discrete density profile reconstruction and the robustness of the measurements against fast dynamic events. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the European Commission.

  8. In situ Polarized Neutron Reflectometry: Epitaxial Thin-Film Growth of Fe on Cu(001) by dc Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Wiedemann, Birgit; Stahn, Jochen; Moulin, Jean-François; Mayr, Sina; Mairoser, Thomas; Schmehl, Andreas; Herrnberger, Alexander; Korelis, Panagiotis; Haese, Martin; Ye, Jingfan; Pomm, Matthias; Böni, Peter; Mannhart, Jochen

    2017-05-01

    The stepwise growth of epitaxial Fe on Cu (001 )/Si (001 ) , investigated by in situ polarized neutron reflectometry is presented. A sputter deposition system was integrated into the neutron reflectometer AMOR at the Swiss neutron spallation source SINQ, which enables the analysis of the microstructure and magnetic moments during all deposition steps of the Fe layer. We report on the progressive evolution of the accessible parameters describing the microstructure and the magnetic properties of the Fe film, which reproduce known features and extend our knowledge on the behavior of ultrathin iron films.

  9. Time-of-Flight Polarized Neutron Reflectometry on PLATYPUS: Status and Future Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saerbeck, T.; Cortie, D. L.; Brück, S.; Bertinshaw, J.; Holt, S. A.; Nelson, A.; James, M.; Lee, W. T.; Klose, F.

    Time-of-flight (ToF) polarized neutron reflectometry enables the detailed investigation of depth-resolved magnetic structures in thin film and multilayer magnetic systems. The general advantage of the time-of-flight mode of operation over monochromatic instruments is a decoupling of spectral shape and polarization of the neutron beam with variable resolution. Thus, a wide Q-range can be investigated using a single angle of incidence, with resolution and flux well-adjusted to the experimental requirement. Our paper reviews the current status of the polarization equipment of the ToF reflectometer PLATYPUS and presents first results obtained on stratified Ni80Fe20/α-Fe2O3 films, revealing the distribution of magnetic moments in an exchange bias system. An outlook on the future development of the PLATYPUS polarization system towards the implementation of a polarized 3He cell is presented and discussed with respect to the efficiency and high Q-coverage up to 1 Å-1 and 0.15 Å-1 in the vertical and lateral momentum transfer, respectively.

  10. The component group structure of DPPC bilayers obtained by specular neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Belička, Michal; Gerelli, Yuri; Kučerka, Norbert; Fragneto, Giovanna

    2015-08-21

    Specular neutron reflectometry was measured on a floating bilayer system consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine deposited over a 1,2-dibehenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer at 25 and 55 °C. The internal structure of lipid bilayers was described by a one-dimensional neutron scattering length density profile model, originally developed for the evaluation of small-angle scattering data. The reflectivity data from the supported bilayer were evaluated separately and used further as constraints in modeling the floating bilayer reflectivity curves. The model reflectivity curves successfully describe the experimental reflectivities of the supported bilayer in the gel phase and the floating bilayer system in the liquid-crystalline phase. The results yield an internal structure of a deposited bilayer and a floating bilayer on the level of component groups of lipid molecules. The obtained structure of the floating d62-diC16:0PC bilayer displays high resemblance of the bilayer structure in the form of unilamellar vesicles. At the same time, however, the results show differences in comparison to unilamellar vesicle bilayers, most likely due to the undulations of supported bilayers.

  11. H-mode studies with microwave reflectometry on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Serra, F.; Kurzan, B.; Nunes, I.; Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Suttrop, W.; Varela, P.; Vergamota, S.

    1998-05-01

    The microwave reflectometry system on ASDEX Upgrade measures density profiles (in broadband swept operation) and plasma fluctuations (fixed-frequency operation) both at the high-field side (HFS) and low-field side (LFS). Densities up to 0741-3335/40/5/036/img12 can be probed. We analyse the evolution of turbulence at the L-H transition and during the ELMy phase of H-mode discharges. The detailed density profile evolution during type I ELMs is resolved and profile oscillations associated with ELM precursors are studied.

  12. Neutron Reflectometry reveals the interaction between functionalized SPIONs and the surface of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Luchini, Alessandra; Gerelli, Yuri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Nylander, Tommy; Pálsson, Gunnar K; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Paduano, Luigi

    2017-03-01

    The safe application of nanotechnology devices in biomedicine requires fundamental understanding on how they interact with and affect the different components of biological systems. In this respect, the cellular membrane, the cell envelope, certainly represents an important target or barrier for nanosystems. Here we report on the interaction between functionalized SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs), promising contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and lipid bilayers that mimic the plasma membrane. Neutron Reflectometry, supported by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) experiments, was used to characterize this interaction by varying both SPION coating and lipid bilayer composition. In particular, the interaction of two different SPIONs, functionalized with a cationic surfactant and a zwitterionic phospholipid, and lipid bilayers, containing different amount of cholesterol, were compared. The obtained results were further validated by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurements and Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) images. None of the investigated functionalized SPIONs were found to disrupt the lipid membrane. However, in all case we observed the attachment of the functionalized SPIONs onto the surface of the bilayers, which was affected by the bilayer rigidity, i.e. the cholesterol concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Percolating bulk-heterostructures from neutron reflectometry and small angle scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, Daniel; Duxbury, Phillip

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel algorithm for efficiently calculating the simulated small angle scattering data of any discretized morphological model of arbitrary scale and resolution, referred to as the distribution function method (DFM). Unlike standard SAS fitting methods, the DFM algorithm allows for the calculation of form factors and structure factors from complex nanoscale morphologies commonly encountered in many modern polymeric and nanoparticle based systems, which have no exact analytical corollary. The computational efficiency of the DFM algorithm suggests it's use in morphological model refinement. We will present a number of simple examples to demonstrate the accuracy and limits of the algorithm, followed by an example of incorporation of the DFM algorithm into reverse Monte Carlo structural refinement of bulk-heterojunction two-phase morphologies, such as those commonly found in organic photovoltaic devices. We will show that morphological features introduced via direct incorporation of experimental neutron reflectometry and SANS data to the models has a direct effect on the results of device simulations. The authors thank CORE-CM at Michigan State University for it's funding of this research.

  14. Depth of α-Synuclein in a Bilayer Determined by Fluorescence, Neutron Reflectometry, and Computation

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; Heinrich, Frank; Sodt, Alexander J.; Maltsev, Alexander S.; Pastor, Richard W.; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) membrane interactions are implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Fluorescence and neutron reflectometry (NR) measurements reveal that α-syn penetrates ∼9–14 Å into the outer leaflet of the bilayer, with a substantial portion of the membrane-bound polypeptide extending into the aqueous solvent. For the first time, to our knowledge, we used NR to obtain direct quantitative evidence of α-syn-induced membrane thinning. To examine the effect of specific residues on membrane penetration depths, we used a series of W4-containing N-terminal peptides. We identified that the first 15 residues (P15) nearly recapitulate the features of the full-length protein (i.e., partition constants, molecular mobility, and insertion of the W4 side chain into the bilayer), and found that as few as the first four N-terminal residues are sufficient for vesicle binding. Although at least one imperfect amphipathic repeat sequence (KAKEGV) is required for α-helical formation, secondary structural formation has little effect on membrane affinity. To develop an N-terminal α-syn model for bilayer interactions, we performed molecular-dynamics simulations of the P15 peptide submerged in a bilayer. The simulation results are highly consistent with experimental data indicating a broad low-energy region (8.5–14.5 Å) for W4 insertion. PMID:22325285

  15. Interactions of Endoglucanases with Amorphous Cellulose Films Resolved by Neutron Reflectometry and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Liu, Zelin; Kent, Michael S; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Michael, Jablin; Jaclyn, Murton K; Halbert, Candice E; Datta, Supratim; Chao, Wang; Brown, Page

    2012-01-01

    A study of the interaction of four endoglucanases with amorphous cellulose films by neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) is reported. The endoglucanases include a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens), a processive endoglucanase from a marine bacterium (Cel5H from S. degradans), and two from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima). The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. The endoglucanases displayed highly diverse behavior. Cel45A and Cel5H, which possess carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), penetrated and digested within the bulk of the films to a far greater extent than Cel9A and Cel5A, which lack CBMs. While both Cel45A and Cel5H were active within the bulk of the films, striking differences were observed. With Cel45A, substantial film expansion and interfacial broadening were observed, whereas for Cel5H the film thickness decreased with little interfacial broadening. These results are consistent with Cel45A digesting within the interior of cellulose chains as a classic endoglucanase, and Cel5H digesting predominantly at chain ends consistent with its designation as a processive endoglucanase.

  16. 90° magnetic coupling in a NiFe/FeMn/biased NiFe multilayer spin valve component investigated by polarized neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Callori, S. J. Bertinshaw, J.; Cortie, D. L.; Cai, J. W. Zhu, T.; Le Brun, A. P.; Klose, F.

    2014-07-21

    We have observed 90° magnetic coupling in a NiFe/FeMn/biased NiFe multilayer system using polarized neutron reflectometry. Magnetometry results show magnetic switching for both the biased and free NiFe layers, the latter of which reverses at low applied fields. As these measurements are only capable of providing information about the total magnetization within a sample, polarized neutron reflectometry was used to investigate the reversal behavior of the NiFe layers individually. Both the non-spin-flip and spin-flip neutron reflectometry signals were tracked around the free NiFe layer hysteresis loop and were used to detail the evolution of the magnetization during reversal. At low magnetic fields near the free NiFe coercive field, a large spin-flip signal was observed, indicating magnetization aligned perpendicular to both the applied field and pinned layer.

  17. Magnetic properties of the SiO2(Co)/GaAs interface: Polarized neutron reflectometry and SQUID magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukleev, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Dyadkina, E. A.; Vorobiev, A. A.; Lott, D.; Lutsev, L. V.; Stognij, A. I.; Novitskiy, N. N.; Mistonov, A. A.; Menzel, D.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of giant injection magnetoresistance (GIMR) was recently observed in a granular SiO2/(54-75 at. % Co) film on a semiconductor GaAs substrate in a temperature range near T=300 K. The magnetoresistance coefficient reaches a value of 105% in a magnetic field of 1.9 T and at a voltage of 90 V. A structural model of the film was proposed based on the results of the grazing-incidence small-angle scattering (GISAXS) and x-ray reflectivity, which showed a specific interface layer 70-75 Å thick separating bulk SiO2(Co) granular film from the semiconductor substrate. This layer is formed by a monolayer of flattened Co particles which are laterally spaced apart much further than the particles in the bulk film. In the present work, using polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR), we study both the structural and magnetic properties of SiO2(Co) film separately in the bulk and in the interface layer, which is possible due to the depth resolution of the method. Temperature-dependent PNR and magnetization measurements performed by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) revealed the occurrence of two types of magnetic nanoparticles with different blocking temperatures and magnetization. The magnetization hysteresis curve demonstrated specific two-loop structure in fields 0.5-2 T. Thus our self-consistent results of PNR, GISAXS, and SQUID measurements emphasize the role of the interface features in the SiO2(Co)/GaAs heterostructures and show a direction for further development of the GIMR theory.

  18. Operando Measurement of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Formation at Working Electrode of Li-Ion Battery by Time-Slicing Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Hiroyuki; Harada, Masashi; Kondo, Yasuhito; Kondo, Hiroki; Suganuma, Yoshitake; Takahashi, Naoko; Sugiyama, Jun; Seno, Yoshiki; Yamada, Norifumi L

    2016-04-20

    We report the first operando measurement of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation at an electrode using in situ neutron reflectometry. The results revealed the growth of the SEI and intercalation of ions during the charge reaction. Furthermore, we propose a way of evaluating the charge used for the SEI formation.

  19. Structural Features of Membrane-bound Glucocerebrosidase and α-Synuclein Probed by Neutron Reflectometry and Fluorescence Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Thai Leong; Jiang, Zhiping; Heinrich, Frank; Gruschus, James M.; Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; Barros, Marilia; Curtis, Joseph E.; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GCase), the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease, are a common genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson disease and related disorders, implicating the role of this lysosomal hydrolase in the disease etiology. A specific physical interaction exists between the Parkinson disease-related protein α-synuclein (α-syn) and GCase both in solution and on the lipid membrane, resulting in efficient enzyme inhibition. Here, neutron reflectometry was employed as a first direct structural characterization of GCase and α-syn·GCase complex on a sparsely-tethered lipid bilayer, revealing the orientation of the membrane-bound GCase. GCase binds to and partially inserts into the bilayer with its active site most likely lying just above the membrane-water interface. The interaction was further characterized by intrinsic Trp fluorescence, circular dichroism, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Both Trp fluorescence and neutron reflectometry results suggest a rearrangement of loops surrounding the catalytic site, where they extend into the hydrocarbon chain region of the outer leaflet. Taking advantage of contrasting neutron scattering length densities, the use of deuterated α-syn versus protiated GCase showed a large change in the membrane-bound structure of α-syn in the complex. We propose a model of α-syn·GCase on the membrane, providing structural insights into inhibition of GCase by α-syn. The interaction displaces GCase away from the membrane, possibly impeding substrate access and perturbing the active site. GCase greatly alters membrane-bound α-syn, moving helical residues away from the bilayer, which could impact the degradation of α-syn in the lysosome where these two proteins interact. PMID:25429104

  20. Magnetic state of Nb(l-7nm)/Cu30Ni70 (6nm) superlattices revealed by Polarized Neutron Reflectometry and SQUID magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaydukov, Yu.; Morari, R.; Lenk, D.; Zdravkov, V.; Merkel, D. G.; Seidlhofer, B.-K.; Miiller, C.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Keller, T.; Steitz, R.; Sidorenko, A.; Horn, S.; Tidecks, R.; Keimer, B.

    2017-06-01

    We report results of a magnetic characterization of [Cu30Ni70(6nm)/Nb(x)]20(x=1÷7nm) superlattices using Polarized Neutron Reflectometry (PNR) and SQUID magnetometry. The study has shown that the magnetic moment of the structures growths almost linearly from H = 0 to Hsat = 1.3kOe which can be interpreted as evidence of antiferromagnetic (AF) coupling of the magnetic moments in neighbouring layers. PNR, however, did not detect any in-plane AF coupling. Taking into account the out-of-plane easy axis of the Cu30Ni70 layers, this may mean that only the out-of-plane components of the magnetic moments are AF coupled.

  1. Lithium diffusion in congruent LiNbO3 single crystals at low temperatures probed by neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Hüger, E; Rahn, J; Stahn, J; Geue, T; Heitjans, P; Schmidt, H

    2014-02-28

    The self-diffusion of lithium in congruent LiNbO3 single crystals was investigated at low temperatures between 379 and 523 K by neutron reflectometry. From measurements on (6)LiNbO3 (amorphous film)/(nat)LiNbO3 (single crystal) samples, Li self-diffusivities were determined in single crystals down to extremely low values of 1 × 10(-25) m(2) s(-1) on small length scales of 1-10 nm. The measured diffusivities are in excellent agreement with (extrapolated) literature data obtained by experiments based on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Impedance Spectroscopy. The tracer diffusivities can be described by a single Arrhenius line over ten orders of magnitude with an activation enthalpy of 1.33 eV, which corresponds to the migration energy of a single Li vacancy. A deviation from the Arrhenius behaviour at low temperatures, e.g., due to defect cluster formation is not observed.

  2. Correlating Interfacial Structure and Magnetism in Thin-Film Oxide Heterostructures Using Transmission Electron Microscopy and Polarized Neutron Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgeon, Steven Richard

    Oxide thin-films have attracted considerable attention for a new generation of spintronics devices, where both electron charge and spin are used to transport information. However, a poor understanding of the local features that mediate magnetization and coupling in these materials has greatly limited their deployment into new information and communication technologies. This thesis describes direct, local measurements of structure-property relationships in ferrous thin-films and La1--xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) / Pb(ZrxTi1--x)O3 (PZT) thin-film heterostructures using spatially-resolved characterization techniques. In the first part of this thesis we explore the properties of ferrous spintronic thin-films. These films serve as a model system to establish a suite of interfacial characterization techniques for subsequent studies. We then study the static behavior of LSMO / PZT devices with polarization set by the underlying substrate. Using transmission electron microscopy and geometric phase analysis we reveal the presence of significant local strain gradients in these films for the first time. Electron energy loss spectroscopy mapping of the LSMO / PZT interface reveals Mn valence changes induced by charge-transfer screening. Bulk magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectometry indicate that these chemical and strain changes are associated with a graded magnetization across the LSMO layer. Density functional theory calculations are presented, which show that strain and charge-transfer screening act locally to suppress magnetization in the LSMO by changing the Mn orbital polarization. In the second half of this thesis, we explore asymmetric screening effects on magnetization LSMO / PZT composites. We find that the local ferroelectric polarization can vary widely and that this may be responsible for reduced charge-transfer effects, as well as magnetic phase gradients at interfaces. From this information and electron energy loss spectroscopy, we construct a map of the magnetic

  3. Engineered Surface Barrier Monitoring Using Ground-Penetrating Radar, Time-Domain Reflectometry, and Neutron-Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Christopher E.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clement, William P.; Draper, Kathryn E.

    2010-05-01

    Effective monitoring of surface barriers intended to isolate and protect waste from the accessible environment requires techniques to assess their performance. Quantifying drainage conditions at any point below the barrier is difficult because field-scale drainage measurements are not well suited for assessing spatial drainage heterogeneity. Measurements of water storage, however, can provide an indirect measure of impending drainage. We measured seasonal water content at a vegetated capillary barrier on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to determine effective water-content monitoring methods. Measurements were made using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) techniques. Simultaneous measurements using time-domain reflectometry (TDR) and neutron-scattering probe (NP) at multiple depths were used to determine the depth of influence of the GPR ground wave. The GPR depth of influence increased only slightly with decreasing moisture content, ranging from 33 cm to 37 cm. TDR measurements were made using permanently emplaced arrays, eliminating the need for repeated ground disturbance. All three methods showed similar seasonal responses, with the highest water contents observed during the winter months decreasing through the summer. Unlike TDR and NPs, which are point measurements, GPR exhibited much greater spatial variability across the barrier surface. Our results indicate that GPR, in conjunction with automated TDR depth profiles can provide an effective and minimally invasive method for providing high-resolution estimates of soil water content within an engineered barrier.

  4. Application of microwave reflectometry to disordered petroleum multiphase flow study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannier, B.; Dubrunfaut, O.; Ossart, F.

    2013-02-01

    Microwave reflectometry is applied to multiphase flow metering in the context of oil extraction. Our sensor consists of two open-ended coaxial probes operating at complementary frequencies (at 600 MHz and around 36 GHz) and was designed to resist harsh field conditions. This paper presents and comments on results obtained in realistic dynamic conditions, on a triphasic flow loop (water-oil-gas). The main conclusions are the following: Bruggeman-Hanai's mixing rule applies to natural emulsions and can be used to determine the composition of the water-oil liquid phase; results obtained for annular flows are very sensitive to small perturbations such as bubbles or waves at the liquid-gas interface; in the case of triphasic slug flows, the composition of the liquid phase can be estimated by proper filtering of the data.

  5. A versatile UHV transport and measurement chamber for neutron reflectometry under UHV conditions.

    PubMed

    Syed Mohd, A; Pütter, S; Mattauch, S; Koutsioubas, A; Schneider, H; Weber, A; Brückel, T

    2016-12-01

    We report on a versatile mini ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chamber which is designed to be used on the MAgnetic Reflectometer with high Incident Angle of the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum in Garching, Germany. Samples are prepared in the adjacent thin film laboratory by molecular beam epitaxy and moved into the compact chamber for transfer without exposure to ambient air. The chamber is based on DN 40 CF flanges and equipped with sapphire view ports, a small getter pump, and a wobble stick, which serves also as sample holder. Here, we present polarized neutron reflectivity measurements which have been performed on Co thin films at room temperature in UHV and in ambient air in a magnetic field of 200 mT and in the Q-range of 0.18 Å(-1). The results confirm that the Co film is not contaminated during the polarized neutron reflectivity measurement. Herewith it is demonstrated that the mini UHV transport chamber also works as a measurement chamber which opens new possibilities for polarized neutron measurements under UHV conditions.

  6. A versatile UHV transport and measurement chamber for neutron reflectometry under UHV conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed Mohd, A.; Pütter, S.; Mattauch, S.; Koutsioubas, A.; Schneider, H.; Weber, A.; Brückel, T.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a versatile mini ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chamber which is designed to be used on the MAgnetic Reflectometer with high Incident Angle of the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum in Garching, Germany. Samples are prepared in the adjacent thin film laboratory by molecular beam epitaxy and moved into the compact chamber for transfer without exposure to ambient air. The chamber is based on DN 40 CF flanges and equipped with sapphire view ports, a small getter pump, and a wobble stick, which serves also as sample holder. Here, we present polarized neutron reflectivity measurements which have been performed on Co thin films at room temperature in UHV and in ambient air in a magnetic field of 200 mT and in the Q-range of 0.18 Å-1. The results confirm that the Co film is not contaminated during the polarized neutron reflectivity measurement. Herewith it is demonstrated that the mini UHV transport chamber also works as a measurement chamber which opens new possibilities for polarized neutron measurements under UHV conditions.

  7. Off-Specular X-ray and Neutron Reflectometry for the Structural Characterization of Buried Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lavery, Kristopher A.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; Lin, Eric K.; Wu, Wen-li; Satija, Sushil; Wormington, Matthew

    2007-09-26

    Off-specular reflectivity or diffuse scattering is sensitive to lateral compositional variations at surfaces and interfaces. It is particularly well-suited as a means of measuring the form and amplitude of surface roughness, as well as separating contributions from physical roughness and gradients in material density. The roughness and lateral correlation lengths of model rough surfaces were cross-correlated using neutron and x-ray off-specular reflectivity (OSNR and OSXR, respectively), and using power spectral density (PSD) analysis of atomic force microscopy (AFM) data. These experiments highlight the advantages of the technique for the investigation of buried interfaces while illustrating how x-ray and neutron techniques work complementarily to measure interfacial roughness.

  8. Characterization of the Decaheme c-type Cytochrome OmcA in Solution and on Hematite Surfaces by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Neutron Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Shi, Liang; Droubay, Timothy; Ankner, John Francis; Liang, Liyuan

    2010-01-01

    The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate electron shuttling, generated by the bacteria s metabolism, to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite ( -Fe2O3). To investigate the mechanism by which OmcA interacts with hematite, we purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and its interaction with hematite by neutron reflectometry (NR). SAXS results showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with a dimension of 3.4 9.0 6.5 nm3. Changes in redox state affect OmcA conformation. In addition, OmcA interacts with small organic ligands known to act as electron shuttle molecules, such as flavin mononucleotide (FMN), resulting in the formation of high molecular weight assemblies. A model system, developed using NR to study the interaction of OmcA with hematite, shows that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces. This allows OmcA to preferentially interact with hematite in a conformation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. Overall, these results provide experimental and quantitative evidence for OmcA reduction of solid metal oxides involving both direct and indirect mechanisms.

  9. Phase segregation of sulfonate groups in Nafion interface lamellae, quantified via neutron reflectometry fitting techniques for multi-layered structures.

    PubMed

    DeCaluwe, Steven C; Kienzle, Paul A; Bhargava, Pavan; Baker, Andrew M; Dura, Joseph A

    2014-08-21

    Neutron reflectometry analysis methods for under-determined, multi-layered structures are developed and used to determine the composition depth profile in cases where the structure is not known a priori. These methods, including statistical methods, sophisticated fitting routines, and coupling multiple data sets, are applied to hydrated and dehydrated Nafion nano-scaled films with thicknesses comparable to those found coating electrode particles in fuel cell catalyst layers. These results confirm the lamellar structure previously observed on hydrophilic substrates, and demonstrate that for hydrated films they can accurately be described as layers rich in both water and sulfonate groups alternating with water-poor layers containing an excess of fluorocarbon groups. The thickness of these layers increases slightly and the amplitude of the water volume fraction oscillation exponentially decreases away from the hydrophilic interface. For dehydrated films, the composition oscillations die out more rapidly. The Nafion-SiO2 substrate interface contains a partial monolayer of sulfonate groups bonded to the substrate and a large excess of water compared to that expected by the water-to-sulfonate ratio, λ, observed throughout the rest of the film. Films that were made thin enough to truncate this lamellar region showed a depth profile nearly identical to thicker films, indicating that there are no confinement or surface effects altering the structure. Comparing the SLD profile measured for films dried at 60 °C to modeled composition profiles derived by removing water from the hydrated lamellae suggests incomplete re-mixing of the polymer groups upon dehydration, indicated limited polymer mobility in these Nafion thin films.

  10. Physical properties of archaeal tetraether lipid membranes as revealed by differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry, molecular acoustics, and neutron reflectometry: effects of pressure and cell growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yong; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Taylor, Leeandrew Jacques-Asa; Erlkamp, Mirko; Grobelny, Sebastian; Czeslik, Claus; Watkins, Erik; Winter, Roland

    2012-03-20

    The polar lipid fraction E (PLFE) is a major tetraether lipid component in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Using differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry as well as ultrasound velocity and density measurements, we have determined the compressibilities and volume fluctuations of PLFE liposomes derived from different cell growth temperatures (T(g) = 68, 76, and 81 °C). The compressibility and volume fluctuation values of PLFE liposomes, which are substantially less than those detected from diester lipid membranes (e.g., DPPC), exhibit small but significant differences with T(g). Among the three T(g)s employed, 76 °C leads to the least compressible and most tightly packed PLFE membranes. This temperature is within the range for optimal cell growth (75-80 °C). It is known that a decrease in T(g) decreases the number of cyclopentane rings in archael tetraether lipids. Thus, our data enable us to present the new view that membrane packing in PLFE liposomes varies with the number of cyclopentane rings in a nonlinear manner, reaching maximal tightness when the tetraether lipids are derived from cells grown at optimal T(g)s. In addition, we have studied the effects of pressure on total layer thickness, d, and neutron scattering length density, ρ(n), of a silicon-D(2)O interface that is covered with a PLFE membrane using neutron reflectometry (NR). At 55 °C, d and ρ(n) are found to be rather insensitive to pressure up to 1800 bar, suggesting minor changes of the thickness of the membrane's hydrophobic core and headgroup orientation upon compression only.

  11. BioRef II—Neutron reflectometry with relaxed resolution for fast, kinetic measurements at HZB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, M.; Steitz, R.; Kreuzer, M.; Strobl, M.; Rose, M.; Dahint, R.

    2016-10-01

    We present an upgrade to the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer BioRef at the research reactor BER II of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB). Through the integration of an additional chopper into the existing setup, the available wavelength resolution is significantly extended. Now two distinct operation modes can be used: a high resolution mode with Δλ/λ ranging from 1% to 5%, which allows for the investigation of thick films up to 4000 Å, and a high flux mode with Δλ/λ = 7%-11%. In the high flux mode, reflectivity curves from 0.007 Å-1 to 0.2 Å-1 with three angular settings can be recorded in 7 min. For a single angular setting and its respective window in Q-space, a time resolution of even less than 4 min is reached. The different configurations are documented by respective measurements (a) on a Ni-Ti multilayer and (b) the swelling kinetics of a solid-supported phospholipid coating upon incubation in a polyelectrolyte solution.

  12. BioRef II-Neutron reflectometry with relaxed resolution for fast, kinetic measurements at HZB.

    PubMed

    Trapp, M; Steitz, R; Kreuzer, M; Strobl, M; Rose, M; Dahint, R

    2016-10-01

    We present an upgrade to the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer BioRef at the research reactor BER II of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB). Through the integration of an additional chopper into the existing setup, the available wavelength resolution is significantly extended. Now two distinct operation modes can be used: a high resolution mode with Δλ/λ ranging from 1% to 5%, which allows for the investigation of thick films up to 4000 Å, and a high flux mode with Δλ/λ = 7%-11%. In the high flux mode, reflectivity curves from 0.007 Å(-1) to 0.2 Å(-1) with three angular settings can be recorded in 7 min. For a single angular setting and its respective window in Q-space, a time resolution of even less than 4 min is reached. The different configurations are documented by respective measurements (a) on a Ni-Ti multilayer and (b) the swelling kinetics of a solid-supported phospholipid coating upon incubation in a polyelectrolyte solution.

  13. Characterization of the Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome OmcA in Solution and on Hematite Surfaces by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering and Neutron Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, A.; Shi, L.; Droubay, T.; Ankner, J. F.; Liang, L.

    2010-06-15

    The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate shuttling of electrons to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite (α-Fe2O3). No information is yet available concerning OmcA structure in physiologically relevant conditions such as aqueous environments. We purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and its interaction at the hematite-water interface by neutron reflectometry. SAXS showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with an overall dimension of 34 × 90 × 65 Å3. To our knowledge, we obtained the first direct evidence that OmcA undergoes a redox state-dependent conformational change in solution whereby reduction decreases the overall length of OmcA by ~7 Å (the maximum dimension was 96 Å for oxidized OmcA, and 89 Å for NADH and dithionite-reduced OmcA). OmcA was also found to physically interact with electron shuttle molecules such as flavin mononucleotide, resulting in the formation of high-molecular-weight assemblies. Neutron reflectometry showed that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces, where it assumes an orientation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. Finally, these novel insights into the molecular structure of OmcA in solution, and its interaction with insoluble hematite and small organic ligands, demonstrate the fundamental structural bases underlying OmcA's role in mediating redox processes.

  14. Characterization of the decaheme c-type cytochrome OmcA in solution and on hematite surfaces by small angle x-ray scattering and neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Johs, A; Shi, L; Droubay, T; Ankner, J F; Liang, L

    2010-06-16

    The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate shuttling of electrons to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)). No information is yet available concerning OmcA structure in physiologically relevant conditions such as aqueous environments. We purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and its interaction at the hematite-water interface by neutron reflectometry. SAXS showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with an overall dimension of 34 x 90 x 65 A(3). To our knowledge, we obtained the first direct evidence that OmcA undergoes a redox state-dependent conformational change in solution whereby reduction decreases the overall length of OmcA by approximately 7 A (the maximum dimension was 96 A for oxidized OmcA, and 89 A for NADH and dithionite-reduced OmcA). OmcA was also found to physically interact with electron shuttle molecules such as flavin mononucleotide, resulting in the formation of high-molecular-weight assemblies. Neutron reflectometry showed that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces, where it assumes an orientation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. These novel insights into the molecular structure of OmcA in solution, and its interaction with insoluble hematite and small organic ligands, demonstrate the fundamental structural bases underlying OmcA's role in mediating redox processes. (c) 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of the Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome OmcA in Solution and on Hematite Surfaces by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering and Neutron Reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Johs, A.; Shi, L.; Droubay, T.; Ankner, J.F.; Liang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate shuttling of electrons to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite (α-Fe2O3). No information is yet available concerning OmcA structure in physiologically relevant conditions such as aqueous environments. We purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and its interaction at the hematite-water interface by neutron reflectometry. SAXS showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with an overall dimension of 34 × 90 × 65 Å3. To our knowledge, we obtained the first direct evidence that OmcA undergoes a redox state-dependent conformational change in solution whereby reduction decreases the overall length of OmcA by ∼7 Å (the maximum dimension was 96 Å for oxidized OmcA, and 89 Å for NADH and dithionite-reduced OmcA). OmcA was also found to physically interact with electron shuttle molecules such as flavin mononucleotide, resulting in the formation of high-molecular-weight assemblies. Neutron reflectometry showed that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces, where it assumes an orientation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. These novel insights into the molecular structure of OmcA in solution, and its interaction with insoluble hematite and small organic ligands, demonstrate the fundamental structural bases underlying OmcA's role in mediating redox processes. PMID:20550916

  16. Microwave reflectometry for ICRF coupling studies on TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilgen, J. B.; Hanson, G. R.; Bigelow, T. S.; Batchelor, D. B.; Collazo, I.; Hoffman, D. J.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Stallings, D. C.; Raftopoulos, S.; Wilson, J. R.

    1994-10-01

    A dual-frequency differential-phase reflectometer has been developed for use in ICRF power coupling studies on TFTR. This system has been optimized for measurements of the electron density profile in the edge-gradient region, where density fluctuations are large. Initial proof-of-principle measurements demonstrate that this is an effective way to measure the electron density profile in the plasma-edge region. A new reflectometer launcher is presently being installed on the center axis of the bay-K ICRF antenna on TFTR, along with the associated waveguide transmission line. This will allow direct measurement of the edge-density profile within the high-power-density environment of the ICRF antenna where density profile modification might be expected.

  17. Distinguishing between similar tubular objects using pulse reflectometry: a study of trumpet and cornet leadpipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buick, J. M.; Kemp, J.; Sharp, D. B.; van Walstijn, M.; Campbell, D. M.; Smith, R. A.

    2002-05-01

    This paper considers the measurement of the internal radius of a number of similar, short, tubular leadpipes using pulse reflectometry. Pulse reflectometry is an acoustical technique for measuring the internal bore of a tubular object by analysing the reflections which occur when an acoustical pulse is directed into the object. The leadpipes are designed to form the initial, or lead, part of a trumpet or cornet and their internal radii differ by less than 0.1 mm between similar pipes. The ability of the reflectometer to detect these small differences, which are considered by players to produce a noticeable difference in the sound of an instrument, are investigated. It is seen that the pulse reflectometer is able to distinguish between leadpipes with different nominal radii varying by as little as 0.03 mm, demonstrating its potential in the study of musical instruments and showing that it can be used as a diagnostic tool by the instrument manufacturer to detect defects which are significant enough to acoustically alter performance. The absolute accuracy of the radius measurements is also considered at the end of the leadpipe, where the uncertainty is ±0.05 mm.

  18. Spectroscopic and time domain reflectometry studies on acetonitrile - Ethylene glycol binary solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendraprabu, A.; Kumbharkhane, A. C.; Joshi, Y. S.; Shaikh, S. S.; Kannan, P. P.; Karthick, N. K.; Arivazhagan, G.

    2017-05-01

    Spectroscopic (FTIR and 13C NMR) and time domain reflectometry (in the frequency range from 10 MHz to 25 GHz) studies have been carried out on the binary solutions of acetonitrile (AN) with ethylene glycol (EG). The presence of EG-EG multimers of various orders in neat EG has been confirmed by spectroscopic studies. AN-EG association through the formation of ∁ ≡ N ⋯ H - O , ∁ ≡ N ⋯ H - C(EG) and (EG) C - O ⋯ H - C(AN) hydrogen bonds have been identified using spectral studies. The principal relaxation process of the heteromolecular entities that involve higher order alcohol association in ethylene glycol rich solutions is found to be relatively slower than that in acetonitrile rich solutions in which lower order alcohol association involves in heterointeraction. The angular correlation among the dipoles appears to be described more precisely when the experimental ε∞ values rather than ε∞ =n2 are used for the calculation of geff .

  19. A Feasibility Study of RF Time-Domain Reflectometry as a Railgun Armature Tracking Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-08

    SUBJECT TERMS armature, radio frequency (RF), time-domain reflectometry ( TDR ), HEMCL, electromagnetic noise (EMI) 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 14 16. PRICE CODE...are very sensitive to electromagnetic noise (EMI). A frequent cause of electromagnetic noise within the railgun is that caused by arcing at the...the moving armature), radio frequency (RF), time-domain reflectometry ( TDR ) may potentially be used to obtain the position history of armature

  20. Evaluating the solid electrolyte interphase formed on silicon electrodes: A comparison of ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Doucet, Mathieu; Browning, Jim; Baldwin, J. K.; Winiarz, Jeffrey; Kaiser, Helmut; Taub, H.; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2016-04-15

    This work details the in situ characterization of the interface between a silicon electrode and an electrolyte using a linear fluorinated solvent molecule, 0.1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in deuterated dimethyl perfluoroglutarate (d6-PF5M2) (1.87 x 10-2 mS/cm-1). The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) composition and thickness determined via in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were compared. The data show that SEI expansion and contraction (breathing) during electrochemical cycling was observed via both techniques; however, ex situ XPS suggests that the SEI thickness increases during Si lithiation and decreases during delithiation, while in situ NR suggests the opposite. The most likely cause of this discrepancy is the selective removal of SEI components (top 20 nm of the SEI) during the electrode rinse process, required to remove electrolyte residue prior to ex situ analysis, demonstrating the necessity of performing SEI characterizations in situ.

  1. Evaluating the solid electrolyte interphase formed on silicon electrodes: A comparison of ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ neutron reflectometry

    DOE PAGES

    Doucet, Mathieu; Browning, Jim; Baldwin, J. K.; ...

    2016-04-15

    This work details the in situ characterization of the interface between a silicon electrode and an electrolyte using a linear fluorinated solvent molecule, 0.1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in deuterated dimethyl perfluoroglutarate (d6-PF5M2) (1.87 x 10-2 mS/cm-1). The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) composition and thickness determined via in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were compared. The data show that SEI expansion and contraction (breathing) during electrochemical cycling was observed via both techniques; however, ex situ XPS suggests that the SEI thickness increases during Si lithiation and decreases during delithiation, while in situ NR suggestsmore » the opposite. The most likely cause of this discrepancy is the selective removal of SEI components (top 20 nm of the SEI) during the electrode rinse process, required to remove electrolyte residue prior to ex situ analysis, demonstrating the necessity of performing SEI characterizations in situ.« less

  2. Evaluating the solid electrolyte interphase formed on silicon electrodes: a comparison of ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Fears, T M; Doucet, M; Browning, J F; Baldwin, J K S; Winiarz, J G; Kaiser, H; Taub, H; Sacci, R L; Veith, G M

    2016-05-18

    This work details the in situ characterization of the interface between a silicon electrode and an electrolyte using a linear fluorinated solvent molecule, 0.1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in deuterated dimethyl perfluoroglutarate (d6-PF5M2) (1.87 × 10(-2) mS cm(-1)). The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) composition and thickness determined via in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were compared. The data show that SEI expansion and contraction (breathing) during electrochemical cycling were observed via both techniques; however, ex situ XPS suggests that the SEI thickness increases during Si lithiation and decreases during delithiation, while in situ NR suggests the opposite. The most likely cause of this discrepancy is the selective removal of SEI components (top 20 nm of the SEI) during the electrode rinse process, which is required to remove the electrolyte residue prior to ex situ analysis, demonstrating the necessity of performing SEI characterization in situ.

  3. Formation of solid thorium monoxide at near-ambient conditions as observed by neutron reflectometry and interpreted by screened hybrid functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Heming; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Allred, David D.; Wang, Peng; Wen, Xiaodong; Rector, Kirk D.

    2017-04-01

    Oxidation of a ∼1000 Å sputter-deposited thorium thin film at 150 °C in 100 ppm of flowing oxygen in argon produces the long-sought solid form of thorium monoxide. Changes in the scattering length density (SLD) distribution in the film over the 700-min experiment measured by in-situ, dynamic neutron reflectometry (NR) shows the densities, compositions and thickness of the various thorium oxides layers formed. Screened, hybrid density-functional theory calculations of potential thorium oxides aid interpretation, providing atomic-level picture and energetics for understanding oxygen migration. NR provided evidence of the formation of substoichiometric thorium oxide, ThOy (y < 1) at the interface between the unreacted thorium metal and its dioxide overcoat which grows inward, consuming the thorium at a rate of 2.1 Å/min while y increases until reaching 1:1 oxygen-to-thorium. Its presence indicates that kinetically-favored solid-phase ThO can be preferentially generated as a majority phase under the thermodynamically-favored ThO2 top layer at conditions close to ambient.

  4. Polyelectrolyte adsorption on thin cellulose films studied with reflectometry and quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation.

    PubMed

    Enarsson, Lars-Erik; Wågberg, Lars

    2009-01-12

    Thin cellulose films were prepared by dissolving carboxymethylated cellulose fibers in N-methyl morpholine oxide and forming thin films on silicon wafers by spin-coating. The adsorption of cationic polyacrylamides and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride onto these films was studied by stagnation point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR) and by quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCM-D). The polyelectrolyte adsorption was studied by SPAR as a function of salt concentration, and it was found that the adsorption maximum was located at 1 mM NaCl for polyelectrolytes of low charge density and at 10 mM NaCl for polyelectrolytes of high charge density. Electrostatic screening led to complete elimination of the polyelectrolyte adsorption at salt concentrations of 300 mM NaCl. According to the QCM-D analysis, the cellulose films showed a pronounced swelling in water that took several hours to complete. Subsequent adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto the cellulose films led to a release of water from the cellulose, an effect that was substantial for polyelectrolytes of high charge density at low salt concentrations. The total mass change including water could therefore show either an increase or a decrease during adsorption onto the cellulose films, depending on the experimental conditions.

  5. Dielectric study of heat-denatured ovalbumin in aqueous solution by time domain reflectometry method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanxia; Ishida, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Shigeru

    2004-04-21

    The dielectric behavior of native and heat-denatured ovalbumins (OVAs) from three avian species in aqueous solution was examined over a frequency range of 100 kHz to 20 GHz, using the time domain reflectometry (TDR) method. For the native OVA solutions, three kinds of relaxation processes were observed at around 10 MHz, 100 MHz, and 20 GHz, respectively; these could be assigned to the overall rotation of protein molecules, the reorientations of the bound water, and the free water molecules, respectively. For the heat-denatured samples, three relaxation processes were also observed. However, the relaxation process at approximately 100 MHz originated via a different mechanism other than the reorientation of bound water, namely, the micro-Brownian motion of peptide chains of heat-denatured protein. From the observed relaxation process at approximately 100 MHz, the relaxation strength of heat-denatured OVA solution for duck was higher than that of OVA solutions for hen and guinea fowl and showed the pH dependency from pH 7.0 to 8.0 for OVAs obtained from all three species. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the relaxation strength was closely related to surface hydrophobicity of protein molecules and gel rheological properties. It was suggested that the difference in the surface hydrophobicity of protein influenced the dielectric behavior of water around denatured protein, whereas the dielectric behavior of denatured protein could be an indication of the gel rheological properties. Such studies can aid in the understanding of the different network structures of OVA gels from three avian species.

  6. Microwave Reflectometry for Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is about microwave reflectometry -- a radar technique for plasma density measurements using the reflection of electromagnetic waves by a plasma cutoff. Both the theoretical foundations of reflectometry and its practical application to the study of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper. In particular, the role of short-scale density fluctuations is discussed at length, both as a unique diagnostic tool for turbulence studies in thermonuclear plasmas and for the deleterious effects that fluctuations may have on the measurement of the average plasma density with microwave reflectometry.

  7. Kinetics of Particle Adsorption in Stagnation Point Flow Studied by Optical Reflectometry

    PubMed

    Böhmer; van der Zeeuw EA; Koper

    1998-01-15

    The kinetics of adsorption of nano-sized silica particles on a polymer pretreated surface were followed in situ by using optical reflectometry in a stagnation point flow setup. Conversion of the reflectometric signal to the surface coverage could be performed using a homogeneous slab model which was verified by determining the particle density on SEM pictures taken in the stagnation point and by comparison with a model which includes the particulate nature of the layer explicitly. The effects of salt concentration on the plateau adsorbed amounts for all particle sizes can be described with an effective hard sphere concept. Although initial slopes and plateau values are in reasonable agreement with a random sequential adsorption model, this model does not accurately describe the evolution of the surface coverage as a function of time in a stagnation point flow system. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. Copyright 1998Academic Press

  8. A study of optical frequency domain reflectometry and its associated distributed sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolen, Ryan

    Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) is an interferometric technique which is capable of interrogating fibers under test (FUT) up to kilometers in length with millimeter resolution[10]. It does so by taking the Rayleigh backscattered light, or Fresnel back-reflected light and combining it with the reference arm to create a beating signal. The beating signal is then Fourier transformed to create a scattering profile of the FUT. Presented in this thesis are 5 novel OFDR configurations that improve the SNR in the spatial domain up to 26dB. As well, 4 new data analysis algorithms are presented that improve the spectral resolution by up to a factor of 40 and spectral SNR by 1.31dB. The FUT's investigated are regular SMF, linear FBG's, and chirped FBG's. With these, the wavelength shift at specific points along the FUT is measured and correlated with temperature changes (with associated applications), longitudinal stress, and torsional stress stimuli.

  9. Neutron diffraction studies of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Popot, J.L.; Engelman, D.M.; Zaccai, G.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of bacteriorhodopsin have utilized the entire range of deuterium labeling techniques that are commonly used in biological neutron scattering experiments. We will review the work published in this area and report on current projects. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  10. A numerical study of fixed frequency reflectometry measurements of plasma filaments with radial and poloidal velocity components.

    PubMed

    Vicente, J; da Silva, F; Heuraux, S; Manso, M E; Conway, G D; Silva, C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D finite-differences time-domain full-wave code is used to simulate the measurements of plasma filaments with fixed frequency O-mode reflectometry. The plasma is modeled by a linear slab plasma plus a Gaussian perturbation propagating in a direction that can vary from poloidal to radial. The plasma background density gradient is chosen in agreement with the steep edge transport barrier of H-modes in the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak. Illustrative results are presented and different types of reflectometry responses are observed depending on filament sizes and propagation directions. The reflectometry signatures obtained here with numerical simulations support previous experimental findings on filament measurements.

  11. ATW neutronics design studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, D. C.; Yang, W. S.; Khalil, H.

    2000-11-10

    The Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept has been proposed as a transuranics (TRU) (and long-lived fission product) incinerator for processing the 87,000 metric tonnes of Light Water Reactor used fuel which will have been generated by the time the currently deployed fleet of commercial reactors in the US reach the end of their licensed lifetime. The ATW is proposed to separate the uranium from the transuranics and fission products in the LWR used fuel, to fission the transuranics, to send the LWR and ATW generated fission products to the geologic repository and to send the uranium to either a low level waste disposal site or to save it for future use. The heat liberated in fissioning the transuranics would be converted to electricity and sold to partially offset the cost of ATW construction and operations. Options for incineration of long-lived fission products are under evaluation. A six-year science-based program of ATW trade and system studies was initiated in the US FY 2000 to achieve two main purposes: (1) ''to evaluate ATW within the framework of nonproliferation, waste management, and economic considerations,'' and (2) ''to evaluate the efficacy of the numerous technical options for ATW system configuration.'' This paper summarizes the results from neutronics and thermal/hydraulics trade studies which were completed at Argonne National Laboratory during the first year of the program. Core designs were developed for Pb-Bi cooled and Na cooled 840 MW{sub th} fast spectrum transmuter designs employing recycle. Additionally, neutronics analyses were performed at Argonne for a He cooled 600 MW{sub th} hybrid thermal and fast core design proposed by General Atomics Co. which runs critical for 3/4 and subcritical for 1/4 of its four year once-thin burn cycle. The mass flows and the ultimate loss of transuranic isotopes to the waste stream per unit of heat generated during transmutation have been calculated on a consistent basis and are compared. (Long

  12. Microwave dielectric study of an oligomeric electrolyte gelator by time domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Shyamal Kumar; Yagihara, Shin; Yoshida, Masaru; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2009-07-30

    The dynamics of water molecules in aqueous solutions of an oligomeric electrolyte gelator, poly[pyridinium-1,4-diyliminocarbonyl-1,4-phenylene-methylene chloride] (1-Cl) was characterized by microwave dielectric measurements using the time domain reflectometry method. The dielectric dispersion and absorption curves related to the orientational motion of water molecules were described by the Cole-Cole equation. Discontinuities were observed in the concentration dependence of the dielectric relaxation strength, Deltaepsilonh, as well as in the Cole-Cole parameter, betah. These discontinuities were observed between the samples with concentrations of 6 and 7 g/L 1-Cl/water, which correspond to a change in the transparency. Such a discontinuity corresponds to the observation of the critical concentration of gelation. The interaction between water and 1-Cl molecules was discussed from the tauh-betah diagram. As 1-Cl carries an amide group, it could be expected that 1-Cl may interact hydrophilically with water, but the present result suggests that 1-Cl interact hydrophobically with water.

  13. Study on a focusing, low-background neutron delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahn, J.; Panzner, T.; Filges, U.; Marcelot, C.; Böni, P.

    2011-04-01

    In various fields of neutron scattering there is a tendency to use smaller and smaller samples. There are various reasons for this, e.g. the limited size in high pressure cells, the restrictions given by growth methods of thin films, or the impossibility to grow larger single crystals. With conventional guides this leads to the situation that a white beam with some 50 cm2 cross-section and a broad divergence is to illuminate a sample of some mm2 area. Thus more than 99% of the neutrons leaving the guide are not needed and cause background and radiation problems.It is suggested to change the order of the optical elements and the design of the guide section to filter neutrons not intended to hit the sample as early as possible. As an example a set-up for specular reflectivity on small samples is presented. A double monochromator some meters behind the source cuts away all neutrons of the wrong wavelength even before they enter the guide. The guide itself is one branch of an ellipse. It maps the divergent beam from the monochromator to a convergent beam at the sample position. An entry aperture at the first focal point, a bit larger than the sample, guarantees that just enough neutrons enter the guide to bath the sample. There is no direct line of sight to the source and the guide ends far away from the sample position, so that there are only few spacial restrictions.Detailed McStas calculations and a design study for a down-scaled test device, both for reflectometry and diffraction, are presented.

  14. Study of the magnetic structure of multilayers and of an ultracold neutron storage anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, Dmitry

    This thesis describes the results of polarized neutron reflectometry experiments with spin-valve samples performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD). The study was motivated by the strong technological interest in spin-valve structures exhibiting the effect of giant magnetoresistance. This phenomenon has been widely utilized in a new generation of magnetoresistive memory, reading heads for magnetic disk drives, and field sensors. The study showed that the interfacial roughness strongly depends on the conditions of sample preparation. We have also observed a non-collinear coupling of magnetization between the ferromagnetic layers of the spin-valve samples. The signs of the coupling constants were determined from the neutron reflectometry data using a minimum energy model for the relative orientations of magnetization. The results are consistent with the theoretical values obtained from the RKKY model of oscillatory exchange coupling. We also present the results of specific ultracold neutron (UCN) storage experiments performed at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France). We investigated certain anomalous features of UCN storage. The UCN were filled into a container whose walls were coated by a good neutron reflector (Fomblin grease). Then the neutrons were quickly removed by an absorber, until their residual density in the trap was measured to be negligible. Nevertheless, when the absorber was withdrawn, a measurable number of neutrons emerged from the trap. We have also found that application of a magnetic field gradient at the trap bottom as well as replacement of some Fomblin grease by liquid Fornblin oil gave rise to alterations of UCN count rate. These surprising phenomena are not well understood so far and require further experimental study.

  15. Neutron and X-ray Scattering From Single Supported Lipid Bilayers: Reflectometry, Grazing Incidence In-Plane Diffraction and Off-Specular Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2010-03-01

    Biological membranes mediate transport and communication between the cell and its surroundings. They defend the cell against invasive agents, and most present day drugs interact with membrane components. Complexity of the cell membranes renders many of their characteristics impenetrable to fundamental physical studies. As a result, a significant emphasis has been placed on developing model lipid membranes that facilitate the physical and chemical characterization of particular membrane features. X-ray (XR) and neutron reflectivity (NR) and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) techniques can be utilized to measure the structure of single, supported lipid bilayers in bulk water. GIXD studies demonstrated that bilayers formed by vesicle fusion have more disorder in the inner leaflet compared to structures prepared using the Langmuir-Blodgett/Schaeffer (LB/S) technique. In both cases, only a modest water cushion was detected between the bilayer and substrate. Diffraction from in-plane ordered domains was observed from bilayers prepared by either technique. In the case of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers, the ordered domains were coupled across both leaflets, scattering as one entity. Contrastingly, the ordered domains were uncoupled in 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine (DPPE) bilayers. NR can be effectively used to study polymer-supported single lipid bilayers in bulk water. Using NR and fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrated that a hydrated, surface-tethered polymer network capable of five-fold change in thickness over a 25-37 C temperature range can be a novel support for single DPPC bilayers in a liquid environment. Moderate temperature change swells the polymer, lifting the membrane from the substrate, creating a nearly aqueous cushion. Additionally, as the polymer swells, it promotes both in- and out-of-plane undulations in the supported membrane. Off-specular neutron scattering was used to deduce the in

  16. In situ laser reflectometry study of the amorphization of silicon carbide by MeV ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, T.; Heera, V.; Kögler, R.; Skorupa, W.

    1998-09-01

    In situ laser reflectometry and ex situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry have been used to investigate the ion fluence and temperature dependence of the amorphization process in silicon carbide induced by 3 MeV I2+ irradiation. A comparative study in silicon showed that damage accumulation in silicon carbide proceeds more gradually in the preliminary stage of amorphization. The amorphization fluence depends weakly on temperature below 300 K but strongly above 300 K. Silicon carbide is amorphized more quickly than silicon at elevated temperatures. At very low temperatures a higher ion fluence for the amorphization of silicon carbide is required in comparison to silicon. Owing to this behavior, different mechanisms of damage growth are assumed to be present in these semiconductors. A critical energy density of 5.6×1024 eV/cm3 for the amorphization of the silicon carbide crystal up to the surface has been found at room temperature. Experimental results are compared with predictions of the models proposed by Carter as well as by Morehead and Crowder.

  17. Neutron Scattering Studies of Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Despite more than a century of research, basic questions remain regarding both the internal structure and the role of water in Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete, the world's most widely used manufactured material. Most such questions concern the primary hydration product and strength-building phase of OPC paste, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. When cement and water are mixed, this phase precipitates as clusters of nanoscale (nearly amorphous) colloidal particles with an associated water-filled inter-particle pore system. Most attempts to characterize the C-S-H gel and the behavior of the associated water involve drying or other processes that, themselves, change the bound water content within and around the gel. Neutron scattering methods do not suffer from this disadvantage. Furthermore, the neutron isotope effect and the neutron's sensitivity to molecular motion have enabled considerable progress to be made in recent years by: (i) determining the C-S-H composition, density and gel structure in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) H/D contrast variation studies; (ii) elucidating the changing state of water within cement as hydration progresses using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS); and (iii) measuring the production and consumption of nanoscale calcium hydroxide (CH), a by-product of cement hydration that co-exists with the C-S-H gel, using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These experiments have provided new insights into the physics and chemistry of cement hydration, and have implications for the design of new concretes with pozzolanic cement additions that are intended to address environmental concerns and sustainability issues.

  18. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  19. Neutron scattering for analysis of processes in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagurov, A. M.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Samoylova, N. Yu; Drozhzhin, O. A.; Antipov, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The review is concerned with analysis and generalization of information on application of neutron scattering for elucidation of the structure of materials for rechargeable energy sources (mainly lithium-ion batteries) and on structural rearrangements in these materials occurring in the course of electrochemical processes. Applications of the main methods including neutron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, neutron reflectometry and neutron introscopy are considered. Information on advanced neutron sources is presented and a number of typical experiments are outlined. The results of some studies of lithium-containing materials for lithium-ion batteries, carried out at IBR-2 pulsed reactor, are discussed. The bibliography includes 50 references.

  20. UA/ORNL Collaboration: Neutron Scattering Studies of Antiferromagnetic Films, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mankey, Gary J.

    2006-07-26

    The work reported here was a collaborative project between the research groups of Dr. J.L. Robertson at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Dr. G.J. Mankey at the University of Alabama. The main thrust is developing neutron optical devices and materials for the study of magnetic thin films and interfaces. The project is particularly timely, since facility upgrades are currently underway at the High Flux Isotope Reactor. A new neutron optical device, a multicrystal analyzer, was designed and built to take maximum advantage of the increased flux that the upgraded beamlines at HFIR will provide. This will make possible detailed studies of the magnetic structure of thin films, multilayers, and interfaces that are not feasible at present. We performed studies of the antiferromagnetic order in thin films and crystals using neutron scattering, determined magnetic structures at interfaces with neutron reflectometry and measured order in magnetic dispersions using small angle neutron scattering. The collaboration has proved fruitful: generating eleven publications, contributing to the training of a postdoc who is now on staff at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and providing the primary support for two recent Ph.D. recipients. The collaboration is still vibrant, with anticipated implementation of the multicrystal analyzer on one of the new cold source beamlines at the High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  1. Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% {sup 235}U) or medium enriched uranium (35% {sup 235}U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology.

  2. Scanning laser reflectometry of retinal and subretinal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Ann E.; Moraes, L.; Beausencourt, E.; Remky, Andreas; Weiter, J. J.; Walker, J. P.; Wing, G. L.; Burns, Stephen Allan; Raskauskas, P. A.; Kelley, L. M.

    2000-06-01

    Measurements of the human ocular fundus that make use of the light returning through the pupil are called reflectometry. Early reflectometry studies were limited by poor light return from the retina and strong reflections from the anterior surface of the eye. Artifacts produced misleading results in diseases like age-related macular degeneration. Novel laser sources, scanning, confocal optics, and digital imaging provide improved sampling of the signal from the tissues of interest: photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells. A wider range of wavelengths is now compared, including the near infrared. Reflectometry now provides functional mapping, even in severe pathology.

  3. Study on optical frequency domain reflectometry based on tunable semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoyu; Liu, Tongqing; Zhang, Liwei; Guan, Bai-ou

    2009-11-01

    The relation of beat frequency, sweep rate, optical frequency modulation excursion and length of fiber under test (FUT) based on tunable semiconductor laser is studied. Experimental results show that the frequency of beat signal will increase when the length of the FUT, optical frequency modulation excursion or sweep rate increases.

  4. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  5. Correlation reflectometry at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Soldatov, S.; Vowinkel, B.; Mueller, P.

    2010-11-15

    In high temperature fusion plasmas the transport of energy and particles is commonly believed to be driven by turbulence. Turbulence quantities as correlation length and decorrelation time are important for the confinement properties of a plasma. Besides other diagnostics, correlation reflectometry has proven to be a suitable tool for the measurement of turbulence properties. At the medium sized Toroidal EXperiment for Technical Oriented Research (TEXTOR) the existing correlation reflectometry has been recently upgraded. A new reflectometer based on a microwave synthesizer has been developed and installed for the investigation of turbulence properties in a fusion plasma. Together with the existing reflectometer the measurement of radial correlation length and decorrelation time becomes available. Both reflectometers are computer controlled and allow to program individual frequency sequences and the duration of each frequency step. With the existing poloidal antenna array at {theta}=0 deg. and on top of the vacuum vessel, the system allows the measurement of radial correlation and poloidal correlations at the same time. First experiments have been performed and the results on the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in a fusion plasma are presented.

  6. Time-domain reflectometry studies on Halobacterium halobium and Halobacterium marismortui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bone, S.; Ginzburg, B. Z.; Morgan, H.; Wilson, G.; Zaba, B.

    1996-01-01

    The dielectric properties of Halobacterium halobium and Halobacterium marismortui measured over the frequency range 1 MHz to 1 GHz are compared with a single-shell model for interfacial polarization. In the case of Halobacterium halobium, the model shows excellent agreement with the experimental data for reasonable values of membrane and cytoplasmic conductivity and permittivity. For Halobacterium marismortui however, an acceptable fit to the data can only be achieved by invoking a plasma membrane conductivity some three orders of magnitude larger than that of Halobacterium halobium and adding a second high-frequency dielectric dispersion. These observations confirm the findings of a previous study and are consistent with a scheme for Halobacterium marismortui involving thermodynamic compartmentalization of Na and K ions and the existence of a conductive plasma membrane.

  7. Fast sweeping reflectometry upgrade on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Molina, D.; Ducobu, L.; Leroux, F.; Barbuti, A.; Heuraux, S.

    2010-10-15

    In order to study the temporal dynamics of turbulence, the sweep time of our reflectometry has been shortened from 20 to 2 {mu}s with 1 {mu}s dead time. Detailed technical aspects of the upgrade are given, namely, about the stability of the ramp generation, the detection setup, and the fast acquisition module. A review of studies (velocity measurement of the turbulence, modifications of the wavenumber spectrum, radial mapping of correlation time, etc.) offered by such improvements is presented.

  8. Model approach to solving the inverse problem of X-ray reflectometry and its application to the study of the internal structure of hafnium oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Yu. O. Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Roshchin, B. S.; Filatova, E. O.; Asadchikov, V. E.

    2013-01-15

    The key features of the inverse problem of X-ray reflectometry (i.e., the reconstruction of the depth profile of the dielectric constant using an experimental angular dependence of reflectivity) are discussed and essential factors leading to the ambiguity of its solution are analyzed. A simple approach to studying the internal structure of HfO{sub 2} films, which is based on the application of a physically reasonable model, is considered. The principles for constructing a film model and the criteria for choosing a minimal number of fitting parameters are discussed. It is shown that the ambiguity of the solution to the inverse problem is retained even for the simplest single-film models. Approaches allowing one to pick out the most realistic solution from several variants are discussed.

  9. Nuclear and neutron matter studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R.B.; Akmal, A.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1995-08-01

    We are studying nuclear and neutron matter with the new Argonne v{sub 18} NN and Urbana 3N potentials. We use variational wave functions and a diagrammatic cluster expansion with Fermi hypernetted and single-operator chain (FHNC/SOC) integral equations to evaluate the energy expectation value. Initial results show some interesting differences with our previous calculations with the older Argonne v{sub 14} potential. In particular, there are a number of diagrams involving L{center_dot}S and L{sup 2} terms which were small with the older model and were rather crudely estimated or even neglected. It appears that these terms are more important with the new potential and will have to be evaluated more accurately. Work on this subject is in progress. A simple line of attack is to just add additional diagrams at the three-body cluster level. A longer term approach may be to adapt some of the methods for evaluating nucleon clusters used in the few-body and closed shell nuclei described above.

  10. Performance study of the neutron-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Meng; Li, Yulan; Niu, Libo; Deng, Zhi; Cheng, Xiaolei; He, Li; Zhang, Hongyan; Fu, Jianqiang; Yan, Yangyang; Cai, Yiming; Li, Yuanjing

    2017-02-01

    Fast neutron spectrometers will play an important role in the future of the nuclear industry and nuclear physics experiments, in tasks such as fast neutron reactor monitoring, thermo-nuclear fusion plasma diagnostics, nuclear reaction cross-section measurement, and special nuclear material detection. Recently, a new fast neutron spectrometer based on a GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier amplification)-TPC (Time Projection Chamber), named the neutron-TPC, has been under development at Tsinghua University. It is designed to have a high energy resolution, high detection efficiency, easy access to the medium material, an outstanding n/γ suppression ratio, and a wide range of applications. This paper presents the design, test, and experimental study of the neutron-TPC. Based on the experimental results, the energy resolution (FWHM) of the neutron-TPC can reach 15.7%, 10.3% and 7.0% with detection efficiency higher than 10-5 for 1.2 MeV, 1.81 MeV and 2.5 MeV neutrons respectively. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275109)

  11. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  12. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  13. Microwave imaging reflectometry in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, S.; Nagayama, Y.; Pavlichenko, R.; Inagaki, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.

    2006-10-15

    A multichannel reflectometry with an imaging optical system is under development for the measurement of the electron density fluctuations in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The right-hand cutoff layer is utilized as a reflection surface. The angle of an ellipsoidal mirror installed inside the vacuum chamber is remotely adjustable with the ultrasonic motor in order to optimize the illumination angle for the wider range of the plasma parameters. An oscillation due to density fluctuation was observed using the microwave imaging reflectometry for the first time in LHD plasma experiment.

  14. Neutron generator (HIRRAC) and dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Hoshi, M; Takada, J; Tauchi, H; Matsuura, S; Takeoka, S; Kitagawa, K; Suga, S; Komatsu, K

    1999-12-01

    Dosimetry studies have been made for neutrons from a neutron generator at Hiroshima University (HIRRAC) which is designed for radiobiological research. Neutrons in an energy range from 0.07 to 2.7 MeV are available for biological irradiations. The produced neutron energies were measured and evaluated by a 3He-gas proportional counter. Energy spread was made certain to be small enough for radiobiological studies. Dose evaluations were performed by two different methods, namely use of tissue equivalent paired ionization chambers and activation of method with indium foils. Moreover, energy deposition spectra in small targets of tissue equivalent materials, so-called lineal energy spectrum, were also measured and are discussed. Specifications for biological irradiation are presented in terms of monoenergetic beam conditions, dose rates and deposited energy spectra.

  15. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies on the Multilamellae Formed by Mixing Lamella-Forming Cationic Diblock Copolymers with Lipids and Their Interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Wei; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Liu, I-Ting; Hu, Yuan; Jeng, U-Ser; Gilbert, Elliot Paul

    2016-02-23

    We demonstrate that the lamella-forming polystyrene-block-poly(N-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodine) (PS-b-P4VPQ), with similar sizes of the PS and P4VPQ blocks, can be dispersed in the aqueous solutions by forming lipid/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (d62-DPPC) in D2O, a broad correlation peak is found in the scattering profile that signifies the formation of the loosely ordered d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. The thicknesses of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic layers of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are close to the PS layer and the condensed brush layer thicknesses as determined from previous neutron reflectometry studies on the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer at the air-water interface. Such well-dispersed d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are capable of forming multilamellae with DNA in aqueous solution. It is found that the encapsulation of DNA in the hydrophilic layer of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae slightly increases the thickness of the hydrophilic layer. Adding CaCl2 can enhance the DNA adsorption in the hydrophilic brush layer, and it is similar to that observed in the neutron reflectometry study of the DNA adsorption by the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer.

  16. Neutron scattering studies of multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Ivelisse M.

    Magnetoelectric multiferroics are systems that exhibit magnetic and ferroelectric order. In strongly coupled multiferroics, competing magnetic interactions can break spatial inversion symmetry and yield ferroelectricity through a magnetic phase transition. In this dissertation, I present original work on the multiferroic properties of Ni3V2O8 and critical phenomena in TbMnO3 and RbFe(MoO4)2. Ni3V2O8 is an insulating magnet where Ni-spins order in a longitudinal amplitude modulated pattern along the a axis in the high-temperature incommensurate (HTI) phase. Upon cooling to the low-temperature incommensurate phase, an additional spine site spin component along b results in a cycloidal structure that breaks spatial inversion symmetry, yielding ferroelectricity. Electric control of multiferroic domains is demonstrated quantitatively and qualitatively using polarized magnetic neutron diffraction. We show that magnetic and ferroelectric domains are strongly coupled in this system and that definite cycloid handedness is achieved by antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Ni3 V2O8 displays a memory effect where the system reverts to the previous polarization state upon exiting and re-entering the multiferroic phase through a first order phase transition. Our results suggest that small multiferroic domains in the paraelectric, commensurate phase retain the polarization history and reestablish it upon re-entering the multiferroic phase. TbMnO3 is a frustrated magnet similar to Ni3V 2O8 which undergoes two magnetic phase transitions before becoming multiferroic. A temperature-dependent magnetic diffraction study near TN reveals that this system orders through a continuous phase transition. Further studies in the HTI phase are needed to clarify whether a novel, weak transition exists at around 39 K. Our results support the single irreducible representation model as the system enters the HTI phase. RbFe(MoO4)2 is a nearly 2D antiferromagnet that enters the

  17. A fundamental study on hyper-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K

    1994-12-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum with a Maxwellian distribution at a higher temperature than room temperature (300 K), was studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution at depth in a living body for neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were carried out using a Monte Carlo code 'MCNP-V3' in order to investigate the characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons, i.e. (i) depth dependence of the neutron energy spectrum, and (ii) depth distribution of the reaction rate in a water phantom for materials with 1/v neutron absorption. It is confirmed that hyper-thermal neutron irradiation can improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in the deeper areas in a living body compared with thermal neutron irradiation. When hyper-thermal neutrons with a 3000 K Maxwellian distribution are incident on a body, the reaction rates of 1/v materials such as 14N, 10B etc are about twice that observed for incident thermal neutrons at 300 K, at a depth of 5 cm. The limit of the treatable depth for tumours having 30 ppm 10B is expected to be about 1.5 cm greater by utilizing hyper-thermal neutrons at 3000 K compared with the incidence of thermal neutrons at 300 K.

  18. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vortex Matter in Type-II Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Xinsheng Ling

    2012-02-02

    The proposed program is an experimental study of the fundamental properties of Abrikosov vortex matter in type-II superconductors. Most superconducting materials used in applications such as MRI are type II and their transport properties are determined by the interplay between random pinning, interaction and thermal fluctuation effects in the vortex state. Given the technological importance of these materials, a fundamental understanding of the vortex matter is necessary. The vortex lines in type-II superconductors also form a useful model system for fundamental studies of a number of important issues in condensed matter physics, such as the presence of a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the presence of random pinning. Recent advances in neutron scattering facilities such as the major upgrade of the NIST cold source and the Spallation Neutron Source are providing unprecedented opportunities in addressing some of the longstanding issues in vortex physics. The core component of the proposed program is to use small angle neutron scattering and Bitter decoration experiments to provide the most stringent test of the Bragg glass theory by measuring the structure factor in both the real and reciprocal spaces. The proposed experiments include a neutron reflectometry experiment to measure the precise Q-dependence of the structure factor of the vortex lattice in the Bragg glass state. A second set of SANS experiments will be on a shear-strained Nb single crystal for testing a recently proposed theory of the stability of Bragg glass. The objective is to artificially create a set of parallel grain boundaries into a Nb single crystal and use SANS to measure the vortex matter diffraction pattern as a function of the changing angle between the applied magnetic field to the grain boundaries. The intrinsic merits of the proposed work are a new fundamental understanding of type-II superconductors on which superconducting technology is based, and a firm understanding of phases

  19. Zooming in on disordered systems: Neutron reflection studies of proteins associated with fluid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) is an emerging experimental technique for the structural characterization of proteins interacting with fluid bilayer membranes under conditions that mimic closely the cellular environment. Thus, cellular processes can be emulated in artificial systems and their molecular basis studied by adding cellular components one at a time in a well-controlled environment while the resulting structures, or structural changes in response to external cues, are monitored with neutron reflection. In recent years, sample environments, data collection strategies and data analysis were continuously refined. The combination of these improvements increases the information which can be obtained from NR to an extent that enables structural characterization of protein-membrane complexes at a length scale that exceeds the resolution of the measurement by far. Ultimately, the combination of NR with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be used to cross-validate the results of the two techniques and provide atomicscale structural models. This review discusses these developments in detail and demonstrates how they provide new windows into relevant biomedical problems. PMID:24674984

  20. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, S.

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions were obtained that are not only interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up opportunities for further discoveries.

  1. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions have been obtained that are not ony interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up new opportunities for further discoveries.

  2. Theoretical Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    2003-01-01

    Among the newly discovered classes of X-ray sources which have attracted wide attention are close binary systems in which mass is transferred via Roche lobe overflow from a low mass donor star to its neutron star companion. Many of these sources exhibit intense bursts of X-ray radiation as well as periodic and quasi-periodic phenomena. Intensive analysis of these sources as a class has provided insight into the accretion process in binary star systems and into the magnetic field, rotational, and nuclear evolution of the underlying neutron star. In this proposal we have focused on theoretical studies of the hydrodynamical and nuclear processes that take place on the surface of accreting neutron stars in these systems. The investigation of these processes is critical for providing an understanding of a number of outstanding problems related to their transient behavior and evolution.

  3. Neutron scattering studies of glassy Li+ superionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, Tom; Zella, Leo; Zaidi, Ali; Rathore, Munesh; Dalvi, Anshuman; Mitra, Saibal

    2013-03-01

    Two distinct neutron scattering techniques were implemented in the study of glassy superionic materials composed of a complex network of their interconnected sub-units: Li2O, NH4H2PO2, and Li2SO4. The use of disordered materials underlies an effort to promote Li+ mobility, while suppressing e- conductivity, which makes them good candidates for use as electrolytes in lithium ion batteries. We present triple-axis spectrometer results of energy resolved vs. energy integrated neutron scattering that indicate the presence of a broad range of dynamic processes in the materials, rather than well-defined excitations. Additionally, we report on neutron diffraction data that demonstrates the formation of crystallites within the material upon annealing up to 450 °C. Such crystallites hinder the performance of the materials as electrolytes, which is evident in thin film devices where heating is unavoidable during fabrication.

  4. Dynamic optical frequency domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Arbel, Dror; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-04-21

    We describe a dynamic Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) system which enables real time, long range, acoustic sensing at high sampling rate. The system is based on a fast scanning laser and coherent detection scheme. Distributed sensing is obtained by probing the Rayleigh backscattered light. The system was tested by interrogation of a 10 km communication type single mode fiber and successfully detected localized impulse and sinusoidal excitations.

  5. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1996-12-19

    The goals of this three-year study were: (1) design a neutron focusing system for use with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of cold neutrons appropriate for prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA); (2) orchestrate the construction of the focusing system, integrate it into the TCNS neutron guide complex, and measure its performance; and (3) design, setup, and test a cold-neutron PGAA system which utilizes the guided focused cold neutron beam. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which the authors wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, the authors obtained gains of 3 to 5 for 4 different converging guide geometries. During the second year of the DOE grant, the subject of this final report, Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company was contracted to build a converging neutron guide focusing system to the specifications. Considerable time and effort were spent working with Ovonics on selecting the materials for the converging neutron guide system. The major portion of the research on the design of a cold-neutron PGAA system was also completed during the second year. At the beginning of the third year of the grant, a converging neutron guide focusing system had been ordered, and a cold-neutron PGAA system had been designed. Since DOE did not fund the third year, there was no money to purchase the required equipment for the cold-neutron PGAA system and no money to perform tests of either the converging neutron guide or the cold-neutron PGAA system. The research already accomplished would have little value without testing the systems which had been designed. Thus the project was continued at a pace that could be sustained with internal funding.

  6. Neutron transport study of a beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaial, Anas M.

    Neutron radiography has the ability to differentiate between gas and liquid in two-phase flow due both to the density difference and the high neutron scattering probability of hydrogen. Previous studies have used dynamic neutron radiography -- in both real-time and high-speed -- for air-water, steam-water and gas-liquid metal two-phase flow measurements. Radiography with thermal neutrons is straightforward and efficient as thermal neutrons are easier to detect with relatively higher efficiency and can be easily extracted from nuclear reactor beam ports. The quality of images obtained using neutron radiography and the imaging speed depend on the neutron beam intensity at the imaging plane. A high quality neutron beam, with thermal neutron intensity greater than 3.0x 10 6 n/cm2-s and a collimation ratio greater than 100 at the imaging plane, is required for effective dynamic neutron radiography up to 2000 frames per second. The primary objectives of this work are: (1) to optimize a neutron radiography facility for dynamic neutron radiography applications and (2) to investigate a new technique for three-dimensional neutron radiography using information obtained from neutron scattering. In this work, neutron transport analysis and experimental validation of a dynamic neutron radiography facility is studied with consideration of real-time and high-speed neutron radiography requirements. A beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility, for a target thermal neutron flux of 1.0x107 n/cm2-s, has been analyzed, constructed and experimentally verified at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. The neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance is evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes using copper activation flux-mapping technique. The development of different facility components, such as beam tube liner, gamma ray filter, beam shutter and biological shield, is achieved analytically using neutron attenuation and divergence theories. Monte

  7. Ames collaborative study of cosmic ray neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, J. E.; Hughes, L.; Mccaslin, J. B.; Stephens, L. D.; Rindi, A.; Smith, A. R.; Thomas, R. H.; Griffith, R. V.; Welles, C. G.; Baum, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a collaborative study to define both the neutron flux and the spectrum more precisely and to develop a dosimetry package that can be flown quickly to altitude for solar flare events are described. Instrumentation and analysis techniques were used which were developed to measure accelerator-produced radiation. The instruments were flown in the Ames Research Center high altitude aircraft. Neutron instrumentation consisted of Bonner spheres with both active and passive detector elements, threshold detectors of both prompt-counter and activation-element types, a liquid scintillation spectrometer based on pulse-shape discrimination, and a moderated BF3 counter neutron monitor. In addition, charged particles were measured with a Reuter-Stokes ionization chamber system and dose equivalent with another instrument. Preliminary results from the first series of flights at 12.5 km (41,000 ft) are presented, including estimates of total neutron flux intensity and spectral shape and of the variation of intensity with altitude and geomagnetic latitude.

  8. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Susana C. M.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Leal, Ricardo M. F.; Mitchell, Edward P.; Forsyth, V. Trevor

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  9. Reactivity studies on the advanced neutron source. [Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Redmond, E.L. II; Fletcher, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) with a peak thermal neutron flux of about 8.5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} is being designed for condensed matter physics, materials science, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. The ANS is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady-state source of neutrons. The design effort is currently in the conceptual phase. A reference reactor design has been selected in order to examine the safety, performance, and costs associated with this one design. The ANS Project has an established, documented safety philosophy, and safety-related design criteria are currently being established. The purpose of this paper is to present analyses of safety aspects of the reference reactor design that are related to core reactivity events. These analyses include control rod worth, shutdown rod worth, heavy water voiding, neutron beam tube flooding, light water ingress, and single fuel element criticality. Understanding these safety aspects will allow us to make design modifications that improve the reactor safety and achieve the safety related design criteria. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Advanced techniques for microwave reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, B.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T.; Zhuravlev, V. |; Hartfuss, H.J.; Hirsch, M.; Geist, T.; Segovia, J.; Oramas, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    Microwave reflectometry has been applied during the last years as a plasma diagnostic of increasing interest, mainly due to its simplicity, no need for large access ports and low radiation damage of exposed components. Those characteristics make reflectometry an attractive diagnostic for the next generation devices. Systems used either for density profile or density fluctuations have also shown great development, from the original single channel heterodyne to the multichannel homodyne receivers. In the present work we discuss three different advanced reflectometer systems developed by CIEMAT members in collaboration with different institutions. The first one is the broadband heterodyne reflectometer installed on W7AS for density fluctuations measurements. The decoupling of the phase and amplitude of the reflected beam allows for quantitative analysis of the fluctuations. Recent results showing the behavior of the density turbulence during the L-H transition on W7AS are shown. The second system shows how the effect of the turbulence can be used for density profile measurements by reflectometry in situations where the complicated geometry of the waveguides cannot avoid many parasitic reflections. Experiments from the TJ-I tokamak will be shown. Finally, a reflectometer system based on the Amplitude Modulation (AM) technique for density profile measurements is discussed and experimental results from the TJ-I tokamak are shown. The AM system offers the advantage of being almost insensitive to the effect of fluctuations. It is able to take a direct measurement of the time delay of the microwave pulse which propagates to the reflecting layer and is reflected back. In order to achieve fast reconstruction for real time monitoring of the density profile application of Neural Networks algorithms will be presented the method can reduce the computing times by about three orders of magnitude. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Ultrashort-pulse reflectometry (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Chou, A. E.; Zhang, W.-M.; Romanowsky, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    Time-of-flight radar diagnostics are envisaged as having great potential for determining electron density profiles in next generation tokamaks such as TPX and ITER. Ultrashort-pulse radar reflectometry is a promising new time-of-flight diagnostic capable of making instantaneous density profile determination utilizing a single source and a single set of measurements. A proof-of-principle eight channel system has been constructed for use on the CCT tokamak at UCLA, and has undergone extensive testing in the laboratory.

  12. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  13. Neutron reflectivity studies of ionomer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrys, B. J.; Bhutto, A. A.; Bucknall, D. G.; Braiewa, R.; Vesely, D.; Weiss, R. A.

    Preliminary results are presented of a neutron reflectivity study of the interfacial width between lithium- and zinc-sulphonated deuterated polystyrene with polycarbonate (PC). Both systems are partially miscible and exhibit an upper critical solution temperature behaviour. The interdiffusion in these systems was measured by annealing at a temperature above the glass-transition temperature of both polymers. The interfacial profiles obtained for these systems were described by symmetric Gaussian interfaces. No significant diffusion was observed.

  14. Neutron scattering study of dilute supercritical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, H.D.; Wignall, G.D.; Shah, V.M.; Londono, J.D.; Bienkowski, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    Dilute solutions in supercritical solvents exhibit interesting microstructures that are related to their dramatic macroscopic behavior. In typical attractive solutions, solutes are believed to be surrounded by clusters of solvent molecules, and solute molecules are believed to congregate in the vicinity of one another. Repulsive solutions, on the other hand, exhibit a local region of reduced solvent density around the solute with solute-solute congregation. Such microstructures influence solubility, partial molar volume, reaction kinetics, and many other properties. We have undertaken to observe these interesting microstructures directly by neutron scattering experiments on dilute noble gas systems including Ar. The three partial structure factors for such systems and the corresponding pair correlation functions can be determined by using the isotope substitution technique. The systems studied are uniquely suited for our objectives because of the large coherent neutron scattering length of the isotope {sup 36}Ar and because of the accurate potential energy functions that are available for use in molecular simulations and theoretical calculations to be compared with the scattering results. We will describe our experiment, the unique apparatus we have built for it, and the neutron scattering results from our initial allocations of beam time. We will also describe planned scattering experiments to follow those with noble gases, including study of long-chain molecules in supercritical solvents. Such studies will involve hydrocarbon mixtures with and without deuteration to provide contrast.

  15. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    , ranging from large-scale structures and dynamics of polymers and biological systems, to electronic properties of today's technological materials. Neutron scattering developed into a vast field, encompassing many different experimental techniques aimed at exploring different aspects of matter's atomic structure and dynamics. Modern magnetic neutron scattering includes several specialized techniques designed for specific studies and/or particular classes of materials. Among these are magnetic reflectometry aimed at investigating surfaces, interfaces, and multilayers, small-angle scattering for the large-scale structures, such as a vortex lattice in a superconductor, and neutron spin-echo spectroscopy for glasses and polymers. Each of these techniques and many others offer exciting opportunities for examining magnetism and warrant extensive reviews, but the aim of this chapter is not to survey how different neutron-scattering methods are used to examine magnetic properties of different materials. Here, we concentrate on reviewing the basics of the magnetic neutron scattering, and on the recent developments in applying one of the oldest methods, the triple axis spectroscopy, that still is among the most extensively used ones. The developments discussed here are new and have not been coherently reviewed. Chapter 2 of this book reviews magnetic small-angle scattering, and modern techniques of neutron magnetic reflectometry are discussed in Chapter 3.

  16. Exchange bias studied with polarized neutron reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    te Velthuis, S. G. E.

    2000-01-05

    The role of Polarized Neutron Reflectivity (PNR) for studying natural and synthetic exchange biased systems is illustrated. For a partially oxidized thin film of Co, cycling of the magnetic field causes a considerable reduction of the bias, which the onset of diffuse neutron scattering shows to be due to the loosening of the ferromagnetic domains. On the other hand, PNR measurements of a model exchange bias junction consisting of an n-layered Fe/Cr antiferromagnetic (AF) superlattice coupled with an m-layered Fe/Cr ferromagnetic (F) superlattice confirm the predicted collinear magnetization in the two superlattices. The two magnetized states of the F (along or opposite to the bias field) differ only in the relative orientation of the F and adjacent AF layer. The possibility of reading clearly the magnetic state at the interface pinpoints the commanding role that PNR is having in solving this intriguing problem.

  17. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Susana C M; Blakeley, Matthew P; Leal, Ricardo M F; Mitchell, Edward P; Forsyth, V Trevor

    2008-05-01

    A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 A on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin-receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  18. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Susana C. M.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Leal, Ricardo M. F.; Mitchell, Edward P.; Forsyth, V. Trevor

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste. PMID:18453706

  19. Neutron scattering studies of premartensitic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Elastic neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering are ideal techniques for studying premartensitic behavior in metallic alloys. By necessity, real, bulk samples are probed replete with their intrinsic defects. Also, because of the properties of the neutron it is straightforward to probe the behavior of the phonon modes away from the zone center which is probed in the normal ultrasonic techniques. A wide variety of alloys exhibiting martensitic transformations have been studied. It will be shown that most systems undergoing diffusionless transformations exhibit premartensitic behavior in that precursor effects are seen at temperatures well above the martensitic transformation temperature, T{sub M}. This behavior manifests itself in an anomalous temperature dependence of the energy of a particular phonon mode as the temperature approaches T{sub M}. The wavevector of this mode is frequently away from the zone center (i.e., q {ne} O). This softening is nearly always accompanied by elastic diffuse scattering at the same wavevector. Particular examples to be discussed are the alkali metals, {omega}-phase materials and Ni-based alloys. 34 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Potential of space-borne GNSS reflectometry to constrain simulations of the ocean circulation. A case study for the South African current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saynisch, Jan; Semmling, Maximilian; Wickert, Jens; Thomas, Maik

    2015-11-01

    The Agulhas current system transports warm and salty water masses from the Indian Ocean into the Southern Ocean and into the Atlantic. The transports impact past, present, and future climate on local and global scales. The size and variability, however, of the respective transports are still much debated. In this study, an idealized model based twin experiment is used to study whether sea surface height (SSH) anomalies estimated from reflected signals of the Global Navigation Satellite System reflectometry (GNSS-R) can be used to determine the internal water mass properties and transports of the Agulhas region. A space-borne GNSS-R detector on the International Space Station (ISS) is assumed and simulated. The detector is able to observe daily SSH fields with a spatial resolution of 1-5∘. Depending on reflection geometry, the precision of a single SSH observation is estimated to reach 3 cm (20 cm) when the carrier phase (code delay) information of the reflected GNSS signal is used. The average precision over the Agulhas region is 7 cm (42 cm). The proposed GNSS-R measurements surpass the radar-based satellite altimetry missions in temporal and spatial resolution but are less precise. Using the estimated GNSS-R characteristics, measurements of SSH are generated by sampling a regional nested general circulation model of the South African oceans. The artificial observations are subsequently assimilated with a 4DVAR adjoint data assimilation method into the same ocean model but with a different initial state and forcing. The assimilated and the original, i.e., the sampled model state, are compared to systematically identify improvements and degradations in the model variables that arise due to the assimilation of GNSS-R based SSH observations. We show that SSH and the independent, i.e., not assimilated model variables velocity, temperature, and salinity improve by the assimilation of GNSS-R based SSH observations. After the assimilation of 90 days of SSH observations

  1. Time domain reflectometry in time variant plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherner, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of time-dependent electron density fluctuations on a synthesized time domain reflectometry response of a one-dimensional cold plasma sheath are considered. Numerical solutions of the Helmholtz wave equation, which describes the electric field of a normally incident plane wave in a specified static electron density profile, are used. A study of the effects of Doppler shifts resulting from moving density fluctuations in the electron density profile of the sheath is included. Varying electron density levels corrupt time domain and distance measurements. Reducing or modulating the electron density levels of a given electron density profile affects the time domain response of a plasma and results in motion of the turning point, and the effective motion has a significant effect on measuring electron density locations.

  2. Non-destructive studies of fuel pellets by neutron resonance absorption radiography and thermal neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Vogel, S. C.; Mocko, M.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Yuan, V.; Nelson, R. O.; Brown, D. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2013-09-01

    Many isotopes in nuclear materials exhibit strong peaks in neutron absorption cross sections in the epithermal energy range (1-1000 eV). These peaks (often referred to as resonances) occur at energies specific to particular isotopes, providing a means of isotope identification and concentration measurements. The high penetration of epithermal neutrons through most materials is very useful for studies where samples consist of heavy-Z elements opaque to X-rays and sometimes to thermal neutrons as well. The characterization of nuclear fuel elements in their cladding can benefit from the development of high resolution neutron resonance absorption imaging (NRAI), enabled by recently developed spatially-resolved neutron time-of-flight detectors. In this technique the neutron transmission of the sample is measured as a function of spatial location and of neutron energy. In the region of the spectra that borders the resonance energy for a particular isotope, the reduction in transmission can be used to acquire an image revealing the 2-dimensional distribution of that isotope within the sample. Provided that the energy of each transmitted neutron is measured by the neutron detector used and the irradiated sample possesses neutron absorption resonances, then isotope-specific location maps can be acquired simultaneously for several isotopes. This can be done even in the case where samples are opaque or have very similar transmission for thermal neutrons and X-rays or where only low concentrations of particular isotopes are present (<0.1 atom% in some cases). Ultimately, such radiographs of isotope location can be utilized to measure isotope concentration, and can even be combined to produce three-dimensional distributions using tomographic methods. In this paper we present the proof-of-principle of NRAI and transmission Bragg edge imaging performed at Flight Path 5 (FP5) at the LANSCE pulsed, moderated neutron source of Los Alamos National Laboratory. A set of urania mockup

  3. Full-wave feasibility study of magnetic diagnostic based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, Orso; Choi, Myunghee; Volpe, Francesco

    2014-02-12

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and the edge current as a function of the minor radius in the pedestal region. The idea behind such diagnostic is to localize and characterize a direction of reduced reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. We modeled the wave scattering and mode-conversion processes by means of the finite-element COMSOL Multiphysics code in two dimensions (2D). Sensitivity studies were performed for parameters mocking up DIII-D plasmas. Simulations confirmed the presence of a minimum in reflectivity of an externally injected O-mode beam, and confirmed that this minimum depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from the OX mode conversion physics. This study gives confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic.

  4. Dielectric dispersion, relaxation dynamics and thermodynamic studies of Beta-Alanine in aqueous solutions using picoseconds time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoth, K.; Ganesh, T.; Senthilkumar, P.; Sylvester, M. Maria; Karunakaran, D. J. S. Anand; Hudge, Praveen; Kumbharkhane, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    The aqueous solution of beta-alanine characterised and studied by their dispersive dielectric properties and relaxation process in the frequency domain of 10×106 Hz to 30×109 Hz with varying concentration in mole fractions and temperatures. The molecular interaction and dielectric parameters are discussed in terms of counter-ion concentration theory. The static permittivity (ε0), high frequency dielectric permittivity (ε∞) and excess dielectric parameters are accomplished by frequency depended physical properties and relaxation time (τ). Molecular orientation, ordering and correlation factors are reported as confirmation of intermolecular interactions. Ionic conductivity and thermo dynamical properties are concluded with the behaviour of the mixture constituents. Solute-solvent, solute-solute interaction, structure making and breaking abilities of the solute in aqueous medium are interpreted. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra of beta- alanine single crystal and liquid state have been studied. The 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectral studies give the signature for resonating frequencies and chemical shifts of beta-alanine.

  5. Application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry for characterization of gold reduction from organometallic compound by means of plasma jet technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodák, Jiří; Nečas, David; Pavliňák, David; Macak, Jan M.; Řičica, Tomáš; Jambor, Roman; Ohlídal, Miloslav

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a new application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to determine a distribution of metallic gold in a layer of an organogold precursor which was treated by a plasma jet. Gold layers were prepared by spin coating from a solution of the precursor containing a small amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone on a microscopy glass, then they were vacuum dried. A difference between reflectivity of metallic gold and the precursor was utilized by imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to create a map of metallic gold distribution using a newly developed model of the studied sample. The basic principle of the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is also shown together with the data acquisition principles. XPS measurements and microscopy observations were made to complete the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry results. It is proved that the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry represents a new method for quantitative evaluation of local reduction of metallic components from metaloorganic compounds.

  6. Neutron scattering studies of amorphous Invar alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews recent inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed to study the spin dynamics of two amorphous Invar systems: Fe/sub 100-x/B/sub x/ and Fe/sub 90-x/Ni/sub x/Zr/sub 10/. As in crystalline Invar Fe/sub 65/Ni/sub 35/ and Fe/sub 3/Pt, the excitation of conventional long-wavelength spin waves in these amorphous systems cannot account for the relatively rapid change of their magnetization with temperature. These results are discussed in terms of additional low-lying excitations which apparently have a density of states similar to the spin waves.

  7. Modeling of Ultra-Short-Pulse Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Bruce I.

    1998-11-01

    Pulsed reflectometry offers the prospect of making space and time-resolved measurements of the radial profiles of both the electron density and the vector magnetic field in the midplane of a device, from which the current profile can be inferred if the device is toroidally symmetric and has a weak up-down asymmetry at the midplane. Detailed modeling of the use of ultra-short-pulse reflectometry to diagnose radial electron density and magnetic field strength profiles has been undertaken with a suite of one and two-dimensional, wave-equation-solving simulation codes and analytical calculations.(B. I. Cohen, L. L. LoDestro, E. B. Hooper, and T. A. Casper, Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 40), 75 (1998). The reflectometry simulations are coupled to the CORSICA equilibrium and transport code to allow realistic plasma density and magnetic profiles to be used. The simulations show that pulsed reflectometry is a relatively robust technique for inferring density and magnetic profiles. A new innovation is the demonstration that the linear mode conversion of extraordinary modes to ordinary modes induced by magnetic shear can be diagnosed with reflectometry from which the magnetic pitch angle can be inferred.(B. I. Cohen, E. B. Hooper, M. C. Spang, and C. W. Domier, "Theoretical Aspects of the Use of Pulsed Reflectometry in a Spheromak Plasma," (June, 1998), submitted to Rev. Sci. Instrum.) Some of the characteristics of fluctuations are also revealed by reflectometry. Simulation examples of applications of ultra-short-pulsed reflectometry to the SSPX spheromak experiment at Livermore are presented.

  8. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  9. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  10. Polarized neutron reflectivity study of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFeB/W thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaye, Haile; Zhan, Xiao; Li, Shufa; Lauter, Valeria; Zhu, Tao

    In this work we study the origin of PMA in MgO/CoFeB/W trilayer systems using polarized neutron reflectivity. Recently, the spin Hall effect in the heavy metals, such as Pt and Ta, has been of significant interest for highly efficient magnetization switching of the ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched by such a heavy metal and an oxide, which can be used for spintronic based memory and logic devices. Most work has focused on heavy-metal/ferromagnet/oxide trilayer (HM/FM/MO) structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), where the oxide layer plays the role of breaking inversion symmetry .No PMA was found in W/CoFeB/MgO films. An insertion of Hf layer in between the W and CoFeB layers, however, has been found to create a strong PMA. Roughness and formation of interface alloys by interdiffusion influences the extent of PMA. We intend to identify these influences using the depth sensitive technique of PNR. In our previous study, we have successfully performed polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) measurements on the Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/Ta thin film with MgO thickness of 1 nm. The PNR measurements were carried out using the BL-4A Magnetic Reflectometer at SNS. This work has been supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB933102). Research at SNS was supported by the Office of BES, DOE.

  11. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1995-03-06

    Funds were received for the first year of a three year DOE Nuclear Engineering Research Grant, ``Study of Neutron Focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source`` (FGO2-92ER75711). The purpose of this three year study was to develop a neutron focusing system to be used with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of neutrons. A prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility was also to be designed, setup, and tested under the three year project. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which we wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, we obtained gains of 3 to 5 for the neutron flux averaged over an area of 1 {times} 1 cm.

  12. Neutrons scattering studies in the actinide region

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1992-09-01

    During the report period were investigated the following areas: prompt fission neutron energy spectra measurements; neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from [sup 239]Pu; neutron scattering in [sup 181]Ta and [sup 197]Au; response of a [sup 235]U fission chamber near reaction thresholds; two-parameter data acquisition system; black'' neutron detector; investigation of neutron-induced defects in silicon dioxide; and multiple scattering corrections. Four Ph.D. dissertations and one M.S. thesis were completed during the report period. Publications consisted of three journal articles, four conference papers in proceedings, and eleven abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. There are currently four Ph.D. and one M.S. candidates working on dissertations directly associated with the project. In addition, three other Ph.D. candidates are working on dissertations involving other aspects of neutron physics in this laboratory.

  13. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  14. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  15. Neutron diffraction studies of thin film multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Majkrzak, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    The application of neutron diffraction methods to the study of the microscopic chemical and magnetic structures of thin film multilayers is reviewed. Multilayer diffraction phenomena are described in general and in particular for the case in which one of the materials of a bilayer is ferromagnetic and the neutron beam polarized. Recent neutron diffraction measurements performed on some interesting multilayer systems are discussed. 70 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Use of ultracold neutrons for condensed-matter studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michaudon, A.

    1997-05-01

    Ultracold neutrons have such low velocities that they are reflected by most materials at all incident angles and can be stored in material bottles for long periods of time during which their intrinsic properties can be studied in great detail. These features have been mainly used for fundamental-physics studies including the detection of a possible neutron electric dipole moment and the precise determination of neutron-decay properties. Ultracold neutrons can also play a role in condensed-matter studies with the help of high-resolution spectrometers that use gravity as a strongly dispersive medium for low-velocity neutrons. Such studies have so far been limited by the low intensity of existing ultracold-neutron sources but could be reconsidered with more intense sources, which are now envisaged. This report provides a broad survey of the properties of ultracold neutrons (including their reflectivity by different types of samples), of ultracold-neutron spectrometers that are compared with other high-resolution instruments, of results obtained in the field of condensed matter with these instruments, and of neutron microscopes. All these subjects are illustrated by numerous examples.

  17. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul Samuel

    For many years, wiring has been treated as a system that could be installed and expected to work for the life of the aircraft. As aircraft age far beyond their original expected life span, this attitude is rapidly changing. Wiring problems have recently been identified as the cause of several tragic mishaps and hundreds of thousands of lost mission hours. Intermittent wiring faults have been and continue to be difficult to resolve. Test methods that pinpoint faults on the ground can miss intermittent failures. New test methods involving spread spectrum signals are investigated that could be used in flight to locate intermittent failures, including open circuits, short circuits, and arcs. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry (SSTDR) and sequence time domain reflectometry (STDR) are analyzed in light of the signals commonly present on aircraft wiring. Pseudo noise codes used for the generation of STDR and SSTDR signals are analyzed for application in a STDR/SSTDR test system in the presence of noise. The effects of Mil-Std 1553 and white noise on the STDR and SSTDR signals are discussed analytically, through simulations, and with the use of test hardware. A test system using STDR and SSTDR is designed, built, and used to collect STDR and SSTDR test data. The data collected with the STDR/SSTDR test hardware is analyzed and compared to the theoretical results. Experimental data for open and short circuits collected using SSTDR and a curve fitting algorithm shows a maximum range estimation error of +/-0.2 ft for 75O coaxial cable up to 100ft, and +/-0.6ft for a sample 32.5ft non-controlled impedance aircraft cable. Mil-Std 1553 is specified to operate reliably with a signal-to-noise ratio of 17.5dB, and the SSTDR test system was able to locate an open circuit on a cable also carrying simulated Mil-Std 1553 data where the SSTDR signal was 50dB below the Mil-Std 1553 signal. STDR and SSTDR are shown to be effective in detecting and locating dry and wet arcs on wires.

  18. Study of a Loop Heat Pipe Using Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    C. Thomas Conroy; A. A. El-Ganayni; David R. Riley; John M. Cimbala; Jack S. Brenizer, Jr.; Abel Po-Ya Chuang; Shane Hanna

    2001-08-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, has been identified with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design.

  19. Neutron damage studies of organic materials with NQR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.E.; Jamil, K. )

    1992-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques for the evaluation of radiation damage to materials exposed to neutrons provide valuable methods for monitoring neutron-induced radiation damage. Radiation damage to many organic materials is difficult to monitor without destructive testing. The authors present a new technique for the evaluation of neutron-induced radiation damage based on nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) techniques. This demonstrates the NQR response to neutron damage in two organic materials and provides quantitative estimates of microdosimetry and damage sites associated with neutron-induced damage in these materials. They have used {sup 14}N as a probe nucleus to detect molecular bonding changes induced by neutron irradiation. For these studies, two simple, nitrogen containing, organic materials known to provide strong NQR signals were chosen: urea (CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}) and thiourea (CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}).

  20. Study of a loop heat pipe using neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Cimbala, John M; Brenizer, Jack S; Chuang, Abel Po-Ya; Hanna, Shane; Thomas Conroy, C; El-Ganayni, A A; Riley, David R

    2004-10-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, is potentially identifiable with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design.

  1. TEM study of neutron-irradiated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, L.L.; Bentley, J.; Farrell, K.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a transmission electron microscopy study of the defect structure in iron neutron-irradiated to low fluences (less than or equal to 1 dpa) at temperatures of 455 to 1013/sup 0/K are presented. The dislocation microstructures coarsen with increasing irradiation temperature from decorated dislocations, through clusters of dislocation loops, to near-edge, interstitial dislocation loops with b = a<100>, and network segments. Significant cavity formation occurred only at 548 to 723/sup 0/K, with homogeneous distributions found only at 623 and 673/sup 0/K. The maximum swelling of 0.07% occurred at 673/sup 0/K. Large cavities had a truncated octahedral shape with (111) facets and (100) truncations. Damage halos were observed around boron-containing precipitates. The effects of interstitial impurities on microstructural development and the differences in the observed microstructures compared to those in refractory bcc metals are discussed. 8 figures, 6 tables.

  2. Neutron shielding of the GDT (Novosibirsk) neutron generator project -- A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Robouch, B.V.; Ingrosso, L.; Brzosko, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents results of extensive neutronic studies of the neutron source test facility based on the Novosibirsk Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT). The facility is to provide 10{sup 18} SDT-neutrons/s (over a continuous 10-year period) for material-test studies. The paper examines the protective-shield capacity to ensure survival of GDT vital parts and suggests design modifications when survival is in jeopardy. The numerical studies used the 3D-AMC-VINIA Monte Carlo code with a precise computer representation of the sensitive parts of the facility. Intensity maps were plotted for neutron fluences, displacements, heat deposition, etc. Shielding feasibility has been ascertained, and the lifetime of consumable components ensured beyond the recommended values. A modification is suggested to extend the irradiation space at HARD neutron energy spectra to increase the volume to 1 m{sup 3} with damage gradients <5%/cm. The design achieves neutron fluences close to 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s (3.10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} end-of-life) in a >100 {ell} test space.

  3. A neutron reflectivity study of polymer-modified phospholipid monolayers at the solid-solution interface: polyethylene glycol-lipids on silane-modified substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, T L; Majewski, J; Wong, J Y; Steinberg, S; Leckband, D E; Israelachvili, J N; Smith, G S

    1998-01-01

    The structure of polymer-decorated phospholipid monolayers at the solid-solution interface was investigated using neutron reflectometry. The monolayers were composed of distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) matrixed with varying amounts of DSPE-PEG (DSPE with polyethylene glycol covalently grafted to its headgroup). Mixed lipid monolayers were Langmuir-Blodgett deposited onto hydrophobic quartz or silicon substrates, previously hydrophobized by chemically grafting a robust monolayer of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). We show that this method results in homogeneous and continuous phospholipid monolayers on the silanated substrates and determine that the grafted PEG chains extend away from the monolayers into the solvent phase as a function of their density, as expected from scaling theories. In addition, ligands were coupled to the end of the PEG chains and selective binding was demonstrated using fluorescence microscopy. Our results demonstrate that these constructs are ideal for further characterization and studies with well-defined monomolecular films. PMID:9788930

  4. Use of Anal Acoustic Reflectometry in the Evaluation of Men With Passive Fecal Leakage.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Benjamin R; Telford, Karen J; Carlson, Gordon L; Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Kiff, Edward S

    2017-05-01

    Men with passive fecal leakage represent a distinct clinical entity in which the pathophysiology remains unclear. Standard anorectal investigations fail to demonstrate consistent abnormalities in this group. Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new test of anal sphincter function with greater sensitivity and discriminatory ability than conventional anal manometry. The aim of this study was to determine whether men with fecal leakage have an abnormality in anal sphincter function that is detectable by anal acoustic reflectometry. This was an age-matched study of continent and incontinent men. The study was conducted at a university teaching hospital. Male patients with isolated symptoms of fecal leakage were recruited. Anal acoustic reflectometry, followed by conventional anal manometry, was performed. Results were then compared with those from an age-matched group of men with no symptoms of anal incontinence or anorectal pathology. Variables measured with anal acoustic reflectometry and anal manometry in the incontinent and continent men were compared. Thirty subjects were recruited, of whom 15 were men with fecal leakage and 15 were continent men. There was a significantly higher incidence of previous anorectal surgery in the men with leakage. The anal acoustic reflectometry variables of opening and closing pressure were significantly lower in leakers compared with continent subjects (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001). Hysteresis was significantly greater in the male leaker group (p = 0.026). No difference was seen in anal manometry. With a larger sample size, the effect of previous anorectal surgery and the presence of an anal sphincter defect could be clarified. Anal acoustic reflectometry is a sensitive test of anal sphincter function and, unlike anal manometry, can discriminate male leakers from continent subjects. An identifiable abnormality has been detected using anal acoustic reflectometry, which may further our understanding of the pathogenesis in this group.

  5. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region. Progress report, August 1, 1992--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Prompt fission neutron energy spectra for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu; Two-parameter measurement of nuclear lifetimes; ``Black`` neutron detector; Data reduction techniques for neutron scattering experiments; Inelastic neutron scattering studies in {sup 197}Au; Elastic and inelastic scattering studies in {sup 239}Pu; and neutron induced defects in silicon dioxide MOS structures.

  6. Applying an analytical method to study neutron behavior for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, S. A. Mousavi

    2016-12-01

    In this investigation, a new dosimetry process is studied by applying an analytical method. This novel process is associated with a human liver tissue. The human liver tissue has compositions including water, glycogen and etc. In this study, organic compound materials of liver are decomposed into their constituent elements based upon mass percentage and density of every element. The absorbed doses are computed by analytical method in all constituent elements of liver tissue. This analytical method is introduced applying mathematical equations based on neutron behavior and neutron collision rules. The results show that the absorbed doses are converged for neutron energy below 15MeV. This method can be applied to study the interaction of neutrons in other tissues and estimating the absorbed dose for a wide range of neutron energy.

  7. Studies of D-Li neutron source: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-06-01

    The construction of a neutron source facility able to reproduce the radiation environment predicted for a fusion reactor can be considered a very important milestone for the fusion program. Such a neutron source should allow materials testing over a wide range of neutron flux and neutron fluence. To date, none of the existing facilities reproduce the neutron flux with the energy spectrum of a fusion reactor. As a result, the major part of the required material database is obtained by extrapolations which may not be as reliable as needed to predict the real performance of those materials under fusion reactor conditions. As an example, the effect of the gas production, transmutation, atomic displacement, and other nuclear responses on the ductility and swelling and perhaps other properties as well, must be analyzed in samples which have undergone reactor conditions environment. This study is focused on the neutronics analysis of a D-Li neutron source. Neutron induced nuclear responses and neutron transport are calculated with the aim at defining the expected performance of a D-Li neutron source. The first section describes the differences in the magnitude of the neutron flux when material is present or not inside the test cell The second section deals with nuclear responses such as DPA, helium production, and nuclear heating. In the third section, calculations of the available volume above a threshold DPA value are presented. Section four presents results for the gamma-ray flux distribution. A brief discussion about tritium generation in the lithium jet is given in section live, and the conclusions are summarized in section six.

  8. Neutron beta decay studies with Nab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeßler, S.; Alarcon, R.; Alonzi, L. P.; Balascuta, S.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Bowman, J. D.; Bychkov, M. A.; Byrne, J.; Calarco, J. R.; Chupp, T.; Cianciolo, T. V.; Crawford, C.; Frlež, E.; Gericke, M. T.; Glück, F.; Greene, G. L.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Gudkov, V.; Harrison, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Ito, T.; Makela, M.; Martin, J.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGovern, S.; Page, S.; Penttilä, S. I.; Počanić, D.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Tompkins, Z.; Wagner, D.; Wilburn, W. S.; Young, A. R.

    2013-10-01

    Precision measurements in neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay and allow for several stringent tests of the standard model. This paper discusses the design and the expected performance of the Nab spectrometer.

  9. Neutron Activation Analysis, A Titanium Material Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresser, Charles

    2011-04-01

    In order to obtain faster and more accurate measurements of radioactive contaminates within a sample of titanium we expose it to a neutron flux. This flux will activate the stable and quasi stable (those with extremely long half lives) isotopes into resultant daughter cells that are unstable which will result in shorter half lives on the order of minutes to days. We measured the resulting decays in the Germanium Crystal Detector and obtained a complex gamma spectrum. A mathematical model was used to recreate the production of the measured isotopes in the neutron flux and the resultant decays. Using this model we calculated the mass percent of the contaminate isotopes inside our titanium sample. Our mathematical model accounted for two types of neutron activation, fast or thermal activation, since this would determine which contaminate was the source of our signals. By looking at the percent abundances, neutron absorption cross-sections and the resulting mass percents of each contaminate we are able to determine the exact source of our measured signals. Additionally we implemented a unique ratio method to cross check the mathematical model. Our results have verified that for fast neutron activation and thermal neutron activation the method is accurate.

  10. MCNPX Simulation Study of STRAW Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Stephen Mitchell

    2010-01-08

    A novel prototype fission meter is being designed at National Security Technologies, LLC, using a thin uniform coating (only 1 micron thick) of {sup 10}B as a neutron converter inside a large array of thin (4 mm diameter) copper tubes. The copper tubes are only 2 mils thick, and each holds the stretched anode wire under tension and high voltage. The tubes are filled with proportional counter gas (a mixture of 90%/10% of Ar/CO{sub 2}). The tubes operate in proportional counter mode and attract mobile charged particles ({alpha}'s) created in the nuclear interaction {sup 10}B(n, {sup 4}He){sup 7}Li. However, a single tube has about 1/7th the sensitivity of a {sup 3}He tube. Modeling is required to determine if enough such tubes could be placed in a neutron detection assembly of the current size to give comparable sensitivity to {sup 3}He. Detectors lined with {sup 10}B lie between {sup 3}He and {sup 10}BF{sub 3} proportional counters and fission chambers in terms of neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray insensitivity. The mean free path of thermal neutrons in {sup 10}B is about 18 {micro}m. It takes about 60 {micro}m of {sup 10}B layer to completely stop thermal neutrons, but the energetic {alpha}-particles generated in the reaction have a range of only 3.3 {micro}m in {sup 10}B environment - hence the thin layer of boron coating on the copper tube. The prototype design is shown in Figure 1. It consists of two panels of three staggered rows of 500-mm-long, 4-mm-diameter straws, with 20 in each row, embedded in 30-mm-thick high density polyethylene (HDPE). The project demonstrates a new application of thin neutron and gamma converter technique (1 micron thin {sup 10}B coated copper tube). It exploits fast timing from multiple straw detectors to count multiplicity of both gamma and neutrons from fissioning materials. The objective is to find a near-term replacement of {sup 3}He gas in neutron detection and measurement (with a very large neutron detection area). All

  11. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  12. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1993-01-28

    The purpose of this three year study is to develop a neutron focusing system to be used with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of neutrons. A prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility will also be designed, setup, and tested under this DOE grant. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which the authors wrote to trace neutrons through the existing curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, they obtained gains of 4 to 5 for the neutron flux averaged over an area of 1 x 1 cm. Two graduate students were supported by the first year of the DOE grant. Both have passed the Nuclear Engineering qualifying examination and have been admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree at The University of Texas at Austin. Their programs of study and dissertation projects have been approved by the appropriate committees.

  13. Upgrades to the Polarized Neutron Reflectometer Asterix at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, Roger

    2015-03-16

    We have upgraded the polarized neutron reflectometer, Asterix, at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos for the benefit of the research communities that study magnetic and complex-fluid films, both of which play important roles in support of the DOE’s energy mission. The upgrades to the instrument include: • A secondary spectrometer that was integrated with a Huber sample goniometer purchased with other funds just prior to the start of our project. The secondary spectrometer provides a flexible length for the scattered flight path, includes a mechanism to select among 3 alternative polarization analyzers as well as a support for new neutron detectors. Also included is an optic rail for reproducible positioning of components for Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME). The entire secondary spectrometer is now non-magnetic, as required for neutron Larmor labeling. • A broad-band neutron polarizer for the incident neutron beam based on the V geometry. • A wide-angle neutron polarization analyzer • A 2d position-sensitive neutron detector • Electromagnetic coils (Wollaston prisms) for SESAME plus the associated power supplies, cooling, safety systems and integration into the data acquisition system. The upgrades allowed a nearly effortless transition between configurations required to serve the polarized neutron reflectometry community, users of the 11 T cryomagnet and users of SESAME.

  14. Neutron spectrum studies in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.; Putnam, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been and currently is used to provide irradiation fields to study the effects of intense radiation on samples of reactor materials. These samples include fuel, cladding, control and structural materials. The ATR is also used to irradiate target materials for the production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications as well as for scientific research. Routine monitoring of the thermal'' and fast'' neutron levels have been conducted during every operational cycle since its startup in 1970. The routine neutron dosimetry has been primarily accomplished using the {sup 59}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 60}Co reaction for thermal'' neutrons and the {sup 58}Ni(n,p) {sup 58}Co reaction for fast'' neutrons as described in ASTM standard methods E261, E262, and E264. Neutron spectrum studies have now been conducted in the epithermal and fast neutron energy ranges for the various capsule irradiation test facilities and the routine neutron monitoring locations. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Trojan Horse Method for neutrons-induced reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulino, M.; Asfin Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced reactions play an important role in nuclear astrophysics in several scenario, such as primordial Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Inhomogeneous Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, heavy-element production during the weak component of the s-process, explosive stellar nucleosynthesis. To overcome the experimental problems arising from the production of a neutron beam, the possibility to use the Trojan Horse Method to study neutron-induced reactions has been investigated. The application is of particular interest for reactions involving radioactive nuclei having short lifetime.

  16. SEOP polarized 3He Neutron Spin Filters for the JCNS user program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, Earl; Salhi, Zahir; Theisselmann, Tobias; Starostin, Denis; Schmeissner, Johann; Feoktystov, Artem; Mattauch, Stefan; Pistel, Patrick; Radulescu, Aurel; Ioffe, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Over the past several years the JCNS has been developing in-house applications for neutron polarization analysis (PA). These methods include PA for separation of incoherent from coherent scattering in soft matter studies (SANS), and online polarization for analysis for neutron reflectometry, SANS, GISANS and eventually spectroscopy. This paper will present an overview of the user activities at the JCNS at the MLZ and gives an overview of the polarization 3He methods and devices used. Additionally we will summarise current projects which will further support the user activities using polarised 3He spin filters.

  17. Neutron capture autoradiographic study of the biodistribution of 10B in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ogura, K; Yanagie, H; Eriguchi, M; Lehmann, E H; Kühne, G; Bayon, G; Kobayashi, H

    2004-10-01

    For the study on boron neutron capture therapy, the whole-body sections of tumor-bearing mice infused with 10B attached to CR-39 plastic track detectors were exposed to thermal and cold neutron beams. Neutron capture autoradiographic images obtained by the cold neutron irradiation were extremely superior in quality to those of the thermal neutron beams. From the autoradiographic images, the 10B reaction dose of the neutron-induced particles was estimated using the differential LET distribution.

  18. Neutron scattering study on U-dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metoki, N.; Kaneko, K.; Ikeda, S.; Sakai, H.; Yamamoto, E.; Haga, Y.; Homma, Y.; Shiokawa, Y.

    2010-03-01

    We will report the results of our recent inelastic neutron scattering study on β-US2. This compound shows a semi-metallic or narrow gap semi-conducting behaviour at room temperature. A clear exponential up-turn of the resistivity in the order of ~106 Ωcm has been observed below 100 K. We found a sharp inelastic peak at the excitation energy of about 7 meV at 8 K. The Q-dependence of the peak intensity is in good agreement with the magnetic form factor of U4+ ion and no clear dispersion relation has been observed. Therefore we concluded that this is a crystalline electric field (CEF) excitation peak. The excitation energy is in good agreement with the CEF level scheme obtained from the susceptibility data. The CEF peak intensity decreases with increasing temperature and becomes much weaker than the calculated temperature factor expected from the CEF level scheme. Furthermore a quasi-elastic response appears, and coexists with a broadened CEF peak at higher temperatures. The quasi-elastic component is not due to phonon, because the temperature dependence of the intensity is inconsistent with calculation. We concluded that this quasi-elastic response is a hybridization effect of U-5f electrons with, most likely, p-electrons of sulfur. It is highly interesting that the energy scale of the CEF peak (~7 meV) is very close to the conduction gap (90K), and the quasi-elastic component appears above the characteristic temperature of about 100 K. Our data strongly suggest that the crossover of 5f character plays an import role for the metal-insulating transition in β-US2.

  19. A study on the optimum fast neutron flux for boron neutron capture therapy of deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-02-01

    High-energy neutrons, named fast neutrons which have a number of undesirable biological effects on tissue, are a challenging problem in beam designing for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. In spite of this fact, there is not a widely accepted criterion to guide the beam designer to determine the appropriate contribution of fast neutrons in the spectrum. Although a number of researchers have proposed a target value for the ratio of fast neutron flux to epithermal neutron flux, it can be shown that this criterion may not provide the optimum treatment condition. This simulation study deals with the determination of the optimum contribution of fast neutron flux in the beam for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. Since the dose due to these high-energy neutrons damages shallow tissues, delivered dose to skin is considered as a measure for determining the acceptability of the designed beam. To serve this purpose, various beam shaping assemblies that result in different contribution of fast neutron flux are designed. The performances of the neutron beams corresponding to such configurations are assessed in a simulated head phantom. It is shown that the previously used criterion, which suggests a limit value for the contribution of fast neutrons in beam, does not necessarily provide the optimum condition. Accordingly, it is important to specify other complementary limits considering the energy of fast neutrons. By analyzing various neutron spectra, two limits on fast neutron flux are proposed and their validity is investigated. The results show that considering these limits together with the widely accepted IAEA criteria makes it possible to have a more realistic assessment of sufficiency of the designed beam. Satisfying these criteria not only leads to reduction of delivered dose to skin, but also increases the advantage depth in tissue and delivered dose to tumor during the treatment time. The Monte Carlo Code, MCNP-X, is used to perform these simulations.

  20. Prospect for application of compact accelerator-based neutron source to neutron engineering diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoshimasa; Taketani, Atsushi; Takamura, Masato; Sunaga, Hideyuki; Kumagai, Masayoshi; Oba, Yojiro; Otake, Yoshie; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    A compact accelerator-based neutron source has been lately discussed on engineering applications such as transmission imaging and small angle scattering as well as reflectometry. However, nobody considers using it for neutron diffraction experiment because of its low neutron flux. In this study, therefore, the neutron diffraction experiments are carried out using Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source (RANS), to clarify the capability of the compact neutron source for neutron engineering diffraction. The diffraction pattern from a ferritic steel was successfully measured by suitable arrangement of the optical system to reduce the background noise, and it was confirmed that the recognizable diffraction pattern can be measured by a large sampling volume with 10 mm in cubic for an acceptable measurement time, i.e. 10 min. The minimum resolution of the 110 reflection for RANS is approximately 2.5% at 8 μs of the proton pulse width, which is insufficient to perform the strain measurement by neutron diffraction. The moderation time width at the wavelength corresponding to the 110 reflection is estimated to be approximately 30 μs, which is the most dominant factor to determine the resolution. Therefore, refinements of the moderator system to decrease the moderation time by decreasing a thickness of the moderator or by applying the decoupler system or application of the angular dispersive neutron diffraction technique are important to improve the resolution of the diffraction experiment using the compact neutron source. In contrast, the texture evolution due to plastic deformation was successfully observed by measuring a change in the diffraction peak intensity by RANS. Furthermore, the volume fraction of the austenitic phase in the dual phase mock specimen was also successfully evaluated by fitting the diffraction pattern using a Rietveld code. Consequently, RANS has been proved to be capable for neutron engineering diffraction aiming for the easy access

  1. Neutron Imaging Studies of In Situ Growth of Neutron and Gamma Detector Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strange, Nicholas; Crain, Christopher; Wahida, Fatema; Stroupe, Zach; Larese, J. Z.

    The studies described here are aimed at addressing the critical need to develop dependable crystal growth techniques of solid-state materials used as radiation detectors for both national security and medical applications. We present our activities using pulsed neutron, radiographic imaging and simultaneous diffraction techniques to examine the synthesis of both CZT and CLYC with the goal of identifying the conditions that favor the production of defect free materials. Using a pulsed neutron beam and time of flight detection methods, we exploit the penetrating power and wavelength dependence of neutron absorption to perform measurements during crystal growth. Furthermore, solid boules can be examined either inside the furnace or free standing. The objective of these studies include the validation/improvement of the modeling studies of CLYC and CZT growth behavior, the development of new/improved furnace design, and the identification of optimum growth techniques that enable the production of large boules of defect free, single crystalline materials in a timely/cost effective manner. We provide our preliminary results that include the experiential setup at LANSCE and sample neutron radiographic and synchrotron based IR images of CZT flat solid plates.

  2. Slow Neutron Velocity Spectrometer Transmission Studies Of Pu

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Havens, W. W. Jr.; Melkonian, E.; Rainwater, L. J.; Levin, M.

    1951-05-28

    The slow neutron transmission of several samples of Pu has been investigated with the Columbia Neutron Velocity Spectrometer. Data are presented in two groups, those covering the energy region from 0 to 6 ev, and those covering the region above 6 ev. Below 6 ev the resolution was relatively good, and a detailed study of the cross section variation was made. Work above 6 ev consisted of merely locating levels and obtaining a rough idea of their strengths.

  3. The model of the power lines fault location method using time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagiev, R. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Kalabanov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes a simulation model of the method, locating power lines fault, using time domain reflectometry. This diagnostic method is a one-side method that can work on both enabled and disabled transmission lines and allows defining the main types of faults, including the high-impedance faults. The developed model consists of two modules: a generation unit implemented in PSCAD/EMTDC and a processing unit implemented in MATLAB. The model is successfully verified and is intended for a comprehensive study of the time domain reflectometry method for power lines diagnostics including analysis for various line topologies using different probing signals and various signal to noise ratio.

  4. Neutron diffraction study of the zeolite edingtonite

    SciTech Connect

    Kvick, A.; Smith, J.V.

    1983-09-01

    A neutron diffraction study at 294 K of a single crystal of edingtonite (Ba/sub 2/Al/sub 4/Si/sub 6/O/sub 20/ x 7H/sub 2/O; a 9.537(3) b 9.651(2) c 6.509(2) A; P2/sub 1/2/sub 1/2) utilized 1876 diffraction intensities from the Brookhaven National Laboratory high-flux beam reactor. The agreement factor R(F/sup 2/) = 0.055 for conventional anisotropic refinement was reduced to 0.045 for a Gram--Charlier expansion up to fourth order for the thermal factors of the water atoms. The Si--O and Al--O distances correlate inversely with the Si--O--Al angle as in scolecite. There is no indication of substitutional disorder. The barium atom is coordinated to three pairs of framework oxygens (2.89, 2.96, and 3.04 A) and two pairs of water oxygens (2.79 and 2.79 A). Two framework oxygens have weak hydrogen bonds to both water molecules (O(4)--OW(1) 2.87, -OW(2) 2.96; O(5) -OW(1) 3.02, -OW(2) 3.02 A) and the other three framework oxygens are each bonded to a Ba atom. The OW--H xxx O angles (163.5/sup 0/, 165.1/sup 0/, 173.9/sup 0/, and 178.0/sup 0/) are fairly close to 180/sup 0/, the H xxx O distances are long (1.91, 2.02, 2.09, and 2.10 A) and the observed uncorrected OW--H distances range from 0.928(6) to 0.959(4) A. Only seven out of the eight water positions are occupied (W(1) 84% occupancy; W(2) 91%). The average rms displacement of each hydrogen (0.32, 0.29, 0.27, and 0.24 A) correlates approximately with the hydrogen bond length (2.09, 2.10, 2.02, and 1.91 A). Third- and fourth-order tensor components in the displacements of the water molecules may result from anharmonic or curvilinear vibrations; however, the effect of the static displacements of the center-of-motion from interaction with unoccupied water sites may also be important.

  5. Study of the neutron beam line shield design for JSNS.

    PubMed

    Kawai, M; Saito, K; Sanami, T; Nakao, N; Maekawa, F

    2005-01-01

    The JSNS, a spallation neutron source of J-PARC (JAERI-KEK Joint Project of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator) has 23 neutron beam lines. In the present study, a database was formulated for an optimum shielding design using the MCNP-X code. The calculations involved two steps. In the first step, the neutron distributions were created in the typical neutron beam line with a model that included the spallation neutron source target. The neutron currents evaluated flowed from the duct into the duct wall which was the boundary source for the bulk shield surrounding the beam line. In the second step, bulk-shield calculations were performed for the various shielding materials (iron, concrete, heavy concrete and so on) used and their composites up to thicknesses of 3 m. The results were compared with each other. Composite material shields of iron and such hydrogeneous materials as polyethylene or concrete were more effective. A typical design was prepared for a beam line within 25 m distance from a moderator, as a sample.

  6. Neutron Diffraction Study of Silicate Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. K.; van Orman, J.; Fei, Y.; Hemley, R. J.; Loveday, J.; Nelmes, R.; Smith, R. I.

    2002-12-01

    The oxygen deficiency and cation-site distribution of silicate perovskite control its physical and chemical properties, including density, bulk modulus, defect mobility, ionic transport, flow behavior, oxidation states, hydration, and minor-element solubility. These properties of perovskite, in turn control the geophysical and geochemical processes of the Earth. The possibility of oxygen deficiency was first recognized in perovskite with minor amounts of Al replacing Mg and Si [1, 2], and its significance is compared to the analogous defect perovskite in ceramics [3]. Basic crystallographic characteristics of the silicate perovskite, including the lattice parameters of the orthorhombic unit cell, the Pbmn space group, and atomic positions, were previously determined by x-ray diffraction [4]. The defect crystallography of silicate perovskite, however, cannot be measured by x-rays because the relevant ions (Mg2+, Al3+, Si4+ and O2-) are isoelectronic. These ions have very different neutron cross-section and can be readily resolved by neutron diffraction. Using multianvil apparatus, we synthesized perovskite samples at 1700°C and 25-28 GPa. We perform multiple runs to accumulate 3 mm3 sample each for the MgSiO3 end member and MgSiO3 plus 5 weight %\\ Al2O3 in perovskite structure. Excellent powder diffraction data were collected at the POLARIS Beamline of ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Lab, and were subjected to Rietveld analysis. Neutron derived information sheds light on the unusual effects found for Al3+ substitution on the compressibility of the silicate perovskite [1]. 1. J. Zhang and D. J. Weidner, Science 284, 782 (1999). 2. J. P. Brodholt, Nature 407, 620 (2000). 3. A. Navrotsky, Science 284, 1788 (1999). 4. N. L. Ross and R. M. Hazen, Phys. Chem. Minerals 17, 228 (1990).

  7. Neutron generator at Hiroshima University for use in radiobiology study.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Hoshi, M; Tauchi, H; Takeoka, S; Kitagawa, K; Suga, S; Maeda, N; Komatsu, K; Sawada, S; Iwamoto, E

    1995-06-01

    A neutron generator (HIRRAC) for use in radiobiology study has been constructed at the Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University (RIRBM). Monoenergetic neutrons of which energy is less than 1.3 MeV are generated by the 7Li(p,n)7 Be reaction at proton energies up to 3 MeV. The protons are accelerated by a Schenkel-type-accelerator and are bombared onto the 7Li-target. An apparatus for the irradiation of biological material such as mice, cultured cells and so on, was designed and will be manufactured. Neutron and gamma-ray dose rates were measured by paired (TE-TE and C-CO2) ionization chambers. Contamination of the gamma ray was less than about 6% when using 10-microns-thick 7Li as a target. Maximum dose rates for the tissue equivalent materials was 40 cGy/min at a distance of 10 cm from the target. Energy distributions of the obtained neutrons have been measured by a 3He-gas proportional counter. The monoenergetic neutrons within an energy region from 0.1 to 1.3 MeV produced by thin 7Li or 7LiF targets had a small energy spread of about 50 keV (1 sigma width of gaussian). The energy spread of neutrons was about 10% or less at an incident proton energy of 2.3 MeV. We found that HIRRAC produces small energy spread neutrons and at sufficient dose rates for use in radiobiology studies.

  8. Structure of Protein Layers in Polyelectrolyte Matrices Studied by Neutron Reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Ankner, John Francis; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Zhang, Qiu; Kharlampieva, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer films obtained by localized incorporation of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) within electrostatically assembled matrices of poly(styrene sulfonate)/poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PSS/PAH) via spin-assisted layer-by-layer growth were discovered to be highly structured, with closely packed monomolecular layers of the protein within the bio-hybrid films. The structure of the films was evaluated in both vertical and lateral directions with neutron reflectometry, using deuterated GFP as a marker for neutron scattering contrast. Importantly, the GFP preserves its structural stability upon assembly as confirmed by circular dichroism (CD) and in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Atomic force microscopy was complimented with X-ray reflectometry to characterize the external roughness of the biohybrid films. Remarkably, films assembled with a single GFP layer confined at various distances from the substrate exhibit a strong localization of the GFP layer without intermixing into the LbL matrix. However, partial intermixing of the GFP layers with polymeric material is evidenced in multiple-GFP layer films with alternating protein-rich and protein-deficient regions. We hypothesize that the polymer-protein exchange observed in the multiple-GFP layer films suggests the existence of a critical protein concentration which can be accommodated by the multilayer matrix. Our results yield new insights into the mechanism of GFP interaction with a polyelectrolyte matrix and open opportunities for fabrication of bio-hybrid films with well-organized structure and controllable function, a crucial requirement for advanced sensing applications.

  9. 1982 US-CEC neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.; Schraube, H.; Burger, G.

    1983-11-01

    A neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison study was conducted during April 19-23, 1982, as a joint effort between the United States and the Commission of European Communities. Dosimeters from 48 participating agencies were mounted on cylindrical phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (0.48-13.91 mSv neutron and 0.02-1.32 mSv gamma) in nine different radiation fields. Exposure conditions considered in this study included four mixed-field spectra produced using the Health Physics Research Reactor, four monoenergetic neutron fields generated by accelerators, and one 15-cm D/sub 2/O-moderated californium source spectrum. In general, neutron results reported by the participating agencies were consistent with expected dosimeter performance based on energy response characteristics of the detection systems. Albedo dosimeters, which were the most popular neutron monitoring systems used in this study, provided the best overall accuracy for all exposure conditions. Film, Cr-39 recoil track, and Th-232 fission track systems generally underestimated dose equivalents relative to reference values. Associated gamma measurements showed that TLD monitors produced more accurate results than film dosimeters although both systems overestimated gamma dose equivalents in mixed radiation fields. 24 references, 10 figures, 19 tables.

  10. Neutron-induced reaction studies using stored ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, Jan; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2015-11-01

    Storage rings provide unique possibilities for investigations of nuclear reactions. Radioactive ions can be stored if the ring is connected to an appropriate facility and reaction studies are feasible at low beam intensities because of the recycling of beam particles. Using gas jet or droplet targets, charged particle-induced reactions on short-lived isotopes can be studied in inverse kinematics. In such a system a high-flux reactor could serve as a neutron target extending the experimental spectrum to neutron-induced reactions. Those could be studied over a wide energy range covering the research fields of nuclear astrophysics and reactor safety, transmutation of nuclear waste and fusion.

  11. Development of new methods for studying nanostructures using neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, Roger

    2016-03-18

    The goal of this project was to develop improved instrumentation for studying the microscopic structures of materials using neutron scattering. Neutron scattering has a number of advantages for studying material structure but suffers from the well-known disadvantage that neutrons’ ability to resolve structural details is usually limited by the strength of available neutron sources. We aimed to overcome this disadvantage using a new experimental technique, called Spin Echo Scattering Angle Encoding (SESAME) that makes use of the neutron’s magnetism. Our goal was to show that this innovation will allow the country to make better use of the significant investment it has recently made in a new neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and will lead to increases in scientific knowledge that contribute to the Nation’s technological infrastructure and ability to develop advanced materials and technologies. We were successful in demonstrating the technical effectiveness of the new method and established a baseline of knowledge that has allowed ORNL to start a project to implement the method on one of its neutron beam lines.

  12. Monte Carlo studies on neutron interactions in radiobiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Hau, Tak Cheong; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to study the characteristics of neutron interactions with cells underneath a water medium layer with varying thickness. The following results were obtained. (1) The fractions of neutron interaction with 1H, 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei in the cell layer were studied. The fraction with 1H increased with increasing medium thickness, while decreased for 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei. The bulges in the interaction fractions with 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei were explained by the resonance spikes in the interaction cross-section data. The interaction fraction decreased in the order: 1H > 16O > 12C > 14N. (2) In general, as the medium thickness increased, the number of "interacting neutrons" which exited the medium and then further interacted with the cell layer increased. (3) The area under the angular distributions for "interacting neutrons" decreased with increasing incident neutron energy. Such results would be useful for deciphering the reasons behind discrepancies among existing results in the literature.

  13. Halo Nucleus 11Be: A Spectroscopic Study via Neutron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Kyle; Jones, K. L.; Bey, A.; Ahn, S.H.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeffery C; Brown, S.; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Matei, Catalin; Matos, M.; Moazen, Brian H; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Nunes, F. M.; O'Malley, Patrick; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Wilson, G.

    2012-01-01

    The best examples of halo nuclei, exotic systems with a diffuse nuclear cloud surrounding a tightly bound core, are found in the light, neutron-rich region, where the halo neutrons experience only weak binding and a weak, or no, potential barrier. Modern direct-reaction measurement techniques provide powerful probes of the structure of exotic nuclei. Despite more than four decades of these studies on the benchmark one-neutron halo nucleus 11Be, the spectroscopic factors for the two bound states remain poorly constrained. In the present work, the 10Be d;p reaction has been used in inverse kinematics at four beam energies to study the structure of 11Be. The spectroscopic factors extracted using the adiabatic model were found to be consistent across the four measurements and were largely insensitive to the optical potential used. The extracted spectroscopic factor for a neutron in an n j 2s1=2 state coupled to the ground state of 10Be is 0.71(5). For the first excited state at 0.32 MeV, a spectroscopic factor of 0.62(4) is found for the halo neutron in a 1p1=2 state.

  14. Neutron diffraction studies of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.C.; Erwin Desa, J.A.; Weeks, R.A.; Sinclair, R.N.; Bailey, D.K.

    1983-08-01

    A neutron diffraction investigation has been carried out of the structures of several naturally occurring glasses, viz. Libyan Desert glass, a Fulgurite, Wabar glass, Lechatelierite from Canon Diablo, a Tektite, Obsidian (3 samples), and Macusani glass. Libyan Desert sand has also been examined, together with crystalline ..cap alpha..-quartz and ..cap alpha..-cristobalite. A comparison of data for the natural glasses and synthetic vitreous silica (Spectrosil B) in both reciprocal and real space allows a categorisation into Silicas, which closely resemble synthetic vitreous silica, and Silicates, for which the resemblance to silica is consistently less striking. The data support the view that Libyan Desert glass and sand have a common origin, while the Tektite has a structure similar to that of volcanic glasses.

  15. Improved theory of time domain reflectometry with variable coaxial cable length for electrical conductivity measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although empirical models have been developed previously, a mechanistic model is needed for estimating electrical conductivity (EC) using time domain reflectometry (TDR) with variable lengths of coaxial cable. The goals of this study are to: (1) derive a mechanistic model based on multisection tra...

  16. Neutron crystallographic studies of T4 lysozyme at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Shukla, Shantanu; Meilleur, Flora; Standaert, Robert F; Pierce, Josh; Myles, Dean A A; Cuneo, Matthew J

    2017-07-13

    Bacteriophage T4 lysozyme (T4L) has been used as a paradigm for seminal biophysical studies on protein structure, dynamics, and stability. Approximately 700 mutants of this protein and their respective complexes have been characterized by X-ray crystallography; however, despite the high resolution diffraction limits attained in several studies, no hydrogen atoms were reported being visualized in the electron density maps. To address this, a 2.2 Å-resolution neutron data set was collected at 80 K from a crystal of perdeuterated T4L pseudo-wild type. We describe a near complete atomic structure of T4L, which includes the positions of 1737 hydrogen atoms determined by neutron crystallography. The cryogenic neutron model reveals explicit detail of the hydrogen bonding interactions in the protein, in addition to the protonation states of several important residues. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  17. Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Karim, Julia Abdul

    2011-03-30

    Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

  18. Proton Transfer Reactions Studied Using the VANDLE Neutron Detector Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornsberry, C. R.; Burcher, S.; Gryzwacz, R.; Jones, K. L.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Smith, K.; Vostinar, M.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blankstein, D.; Deboer, J.; Hall, M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Reingold, C.; Tan, W.; Cizewski, J. A.; Lepailleur, A.; Walter, D.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Marley, S. T.

    2016-09-01

    Proton transfer reactions, such as (d,n), are powerful tools for the study of single particle proton states of exotic nuclei. Measuring the outgoing neutron allows for the extraction of spectroscopic information from the recoil nucleus. With the development of new radioactive ion beam facilities, such as FRIB in the U.S., comes the need for new tools for the study of reactions involving radioactive nuclei. Neutron detectors, such as VANDLE, are sensitive to gamma rays in addition to neutrons. This results in high background rates for measurements with high external trigger rates. The use of discriminating recoil particle detectors, such as phoswich detectors, allow for the selection of a clean recoil tag by separating the recoil nucleus of interest from unreacted RIB components. Developments of low energy proton transfer measurements in inverse kinematics and recent (d,n) results will be presented. This work supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  19. Study of nuclear recoils in liquid argon with monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenfus, C.; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Creus, W.; Ferella, A.; Rochet, J.; Walter, M.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of developments for liquid argon dark matter detectors we assembled a laboratory setup to scatter neutrons on a small liquid argon target. The neutrons are produced mono-energetically (Ekin = 2.45 MeV) by nuclear fusion in a deuterium plasma and are collimated onto a 3" liquid argon cell operating in single-phase mode (zero electric field). Organic liquid scintillators are used to tag scattered neutrons and to provide a time-of-flight measurement. The setup is designed to study light pulse shapes and scintillation yields from nuclear and electronic recoils as well as from alpha particles at working points relevant for dark matter searches. Liquid argon offers the possibility to scrutinise scintillation yields in noble liquids with respect to the population strength of the two fundamental excimer states. Here we present experimental methods and first results from recent data towards such studies.

  20. LANL sunnyside experiment: Study of neutron production in accelerator-driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G.; Butler, G.; Cappiello, M.

    1995-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the neutron production in prototypic targets for accelerator driven systems. Studies were conducted on four target assemblies containing lead, lithium, tungsten, and a thorium-salt mixture. Integral data on total neutron production were obtained as well as more differential data on neutron leakage and neutron flux profiles in the blanket/moderator region. Data analysis on total neutron production is complete and shows excellent agreement with calculations using the LAHET/MCNP code system.

  1. LANL sunnyside experiment: Study of neutron production in accelerator-driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, G.; Butler, G.; Cappiello, M.; Carius, S.; Daemen, L.; DeVolder, B.; Frehaut, J.; Goulding, C.; Grace, R.; Green, R.; Lisowski, P.; Littleton, P.; King, J.; King, N.; Prael, R.; Stratton, T.; Turner, S.; Ullmann, J.; Venneri, F.; Yates, M.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the neutron production in prototypic targets for accelerator driven systems. Studies were conducted on four target assemblies containing lead, lithium, tungsten, and a thorium-salt mixture. Integral data on total neutron production were obtained as well as more differential data on neutron leakage and neutron flux profiles in the blanket/moderator region. Data analysis on total neutron production is complete and shows excellent agreement with calculations using the LAHET/MCNP code system.

  2. Digital acquisition development for neutron induced fission studies at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Debra; O'Donnell, John; Couture, Aaron; Mosby, Shea; Wender, Steve

    2013-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a neutron time of flight facility with a diverse group of experiments dedicated to the study of neutron induced reactions. A powerful proton LINAC is used to produce multiple pulsed neutron beams for which monitoring is required to track the neutron flux and energy distribution for each pulse. Digital DAQ techniques lend themselves well to beam monitoring and many of the experiments. Significant effort is being put into transitioning several traditional analog DAQ systems to state of the art digital systems. The Irradiation of Chips and Electronics (ICE House) and the Total Kinetic Energy of Fission (TKE) experiments are both transitioning to digital for the fall 2013 LANSCE run cycle. These new DAQ systems were built using the CAEN VME digitizer family, and both systems will benefit from reduced module count and zero deadtime. The TKE experiment utilizes FPGA firmware to streamline the acquisition system, as well as provide additional data for further analysis. Details of the implementation process along with preliminary data from both experiments will be presented.

  3. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  4. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  5. Neutron irradiation study of silicon photomultipliers from different vendors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushpil, V.; Mikhaylov, V.; Kugler, A.; Kushpil, S.; Ladygin, V. P.; Reznikov, S. G.; Svoboda, O.; Tlustý, P.

    2017-02-01

    We present recent results on the investigation of the KETEK, ZECOTEK, HAMAMATSU and SENSL SiPM properties after irradiation by the 6-35 MeV neutrons. The typical neutron fluence was about 1012 n /cm2. The changing of the internal structure of the irradiated SiPMs was studied by the measuring of the C-V and C-f characteristics. We have observed the strong influence of the SiPM manufacturing technology on their radiation hardness. The application of the obtained results to the development of the readout electronics is discussed.

  6. Differential reflectometry versus tactile sense detection of subgingival calculus in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakibaie, Fardad; Walsh, Laurence J.

    2012-10-01

    Detecting dental calculus is clinically challenging in dentistry. This study used typodonts with extracted premolar and molar teeth and simulated gingival tissue to compare the performance of differential reflectometry and periodontal probing. A total of 30 extracted teeth were set in an anatomical configuration in stone to create three typodonts. Clear polyvinyl siloxane impression material was placed to replicate the periodontal soft tissues. Pocket depths ranged from 10 to 15 mm. The three models were placed in a phantom head, and an experienced dentist assessed the presence of subgingival calculus first using the DetecTar (differential reflectometry) and then a periodontal probe. Scores from these two different methods were compared to the gold standard (direct examination of the root surface using 20× magnification) to determine the accuracy and reproducibility. Differential reflectometry was more accurate than tactile assessment (79% versus 60%), and its reproducibility was also higher (Cohen kappa 0.54 versus 0.39). Both methods performed better on single rooted premolar teeth than on multirooted teeth. These laboratory results indicate that differential reflectometry allows more accurate and reproducible detection of subgingival calculus than conventional probing, and supports its use for supplementing traditional periodontal examination methods in dental practice.

  7. AMOR - the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at SINQ/PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mukul; Gutberlet, T.; Stahn, J.; Keller, P.; Clemens, D.

    2004-07-01

    The apparatus for multioptional reflectometry (AMOR) at SINQ/PSI is a versatile reflectometer operational in the time-of-flight (TOF) mode (in a wavelength range of 0.15 nm <λ < 1.3 nm) as well as in the monochromatic (theta-2theta) mode with both polarized and unpolarized neutrons. AMOR is designed to perform reflectometry measurements in horizontal sample-plane geometry which allows studying both solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces. A pulsed cold neutron beam from the end position of the neutron guide is produced by a dual-chopper system (side-by-side) having two windows at 180^{circ} and rotatable with a maximum frequency of 200 Hz. In the TOF mode, the chopper frequency, width of the gating window and the chopper-detector distance can be selected independently providing a wide range of q-resolution (Delta q/q=1-10&%slash;). Remanent FeCoV/Ti : N supermirrors are used as polarizer/analyzer with a polarization efficiency of sim97&%slash;. For the monochromatic wavelength mode, a Ni/Ti multilayer is used as a monochromator, giving sim50&%slash; reflectivity at a wavelength of 0.47 nm. In the present work, a detailed description of the instrument and setting-up of the polarization option is described. Results from some of the recent studies with polarized neutrons and measurements on liquid surfaces are presented.

  8. RESPECT: Neutron resonance spin-echo spectrometer for extreme studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgii, R.; Kindervater, J.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2016-11-01

    We propose the design of a REsonance SPin-echo spECtrometer for exTreme studies, RESPECT, that is ideally suited for the exploration of non-dispersive processes such as diffusion, crystallization, slow dynamics, tunneling processes, crystal electric field excitations, and spin fluctuations. It is a variant of the conventional neutron spin-echo technique (NSE) by (i) replacing the long precession coils by pairs of longitudinal neutron spin-echo coils combined with RF-spin flippers and (ii) by stabilizing the neutron polarization with small longitudinal guide fields that can in addition be used as field subtraction coils thus allowing to adjust the field integrals over a range of 8 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the dynamic range of RESPECT can in principle be varied over 8 orders of magnitude in time, if neutrons with the required energy are made available. Similarly as for existing NSE-spectrometers, spin echo times of up to approximately 1 μs can be reached if the divergence and the correction elements are properly adjusted. Thanks to the optional use of neutron guides and the fact that the currents for the correction coils are much smaller than in standard NSE, intensity gains of at least one order of magnitude are expected, making the concept of RESPECT also competitive for operation at medium flux neutron sources. RESPECT can also be operated in a MIEZE configuration allowing the investigation of relaxation processes in depolarizing environments as they occur when magnetic fields are applied at the sample position, i.e. for the investigation of the dynamics of flux lines in superconductors, magnetic fluctuations in ferromagnetic materials, and samples containing hydrogen.

  9. A Study on Inhomogeneous Neutron Intensity Distribution Origin from Neutron Guide Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wei, Guohai; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Yuntao; He, Linfeng; Sun, Kai; Han, Songbai; Chen, Dongfeng

    The uniformity of the neutron intensity spatial distribution at the sample position will directly affect the neutron imaging quality. But the unexpected inhomogeneous spatial distribution phenomenon always appears in the neutron radiography facilities installed at the end of neutron guide. In this paper, the source of this phenomenon has been analyzed through geometrical optics and confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations, and several optimization solutions are also proposed.

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies in neutron-irradiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, James W.; Kleinhenz, Richard L.; En, Wu; Zhi-pu, You

    1982-08-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of neutron-irradiated silicon are surveyed, both as being of interest per se and as related to transmutation doping. The emerging panorama progressing from vacancy- and interstitial-related point defects to agglomerates visible in the electron microscope is described. Intrinsic and impurity-driven partial dissociation of defect complexes is discussed.

  11. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  12. Study of Scattered Background Neutron in NIF and Time-of Flight (TOF) to Measure Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Moran, M; Phillips, T; Lerche, R; Koch, J; Eder, D

    2005-08-31

    Some of the planned core diagnostics for National Ignition Facility (NIF) will use neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy techniques to gather information for primary neutron yield measurement or neutron imaging. This technique has been widely and routinely used at other laser facilities including Nova and Omega. TOF methods will also be used to observe target fuel areal density <{rho}R> (radial integral of density) via measuring the number of primary 14.1 MeV neutrons that are down-scattered to lower energies by nuclear collisions inside the compressed target core. The substantially larger target chamber size and higher neutron yield for NIF raises issues related to the large number of scattered neutrons produced by high yield deuterium-tritium (D-T) shots at NIF. The effect of primary neutrons scattered by the walls of the massive target chamber and structures both inside and outside the chamber will contribute a significant scattered background signal when trying to determine the number of neutrons down-scattered from the target core. The optimum detector locations outside the target chamber or target bay wall will be proposed. Appropriate collimators at the chamber port and the bay wall (between the neutron source at target chamber center (TCC) and detector) that maximize detection of signal neutrons while minimizing the background from scattered neutrons and neutron induced gamma rays will also be presented.

  13. Studies of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission using Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegl, Kevin; Aprahamian, A.; Scielzo, N. D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Burkey, M.; Caldwell, S.; Czeszumska, A.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Kolos, K.; Marley, S. T.; Morgan, G. E.; Norman, E. B.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Pérez Galván, A.; Sh, K. S.; Strauss, S. Y.; Wang, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Using a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap to confine radioactive ions allows indirect measurements of beta-delayed neutron (BDN) emission. By determining the recoil energy of the beta-decay daughter ions it is possible to study BDN emission, as the neutron emission can impart a significantly larger nuclear recoil than from beta-decay alone. This method avoids most of the systematic uncertainties associated with direct neutron detection but introduces dependencies on the specifics of the decay and interactions of the ion with the RF fields. The decays of seven BDN precursors were studied using the Beta-decay Paul Trap (BPT) to confine fission fragments from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The analysis of these measurements and results for the branching ratios and neutron energy spectra will be presented. Supported by the NSF under grant PHY-1419765, and the U.S. DOE under the NEUP project 13-5485, contracts DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL) and DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and award DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  14. ANALYTICAL NEUTRONIC STUDIES CORRELATING FAST NEUTRON FLUENCE TO MATERIAL DAMAGE IN CARBON, SILICON, AND SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Sterbentz

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluates how fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV correlates to material damage (i.e., the total fluence spectrum folded with the respective material’s displacements-per- atom [dpa] damage response function) for the specific material fluence spectra encountered in Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) service and the irradiation tests conducted in material test reactors (MTRs) for the fuel materials addressed in the white paper. It also reports how the evaluated correlations of >0.1 MeV fluence to material damage vary between the different spectral conditions encountered in material service versus testing.

  15. Study of DD Neutrons and their Transmission in Iron Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sushil

    The Deuterium-Deuteron (DD) reaction has been used as a neutron source to study the transport of neutrons in natural iron. The scattering targets are used in the form of spheres and the neutron transmission measurement has been done at 7-MeV incident deuteron beam energy. The purpose of this study is to test the elastic and non-elastic neutron scattering cross sections for iron in the ENDF/B-VII data library, as some indications about the inaccuracy of those cross sections have been found from previous studies. The experiment has been carried out using the 4.5-MV tandem accelerator at Edwards Accelerator Laboratory at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. The DD source reaction has been measured at 5- and 7-MeV deuteron beam energy. The D(d,n)3He monoenergetic reaction cross section has been measured from 0° to 135° at both 5- and 7-MeV beam energy and the D(d,np)D breakup reaction cross section has been measured up to 60° laboratory angles at 7-MeV beam energy. The target used is a deuterium gas cell of 3-cm length at approximately 2 atmosphere absolute pressure. The neutron energy is determined using the time of flight method. A NE213 liquid scintillation detector is used for neutron detection and the thick-target 27Al(d,n) reaction is used for the determination of neutron detector efficiency. The monoenergetic reaction cross section has been found to be in reasonable agreement with previous evaluations. The neutron transmission studies through iron spheres is done using two natural iron spheres with thicknesses of 3 and 8 cm. The DD source measurement (sphere-off) were repeated for the transmission studies and the neutron source was covered with the spheres for the transmission measurements. The experimental transmitted neutron spectrum is compared with the calculation done using Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP6.1 developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. MCNP uses ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluated iron cross section for the simulation. The calculated and experimental

  16. GPS/GNSS reflectometry nanosatellite demonstration mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Martin J.; Liddle, J. Douglas; Jason, Susan J.

    2003-01-01

    Loss of life, injury and huge economic losses are incurred annually due to irregular and insufficient sea-state information. Figures indicate that, each year, the marine insurance industry pays out over $2 billion in claims for weather-related accidents, while bad weather causes one ship of over 500 t to sink somewhere on the globe every week. Accurate knowledge of local ocean conditions is therefore crucial in providing forecasts and early warnings of severe weather conditions. Space-borne systems, particularly satellites, provide the ideal platform for global monitoring of sea conditions via altimetric measurements. As an alternative to active altimetry, another concept is passively receiving reflected signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites. This concept was first developed by Dr Manuel Martin-Neira at ESAESTEC. ESA's Passive Reflectometry and Interferometry System makes use of GPS/GNSS signals from satellites and their reflection off the ocean surface to derive oceanic properties such as surface height, significant wave height, wind speed and wind direction. Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd are proposing a nanosatellite demonstration mission to ascertain the feasibility of the GPS ocean reflectometry concept.

  17. Neutron-Rich Nuclei and Neutron Stars: A New Accurately Calibrated Interaction for the Study of Neutron-Rich Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Todd-Rutel, B.G.; Piekarewicz, J.

    2005-09-16

    An accurately calibrated relativistic parametrization is introduced to compute the ground state properties of finite nuclei, their linear response, and the structure of neutron stars. While similar in spirit to the successful NL3 parameter set, it produces an equation of state that is considerably softer--both for symmetric nuclear matter and for the symmetry energy. This softening appears to be required for an accurate description of several collective modes having different neutron-to-proton ratios. Among the predictions of this model are a symmetric nuclear-matter incompressibility of K=230 MeV and a neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb of R{sub n}-R{sub p}=0.21 fm. The impact of such a softening on various neutron-star properties is also examined.

  18. Neutron-rich nuclei and neutron stars: a new accurately calibrated interaction for the study of neutron-rich matter.

    PubMed

    Todd-Rutel, B G; Piekarewicz, J

    2005-09-16

    An accurately calibrated relativistic parametrization is introduced to compute the ground state properties of finite nuclei, their linear response, and the structure of neutron stars. While similar in spirit to the successful NL3 parameter set, it produces an equation of state that is considerably softer--both for symmetric nuclear matter and for the symmetry energy. This softening appears to be required for an accurate description of several collective modes having different neutron-to-proton ratios. Among the predictions of this model are a symmetric nuclear-matter incompressibility of K=230 MeV and a neutron skin thickness in 208 Pb of Rn-Rp=0.21 fm. The impact of such a softening on various neutron-star properties is also examined.

  19. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Jr., Thomas Dean

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 108 n/cm2 • s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10-11cGy•cm2/nepi and 20 x 10-11 cGy•cm2/nepi , respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  20. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  1. Neutron scattering of advanced magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf, S. M.; Kumar, Amit

    2017-09-01

    and spin delocalization at molecular levels, and (iv) role of bridging ligands in propagating magnetic exchange interactions. The neutron diffraction studies have contributed towards the development of spintronics by bringing out (i) correlations between atomic site disorder and electronic spin polarization in full Heusler and half Heusler alloys, and (ii) microscopic origin of magnetic ordering in antiferromagnetic spintronics and other potential spintronic materials. Neutron depolarization, small angle neutron scattering, and neutron reflectometry techniques, on the other hand, have probed magnetism at mesoscopic length scales in such advanced magnetic materials. The derived understanding would be useful to exploit such materials for their practical applications as well as to set directions for future research in these areas.

  2. The study of neutron burst shape of a neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishnyaev, Evgeny; Polosatkin, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    A slim-shaped portable DD-neutron generator is developed at Budker institute of Nuclear Physics. The generator is a combination of Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier and a sealed gas-filled neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode. Neutron burst shape in pulsed mode of neutron tube operation is measured with stroboscopic time spectrometry, implemented on scintillation detector, and modeled with Comsol Script 1.3 and Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. Modeling appears to be in good agreement with experimental results. Measured pulse rise and fall times are 110 ns and 100 ns respectively.

  3. Neutron irradiated uranium silicides studied by neutron diffraction and Rietveld analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Mueller, M.H.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The irradiation behavior of high-density uranium silicides has been a matter of interest to the nuclear industry for use in high power or low enrichment applications. Transmission electron microscopy studies have found that heavy ion bombardment renders U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} amorphous at temperatures below about 250 C and that U{sub 3}Si becomes mechanically unstable suffering rapid growth by plastic flow. In this present work, crystallographic changes preceding amorphization by fission fragment damage have been studied by high-resolution neutron diffraction as a function of damage produced by uranium fission at room temperature. Initially, both silicides had tetragonal crystal structures. Crystallographic and amorphous phases were studied simultaneously by combining conventional Rietveld refinement of the crystallographic phases with Fourier-filtering analysis of the non-crystalline scattering component. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Study of pipe thickness loss using a neutron radiography method

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Wahab, Aliff Amiru Bin; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Md; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2014-02-12

    The purpose of this preliminary work is to study for thickness changes in objects using neutron radiography. In doing the project, the technique for the radiography was studied. The experiment was done at NUR-2 facility at TRIGA research reactor in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Malaysia. Test samples of varying materials were used in this project. The samples were radiographed using direct technique. Radiographic images were recorded using Nitrocellulose film. The films obtained were digitized to processed and analyzed. Digital processing is done on the images using software Isee!. The images were processed to produce better image for analysis. The thickness changes in the image were measured to be compared with real thickness of the objects. From the data collected, percentages difference between measured and real thickness are below than 2%. This is considerably very low variation from original values. Therefore, verifying the neutron radiography technique used in this project.

  5. The neutron moderated detector and groundbased cosmic ray modulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, P. H.; Raubenheimer, B. C.

    1985-01-01

    Reports appear on modulation studies with the neutron monitor without lead. Some of these studies cast doubt on the reliability of this detector. The stability of the neutron moderated detector (NMD) at Sanae, Antarctic is discussed. The barometric coeficient of the 4NMD for epoch 1976 appears not to differ statistically from the 0.73%/mb of the 3NM64. The monthly averaged hourly counting rate of our 4NMD and 3NM64 correlates very well (correlation coefficient: 98%) over the years from 1974-1984, with the 4NMD showing a 8% larger long term modulation effect than the 3NM64, indicating a difference in sensitivities of the two detectors. From this difference in sensitivities spectra of ground level solar proton events and modulation functions of Forbush decreases are deduced.

  6. GPS Diffractive Reflectometry and Further Developments in SNR- and Phase-based GPS Multipath Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geremia-Nievinski, F.; Ferreira e Silva, M.; Boniface, K.; Galera Monico, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The validation of remote sensing environmental estimates requires knowledge of their spatial extent and resolution. Here we consider coherent radio reflections routinely observed in ground-based GPS reflectometry. Their footprint is often conceptualized in terms of the specular point (SP) and the first Fresnel zone (FFZ). Such infinitesimal point and finite zone can be generalized into a spatially continuous sensitivity kernel (SK). The SK represents a diffraction pattern, as the importance of each surface portion depends on its power and phase scattering. We measured the SK of a GPS radio reflection under bi-path reception conditions. The SK exhibited oscillations along the plane of incidence. The envelope of oscillations peaked near the SP and persisted in its decay well beyond the FFZ. Within the FFZ, sensitivity was skewed towards the antenna. This experiment suggests the feasibility of overcoming the diffraction limit and resolving features smaller than the FFZ via GPS diffractive reflectometry. We also report more recent developments in SNR- and carrier-phase-based GPS Multipath Reflectometry.

  7. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to function

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In the Progress Report for last year (7-1-88 to 6-30-89) we proposed to complete the following experiments: (1) Structure of TFIIIA/DNA complex, (2) Effect of histone acetylation on nucleosome structure, and (3) Location of lysine rich histone H5 on the nucleosome. Our major source of neutrons is LANSCE, LANL. However, for the period of this report LANSCE has been down between cycles of operation. Continuing neutron scatter studies have been carried out at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France, on the trimmed nucleosome core particles. X-ray scatter studies have been carried out at DESY, Hamburg on the histone octamer and trimmed octamer. X-ray scatter studies have been performed also at LANL on proposed objectives. We have continued with the following of our research program; (i) assembly of fully characterized nucleosomes; (ii) effect of histone acetylation on nucleosomes; (iii) effect of full acetylation of H3 and H4 on nucleosome DNA linking number; (iv) assembly and characterization of defined minichromosomes; (v) neutron and X-ray scatter of the histone octamer and trimmed octamer; (vi) structural studies of human sperm chromatin, histones and protamines. 5 refs.

  8. Crystals for neutron scattering studies of quantum magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Yankova, Tantiana; Hüvonen, Dan; Mühlbauer, Sebastian; Schmidiger, David; Wulf, Erik; Hong, Tao; Garlea, Vasile O; Custelcean, Radu; Ehlers, Georg

    2012-01-01

    We review a strategy for targeted synthesis of large single crystal samples of prototype quantum magnets for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Four case studies of organic copper halogenide S = 1/2 systems are presented. They are meant to illustrate that exciting experimental results pertaining to the forefront of many-body quantum physics can be obtained on samples grown using very simple techniques, standard laboratory equipment, and almost no experience in advanced crystal growth techniques.

  9. Study of neutron irradiated structures of ammonothermal GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Deveikis, L.; Meskauskaite, D.; Miasojedovas, S.; Mickevicius, J.; Pavlov, J.; Pukas, K.; Vaitkus, J.; Velicka, M.; Zajac, M.; Kucharski, R.

    2017-04-01

    Study of the radiation damage in GaN-based materials becomes an important aspect for possible application of the GaN detectors in the harsh radiation environment at the Large Hadron Collider and at other particle acceleration facilities. Intentionally doped and semi-insulating bulk ammonothermal GaN materials were studied to reveal the dominant defects introduced by reactor neutron irradiations. These radiation defects have been identified by combining electron spin resonance and transmission spectroscopy techniques. Characteristics of carrier lifetime dependence on neutron irradiation fluence were examined. Variations of the response of the capacitor-type sensors with neutron irradiation fluence have been correlated with the carrier lifetime changes. The measurements of the photoconductivity and photoluminescence transients have been used to study the variation of the parameters of radiative and non-radiative recombination. The examined characteristics indicate that AT GaN as a particle sensing material is radiation hard up to high hadron fluences  ⩾1016 cm‑2.

  10. Protein Dynamics Studied by Quasi-elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Mamontov, Eugene; Lagi, Marco; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Gajapathy, Manavalan; Ng, Joseph; Weiss, Kevin; Coates, Leighton; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero

    2012-02-01

    The biological function and activities of proteins are intimately related to their structures and dynamics. Nowadays, neutron scattering is one of the most powerful tools to study the protein dynamics. In this study, we use quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) at the Spallation Neutron Source, ORNL, to study relaxational dynamics of two structurally different proteins --- hen egg white lysozyme and an inorganic pyrophosphatase from a hyperthermophile, in the time range of 10ps to 1ns. We experimentally prove that the slow dynamics of globular proteins can be described by the mode-coupling theory (MCT) that was originally developed for glass-forming molecular liquids. The MCT predicts the appearance of a logarithmic decay for a glass-forming liquid. Such dynamic behavior is also observed by recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on protein molecules. In addition, we compare the temperature dependence of the dynamics of the two proteins with completely different activity profiles. Our results greatly help understanding the relation between protein dynamics and their biological functions.

  11. Explosives detection studies using Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) is being investigated for detection of explosives in luggage or air cargo. We present here the principle results of a two-year study of a few-view tomographic FNTS system using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP to simulate neutron transmission through simple luggage phantoms and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves to determine system performance. Elemental distributions along projections through the interrogated object are obtained by analyzing MCNP generated neutron transmission data. Transmission data for few (3-5) angles and relatively coarse resolution ({approximately}2 cm) are used to create a tomographic reconstruction of elemental distributions within the object. The elemental unfolding and tomographic reconstruction algorithms and the concept of transmission-derived cross sections for use in elemental analysis have been validated by application to experimental data. Elemental distributions are combined in an explosives detection algorithm to provide an indication of the presence or absence of explosives. The algorithm in current use, termed the ``equivalent explosive`` algorithm, determines the quantity of explosive that can be formed using the measured amount of the constituent elements in each pixel. Reconstruction and explosives detection algorithms have been applied to a series of randomly packed suitcases to generated ROC that describe system performance in terms of the probability of detection and of false alarms. System studies have been performed to study the operational characteristics and limitations of a FNTS system, and to determine the system`s sensitivity to several important parameters such as neutron source reaction and incident particle energy, flight path length, and the position of the interrogated object.

  12. Birefringence insensitive optical coherence domain reflectometry system

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Davis, Joseph G.

    2002-01-01

    A birefringence insensitive fiber optic optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) system is provided containing non-polarization maintaining (non-PM) fiber in the sample arm and the reference arm without suffering from signal degradation caused by birefringence. The use of non-PM fiber significantly reduces the cost of the OCDR system and provides a disposable or multiplexed section of the sample arm. The dispersion in the reference arm and sample arm of the OCDR system are matched to achieve high resolution imaging. This system is useful in medical applications or for non-medical in situ probes. The disposable section of non-PM fiber in the sample arm can be conveniently replaced when contaminated by a sample or a patient.

  13. Vascular interventions with optical coherence reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neet, John M.

    2003-07-01

    There have been many innovations and technological advancements in balloon angioplasty since its introduction in the late 1970's, but percutaneous intervention on a totally occluded artery is still a challenge to the vascular interventionalist. Catheter-based intervention that avoids an invasive surgical procedure is a clear and desired advantage for the patient. A total occlusion challenges the interventionalist because the path of the artery can not be seen in the occluded vessel since the flow of the radiopaque contrast media is blocked. Optical coherence reflectometry techniques have been shown to be able to differentiate between artery wall and occlusive materials allowing the lumen of the blocked artery to be seen inside the occlusion. Light emitting diodes are a critical component of these systems making them technologically possible and economically feasible.

  14. Neutron and Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Studies of Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tranquada,J.M.

    2008-09-01

    Superconductors hold the promise for a more stable and efficient electrical grid, but new isotropic, high-temperature superconductors are needed in order to reduce cable manufacturing costs. The effort to understand high-temperature superconductivity, especially in the layered cuprates, provides guidance to the search for new superconductors. Neutron scattering has long provided an important probe of the collective excitations that are involved in the pairing mechanism. For the cuprates, neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques also provide information on competing types of order, such as charge and spin stripes, that appear to be closely connected to the superconductivity. Recently, inelastic x-ray scattering has become competitive for studying phonons and may soon provide valuable information on electronic excitations. Examples of how these techniques contribute to our understanding of superconductivity are presented.

  15. Scissors Mode of 162 Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    DOE PAGES

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; ...

    2015-05-28

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions,more » (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ’) reactions.« less

  16. Neutron skin studies of medium and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, M.; Becker, D.; Ferretti, M.; Kumar, K.; Sfienti, C.

    2014-06-01

    The recent PREX experiment at JLab has demonstrated the sensitivity of parity violating electron scattering to the neutron density, meanwhile outlining its major experimental challenges. On the other side, intermediate energy photons are an ideal probe for studying the properties of strongly interacting matter from the nuclear scale down to the sub-nuclear components of the nucleus. Among others coherent pion photoproduction can provide information on the existence and nature of neutron skins in nuclei. The simultaneous combination of different techniques allows a systematic determination across the periodic table thus benchmarking modern calculation. Recently a systematic investigation of the latter method has been exploited at MAMI (Mainz). At MESA the same setup as in the measurement of the weak mixing angle can be used to determine the parity-violating asymmetry for polarized electrons scattered on heavy nuclei with a 1% resolution. Status and prospects of the projects are presented.

  17. Scissors Mode of 162Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions, (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ') reactions.

  18. Study of spherical torus based volume neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.T.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    1998-01-01

    With the worldwide development of fusion power focusing on the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), developmental strategies for the demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) are being discussed. A relatively prudent strategy is to construct and operate a small deuterium tritium fuelled volumetric neutron source (VNS) in parallel with ITER. The VNS is to provide, over a period less than 20 years, a relatively high fusion neutron fluence of 6 MW year m2 and wall loading of 1 MW m2 or more, over an accessible blanket test area of more than 10 m2. Such a VNS would complement ITER in testing, developing, and qualifying nuclear technology components, materials, and their combinations for DEMO and future commercial power plants. The effort of this study has established the potential of the spherical tokamak as a credible VNS concept that satisfies the above requirements.

  19. Monte Carlo studies on neutron interactions in radiobiological experiments

    PubMed Central

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Hau, Tak Cheong; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to study the characteristics of neutron interactions with cells underneath a water medium layer with varying thickness. The following results were obtained. (1) The fractions of neutron interaction with 1H, 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei in the cell layer were studied. The fraction with 1H increased with increasing medium thickness, while decreased for 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei. The bulges in the interaction fractions with 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei were explained by the resonance spikes in the interaction cross-section data. The interaction fraction decreased in the order: 1H > 16O > 12C > 14N. (2) In general, as the medium thickness increased, the number of “interacting neutrons” which exited the medium and then further interacted with the cell layer increased. (3) The area under the angular distributions for “interacting neutrons” decreased with increasing incident neutron energy. Such results would be useful for deciphering the reasons behind discrepancies among existing results in the literature. PMID:28704557

  20. Neutron structure and mechanistic studies of diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Julian C.-H.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Schoenborn, Benno P.; Langan, Paul; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2010-11-01

    The structure and mechanism of diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) have been studied using a variety of methods, including isotopic labelling, X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography. The neutron structure of DFPase, mechanistic studies and subsequent rational design efforts are described. Diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) is a calcium-dependent phosphotriesterase that acts on a variety of highly toxic organophosphorus compounds that act as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase. The mechanism of DFPase has been probed using a variety of methods, including isotopic labelling, which demonstrated the presence of a phosphoenzyme intermediate in the reaction mechanism. In order to further elucidate the mechanism of DFPase and to ascertain the protonation states of the residues and solvent molecules in the active site, the neutron structure of DFPase was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. The proposed nucleophile Asp229 is deprotonated, while the active-site solvent molecule W33 was identified as water and not hydroxide. These data support a mechanism involving direct nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on the substrate and rule out a mechanism involving metal-assisted water activation. These data also allowed for the re-engineering of DFPase through rational design to bind and productively orient the more toxic S{sub P} stereoisomers of the nerve agents sarin and cyclosarin, creating a modified enzyme with enhanced overall activity and significantly increased detoxification properties.

  1. Cosmic ray modulation studies with Lead-Free Gulmarg Neutron Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darzi, M. A.; Ishtiaq, P. M.; Mir, T. A.; Mufti, S.; Shah, G. N.

    2014-02-01

    A lead-free neutron monitor operating at High Altitude Research Laboratory (HARL), Gulmarg optimized for detecting 2.45 MeV neutron bursts produced during the atmospheric lightning discharges is also concurrently used for studying background neutron component present in the atmosphere. These background neutrons are produced due to the interaction of primary cosmic rays with the atmospheric constituents. In order to study and extract the information about the yield of the neutron production during transient atmospheric lightning discharges, the system is continuously operated to monitor and record the cosmic ray produced background secondary neutrons in the atmosphere. The data analysis of the background neutrons recorded by Lead-Free Gulmarg Neutron Monitor (LFGNM) has convincingly established that the modulation effects due to solar activity phenomena compare very well with those monitored by the worldwide IGY or NM64 type neutron monitors which have optimum energy response relatively towards the higher energy regime of the cosmic rays. The data has revealed various types of modulation phenomena like diurnal variation, Forbush decrease etc. during its entire operational period. However, a new kind of a periodic/seasonal variation pattern is also revealed in the data from September 2007 to September 2012, which is seen to be significantly consistent with the data recorded by Emilio Segre observatory, Israel (ESOI) Neutron Monitor. Interestingly, both these neutron monitors have comparable latitude and altitude. However, the same type of consistency is not observed in the data recorded by the other conventional neutron monitors operating across the globe.

  2. Preparation of radioactive rare earth targets for neutron capture study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G. G.; Rogers, P. S. Z.; Palmer, P. D.; Dry, D. E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    The understanding of thc details of nucleosynthesis in stars remains a great challenge. Though the basic mechanisms governing the processes have been known since the pioneering work of Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle (l), we are now evolving into a condition where we can ask more specific questions. Of particular interest are the dynamics of the s ('slow') process. In this process the general condition is one in which sequential neutron captures occur at time scales long compared with the beta decay half lives of the capturing nuclides. The nucleosynthesis period for C or Ne burning stellar shells is believed to be in the year to few year time frame (2). This means that radionuclides with similar half lives to this burning period serve as 'branch point' nuclides. That is, there will be a competition between a capture to the next heavier isotope and a beta decay to the element of nexl higher atomic number. By understanding the abundances of these competing reactions we can learn about the dynamics of the nucleosynthesis process in the stellar medium. Crucial to this understanding is that we have a knowledge of the underlying neutron reaction cross sections on these unstable nuclides in the relevant stellar energy regions (neutrons of 0.1-100 KeV). Tm (1.9 years) and ls'Sm (90 ycws) have decay properties that permit their handling in an open fume hood. These Iwo were therefore selected to be the first radionuclides for neutron capture study in what will be an ongoing effort.

  3. Neutron scattering study of unconventional superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seunghun

    2014-06-30

    My group’s primary activity at the University of Virginia supported by DOE is to study novel electronic, magnetic, and structural phenomena that emerge out of strong interactions between electrons. Some of these phenomena are unconventional superconductivity, exotic states in frustrated magnets, quantum spin liquid states, and magneto-electricity. The outcome of our research funded by the grant advanced microscopic understanding of the emergence of the collective states in the systems.

  4. Neutron capture studies on /sup 189/Os

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, A.M.; Colvin, G.G.; Gelletly, W.; Warner, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive study of the level structure of /sup 189/Os has been carried out using the (n,..gamma..) and (n,e-) reactions. The use of the Average Resonance Capture technique ensures that the complete set of 1/2-, 3/2- states has been established up to 1500 keV in excitation energy and secondary ..gamma..-rays have been measured in singles and coincidence to build up the detailed level scheme. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Optimization study of normal conductor tokamak for commercial neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Sakai, R.; Okamoto, A.

    2017-05-01

    The optimum conceptual design of tokamak with normal conductor coils was studied for minimizing the cost for producing a given neutron flux by using a system code, PEC. It is assumed that the fusion neutrons are used for burning transuranics from the fission reactor spent fuel in the blanket and a fraction of the generated electric power is circulated to opearate the tokamak with moderate plasma fusion gain. The plasma performance was assumed to be moderate ones; {β\\text{N}}~∼ ~3{--}4 in the aspect ratio A~=~2{--}3 and {{H}98y2}~=~1 . The circulating power is an important factor affecting the cost. Though decreasing the aspect ratio is useful to raise the plasma beta and decrease the toroidal field, the maximum field in the coil starts to rise in the very low aspect ratio range and then the circulating power increases with decrease in the plasma aspect ratio A below A~∼ ~2 , while the construction cost increases with A . As a result, the cost per neutron has its minimum around A~∼ ~2.2 , namely, between ST and the conventional tokamak. The average circulating power fraction is expected to be ~51%.

  6. Density of states in solid deuterium: Inelastic neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Morkel, C.; Mueller, A. R.; Paul, S.; Urban, M.; Schober, H.; Rols, S.; Unruh, T.; Hoelzel, M.

    2009-08-01

    The dynamics of solid deuterium (sD{sub 2}) is studied by means of inelastic scattering (coherent and incoherent) of thermal and cold neutrons at different temperatures and para-ortho ratios. In this paper, the results for the generalized density of states (GDOS) are presented and discussed. The measurements were performed at the thermal neutron time-of-flight (TOF) instrument IN4 at ILL Grenoble and at the cold neutron TOF instrument TOFTOF at FRM II Garching. The GDOS comprises besides the hcp phonon excitations of the sD{sub 2} the rotational transitions J=0{yields}1 and J=1{yields}2. The intensities of these rotational excitations depend strongly on the ortho-D{sub 2} molecule concentration c{sub o} in sD{sub 2}. Above E=10 meV there are still strong excitations, which very likely may originate from higher-energy damped optical phonons and multiphonon contributions. A method for separating the one-phonon and multiphonon contributions to the density of states will be presented and discussed.

  7. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg).

  8. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (˜100 mg).

  9. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Kelton, K. F.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Goldman, A. I.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Egami, T.

    2016-01-15

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr{sub 64}Ni{sub 36} measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg)

  10. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGES

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  11. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).

  12. Neutron studies of liquid and solid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Glyde, H.R.

    1987-04-01

    The progress made during 5/1/86--4/31/87 under contract No. F902- 34ER45082 is reported. The validity of the Impulse Approximation (IA) to the dynamic form factor, S(Q,{omega}), has been investigated using realistic models of solid helium. The calculations suggest that the IA can be used to obtain the momentum distribution, n(p), within 1% at Q {approx} 30 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}, if S(Q,{omega}) is first symmetrized about the recoil frequency, {omega}{sub R}. For solid helium under pressure (e.g. 5 kbar) a Q {approx gt} 50 {Angstrom} {sup {minus}1} is required. The S(Q,{omega}) in liquid {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He in the wave vector transfer range 3 {le} Q {le} 10 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1} has been evaluated, beginning from the pair potential. The general shape and width of S(Q,{omega}) obtained agrees well with existing experiment. The width of S(Q,{omega}) is found to oscillate as a function of Q in {sup 4}He but not in {sup 3}He. The dynamics of atoms adsorbed in solid layers on surfaces has been studied using self-consistent methods.

  13. Study of Neutron Deficient 13O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarge, Joseph; Rogachev, G. V.; Blackmon, J.; Wiedenhover, I.; Baby, L.; Johnson, E. D.; Kuchera, A. N.; Koshchiy, E.; Lai, J.; Linhardt, L.; Macon, K.; Matos, M.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2013-10-01

    Development of theoretical framework that allows the combination of nuclear structure calculations with the continuum is an important objective of modern nuclear theory [A. Volya, PRC 79, 044308 (2009), S. Quaglioni and P. Navratil, PRL 101092501 (2008)]. Due to the low binding energy of exotic isotopes even the lowest excited states are unbound and therefore it is essential to take the continuum into account. We studied the structure of the lightest bound oxygen isotope, 13O, through 12N+p resonance scattering using the new active target detector ANASEN [M. Matos et al., Proc. Intern. Symp. on Nuclei in the Cosmos, July 19-23, Heidelberg, Germany, p. 226 (2010)]. The experiment was performed at the John D. Fox Superconducting Accelerator Laboratory at Florida State University. A rare isotope beam of 12N ions was produced using the radioactive nuclear beam facility RESOLUT. Methane gas was used as a target and also as an active medium for the gas proportional counters of the ANASEN detector. The analysis of the p+12N excitation functions was performed using the R-Matrix approach. The preliminary results of the experiment will be presented.

  14. Study of Neutron Deficient ^9C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarge, Joseph; Rogachev, G. V.; Blackmon, J.; Wiedenhover, I.; Baby, L.; Johnson, E. D.; Kuchera, A. N.; Koshchiy, E.; Lai, J.; Linhardt, L.; Macon, K.; Matos, M.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2012-10-01

    Development of theoretical framework that allows the combination of nuclear structure calculations with the continuum is an important objective of modern nuclear theory [1,2]. Due to the low binding energy of exotic isotopes even the lowest excited states are unbound and therefore it is essential to take the continuum into account. We studied the structure of the lightest bound carbon isotope, ^9C, through ^8B+p resonance scattering using the new active target detector ANASEN [3]. The experiment was performed at the John D. Fox Superconducting Accelerator Laboratory at FSU. A rare isotope beam of ^8B ions was produced using the radioactive nuclear beam facility RESOLUT. Pure hydrogen gas was used as a target and also as an active medium for the gas proportional counters of the ANASEN detector. The analysis of the p+^8B excitation functions was performed using the R-Matrix approach. The preliminary results will be presented.[4pt] [1] A. Volya, Phys. Rev. C 79, 044308 (2009).[0pt] [2] S. Quaglioni and P. Navr'atil, PRL 101, 092501 (2008).[0pt] [3] M. Matos, et al.,Proc. Intern. Symposium on Nuclei in the Cosmos XI, July 19-23 2010, Heidelberg, Germany, p.226(2010).

  15. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rorschach, H.E.

    1993-05-25

    Results that shed new light on the study of protein dynamics were obtained by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The triple axis instrument H-9 supplied by the cold source was used to perform a detailed study of the quasi-elastic spectrum and the Debye-Waller factor for trypsin in powder form, in solution, and in crystals. A preliminary study of myoglobin crystals was also done. A new way to view the results of quasi-elastic scattering experiments is sketched, and the data on trypsin are presented and analyze according to this new picture.

  16. Simulation study of accelerator based quasi-mono-energetic epithermal neutron beams for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Adib, M; Habib, N; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Mansy, M S

    2016-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-7.5 keV at the accelerator port using the generated neutron spectrum from a Li (p, n) Be reaction. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The feature of the filtered beams is detailed in terms of optimal thickness of the primary and additive components. A computer code named "QMNB-AS" was developed to carry out the required calculations. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity with low contamination from the accompanying thermal, fast neutrons and γ-rays.

  17. Feasibility of terahertz reflectometry for discrimination of human early gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Gyu Min; Noh, Sam Kyu; Jeon, Tae-In; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo; Oh, Seung Jae; Lee, Sang Kil; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of THz time-domain reflectometry for the discrimination of human early gastric cancer (EGC) from the normal gastric region. Eight fresh EGC tissues, which were resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection, were studied. Of them, six lesions were well discriminated on THz images and the regions well correlated with tumor regions on pathologically mapped images. Four THz parameters could be suggested for quantitative discrimination of EGCs. PMID:25909023

  18. Microwave Imaging Reflectometry for the Measurement of Turbulent Fluctuations in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    E. Mazzucato

    2004-02-19

    This article describes a numerical study of microwave reflectometry for the measurement of turbulent fluctuations in tokamak-like plasmas with a cylindrical geometry. Similarly to what was found previously in plane-stratified plasmas, the results indicate that the characteristics of density fluctuations cannot be uniquely determined from the reflected waves if the latter are allowed to propagate freely to the point of detection, as in standard reflectometry. Again, we find that if the amplitude of fluctuations is below a threshold that is set by the spectrum of poloidal wave numbers, the local characteristics of density fluctuations can be obtained from the phase of reflected waves when these are collected with a wide aperture antenna, and an image of the cutoff is formed onto an array of phase-sensitive detectors.

  19. Neutron scattering studies of 54,56Fe with monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B. M.; Henderson, S. L.; Sidwell, L. C.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Garza, E.; Steves, J.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Prados-Estevez, F. M.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-10-01

    Neutron scattering data for Fe are important for the development of next generation fission reactors, since Fe is an important structural material in all proposed reactor designs, as well as in existing reactors. How neutrons interact with Fe has an important impact on fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of fission reactors. While differential scattering cross sections have been previously measured at several incident neutron energies in the fast neutron region, questions remain regarding the uncertainties for existing cross sections and for neutron inelastic scattering. Elastic and inelastic differential scattering cross sections have been measured on 54,56Fe at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory in the fast neutron energy region between 1.7 and 4 MeV. Results from our measurements and comparisons to model calculations will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the Department of Energy under grant NEUP: NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and by the Cowan Physics Fund at the Univ. of Dallas.

  20. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghini, Orso; Volpe, Francesco A.

    2016-11-01

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contains information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. Probing the plasma with different wave frequencies provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry. Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. The proposed reflectometric approach is expected to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit electron Bernstein waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f > 28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.

  1. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, Orso; Volpe, Francesco A.

    2016-08-19

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contain information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. By probing the plasma with different wave frequencies it provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry. Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. We proposed an reflectometric approach in order to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit Electron Bernstein Waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Furthermore, frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f >28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.

  2. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Meneghini, Orso; Volpe, Francesco A.

    2016-08-19

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contain information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. By probing the plasma with different wave frequencies it provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry.more » Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. We proposed an reflectometric approach in order to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit Electron Bernstein Waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Furthermore, frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f >28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.« less

  3. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, Orso; Volpe, Francesco A.

    2016-11-15

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contains information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. Probing the plasma with different wave frequencies provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry. Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. The proposed reflectometric approach is expected to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit electron Bernstein waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f > 28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.

  4. GNSS-Reflectometry based water level monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckheinrich, Jamila; Schön, Steffen; Beyerle, Georg; Apel, Heiko; Semmling, Maximilian; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Due to climate changing conditions severe changes in the Mekong delta in Vietnam have been recorded in the last years. The goal of the German Vietnamese WISDOM (Water-related Information system for the Sustainable Development Of the Mekong Delta) project is to build an information system to support and assist the decision makers, planners and authorities for an optimized water and land management. One of WISDOM's tasks is the flood monitoring of the Mekong delta. Earth reflected L-band signals from the Global Navigation Satellite System show a high reflectivity on water and ice surfaces or on wet soil so that GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) could contribute to monitor the water level in the main streams of the Mekong delta complementary to already existing monitoring networks. In principle, two different GNSS-R methods exist: the code- and the phase-based one. As the latter being more accurate, a new generation of GORS (GNSS Occultation, Reflectometry and Scatterometry) JAVAD DELTA GNSS receiver has been developed with the aim to extract precise phase observations. In a two week lasting measurement campaign, the receiver has been tested and several reflection events at the 150-200 m wide Can Tho river in Vietnam have been recorded. To analyze the geometrical impact on the quantity and quality of the reflection traces two different antennas height were tested. To track separately the direct and the reflected signal, two antennas were used. To derive an average height of the water level, for a 15 min observation interval, a phase model has been developed. Combined with the coherent observations, the minimum slope has been calculated based on the Least- Squares method. As cycle slips and outliers will impair the results, a preprocessing of the data has been performed. A cycle slip detection strategy that allows for automatic detection, identification and correction is proposed. To identify outliers, the data snooping method developed by Baarda 1968 is used. In this

  5. STUDY OF A 10-MW CONTINUOUS SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.G.LUDEWIG,H.SHAPIRO,S.

    2003-05-12

    This paper reports on the feasibility study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac as the driver for an Accelerator-based Continuous Neutron Source (ACNS) [1] to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Linac is to be operated in the Continuous Wave (CW) mode to produce an average 10 MW of beam power. The Linac beam energy is taken to be 1.25 GeV. The required average proton beam intensity in exit is then 8 mA.

  6. Neutron depth profiling study of lithium niobate optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolářova, P.; Vacík, J.; Špirková-Hradilová, J.; Červená, J.

    1998-05-01

    The relation between optical properties and the structure of proton exchanged and annealed proton exchanged optical waveguides in lithium niobate was studied using the mode spectroscopy and neutron depth profiling methods. We have found a close correlation between the lithium depletion and the depth profile of the extraordinary refractive index. The form of the observed dependence between Li depletion and refractive index depends on the fabrication procedure by which the waveguide was prepared but it is highly reproducible for specimens prepared by the same procedure.

  7. Neutron Scattering Study of TbPtin Intermetallic Compound

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Vasile O; Morosan, E.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Zarestky, Jerel L; Canfield, P. C.; Stassis, C.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron diffraction techniques have been used to study the magnetic properties of a TbPtIn single-crystal as a function of temperature and magnetic field. In the absence of an externally applied magnetic field, the compound orders, below approximately 47 K, in an antiferromagnetic structure with propagation vector k=(1/2,0,1/2); the magnetic moments were found to be parallel to the [1 {ovr 2} 0] direction. Measurements at 4.2 K, with a magnetic field applied along the [1 {ovr 2} 0] direction, revealed metamagnetic transitions at approximately 20 kG and 40 kG.

  8. Solid phases of spatially nanoconfined oxygen: A neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Kojda, Danny; Wallacher, Dirk; Hofmann, Tommy; Baudoin, Simon; Hansen, Thomas; Huber, Patrick

    2014-01-14

    We present a comprehensive neutron scattering study on solid oxygen spatially confined in 12 nm wide alumina nanochannels. Elastic scattering experiments reveal a structural phase sequence known from bulk oxygen. With decreasing temperature cubic γ-, orthorhombic β- and monoclinic α-phases are unambiguously identified in confinement. Weak antiferromagnetic ordering is observed in the confined monoclinic α-phase. Rocking scans reveal that oxygen nanocrystals inside the tubular channels do not form an isotropic powder. Rather, they exhibit preferred orientations depending on thermal history and the very mechanisms, which guide the structural transitions.

  9. Functional renormalization group study of nuclear and neutron matter

    SciTech Connect

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-01-22

    A chiral model based on nucleons interacting via boson exchange is investigated. Fluctuation effects are included consistently beyond the mean-field approximation in the framework of the functional renormalization group. The liquid-gas phase transition of symmetric nuclear matter is studied in detail. No sign of a chiral restoration transition is found up to temperatures of about 100 MeV and densities of at least three times the density of normal nuclear matter. Moreover, the model is extended to asymmetric nuclear matter and the constraints from neutron star observations are discussed.

  10. Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.G.; Durkee, J.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in the design and demonstrations of a small, long-lived nuclear heat and electric power source for potential applications at remote sites where alternate fossil energy systems would not be cost effective. This paper describes the neutronic design analysis that was performed to arrive at two conceptual designs, one using thermoelectric conversion, the other using an organic Rankine cycle. To meet the design objectives and constraints a number of scoping and optimization studies were carried out. The results of calculations of control worths, temperature coefficients of reactivity and fuel depletion effects are reported.

  11. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structure related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron scatter studies have been performed at LANSCE, LANL and at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France. In the previous progress report (April 1, 1988--July 1, 1988) the following objectives were listed: shape of the histone octamer; location of the N-terminal domains of histone in the nucleosome core particle (specific aim 1 of original grant proposal); effect of acetylation on nucleosome structure (specific aim 2); location of the globular domain of histone H1 (specific aim 6); and complexes of the transcription factor 3A with its DNA binding site. Progress is briefly discussed.

  12. Infrared absorption study of neutron-transmutation-doped germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, I. S.; Haller, E. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using high-resolution far-infrared Fourier transform absorption spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements, the evolution of the shallow acceptor and donor impurity levels in germanium during and after the neutron transmutation doping process was studied. The results show unambiguously that the gallium acceptor level concentration equals the concentration of transmutated Ge-70 atoms during the whole process indicating that neither recoil during transmutation nor gallium-defect complex formation play significant roles. The arsenic donor levels appear at full concentration only after annealing for 1 h at 450 C. It is shown that this is due to donor-radiation-defect complex formation. Again, recoil does not play a significant role.

  13. Infrared absorption study of neutron-transmutation-doped germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, I. S.; Haller, E. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using high-resolution far-infrared Fourier transform absorption spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements, the evolution of the shallow acceptor and donor impurity levels in germanium during and after the neutron transmutation doping process was studied. The results show unambiguously that the gallium acceptor level concentration equals the concentration of transmutated Ge-70 atoms during the whole process indicating that neither recoil during transmutation nor gallium-defect complex formation play significant roles. The arsenic donor levels appear at full concentration only after annealing for 1 h at 450 C. It is shown that this is due to donor-radiation-defect complex formation. Again, recoil does not play a significant role.

  14. Precision Neutron Decay Studies with the Nab and UCNB Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprow, Aaron; Nab Collaboration; UCNB Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Precision neutron decay correlation experiments are a sensitive means to study the standard model and probe for beyond the standard model physics. Nab and UCNB are two such experiments that will measure the neutrino-electron correlation term, a, and the neutrino asymmetry, B, respectively. Thick, highly-segmented silicon detectors will be used to directly measure the proton and electron from each decay event in coincidence, leading to the extraction of these angular correlations. Preliminary work to understand the systematic uncertainties associated with these experiments, as well as the early analysis of data taken from the 2015-2016 beam time at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be presented.

  15. Decay studies of the highly neutron-deficient indium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    An extension of the experimentally known nuclidic mass surface to nuclei far from the region of beta-stability is of fundamental interest in providing a better determination of the input parameters for the various nuclear mass formulae, allowing a more accurate prediction of the ultimate limits of nuclear stability. In addition, a study of the shape of the mass surface in the vicinity of the doubly-closed nuclide /sup 100/Sn provides initial information on the behavior of the shell closure to be expected when Z = N = 50. Experiments measuring the decay energies of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In by ..beta..-endpoint measurements are described with special attention focused on the development of a plastic scintillator ..beta..-telescope coupled to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer). An attempt to measure the ..beta..-endpoint energy of /sup 102/In is also briefly described. The experimentally determined decay energies and derived masses for /sup 103/ /sup 105/In are compared with the predictions of different mass models to identify which models are more successful in this region. Furthermore, the inclusion in these comparisons of the available data on the neutron-rich indium nuclei permits a systematic study of their ground state mass behavior as a function of the neutron number between the shell closures at N = 50 and N = 82. These analyses indicate that the binding energy of /sup 103/In is 1 MeV larger than predicted by the majority of the mass models. An examination of the Q/sub EC/ surface and the single- and two-neutron separation energies in the vicinity of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In is also performed to investigate further the deviation and other possible systematic variations in the mass surface in a model-independent way.

  16. Materials compatibility studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R and D programs. In addition, corrosion studies also include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous spallation neutron systems as a window material. Two types of compatibility issues relative to 316 SS/mercury and Inconel 718/mercury are being examined: (1) liquid metal embrittlement (LME) and (2) temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275 C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercury or mercury-gallium. However, there was evidence that the fracture was less ductile. Preliminary evaluation of mass transfer of either type 316 SS or Inconel 718 in mercury or mercury-gallium at 350 C (maximum temperature) did not reveal significant effects. Two 5,000 h thermal convection loop tests of type 316 SS are in progress, with specimens in both hot and cold test regions, at 300 and 240 C, respectively.

  17. Neutron and X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Tiley, Jaimie; Wang, Yandong; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    The selection of articles in the special topic 'Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials' is based on the materials presented during the TMS 2009 annual meeting in San Francisco, CA, February 15-19, 2009. The development of ultrabrilliant third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, together with advances in X-ray optics, has created intense X-ray microbeams, which provide the best opportunities for in-depth understanding of mechanical behavior in a broad spectrum of materials. Important applications include ultrasensitive elemental detection by X-ray fluorescence/absorption and microdiffraction to identify phase and strain with submicrometer spatial resolution. X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly exciting application compared with alternative probes of crystalline structure, orientation, and strain. X-ray microdiffraction is nondestructive with good strain resolution, competitive or superior spatial resolution in thick samples, and with the ability to probe below the sample surface. Moreover, the high-energy X-ray diffraction technique provides an effective tool for characterizing the mechanical and functional behavior in various environments (temperature, stress, and magnetic field). At the same time, some neutron diffraction instruments constructed mainly for the purpose of engineering applications can be found at nearly all neutron facilities. The first generation-dedicated instruments designed for studying in-situ mechanical behavior have been commissioned and used, and industrial standards for reliable and repeatable measurements have been developed. Furthermore, higher penetration of neutron beams into most engineering materials provides direct measurements on the distribution of various stresses (i.e., types I, II, and III) beneath the surface up to several millimeters, even tens of millimeters for important industrial components. With X-ray and neutron measurements, it is possible to characterize material behavior at different length scales. It

  18. Application of reflectometry power flow for magnetic field pitch angle measurements in tokamak plasmas (invited).

    PubMed

    Gourdain, P-A; Peebles, W A

    2008-10-01

    Reflectometry has successfully demonstrated measurements of many important parameters in high temperature tokamak fusion plasmas. However, implementing such capabilities in a high-field, large plasma, such as ITER, will be a significant challenge. In ITER, the ratio of plasma size (meters) to the required reflectometry source wavelength (millimeters) is significantly larger than in existing fusion experiments. This suggests that the flow of the launched reflectometer millimeter-wave power can be realistically analyzed using three-dimensional ray tracing techniques. The analytical and numerical studies presented will highlight the fact that the group velocity (or power flow) of the launched microwaves is dependent on the direction of wave propagation relative to the internal magnetic field. It is shown that this dependence strongly modifies power flow near the cutoff layer in a manner that embeds the local magnetic field direction in the "footprint" of the power returned toward the launch antenna. It will be shown that this can potentially be utilized to locally determine the magnetic field pitch angle at the cutoff location. The resultant beam drift and distortion due to magnetic field and relativistic effects also have significant consequences on the design of reflectometry systems for large, high-field fusion experiments. These effects are discussed in the context of the upcoming ITER burning plasma experiment.

  19. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  20. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew; Colston, Billy W.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  1. Study of radioactive impurities in neutron transmutation doped germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathimalar, S.; Dokania, N.; Singh, V.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Shrivastava, A.; Jagadeesan, K. C.; Thakare, S. V.

    2015-02-01

    A program to develop low temperature (mK) sensors with neutron transmutation doped Ge for rare event studies with a cryogenic bolometer has been initiated. For this purpose, semiconductor grade Ge wafers are irradiated with thermal neutron flux from Dhruva reactor at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai. Spectroscopic studies of irradiated samples have revealed that the environment of the capsule used for irradiating the sample leads to significant levels of 65Zn, 110mAg and 182Ta impurities, which can be reduced by chemical etching of approximately 50 μm thick surface layer. From measurements of the etched samples in the low background counting setup, activity due to trace impurities of 123Sb in bulk Ge is estimated to be 1 Bq / g after irradiation. These estimates indicate that in order to use the NTD Ge sensors for rare event studies, a cooldown period of 2 years would be necessary to reduce the radioactive background to ≤ 1 mBq / g.

  2. (Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structure related to function)

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study is concerned with the application of neutron scatter techniques to the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin with the long term objective of understanding how the enormous lengths of DNA are folded into chromosomes. Micrococcal nuclease digestion kinetics have defined two subnucleosome particles; the chromatosome with 168 bp DNA, the histone octamer and one H1 and the nucleosome core particle with 146 bp DNA and the histone octamer. As will be discussed, the structure of the 146 bp DNA core particle is known in solution at low resolution from neutron scatter studies and in crystals. Based on this structure, the authors have a working model for the chromatosome and the mode of binding of H1. In order to define the structure of the nucleosome and also the different orders of chromatin structures they need to know the paths of DNA that link nucleosomes and the factors associated with chromosome functions that act on those DNA paths. The major region for this situation is the inherent variabilities in nucleosome DNA sequences, in the histone subtypes and their states of chemical modification and in the precise locations of nucleosomes. Such variabilities obscure the underlying principles that govern the packaging of DNA into the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin. The only way to elucidate these principles is to study the structures of nucleosomes and oligonucleosomes that are fully defined. They have largely achieved these objectives.

  3. The physics experimental study for in-hospital neutron irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yiguo; Xia Pu; Zou Shuyun; Zhang Yongbao; Zheng Iv; Zheng Wuqing; Shi Yongqian; Gao Jijin; Zhou Yongmao

    2008-07-15

    MNSRs (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor) are low power research reactors designed and manufactured by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). MNSRs are mainly used for NAA, training and teaching, testing of nuclear instrumentation. The first MNSR, the prototype MNSR, was put into operation in 1984, later, eight other MNSRs had been built both at home and abroad. For MNSRs, highly enriched uranium (90%) is used as the fuel material. The In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator (IHNI) is designed for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) based on Miniature Neutron Source Reactor(MNSR). On both sides of the reactor core, there are two neutron beams, one is thermal neutron beam, and the other opposite to the thermal beam, is epithermal neutron beam. A small thermal neutron beam is specially designed for the measurement of blood boron concentration by the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA). In this paper, the experimental results of critical mass worth of the top Be reflectors worth of the control rod, neutron flux distribution and other components worth were measured, the experiment was done on the Zero Power Experiment equipment of MNSR. (author)

  4. Simulation study of a 'fission electron-collection' neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dong; Zhang Chuanfei

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a 'fission electron-collection' neutron detector was studied using the Monte Carlo method. The detector consists of two metal electrodes mounted in a vacuum, named coated and collection electrodes, respectively. The first electrode is coated with triuranium octoxide. The detector uses the 'fission electron-collection' technique, which does not need an intermediate material but directly collects electrons from the coating. Such a detector can realize a flat energy response and a fast time response, both of which are important in the fluence measurement of pulsed neutron sources. In this paper, the physical processes of detection are presented, as well as Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 toolkit. From the results, the sensitivity of the detector is approximately 1.5 x 10{sup -21} [C/(n/cm{sup 2})], and the FWHM of response function is 2.5 nanoseconds. Additionally, the characterization of escaping electrons is also presented, and the sensitivity of the detector is determined for various coating thicknesses. (authors)

  5. Study of SMM flares in gamma-rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research supported by NASA grant NAGW-2755 and lists the papers and publications produced through the grant. The objective of the work was to study solar flares that produced observable signals from high-energy (greater than 10 MeV) gamma-rays and neutrons in the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS). In 3 of 4 flares that had been studied previously, most of the neutrons and neutral pions appear to have been produced after the 'main' impulsive phase as determined from hard x-rays and gamma-rays. We, therefore, proposed to analyze the timing of the high-energy radiation, and its implications for the acceleration, trapping, and transport of flare particles. It was equally important to characterize the spectral shapes of the interacting energetic electrons and protons - another key factor in constraining possible particle acceleration mechanisms. In section 2.0, we discuss the goals of the research. In section 3.0, we summarize the results of the research. In section 4.0, we list the papers and publications produced under the grant. Preprints or reprints of the publications are attached as appendices.

  6. A survey of reflectometry techniques with applications to TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo, I.; Stacey, W.M.; Wilgen, J.; Hanson, G.; Bigelow, T.; Thomas, C.E.; Bretz, N.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents a review of reflectometry with particular attention to eXtraordinary mode (X-mode) reflectometry using the novel technique of dual frequency differential phase. The advantage of using an X-mode wave is that it can probe the edge of the plasma with much higher resolution and using a much smaller frequency range than with the Ordinary mode (O-Mode). The general problem with previous full phase reflectometry techniques is that of keeping track of the phase (on the order of 1000 fringes) as the frequency is swept over the band. The dual frequency phase difference technique has the advantage that since it is keeping track of the phase difference of two frequencies with a constant frequency separation, the fringe counting is on the order of only 3 to 5 fringes. This fringe count, combined with the high resolution of the X-mode wave and the small plasma access requirements of reflectometry, make X-mode reflectometry a very attractive diagnostic for today`s experiments and future fusion devices.

  7. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed a study on the structure of trypsin trimmed histone octamers using small angle neutron and X-ray scattering studies and nuclear magnetic resonance. We have also completed studies on the structure of TFIIIA induced DNA bending by a circular permutation gel electrophoresis assay. Individual acetylated species of core histones from butyrate treated HeLa cells were isolated and reconstituted into nucleosomes using a 5S rDNA nucleosome positioning DNA sequence from sea urchin. These nucleosomes were characterized by sulfhydryl group probing, nucleoprotein particle gel electrophoresis and DNase I footprinting. Fully acetylated species of histones H3 and H4 were also reconstituted in closed circular minichromosomes and the effect of DNA topology changes caused by acetylation was studied. Finally, protamines isolated from human sperm were characterized and a full set of core histones were isolated and characterized. 7 refs.

  8. Neutron production from flattening filter free high energy medical linac: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, M. A.; Abolaban, F. A.; Podolyák, Z.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the problems arising from using a conventional linac at high energy (>8 MV) is the production of neutrons. One way to reduce neutron production is to remove the flattening filter (FF). The main purpose of this work was to study the effect of FF removal on neutron fluence and neutron dose equivalent inside the treatment room at different photon beam energies. Several simulations based on Monte Carlo techniques were carried out in order to calculate the neutron fluence at different locations in the treatment room from different linac energies with and without a FF. In addition, a step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) for prostate cancer was modelled using the 15 MV photon beam with and without a FF on a water phantom to calculate the neutron dose received in a full treatment. The results obtained show a significant drop-off in neutrons fluence and dose equivalent when the FF was removed. For example, the neutron fluence was decreased by 54%, 76% and 75% for 10, 15 and 18 MV, respectively. This can decrease the neutron dose to the patient as well as reduce the shielding cost of the treatment room. The neutron dose equivalent of the SnS IMRT for prostate cancer was reduced significantly by 71.3% when the FF was removed. It can be concluded that the flattening filter removal from the head of the linac could reduce the risk of causing secondary cancers and the shielding cost of radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  9. Time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering studies of native photosystems.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    The internal molecular dynamics of proteins plays an important role in a number of functional processes in native photosystems. Prominent examples include the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin and electron transfer in the reaction center of plant photosystem II. In this regard, the recently developed technique of time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering with laser excitation opens up new perspectives for the study of protein/membrane dynamics in specific functional states of even complex systems. The first direct observation of a functionally modulated protein dynamics has just recently been reported for the model system bacteriorhodopsin (Pieper et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 2008, 228103.), where a transient softening of the protein was observed on a timescale of approximately 1 ms along with the large-scale structural change in the M-intermediate of bacteriorhodopsin. In contrast, photosystem II membrane fragments with inhibited electron transfer show a suppression of protein dynamics approximately 160 mus after the actinic laser flash (Pieper and Renger, Biochemistry 48, 2009, 6111). This effect may reflect aggregation-like conformational changes capable of dissipation of excess excitation energy to prevent photodamage in the absence of Q(A)-->Q(B) electron transfer. These findings indicate that proteins exhibit a remarkable flexibility to accommodate different functional processes. This contribution will discuss methodical aspects, challenges, and recent applications of laser-excited, time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering.

  10. Neutron scattering studies of disordered carbon anode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanek, P.; Kamitakahara, W. A.; Zhou, P.; Fischer, J. E.

    2001-09-01

    Carbon-based anodes show many promising properties in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. So-called `disordered carbons' are characterized by a substantial amount of residual hydrogen, and exhibit large Li uptake capacities. We have employed a variety of neutron scattering techniques, coupled with computer simulations, to study the composition, local atomic structure, and vibrational dynamics of such materials. Radial distribution function analysis of neutron diffraction data, and incoherent inelastic scattering show that the structural motif is a planar graphene fragment, with edge carbons terminated by single hydrogen atoms, and random stacking between fragments. The vibrational spectra of the hydrogen-rich carbons are remarkably similar to the spectra of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon coronene in the medium-frequency region. At low frequencies, only a boson peak is observed, characteristic for glassy and disordered materials, and this feature shifts upon doping. The results are consistent with two proposed mechanisms for Li capacity, one analogous to conventional intercalation but with Li on both sides of graphene fragments, the other involving bonding of Li to H-terminated edge carbons.

  11. Neutron crystallography for the study of hydrogen bonds in macromolecules

    DOE PAGES

    Oksanen, Esko; Chen, Julian C.; Fisher, Zoe

    2017-04-07

    The hydrogen bond (H bond) is one of the most important interactions that form the foundation of secondary and tertiary protein structure. Beyond holding protein structures together, H bonds are also intimately involved in solvent coordination, ligand binding, and enzyme catalysis. The H bond by definition involves the light atom, H, and it is very difficult to study directly, especially with X-ray crystallographic techniques, due to the poor scattering power of H atoms. Neutron protein crystallography provides a powerful, complementary tool that can give unambiguous information to structural biologists on solvent organization and coordination, the electrostatics of ligand binding, themore » protonation states of amino acid side chains and catalytic water species. The method is complementary to X-ray crystallography and the dynamic data obtainable with NMR spectroscopy. Also, as it gives explicit H atom positions, it can be very valuable to computational chemistry where exact knowledge of protonation and solvent orientation can make a large difference in modeling. Finally, this article gives general information about neutron crystallography and shows specific examples of how the method has contributed to structural biology, structure-based drug design; and the understanding of fundamental questions of reaction mechanisms.« less

  12. Enzymes for carbon sequestration: neutron crystallographic studies of carbonic anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S. Z. Kovalevsky, A. Y.; Domsic, J.; Mustyakimov, M.; Silverman, D. N.; McKenna, R.; Langan, P.

    2010-11-01

    The first neutron crystal structure of carbonic anhydrase is presented. The structure reveals interesting and unexpected features of the active site that affect catalysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a ubiquitous metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO{sub 2} to form HCO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sup +} using a Zn–hydroxide mechanism. The first part of catalysis involves CO{sub 2} hydration, while the second part deals with removing the excess proton that is formed during the first step. Proton transfer (PT) is thought to occur through a well ordered hydrogen-bonded network of waters that stretches from the metal center of CA to an internal proton shuttle, His64. These waters are oriented and ordered through a series of hydrogen-bonding interactions to hydrophilic residues that line the active site of CA. Neutron studies were conducted on wild-type human CA isoform II (HCA II) in order to better understand the nature and the orientation of the Zn-bound solvent (ZS), the charged state and conformation of His64, the hydrogen-bonding patterns and orientations of the water molecules that mediate PT and the ionization of hydrophilic residues in the active site that interact with the water network. Several interesting and unexpected features in the active site were observed which have implications for how PT proceeds in CA.

  13. Neutron Crystallography for the Study of Hydrogen Bonds in Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Oksanen, Esko; Chen, Julian C-H; Fisher, Suzanne Zoë

    2017-04-07

    Abstract: The hydrogen bond (H bond) is one of the most important interactions that form the foundation of secondary and tertiary protein structure. Beyond holding protein structures together, H bonds are also intimately involved in solvent coordination, ligand binding, and enzyme catalysis. The H bond by definition involves the light atom, H, and it is very difficult to study directly, especially with X-ray crystallographic techniques, due to the poor scattering power of H atoms. Neutron protein crystallography provides a powerful, complementary tool that can give unambiguous information to structural biologists on solvent organization and coordination, the electrostatics of ligand binding, the protonation states of amino acid side chains and catalytic water species. The method is complementary to X-ray crystallography and the dynamic data obtainable with NMR spectroscopy. Also, as it gives explicit H atom positions, it can be very valuable to computational chemistry where exact knowledge of protonation and solvent orientation can make a large difference in modeling. This article gives general information about neutron crystallography and shows specific examples of how the method has contributed to structural biology, structure-based drug design; and the understanding of fundamental questions of reaction mechanisms.

  14. Study of pulse shape discrimination for a neutron phoswich detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica; Barzilov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    A portable phoswich detector capable of differentiating between fast neutrons and thermal neutrons, and photons was developed. The detector design is based on the use of two solid-state scintillators with dissimilar scintillation time properties coupled with a single optical sensor: a 6Li loaded glass and EJ-299-33A plastic. The on-the-fly digital pulse shape discrimination and the wavelet treatment of measured waveforms were employed in the data analysis. The instrument enabled neutron spectrum evaluation.

  15. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  16. Exotic geophysical phenomena observed in an environmental neutron flux study using EAS PRISMA detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Victor; Bagrova, Anastasia; Cui, Shuwang; He, Yayun; Li, Bingbing; Ma, Xinhua; Pozdnyakov, Egor; Shchegolev, Oleg; Stenkin, Yuri; Stepanov, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    Some exotic geophysical events are observed by a global net of electron-neutron detectors (en-detectors) developed in the framework of the PRISMA EAS project. Our en-detectors running both on the Earth's surface and underground are continuously measuring the environmental thermal neutron flux. Thermal neutrons are in equilibrium with media and are therefore sensitive to many geophysical phenomena, which are exotic for people studying ultra high-energy cosmic rays or carrying out low background experiments deep underground.

  17. Recent neutronics developments for reactor safety studies with SIMMER code at KIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rineiski, A.; Marchetti, M.; Andriolo, L.; Gabrielli, F.

    2017-01-01

    The SIMMER family of codes is applied for safety studies of sodium fast reactors and reactors of other types. Both neutronics and fluid-dynamics parts of SIMMER are under development. In the paper new neutronics capabilities are presented. In particular developments for neutron transport solvers and a new technique for taking into account thermal expansion effects are described. These new capabilities facilitate 3D simulations and improve accuracy of modelling for the initiation transient phase during a hypothetical severe accident.

  18. Associated particle neutron elemental imaging in vivo: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Abel, Michael R; Koltick, David S; Nie, Linda H

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a Monte Carlo simulation model for in vivo associated particle neutron elemental imaging (APNEI) and to study the feasibility of using APNEI to determine the iron distribution in a human liver with the defined model. The model presented in this study was defined in mcnp by the basic geometry of the human body, the use of D + D source neutrons, iron as the element of interest, an iron-containing voxel in the liver as the target region, and 2 large germanium detectors anterior and posterior to the trunk of the body. The f8 pulse height tally was employed in mcnp to determine the signal acquired from iron inelastic scatter gamma rays at various iron concentrations in the target liver voxel. Correspondingly, the f4 average flux tally in mcnp was modified by a dose function such that the equivalent dose to the whole liver and the effective dose to the whole body could be estimated and used as the basis for a limiting number of neutron histories which could feasibly allow for the collection of a sufficient volume of data to construct a 2D image of iron distribution in the liver voxel. Assuming an allowable equivalent dose to the liver of 5 mSv, 143 inelastic scatter iron gamma ray counts (at ∼847 keV) would ideally be registered at the germanium detectors for a 1 cm(3) cube-shaped liver voxel with an iron concentration of 1000 ppm. According to the simulation model, an image of iron distribution in the liver can be constructed with a 1 cm resolution at the level of 1000 ppm iron. Collecting such an image would yield an estimated whole body dose of 0.82 mSv. The mathematical introduction of image uncertainty resulting from source spot diameter and detector timing resolution more closely approximates the result of real world application. APNEI of certain elements in vivo appears feasible given several timing, sensitivity, and resolution caveats. However, further study is required to determine what the detection limit of iron would

  19. Final report on Seed Money Project 3210-0346: Feasibility study for californium cold neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G.; Henderson, D.L.; Montgomery, B.H.

    1988-10-01

    A study has been completed of the feasibility and cost of building a cold neutron source that is not dependent on a reactor or accelerator. The neutron source is provided by up to ten /sup 252/Cf capsules, each containing 50 mg of the isotope produced in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor. The neutrons are moderated by heavy water and liquid deuterium to attain, in practice, a peak cold neutron flux of 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 13/ neutrons/(m/sup 2//center dot/s). The new facility would be located in the TURF Californium Facility. The estimated cost of the Californium Cold Neutron Source Facility is $6.5 million. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-08-26

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs.

  1. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  2. Using Neutrons to Study Fluid-Rock Interactions in Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiStefano, V. H.; McFarlane, J.; Anovitz, L. M.; Gordon, A.; Hale, R. E.; Hunt, R. D.; Lewis, S. A., Sr.; Littrell, K. C.; Stack, A. G.; Chipera, S.; Perfect, E.; Bilheux, H.; Kolbus, L. M.; Bingham, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Recovery of hydrocarbons by hydraulic fracturing depends on complex fluid-rock interactions that we are beginning to understand using neutron imaging and scattering techniques. Organic matter is often thought to comprise the majority of porosity in a shale. In this study, correlations between the type of organic matter embedded in a shale and porosity were investigated experimentally. Selected shale cores from the Eagle Ford and Marcellus formations were subjected to pyrolysis-gas chromatography, Differential Thermal Analysis/Thermogravimetric analysis, and organic solvent extraction with the resulting affluent analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The pore size distribution of the microporosity (~1 nm to 2 µm) in the Eagle Ford shales was measured before and after solvent extraction using small angle neutron scattering. Organics representing mass fractions of between 0.1 to 1 wt.% were removed from the shales and porosity generally increased across the examined microporosity range, particularly at larger pore sizes, approximately 50 nm to 2 μm. This range reflects extraction of accessible organic material, including remaining gas molecules, bitumen, and kerogen derivatives, indicating where the larger amount of organic matter in shale is stored. An increase in porosity at smaller pore sizes, ~1-3 nm, was also present and could be indicative of extraction of organic material stored in the inter-particle spaces of clays. Additionally, a decrease in porosity after extraction for a sample was attributed to swelling of pores with solvent uptake. This occurred in a shale with high clay content and low thermal maturity. The extracted hydrocarbons were primarily paraffinic, although some breakdown of larger aromatic compounds was observed in toluene extractions. The amount of hydrocarbon extracted and an overall increase in porosity appeared to be primarily correlated with the clay percentage in the shale. This study complements fluid transport neutron

  3. Methods for lipid nanostructure investigation at neutron and synchrotron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    A lipid membrane is a main component of biological membranes. Contemporary bionanotechnologies use phospholipids and ceramides as basic components of drugs and cosmetic preparations. Phospholipids-based nanoparticles are used as drug carriers. Effective development of bionanotechnologies in Russia calls for creation of physical methods to diagnose the particle nanostructure which would be promising for application in pharmacology. Radiation with wavelengths of 1-10 Å is an adequate instrument for detecting the nanostructure of lipid bi- and monolayers. The review deals with methods that apply neutron scattering and synchrotron radiation for studying nanostructures of lipid membranes, phospholipid nanoparticles, and phospholipid monolayers on a water surface by techniques of diffraction, small-angle scattering, and reflectometry. The importance of the mutually complementary application of neutron and synchrotron radiation for solving urgent problems of membrane biophysics, microbiology, dermapharmacology, and bionanotechnologies is demonstrated by particular examples of studies of phospholipid membranes and ceramide-based membranes. The efficiency of development and application of new methods for solving urgent problems of biophysics is shown. The review is written on the basis of results obtained over the period of 1999-2010 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Laboratory of Neutron Physics in collaboration with the Pharmaceutical Departments of universities of France (Paris-Sud, Chatenay Malabry) and Germany (Martin Luther University, Halle). The experiments were performed at various European and Russian neutron and synchrotron sources.

  4. Measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on the Godiva IV fast burst assembly for application to neutron dosimetry studies

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Hsu, H.H.; Paternoster, R.R.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1996-06-01

    In June, 1995, Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted the 23rd U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Study at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The participants tested their facilities accident dosimeters under a variety of neutrons fields produced by the Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) and the Godiva IV fast burst assembly. To provide useful information for the evaluation of the results, the neutron energy Spectrum was determined and the delivered absorbed dose to tissue. The measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on Godiva provides a unique problem in that the burst, which is nearly Gaussian in time, has a full width at half maximum of around 50 microseconds. The neutron spectrum was first determined at low-power while running at delayed critical using a standard set of Bonner spheres. At the same time, the response of a set of TLD dosimeters were measured. After that, measurements were conducted during a burst with another set of TLDs and with sulfur pellets.

  5. Fast neutron (14.5 MeV) radiography: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-07-01

    Fast neutron (14.5 MeV) radiography is a type of non-destructive analysis tool that offers its own benefits and drawbacks. Because cross-sections vary with energy, a different range of materials can be examined with fast neutrons than can be studied with thermal neutrons, epithermal neutrons, or x-rays. This paper details these differences through a comparative study of fast neutron radiography to the other types of radiography available. The most obvious difference among the different types of radiography is in the penetrability of the sources. Fast neutrons can probe much deeper and can therefore obtain details of the internals of thick objects. Good images have been obtained through as much as 15 cm of steel, 10 cm of water, and 15 cm of borated polyethylene. In addition, some objects were identifiable through as much as 25 cm of water or 30 cm of borated polyethylene. The most notable benefit of fast neutron radiography is in the types of materials that can be tested. Fast neutron radiography can view through materials that simply cannot be viewed by X rays, thermal neutrons, or epithermal neutrons due to the high cross-sections or linear attenuation coefficients involved. Cadmium was totally transparent to the fast neutron source. Fast neutron radiography is not without drawbacks. The most pronounced drawback has been in the quality of radiograph produced. The image resolution is only about 0.8 mm for a 1.25 cm thick object, whereas, other forms of radiography have much better resolution.

  6. The study of the thermal neutron flux in the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, V. V.; Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Dzhappuev, D. D.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the study of thermal neutron flux using monitors based on mixture of ZnS(Ag) and LiF enriched with a lithium-6 isotope at the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900 at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory. An annual modulation of thermal neutron flux in DULB-4900 is observed. Experimental evidences were obtained of correlation between the long-term thermal neutron flux variations and the absolute humidity of the air in laboratory. The amplitude of the modulation exceed 5% of total neutron flux.

  7. Spatially resolved in operando neutron scattering studies on Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyshyn, A.; Mühlbauer, M. J.; Dolotko, O.; Hofmann, M.; Pirling, T.; Ehrenberg, H.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially-resolved neutron diffraction has been applied to probe the lithium distribution in radial direction of a commercial Li-ion cell of 18650-type. The spatial evolution of selected Bragg reflections for LiCoO2 (positive electrode, "cathode") and graphite and lithium intercalated graphite (negative electrode, "anode") was observed and evaluated by taking beam attenuation and cell geometry effects into account. No evidences for lithium inhomogeneities have been found for the investigated set of cells. Computed neutron tomography using a monochromatic neutron beam confirmed the homogeneous lithium distribution. The relevance of the monochromatic beam to neutron imaging studies of Li-ion cells is discussed.

  8. Materials Compatibility Studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. The energy deposited in the target is transported by two separate mercury flow streams: one to transport heat in the interior target region and one to cool the stainless steel container. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations have been performed to predict temperature, velocity, and pressure distributions in the target. Results have generally shown that the power deposited in the bulk mercury can be effectively transported with reasonable flow rates and the bulk mercury temperature should not exceed 160{deg}C. Assuming good thermal contact, the maximum stainless steel wall temperature should be 130 {deg}C. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R&D programs. In addition, corrosion studies include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous water cooled spallation neutron systems as a window material. With type 316 SS selected to contain the mercury target of the SNS, two types of compatibility issues have been examined: LME and temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275{deg}C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 {deg}C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercwy or mercury-gallium. However, there

  9. A Deuterated Neutron Detector Array For Nuclear (Astro)Physics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaraz-Calderon, Sergio; Asher, B. W.; Barber, P.; Hanselman, K.; Perello, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    The properties of neutron-rich nuclei are at the forefront of research in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics. The advent of intense rare isotope beams (RIBs) has opened a new door for studies of systems with very short half-lives and possible fascinating properties. Neutron spectroscopic techniques become increasingly relevant when these neutron rich nuclei are used in a variety of experiments. At Florida State University, we are developing a neutron detector array that will allow us to perform high-resolution neutron spectroscopic studies with stable and radioactive beams. The neutron detection system consists of 16 deuterated organic liquid scintillation detectors with fast response and pulse-shape discrimination capabilities. In addition to these properties, there is the potential to use the structure in the pulse-height spectra to extract the energy of the neutrons and thus produce directly excitation spectra. This type of detector uses deuterated benzene (C6D6) as the liquid scintillation medium. The asymmetric nature of the scattering between a neutron and a deuterium in the center of mass produces a pulse-height spectrum from the deuterated scintillator which contains useful information on the initial energy of the neutron. Work supported in part by the State of Florida and NSF Grant No. 1401574.

  10. The pilot experimental study of 14 MeV fast neutron digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Zhou, Changgen; Huo, Heyong; Wu, Yang; Liu, Bin; Lou, Benchao; Sun, Yong

    2009-09-01

    14 MeV Fast neutrons has good penetrability and the 14 MeV fast neutron radiography can meet the need of Non-Destructive Test of the structure and lacuna of heavy-massive sample, whose shell is made of heavy metal and in which there are some hydrogen materials, and the study of fast neutron digital radiography just begins in China. By the use of a D-T accelerator, a digital imaging system made up of a fast neutron scintillation screen made of ZnS(Ag) and polypropylene, lens and a scientific grade CCD, the experimental study of fast neutron radiography has been done between 4.3×1010-6.8×1010 n/s of neutron yield. Some 14 MeV fast neutron digital radiographs have been gotten. According to experimental radiographs and their data, the performance of the fast neutron scintillation screen and the basic characters of 14 MeV fast neutron radiography are analyzed, and it is helpful for the further research.

  11. Radial correlation reflectometry measurements on the JET tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A.; Alper, B.; Budny, R.; Cupido, L.; Fessey, J.; Figueiredo, A.; Hacquin, S.; Manso, M. E.; Mazzucato, E.; Meneses, L.; Sirinelli, A.; Walsh, M.

    2007-11-01

    Fluctuations and turbulence are believed to play an important role in anomalous transport of heat and particles in magnetic fusion devices. It is of vital importance to characterize transport mechanism in order to understand and control it. In correlation reflectometry (CR), two microwave beams with different frequencies are launched into the plasma from which the turbulence correlation length, Lr, and the density fluctuation level, 0.7exn / n n.- 0.7exn can be deduced; quantities that are important for the study of plasma turbulence and transport. In this paper, some results of Lr obtained with the four X-mode CR systems installed at Joint European Torus (JET) are reported. Experimentally, it was observed that Lr increases from the plasma edge to the plasma core. Also, Lr decreases inside the Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) [1]. The results obtained at JET agree quiet well with the Lr dependence measured in other tokamak machines. [1] - A.C.A. Figueiredo, et.al., in the 34^th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics, Warsaw, Poland, 2-7 July, (2007).

  12. Time domain reflectometry as a rock mass monitoring technique

    SciTech Connect

    Francke, J.L.; Terrill, L.J.; Allen, W.W.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes the practices and methods used in a study of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) as an inexpensive deformation monitoring tool in underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP is being developed near Carlsbad, New Mexico, for the disposal of transuranic nuclear wastes in bedded salt 655 m (2150 ft) below the surface. Data collected from WIPP geomechanical monitoring are used to characterize conditions, confirm design assumptions, and understand and predict the performance of the deep salt excavation. The geomechanical monitoring techniques ranging from inspection of observation boreholes to advanced radar surveys. In 1989 TDR was introduced as a monitoring tool with the installation of 12.7 mm (0.5 in) diameter TDR cables in the underground excavations. In 1993, a new TDR system was installed in a separate location. Based on experience with the previous installation, enhancements were implemented into the new TDR system that: (1) extended the period of performance by increasing cable diameter to 22. 2 mm (0.875 in), (2) increased accuracy in locating areas of deformation by aligning cables with nearby observation boreholes, and (3) improved data acquisition and analyses using a standard laptop computer, eliminating the chart recorder previously used. In summary, the results of a correlation between the TDR signatures to nearby observation boreholes and geomechanical instrumentation will be presented.

  13. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Spectra of {gamma} rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of {sup 153,155-159}Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow}, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow} increases with A and for {sup 157,159}Gd it is significantly higher compared to {sup 156,158}Gd.

  14. Mass Study of the Neutron Deficient Nulceus ^68Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, T.; Davids, C.; Penttila, H.; Blumenthal, D.; Lister, C.; Busse, B.; Batchelder, J.; Walters, W.; Conticchio, L.; Mustillo, D.; Ramayya, A. V.

    1998-10-01

    For the last few decades, many groups have made innovative attempts to study the properties of the neutron deficient nucleus ^68Se. Due to the small production cross section and the inability to quickly and definitely separate ^68Se from other reaction products, the search has thus far been incomplete. With the Fragment Mass Analyzer at Argonne National Lab, the halflife and β+ decay scheme were measured and found to agree with that of a previous work (P. Baumann et al., Phys. Rev. C50 R1180(1994)). A mass measurement was also performed. The latter piece of information is critical for nuclear synthesis models in regard to the rp process. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Nuclear Physics Division, under contract W-31-109-ENG-38 and by the NSF.

  15. Diffusion of water in bentonite clay: Neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V. K.; Prabhudesai, S. A.; Dessai, R. Raut; Erwin Desa, J. A.; Mitra, S.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2013-02-01

    Diffusion of water confined in natural bentonite clay is studied using the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. X-ray diffraction shows a well-defined crystalline structure of the clay with an interlayer spacing of 13 Å. The QENS experiment has been carried out on hydrated as well as dehydrated clay at 300 K. Significant quasi-elastic broadening was observed in case of hydrated bentonite clay whereas dehydrated clay did not show any broadening over the instrument resolution. Analysis of QENS data reveals that diffusion of water occurs through jump diffusion characterized by random distribution of jump lengths. Diffusion of water in clay is found to be hindered vis a vis bulk water.

  16. A neutron diffraction study of ancient Greek ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siouris, I. M.; Walter, J.

    2006-11-01

    Non-destructive neutron diffraction studies were performed on three 2nd-century BC archaeological pottery fragments from the excavation site of Neos Scopos, Serres, in North Greece. In all the 273 K diagrams quartz and feldspars phase fractions are dominant. Diopside and iron oxide phases were also identifiable. The diopside content is found to decrease with increasing quartz-feldspar compositions. Iron oxides containing minerals were found to be present and the phase compositions reflect upon the coloring of the samples. However, the different content compositions of the phases may suggest different regions of the original clay materials as well as different preparation techniques. The firing temperatures were determined to be in the range of 900-1000 °C.

  17. Neutron spin echo studies on the segmental dynamics of macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Bernd; Richter, Dieter

    The ultrahigh resolution neutron spin echo (NSE) technique provides the unique opportunity to investigate internal dynamic relaxation processes of polymer molecules simultaneously in spcae and time. In particular, information of the single chain behaviour is not restricted to dilute solutions but may also be obtained, if an appropriate mixture of protonated and deuterated polymers is used, from concentrated systems, the melt included. This paper gives a review on recent NSE studies on liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) systems. Single chain relaxation as well as collective fluctuations are considered in the whole range of concentrations. Thereby especially the cross over phenomena between different dynamic regimes are emphasized. The results are discussed in terms of microscopic models and compared with the theoretical predictions concerning universal and critical behaviour.

  18. Quantum states of neutrons in the gravitational and centrifugal potentials in a new GRANIT spectrometer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    We will discuss the scientific program to be studied in a new gravitational spectrometer GRANIT in a broad context of quantum states (quantum behaviour) of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in gravitational [1] and centrifugal [2] potentials, as well as applications of these phenomena/spectrometer to various domains of physics, ranging from studies of fundamental short-range interactions and symmetries to neutron quantum optics and reflectometry using UCN. All these topics, as well as related instrumental and methodical developments have been discussed during dedicated GRANIT-2010 Workshop [3]. The GRANIT spectrometer has been recently installed at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France [4] and could become operational in near future. 1. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2002), Nature 415, 297. 2. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2010), Nature Physics 6, 114. 3. GRANIT-2010, Les Houches, 14-19 february 2010. 4. M. Kreuz et al (2009), NIM 611, 326.

  19. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Study on spatial resolution of micromegas as a neutron detector under condition of high neutron flux and γ ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Ji-Jin; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2009-02-01

    In this paper Micromegas has been designed to detect neutrons. The simulation of the spatial resolution of Micromegas as neutron detector is carried out by GEANT4 toolkit. The neutron track reconstruction method based on the time coincidence technology is employed in the present work. The influence of the flux of incident 14 MeV neutron and high gamma background on the spatial resolution is carefully studied. Our results show that the spatial resolution of the detector is sensitive to the neutron flux, but insensitive to the intensity of γ background if the neutron track reconstruction method proposed by our group is used. The γ insensitivity makes it possible for us to use the Micromegas detector under condition which has high γ-rays background.

  20. Neutron scattering studies of superconducting MgB2 tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellingeri, E.; Malagoli, A.; Modica, M.; Braccini, V.; Siri, A. S.; Grasso, G.

    2003-02-01

    The capability of manufacturing long superconducting MgB2 wires with already remarkable critical currents makes this material a very promising candidate for future applications. Tapes are prepared by the powder-in-tube technique. After the cold working procedure typically carried out by wire drawing and cold rolling, it has been found that a final sintering step carried out in argon atmosphere is a key process for further improving the superconducting properties of the conductors. To study the effect of the deformation and heat treatment processes, we performed neutron scattering experiment. Due to the high penetration depth of neutron inside matter, it was possible to analyse the MgB2 phase still wrapped in the Ni sheath. Our studies were carried out by a full spectra refinement by the Rietveld method. In the starting superconducting powder a large Mg deficiency was observed. In the tapes we found that the large forces applied during the cold working induced a large MgB2 lattice deformation, and that it is partly relaxed during the final sintering process. An important correlation of the residual stress with the critical temperature and the pinning properties was pointed out. We also observed the appearance of detrimental secondary phases during the sintering process. In particular, the MgB2 phase reacted with the nickel sheath and MgB2Ni2.5 was formed at temperatures higher than 850 °C. These results are of basic importance for a further optimization of the transport properties at moderate fields where applications of MgB2 tapes are already envisageable.

  1. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Guiseppe, V.; Kidd, M.; Rundberg, B.; Tybo, J.

    2013-04-01

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of 195Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  2. Studies of neutron cross-sections important for spallation experiments using the activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Krása, A.; Majerle, M.; Suchopár, M.; Svoboda, O.; Wagner, V.

    2014-09-01

    A series of experiments devoted to studies of neutron cross-sections by activation method was carried out. The cross-sections of various threshold reactions were studied by means of different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources with energies from 14 MeV up to 100 MeV. Threshold reactions in various materials are among other used to measure fast neutron fields produced during accelerator driven system studies. For this reason our measurements of neutron cross-sections are crucial. At present, neither experimental nor evaluated data above 30 MeV are available for neutron threshold reactions in Au, I and In published in this proceedings. We studied materials in the form of thin foils and compared our data with the calculations preformed using the deterministic code TALYS 1.4.

  3. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  4. Studies of 54,56Fe Neutron Scattering Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.; French, A. J.; Henderson, S. L.; Howard, T. J.; Pecha, R. L.; Santonil, Z. C.; Crider, B. P.; Liu, S.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-05-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering differential cross sections and γ-ray production cross sections have been measured on 54,56Fe at several incident energies in the fast neutron region between 1.5 and 4.7 MeV. All measurements were completed at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (UKAL) using a 7-MV Model CN Van de Graaff accelerator, along with the neutron production and neutron and γ-ray detection systems located there. The facilities at UKAL allow the investigation of both elastic and inelastic scattering with nearly mono-energetic incident neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques were used to detect the scattered neutrons for the differential cross section measurements. The measured cross sections are important for fission reactor applications and also for testing global model calculations such as those found at ENDF, since describing both the elastic and inelastic scattering is important for determining the direct and compound components of the scattering mechanism. The γ-ray production cross sections are used to determine cross sections to unresolved levels in the neutron scattering experiments. Results from our measurements and comparisons to model calculations are presented.

  5. A pulsed neutron generator for in vivo body composition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinlein, J. H.; O'Neal, M. L.; Bacon, F. M.

    1991-05-01

    A neutron generator system utilizing two Zetatron neutron tubes has been designed and delivered to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University for use in clinical measurements of body carbon by neutron inelastic scattering. Each neutron tube is capable of delivering 10 3-10 4 14-MeV neutrons in a 7-μs pulse at repetition rates of 4 or 8 kHz, and can be operated independently as well as in a master-slave mode. The neutron tubes are gas filled with a mixture of deuterium and tritium; the target of the tube is operated at - 30 to - 60 kV dc and the ion source is operated with a 2.5-kV, 7-μs pulse. The tube gas pressure is monitored and controlled by measuring the total current in the high voltage circuit and feeding it back to the gas-reservoir drive circuit. Neutrons were measured with a plastic scintillator and photomultiplier tube.

  6. Ames collaborative study of cosmic-ray neutrons. 2: Low- and mid-latitude flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, L. D.; Mccaslin, J. B.; Smith, A. R.; Thomas, R. H.; Hewitt, J. E.; Hughes, L.

    1978-01-01

    Progress of the study of cosmic ray neutrons is described. Data obtained aboard flights from Hawaii at altitudes of 41,000 and 45,000 feet, and in the range of geomagnetic latitude 17 N less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 21 N are reported. Preliminary estimates of neutron spectra are made.

  7. Palladium deuteride formation in the cathode of an electrochemical cell: An in situ neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Rotella, F.J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Redey, L.; Felcher, G.P.; Hitterman, R.L.; Kleb, R.

    1991-12-31

    In this report, neutron diffraction of palladium cathodes is utilized to reveal palladium deuteride formation within the crystal structure of the metal. The experiment described in this report demonstrates the efficacy of neutron powder diffraction as a tool for structural studies of metal deuterides/hydrides and the feasibility of in situ diffraction measurements from a working electrochemical cell. (JL)

  8. Palladium deuteride formation in the cathode of an electrochemical cell: An in situ neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Rotella, F.J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Redey, L.; Felcher, G.P.; Hitterman, R.L.; Kleb, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this report, neutron diffraction of palladium cathodes is utilized to reveal palladium deuteride formation within the crystal structure of the metal. The experiment described in this report demonstrates the efficacy of neutron powder diffraction as a tool for structural studies of metal deuterides/hydrides and the feasibility of in situ diffraction measurements from a working electrochemical cell. (JL)

  9. Study of {beta}-Decay in the Proton-Neutron Interacting Boson-Fermion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuffi, L.; Brant, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2006-04-26

    We study {beta}-decay in odd-A nuclei together with the energy levels and other properties in the proton-neutron interacting-boson-fermion model. We also report on the preliminary results in the odd-odd nuclei in the proton-neutron interacting boson-fermion-fermion model.

  10. Using FLUKA to Study Concrete Square Shield Performance in Attenuation of Neutron Radiation Produced by APF Plasma Focus Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, M. J.; Habibi, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    In 2010, representatives from the Nuclear Engineering and physics Department of Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT) requested development of a project with the objective of determining the performance of a concrete shield for their Plasma Focus as neutron source. The project team in Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering and physics department of Amirkabir University of Technology choose some shape of shield to study on their performance with Monte Carlo code. In the present work, the capability of Monte Carlo code FLUKA will be explored to model the APF Plasma Focus, and investigating the neutron fluence on the square concrete shield in each region of problem. The physical models embedded in FLUKA are mentioned, as well as examples of benchmarking against future experimental data. As a result of this study suitable thickness of concrete for shielding APF will be considered.

  11. Study of low energy neutron beam formation based on GEANT4 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagyan, R.; Avetisyan, R.; Ivanyan, V.; Kerobyan, I.

    2017-07-01

    The possibility of obtaining thermal/epithermal energy neutron beams using external protons from cyclotron C18/18 is studied based on GEANT4 simulations. This study will be the basis of the Beam Shaped Assembly (BSA) development for future Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Proton induced reactions on 9Be target are considered as a neutron source, and dependence of neutron yield on target thickness is investigated. The problem of reducing the ratio of gamma to neutron yields by inserting a lead sheet after the beryllium target is studied as well. By GEANT4 modeling the optimal thicknesses of 9Be target and lead absorber are determined and the design characteristics of beam shaping assembly, including the materials and thicknesses of reflector and moderator are considered.

  12. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  13. Directly coupled vs conventional time domain reflectometry in soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR), a technique for estimation of soil water, measures the travel time of an electromagnetic pulse on electrodes embedded in the soil, but has limited application in commercial agriculture due to costs, labor, and sensing depth. Conventional TDR systems have employed ana...

  14. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  15. Study of calculated and measured time dependent delayed neutron yields. [TX, for calculating delayed neutron yields; MATINV, for matrix inversion; in FORTRAN for LSI-II minicomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Time-dependent delayed neutron emission is of interest in reactor design, reactor dynamics, and nuclear physics studies. The delayed neutrons from neutron-induced fission of /sup 232/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 242m/Am, /sup 245/Cm, and /sup 249/Cf were studied for the first time. The delayed neutron emission from /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Pu, and /sup 242/Pu were measured as well. The data were used to develop an empirical expression for the total delayed neutron yield. The expression gives accurate results for a large variety of nuclides from /sup 232/Th to /sup 252/Cf. The data measuring the decay of delayed neutrons with time were used to derive another empirical expression predicting the delayed neutron emission with time. It was found that nuclides with similar mass-to-charge ratios have similar decay patterns. Thus the relative decay pattern of one nuclide can be established by any measured nuclide with a similar mass-to-charge ratio. A simple fission product yield model was developed and applied to delayed neutron precursors. It accurately predicts observed yield and decay characteristics. In conclusion, it is possible to not only estimate the total delayed neutron yield for a given nuclide but the time-dependent nature of the delayed neutrons as well. Reactors utilizing recycled fuel or burning actinides are likely to have inventories of fissioning nuclides that have not been studied until now. The delayed neutrons from these nuclides can now be incorporated so that their influence on the stability and control of reactors can be delineated. 8 figures, 39 tables.

  16. Progress on the Europium Neutron-Capture Study using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Macri, R A; Parker, W; Wilk, P; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T A; Esch, E; Haight, R C; O'Donnell, J M; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wouters, J M; Mitchell, G E; Sheets, S A; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2006-09-05

    The accurate measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of the Eu isotopes is important for many reasons including nuclear astrophysics and nuclear diagnostics. Neutron capture excitation functions of {sup 151,153}Eu targets were measured recently using a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter array DANCE located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for E{sub n} = 0.1-100 keV. The progress on the data analysis efforts is given in the present paper. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distributions for the Eu targets and Be backing are significantly different. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution is found to be the same for different neutron energies for both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu. The statistical simulation to model the {gamma}-ray decay cascade is summarized.

  17. Neutron activation studies and the effect of exercise on osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is described to measure calcium content by in vivo neutron activation analysis of the trunk and upper thighs. In postmenopausal women, estrogen and calcium or fluoride reversed osteoporosis.

  18. In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Kargl, F; Engelhardt, M; Yang, F; Weis, H; Schmakat, P; Schillinger, B; Griesche, A; Meyer, A

    2011-06-29

    When in situ techniques became available in recent years this led to a breakthrough in accurately determining diffusion coefficients for liquid alloys. Here we discuss how neutron radiography can be used to measure chemical diffusion in a ternary AlCuAg alloy. Neutron radiography hereby gives complementary information to x-ray radiography used for measuring chemical diffusion and to quasielastic neutron scattering used mainly for determining self-diffusion. A novel Al(2)O(3) based furnace that enables one to study diffusion processes by means of neutron radiography is discussed. A chemical diffusion coefficient of Ag against Al around the eutectic composition Al(68.6)Cu(13.8)Ag(17.6) at.% was obtained. It is demonstrated that the in situ technique of neutron radiography is a powerful means to study mass transport properties in situ in binary and ternary alloys that show poor x-ray contrast.

  19. High-temperature high pressure cell for neutron-scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qianli; Holdsworth, Stuart; Embs, Jan; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Frick, Bernhard; Braun, Artur

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a simple high-temperature high pressure cell concept has been developed to enable neutron diffraction and quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron-scattering studies to be conducted on large-volume powder samples of ceramic proton conductors at pressures of up to 1 GPa and at temperatures of up to 770 K. Details of the cell are provided, along with the first experimental neutron diffractograms (at 0.62 GPa and 300 K), quasi-elastic neutron-scattering spectra (at 0.58 GPa and 770 K) and inelastic neutron spectra (at 0.75 GPa and 530 K) determined for samples of BaCe0.8Y0.2O3.

  20. A possible approach to 14MeV neutron moderation: A preliminary study case.

    PubMed

    Flammini, D; Pilotti, R; Pietropaolo, A

    2017-07-01

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) interactions produce almost monochromatic neutrons with about 14MeV energy. These neutrons are used in benchmark experiments as well as for neutron cross sections assessment in fusion reactors technology. The possibility to moderate 14MeV neutrons for purposes beyond fusion is worth to be studied in relation to projects of intense D-T sources. In this preliminary study, carried out using the MCNP Monte Carlo code, the moderation of 14MeV neutrons is approached foreseeing the use of combination of metallic materials as pre-moderator and reflectors coupled to standard water moderators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface properties of neutron-rich exotic nuclei: A source for studying the nuclear symmetry energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidarov, M. K.; Antonov, A. N.; Sarriguren, P.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2011-09-15

    We study the correlation between the thickness of the neutron skin in finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy for isotopic chains of even-even Ni, Sn, and Pb nuclei in the framework of the deformed self-consistent mean-field Skyrme HF + BCS method. The symmetry energy, the neutron pressure, and the asymmetric compressibility in finite nuclei are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model using the symmetry energy as a function of density within the Brueckner energy density functional. The mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and the neutron-skin thickness are also studied together with the role of the neutron-proton asymmetry. A correlation between the parameters of the equation of state (symmetry energy and its density slope) and the neutron skin is suggested in the isotopic chains of Ni, Sn, and Pb nuclei.

  2. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region. Progress report, August 1, 1991--July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    During the period August 1, 1991 to July 31, 1994 the authors report progress on the following: (a) prompt fission neutron energy spectra for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu; (b) two-parameter measurement of nuclear lifetimes; (c) `black` neutron detector; (d) data reduction techniques for neutron scattering experiments; (e) elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in {sup 197}Au; (f) elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in {sup 239}Pu; (g) neutron induced defects in silicon dioxide MOS structures; (h) response of a {sup 235}U fission chamber near reaction thresholds; (i) efficiency calibration of a liquid scintillation detector using the WNR facility at LAMPF; (j) prompt fission neutron energy spectrum measurements below the incident neutron energy; (k) multi-parameter data acquisition system; (l) accelerator improvements; (m) non-DOE supported research. Eight Ph.D. dissertations and two M.S. theses were completed during the report period. Publications consisted of 6 journal articles, 10 conference proceedings, and 19 abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. One invited talk was given.

  3. Study of concrete activation with IFMIF-like neutron irradiation: Status of EAF and TENDL neutron activation cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Mauricio; Sauvan, Patrick; García, Raquel; Ogando, Francisco; Sanz, Javier

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to check the performance of last versions of EAF and TENDL libraries (EAF2007, EAF2010, and TENDL2014) in the prediction of concrete activation under the neutron irradiation environment expected in IFMIF, an accelerator-based neutron source conceived for fusion materials testing. For this purpose Activity and dose rate responses of three types of concrete (ITER-Bioshield kind, barite and magnetite concretes) have been studied. For these quantities, dominant nuclides and production pathways have been determined and, then, a qualitative analysis of the relevant activation cross-sections involved has been performed by comparing data from mentioned libraries with experimental data from EXFOR database. Concrete activation studies have been carried out with IFMIF-like neutron irradiation conditions using the ACAB code and EAF and TENDL libraries. The cooling times assessed are related to safety and maintenance operations, specifically 1 hour, 1 day and 12 days. Final conclusions are focused on the recommendations for the activation library to be used among those analyzed and cross-section data to be improved.

  4. Use of complementary neutron techniques in studying the effect of a solid/liquid interface on bulk solution structures

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.D.; Hamilton, W.A.; Magid, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    By appropriate combination of neutron scattering techniques, it is possible to obtain structural information at various distances from a solid/liquid interface and thus probe in some detail how the surface structures evolve into bulk structures. We have used neutron reflectometry (NR) with a newly developed shear cell, near surface small angle neutron scattering (NSSANS) again in combination with the new shear cell, and regular small angle neutron scattering (SANS) with a standard Couette shear cell to probe the structures formed in our aqueous surfactant systems and how they react to a flow field, particularly in the near surface region of a solid/liquid interface. We present data for a 20mM aqueous solutions of 70% cetyltrimethylammonium 3,5-dichlorobenzoate (abbreviated CTA3,5ClBz) and 30% CTAB. This system forms a very viscoelastic solution containing long threadlike micelles. NR only probes to a depth of about 0.5 {mu}m from the surface in these systems and clearly indicates that adsorbed onto the surface is, surfactant layer which is insensitive to shear. The depth probed by the NSSANS is on the order of 20-30 {mu}m and is determined by the transmission of the sample, the angle of incidence, and the wavelength. In this region, the rods align under shear into a remarkably well ordered hexagonal crystal. The SANS from the Couette cell averages over the entire sample, so that the signal is dominated by scattering from the bulk. While the near surface hexagonal structure is clearly visible, these data are not consistent with the crystal structure persisting throughout the bulk, leading to the postulate that the bulk structure is a two dimensional (2D) liquid where the rods align with the flow, but do not order in the other two dimensions.

  5. Background Neutron Studies for Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering Measurements at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane; Coherent Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The COHERENT collaboration has proposed to measure coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE νNS) cross sections on several nuclear targets using neutrinos produced at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The largest background of concern arises from beam-induced, fast neutrons that can mimic a nuclear recoil signal event in the detector. Multiple technologies of neutron detection have been employed at prospective experiment sites at the SNS. Analysis of these data have produced a consistent picture of the backgrounds expected for a CE νNS measurement. These background studies show that at suitable locations, the fast neutrons of concern arrive mainly in the prompt 1.3 μs window and the neutrons in the delayed window are primarily of lower energies that are relatively easier to shield.

  6. A Feasibility Study on Reactor Based Fission Neutron Radiography of 200-l Waste Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bücherl, T.; Kalthoff, O.; von Gostomski, Ch. Lierse

    This feasibility study investigates the applicability of fission neutrons for the non-destructive characterization of radioactive waste packages by means of neutron radiography. Based on a number of mock-up drums of different non-radioactive matrices, but being typical for radioactive waste generated in Europe, radiography measurements at the NECTAR and the ITS facility using fission neutrons and 60Co-gamma-rays, respectively, are performed. The resulting radiographs are compared and qualitatively assessed. In addition, a first approach for the stitching of the fission neutron radiographs to visualize the complete area of 200-l waste drums is performed. While the feasibility of fission neutrons is demonstrated successfully, fields for further improvements are identified.

  7. Neutron detection in nuclear astrophysics experiments: study of organic liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giovanni Francesco

    2016-02-01

    In order to study the nuclear reaction 13 C(α,n)16 O, crucial for the nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei (A>58), the LUNA collaboration at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, is looking for the best neutron detector to use in the set up. One of the possibilities is to use detectors based on cell filled with Organic Liquid Scintillator BC501A. These detectors are sensible to fast neutron, but also to gamma rays. A Pulse Shape Discrimination process using the Zero Crossing method has been performed to select only signals from neutrons. Comparing the neutron spectra after the Pulse Shape Discrimination and the spectrum from a GEANT4 simulations, the efficiency of the BC501A, in function of the neutron energy and varying the light threshold, has been evaluated.

  8. Theoretical study on neutron distribution of 208Pb by parity-violating electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Cun; Ren, Zhong-Zhou; Xu, Chang

    2016-03-01

    The precise determination of neutron distribution has important implications for both nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The purpose of this paper is to study the characteristics of neutron distribution of 208Pb by parity-violating electron scattering (PVS). Parity-violating asymmetries of 208Pb with different types of neutron skins are systematically calculated and compared with the experimental data of PREx. The results indicate that the PVS experiments are very sensitive to the nuclear neutron distributions. From further PVS measurements, detailed information on nuclear neutron distributions can be extracted. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11505292, 11175085, 11235001, 11447226), by the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (BS2014SF007), by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (15CX02072A, 15CX02070A, 15CX05026A, 13CX10022A, 14CX02157A).

  9. Focused neutron beam dose deposition profiles in tissue equivalent materials: a pilot study for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Welsh, James; Chen-Mayer, Huaiyu H.

    1997-02-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been limited by the inability to direct neutrons toward the therapeutic target and away from sensitive normal tissues. The recently developed Kumakhov lens has focused a broad incident low energy neutron beam in air to a sub-mm spot. This study examines the radiation does distribution of a converging beam passing through tissue equivalent materials. A neutron beam exiting a focusing lens is directed toward a stack of thin radiochromic media sandwiched between plastic sheets. The depth dose and beam profile within the tissue equivalent materials are determined by optical scanning and image processing of the individual radiochromic media sheets, a polymer based dosimetry medium which darkens upon exposure to ionizing radiation. The alpha particle emission from boron is examined by substituting a plastic sheet with a 6Li enriched lithium carbonate sheet positioned at the focal plane. The information will help determine the feasibility of applying the focused neutron beam to BNCT for therapy.

  10. Study of muon-induced neutron production using accelerator muon beam at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; Lin, C. J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Draeger, E.; White, C. G.; Luk, K. B.; Steiner, H.

    2015-08-17

    Cosmogenic muon-induced neutrons are one of the most problematic backgrounds for various underground experiments for rare event searches. In order to accurately understand such backgrounds, experimental data with high-statistics and well-controlled systematics is essential. We performed a test experiment to measure muon-induced neutron production yield and energy spectrum using a high-energy accelerator muon beam at CERN. We successfully observed neutrons from 160 GeV/c muon interaction on lead, and measured kinetic energy distributions for various production angles. Works towards evaluation of absolute neutron production yield is underway. This work also demonstrates that the setup is feasible for a future large-scale experiment for more comprehensive study of muon-induced neutron production.

  11. Dose evaluation of boron neutron capture synovectomy using the THOR epithermal neutron beam: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Chang, Shu-Jun; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Hsueh, Yen-Wan; Yeh, Kuan-Chuan; Wang, Jeng-Ning; Tsai, Wen-Pin

    2007-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common epidemic diseases in the world. For some patients, the treatment with steroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not effective, thus necessitating physical removal of the inflamed synovium. Alternative approaches other than surgery will provide appropriate disease control and improve the patient's quality of life. In this research, we evaluated the feasibility of conducting boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) with the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) as a neutron source. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with arthritic joint models and uncertainties were within 5%. The collimator, reflector and boron concentration were optimized to reduce the treatment time and normal tissue doses. For the knee joint, polyethylene with 40%-enriched Li2CO3 was used as the collimator material, and a rear reflector of 15 cm thick graphite and side reflector of 10 cm thick graphite were chosen. The optimized treatment time was 5.4 min for the parallel-opposed irradiation. For the finger joint, polymethyl methacrylate was used as the reflector material. The treatment time can be reduced to 3.1 min, while skin and bone doses can be effectively reduced by approximately 9% compared with treatment using the graphite reflector. We conclude that using THOR as a treatment modality for BNCS could be a feasible alternative in clinical practice.

  12. Neutron, X-ray, and optical studies of multiferroic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearmon, Alexander J.

    Developing a greater understanding of multiferroic materials, particularly those in which a strong coupling is exhibited between magnetic and electrical orderings, is of great importance if potential applications are to be realised. This thesis reports new experimental findings on several multiferroics using the techniques of X-ray and neutron diffraction together with nonlinear optical experiments. Spherical neutron polarimetry measurements on RbFe(MoOstudy. In zero field the system is helimagnetic, and with small applied fields peaks corresponding to a new phase appear. Energy calculations are used to suggest a suitable magnetic structure for the new phase and to show how this relates to the known commensurate phases that are present in low fields. Finally, an experimental setup designed to measure second harmonic generation from non-centrosymmetric crystals is presented, along with static measurements on the multiferroic system MnWO4. An optical

  13. A Study of the Spin Structure on the Neutron in Deep Inelastic Scattering of Polarized Electrons on Polarized Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Spengos, M

    2004-01-06

    The internal spin structure of the neutron, was studied in deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target in the End Station A of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The spin asymmetry of the neutron was measured at energies between 19 and 26 GeV in the range 0.03 {le} x {le} 0.06 at an average Q{sup 2} of 2 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The results are in agreement with a new measurement of the asymmetry by SMC within their six times larger uncertainties. The spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}(x) for the neutron was determined from the asymmetry measurement and, its integral over x is found to be {integral}g{sub 1}{sup n}(x)dx = -0.038 {+-} 0.009. This result is 2.7 standard deviations from the Ellis-Jaffe Sum Rule and combined with the EMC results from the proton in very good agreement with the Bjorken Sum Rule. In the Quark Parton Model (QPM), in conjunction with the weak coupling constants F and D, from baryon decay, the result implies that the quarks contribute approximately 32% of the nucleon helicity. Finally, different ways of evolving the data, based on various theoretical models, is attempted and future aspects for spin physics, with emphasis at spin physics at SLAC, are discussed.

  14. Study of boron neutron capture therapy used neutron source with protons bombarding a thick 9Be target.

    PubMed

    Yue, G; Chen, J; Song, R

    1997-06-01

    Neutron sources created by 4-, 3.5-, and 3-MeV protons striking a thick beryllium target were studied via the time-of-flight technique. Protons were accelerated by the Peking University 4.5 MV electrostatic accelerator. Two disk-shaped 9Be targets with thickness 1.5 and 3 mm were used in the measurements. The time-of-flight spectra were observed at zero degrees with respect to the incident proton beam. The analysis to these time-of-flight spectra is given. The time-of-flight spectra were converted to the energy spectra and compared to a neutron spectrum of 7Li(p, n)7 Be reaction with incident energy 2.5 MeV, which was also measured in this work. Restricted by the spectrometer itself, the threshold of the measurements is 400 keV. The results show that by using several MeV protons bombarding a thick beryllium target, reactions other than 9Be(p, n)9B produce significant contributions to the neutron yield with energy less than 1 MeV.

  15. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  16. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  17. Measurement of shear-wave velocity by ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S.; Antich, P.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    There exists a growing body of research that relates the measurement of pressure-wave velocity in bone to different physiological conditions and treatment modalities. The shear-wave velocity has been less studied, although it is necessary for a more complete understanding of the mechanical properties of bone. Ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR) is a noninvasive and nondestructive technique previously used to measure pressure-wave velocities both in vitro and in vivo. This note describes its application to the measurement of shear-wave velocity in bone, whether directly accessible or covered by soft tissue.

  18. Contact-free fault location and imaging with on-chip terahertz time-domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Michael; Michalski, Alexander; Kurz, Heinrich

    2011-06-20

    We demonstrate in a first experimental study the application of novel micro-machined optoelectronic probes for a time-domain reflectometry-based localization of discontinuities and faults in electronic structures at unprecedented resolution and accuracy (± 0.55 µm). Thanks to the THz-range bandwidth of our optoelectronic system--including the active probes used for pulse injection and detection--the spatial resolution and precision of high-end all-electronic detection systems is surpassed by more than one order of magnitude. The new analytic technology holds great promise for rapid and precise fault detection and location in advanced (3D) integrated semiconductor chips and packages.

  19. Functional renormalization group studies of nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) methods applied to calculations of isospin-symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter as well as neutron matter are reviewed. The approach is based on a chiral Lagrangian expressed in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom as appropriate for the hadronic phase of QCD with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated solving Wetterich's FRG flow equations. Nuclear thermodynamics and the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition are investigated in detail, both in symmetric matter and as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with advanced ab-initio many-body computations. Contacts with perturbative many-body approaches (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) are discussed. As an interesting test case, the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium is investigated. The question of chiral symmetry restoration in nuclear and neutron matter is addressed. A stabilization of the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry is found to persist up to high baryon densities once fluctuations beyond mean-field are included. Neutron star matter including beta equilibrium is discussed under the aspect of the constraints imposed by the existence of two-solar-mass neutron stars.

  20. Neutron scattering studies of ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D.; Ritz, R.; Pfleiderer, C.; Keller, T.

    2010-03-01

    Observation of an unconventional superconductivity in ferromagnetic UGe2 when ferromagnetism is suppressed by pressure indicates a dramatic modification of its electronic structure near the Quantum Critical Point [1]. We present high resolution measurements of the lattice constants of ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2 under pressure probed by a novel technique, which utilizes Larmor precession of polarized neutrons and surpasses the resolution of conventional scattering methods by an order of magnitude. We have observed sharp anomalies at the Curie temperature, TC and at TX, which marks the crossover regime. Our studies under pressure of 10, and 12 kbar indicate that the sharp anomaly corresponding to TC shifted to lower temperature in agreement with a phase diagram. At the pressure corresponding to an onset of superconductivity, 10kbar, the lattice expansion corresponding to ferromagnetic transition undergoes a first order transition and increases by a factor of 3. The results indicate a complex response of the electronic structure of UGe2 to external pressure and suggest a strong magnetoelastic coupling as one of multiple energy scales that stabilize superconductivity in UGe2. [1] S. S. Saxena, et al., Nature 406, 587 (2000)

  1. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Iles, Gail N. Reinhart, Guillaume; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F. Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3} and NiAl{sub 3} continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  2. Neutron-scattering studies of Yb-bearing silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Loong, C.K.; Wagner, J.

    1993-09-01

    The static and dynamic magnetic response of the Yb{sup 3+} ions in 2Na{sub 2}O{center_dot}Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}6SiO{sub 2} glass and the isochemical crystalline silicate Na{sub 3}YbSi{sub 3}O{sub 9} has been studied by neutron diffraction, inelastic magnetic-scattering, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The rare earth sites in the glass have an average coordination number of 5.6 {plus_minus} 0.5 and give a mean rare earth-oxygen bond length of 2.23 {Angstrom}; average Si-O and O-O coordination numbers and bond distances are comparable to those in vitreous SiO{sub 2}. The magnetic excitation spectrum of the Na{sub 3}YbSi{sub 3}O{sub 9} material was analyzed by a crystal-field model using a method of descending symmetry. The magnetic susceptibility and the excitation spectrum of the Yb glasses can be described by a distribution of ligand-field effects on the Yb{sup 3+} ions that are similar to the nominal crystal field in crystalline Na{sub 3}YbSi{sub 3}O{sub 9}.

  3. Beta Decay Study of Neutron-rich Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, John; Rajabali, Mustafa; Griffin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Within the ``island of inversion'' around the N = 20 shell gap, isotopes of magnesium, and aluminum deviate from the expected closed-shell structure. Particles promoted across the N = 20 shell gap result in a lower energy deformed ground state configuration rather than the expected spherical configuration. An experiment was conducted at TRIUMF laboratory in the summer of 2015 to study the decay of ``island of inversion'' isotopes 33 , 34 , 35Mg and the structure of the respective daughter nuclei. The isotopes of interest were produced by a proton beam from TRIUMF's 500 MeV cyclotron impacting on a UCx target. The magnesium decays populated states along the decay chain in Al, Si, P, and S isotopes. The new GRIFFIN spectrometer in the ISAC-I facility was used to detect the gamma rays. Two sets of scintillators, one for detecting the beta particles (SCEPTAR) and the other for detecting beta-delayed neutrons (DESCANT), were also used in conjunction with GRIFFIN. The GRIFFIN data were energy calibrated and partially analyzed for this project. New algorithms were developed for the analysis. Preliminary results for new transitions detected in 34Mg as well as the half lives obtained will be presented in their current form. This research was supported by the Tennessee Tech research office.

  4. Neutron scattering studies of the hydration structure of Li+.

    PubMed

    Mason, P E; Ansell, S; Neilson, G W; Rempe, S B

    2015-02-05

    New results derived from the experimental method of neutron diffraction and isotopic substitution (NDIS) are presented for the hydration structure of the lithium cation (Li(+)) in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride in heavy water (D2O) at concentrations of 6, 3, and 1 m and at 1.5 m lithium sulfate. By introducing new and more-accurate data reduction procedures than in our earlier studies (I. Howell and G. W. Neilson, J. Phys: Condens. Matter, 1996, 8, 4455-4463), we find, in the first hydration shell of Li(+), ∼4.3(2) water molecules at 6 m, 4.9(3) at 3 m, 4.8(3) at 1 m in the LiCl solutions, and 5.0(3) water molecules in the case of Li2SO4 solution. The general form of the first hydration shell is similar in all four solutions, with the correlations for Li-O and Li-D sited at 1.96 (0.02) Å and 2.58 (0.02) Å, respectively. The results resemble those presented in 1996, in terms of ion-water distances and local coordination, but the hydration number is significantly lower for the case at 1 m than the 6.5 (1.0) given at that time. Thus, experimental and theoretical results now agree that lithium is hydrated by a small number of water molecules (4-5) in the nearest coordination shell.

  5. Neutron diffraction study of metal-matrix composite with fullerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, P. A.; Blanter, M. S.; Brazhkin, VV; Somenkov, VA; Filonenko, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Interaction of amorphous fullerite C60 with austenitic Fe-33.2 wt. % Ni alloy at pressures 0-8 GPa and temperatures 600-1100 °C was studied by neutron diffraction. The amorphous fullerite was obtained by ball milling and mixed with the powder of the crystalline alloy. The interaction at sintering led to the dissolution of carbon in fcc Fe-Ni solid solution and the formation of carbide (Fe, Ni)3C, but the Fe-Ni-C alloy did not undergo phase transformations and preserved the original fcc structure. As a result, the alloy hardened, we could also witness a clear barometric effect: at the pressure of 2 GPa the amount of the dissolved carbon and the microhardness turned out to be significantly higher than those at 8 GPa. During sintering amorphous fullerite is undergoing phase transitions and its microhardness is higher than the microhardness of the metal component. At high temperatures of interaction graphite appears. The presence of Fe-Ni alloy in the composite reduces the temperature of graphite formation in comparison with transformations in the pure amorphous fullerene.

  6. HERITAGE: the concept of a giant flux neutron reflectometer for the exploration of 3-d structure of free-liquid and solid interfaces in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.; Lott, D.; Bottyán, L.; Daillant, J.; Markó, M.; Menelle, A.; Sajti, S.; Veres, T.

    2017-01-01

    The instrumental concept of HERITAGE - a reflectometer with a horizontal sample geometry - well fitted to the long pulse structure of a neutron source is presented. It is constitutes a new class of reflectometers achieving the unprecedentedly high flux for classical specular reflectometry combined with off-specular reflectometry and grazing incidence small-angle scattering (GISANS), thus resulting in a complete 3-d exploration of lateral and in depth structures in thin films. This is achieved by specially designed neutron guides. In the horizontal direction (perpendicular to the scattering plane) the guide's elliptic shape focusses the neutrons onto the sample. In the vertical direction a multichannel geometry provides a smooth divergence distribution at the sample position while accepting the entire beam from a compact high-brilliance flat moderator. The modular collimation setup of HERITAGE provides extremely high flexibility in respect to sample geometries and environments, including the possibility to study virtually all types of solid and liquid interfaces, statically or kinetically. The use of multiple beam illumination allows for reflectivity and GISANS measurements at liquid interfaces both from above and below without a need to move the sample. This concept assures the delivery of the maximum possible and usable flux to the sample in both reflectivity and GISANS measurement regimes. The presented design outperforms the flux of all present-day and already for the ESS planned reflectometers and GISANS setups in flux and in measuring time for standard samples.

  7. Shielding design studies for a neutron irradiator system based on a 252Cf source.

    PubMed

    da Silva, A X; Crispim, V R

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a shielding design against neutrons and gamma rays from a source of 252Cf, using Monte Carlo simulation. The shielding materials studied were borated polyethylene, borated-lead polyethylene and stainless steel. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4B was used to design shielding for 252Cf based neutron irradiator systems. By normalising the dose equivalent rate values presented to the neutron production rate of the source, the resulting calculations are independent of the intensity of the actual 252Cf source. The results show that the total dose equivalent rates were reduced significantly by the shielding system optimisation.

  8. RECENT RESULTS OF FUSION INDUCED BY NEUTRON-RICH RADIOACTIVE BEAMS STUDIED AT HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J Felix

    2013-01-01

    The reaccelerated fission-fragment beams at HRIBF provide a unique opportunity for studying the mechanisms of fusion involving nuclei with large neutron excess. The fusion excitation functions for neutron-rich ra- dioactive 132Sn incident on 40Ca and 58Ni targets have been measured to explore the role of transfer couplings in sub-barrier fusion enhancement. Evaporation residue cross sections for 124,126,127,128Sn+64Ni were measured to study the dependence of fusion probability on neutron excess.

  9. GNSS-Reflectometry aboard ISS with GEROS: Investigation of atmospheric propagation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, F.; Heise, S.; Wickert, J.; Semmling, M.

    2015-12-01

    GEROS-ISS (GNSS rEflectometry Radio Occultation and Scatterometry) is an ESA mission aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The main mission goals are the determination of the sea surface height and surface winds. Secondary goals are monitoring of land surface parameters and atmosphere sounding using GNSS radio occultation measurements. The international scientific study GARCA (GNSS-Reflectometry Assessment of Requirements and Consolidation of Retrieval Algorithms), funded by ESA, is part of the preparations for GEROS-ISS. Major goals of GARCA are the development of an end2end Simulator for the GEROS-ISS measurements (GEROS-SIM) and the evaluation of the error budget of the GNSS reflectometry measurements. In this presentation we introduce some of the GARCA activities to quantify the influence of the ionized and neutral atmosphere on the altimetric measurements, which is a major error source for GEROS-ISS. At first, we analyse, to which extend the standard linear combination of interferometric paths at different carrier frequencies can be used to correct for the ionospheric propagation effects. Second, we make use of the tangent-linear version of our ray-trace algorithm to propagate the uncertainty of the underlying refractivity profile into the uncertainty of the interferometric path. For comparison the sensitivity of the interferometric path with respect to the sea surface height is computed. Though our calculations are based on a number of simplifying assumptions (the Earth is a sphere, the atmosphere is spherically layered and the ISS and GNSS satellite orbits are circular) some general conclusions can be drawn. In essence, for elevation angles above -5° at the ISS the higher-order ionospheric errors and the uncertaintiy of the inteferometric path due to the uncertainty of the underlying refractivity profile are small enough to distinguish a sea surface height of ± 0.5 m.

  10. Signals of Opportunity Earth Reflectometry (SoOp-ER): Enabling new microwave observations from small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, J. L.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Shah, R.; Lin, Y. C.; Du Toit, C. F.; Vega, M. A.; Knuble, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Several recent experiments have demonstrated remote sensing by reutilizing communication satellite transmissions as sources in a bistatic radar configuration. This technique, referred to as "Signals of Opportunity Earth Reflectometry" (SoOp-ER), combines aspects of passive radiometry, active scatterometry and radar altimetry, but is essentially a new and alternative approach to microwave remote sensing. Reflectometry was first demonstrated with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals, enabled by their use of pseudorandom noise (PRN) codes for ranging. Two decades of research in GNSS reflectometry has culminated in the upcoming launches of several satellite missions within the next few years (TechDemoSat-1, CYGNSS, and GEROS-ISS). GNSS signals, however, have low power and are confined to a few L-band frequencies allocated to radionavigation. Communication satellites, in contrast, transmit in nearly all bands penetrating the Earth's atmosphere at very high radiated powers to assure a low bit-error-rate. High transmission power and a forward scatter geometry result in a very high signal to noise ratio at the receiver. Surface resolution is determined by the signal bandwidth, not the antenna beam. In many applications, this will allow small, low gain antennas to be used to make scientifically useful measurements. These features indicate that SoOp-ER instruments would be an ideal technology for microwave remote sensing from small platforms. SoOp-ER observations are referenced at the specular point and a constellation of small satellites, evenly spaced in the same orbit, would provide global coverage through parallel specular point ground tracks. This presentation will summarize the current instrument development work by the authors on three different application of SoOp-ER: P-band (230-270 MHz) sensing of root-zone soil moisture (RZSM), S-band sensing of ocean winds and Ku/Ka-band altimetry. Potential mission scenarios using small satellite constellations

  11. A Study of Neutron Leakage in Finite Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for simple shielded objects. Monte Carlo (MC) benchmarks were used to verify the 3DHZETRN methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with MC codes to the degree that various MC codes agree among themselves. One limitation in the verification process is that all of the codes (3DHZETRN and three MC codes) utilize different nuclear models/databases. In the present report, the new algorithm, with well-defined convergence criteria, is used to quantify the neutron leakage from simple geometries to provide means of verifying 3D effects and to provide guidance for further code development.

  12. Neutron scattering study of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernavanois, N.; Grenier, B.; Huxley, A.; Ressouche, E.; Sanchez, J. P.; Flouquet, J.

    2001-11-01

    Unpolarized and polarized neutron scattering experiments have been performed at ambient pressure on a single crystal of the itinerant electron superconductor UGe2 in both the ferromagnetic and the paramagnetic phases. Unpolarized neutrons have confirmed the ZrGa2-type orthorhombic crystal structure of UGe2 and a ferromagnetic ordering below TC=53 K with the moments aligned along the a axis. No evidence of any modulated component for the magnetic structure has been found. Polarized neutron data have shown a large and almost spherical magnetization distribution at the U sites and no induced moment at the Ge sites. Refinements of the magnetic structure factors within the dipolar approximation allow the magnitude of the orbital and spin uranium moments to be quantified, and a comparison to the measured static magnetization reveals that there is no diffuse contribution.

  13. Scoping studies - photon and low energy neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.; Harker, Y.; Jones, J.; Harmon, F.

    1997-11-01

    High energy photon interrogation of waste containers, with the aim of producing photo nuclear reactions, in specific materials, holds the potential of good penetration and rapid analysis. Compact high energy ({le} 10 MeV) photon sources in the form of electron linacs producing bremstrahlung radiation are readily available. Work with the Varitron variable energy accelerator at ISU will be described. Advantages and limitations of the technique will be discussed. Using positive ion induced neutron producing reactions, it is possible to generate neutrons in a specific energy range. By this means, variable penetration and specific reactions can be excited in the assayed material. Examples using the {sup 3}H(p,n) and {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions as neutron sources will be discussed. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Material flow in metal foams studied by neutron radioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanzick, H.; Klenke, J.; Danilkin, S.; Banhart, J.

    Two kinds of experiments are presented in this paper: In the first lead alloy foams were generated in a furnace by expanding a foamable precursor material containing metal and a blowing agent. Vertical columns of liquid metal foam were scanned with a beam of neutrons while recording the time-dependent local neutron transmission. The resulting transmission profiles reflect the kinetics of material redistribution in liquid metallic foams under the influence of gravity (drainage). In the second experiment pre-fabricated solid lead foams were re-melted in a furnace. Neutron transmission profiles were also obtained in these experiments. Results of each type of experiment are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the density profile of aqueous foams.

  15. Interfacial assembly of proteins and peptides: recent examples studied by neutron reflection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, XiuBo; Pan, Fang; Lu, Jian R.

    2009-01-01

    Through reviewing a number of recent neutron reflection studies of interfacial adsorption of peptides and proteins, this paper aims to demonstrate the significance of this technique in studying interfacial biomolecular processes by illustrating the typical structural details that can be derived. The review will start with the introduction of relevant theoretical background, followed by an outline of representative biomolecular systems that have recently been studied to indicate the technical strengths of neutron reflection. PMID:19656822

  16. Review of Livermore-Led Neutron Capture Studies Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Sheets, S; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T; Clement, R; Couture, A; Esch, E; Haight, R; Jandel, M; Krticka, M; Mitchell, G; Macri, R; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R; Schwantes, J; Ullmann, J; Vieira, D; Wouters, J; Wilk, P

    2007-05-11

    We have made neutron capture cross-section measurements using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Science Center, the DANCE detector array (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for basic science and stockpile stewardship. In this paper, we review results from (n,{gamma}) reactions on {sup 94,95}Mo, {sup 152,154,157,160,nat}Gd, {sup 151,153}Eu and {sup 242m}Am for neutron energies from < 1eV up to {approx} 20 keV. We measured details of the {gamma}-ray cascade following neutron capture, for comparison with results of statistical model simulations. We determined the neutron energy dependent (n,{gamma}) cross section and gained information about statistical decay properties, including the nuclear level density and the photon strength function. Because of the high granularity of the detector array, it is possible to look at gamma cascades with a specified number of transitions (a specific multiplicity). We simulated {gamma}-ray cascades using a combination of the DICEBOX/GEANT computer codes. In the case of the deformed nuclei, we found evidence of a scissors-mode resonance. For the Eu, we also determined the (n,{gamma}) cross sections. For the {sup 94,95}Mo, we focused on the spin and parity assignments of the resonances and the determination of the photon strength functions for the compound nuclei {sup 95,96}Mo. Future plans include measurements on actinide targets; our immediate interest is in {sup 242m}Am.

  17. Low-level gamma and neutron monitoring based on use of proportional counter filled with 3He in polythene moderator: study of the responses to gamma and neutrons.

    PubMed

    Pszona, S; Bantsar, A; Tulik, P; Wincel, K; Zaręba, B

    2014-10-01

    It has been shown that a proportional counter filled with (3)He placed centrally inside a polythene sphere opens a new possibility for measuring gamma photons and neutrons in the separate pulse-height windows. The responses to gamma and neutrons (in terms of ambient dose equivalent) of the detector assembly consisting of 203-mm polythene sphere with centrally positioned 40-mm diameter (3)He proportional counter have been studied. The response to secondary gammas from capture process in hydrogen has also been studied. The rather preliminary studies indicate that the proposed measuring system has very promising features as an ambient dose equivalent device for mixed gamma-neutron fields.

  18. Sustaining knowledge in the neutron generator community and benchmarking study.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrentine, Tameka C.; Kennedy, Bryan C.; Saba, Anthony W.; Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Schneider, Julia Teresa; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Baldonado, Esther

    2008-03-01

    In 2004, the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment department embarked upon a partnership with the Systems Engineering and Analysis knowledge management (KM) team to develop knowledge management systems for the neutron generator (NG) community. This partnership continues today. The most recent challenge was to improve the current KM system (KMS) development approach by identifying a process that will allow staff members to capture knowledge as they learn it. This 'as-you-go' approach will lead to a sustainable KM process for the NG community. This paper presents a historical overview of NG KMSs, as well as research conducted to move toward sustainable KM.

  19. A study on optical aberrations in parabolic neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Yuntao; Zu, Yong; He, Linfeng; Wei, Guohai; Sun, Kai; Han, Songbai; Chen, Dongfeng

    2015-06-01

    It is widely believed that a neutron beam can be focused to a small spot using a parabolic guide, which will significantly improve the flux. However, researchers have also noted challenges for the neutron inhomogeneous phase space distribution in parabolic focusing guide systems. In this paper, the sources of most prominent optical aberrations, such as an inhomogeneous phase space distribution and irregular divergence distribution, are discussed, and an optimization solution is also proposed. We indicate that optimizing the parabolic guide geometrical configuration removes almost all of the aberrations and yields a considerable intensity gain factor.

  20. Neutron scattering and diffraction instrument for structural study on biology in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering and diffraction instruments in Japan which can be used for structural studies in biology are briefly introduced. Main specifications and general layouts of the instruments are shown.

  1. Cross-section studies of important neutron and relativistic deuteron reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, V.; Suchopár, M.; Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Herman, T.; Svoboda, O.; Geier, B.; Krása, A.; Majerle, M.; Kugler, A.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A.; Furman, W.; Kadykov, M.; Khushvaktov, J.; Solnyshkin, A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunikov, S.; Zavorka, L.; Vladimirova, N.; Bielewicz, M.; Kilim, S.; Szuta, M.; Strugalska-Gola, E.

    2014-09-01

    The cross-sections of relativistic deuteron reactions on natural copper were studied by the means of activation method. The deuteron beams produced by JINR Nuclotron (Russia) with energies from 1 GeV up to 8 GeV were used. Lack of such cross-sections prevents the usage of copper foils for beam integral monitoring. The copper monitors will help us to improve the beam integral determination during ADS studies. The yttrium samples are very suitable activation detectors for monitoring of neutron fields not only in the ADS studies. But experimental cross-section data for higher energy threshold neutron reactions are still missing. This situation is the reason why we have started to study neutron reactions on yttrium by the means of quasi mono-energetic neutron source based on NPI Řež cyclotron (Czech Republic).

  2. Study on Destructuring effect of trehalose on water by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branca, C.; Magazu', V.; Maisano, G.; Migliardo, F.; Soper, A. K.

    In this work results on trehalose/water solutions by neutron diffraction are reported. The study of the partial structure factors and spatial distribution functions gives evidence of a decreasing tetrahedrality degree of water and justifies its cryoprotectant effectiveness.

  3. Structure of Sn107 studied through single-neutron knockout reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Cerizza, G.; Ayres, A.; Jones, K. L.; ...

    2016-02-04

    The neutron-deficient nucleus Sn-107 has been studied by using the one-neutron knockout reaction. By measuring the decay gamma rays and momentum distributions of reaction residues, the spins of the ground, 5/2+, and first-excited, 7/2+, states of Sn-107 have been assigned by comparisons to eikonal-model reaction calculations. We also observed limits on the inclusive and exclusive cross sections and transitions due to neutron removals from below the N = 50 closed shell have been observed. New excited states up to 5.5 MeV in Sn-107 have been identified.

  4. Optical absorption and luminescence studies of fast neutron-irradiated complex oxides for jewellery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Skvortsova, V.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We studied the optical absorption and luminescence of agate (SiO2), topaz (Al2[SiO4](F,OH)2), beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18), and prehnite (Ca2Al(AlSi3O10)(OH)2) doped with different concentrations of transition metal ions and exposed to fast neutron irradiation. The exchange interaction between the impurity ions and the defects arising under neutron irradiation causes additional absorption as well as bands' broadening in the crystals. These experimental results allow us to suggest the method for obtaining new radiation-defect induced jewellery colors of minerals due to neutron irradiation.

  5. Experimental study of neutron induced background noise on gated x-ray framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N.; Hagmann, C.; Stone, G.; Hey, D.; Glenn, S.; Conder, A.; Teruya, A.; Sorce, C.; Tommasini, R.; Stoeffl, W.; Springer, P.; Landen, O. L.; Eckart, M.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Koch, J. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bahukutumbi, R.; and others

    2010-10-15

    A temporally gated x-ray framing camera based on a proximity focus microchannel plate is one of the most important diagnostic tools of inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, fusion neutrons produced in imploded capsules interact with structures surrounding the camera and produce background to x-ray signals. To understand the mechanisms of this neutron induced background, we tested several gated x-ray cameras in the presence of 14 MeV neutrons produced at the Omega laser facility. Differences between background levels observed with photographic film readout and charge-coupled-device readout have been studied.

  6. An accelerator-based neutron microbeam system for studies of radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A; Bigelow, Alan W; Akselrod, Mark S; Sykora, Jeff G; Brenner, David J

    2011-06-01

    A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The RARAF microbeam facility has been used for studies of radiation bystander effects in mammalian cells for many years. Now a prototype neutron microbeam is being developed that can be used for bystander effect studies. The neutron microbeam design here is based on the existing charged particle microbeam technology at the RARAF. The principle of the neutron microbeam is to use the proton beam with a micrometre-sized diameter impinging on a very thin lithium fluoride target system. From the kinematics of the ⁷Li(p,n)⁷Be reaction near the threshold of 1.881 MeV, the neutron beam is confined within a narrow, forward solid angle. Calculations show that the neutron spot using a target with a 17-µm thick gold backing foil will be <20 µm in diameter for cells attached to a 3.8-µm thick propylene-bottomed cell dish in contact with the target backing. The neutron flux will roughly be 2000 per second based on the current beam setup at the RARAF singleton accelerator. The dose rate will be about 200 mGy min⁻¹. The principle of this neutron microbeam system has been preliminarily tested at the RARAF using a collimated proton beam. The imaging of the neutron beam was performed using novel fluorescent nuclear track detector technology based on Mg-doped luminescent aluminum oxide single crystals and confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy.

  7. An accelerator-based neutron microbeam system for studies of radiation effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Bigelow, Alan W.; Akselrod, Mark S.; Sykora, Jeff G.; Brenner, David J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The RARAF microbeam facility has been used for studies of radiation bystander effects in mammalian cells for many years. Now a prototype neutron microbeam is being developed that can be used for bystander effect studies. The neutron microbeam design here is based on the existing charged particle microbeam technology at the RARAF. The principle of the neutron microbeam is to use the proton beam with a micrometre-sized diameter impinging on a very thin lithium fluoride target system. From the kinematics of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction near the threshold of 1.881 MeV, the neutron beam is confined within a narrow, forward solid angle. Calculations show that the neutron spot using a target with a 17-µm thick gold backing foil will be <20 µm in diameter for cells attached to a 3.8-µm thick propylene-bottomed cell dish in contact with the target backing. The neutron flux will roughly be 2000 per second based on the current beam setup at the RARAF singleton accelerator. The dose rate will be about 200 mGy min−1. The principle of this neutron microbeam system has been preliminarily tested at the RARAF using a collimated proton beam. The imaging of the neutron beam was performed using novel fluorescent nuclear track detector technology based on Mg-doped luminescent aluminum oxide single crystals and confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy. PMID:21131327

  8. High energy neutron treatment for pelvic cancers: study stopped because of increased mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Errington, R D; Ashby, D; Gore, S M; Abrams, K R; Myint, S; Bonnett, D E; Blake, S W; Saxton, T E

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare high energy fast neutron treatment with conventional megavoltage x ray treatment in the management of locally advanced pelvic carcinomas (of the cervix, bladder, prostate, and rectum). DESIGN--Randomised study from February 1986; randomisation to neutron treatment or photon treatment was unstratified and in the ratio of 3 to 1 until January 1988, when randomisation was in the ratio 1 to 1 and stratified by site of tumour. SETTING--Mersey regional radiotherapy centre at Clatterbridge Hospital, Wirral. PATIENTS--151 patients with locally advanced, non-metastatic pelvic cancer (27 cervical, 69 of the bladder, seven prostatic, and 48 of the rectum). INTERVENTION--Randomisation to neutron treatment was stopped in February 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patient survival and causes of death in relation to the development of metastatic disease and treatment related morbidity. RESULTS--In the first phase of the trial 42 patients were randomised to neutron treatment and 14 to photon treatment, and in the second phase 48 to neutron treatment and 47 to photon treatment. The relative risk of mortality for photons compared with neutrons was 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.40 to 1.10) after adjustment for site of tumour and other important prognostic factors. Short term and long term complications were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS--The trial was stopped because of the increased mortality in patients with cancer of the cervix, bladder, or rectum treated with neutrons. PMID:1903663

  9. Remote Strain Sensing of CFRP Using Microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Project is investigating technologies that increase automated remote inspection of aircraft composite structures. Therefore, microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) is being investigated as a method of enabling rapid remote measurement of strain occurring at the first ply of a composite fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) structure using Radio Frequency (RF) Electro-Magnetic (EM) radiation. While microwave reflectometry has been used to detect disbonds in CFRP structures, its use in detecting strain has been limited. This work will present data demonstrating the measurement of the reactance changes due to loading conditions that are indicative of strain in a CFRP structure. In addition, the basic EM signature will be presented along with an analysis of temperature and humidity effects.

  10. New signal processing technique for density profile reconstruction using reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Ricaud, B.; Briolle, F.; Heuraux, S.

    2011-08-15

    Reflectometry profile measurement requires an accurate determination of the plasma reflected signal. Along with a good resolution and a high signal to noise ratio of the phase measurement, adequate data analysis is required. A new data processing based on time-frequency tomographic representation is used. It provides a clearer separation between multiple components and improves isolation of the relevant signals. In this paper, this data processing technique is applied to two sets of signals coming from two different reflectometer devices used on the Tore Supra tokamak. For the standard density profile reflectometry, it improves the initialization process and its reliability, providing a more accurate profile determination in the far scrape-off layer with density measurements as low as 10{sup 16} m{sup -1}. For a second reflectometer, which provides measurements in front of a lower hybrid launcher, this method improves the separation of the relevant plasma signal from multi-reflection processes due to the proximity of the plasma.

  11. SU-E-T-21: A D-D Based Neutron Generator System for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, M; Liu, Y; Nie, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator for application in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain cancer Methods: MCNP simulations were performed using a head phantom and a monoenergetic neutron source, which resembles the point source in a DD generator that emits 2.45-MeV neutrons. Source energies ranging from 5eV to 2.45MeV were simulated to determine the optimal treatment energy. The phantom consisted of soft tissue, brain tissue, skull, skin layer, and a brain tumor of 5 cm in diameter. Tumor depth was varied from 5–10 cm. Boron-10 concentrations of 10 ppm, 15 ppm, and 30 ppm were used in the soft/brain tissues, skin, and tumor, respectively. The neutron flux required to deliver 60 Gy to the tumor as well as the normal tissue doses were determined. Results: Beam energies between 5eV and 10keV obtained doses with the highest dose ratios (3.3–25.9) between the tumor and the brain at various depths. The dose ratio with 2.45-MeV neutrons ranged from 0.8–6.6. To achieve the desired tumor dose in 40 minutes, the required neutron flux for a DD generator was between 8.8E10 and 5.2E11 n/s and the resulting brain dose was between 2.3 and 18 Gy, depending on the tumor depth. The skin and soft tissue doses were within acceptable tolerances. The boron-neutron interaction accounted for 54–58% of the total dose. Conclusion: This study shows that the DD neutron generator can be a feasible neutron source for BNCT. The required neutron flux for treatment is achievable with the current DD neutron technology. With a well-designed beam shaping assembly and treatment geometry, the neutron flux can be further improved and a 60-Gy prescription can be accurately delivered to the target while maintaining tolerable normal tissue doses. Further experimental studies will be developed and conducted to validate the simulation results.

  12. Thermonuclear processes on accreting neutron stars - A systematic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayasli, S.; Joss, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    A series of model calculations for the evolution of the surface layers of an accreting neutron star is carried out. The neutron star mass, radius, core temperature, and surface magnetic field strength are systematically varied, as are the accretion rate onto the neutron star surface and the metallicity of the accreting matter, in order to determine the effects of these parameters on the properties of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers and the emitted X-ray bursts that result from such flashes. The core temperatures required for thermal equilibrium are found to be approximately a factor of 2 lower than estimated in earlier work. Owing to the effects of the gravitational redshift, the emitted X-ray bursts have lower peak luminosities and longer durations than those calculated in the Newtonian approximation. The entrainment of hydrogen into helium flashes can cause the flashes to exhibit a rather wide range of observable effects and can decrease by a factor of more than 2 the ratio of persistent accretion-driven luminosity to time-averaged burst luminosity emitted by the neutron star.

  13. Carbon Fiber TOW Angle Determination Using Microwave Reflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Project is investigating technologies that increase automated remote inspection of aircraft composite structures. Therefore, microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) is being investigated as a method of enabling rapid remote inspection of angular orientation of the tow using microwave radiation. This work will present preliminary data demonstrating that frequency shifts in the reflection spectrum of a carbon fiber tow sample are indicative of the angle of the tow with respect to an interrogating antenna's linear polarized output.

  14. Time Domain Reflectometry for Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-18

    Final Report PROJECT ID: AOARD-10-4112 Title: Time Domain Reflectometry for damage detection of laminated CFRP plate Researcher: Professor Akira...From July/2010 To July/2011 Abstract Recently, high toughness Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) laminates are used to primary structures. The...tough CFRP yields small fiber breakages when delamination crack is made in many cases. This requires a detection system of fiber breakages at low cost for

  15. Pulsed Neutron Scattering Studies of Strongly Fluctuating solids, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin Broholm

    2006-06-22

    The conventional description of a solid is based on a static atomic structure with small amplitude so-called harmonic fluctuations about it. This is a final technical report for a project that has explored materials where fluctuations are sufficiently strong to severely challenge this approach and lead to unexpected and potentially useful materials properties. Fluctuations are enhanced when a large number of configurations share the same energy. We used pulsed spallation source neutron scattering to obtain detailed microscopic information about structure and fluctuations in such materials. The results enhance our understanding of strongly fluctuating solids and their potential for technical applications. Because new materials require new experimental techniques, the project has also developed new techniques for probing strongly fluctuating solids. Examples of material that were studied are ZrW2O8 with large amplitude molecular motion that leads to negative thermal expansion, NiGa2S4 where competing interactions lead to an anomalous short range ordered magnet, Pr1- xBixRu2O7 where a partially filled electron shell (Pr) in a weakly disordered environment produces anomalous metallic properties, and TbMnO3 where competing interactions lead to a magneto-electric phase. The experiments on TbMnO3 exemplify the relationship between research funded by this project and future applications. Magneto-electric materials may produce a magnetic field when an electric field is applied or vise versa. Our experiments have clarified the reason why electric and magnetic polarization is coupled in TbMnO3. While this knowledge does not render TbMnO3 useful for applications it will focus the search for a practical room temperature magneto-electric for applications.

  16. Interfacial Adsorption of Antifreeze Proteins: A Neutron Reflection Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Perumal, Shiamalee; Zhao, Xiubo; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Jia, Zongchao; Lu, Jian R.

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial adsorption from two antifreeze proteins (AFP) from ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus, type III AFP, AFP III, or maAFP) and spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana, isoform 501, or cfAFP) were studied by neutron reflection. Hydrophilic silicon oxide was used as model substrate to facilitate the solid/liquid interfacial measurement so that the structural features from AFP adsorption can be examined. All adsorbed layers from AFP III could be modeled into uniform layer distribution assuming that the protein molecules were adsorbed with their ice-binding surface in direct contact with the SiO2 substrate. The layer thickness of 32 Å was consistent with the height of the molecule in its crystalline form. With the concentration decreasing from 2 mg/ml to 0.01 mg/ml, the volume fraction of the protein packed in the monolayer decreased steadily from 0.4 to 0.1, consistent with the concentration-dependent inhibition of ice growth observed over the range. In comparison, insect cfAFP showed stronger adsorption over the same concentration range. Below 0.1 mg/ml, uniform layers were formed. But above 1 mg/ml, the adsorbed layers were characterized by a dense middle layer and two outer diffuse layers, with a total thickness around 100 Å. The structural transition indicated the responsive changes of conformational orientation to increasing surface packing density. As the higher interfacial adsorption of cfAFP was strongly correlated with the greater thermal hysteresis of spruce budworm, our results indicated the important relation between protein adsorption and antifreeze activity. PMID:18234809

  17. From asymmetric nuclear matter to neutron stars: A functional renormalization group study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2015-03-01

    A previous study of nuclear matter in a chiral nucleon-meson model is extended to isospin-asymmetric matter. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated in the framework of the functional renormalization group. The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is investigated in detail as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of both symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with realistic many-body computations. We also study the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium. The question of chiral symmetry restoration in neutron matter is addressed; we find a stabilization of the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry once fluctuations are included. Finally, neutron-star matter including β equilibrium is discussed. The model satisfies the constraints imposed by the existence of two-solar mass neutron stars.

  18. Fully self-consistent thermal evolution studies of rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, Rodrigo; Schramm, Stefan; Weber, Fridolin

    2017-07-01

    In this work we study the thermal evolution of rotating, axis-symmetric neutron stars, which are subjected to structural and compositional changes during spin-down. Our aim is to go beyond standard thermal evolution calculations where neutron stars are considered spherically-symmetric and with a static, "frozen-in" composition. Building on previous work, we carry out fully self-consistent thermal evolution calculations where the neutron star has an axis-symmetric, time-dependent structure. Such an approach allows us to consider, during the thermal evolution, changes of the star's geometry as well as its microscopic particle population. As a proof-of-concept, we study the thermal evolution of a neutron star subjected to magnetic braking spin-down. We show that the spin-evolution, combined with the accompanying structural and compositional changes lead to a substantially distinct thermal evolution scenario.

  19. Neutron scattering studies of BiFeO(3) multiferroics: a review for microscopists.

    PubMed

    Sosnowska, I M

    2009-11-01

    Application of the neutron scattering technique in the study of crystal and magnetic properties of multiferroic BiFeO(3) is presented. The crucial role of the neutron scattering technique, complementary to X-ray diffraction method and transmission electron microscopy, is shown. Especially the ultra high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction technique used by Sosnowska et al. to detect the magnetic cycloid ordering and its role in studies of physical properties of BiFeO(3) and its alloys are reviewed. The first inelastic neutron scattering patterns of magnetic excitations in BiFeO(3) are also presented. Applications of different microscopy techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission TEM and SEM (FESEM and FETEM), magnetic force microscope (MFM) and polarization force microscopy (PFM) bring insight on the fundamental problem of ferroelectricity and confirm the potential of BiFeO(3) multiferroic material for nanoscale devices.

  20. Monte Carlo study on secondary neutrons in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy: identification of the main source and reduction in the secondary neutron dose.

    PubMed

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2009-10-01

    Recent successful results in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy allow the patient to live for a longer time and allow younger patients to receive the radiotherapy. Undesired radiation exposure in normal tissues far from the target volume is considerably lower than that close to the treatment target, but it is considered to be non-negligible in the estimation of the secondary cancer risk. Therefore, it is very important to reduce the undesired secondary neutron exposure in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy without influencing the clinical beam. In this study, the source components in which the secondary neutrons are produced during passive carbon-ion radiotherapy were identified and the method to reduce the secondary neutron dose effectively based on the identification of the main sources without influencing the clinical beam was investigated. A Monte Carlo study with the PHITS code was performed by assuming the beamline at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). At first, the authors investigated the main sources of secondary neutrons in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy. Next, they investigated the reduction in the neutron dose with various modifications of the beamline device that is the most dominant in the neutron production. Finally, they investigated the use of an additional shield for the patient. It was shown that the main source is the secondary neutrons produced in the four-leaf collimator (FLC) used as a precollimator at HIAMC, of which contribution in the total neutron ambient dose equivalent is more than 70%. The investigations showed that the modification of the FLC can reduce the neutron dose at positions close to the beam axis by 70% and the FLC is very useful not only for the collimation of the primary beam but also the reduction in the secondary neutrons. Also, an additional shield for the patient is very effective to reduce the neutron dose at positions farther than 50 cm from the beam axis. Finally, they showed that the neutron dose can be

  1. Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries (ANSL-V): ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E. III; Arwood, J.W.; Greene, N.M.; Moses, D.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Slater, C.O.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1990-09-01

    Pseudo-problem-independent, multigroup cross-section libraries were generated to support Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor design studies. The ANS is a proposed reactor which would be fueled with highly enriched uranium and cooled with heavy water. The libraries, designated ANSL-V (Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries based on ENDF/B-V), are data bases in AMPX master format for subsequent generation of problem-dependent cross-sections for use with codes such as KENO, ANISN, XSDRNPM, VENTURE, DOT, DORT, TORT, and MORSE. Included in ANSL-V are 99-group and 39-group neutron, 39-neutron-group 44-gamma-ray-group secondary gamma-ray production (SGRP), 44-group gamma-ray interaction (GRI), and coupled, 39-neutron group 44-gamma-ray group (CNG) cross-section libraries. The neutron and SGRP libraries were generated primarily from ENDF/B-V data; the GRI library was generated from DLC-99/HUGO data, which is recognized as the ENDF/B-V photon interaction data. Modules from the AMPX and NJOY systems were used to process the multigroup data. Validity of selected data from the fine- and broad-group neutron libraries was satisfactorily tested in performance parameter calculations.

  2. Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, D. Q.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    We study the relation between neutron removal cross section (sigma{sub -N}) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron-rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between sigma{sub -N} and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increase of neutron removal cross section could be used as a quantitative measure for neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei.

  3. A New Neutron Time-of-Flight Array for β-Decay Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sénoville, M.; Delaunay, F.; Achouri, N. L.; Pârlog, M.; Orr, N. A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carniol, B.; Étasse, D.; Fontbonne, C.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Gibelin, J.; Hommet, J.; Laurent, B.; Ledoux, X.; Marqués, F. M.; Martínez, T.; De Séréville, N.

    A new time-of-flight array for β-delayed neutron spectroscopy (En < 5 MeV) is being developed with the aim of improved performance compared to existing arrays. We report on the status of this development, in particular the study of the n-γ discrimination quality with digital electronics, a comparison of several organic scintillators, including new discriminating plastics, as well as the characterisation of detectors with monoenergetic neutrons to measure intrinsic efficiencies and cross-talk probabilities.

  4. Analysis of bacterial growth by UV/Vis spectroscopy and laser reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Gomar, Mary Carmen; Viramontes-Gamboa, Gonzalo; Peña-Gomar, Grethel; Ortiz Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Hernández Ramírez, Mariano

    2012-10-01

    This work presents a preliminary study on an experimental analysis of the lactobacillus bacterial growth in liquid medium with and without the presence of silver nanoparticles. The study aims to quantify the bactericidal effect of nanoparticles. Quantification of bacterial growth at different times was analyzed by spectroscopy UV/visible and laser reflectometry near the critical angle. From these two techniques the best results were obtained by spectroscopy, showing that as the concentration of silver nanoparticles increases, it inhibits the growth of bacteria, it only grows 63% of the population. Regarding Laser Reflectometry, the variation of reflectance near the critical angle is measured in real time. The observed results at short times are reasonable, since they indicate a gradual growth of the bacteria and the stabilization stage of the population. But at long time, the observed results show abrupt changes caused by temperature effects. The bacteria were isolated from samples taken from commercial yougurth, and cultured in MRS broth at pH 6.5, and controlled with citric acid and constant temperature of 32 °C. Separately, silver nanoparticles were synthesized at 3 °C from aqueous solutions of 1.0 mM silver nitrate and chemically reduced with sodium borohydride to 2.0 mM, with magnetic stirring.

  5. Enhanced Doppler reflectometry power response: physical optics and 2D full wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzón, J. R.; Happel, T.; Blanco, E.; Conway, G. D.; Estrada, T.; Stroth, U.

    2017-03-01

    The power response of a Doppler reflectometer is investigated by means of the physical optics model; a simple model which considers basic scattering processes at the reflection layer. Apart from linear and saturated scattering regimes, non-linear regimes with an enhanced backscattered power are found. The different regimes are characterized and understood based on analytical calculations. The power response is also studied with two-dimensional full wave simulations, where the enhanced backscattered power regimes are also found in qualitative agreement with the physical optics results. The ordinary and extraordinary modes are compared for the same angle of incidence, with the conclusion that the ordinary mode is better suited for Doppler reflectometry turbulence level measurements due to the linearity of its response. The scattering efficiency is studied and a first approximation to describe it is proposed. At the end, the application of the physical optics results to experimental data analysis is discussed. In particular, a formula to assess the linearity of Doppler reflectometry measurements is provided.

  6. A preliminary neutron diffraction study of rasburicase, a recombinant urate oxidase enzyme, complexed with 8-azaxanthin

    SciTech Connect

    Budayova-Spano, Monika; Bonneté, Françoise; Ferté, Natalie; El Hajji, Mohamed; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew Paul; Castro, Bertrand

    2006-03-01

    Neutron diffraction data of hydrogenated recombinant urate oxidase enzyme (Rasburicase), complexed with a purine-type inhibitor 8-azaxanthin, was collected to 2.1 Å resolution from a crystal grown in D{sub 2}O by careful control and optimization of crystallization conditions via knowledge of the phase diagram. Deuterium atoms were clearly seen in the neutron-scattering density map. Crystallization and preliminary neutron diffraction measurements of rasburicase, a recombinant urate oxidase enzyme expressed by a genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, complexed with a purine-type inhibitor (8-azaxanthin) are reported. Neutron Laue diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution using the LADI instrument from a crystal (grown in D{sub 2}O) with volume 1.8 mm{sup 3}. The aim of this neutron diffraction study is to determine the protonation states of the inhibitor and residues within the active site. This will lead to improved comprehension of the enzymatic mechanism of this important enzyme, which is used as a protein drug to reduce toxic uric acid accumulation during chemotherapy. This paper illustrates the high quality of the neutron diffraction data collected, which are suitable for high-resolution structural analysis. In comparison with other neutron protein crystallography studies to date in which a hydrogenated protein has been used, the volume of the crystal was relatively small and yet the data still extend to high resolution. Furthermore, urate oxidase has one of the largest primitive unit-cell volumes (space group I222, unit-cell parameters a = 80, b = 96, c = 106 Å) and molecular weights (135 kDa for the homotetramer) so far successfully studied with neutrons.

  7. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux beam reactor (HFBR).

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R. B.

    1998-01-16

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm{sup 3} in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept.

  8. Preliminary study of nuclear fuel element testing based on coded source neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Wang; Hang Li; Chao Cao; Yang Wu; Heyong Huo; Bin Tang

    2015-07-01

    Neutron radiography (NR) is one of the most important nondestructive testing methods, which is sensitive to low density materials. Especially, Neutron transfer imaging method could be used to test radioactivity materials refraining from γ effect, but it is difficult to realize tomography. Coded source neutron imaging (CSNI) is a newly NR method developed fast in the last several years. The distance between object and detector is much longer than traditional NR, which could be used to test radioactivity materials. With pre-reconstruction process from fold-cover projections, CSNI could easily realize tomography. This thesis carries out preliminary study on the nuclear fuel element testing by coded source neutron imaging. We calculate different enrichment, flaws and activity in nuclear fuel elements tested by CSNI with Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that CSNI could be a useful testing method for nuclear fuel element testing. (authors)

  9. Neutron radiation damage and recovery studies of SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, T.; Rao, T.; Stoll, S.; Woody, C.

    2016-12-01

    We characterized the performance of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) before and after exposure of up to 1012 neutron/cm2 dosage. We show that the typical orders of magnitude increase of dark current upon neutron irradiation can be suppressed by operating it at a lower temperature and single-photoelectron detection capability can be restored. The required operating temperature depends on the dosage received. Furthermore, after high temperature thermal annealing, there is compelling evidence that the extrinsic dark current is lowered by orders of magnitude and single-photon detection performance are to some extent recovered at room temperature. Our experimental findings might have widespread implications for extending the functionality and the useful lifetime of current and future large scale SiPM detectors deployed in ionization radiation environment.

  10. Passive neutron design study for 200-L waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Beddingfield, D.B.; Pickrell, M.M.

    1997-09-01

    We have developed a passive neutron counter for the measurement of plutonium in 200-L drums of scrap and waste. The counter incorporates high efficiency for the multiplicity counting in addition to the traditional coincidence counting. The {sup 252}Cf add-a-source feature is used to provide an accurate assay over a wide range of waste matrix materials. The room background neutron rate is reduced by using 30 cm of external polyethylene shielding and the cosmic-ray background is reduced by statistical filtering techniques. Monte Carlo Code calculations were used to determine the optimum detector design, including the gas pressure, size, number, and placement of the {sup 3}He tubes in the moderator. Various moderators, including polyethylene, plastics, teflon, and graphite, were evaluated to obtain the maximum efficiency and minimum detectable mass of plutonium.

  11. Neutron radiation damage and recovery studies of SiPMs

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Rao, T.; Stoll, S.; Woody, C.

    2016-12-01

    We characterized the performance of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) before and after exposure of up to 1012 neutron/cm2 dosage. We show that the typical orders of magnitude increase of dark current upon neutron irradiation can be suppressed by operating it at a lower temperature and single-photoelectron detection capability can be restored. The required operating temperature depends on the dosage received. Furthermore, after high temperature thermal annealing, there is compelling evidence that the extrinsic dark current is lowered by orders of magnitude and single-photon detection performance are to some extent recovered at room temperature. Our experimental findings might have widespread implications for extending the functionality and the useful lifetime of current and future large scale SiPM detectors deployed in ionization radiation environment.

  12. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vapor Deposited Amorphous Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, A. I.; Li, J.-C.; Dong, S.; Bailey, I. F.; Eccleston, R. S.; Hahn, W.; Parker, S. F.

    1997-09-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra were measured for amorphous ice H2O and D2O produced by low-temperature and low-rate vapor deposition. The data show that the deposition produced the low-density amorphous form of ice, i.e., the high-density amorphous ice observed by x-ray [A. H. Narten, C. G. Venkatesh, and S. A. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 64, 1106 (1976)] and electron diffraction [P. Jenniskens and D. F. Blake, Science 265, 753 (1994)] under similar conditions was not detected. This result was confirmed by separate neutron diffraction experiments. Vibrational spectra of the deposited amorphous ice were dissimilar to that of ice Ih/Ic, as was believed previously.

  13. Neutron diffraction study of α-iron titanium cerium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Niu, Shiwen; Gou, Cheng; Jin, Longhuan; Tao, Fang; Bao, Deyou; Su, Lanying

    1987-03-01

    The results of the neutron scattering method shows that the crystal structure of Fe0.94TiCe0.06H0.03 is the same as that of the FeTiH0.02. However, its diffraction peak intensities drop by 47-58%, the background increased markedly about 2 times and the lattice constant increase by 5%.

  14. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of POSS ligand dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jalarvo, Niina H; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Crawford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Polyoligosilsesquioxanes are molecules having cage-like structures composed of silicon and oxygen. These molecules can have a wide variety of functional ligands attached to them. Depending on the nature of the ligand, interesting properties and applications are found. In this work we present results from quasielastic neutron scattering measurements of four different POSS molecules that illustrate the presence of strong coupling between the ligand dynamics and the POSS crystal structures.

  15. Neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: a summary (1981-1986).

    PubMed

    Swaja, R E; Sims, C S

    1988-09-01

    To provide an opportunity for dosimetrists to test and calibrate their neutron personnel monitoring systems, the staff of the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies (PDIS) periodically since 1974. During these studies, personnel dosimeters are mailed to ORNL, exposed to low-level (less than 15 mSv) neutron dose equivalents in a variety of mixed-radiation fields, and then returned to the participants for evaluation. These intercomparisons have provided more data on neutron dosimeter performance than any other periodic test program conducted to date. This report presents a summary and analysis of about 3450 neutron dose equivalent measurements reported for PDIS 7 through 12 (1981-1986) with emphasis on low dose equivalent sensitivity, accuracy and precision, and performance relative to accreditation standards for the basic types of personnel dosimetry systems. Relationships of the PDIS results to occupational neutron monitoring, accreditation testing, and methods to improve personnel neutron dosimetry performance are also discussed.

  16. Beta-delayed neutron emission studies with a C7LYC array at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Gemma; Chowdhury, Partha; Lister, Christopher; Brown, Tristan; Carpenter, Michael; Chillery, Thomas; Copp, Patrick; Doucet, Emery; Mitchell, Alan; Savard, Guy; Zhu, Shaofei

    2016-09-01

    This work is a study of β-delayed neutron and γ emission from 94Rb at CARIBU. Beta-delayed neutron emission studies are important in the astrophysical r-process, nuclear structure and for nuclear reactor safety and design. Approximately 150 γ rays are known in the daughter 94Sr, many of which are unplaced. An estimated 26% of γ rays are thought to be missing. The probability of β-delayed neutron emission in 94Sr is 10.2(2)%. Recently, substantial γ-decay from above the neutron separation energy in 94Rb has been reported. This research is aimed at understanding this high-lying γ-strength. The experiment employed the X-Array (a high efficiency HPGe clover array), SCANS (Small CLYC Array for Neutron Scattering) and the SATURN decay station (Scintillator And Tape Using Radioactive Nuclei) for γ, fast neutron and β-particle detection, respectively. Data were collected in a triggerless digital data acquisition system, with detected β , n , and γ events correlated offline. Techniques, analysis and first results will be discussed. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance Program under Grant DE-NA00013008, and by US DoE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  17. Thermal-hydraulic studies of the Advanced Neutron Source cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was to be a user-oriented neutron research facility producing the most intense steady-state flux of thermal and cold neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the production of cold neutrons was a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410-mm-diam sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design were performed with heat conduction simulations of the vessel walls and multidimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This report presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that were planned to verify the final design.

  18. Feasibility of Small Animal Anatomical and Functional Imaging with Neutrons: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medich, David C.; Currier, Blake H.; Karellas, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    A novel technique is presented for obtaining a single in-vivo image containing both functional and anatomical information in a small animal model such as a mouse. This technique, which incorporates appropriate image neutron-scatter rejection and uses a neutron opaque contrast agent, is based on neutron radiographic technology and was demonstrated through a series of Monte Carlo simulations. With respect to functional imaging, this technique can be useful in biomedical and biological research because it could achieve a spatial resolution orders of magnitude better than what presently can be achieved with current functional imaging technologies such as nuclear medicine (PET, SPECT) and fMRI. For these studies, Monte Carlo simulations were performed with thermal (0.025 eV) neutrons in a 3 cm thick phantom using the MCNP5 simulations software. The goals of these studies were to determine: 1) the extent that scattered neutrons degrade image contrast; 2) the contrasts of various normal and diseased tissues under conditions of complete scatter rejection; 3) the concentrations of Boron-10 and Gadolinium-157 required for contrast differentiation in functional imaging; and 4) the efficacy of collimation for neutron scatter image rejection. Results demonstrate that with proper neutron-scatter rejection, a neutron fluence of 2 ×107 n/cm2 will provide a signal to noise ratio of at least one ( S/N ≥ 1) when attempting to image various 300 μm thick tissues placed in a 3 cm thick phantom. Similarly, a neutron fluence of only 1 ×107 n/cm2 is required to differentiate a 300 μm thick diseased tissue relative to its normal tissue counterpart. The utility of a B-10 contrast agent was demonstrated at a concentration of 50 μg/g to achieve S/N ≥ 1 in 0.3 mm thick tissues while Gd-157 requires only slightly more than 10 μg/g to achieve the same level of differentiation. Lastly, neutron collimator with an L/D ratio from 50 to 200 were calculated to provide appropriate scatter

  19. GNSS Reflectometry for estimation of ocean dynamic topography at the coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Simon D. P.; Hughes, Christopher W.

    2017-04-01

    The greatest direct impact of sea level is at the coast, but measurements of dynamic topography precisely at the coast are difficult to make, and are presently limited to the relatively small number of tide gauges for which precise GPS vertical coordinates are known. Using recent geoid estimates, dynamic topography estimates are consistent with ocean model analyses at the 5-8 cm level. In order to expand the available dataset, we investigate the use of GNSS Reflectometry to measure sea level that is naturally in a modern vertical reference frame that can be used to study mean dynamic topography, validate geoid models and help to define a world height system. We show the results from multiple GNSS sites with wildly varying environments and equipment; including some with over 10 years of data. We find that in order to get an accuracy of around 5 cm requires the application of both the wet and dry tropospheric correction to the data. We also discuss the use of L5 SNR data where we find precisions of around 3-5 cm and the use of GNSS reflectometry at the coast to also measure or detect the onset of sea ice.

  20. Improved time-frequency analysis of ASDEX Upgrade reflectometry data using the reassigned spectrogram technique

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, P.; Silva, A.; Silva, F. da; Graca, S. da; Manso, M. E. [Associacao EURATOM Conway, G. D. [MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-10-15

    The spectrogram is one of the best-known time-frequency distributions suitable to analyze signals whose energy varies both in time and frequency. In reflectometry, it has been used to obtain the frequency content of FM-CW signals for density profile inversion and also to study plasma density fluctuations from swept and fixed frequency data. Being implemented via the short-time Fourier transform, the spectrogram is limited in resolution, and for that reason several methods have been developed to overcome this problem. Among those, we focus on the reassigned spectrogram technique that is both easily automated and computationally efficient requiring only the calculation of two additional spectrograms. In each time-frequency window, the technique reallocates the spectrogram coordinates to the region that most contributes to the signal energy. The application to ASDEX Upgrade reflectometry data results in better energy concentration and improved localization of the spectral content of the reflected signals. When combined with the automatic (data driven) window length spectrogram, this technique provides improved profile accuracy, in particular, in regions where frequency content varies most rapidly such as the edge pedestal shoulder.

  1. ^3He neutron spin filters for polarized neutron scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wangchun; Borchers, Julie; Chen, Ying; O'Donovan, Kevin; Erwin, Ross; Lynn, Jeffrey; Majkrzak, Charles; McKenney, Sarah; Gentile, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Polarized neutron scattering (PNS) is a powerful tool that probes the magnetic structures in a wide variety of magnetic materials. Polarized ^3He gas, produced by optical pumping, can be used to polarize or analyze neutron beams because of the strong spin dependence of the neutron absorption cross section for ^3He. Polarized ^3He neutron spin filters (NSF) have been of great interest in PNS community due to recent significant improvement of their performance. Here I will discuss successful applications using ^3He NSFs in polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) and triple-axis spectrometry (TAS). In PNR, a ^3He NSF in conjunction with a position-sensitive detector allows for efficient polarization analysis of off-specular scattering over a broad range of reciprocal space. In TAS, a ^3He NSF in combination with a double focusing pyrolytic graphite monochromator provides greater versatility and higher intensity compared to a Heusler polarizer. Finally I will present the results from patterned magnetically-coupled thin films in PNR and our first ``proof-of-principle'' experiment in TAS, both of which were performed using ^3He NSF(s) at the NIST Center for Neutron Research.

  2. A neutron diffraction study of the zeolite edingtonitea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvick, Åke; Smith, Joseph V.

    1983-09-01

    A neutron diffraction study at 294 K of a single crystal of edingtonite (Ba2Al4Si6O20 ṡ 7H2O; a 9.537(3) b 9.651(2) c 6.509(2) Å; P21212) utilized 1876 diffraction intensities from the Brookhaven National Laboratory high-flux beam reactor. The agreement factor R(F2)=0.055 for conventional anisotropic refinement was reduced to 0.045 for a Gram-Charlier expansion up to fourth order for the thermal factors of the water atoms. The Si-O and Al-O distances correlate inversely with the Si-O-Al angle as in scolecite. There is no indication of substitutional disorder. The barium atom is coordinated to three pairs of framework oxygens (2.89, 2.96, and 3.04 Å) and two pairs of water oxygens (2.79 and 2.79 Å). Two framework oxygens have weak hydrogen bonds to both water molecules [O(4)-OW(1) 2.87, -OW(2) 2.96; O(5) -OW(1) 3.02, -OW(2) 3.02 Å] and the other three framework oxygens are each bonded to a Ba atom. The OW-H ṡṡṡ O angles (163.5°, 165.1°, 173.9°, and 178.0°) are fairly close to 180°, the H ṡṡṡ O distances are long (1.91, 2.02, 2.09, and 2.10 Å) and the observed uncorrected OW-H distances range from 0.928(6) to 0.959(4) Å. Only seven out of the eight water positions are occupied [W(1) 84% occupancy; W(2) 91%]. The average rms displacement of each hydrogen (0.32, 0.29, 0.27, and 0.24 Å) correlates approximately with the hydrogen bond length (2.09, 2.10, 2.02, and 1.91 Å). Third- and fourth-order tensor components in the displacements of the water molecules may result from anharmonic or curvilinear vibrations; however, the effect of the static displacements of the center-of-motion from interaction with unoccupied water sites may also be important.

  3. HEIMDAL: A thermal neutron powder diffractometer with high and flexible resolution combined with SANS and neutron imaging - Designed for materials science studies at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Lefmann, Kim; Henry, Paul F.; Bertelsen, Mads; Schefer, Jürg; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-08-01

    HEIMDAL will be a multi length scale neutron scattering instrument for the study of structures covering almost nine orders of magnitude from 0.01 nm to 50 mm. The instrument is accepted for construction at the European Spallation Source (ESS) and features a variable resolution thermal neutron powder diffractometer (TNPD), combined with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron imaging (NI). The instrument uses a novel combination of a cold and a thermal guide to fulfill the diverse requirements for diffraction and SANS. With an instrument length of 170 m, HEIMDAL will take advantage of the high neutron flux of the long pulse at ESS, whilst maintaining a high q-resolution due to the long flight path. The q-range coverage is up to 20 Å-1 allowing low-resolution PDF analysis. With the addition of SANS, HEIMDAL will be able to cover a uniquely broad length scale within a single instrumental set-up. HEIMDAL will be able to accommodate modern materials research in a broad variety of fields, and the task of the instrument will be to study advanced functional materials in action, as in situ and in operandi at multiple length scales (0.01-100 nm) quasi simultaneously. The instrument combines state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques (TNPD, SANS, and NI) with the goal of studying real materials, in real time, under real conditions. This article describes the instrument design ideas, calculations and results of simulations and virtual experiments.

  4. Neutron Radiography and Tomography for the in situ Study of Geological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, D. S.; Jacobson, D. L.; LaManna, J.; Baltic, E.

    2016-12-01

    Neutron radiography and tomography are powerful methods to non-destructively study geological specimens in controlled laboratory experiments in situ. This is due to the remarkable nature of neutrons to penetrate high Z materials and still maintain sensitivity to small quantities of liquid water or hydrocarbons bound inside or flowing through geological specimens. The use of neutron imaging as a tool for geology is a relatively recent development. The National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research has two neutron imaging user facilities available to the geology community. Here we will introduce the facilities, method, present data and show how technique applies to geology specimens. We will examine how to quantify the data and the show basic analysis methods and tools that have been developed to convert neutron radiographs into quantifiable information relevant to the geology community. Also the way that the attenuation coefficients for specific rock specimens and the effect of beam hardening will be presented. The freely available software tools used for this analysis will be discussed as well.

  5. Studies on new neutron-sensitive dosimeters using an optically stimulated luminescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M. S.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Behrens, R.; Muthe, K. P.; Rawat, N. S.; Gupta, S. K.; Sharma, D. N.

    2011-07-01

    The neutron response of detectors prepared using α-Al 2O 3:C phosphor developed using a melt processing technique and mixed with neutron converters was studied in monoenergetic neutron fields. The detector pellets were arranged in two different pairs: α-Al 2O 3:C + 6LiF/α-Al 2O 3:C + 7LiF and α-Al 2O 3:C + high-density polyethylene/α-Al 2O 3:C + Teflon, for neutron dosimetry using albedo and recoil proton techniques. The optically stimulated luminescence response of the Al 2O 3:C + 6,7LiF dosimeter to radiation from a 252Cf source was 0.21, in terms of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and relative to radiation from a 137Cs source. This was comparable to results obtained with similar detectors prepared using commercially available α-Al 2O 3:C phosphor. The Hp(10) response of the α-Al 2O 3:C + 6,7LiF dosimeters was found to decrease by more than two orders of magnitude with increasing neutron energy, as expected for albedo dosimeters. The response of the α-Al 2O 3:C + high-density polyethylene/α-Al 2O 3:C + Teflon dosimeters was small, of the order of 1% to 2% in terms of Hp(10) and relative to radiation from a 137Cs source, for neutron energies greater than 1 MeV.

  6. Study of the response of PICASSO bubble detectors to neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlisov, Daniiar

    The objective of this work was to simulate the PICASSO experiment and to study the detector response to neutron irradiation. The results of the simulation show the rock neutron rate to be 1-2 neutrons/day for the setup used until 2009 and less than 0.1 neutrons/day for the setup used after 2010. The shielding efficiency was calculated to be 98% and 99.6% for the two setups respectively. The detector response to an AmBe source was simulated. Neutron rates differ for two AmBe source spectra from the literature. The observed data rate is in agreement with the rate from the simulation. The detector stability was examined and found to be stable. The source position and orientation affect the detector efficiency creating a systematic uncertainity on the order of 10-35%. This uncertainity was eliminated with a source holder. The localisation of recorded events inside the detector and the simulated neutron distribution agree.

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering study of radiation-induced defects in synthetic quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. M. Lebedev, V. T.; Orlov, S. P.; Pevzner, B. Z.; Tolstikhin, I. N.

    2006-12-15

    The supraatomic structure of single crystals of synthetic quartz was studied by thermal neutron small-angle scattering in the initial state (dislocation densities 54 and 570 cm{sup -2}) and after irradiation in the WWR-M reactor (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute) by fast neutrons with energies E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV at fluences F{sub n} = 0.2 x 10{sup 17} -5 x 10{sup 18} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. It is established that fast neutrons form point, linear, and volume defects in the lattice throughout the entire volume of a sample. Large-volume structures-amorphous-phase nuclei-reach sizes of {approx}100 nm in quartz, while occupying a small total volume of {approx}0.3% even at the maximum fluence 5 x 10{sup 18} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. The main fraction of the damaged volume (up to 5%) corresponds to point (with a radius of gyration of 1-2 nm) and linear defects, giving a comparable contribution ({approx}1-4%). The extended linear structures with a radius of 2 nm, even at a moderate fluence of 7.7 x 10{sup 17} neutrons/cm{sup 2}, have a significant total length per volume unit ({approx}10{sup 11} cm/cm{sup 3}) and can form a connected network with a cell {approx}30 nm in size in the sample. Foreign atoms and molecules can migrate through channels of this network.

  8. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  9. SU-E-T-304: Study of Secondary Neutrons From Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M; Zheng, Y; Benton, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are unwanted byproducts from proton therapy and exposure from secondary radiation during treatment could increase risk of developing a secondary cancer later in a patient's lifetime. The purpose of this study is to investigate secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams under various beam conditions using both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: CR-39 Plastic Track Nuclear Detectors (PNTD) were used for the measurement. CR-39 PNTD has tissue like sensitivity to the secondary neutrons but insensitive to the therapeutic protons. In this study, we devised two experimental conditions: a) hollow-phantom; phantom is bored with a hollow cylinder along the direction of the beam so that the primary proton passes through the phantom without interacting with the phantom material, b) cylindrical-phantom; a solid cylinder of diameter close to the beam diameter is placed along the beam path. CR-39 PNTDs were placed laterally inside a 60X20X35 cm3 phantom (hollow-phantom) and in air (cylindrical-phantom) at various angles with respect to the primary beam axis. We studied for three different proton energies (78 MeV, 162 MeV and 226 MeV), using a 4 cm modulation width and 5cm diameter brass aperture for the entire experiment and simulation. A comparison of the experiment was performed using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Results: The measured secondary neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranges from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 25.42 ± 2.3 mSv/Gy for the hollow phantom study, and 2.7 ± 0.3 to 46.4 ± 3.4 mSv/Gy for the cylindrical phantom study. Monte Carlo simulations predicated neutron dose equivalent from measurements within a factor of 5. Conclusion: The study suggests that the production of external neutrons is significantly higher than the production of internal neutrons.

  10. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  11. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H *(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy-1 was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H *(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy-1 at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to thermal

  12. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M

    2016-06-07

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H (*)(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H (*)(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy(-1) was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H (*)(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy(-1) at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to

  13. The GNSS Reflectometry Response to the Ocean Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul; Jelenak, Zorana; Soisuvarn, Seubson; Said, Faozi

    2016-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System - Reflectometry (GNSS-R) exploits signals of opportunity from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). GNSS transmitters continuously transmit navigation signals at L-band toward the earth's surface. The scattered power reflected off the earth's surface can be sensed by specially designed GNSS-R receivers. The reflected signal can then be used to glean information about the surface of the earth, such as ocean surface roughness, snow depth, sea ice extent, and soil moisture. The use of GNSS-R for ocean wind retrievals was first demonstrated from aircraft. On July 8 2014, the TechDemoSat-1 satellite (TDS-1) was launched by Surrey Satellite Technology, Ltd as a technology risk reduction mission into sun-synchronous orbit. This paper investigates the GNSS-R measurements collected by the Space GNSS Receiver-Remote Sensing Instrument (SGR-ReSI) on board the TDS-1 satellite. The sensitivity of the SGR-ReSI measurements to the ocean surface winds and waves are characterized. The effects of sea surface temperature, wind direction, and rain are also investigated. The SGR-ReSI measurements exhibited sensitivity through the entire range of wind speeds sampled in this dataset, up to 35 m/s. A significant dependence on the larger waves was observed for winds < 6 m/s. Additionally, an interesting dependence on SST was observed where the slope of the SGR-ReSI measurements is positive for winds < 5 m/s and reverses for winds > 5 m/s. There appeared to be very little wind direction signal, and investigation of the rain impacts found no apparent sensitivity in the data. These results are shown through the analysis of global statistics and examination of a few case studies. This released SGR-ReSI dataset provided the first opportunity to comprehensively investigate the sensitivity of satellite-based GNSS-R measurements to various ocean surface parameters. The upcoming NASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) satellite

  14. Ellipsometric and neutron diffraction study of pentane physisorbed on graphite.

    PubMed

    Kruchten, Frank; Knorr, Klaus; Volkmann, Ulrich G; Taub, Haskell; Hansen, Flemming Y; Matthies, Blake; Herwig, Kenneth W

    2005-08-02

    High-resolution ellipsometry and neutron diffraction measurements have been used to investigate the structure, growth, and wetting behavior of fluid pentane (n-C(5)H(12)) films adsorbed on graphite substrates. We present isotherms of the thickness of pentane films adsorbed on the basal-plane surfaces of a pyrolytic graphite substrate as a function of the vapor pressure. These isotherms are measured ellipsometrically for temperatures between 130 and 190 K. We also describe neutron diffraction measurements in the temperature range 11-140 K on a deuterated pentane (n-C(5)D(12)) monolayer adsorbed on an exfoliated graphite substrate. Below a temperature of 99 K, the diffraction patterns are consistent with a rectangular centered structure. Above the pentane triple point at 143.5 K, the ellipsometric measurements indicate layer-by-layer adsorption of at least seven fluid pentane layers, each having the same optical thickness. Analysis of the neutron diffraction pattern of a pentane monolayer at a temperature of 130 K is consistent with small clusters having a rectangular-centered structure and an area per molecule of approximately 37 A(2) in coexistence with a fluid monolayer phase. Assuming values of the polarizability tensor from the literature and that the monolayer fluid has the same areal density as that inferred for the coexisting clusters, we calculate an optical thickness of the fluid pentane layers in reasonable agreement with that measured by ellipsometry. We discuss how these results support the previously proposed "footprint reduction" mechanism of alkane monolayer melting. In the hypercritical regime, we show that the layering behavior is consistent with the two-dimensional Ising model and determine the critical temperatures for layers n = 2-5.

  15. Sensitivity study of neutron transport through standard and rebar concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Roussin, R.W.; Lucius, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is under way at ORNL to (1) develop a data base pertinent to the transport of neutrons through thick concrete shields, (2) use the data base in an energy group boundary selection and collapsing scheme, and (3) develop a simple methodology to access the data base to provide rapid solutions to practical shielding problems. This paper describes work carried out to fulfill objective (1), the work consisting of calculations of the transport of fission neutrons through 1- and 2-m-thick slabs of standard concrete and rebar (steel-reinforced) concrete, together with calculations of the sensitivities of the results to total, absorption, and elastic cross sections. The transport calculations were performed with the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN in both forward and adjoint modes. The DLC-41C/VITAMIN-C cross-section library (171 neutron, 36 gamma groups) was employed, with a P/sub 3/ cross-section expansion and an S/sub 16/ angular quadrature. In all cases the fission source was assumed to be distributed within the first 1-cm thickness of the slab and the detector was assumed to occupy the last 1-cm thickness of the slab. For the rebar concrete the slab constituents were homogenized, with the horizontal and vertical No. 11 reinforcing steel rods comprising 7.6 vol. % of the slab. The quantity calculated was the absorbed dose rate, and care was taken in the mesh interval selection and source description to ensure agreement between the forward and adjoint results to within 0.02%.

  16. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  17. Thermal Denaturation of DNA Studied with Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wildes, Andrew; Theodorakopoulos, Nikos; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Peyrard, Michel; Garden, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-28

    The melting transition of DNA, whereby the strands of the double-helix structure completely separate at a certain temperature, has been characterized using neutron scattering. A Bragg peak from B-form fiber DNA has been measured as a function of temperature, and its widths and integrated intensities have been interpreted using the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model with only one free parameter. The experiment is unique, as it gives spatial correlation along the molecule through the melting transition where other techniques cannot.

  18. Feasibility study of Self Powered Neutron Detectors in Fast Reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, Christian; Filliatre, Philippe; Verma, Vasudha; Hellesen, Carl; Jacobsson Svard, Staffan

    2015-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor system. Diverse possibilities of detector systems installation have to be investigated with respect to practicality and feasibility according to the detection parameters. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution. We show that the gamma contribution from fission products decay in the fuel and activation of structural materials is very small compared to the fission gammas. Thus, it is possible for the in-core SPND signal to follow changes in local neutron flux as they are proportional to each other. This implies that the signal from an in-core SPND can provide dynamic information on the neutron flux perturbations occurring inside the reactor core. (authors)

  19. Neutron diffraction studies of welds of aerospace aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Martukanitz, R.P.; Howell, P.R.; Payzant, E.A.; Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron diffraction and electron microscopy were done on residual stress in various regions comprising variable polarity plasma arc welds of alloys 2219 (Al-6.3Cu) and 2195 (Al-4.0Cu-1.0Li-0.5Mg-0.5Ag). Results indicate that lattice parameter changes in the various weld regions may be attributed to residual stresses generated during welding, as well as local changes in microstructure. Distribution of longitudinal and transverse stress of welded panels shows peaks of tension and compression, respectively, within the HAZ and corroborate earlier theoretical results. Position of these peaks are related to position of minimum strength within the HAZ, and the magnitude of these peaks are a fraction of the local yield strength in this region. Weldments of alloy 2195-T8 exhibited higher peak residual stress than alloy 2219-T87. Comparison of neutron diffraction and microstructural analysis indicate decreased lattice parameters associated with the solid solution of the near HAZ; this results in decreased apparent tensile residual stress within this region and may significantly alter interpretation of residual stress measurements of these alloys. Considerable relaxation of residual stress occurs during removal of specimens from welded panels and was used to aid in differentiating changes in lattice parameters attributed to residual stress from welding and modifications in microstructure.

  20. Focused Study of Thermonuclear Bursts on Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevez, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    X-ray bursters form a class of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries where accreted material from a donor star undergoes rapid thermonuclear burning in the surface layers of a neutron star. The flux released can temporarily exceed the Eddington limit and drive the photosphere to large radii. Such photospheric radius expansion bursts likely eject nuclear burning ashes into the interstellar medium, and may make possible the detection of photoionization edges. Indeed, theoretical models predict that absorption edges from 58Fe at 9.2 keV, 60Zn and 62Zn at 12.2 keV should be detectable by the future missions Simbol-X and NuSTAR. A positive detection would thus probe the nuclear burning as well as the gravitational redshift from the neutron star. Moreover, likely observations of atomic X-ray spectral components reflected from the inner accretion disk have been reported. The high spectral resolution capabilities of the focusing X-ray telescopes may therefore make possible to differentiate between the potential interpretations of the X-ray bursts spectral features.

  1. Cosmic ray heliospheric transport study with neutron monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Ygbuhay, R. C.; Modzelewska, R.; Dorman, L. I.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Determining transport coefficients for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) propagation in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) poses a fundamental challenge in modeling cosmic ray modulation processes. GCR scattering in the solar wind involves wave-particle interaction, the waves being Alfven waves which propagate along the ambient field (B). Empirical values at 1 AU are determined for the components of the diffusion tensor for GCR propagation in the heliosphere using neutron monitor (NM) data. At high rigidities, particle density gradients and mean free paths at 1 AU in B can only be computed from the solar diurnal anisotropy (SDA) represented by a vector A (components Ar, Aϕ, and Aθ) in a heliospherical polar coordinate system. Long-term changes in SDA components of NMs (with long track record and the median rigidity of response Rm ~ 20 GV) are used to compute yearly values of the transport coefficients for 1963-2013. We confirm the previously reported result that the product of the parallel (to B) mean free path (λ||) and radial density gradient (Gr) computed from NM data exhibits a weak Schwabe cycle (11y) but strong Hale magnetic cycle (22y) dependence. Its value is most depressed in solar activity minima for positive (p) polarity intervals (solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere points outward from the Sun) when GCRs drift from the polar regions toward the helioequatorial plane and out along the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), setting up a symmetric gradient Gθs pointing away from HCS. Gr drives all SDA components and λ|| Gr contributes to the diffusive component (Ad) of the ecliptic plane anisotropy (A). GCR transport is commonly discussed in terms of an isotropic hard sphere scattering (also known as billiard-ball scattering) in the solar wind plasma. We use it with a flat HCS model and the Ahluwalia-Dorman master equations to compute the coefficients α (=λ⊥/λ∥) and ωτ (a measure of turbulence in the solar wind) and transport

  2. In-situ, Gate Bias Dependent Study of Neutron Irradiation Effects on AlGaN/GaN HFETs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    equivalent neutron fluence in gallium arsenide. Gallium arsenide was chosen instead of Si due to more similar structure to GaN. The equivalent fluence...IN-SITU GATE BIAS DEPENDENT STUDY OF NEUTRON IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON ALGAN/GAN HFETS THESIS...AFIT/GNE/ENP/10M-06 IN-SITU GATE BIAS DEPENDENT STUDY OF NEUTRON IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON ALGAN/GAN HFETS THESIS Presented to the

  3. Background studies for the COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane M.; COHERENT Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The COHERENT experiment is designed for a first measurement and N2 dependence study of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). CEvNS is a standard model process that is important in understanding supernova neutrinos, the structure of the weak interaction and backgrounds for dark matter searches. The COHERENT collaboration is placing a suite of detector technologies in a basement location at the SNS: 14 kg CsI[Na] crystals; 185 kg NaI crystals; 35 kg single-phase LAr; 10kg high-purity, point contact Ge. Previous attempts to measure the CEvNS process have grappled with very high background rates. One class of troublesome backgrounds is accelerator-correlated neutrons because a simple accelerator on/off background subtraction procedure fails to remove these events. The collaboration has completed a comprehensive background study in the basement region where the experiments are located. We conclude from these studies that the neutron background is sufficiently low for successful CEvNS measurement in the SNS basement region. Neutron measurements from the Indiana University SciBath detector and the Sandia Neutron Scatter Camera are presented here.

  4. Continuous liquid level measurements with time-domain reflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, J. E.; Rogers, E. H.; Heister, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the basic principles of radar measurements of cryogenic liquid levels in storage vessels by time-domain reflectometry. The probe consists of a right circular coaxial transmission line positioned vertically in the storage vessel and having holes drilled in the outer conductor to permit penetration of the liquid into the annular gap. RF pulses transmitted through the probe are reflected at liquid/gas interface and returned for sampling at the input. The measured delay of the return pulse is displayed as the level of liquid in the vessel.

  5. Acoustic reflectometry esophageal profiles minimally affected by massive gas ventilation.

    PubMed

    Raphael, David T; Crookes, Peter; Arnaudov, Dimiter; Benbassat, Maxim

    2005-10-01

    Acoustic reflectometry can be used to distinguish between breathing tube placement in an esophagus vs the trachea via characteristic area-distance profiles for both cavities. In the cardiopulmonary resuscitation setting, capnography may be useless because the patient has little or no pulmonary circulation. With the breathing tube in the esophagus, can massive ventilation with a manual resuscitation bag, as might occur in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation setting, markedly alter the form of the obtained esophageal reflectometry profile? Nine hounds were induced, endotracheally intubated, mechanically ventilated, and anesthetized. Area-distance profiles were obtained with a 2-microphone acoustic reflectometer customized to measure areas up to 50 cm. Acoustic reflectometer profiles were obtained in intubated esophagi as follows: (1) baseline nonventilated state, (2) after aggressive 2-handed manual ventilation with high inspiratory pressures, rapid respiratory rates, and large tidal volumes for periods of 0.5, 1, and 1.5 minutes, upon detachment of the resuscitation bag, and (3) after esophagogastric decompression. We hypothesized that massive gas ventilation has no effect on the esophageal peak areas (null hypothesis), and used a paired t test for statistical significance (P < .05). For times of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 minutes, the ventilation volumes (mean +/- SD) were 25 +/- 7, 49 +/- 8, and 70 +/- 18 L. Massive gas ventilation caused minimal broadening and slight distal spread of the basal "hump". The mean peak area change was 0.18 +/- 0.35 cm2. For a paired t test (n = 9, df = 8), the corresponding t value was 1.54, with a P value of .16, which was incompatible with the null hypothesis. The experimental observations indicate a minimal effect of massive gas ventilation on the acoustic reflectometry esophageal profile. Hence, operator recognition of the altered canine acoustic reflectometer profile as that of an esophageal cavity is maintained, indicating that acoustic

  6. Polarized neutrons for Australian scientific research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Shane J.

    2005-02-01

    Polarized neutron scattering has been a feature at ANSTO's HIFAR research reactor since the first polarization analysis (PA) spectrometer Longpol began operation over 30 years ago. Since that time, we have improved performance of Longpol and added new capabilities in several reincarnations of the instrument. Most of the polarized neutron experiments have been in the fields of magnetism and superconductivity, and most of that research has involved PA. Now as we plan our next generation neutron beam facility, at the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR), we intend to continue the tradition of PA but with a far broader scope in mind. Our new capabilities will combine PA and energy analysis with both cold and thermal neutron source spectra. We will also provide capabilities for research with polarized neutrons in small-angle neutron scattering and in neutron reflectometry. The discussion includes a brief historical account of the technical developments with a summary of past and present applications of polarized neutrons at HIFAR, and an outline of the polarized neutron capabilities that will be included in the first suite of instruments, which will begin operation at the new reactor in 2006.

  7. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei far from stability at TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The ISOL facility, TRISTAN, is a user facility located at Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor. Short-lived, neutron-rich nuclei, far from stability, are produced by thermal neutron fission of /sup 235/U. An extensive array of experimental end stations are available for nuclear structure studies. These studies are augmented by a variety of long-lived ion sources suitable for use at a reactor facility. Some recent results at TRISTAN are presented as examples of using an ISOL facility to study series of nuclei, whereby an effective means of conducting nuclear structure investigations is available.

  8. A feasibility study of a deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based boron neutron capture therapy system for treatment of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Mindy; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Poulson, Jean M; Nie, Linda H

    2017-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that uses high LET particles to achieve tumor cell killing. Deuterium-deuterium (DD) compact neutron generators have advantages over nuclear reactors and large accelerators as the BNCT neutron source, such as their compact size, low cost, and relatively easy installation. The purpose of this study is to design a beam shaping assembly (BSA) for a DD neutron generator and assess the potential of a DD-based BNCT system using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The MC model consisted of a head phantom, a DD neutron source, and a BSA. The head phantom had tally cylinders along the centerline for computing neutron and photon fluences and calculating the dose as a function of depth. The head phantom was placed at 4 cm from the BSA. The neutron source was modeled to resemble the source of our current DD neutron generator. A BSA was designed to moderate and shape the 2.45-MeV DD neutrons to the epithermal (0.5 eV to 10 keV) range. The BSA had multiple components, including moderator, reflector, collimator, and filter. Various materials and configurations were tested for each component. Each BSA layout was assessed in terms of the in-air and in-phantom parameters. The maximum brain dose was limited to 12.5 Gray-Equivalent (Gy-Eq) and the skin dose to 18 Gy-Eq. The optimized BSA configuration included 30 cm of lead for reflector, 45 cm of LiF, and 10 cm of MgF2 for moderator, 10 cm of lead for collimator, and 0.1 mm of cadmium for thermal neutron filter. Epithermal flux at the beam aperture was 1.0 × 10(5)  nepi /cm(2) -s; thermal-to-epithermal neutron ratio was 0.05; fast neutron dose per epithermal was 5.5 × 10(-13)  Gy-cm(2) /φepi , and photon dose per epithermal was 2.4 × 10(-13)  Gy-cm(2) /φepi . The AD, AR, and the advantage depth dose rate were 12.1 cm, 3.7, and 3.2 × 10(-3)  cGy-Eq/min, respectively. The maximum skin dose was 0.56 Gy-Eq. The DD neutron yield that is needed to

  9. A Multi-layered target for the Study of Neutron-Unbound Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, Paul; Frank, Nathan; Thoennessen, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The MoNA/LISA setup at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University has provided an avenue to study the nuclear structure of unbound states/nuclei at and beyond the neutron drip line for the past decade using secondary beams from the Coupled Cyclotron Facility. A new multi-layered Si/Be active target is planned to be built to specifically study neutron unbound nuclei. In these experiments the decay energy is reconstructed from fragment-neutron coincidence measurements which are typically low in count rate. The multi-layered target will allow the use of thicker targets to increase the reaction rates, thus enabling to study currently out of reach nuclei such as 21C, 23C, and 24N. A description of the new setup and physics impact will be discussed.

  10. High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction Studies for Materials Sciences and Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Los Alamos High Pressure Materials Research Team

    2013-05-01

    The development of neutron diffraction under extreme pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions is highly valuable to condensed matter physics, crystal chemistry, materials sciences, as well as earth and planetary sciences. We have incorporated a 500-ton press TAP-98 into the HiPPO diffractometer at LANSCE to conduct in situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments. We have worked out a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP, to conduct neutron diffraction experiments at high-P and low-T. The ZAP cell can be used to integrate multiple experimental techniques such as neutron diffraction, laser spectroscopy, and ultrasonic interferometery. Recently, we have developed high-P low-T gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments. These techniques enable in-situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes and allow high-resolution time-dependent determination of changes in crystal structure and related reaction kinetics. We have successfully used these techniques to study the equation of state, structural phase transition, and thermo-mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, and minerals. We have conducted researches on the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, and hydrogen adsorption of the inclusion compounds such as the recently discovered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The aim of our research is to accurately map phase diagram, lattice parameters, thermal parameters, bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. We are currently developing further high P-T technology with a new "true" triaxial loading press, TAP_6x, to compress cubic sample package to achieve pressures up to 20 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K in routine experiments. The implementation of TAP_6x300 with high-pressure neutron beamlines is underway for simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction, ultrasonic, calorimetry, radiography, and tomography studies. Studies based on high

  11. Study of a Li doped CsI scintillator crystal as a neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi Filho, T.; Pereira, M. C. C.; Berretta, J. R.; Cárdenas, J. P. N.

    2015-07-01

    The radiation monitoring system is an important requirement in the premises of a nuclear reactor. A variety of types of radiation (neutrons. gamma. beta and fission products) exist in a reactor. associated to the broad energy spectrum of these radiations. implying the need of detectors to be used in the reactor system and security. as well as radiation monitoring. As the neutron sources are associated to gamma radiation. it is necessary that the neutron detecting system may be capable to discriminate the gamma interference. In our work environment. there are two Nuclear Research Reactors and a neutron irradiator with two AmBe sources (592GBq of Am. each). These conditions warrant the development of new types of detectors. Due to the absence of charge in the neutron. it is necessary to use a converter material that generates radiations capable to produce signals in the detector. Materials with high cross section. like Li or B. are used for this purpose. The CsIcrystal doped with 6Li has been studied. The concentration of the lithium doping element (Li) studied was 10-3M. The detector test was done using an AmBe source (37GBq) and gamma sources. The crystal was coupled to a photomultiplier.

  12. Cable Damage Detection System and Algorithms Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G A; Robbins, C L; Wade, K A; Souza, P R

    2009-03-24

    This report describes the hardware system and the set of algorithms we have developed for detecting damage in cables for the Advanced Development and Process Technologies (ADAPT) Program. This program is part of the W80 Life Extension Program (LEP). The system could be generalized for application to other systems in the future. Critical cables can undergo various types of damage (e.g. short circuits, open circuits, punctures, compression) that manifest as changes in the dielectric/impedance properties of the cables. For our specific problem, only one end of the cable is accessible, and no exemplars of actual damage are available. This work addresses the detection of dielectric/impedance anomalies in transient time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements on the cables. The approach is to interrogate the cable using time domain reflectometry (TDR) techniques, in which a known pulse is inserted into the cable, and reflections from the cable are measured. The key operating principle is that any important cable damage will manifest itself as an electrical impedance discontinuity that can be measured in the TDR response signal. Machine learning classification algorithms are effectively eliminated from consideration, because only a small number of cables is available for testing; so a sufficient sample size is not attainable. Nonetheless, a key requirement is to achieve very high probability of detection and very low probability of false alarm. The approach is to compare TDR signals from possibly damaged cables to signals or an empirical model derived from reference cables that are known to be undamaged. This requires that the TDR signals are reasonably repeatable from test to test on the same cable, and from cable to cable. Empirical studies show that the repeatability issue is the 'long pole in the tent' for damage detection, because it is has been difficult to achieve reasonable repeatability. This one factor dominated the project. The two-step model-based approach is

  13. Small angle neutron scattering studies of vesicle stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, J.T.; Hjelm, R.P.

    1997-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate the structure of mixed colloids of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) with the bile salt, cholylglycine (CG), in D{sub 2}O as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). At atmospheric pressure, the system forms an isotropic phase of mixed, single bilayer vesicles (SLV`s). Increasing the external hydrostatic pressure brought about significant changes in particle morphology. At T = 25 C, application of a pressure of 3.5 MPa resulted in the collapse of the SLV`s. Further increase of P, up to 51.8 MPa, resulted in a transition from a phase of ordered (stacked), collapsed vesicles to one of stacked, ribbon-like particles. A similar collapse of the vesicles was observed at higher temperature (T = 37 C) with increasing P, but at this temperature, no ribbon phase was found at the highest pressure explored.

  14. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  15. Powder neutron diffraction studies of a carbonate fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Leventouri, Th.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Moghaddam, H. Y.; Perdikatsis, V.

    2000-02-01

    Atomic positional disorder of a single-phase natural carbonate fluorapatite (francolite) is revealed from analysis of the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) refined from neutron powder diffraction data as a function of temperature and carbonate content. The ADPs of the francolite show a strong disturbance at the P, O3, and F sites. When it is heat treated to partially or completely remove the carbonate, the ADPs as well as the other structural parameters resemble those of a fluorapatite (Harding pegmatite) that was measured under the same conditions. The various structural changes are consistent with a substitution mechanism whereby the planar carbonate group replaces a phosphate group and lies on the mirror plane of the apatite structure. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society.

  16. Radiation damage study using small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rétfalvi, E.; Török, Gy; Rosta, L.

    2000-03-01

    Nuclear radiation provides important changes in the microstructure of metallic components of nuclear power plant and research reactors, influencing their mechanical properties. The investigation of this problem has primary interest for the safety and life-time of such nuclear installations. For the characterization of this kind of nanostructures small angle neutron scattering technique is a very useful tool. We have carried out experiments on samples of irradiated reactor vessel material and welded components of VVER-440-type reactors on the SANS instrument at the Budapest Research Reactor. In our measurements irradiated as well as non-irradiated samples were compared and magnetic field was applied for viewing the magnetic structure effects of the materials. A clear modification of the structure due to irradiation was obtained. Our data were analyzed by the ITP92 code, the inverse Fourier transform program of O. Glatter [1].

  17. Error-disturbance uncertainty relations studied in neutron optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponar, Stephan; Sulyok, Georg; Demirel, Bulent; Hasegawa, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is probably the most famous statement of quantum physics and its essential aspects are well described by a formulations in terms of standard deviations. However, a naive Heisenberg-type error-disturbance relation is not valid. An alternative universally valid relation was derived by Ozawa in 2003. Though universally valid Ozawa's relation is not optimal. Recently, Branciard has derived a tight error-disturbance uncertainty relation (EDUR), describing the optimal trade-off between error and disturbance. Here, we report a neutron-optical experiment that records the error of a spin-component measurement, as well as the disturbance caused on another spin-component to test EDURs. We demonstrate that Heisenberg's original EDUR is violated, and the Ozawa's and Branciard's EDURs are valid in a wide range of experimental parameters, applying a new measurement procedure referred to as two-state method.

  18. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of water confined in carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Chathoth, S. M.; Mamontov, E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Gogotsi, Y.; Wesolowski, D. J.

    2011-07-26

    Microscopic dynamics of water confined in nanometer and sub-nanometer pores of carbide-derived carbon (CDC) were investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The temperature dependence of the average relaxation time, ‹τ›, exhibits super-Arrhenius behavior that could be described by Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) law in the range from 250 K to 190 K; below this temperature, ‹τ› follows Arrhenius temperature dependence. The temperature of the dynamic crossover between the two regimes in water confined in the CDC pores is similar to that observed for water in hydrophobic confinement of the larger size, such as 14 Å ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK) and 16 Å double-wall carbon nanotubes. Thus, the dynamical behavior of water remains qualitatively unchanged even in the very small hydrophobic pores.

  19. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of water confined in carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Mavila Chathoth, Suresh; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Wesolowski, David J

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic dynamics of water confined in nanometer and sub-nanometer pores of carbide-derived carbon (CDC) were investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The temperature dependence of the average relaxation time, {tau}, exhibits super-Arrhenius behavior that could be described by Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) law in the range from 250 K to 190 K; below this temperature, {tau} follows Arrhenius temperature dependence. The temperature of the dynamic crossover between the two regimes in water confined in the CDC pores is similar to that observed for water in hydrophobic confinement of the larger size, such as 14 {angstrom} ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK) and 16 {angstrom} double-wall carbon nanotubes. Thus, the dynamical behavior of water remains qualitatively unchanged even in the very small hydrophobic pores.

  20. Study on induced radioactivity of China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Biao; Wang, Qing-Bin; Wu, Jing-Min; Ma, Zhong-Jian

    2011-06-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is the first High Energy Intense Proton Accelerator planned to be constructed in China during the State Eleventh Five-Year Plan period, whose induced radioactivity is very important for occupational disease hazard assessment and environmental impact assessment. Adopting the FLUKA code, the authors have constructed a cylinder-tunnel geometric model and a line-source sampling physical model, deduced proper formulas to calculate air activation, and analyzed various issues with regard to the activation of different tunnel parts. The results show that the environmental impact resulting from induced activation is negligible, whereas the residual radiation in the tunnels has a great influence on maintenance personnel, so strict measures should be adopted.

  1. Small-angle neutron scattering study of polymeric micellar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Chu, B. ); Schneider, D.K. )

    1994-11-17

    Polymeric micellar structures formed by a PEO-PPO-PEO copolymer in o-xylene in the presence of water were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. In order to reveal the detailed micellar structure, different contrasts among the micellar core, the micellar shell, and the dispersing medium (background) were constructed by selectively changing the protonated/deuterated combination of water and xylene. The micellar structure could be well described by a core-shell structure with the scattering behavior of the micellar shell being very similar to that of a star polymer. The solubilized water existed not only in the micellar core but also in the micellar shell. The volume fraction of a copolymer segments in the micellar shell was rather low, being of the order of 0.2. There seemed to be no sharp interface between the micellar core and the micellar shell. 25 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Fast Neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.; Spencer, J.; Wolf, Z.; Baldwin, A.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.; /UC, Davis

    2005-05-17

    Many materials and electronics need to be tested for the radiation environment expected at linear colliders (LC) since both accelerator and detectors will be subjected to large fluences of hadrons, leptons and {gamma}'s over the life of the facility [1]. While the linacs will be superconducting, there are still many uses for NdFeB in the damping rings, injection and extraction lines and final focus. Our understanding of the situation for rare earth, permanent magnet materials was presented at PAC03 [2]. Our first measurements of fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC Davis McClellan Nuclear Reactor Center (UCD MNRC) were presented at EPAC04 [3]. We have extended the doses, included other manufacturer's samples, and measured induced radioactivities which are discussed in detail.

  3. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR).

    SciTech Connect

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-01-14

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two possible LEU cores were identified that would provide nearly the same neutron flux and spectrum as the present HEU core at irradiation facilities that are used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and for animal research. One core has 17 and the other has 18 LEU MTR-type fuel assemblies with uranium densities of 2.5g U/cm{sup 3} or less in the fuel meat. This LEU fuel is fully-qualified for routine use. Thermal hydraulics and safety analyses need to be performed to complete the feasibility study.

  4. Studies of Neutron and Proton Nuclear Activation in Low-Earth Orbit 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The study of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit reported in NASA CR-162051 has been continued with increasing emphasis given to primary and secondary neutron activation. The previously reported activation due to protons has been modified to include: (1) flux attenuation caused by all inelastic reactions; (2) the modification of the proton flux distribution caused by sample covering material; and (3) the activation of the sample as a function of the distance into the sample from the surface of incidence. A method has been developed for including the effects on the activation of the finite width and length of the samples. The reactant product spectra produced by proton-induced reactions has been studied. Cross sections needed for neutron induced reactions leading to long-lived (half-life 1 day) radioisotopes have been identified and, in some cases, compiled.

  5. Neutronic studies on decoupled hydrogen moderator for a short-pulse spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kai, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2005-02-01

    Neutronic studies of decoupled hydrogen moderators were performed by calculations taking into account para hydrogen content, decoupling energy, moderator dimensions/shapes and reflector material. Low-energy parts of calculated spectral intensities with different para hydrogen contents were analyzed by a modified Maxwell function to characterize neutron spectra. The result shows that a 100% para hydrogen moderator gives the highest pulse peak intensity together with the narrowest pulse width and the shortest decay times. Pulse broadening with a reflector was explained by time distributions of source neutrons entering into the moderator through a decoupler. Material dependence of time distribution was studied. A decoupling energy higher than 1 eV does not bring about a large improvement in pulse widths and decay times, even at a large penalty in the peak intensity. The optimal moderator thickness was also discussed for a rectangular parallelepipe-shaped and a canteen-shaped moderator.

  6. Neutronics assessment for the ARIES advanced reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    El-Guebaly, L.A.

    1994-12-31

    To enhance the attractiveness of fusion reactors as a clean and safe source of energy, several recent tokamak designs have incorporated the environmental and safety constraints in the design from the beginning. As such, limitations have been imposed on the type of materials that can be used in the design and the potential of low neutron yield fuel cycles (like D-{sup 3}He) to fulfill the safety goals was investigated. Over the past 5 years, several designs have emerged highlighting the safety and environmental features of tokamaks. Theses designs are the ARIES (I,II,III and IV) and PULSAR (I and II) series. PULSAR designs are pulsed versions of ARIES-II and IV. All designs employ D-T fuel cycles except ARIES-III which is D-{sup 3}He fueled. Low activation materials such as SiC/SiC composites, vanadium alloys, and modified HT-9 ferritic steel were utilized as the main structural materials. Neutronics related issues were assessed for these designs. These include breeding capability of blankets, radiation damage to structural components, and shielding requirements. The D-T fueled designs need a blanket to breed tritium (T). The breeder of choice is ceramics for ARIES-I and IV and liquid metal for ARIES-II. ARIES-III employs pure shield to protect the magnets with no need for breeding blanket. It appears that the Li{sub 2}O breeder requires beryllium multiplier to achieve tritium self-sufficiency in the ARIES-IV design while the lithium has the ability to breed sufficient T in ARIES-II without multiplier. An overall tritium breeder ratio of 1.12 seems adequate for ARIES-II/IV. The 12% excess breeding is necessary to account for uncertainties in cross section data and to supply the T inventory for startup of new reactors.

  7. Neutron and light scattering studies of light-harvesting photosynthetic antenna complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-06-28

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been employed in studying the structural information of various biological systems, particularly in systems without high-resolution structural information available. In this report, we briefly present some principles and biological applications of neutron scattering and DLS, compare the differences in information that can be obtained with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and then report recent studies of SANS and DLS, together with other biophysical approaches, for light-harvesting antenna complexes and reaction centers of purple and green phototrophic bacteria.

  8. STUDY MAGNETIC EXCITATIONS IN DOPED TRANSITION METAL OXIDES USING INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Pengcheng

    2014-02-18

    Understanding the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity continues to be a “hot” topic in modern condensed matter physics. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in iron-based materials in 2008 provided an unique opportunity to compare and contrast these materials with traditional high-Tc copper oxide superconductors. Neutron scattering plays an important role in determining the dynamical spin properties in these materials. This proposal is a continuation of previous DOE supported proposal. This report summarizes the final progress we have made over from May 2005 till Aug. 2013. Overall, we continue to carry out extensive neutron scattering experiments on Fe-based materials, focusing on understanding their magnetic properties. In addition, we have established a materials laboratory at UT that has allowed us to grow these superconductors. Because neutron scattering typically demands a large amount of samples, by growing these materials in our own laboratory, we can now pursuit neutron scattering experiments over the entire electronic phase diagram, focusing on regions of interests. The material synthesis laboratory at UT was established entirely with the support of DOE funding. This not only allowed us to carry out neutron scattering experiments, but also permit us to provide samples to other US/International collaborators for studying these materials.

  9. Design studies related to an in vivo neutron activation analysis facility for measuring total body nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Stamatelatos, I E; Chettle, D R; Green, S; Scott, M C

    1992-08-01

    Design studies relating to an in vivo prompt capture neutron activation analysis facility measuring total body nitrogen are presented. The basis of the design is a beryllium-graphite neutron collimator and reflector configuration for (alpha, n) type radionuclide neutron sources (238PuBe or 241AmBe), so as to reflect leaking, or out-scattered, neutrons towards the subject. This improves the ratio of thermal neutron flux to dose and the spatial distribution of thermal flux achieved with these sources, whilst retaining their advantage of long half-lives as compared to 252Cf based systems. The common problem of high count-rate at the detector, and therefore high nitrogen region of interest background due to pile-up, is decreased by using a set of smaller (5.1 cm diameter x 10.2 cm long) NaI(Tl) detectors instead of large ones. The facility described presents a relative error of nitrogen measurement of 3.6% and a nitrogen to background ratio of 2.3 for 0.45 mSv skin dose (assuming ten 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm NaI(Tl) detectors).

  10. A study on artificial rare earth (RE2O3) based neutron absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-O; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2015-11-01

    A new concept of a neutron absorption material (i.e., an artificial rare earth compound) was introduced for criticality control in a spent fuel storage system. In particular, spent nuclear fuels were considered as a potential source of rare earth elements because the nuclear fission of uranium produces a full range of nuclides. It was also found that an artificial rare earth compound (RE2O3) as a High-Level Waste (HLW) was naturally extracted from pyroprocessing technology developed for recovering uranium and transuranic elements (TRU) from spent fuels. In this study, various characteristics (e.g., activity, neutron absorption cross-section) were analyzed for validating the application possibility of this waste compound as a neutron absorption material. As a result, the artificial rare earth compound had a higher neutron absorption probability in the entire energy range, and it can be used for maintaining sub-criticality for more than 40 years on the basis of the neutron absorption capability of Boral™. Therefore, this approach is expected to vastly improve the efficiency of radioactive waste management by simultaneously keeping HLW and spent nuclear fuel in a restricted space.

  11. Response of the central nervous system to fractionated boron neutron capture irradiation: studies with borocaptate sodium.

    PubMed

    Morris, G M; Coderre, J A; Hopewell, J W; Rezvani, M; Micca, P L; Fisher, C D

    1997-02-01

    The response of the central nervous system (CNS) to fractionated doses of boron neutron capture (BNC) irradiation was assessed using a rat spinal cord model. The thermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) was used for the spinal cord irradiations, with borocaptate sodium (BSH) as the neutron capture agent. Irradiations were given as a single dose or as two or four equal fractions. The ED50 for radiation-induced myeloparesis, as indicated by limb paralysis within 7 months, after a single exposure to thermal neutrons in the presence of BSH (blood boron-10 content approximately 70 micrograms/g) was 27.2 +/- 0.9 Gy. This was expressed as the total physical dose to the blood. Dividing the radiation dose into two consecutive daily fractions or four fractions given over 1 week, resulted in ED50 = 32.0 +/- 1.4 and 31.5 +/- 0.4 Gy respectively. Although there was no significant dose sparing in moving from two to four fractions, there was a dose increment of approximately 17% as compared with single-dose irradiation. The variation in the relative biological effectiveness of the thermal neutron beam, with dose per fraction, was established using data from a previous study with single and fractionated doses of thermal neutrons in the absence of a neutron capture agent. This varied from 1.40 to 3.74 for thermal neutron dose per fraction in the range 13.6-1.5 Gy. Previously published CBE factors for both BSH and BPA have been recalculated in the present report to take into account the change in the RBE of the thermal neutron beam with dose. In all cases the recalculated CBE factors were lower than those obtained previously. Values for this parameter increased with fraction number. In the case of BSH, the CBE factor increased from 0.36 +/- 0.03 after a single-dose to 0.51 +/- 0.06 after four fractions.

  12. Radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Han, Xiang; Wen, Fei; Zhang, Shoubiao; Kong, Defeng; Wang, Yumin; Gao, Yu; Huang, Canbin; Cai, Jianqing; Gao, Xiang

    2015-08-15

    An X-mode polarized V band (50 GHz–75 GHz) radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry is designed and installed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Two frequency synthesizers (12 GHz–19 GHz) are used as sources. Signals from the sources are up-converted to V band using active quadruplers and then coupled together for launching through one single pyramidal antenna. Two poloidally separated antennae are installed to receive the reflected waves from plasma. This reflectometry system can be used for radial and poloidal correlation measurement of the electron density fluctuation. In ohmically heated plasma, the radial correlation length is about 1.5 cm measured by the system. The poloidal correlation analysis provides a means to estimate the fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field. In the present paper, the distance between two poloidal probing points is calculated with ray-tracing code and the propagation time is deduced from cross-phase spectrum. Fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field in the core of ohmically heated plasma is about from −1 km/s to −3 km/s.

  13. Electrodynamic-tether fault measurement using time-domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilén, Sven G.

    2002-01-01

    The use of time-domain reflectometry (TDR) has been proposed to determine fault position and/or density along electrodynamic tether (EDT) systems. Future EDT missions are desired to be long duration (from several months to years); hence, these missions can expect possibly significant performance degradation due to breaches in tether insulating material caused by hazards such as micrometeoroids. A TDR system provides one possible method for measuring EDT fault build-up as a function of time, allowing researchers to understand and model the degradation characteristics and to design EDT systems to survive expected levels. In addition, including a TDR system as part of long-duration EDT missions would facilitate real-time tracking of the expected performance degradation and health state of the tether. The TDR technique has long been an effective tool for determining the location of loads and faults along common transmission lines (TLs) such as coaxial cables. Also sometimes known as pulse reflectometry, TDR works by sending an impulse down a TL and recording the reflected energy as a function of time. Measurement of the reflected TDR waveform provides insight into the physical structure of the TL and any loads, i.e., faults, along its length. In addition, the delay between launched and reflected signals determines the location of the load or fault. .

  14. Radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Han, Xiang; Wen, Fei; Zhang, Shoubiao; Kong, Defeng; Wang, Yumin; Gao, Yu; Huang, Canbin; Cai, Jianqing; Gao, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    An X-mode polarized V band (50 GHz-75 GHz) radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry is designed and installed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Two frequency synthesizers (12 GHz-19 GHz) are used as sources. Signals from the sources are up-converted to V band using active quadruplers and then coupled together for launching through one single pyramidal antenna. Two poloidally separated antennae are installed to receive the reflected waves from plasma. This reflectometry system can be used for radial and poloidal correlation measurement of the electron density fluctuation. In ohmically heated plasma, the radial correlation length is about 1.5 cm measured by the system. The poloidal correlation analysis provides a means to estimate the fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field. In the present paper, the distance between two poloidal probing points is calculated with ray-tracing code and the propagation time is deduced from cross-phase spectrum. Fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field in the core of ohmically heated plasma is about from -1 km/s to -3 km/s.

  15. Study for Improvement of VVER-440 Reactor Vessel Neutron Fluence Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, K.; Belousov, S.

    2003-06-01

    A study of the influence of the multigroup representation of the neutron cross sections for the purpose of improving the VVER-440 reactor vessel fluence determination was carried out. To assess this influence a comparison of calculational results obtained on the base of the DORT Discrete Ordinates' code and the multigroup cross-section library BGL440, and results obtained by the MCNP Monte Carlo code and the continuous representation of neutron cross sections was carried out. The MCNP results for the fluence onto the vessel, after neutron transmission through the downcomer, in direction of maximum exposure were about 8% higher than the DORT ones. The results for the flux attenuation through the vessel were practically consistent between the two methods.

  16. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makishima, K.

    2016-05-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1?7) × 10^8 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states.

  17. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1-7) × 10(8) T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states.

  18. Neutron reflectivity studies on the DNA adsorption on lipid monolayers at the air liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Jeng, U.-Ser; Torikai, Naoya

    2006-11-01

    In situ neutron reflectivity was used to study the DC-Chol and TC-Chol monolayers at the air-liquid interface in the presence and absence of DNA in the subphase. It was found that the DC-Chol is more effective in adsorbing the DNA than the TC-Chol. It was also found that a compact DNA layer formed beneath the DC-Chol monolayer with a DNA gap spacing around 20 Å and a less compact DNA layer adsorbed to the TC-Chol monolayer with a DNA spacing around 60 Å, as estimated from the determined neutron scattering length density. From the determined neutron scattering length density profiles, the adsorbed DNA somewhat penetrates into the head group region of the charged lipids.

  19. Protein crystallization and initial neutron diffraction studies of the photosystem II subunit PsbO.

    PubMed

    Bommer, Martin; Coates, Leighton; Dau, Holger; Zouni, Athina; Dobbek, Holger

    2017-09-01

    The PsbO protein of photosystem II stabilizes the active-site manganese cluster and is thought to act as a proton antenna. To enable neutron diffraction studies, crystals of the β-barrel core of PsbO were grown in capillaries. The crystals were optimized by screening additives in a counter-diffusion setup in which the protein and reservoir solutions were separated by a 1% agarose plug. Crystals were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Initial neutron diffraction data were collected from a 0.25 mm(3) crystal at room temperature using the MaNDi single-crystal diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  20. Application of Neutron Reflectivity for Studies of Biomolecular Structures and Functions at Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Ankner, John Francis; Wang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Structures and functions of cell membranes are of central importance in understanding processes such as cell signaling, chemotaxis, redox transformation, biofilm formation, and mineralization occurring at interfaces. This chapter provides an overview of the application of neutron reflectivity (NR) as a unique tool for probing biomolecular structures and mechanisms as a first step toward understanding protein protein, protein lipid, and protein mineral interactions at the membrane substrate interfaces. Emphasis is given to the review of existing literature on the assembly of biomimetic membrane systems, such as supported membranes for NR studies, and demonstration of model calculations showing the potential of NR to elucidate molecular fundamentals of microbial cell mineral interactions and structure functional relationships of electron transport pathways. The increased neutron flux afforded by current and upcoming neutron sources holds promise for elucidating detailed processes such as phase separation, formation of microdomains, and membrane interactions with proteins and peptides in biological systems.