Science.gov

Sample records for neutron scattering combined

  1. Reveal protein dynamics by combining computer simulation and neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Smith, Jeremy; CenterMolecular Biophysics Team

    2014-03-01

    Protein carries out most functions in living things on the earth through characteristic modulation of its three-dimensional structure over time. Understanding the microscopic nature of the protein internal motion and its connection to the function and structure of the biomolecule is a central topic in biophysics, and of great practical importance for drug design, study of diseases, and the development of renewable energy, etc. Under physiological conditions, protein exhibits a complex dynamics landscape, i.e., a variety of diffusive and conformational motions occur on similar time and length scales. This variety renders difficult the derivation of a simplified description of protein internal motions in terms of a small number of distinct, additive components. This difficulty is overcome by our work using a combined approach of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and the Neutron Scattering experiments. Our approach enables distinct protein motions to be characterized separately, furnishing an in-depth understanding of the connection between protein structure, dynamics and function.

  2. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  3. Characterization of porous materials using combined small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Naiping; Borkar, Neha; Kohls, Doug; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2014-09-24

    A combination of ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) is used to characterize porous materials. The analysis methods yield quantitative information, including the mean skeletal chord length, mean pore chord length, skeletal density, and composition. A mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membrane with a manufacturer-labeled pore size of 0.1 {mu}m was used as a model to elucidate the specifics of the method. Four approaches describing four specific scenarios (different known parameters and form of the scattering data) are compared. Pore chords determined using all four approaches are in good agreement with the scanning electron microscopy estimates but are larger than the manufacturer's nominal pore size. Our approach also gives the average chord of the skeletal solid (struts) of the membrane, which is also consistent for all four approaches. Combined data from USAXS and USANS gives the skeletal density and the strut composition.

  4. Combined molecular dynamics and neutron scattering study of alpha-lactalbumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarek, M.; Neumann, D. A.; Tobias, D. J.

    2002-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering have been used to elucidate differences in the dynamics of the native state and the partially folded, molten globule state of the protein, alpha-lactalbumin in solution. The neutron results, which are dominated by scattering from non-labile protons, demonstrate that the side-chains in the molten globules are significantly more mobile than those in the native protein. Molecular dynamics results, which reproduce the measured quasielastic neutron spectra extremely well, show that the observed dynamic changes arise primarily from the particular region of the protein that forms a beta sheet in the native state and unfolds to a random coil in the molten globule. Thus the spectroscopic results clearly reflect the formation of secondary structures that occurs as a protein folds.

  5. Neutron detector resolution for scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kolda, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A resolution function has been determined for scattered neutron experiments at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). This function accounts for the shifting and broadening of the resonance peak due to the additional path length, traveled by the neutron after scattering and prior to detection, along with the broadening of the resonance peak due to the bounce target. This resolution function has been parameterized both in neutron energy and size of the sample disk. Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon (MCNP) modeling has been used to determine the shape of the detector resolution function while assuming that the sample nucleus has an infinite mass. The shape of the function for a monoenergetic neutron point source has been compared to the analytical solution. Additionally, the parameterized detector resolution function has been used to broaden the scatter yield calculated from Evaluated Neutron Data File ENDF/B-VI cross section data for {sup 238}U. The target resolution function has been empirically determined by comparison of the broadened scatter yield and the experimental yield for {sup 238}U. The combined resolution function can be inserted into the SAMMY code to allow resonance analysis for scattering measurements.

  6. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern science

  7. Neutron scattering in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains.

  8. Calculates Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel.

    1989-11-10

    Version 00 THRUSH computes the thermal neutron scattering kernel by the phonon expansion method for both coherent and incoherent scattering processes. The calculation of the coherent part is suitable only for calculating the scattering kernel for heavy water.

  9. Small-angle Neutron Scattering and Contrast Variation: A Powerful Combination for Studying Biological Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, William T

    2010-01-01

    The use of small-angle scattering (SAS) in the biological sciences continues to increase, driven as much by the need to study increasingly complex systems that are often resistant to crystallization or are too large for NMR as by the availability of user facilities and advancements in the modelling of biological structures from SAS data. SAS, whether with neutrons (SANS) or X-rays (SAXS), is a structural probe of length scales ranging from 10 to 10,000 {angstrom}. When applied to biological complexes in dilute solution, it provides size and shape information that can be used to produce structural models that can provide insight into function. SANS enables the use of contrast-variation methods through the unique interaction of neutrons with hydrogen and its isotope deuterium. SANS with contrast variation enables the visualization of components within multisubunit complexes, making it a powerful tool for probing protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid complexes, as well as the interaction of proteins with lipids and detergents.

  10. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  11. Neutron Scattering Stiudies

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, Gunter H.R.; Egan, James J

    2007-04-18

    This project covers four principal areas of research: Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in odd-A terbium, thulium and other highly deformed nuclei near A=160 with special regard to interband transitions and to the investigation of the direct-interaction versus the compound-nucleus excitation process in these nuclei. Examination of new, fast photomultiplier tubes suitable for use in a miniaturized neutron-time-of-flight spectrometer. Measurement of certain inelastic cross sections of 238U. Determination of the multiplicity of prompt fission gamma rays in even-A fissile actinides. Energies and mean lives of fission isomers produced by fast fission of even-Z, even-A actinides. Study of the mean life of 7Be in different host matrices and its possible astro-physical significance.

  12. Direct Measurement of Neutron-Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapov, E.I.; Furman, W.I.; Lychagin, W.I.; Muzichka, G.V.; Nekhaev, G.V.; Safronov, Yu.V.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Strelkov, A.V.; Bowman, C.D.; Crawford, B.E.; Stephenson, S.L.; Howell, C.R.; Tornow, W.; Levakov, B.G.; Litvin, V.I.; Lyzhin, A.E.; Magda, E.P.; Mitchell, G.E.

    2003-08-26

    In order to resolve long-standing discrepancies in indirect measurements of the neutron-neutron scattering length ann and contribute to solving the problem of the charge symmetry of the nuclear force, the collaboration DIANNA (Direct Investigation of ann Association) plans to measure the neutron-neutron scattering cross section {sigma}nn. The key issue of our approach is the use of the through-channel in the Russia reactor YAGUAR with a peak neutron flux of 10{sup 18} /cm2/s. The proposed experimental setup is described. Results of calculations are presented to connect {sigma}nn with the nn-collision detector count rate and the neutron flux density in the reactor channel. Measurements of the thermal neutron fields inside polyethylene converters show excellent prospects for the realization of the direct nn-experiment.

  13. Thermal neutron scattering in graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qasir, Iyad Ibrahim

    Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, are graphite moderated and gas cooled thermal spectrum reactors. The characteristics of the low energy (E < 1 eV) neutron spectrum in these reactors will be dictated by the process of neutron slowing-down and thermalization in the graphite moderator. The ability to accurately predict this process in these reactors can have significant neutronic and safety implications. In reactor design calculations, thermal neutron scattering cross section libraries are needed for the prediction of the thermal neutron environment in the core. Currently used libraries (ENDF/B-VII) are a product of the 1960s and remain based on many physical approximations. In addition, these libraries show noticeable discrepancies with experimental data. In this work, investigation of thermal neutron scattering in graphite as a function of temperature was performed. The fundamental input for the calculation of thermal neutron scattering cross sections, i.e., the phonon frequency distribution and/or the dispersion relations, was generated using a modern approach that is based on quantum mechanical electronic structure (ab initio) simulations combined with a lattice dynamics direct method supercell approach. The calculations were performed using the VASP and PHONON codes. The VASP calculations used the local density approximation, and the projector augmented-wave pseudopotential. A supercell of 144 atoms was used; and the integration over the Brillouin zone was confined to a 3x3x4 k-mesh generated by the Monkhorst-Pack scheme. A plane-wave basis set with an energy cutoff of 500 eV was applied. The corresponding dispersion relations, heat capacity, and phonon frequency distribution show excellent agreement with experimental data. Despite the use of the above techniques to produce more accurate input data, the examination of the results indicated persistence of the inconsistencies between calculations and measurements at neutron energies

  14. Neutron Scattering Studies of Fluorite Compounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Michael Andrew

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The properties of some important compounds with the fluorite structure have been investigated using neutron scattering techniques. All of the compounds in this study have important technological applications, as well as being of intrinsic scientific interest. Inelastic neutron scattering and high temperature technology have been used to measure phonon energies in thorium dioxide at temperatures above 3000K. These phonon energies have been used to determine the elastic constants as a function of temperature. Thorium dioxide provides an interesting comparison with uranium dioxide which has been studied in order to try and establish the cause of the anomalously large enthalpy of this compound. Quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to demonstrate that the dynamic ionic-disorder which occurs in ThO_2 behaves in a similar way to that observed in UO _2 at high temperature. Whilst at only 12K, splittings have been measured in the crystal field excitations of UO_2 which have a significant effect on the theoretical analysis of its thermodynamic properties. This experiment was performed using neutrons scattered with a high energy transfer. Elastic and quasielastic diffuse scattering have both been used to investigate the vacancy-stabilised cubic structure of yttria doped zirconia. Computer modelling of the measured neutron scattering intensities has played a vital role in this part of the study. By the combination of neutron scattering measurements and computational techniques a three part model has been developed for the defect structure in yttria-stabilised zirconia which can explain the ionic conductivity in this compound. Ionic disorder has been observed in the anti-fluorite compounds lithium oxide and magnesium silicide at high temperature, using diffuse quasielastic neutron scattering. The full phonon energy dispersion relation and the elastic constants at high temperature have also

  15. Neutron scatter camera

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  16. Neutron scattering and absorption properties

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Table in this report presents an evaluated set of values for the experimental quantities, which characterize the properties for scattering and absorption of neutrons. The neutron cross section is given for room temperature neutrons, 20.43{degree}C, corresponds to a thermal neutron energy of 0.0253 electron volts (eV) or a neutron velocity of 2200 meters/second. The neutron resonance integral is defined over the energy range from 0.5 eV to 0.1 {times} 10{sup 6} eV, or 0.1 MeV. A list of the major references used is given below. The literature cutoff data is October 1993. Uncertainties are given in parentheses. Parentheses with two or more numbers indicate values to the excited states(s) and to the ground state of the product nucleus.

  17. A combined radial collimator and cooled beryllium filter for neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groitl, Felix; Rantsiou, Emmanouela; Bartkowiak, Marek; Filges, Uwe; Graf, Dieter; Niedermayer, Christof; Rüegg, Christian; Rønnow, Henrik M.

    2016-05-01

    A flexible, combined, radial collimator and beryllium (Be) filter have been designed and manufactured at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Switzerland. The Be is integrated in the radial collimator by placing thin Be slices between the collimator lamellas. The filter/collimator is mounted within a vacuum vessel and dry cooled. The flexible design allows for different degrees of collimation and for different Be lengths. Results of measurements carried out at the BOA beamline at PSI are presented. These experiments include rotation scans determining the focal full width half maximum (FWHM), transmission measurements, test of different collimator lamellas and performance tests of the cooling of the filter. This new combined device will be a crucial part of the CAMEA spectrometer at SINQ, PSI.

  18. Neutron scattering: Progress and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Axe, J.D. )

    1991-05-10

    Over the last decade the unique properties of neutrons have proven useful in a growing number of scientific disciplines. Neutron scattering, traditionally the probe of choice for many magnetic and spectroscopic studies, is now firmly established as an invaluable complement to x-ray scattering for structural and dynamic studies within many other areas of the material sciences, chemistry, and biology. In recent years the instruments and techniques have matured to the point where they are of increasing relevance to the understanding and design of improved practical, everyday materials.

  19. A Combined Small-Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering Study of the Structure of Purified Soluble Gastrointestinal Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Georgiades, Pantelis; di Cola, Emanuela; Heenan, Richard K; Pudney, Paul D A; Thornton, David J; Waigh, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    The structures of purified soluble porcine gastric (Muc5ac) and duodenal (Muc2) mucin solutions at neutral and acidic pH were examined using small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering experiments. We provide evidence for the morphology of the network above the semidilute overlap concentration and above the entanglement concentration. Furthermore, we investigated the gelation of both types of mucin solutions in response to a reduction in pH, where we observed the formation of large-scale heterogeneities within the polymer solutions, typical of microphase-separated gels. The concentration dependence of the inhomogeneity length scale (Ξ) and the amplitude of the excess scattering intensity [Iex(0)] are consistent with previously studied gelled synthetic polymeric systems. The persistence lengths of the chains were found to be similar for both Muc5ac and Muc2 from Kratky plots of the neutron data (8 ± 2 nm). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 101: 1154–1164, 2014. PMID:25041765

  20. Neutron Scattering Studies of Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Despite more than a century of research, basic questions remain regarding both the internal structure and the role of water in Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete, the world's most widely used manufactured material. Most such questions concern the primary hydration product and strength-building phase of OPC paste, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. When cement and water are mixed, this phase precipitates as clusters of nanoscale (nearly amorphous) colloidal particles with an associated water-filled inter-particle pore system. Most attempts to characterize the C-S-H gel and the behavior of the associated water involve drying or other processes that, themselves, change the bound water content within and around the gel. Neutron scattering methods do not suffer from this disadvantage. Furthermore, the neutron isotope effect and the neutron's sensitivity to molecular motion have enabled considerable progress to be made in recent years by: (i) determining the C-S-H composition, density and gel structure in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) H/D contrast variation studies; (ii) elucidating the changing state of water within cement as hydration progresses using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS); and (iii) measuring the production and consumption of nanoscale calcium hydroxide (CH), a by-product of cement hydration that co-exists with the C-S-H gel, using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These experiments have provided new insights into the physics and chemistry of cement hydration, and have implications for the design of new concretes with pozzolanic cement additions that are intended to address environmental concerns and sustainability issues.

  1. Exploring Ion-Ion Interactions in Aqueous Solutions by a Combination of Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Kohagen, Miriam; Pluhařová, Eva; Mason, Philip E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in computational and experimental techniques have allowed for accurate description of ion pairing in aqueous solutions. Free energy methods based on ab initio molecular dynamics, as well as on force fields accounting effectively for electronic polarization, can provide quantitative information about the structures and occurrences of individual types of ion pairs. When properly benchmarked against electronic structure calculations for model systems and against structural experiments, in particular neutron scattering, such force field simulations represent a powerful tool for elucidating interactions of salt ions in complex biological aqueous environments. PMID:26263314

  2. Exploring Ion-Ion Interactions in Aqueous Solutions by a Combination of Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Kohagen, Miriam; Pluhařová, Eva; Mason, Philip E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in computational and experimental techniques have allowed for accurate description of ion pairing in aqueous solutions. Free energy methods based on ab initio molecular dynamics, as well as on force fields accounting effectively for electronic polarization, can provide quantitative information about the structures and occurrences of individual types of ion pairs. When properly benchmarked against electronic structure calculations for model systems and against structural experiments, in particular neutron scattering, such force field simulations represent a powerful tool for elucidating interactions of salt ions in complex biological aqueous environments.

  3. Encapsulation of paclitaxel into a bio-nanocomposite. A study combining inelastic neutron scattering to thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Orecchini, Andrea; Aguilera, Luis; Eckert, Juergen; Embs, Jan; Matic, Aleksander; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-01-01

    The anticancer drug paclitaxel was encapsulated into a bio-nanocomposite formed by magnetic nanoparticles, chitosan and apatite. The aim of this drug carrier is to provide a new perspective against breast cancer. The dynamics of the pure and encapsulated drug were investigated in order to verify possible molecular changes caused by the encapsulation, as well as to follow which interactions may occur between paclitaxel and the composite. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments were performed. These very preliminary results suggest the successful encapsulation of the drug.

  4. Neutron scattering at the OPAL research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Garry J.; Holden, Peter J.

    2016-09-01

    The current suite of 14 neutron scattering instruments at the multipurpose OPAL research reactor is described. All instruments have been constructed following best practice, using state-of-the-art components and in close consultation with the regional user base. First results from the most recently commissioned instruments match their design performance parameters. Selected recent scientific highlights illustrate some unique combinations of instrumentation and the regional flavour of topical applications.

  5. Enhanced dynamics of hydrated tRNA on nanodiamond surfaces: A combined neutron scattering and MD simulation study

    DOE PAGES

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Goswami, Monojoy; O’Neill, Hugh; Mamontov, Eugene; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Hong, Liang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Chu, Xiang -qiang

    2016-09-01

    Nontoxic, biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND) have recently been implemented in rational, systematic design of optimal therapeutic use in nanomedicines. However, hydrophilicity of the ND surface strongly influences structure and dynamics of biomolecules that restrict in situ applications of ND. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the impact of hydrophilic ND surface on biomolecules at the molecular level is essential. For tRNA, we observe an enhancement of dynamical behavior in the presence of ND contrary to generally observed slow motion at strongly interacting interfaces. We took advantage of neutron scattering experiments and computer simulations to demonstrate this atypical faster dynamics of tRNA on NDmore » surface. The strong attractive interactions between ND, tRNA, and water give rise to unlike dynamical behavior and structural changes of tRNA in front of ND compared to without ND. As a result, our new findings may provide new design principles for safer, improved drug delivery platforms.« less

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron scattering instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Daemen, L.L.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1998-12-01

    A code package consisting of the Monte Carlo Library MCLIB, the executing code MC{_}RUN, the web application MC{_}Web, and various ancillary codes is proposed as an open standard for simulation of neutron scattering instruments. The architecture of the package includes structures to define surfaces, regions, and optical elements contained in regions. A particle is defined by its vector position and velocity, its time of flight, its mass and charge, and a polarization vector. The MC{_}RUN code handles neutron transport and bookkeeping, while the action on the neutron within any region is computed using algorithms that may be deterministic, probabilistic, or a combination. Complete versatility is possible because the existing library may be supplemented by any procedures a user is able to code. Some examples are shown.

  7. Medical applications of neutron inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Joseph J.; Banuk-Waitekus, Anathea; Valtuena, Silvia; Sheahan, Charles A.

    1999-10-01

    A sealed, D-T, pulsed neutron generator is used for the in vivo measurement of body carbon and oxygen by neutron inelastic scattering. The generator is operated at 10 KHz, at a neutron output of about 2 X 107 n/s/4(pi) . Gamma ray spectra are collected with two B4Ge3O12 crystal detectors. The measurements are used to measure fat and lean content and distribution in the body, with minimal radiation exposure (0.08 mSv). When combined with other measurements (such as total body potassium), this whole body scanning device provides us with the `quality of lean mass', a measurable outcome of treatments designed to improve nutritional status and function. The method is used in studies of human nutrition and for assessing the efficacy of new anti-obesity and anti-cachexia pharmaceuticals.

  8. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region

    SciTech Connect

    Beghian, L.E.; Kegel, G.H.R.

    1991-08-01

    During the report period we have investigated the following areas: Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering measurements on {sup 14}N, {sup 181}Ta, {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu; Prompt fission spectra for {sup 232}Th, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu; Theoretical studies of neutron scattering; Neutron filters; New detector systems; and Upgrading of neutron target assembly, data acquisition system, and accelerator/beam-line apparatus.

  9. On the microstructure of organic solutions of mono-carboxylic acids: Combined study by infrared spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Roman A.; Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Rosta, László; Grigoryeva, Natalia A.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.

    2015-11-01

    The data of infrared spectroscopy (IR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) have been combined to conclude about the nanoscale structural organization of organic non-polar solutions of saturated mono-carboxylic acids with different alkyl chain lengths for diluted solutions of saturated myristic (C14) and stearic (C18) acids in benzene and decalin. In particular, the degree of dimerization was found from the IR spectra. The structural anisotropy of the acids and their dimers was used in the treatment of the data of MD simulations to describe the solute-solvent interface in a cylindrical approximation and show its rather strong influence on SANS. The corresponding scattering length density profiles were used to fit the experimental SANS data comprising the information about the acid molecule isomerization. The SANS data from concentrated solutions showed a partial self-assembling of the acids within the nematic transition is different for two solvents due to lyophobic peculiarities.

  10. Neutron scattering from a ferrofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.Y. |; Luo, W.; Lynn, J.

    1995-12-31

    Small angle neutron scattering experiments were performed on a eicosane-based ferrofluid. An average size of 88 {angstrom} can be extracted from the data, in agreement with results from electron microscopy. Below the frozen temperature of eicosane, however, the particles are seen to be in larger aggregates with a fractal dimension of 2.15, similar to those formed under reaction-limited cluster aggregation (RLCA) conditions. At high concentrations, particles form larger aggregates even in the liquid state. Applying a magnetic field introduces new structure and changes the density inside the aggregates.

  11. Neutron scattering in the ribosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyuk, Igor N.

    1997-02-01

    Thermal neutron scattering has become a powerful instrument for studying the ribosome and its components. The application of neutron scattering allowed to establish some principal features of the ribosome structure: non-homogeneous distribution of the RNA and protein within ribosomal particles, the RNA role as a framework in the arrangement and maintenance of the structure of ribosomal particles, and the globular character of ribosomal proteins. The use of selective deuteration of separate ribosomal proteins in combination with the triangulation method revealed mutual spatial arrangement (the 3D-map) of all the ribosomal proteins within the small particle and in the most part of the large ribosomal particle. An essential impact has been made in the structural studies of ribosomes with the development of novel experimental approaches: triple isotopic substitution and spin contrast variation. These approaches with direct interpretation of spherical harmonics provide new possibilities for constructing models of ribosomal particles, opening principally new perspectives for joint use of X-ray synchrotron diffraction in crystals and small-angle neutron scattering in solution.

  12. Complex Protein Structures by Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glusker, Jenny

    2008-03-01

    Neutron scattering by an atom, unlike X-ray scattering, does not depend on the atomic number of that atom. Deuterium atoms scatter neutrons to the same extent as carbon or oxygen atoms and give positive peaks in a nuclear density map, while its isotope, hydrogen, gives a negative peak. Therefore neutron diffraction provides two results that are difficult to obtain from macromolecular X-ray diffraction studies: (1) the locations of hydrogen atoms, including the more mobile ones, and (2) the extent to which a hydrogen atom can be replaced by deuterium. The method shows whether an amino acid side chain (at a given pH value) is ionized or not. For example, one can ascertain whether histidine residues are singly or doubly protonated at the pH of study. Neutron diffraction studies can also be used to determine the absolute configuration of the course of a biochemical reaction by anomalous scattering and enzymatic deuteration of the substrate. Neutron diffraction experiments, however, require large crystals and these are often impossible to obtain for many macromolecules. Examples of reports of the use of neutron diffraction to provide information on enzymatic mechanism will be presented. This includes descriptions of our work on the enzyme D-xylose isomerase for which the orientation of a metal ion-bound water molecule in the active site was found. This water, thought to be involved in the isomerization step, was shown to be water (rather than hydroxyl) at pH 8.0. This analysis also revealed that one lysine has two rather than three attached hydrogen atoms and therefore lacks a positive charge. High-resolution X-ray studies (at 0.94 å) indicate how some side chains might move during catalysis. This combination of neutron and X-ray diffraction can contribute greatly to the elucidation of enzyme mechanisms. I thank Amy Katz, Xinmin Li, H. L. Carrell, Leighton Coates, Leif Hanson, Joel Harp, Paul Langan, and Benno Schoenborn who were involved in many of the described

  13. Combined inelastic neutron scattering and solid-state DFT study of dynamics of hydrogen atoms in trioctahedral 1 M phlogopite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrčok, L'ubomír; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Rieder, Milan

    2012-10-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) was used to study the vibrational dynamics of the hydrogen atoms in natural trioctahedral phlogopite, K0.93Na0.03(Mg2.47Fe0.22Al0.16Fe0.04Tl0.06)[Si2.84Al1.16]O10OH1.71F0.28Cl0.01, within the 50-1,000 cm-1 energy range. The INS spectra collected using direct geometry spectrometer SEQUOIA (ORNL) were interpreted by means of the solid-state DFT calculations covering both normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics. To optimize the structure and to calculate the vibrational modes under harmonic approximation, both a hybrid PBE0 and the AM05 functional were used, while the molecular dynamics calculations (60 ps/1 fs) were performed only with the computationally less-demanding AM05 functional. The main contributions to the dominant band within ~750-550 cm-1 are symmetric and antisymmetric Mg-O-H bending modes, overlapping with the skeletal stretching and bending modes causing weaker secondary movements of H atoms of inner hydroxyl groups. Signatures of the Mg-O-H bending modes appear down to ~400 cm-1, where a region of octahedra deformation modes starts. These deformations cause just shallow movements of the hydrogen atoms and are mirrored by the modes with close vibrational energies. The region from ~330 cm-1 down to the low-energy end of the spectrum portrays induced vibrations of the H atoms caused by deformation of individual polyhedra, translational vibrations of the parts of the 2:1 layer relative one to another, and librational and translational vibrations of the layer. The main difference between the INS spectrum of dioctahedral Al-muscovite and trioctahedral Mg-phlogopite is that the Mg-O-H modes are all assigned to in-plane vibrations of the respective hydrogen atoms.

  14. Heterogeneous dynamics of poly(vinyl acetate) far above Tg: A combined study by dielectric spectroscopy and quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Madhusudan; Alegría, Angel; Colmenero, Juan

    2005-06-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of poly(vinly acetate) using broadband dielectric spectroscopy (DS) covering over 14 decades in frequency up to 20GHz and high-resolution quasielastic neutron-scattering (QENS) technique. The dielectric results have been interpreted in terms of the phenomenological Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts [G. Williams and D. C. Watts, Trans. Faraday Soc. 66, 80 (1970); F. Alvarez, A. Alegría, and J. Colmenero, Phys. Rev. B 47, 125 (1993)] description. Because of the wide frequency range covered by DS, it provides a precise determination of dynamics over a wide temperature range and it revealed a crossover in polymer dynamics at 387K through different dielectric parameters, viz., characteristic times, asymmetric shape parameter, and dielectric strength. Moreover, shape parameter is found to be higher in comparison to other typical polymeric systems. The characteristic relaxation times observed by QENS displayed an anomalous dependence of momentum transfer, indicating the possible existence of heterogeneities in the system even at the high temperatures. In addition, spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, were found to be decoupled from dielectric characteristic times. Based on these results, a model was proposed to account for heterogeneities where we consider coexistence of different regions with standard polymeric behavior but with different characteristic times, leading to a distribution of relaxation times. The model is found to account for the anomalous behavior and an inherent shape parameter is found to account for the shape of α relaxation. This model is also found to predict the T variation of T1 characteristic time scales at all temperatures. The origin of the heterogeneous domains is believed to lie in the microstructure of polymer chains.

  15. American Conference on Neutron Scattering 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Dillen, J. Ardie

    2014-12-31

    Scientists from the around the world converged in Knoxville, TN to have share ideas, present technical information and contribute to the advancement of neutron scattering. Featuring over 400 oral/poster presentations, ACNS 2014 offered a strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks and poster sessions covering topics in soft condensed matter, hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications in neutron physics – confirming the great diversity of science that is enabled by neutron scattering.

  16. Neutron scattering and models : molybdenum.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-05-26

    A comprehensive interpretation of the fast-neutron interaction with elemental and isotopic molybdenum at energies of {le} 30 MeV is given. New experimental elemental-scattering information over the incident energy range 4.5 {r_arrow} 10 MeV is presented. Spherical, vibrational and dispersive models are deduced and discussed, including isospin, energy-dependent and mass effects. The vibrational models are consistent with the ''Lane potential''. The importance of dispersion effects is noted. Dichotomies that exist in the literature are removed. The models are vehicles for fundamental physical investigations and for the provision of data for applied purposes. A ''regional'' molybdenum model is proposed. Finally, recommendations for future work are made.

  17. Neutron scattering in polymer physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, D.

    2000-03-01

    By example this short review presents recent scientific advances which were achieved by the application of neutron scattering to polymer systems, thereby, keeping in mind also practical applications. We first focus on experiments on the structure and morphology of polymer systems covering conformational studies, investigations on polymer-microemulsions systems and the observation of aggregation states in living polymerization. Thereafter, we present recent results in the field of polymer dynamics. We begin with local motions which are behind the classical relaxation processes in polymer melts. Then we relate to universal dynamics, we address the Rouse model and its limits, present new results on the dynamic miscibility in blends and display the latest investigations on entanglement dynamics. Finally, we report first observations of ripplon excitations of phase boundaries in diblock copolymer melts.

  18. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mazouz; A. Camsonne; C. Munoz Camacho; C. Ferdi; G. Gavalian; E. Kuchina; M. Amarian; K. A. Aniol; M. Beaumel; H. Benaoum; P. Bertin; M. Brossard; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; R. Feuerbach; J.-M. Fieschi; S. Frullani; M. Garcon; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; J. Gomez; P. Gueye; P.A.M. Guichon; B. Guillon; O. Hansen; D. Hayes; D. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C.E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; R. Igarashi; X. Jiang; H.S. Jo; L.J. Kaufman; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; G. Kumbartzki; G. Laveissiere; J.J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; H.-J. Lu; D.J. Margaziotis; Z.-E. Meziani; K. McCormick; R. Michaels; B. Michel; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; V. Nelyubin; M. Potokar; Y. Qiang; R.D. Ransome; J.-S. Real; B. Reitz; Y. Roblin; J. Roche; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; P.E. Ulmer; E. Voutier; K. Wang; L.B. Weinstein; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2007-12-01

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D$({\\vec e},e'\\gamma)X$ cross section measured at $Q^2$=1.9 GeV$^2$ and $x_B$=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to $E_q$, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  19. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouz, M.; Guillon, B.; Real, J.-S.; Voutier, E.

    2007-12-14

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D(e-vector,e{sup '}{gamma})X cross section measured at Q{sup 2}=1.9 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub B}=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to E{sub q}, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  20. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  1. Electroweak bremsstrahlung from neutron-neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yi; Liou, M. K.; Schreiber, W. M.

    2009-09-15

    Background: Nucleon-nucleon (NN) bremsstrahlung processes NN{gamma} (nn{gamma}, np{gamma}, and pp{gamma}) have been extensively investigated. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes from nucleon-nucleon scattering NN{nu}{nu} (nn{nu}{nu}, np{nu}{nu}, and pp{nu}{nu}) have recently attracted attention in studies of neutrino emission in neutron stars. The calculated NN{nu}{nu} cross sections (or emissivities) are found to be sensitive to the two-nucleon dynamical model used in the calculations. Purpose and Method: A realistic one-boson-exchange (ROBE) model for NN interactions is used to construct the electroweak bremsstrahlung amplitudes using the well-known nucleon electromagnetic and weak interaction vertices. The constructed nn{gamma} and nn{nu}{nu} amplitudes are investigated by applying them to calculate nn{gamma} and nn{nu}{nu} cross sections, respectively. Results: (i) The 190-MeV ROBE nn{gamma} cross sections agree well with those calculated using the TuTts amplitude, but they are in disagreement with those calculated using the Low amplitude. (ii) The calculated nn{nu}{nu} cross sections using the ROBE amplitude at the neutrino-pair energy {omega} = 1 MeV are in quantitative agreement with those calculated by Timmermans et al.[Phys. Rev. C 65, 064007 (2002)], who used the leading-order term of the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung amplitude. Conclusions: The nn{gamma} amplitude in the ROBE approach, which obeys the soft-photon theorem, has a predictive power similar to that of the TuTts amplitude. The nn{nu}{nu} amplitude in the ROBE approach, which is consistent with the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung theorem, has a predictive power similar to that of the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung amplitude of Timmermans et al. in the low neutrino-pair energy region.

  2. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-12-31

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  3. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-01-01

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  4. New insights into the compressibility and high-pressure stability of Ni(CN)2: a combined study of neutron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sanjay K; Mittal, Ranjan; Zbiri, Mohamed; Rao, Rekha; Goel, Prabhatasree; Hibble, Simon J; Chippindale, Ann M; Hansen, Thomas; Schober, Helmut; Chaplot, Samrath L

    2016-02-01

    Nickel cyanide is a layered material showing markedly anisotropic behaviour. High-pressure neutron diffraction measurements show that at pressures up to 20.1 kbar, compressibility is much higher in the direction perpendicular to the layers, c, than in the plane of the strongly chemically bonded metal-cyanide sheets. Detailed examination of the behaviour of the tetragonal lattice parameters, a and c, as a function of pressure reveal regions in which large changes in slope occur, for example, in c(P) at 1 kbar. The experimental pressure dependence of the volume data is fitted to a bulk modulus, B0, of 1050 (20) kbar over the pressure range 0-1 kbar, and to 124 (2) kbar over the range 1-20.1 kbar. Raman spectroscopy measurements yield additional information on how the structure and bonding in the Ni(CN)2 layers change with pressure and show that a phase change occurs at about 1 kbar. The new high-pressure phase, (Phase PII), has ordered cyanide groups with sheets of D4h symmetry containing Ni(CN)4 and Ni(NC)4 groups. The Raman spectrum of phase PII closely resembles that of the related layered compound, Cu1/2Ni1/2(CN)2, which has previously been shown to contain ordered C≡N groups. The phase change, PI to PII, is also observed in inelastic neutron scattering studies which show significant changes occurring in the phonon spectra as the pressure is raised from 0.3 to 1.5 kbar. These changes reflect the large reduction in the interlayer spacing which occurs as Phase PI transforms to Phase PII and the consequent increase in difficulty for out-of-plane atomic motions. Unlike other cyanide materials e.g. Zn(CN)2 and Ag3Co(CN)6, which show an amorphization and/or a decomposition at much lower pressures (~100 kbar), Ni(CN)2 can be recovered after pressurising to 200 kbar, albeit in a more ordered form. PMID:26751175

  5. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  6. A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, Christopher M; Liu, C; Stone, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

  7. Hierarchical optimization for neutron scattering problems

    DOE PAGES

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Rick; Bansal, Dipanshu; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-03-14

    In this study, we present a scalable optimization method for neutron scattering problems that determines confidence regions of simulation parameters in lattice dynamics models used to fit neutron scattering data for crystalline solids. The method uses physics-based hierarchical dimension reduction in both the computational simulation domain and the parameter space. We demonstrate for silicon that after a few iterations the method converges to parameters values (interatomic force-constants) computed with density functional theory simulations.

  8. Frontiers of neutron scattering in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yuji

    1986-03-01

    Current neutron works representing frontiers of neutron scattering in Japan are surveyed. Only those works which either become possible with or have contributed significantly to new techniques and new instrumentations originated in Japan are selected because of the limited space and by the author's choice. Those works performed in the reactor centers (JAERI and KUR) in Japan, as well as in the two high flux reactor centers in the U.S. (BNL and ORNL), which are two coordinating institutions under the U.S.-Japan cooperative neutron scattering research program, and in Japan's spallation pulsed neutron facilities (KENS) are equally stressed for their contributions. Brief accounts of the new projects to renovate neutron sources and neutron facilities in Japan are also included.

  9. Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons using a CLYC array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tristan; Doucet, E.; Chowdhury, P.; Lister, C. J.; Wilson, G. L.; Devlin, M.; Mosby, S.

    2015-10-01

    CLYC scintillators, which have dual neutron and gamma response, have recently ushered in the possibility of fast neutron spectroscopy without time-of-flight (TOF). A 16-element array of 1'' x 1'' 6Li-depleted CLYC crystals, where pulse-shape-discrimination is achieved via digital pulse processing, has been commissioned at UMass Lowell. In an experiment at LANSCE, high energy neutrons were used to bombard 56Fe and 238U targets, in order to measure elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections as a function of energy and angle with the array. The array is placed very close to the targets for enhanced geometrical solid angles for scattered neutrons compared to standard neutron-TOF measurements. A pulse-height spectrum of scattered neutrons in the detectors is compared to the energy of the incident neutrons, which is measured via the TOF of the pulsed neutrons from the source to the detectors. Recoil corrections are necessary to combine the energy spectra from all the detectors to obtain angle-integrated elastic and inelastic cross-sections. The detection techniques, analysis procedures and results will be presented. Supported by NNSA-SSAA program through DOE Grant DE-NA00013008.

  10. BUILDING A NETWORK FOR NEUTRON SCATTERING EDUCATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, Roger; Baker, Shenda Mary; Louca, Despo A; McGreevy, Robert L; Ekkebus, Allen E; Kszos, Lynn A; Anderson, Ian S

    2008-10-01

    In a concerted effort supported by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Energy, the United States is rebuilding its leadership in neutron scattering capability through a significant investment in U.S. neutron scattering user facilities and related instrumentation. These unique facilities provide opportunities in neutron scattering to a broad community of researchers from academic institutions, federal laboratories, and industry. However, neutron scattering is often considered to be a tool for 'experts only' and in order for the U.S. research community to take full advantage of these new and powerful tools, a comprehensive education and outreach program must be developed. The workshop described below is the first step in developing a national program that takes full advantage of modern education methods and leverages the existing educational capacity at universities and national facilities. During March 27-28, 2008, a workshop entitled 'Building a Network for Neutron Scattering Education' was held in Washington, D.C. The goal of the workshop was to define and design a roadmap for a comprehensive neutron scattering education program in the United States. Successful implementation of the roadmap will maximize the national intellectual capital in neutron sciences and will increase the sophistication of research questions addressed by neutron scattering at the nation's forefront facilities. (See Appendix A for the list of attendees, Appendix B for the workshop agenda, Appendix C for a list of references. Appendix D contains the results of a survey given at the workshop; Appendix E contains summaries of the contributed talks.) The workshop brought together U.S. academicians, representatives from neutron sources, scientists who have developed nontraditional educational programs, educational specialists, and managers from government agencies to create a national structure for providing ongoing neutron scattering education. A

  11. 2010 American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, Simon

    2011-06-17

    The ACNS provides a focal point for the national neutron user community to strengthen ties within this diverse group, while at the same time promoting neutron research among colleagues in related disciplines identified as “would-be” neutron users. The American Conference on Neutron Scattering thus serves a dual role as a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides forums for scientific discussion of neutron research in diverse fields such as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, and elementary excitations, fundamental physics and development of neutron instrumentation through a combination of invited talks, contributed talks and poster sessions. As a “super-user” meeting, the ACNS fulfills the main objectives of users' meetings previously held periodically at individual national neutron facilities, with the advantage of a larger and more diverse audience. To this end, each of the major national neutron facilities (NIST, LANSCE, HFIR and SNS) have an opportunity to exchange information and update users, and potential users, of their facility. This is also an appropriate forum for users to raise issues that relate to the facilities. For many of the national facilities, this super-user meeting should obviate the need for separate user meetings that tax the time, energy and budgets of facility staff and the users alike, at least in years when the ACNS is held. We rely upon strong participation from the national facilities. The NSSA intends that the American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS) will occur approximately every two years, but not in years that coincide with the International or European Conferences on Neutron Scattering. The ACNS is to be held in association with one of the national neutron centers in a rotating sequence, with the host facility providing local organization

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron scattering instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    A library of Monte Carlo subroutines has been developed for the purpose of design of neutron scattering instruments. Using small-angle scattering as an example, the philosophy and structure of the library are described and the programs are used to compare instruments at continuous wave (CW) and long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) neutron facilities. The Monte Carlo results give a count-rate gain of a factor between 2 and 4 using time-of-flight analysis. This is comparable to scaling arguments based on the ratio of wavelength bandwidth to resolution width.

  13. Experimental magnetic form factors in Co3V2O8 : A combined study of ab initio calculations, magnetic Compton scattering, and polarized neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, N.; Zbiri, M.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.; Stunault, A.; Ressouche, E.; Hansen, T. C.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Johnson, M. R.; Fuess, H.; Ehrenberg, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Itou, M.; Gillon, B.; Wolf, Th.; Rodríguez-Velamazan, J. A.; Sánchez-Montero, J.

    2009-03-01

    We present a combination of ab initio calculations, magnetic Compton scattering, and polarized neutron experiments, which elucidate the density distribution of unpaired electrons in the kagome staircase system Co3V2O8 . Ab initio wave functions were used to calculate the spin densities in real and momentum spaces, which show good agreement with the respective experiments. It has been found that the spin polarized orbitals are equally distributed between the t2g and the eg levels for the spine (s) Co ions while the eg orbitals of the cross-tie (c) Co ions only represent 30% of the atomic spin density. Furthermore, the results reveal that the magnetic moments of the cross-tie Co ions, which are significantly smaller than those of the spine Co ions in the zero-field ferromagnetic structure, do not saturate by applying an external magnetic field of 2 T along the easy axis a . In turn, the increasing bulk magnetization, which can be observed by field dependent macroscopic measurements, originates from induced magnetic moments on the O and V sites. The refined individual magnetic moments are μ(Coc)=1.54(4)μB , μ(Cos)=2.87(3)μB , μ(V)=0.41(4)μB , μ(O1)=0.05(5)μB , μ(O2)=0.35(5)μB , and μ(O3)=0.36(5)μB combining to the same macroscopic magnetization value, which was previously only attributed to the Co ions.

  14. A more informative approach for characterization of polymer monolithic phases: small angle neutron scattering/ultrasmall angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Ford, Kathleen M; Konzman, Brian G; Rubinson, Judith F

    2011-12-15

    Neutron scattering techniques have been used frequently to characterize geological specimens and to determine the structures of glasses and of polymers as solutions, suspensions, or melts. Little work has been reported on their application in determining polymers' structural properties relevant to separations. Here, we present a comparison of characterization results from nitrogen porosimetry and from combined small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall angle neutron scattering (USANS) experiments. We show that SANS is extremely sensitive to the pore characteristics. Both approaches can provide information about porosity and pore characteristics, but the neutron scattering techniques provide additional information in the form of the surface characteristics of the pores and their length scales. Fits of the scattering data show that cylindrical pores are present with diameters down to 0.6 μm and that, for length scales down to approxmately 20 Å, the material shows self-similar (fractal) slopes of -3.4 to -3.6. Comparison of these characteristics with other examples from the scattering literature indicate that further investigation of their meaning for chromatographic media is required. PMID:22066706

  15. Neutron inelastic scattering by amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Thaper, C.L.; Sinha, S.K.; Dasannacharya, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments on normal, N-deuterated glycine, normal and N-deuterated alanine, L-valine, L-tyrosine and, L-phenylalanine at 100 K, are reported. Coupling of the external modes to different hydrogens is discussed.

  16. Multi-scale characterization of pore evolution in a combustion metamorphic complex, Hatrurim basin, Israel: Combining (ultra) small-angle neutron scattering and image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Burg, Avihu; Cole, David; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Jackson, Andrew J; Stack, Andrew G; Rother, Gernot; Ciarlette, Diane D

    2013-01-01

    Backscattered scanning electron micrograph and ultra small- and small-angle neutron scattering data have been combined to provide statistically meaningful data on the pore/grain structure and pore evolution of combustion metamorphic complexes from the Hatrurim basin, Israel. Three processes, anti-sintering roughening, alteration of protolith (dehydration, decarbonation, and oxidation) and crystallization of high-temperature minerals, occurred simultaneously, leading to significant changes in observed pore/grain structures. Pore structures in the protoliths, and in lowand high-grade metamorphic rocks show surface (Ds) and mass (Dm) pore fractal geometries with gradual increases in both Ds and Dm values as a function of metamorphic grade. This suggests that increases in pore volume and formation of less branching pore networks are accompanied by a roughening of pore/grain interfaces. Additionally, pore evolution during combustion metamorphism is also characterized by reduced contributions from small-scale pores to the cumulative porosity in the high-grade rocks. At high temperatures, small-scale pores may be preferentially closed by the formation of high-temperature minerals, producing a rougher morphology with increasing temperature. Alternatively, large-scale pores may develop at the expense of small-scale pores. These observations (pore fractal geometry and cumulative porosity) indicate that the evolution of pore/grain structures is correlated with the growth of high-temperature phases and is a consequence of the energy balance between pore/grain surface energy and energy arising from heterogeneous phase contacts. The apparent pore volume density further suggests that the localized time/temperature development of the high-grade Hatrurim rocks is not simply an extension of that of the low-grade rocks. The former likely represents the "hot spots (burning foci)" in the overall metamorphic terrain while the latter may represent contact aureoles.

  17. Neutron scattering study of dilute supercritical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, H. D.; Wignall, G. D.; Shah, V. M.; Londono, J. D.; Bienkowski, P. R.

    Dilute solutions in supercritical solvents exhibit interesting microstructures that are related to their dramatic macroscopic behavior. In typical attractive solutions, solutes are believed to be surrounded by clusters of solvent molecules, and solute molecules are believed to congregate in the vicinity of one another. Repulsive solutions, on the other hand, exhibit a local region of reduced solvent density around the solute with solute-solute congregation. Such microstructures influence solubility, partial molar volume, reaction kinetics, and many other properties. We have undertaken to observe these interesting microstructures directly by neutron scattering experiments on dilute noble gas systems including Ar. The three partial structure factors for such systems and the corresponding pair correlation functions can be determined by using the isotope substitution technique. The systems studied are uniquely suited for our objectives because of the large coherent neutron scattering length of the isotope (sup 36)Ar and because of the accurate potential energy functions that are available for use in molecular simulations and theoretical calculations to be compared with the scattering results. We will describe our experiment, the unique apparatus we have built for it, and the neutron scattering results from our initial allocations of beam time. We will also describe planned scattering experiments to follow those with noble gases, including study of long-chain molecules in supercritical solvents. Such studies will involve hydrocarbon mixtures with and without deuteration to provide contrast.

  18. Neutron scattering study of dilute supercritical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, H.D.; Wignall, G.D.; Shah, V.M.; Londono, J.D.; Bienkowski, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    Dilute solutions in supercritical solvents exhibit interesting microstructures that are related to their dramatic macroscopic behavior. In typical attractive solutions, solutes are believed to be surrounded by clusters of solvent molecules, and solute molecules are believed to congregate in the vicinity of one another. Repulsive solutions, on the other hand, exhibit a local region of reduced solvent density around the solute with solute-solute congregation. Such microstructures influence solubility, partial molar volume, reaction kinetics, and many other properties. We have undertaken to observe these interesting microstructures directly by neutron scattering experiments on dilute noble gas systems including Ar. The three partial structure factors for such systems and the corresponding pair correlation functions can be determined by using the isotope substitution technique. The systems studied are uniquely suited for our objectives because of the large coherent neutron scattering length of the isotope {sup 36}Ar and because of the accurate potential energy functions that are available for use in molecular simulations and theoretical calculations to be compared with the scattering results. We will describe our experiment, the unique apparatus we have built for it, and the neutron scattering results from our initial allocations of beam time. We will also describe planned scattering experiments to follow those with noble gases, including study of long-chain molecules in supercritical solvents. Such studies will involve hydrocarbon mixtures with and without deuteration to provide contrast.

  19. Contraband detection via neutron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberg, H.J.; Charatis, G.; Brundage, J.

    1993-04-01

    Reliable detection of explosives and narcotics depends on generating signatures of compounds which characterize them. Major explosives and also alkaloid narcotics contain unique concentrations of Carbon (C), Nitrogen (N), and Oxygen (O). The kinematic energy shifts of neutrons scattered through angles larger than 140{degrees} allows separate determinations of C, N, and O; ratios of N/C and O/C together give clear signatures of the presence of plastic explosives or narcotics. The ability to detect these signatures under conditions similar to those that would obtain for airport screening has been demonstrated for neutrons for energies less {le} 3 MeV. Strong N resonances and a deep window for scattering from O enhance the confidence of element quantification. Detection of contraband in large cargo containers presents a much more difficult problem. Use of higher energy neutrons is now being tested for shielding penetration, so narcotic signatures could be identified behind the shielding of cargo containers. Scattered neutron spectra, or {open_quotes}signatures{close_quotes} of different organic compounds will be presented.

  20. Neutron scattering gets short-changed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipper, Neal

    2009-10-01

    In your excellent coverage of the latest round of funding cuts by the UK's Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), you highlight the problems that will be caused by the severely reduced operations of the ISIS neutron source (August p7 and p15). As a frequent neutron scatterer, I can only echo your sentiment that it makes no sense at all for the UK to build a superb new facility like the £148m ISIS second target station if it can be switched on for only 120 days per year.

  1. Immersive Visual Analytics for Transformative Neutron Scattering Science

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; Daniel, Jamison R; Drouhard, Margaret; Hahn, Steven E; Proffen, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    The ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) provides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and development across a broad range of disciplines. SNS experiments produce large volumes of complex data that are analyzed by scientists with varying degrees of experience using 3D visualization and analysis systems. However, it is notoriously difficult to achieve proficiency with 3D visualizations. Because 3D representations are key to understanding the neutron scattering data, scientists are unable to analyze their data in a timely fashion resulting in inefficient use of the limited and expensive SNS beam time. We believe a more intuitive interface for exploring neutron scattering data can be created by combining immersive virtual reality technology with high performance data analytics and human interaction. In this paper, we present our initial investigations of immersive visualization concepts as well as our vision for an immersive visual analytics framework that could lower the barriers to 3D exploratory data analysis of neutron scattering data at the SNS.

  2. Neutron scattering from elemental uranium and thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B. |; Chiba, S.

    1995-01-01

    Differential neutron-scattering cross sections of elemental uranium and thorium are measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10.0 MeV in steps of {approx} 0.5 MeV. Forty or more differential values are obtained at each incident energy, distributed between {approx} 17{degree} and 160{degree}. Scattered-neutron resolutions are carefully defined to encompass contributions from the first four members of the ground-state rotational band (0{sup 2} g.s., 2{sup +}, 4{sup +} and 6{sup +} states). The experimental results are interpreted in the context of coupled-channels rotational models, and comparisons made with the respective ENDF/B-VI evaluated files. These comparisons suggest some modifications of the ENDF/B-VI {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th evaluations.

  3. Neutron scattering and models: Iron. Nuclear data and measurements series

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.

    1995-08-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic neutron-scattering cross sections of elemental iron are measured from 4.5 to 10 MeV in increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each incident energy the measurements are made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17{degrees} and 160{degrees}, with emphasis on elastic scattering and inelastic scattering due to the excitation of the yrast 2{sup +} state. The measured data is combined with earlier lower-energy results from this laboratory, with recent high-precision {approx} 9.5 {yields} 15 MeV results from the Physilalisch Technische Bundesanstalt and with selected values from the literature to provide a detailed neutron-scattering data base extending from {approx} 1.5 to 26 MeV. This data is interpreted in the context of phenomenological spherical-optical and coupled-channels (vibrational and rotational) models, and physical implications discussed. Deformation, coupling, asymmetry and dispersive effects are explored. It is shown that, particularly in a collective context, a good description of the interaction of neutrons with iron is achieved over the energy range {approx} 0 {yields} 26 MeV, avoiding the dichotomy between high and low-energy interpretations found in previous work.

  4. Quasielastic Neutron Scattering Study on Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, T.; Kishimoto, H.; Kikuchi, T.; Ohira-Kawamura, S.; Inamura, Y.; Koga, T.; Nakajima, K.

    2014-04-01

    By using a quasielastic neutron scattering technique (disk-chopper-type spectrometer AMATERAS at J-PARC), we have investigated the microscopic dynamics of polybutadiene (PB) in which silica particles were embedded. The experimental results gave us both a damped vibration mode of PB and jumped diffusion motion of the segments. It was found that these dynamical features remain unaffected by the presence of the silica particle, while the residence time of the jumped diffusion motion becomes longer at the high filler loading.

  5. Neutron scattering study of frustrated magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yiming

    Geometrical frustration in magnets consisting of networks of triangles or tetrahedra of spins can lead to unusual cooperative paramagnetic phases extending to temperatures well below the Curie-Weiss temperature. In many cases, strong fluctuations prevent magnetic order in the absence of an external magnetic field. In this thesis, I study geometrically frustrated antiferromagnets La4Cu3MoO12 and UNi4B and spin ice pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O7 using neutron scattering technique. In La4Cu3MoO12, triangles of magnetic Cu2+ ions form a slightly distorted orthorhombic structure. Despite the large Curie-Weiss temperature (thetaCW = -558 K), antiferromagnetic Neel order develops only at T N = 2.6 K. At low temperatures, the copper spin-1/2 behave as strongly coupled spin-trimers. Inelastic neutron scattering shows excitations from the ground state at 7.5(3) meV and 132.5(5) meV. An additional peak in the neutron scattering spectrum, which appears at 125.0(5) meV on heating is ascribed to a transition between excited states. The wave-vector and temperature-dependence of the inelastic magnetic scattering cross section is consistent with inta-trimer transitions. Magnetic neutron diffraction reveals long range antiferromagnetic order below TN = 2.6 K, which doubles the unit cell along the a direction. The ordered magnetic structure is described as inter-trimer order where spin correlations within trimers are controlled by the strong intra-trimer interactions. UNi4B is a frustrated intermetallic heavy fermion metal exhibiting both geometrical frustration and strong electron correlation. Magnetic U ions occupy the hexagonal basal plane. Neutron scattering reveals that unusual Neel order develops below TN = 20 K with two incommensurate wave vectors and a mixture of commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structure. The commensurate structure can be described as three sublattices of next-nearest neighbors with moments 120° apart and perpendicular to c-axis. Dy2Ti2O7, in which magnetic Dy

  6. Quantifying the information measured by neutron scattering instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.W.

    1997-09-01

    The concept of the information content of a scientific measurement is introduced, and a theory is presented which enables the information that may be obtained by a neutron scattering instrument to be calculated. When combined with the time taken to perform the measurement the bandwidth of the instrument is obtained. This bandwidth is effectively a figure of merit which is of use in three respects: in the design of neutron instrumentation, the optimisation of measurements, and in the comparison of one instrument with another.

  7. Inelastic neutron scattering in valence fluctuation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M Lawrence

    2011-02-15

    The valence fluctuation compounds are rare earth intermetallics where hybridization of the nearly-localized 4f electrons with the conduction electrons leads to incorporation of the 4f's into the itinerant states. This hybridization slows down the conduction electrons and hence gives them a heavy effective mass, justifying application of the term 'heavy Fermion' (HF) to these materials. During the project period, we grew large single crystals of several such compounds and measured their properties using both standard thermodynamic probes and state-of-the-art inelastic neutron scattering. We obtained three main results. For the intermediate valence compounds CePd{sub 3} and YbAl{sub 3}, we showed that the scattering of neutrons by the fluctuations of the 4f magnetic moment does not have the momentum dependence expected for the itinerant heavy mass state; rather, the scattering is more typical of a localized spin fluctuation. We believe that incoherent scattering localizes the excitation. For the heavy Fermion compound Ce(Ni{sub 0.935}Pd{sub 0.065}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, which sits at a T = 0 critical point for transformation into an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase, we showed that the scattering from the AF fluctuations does not exhibit any of the divergences that are expected at a phase transition. We speculate that alloy disorder profoundly suppresses the growth of the fluctuating AF regions, leading to short range clusters rather than regions of infinite size. Finally, we explored the applicability of key concepts used to describe the behavior of rare earth heavy Fermions to uranium based HF compounds where the 5f electrons are itinerant as opposed to localized. We found that scaling laws relating the spin fluctuation energy measured in neutron scattering to the low temperature specific heat and susceptibility are valid for the uranium compounds, once corrections are made for AF fluctuations; however, the degeneracy of the high temperature moment is smaller than expected

  8. Neutron scattering studies of multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Ivelisse M.

    Magnetoelectric multiferroics are systems that exhibit magnetic and ferroelectric order. In strongly coupled multiferroics, competing magnetic interactions can break spatial inversion symmetry and yield ferroelectricity through a magnetic phase transition. In this dissertation, I present original work on the multiferroic properties of Ni3V2O8 and critical phenomena in TbMnO3 and RbFe(MoO4)2. Ni3V2O8 is an insulating magnet where Ni-spins order in a longitudinal amplitude modulated pattern along the a axis in the high-temperature incommensurate (HTI) phase. Upon cooling to the low-temperature incommensurate phase, an additional spine site spin component along b results in a cycloidal structure that breaks spatial inversion symmetry, yielding ferroelectricity. Electric control of multiferroic domains is demonstrated quantitatively and qualitatively using polarized magnetic neutron diffraction. We show that magnetic and ferroelectric domains are strongly coupled in this system and that definite cycloid handedness is achieved by antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Ni3 V2O8 displays a memory effect where the system reverts to the previous polarization state upon exiting and re-entering the multiferroic phase through a first order phase transition. Our results suggest that small multiferroic domains in the paraelectric, commensurate phase retain the polarization history and reestablish it upon re-entering the multiferroic phase. TbMnO3 is a frustrated magnet similar to Ni3V 2O8 which undergoes two magnetic phase transitions before becoming multiferroic. A temperature-dependent magnetic diffraction study near TN reveals that this system orders through a continuous phase transition. Further studies in the HTI phase are needed to clarify whether a novel, weak transition exists at around 39 K. Our results support the single irreducible representation model as the system enters the HTI phase. RbFe(MoO4)2 is a nearly 2D antiferromagnet that enters the

  9. Benchmarking thermal neutron scattering in graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong

    A Slowing-Down-Time experiment was designed and performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) as a neutron source to study the neutron thermalization in graphite at room and higher temperatures. The MCNP5 code was utilized to simulate the detector responses and help optimize the experimental design including the size of the graphite assembly, furnace, shielding system and detector position. To facilitate such analysis, MCNP5 version 1.30 was modified to enable perturbation calculation using point detector type tallies. By using the modified MCNP5 code, the sensitivity of the experimental models to the graphite total thermal neutron cross-sections was studied to optimize the design of the experiment. Measurements of slowing-down-time spectrum in graphite were performed at room temperature for a 70x70x70 cm graphite pile by using a Li-6 scintillator and a U-235 fission counter at different locations. The measurements were directly compared to Monte Carlo simulations that use different graphite thermal neutron scattering cross-section libraries. Simulations based on the ENDF/B-VI graphite library were found to have a 30%-40% disagreement with the measurements. In addition to the graphite SDT experiment, which provided the data in the energy region above the graphite Bragg-cutoff energy, transmission experiments were performed for different types of graphite samples using the NIST 8.9 A beam (located at NG-6) to investigating the energy region below the Bragg-cutoff energy. Measurements confirmed that reactor grade graphite, which is a two phase material (crystalline graphite and binder (amorphous-like) carbon), has different thermal neutron scattering cross section from pyrolytic graphite (crystalline graphite). The experiments presented in this work compliment each other and provide an experimental data set which can be used to benchmark graphite thermal neutron scattering cross section libraries that

  10. 2009 International Conference on Neutron Scattering (ICNS 2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, PhD; Gillespie, Donna

    2010-08-05

    The ICNS provides a focal point for the worldwide neutron user community to strengthen ties within this diverse group, while at the same time promoting neutron research among colleagues in related disciplines identified as would-be neutron users. The International Conference on Neutron Scattering thus serves a dual role as an international user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ICNS showcases recent results and provides forums for scientific discussion of neutron research in diverse fields such as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, and elementary excitations, fundamental physics and development of neutron instrumentation through a combination of invited talks, contributed talks and poster sessions. Each of the major national neutron facilities (NIST, LANSCE, ANL, HFIR and SNS), along with their international counterparts, has an opportunity to exchange information with each other and to update users, and potential users, of their facility. This is also an appropriate forum for users to raise issues that relate to the facilities.

  11. Diffusion and adsorption of methane confined in nanoporous carbon aerogel: a combined quasi-elastic and small-angle neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Mavila Chathoth, Suresh; Mamontov, Eugene; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Zamponi, Michaela M

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion of methane confined in nano-porous carbon aerogel with the average pore size 48 {angstrom} and porosity 60% was investigated as a function of pressure at T = 298 K using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The diffusivity of methane shows a clear effect of confinement: it is about two orders of magnitude lower than in bulk at the same thermodynamic conditions and is close to the diffusivity of liquid methane at 100 K (i.e. {approx} 90 K below the liquid-gas critical temperature T{sub C} {approx} 191 K). The diffusion coefficient (D) of methane initially increases with pressure by a factor of {approx}2.5 from 3.47 {+-} 0.41 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 0.482 MPa to D = 8.55 {+-} 0.33 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 2.75 MPa and starts to decrease at higher pressures. An explanation of the observed non-monotonic behavior of the diffusivity in the confined fluid is based on the results of small-angle neutron scattering experiments of the phase behavior of methane in a similar carbon aerogel sample. The initial increase of the diffusion coefficient with pressure is explained as due to progressive filling of bigger pores in which molecular mobility in the internal pore volume is less affected by the sluggish liquid-like molecular mobility in the adsorbed phase. Subsequent decrease of D, is associated with the effect of intermolecular collisions, which result in a lower total molecular mobility with pressure, as in the bulk state. The results are compared with the available QENS data on the methane diffusivity in zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and porous silica as well as with the molecular dynamics simulations of methane in nano-porous carbons and silica zeolites.

  12. Biophysical applications of neutron Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Albergamo, F.; Hayward, R. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    Neutron Compton scattering (NCS) can be applied to measuring nuclear momentum distributions and potential parameters in molecules of biophysical interest. We discuss the analysis of NCS spectra from peptide models, focusing on the characterisation of the amide proton dynamics in terms of the width of the H-bond potential well, its Laplacian, and the mean kinetic energy of the proton. The Sears expansion is used to quantify deviations from the high-Q limit (impulse approximation), and line-shape asymmetry parameters are evaluated in terms of Hermite polynomials. Results on NCS from selectively deuterated acetanilide are used to illustrate this approach.

  13. Toward a resolution of the neutron-neutron scattering-length issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, C. R.; Chen, Q.; Carman, T. S.; Hussein, A.; Gibbs, W. R.; Gibson, B. F.; Mertens, G.; Moore, C. F.; Morris, C.; Obst, A.; Pasyuk, E.; Roper, C. D.; Salinas, F.; Slaus, I.; Sterbenz, S.; Tornow, W.; Walter, R. L.; Whiteley, C. R.; Whitton, M.

    1998-12-01

    We report a high-precision determination of the 1S0 neutron-neutron scattering length (ann) using the 2H(π-,nγ)n reaction. The value obtained in the present work is -18.50+/- 0.05 (statistical) +/- 0.44 (systematic) +/- 0.30 (theoretical) fm, which is consistent with the values from previous measurements. Combining our result with previous measurements reduces the total uncertainty in the world average of ann to +/-0.4 fm, matching the accuracy to which the charge-symmetric parameter app is determined.

  14. Enhanced reaction rates in NDP analysis with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R. Gregory

    2014-04-15

    Neutron depth profiling (NDP) makes accessible quantitative information on a few isotopic concentration profiles ranging from the surface into the sample a few micrometers. Because the candidate analytes for NDP are few, there is little interference encountered. Furthermore, neutrons have no charge so mixed chemical states in the sample are of no direct concern. There are a few nuclides that exhibit large probabilities for neutron scattering. The effect of neutron scattering on NDP measurements has not previously been evaluated as a basis for either enhancing the reaction rates or as a source of measurement error. Hydrogen is a common element exhibiting large neutron scattering probability found in or around sample volumes being analyzed by NDP. A systematic study was conducted to determine the degree of signal change when neutron scattering occurs during analysis. The relative signal perturbation was evaluated for materials of varied neutron scattering probability, concentration, total mass, and geometry. Signal enhancements up to 50% are observed when the hydrogen density is high and in close proximity to the region of analysis with neutron beams of sub thermal energies. Greater signal enhancements for the same neutron number density are reported for thermal neutron beams. Even adhesive tape used to position the sample produces a measureable signal enhancement. Because of the shallow volume, negligible distortion of the NDP measured profile shape is encountered from neutron scattering.

  15. Evaluation of Pore Networks in Caprocks at Geologic Storage Sites: A Combined Study using High Temperature and Pressure Reaction Experiments, Small Angle Neutron Scattering, and Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzakis, K. M.; Sitchler, A.; Wang, X.; McCray, J. E.; Kaszuba, J. P.; Rother, G.; Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Low permeability rock units, often shales or mudstones, that overlie geologic formations under consideration for CO2 sequestration will help contain injected CO2. CO2 that does flow through these rocks will dissolve into the porewaters, creating carbonic acid lowering the pH. This perturbation of the system may result in mineral dissolution or precipitation, which can change the pore structure and impact the flow properties of the caprocks. In order to investigate the impacts that reaction can have on caprock pore structure, we performed a combination of high pressure high temperature reaction experiments, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments and high resolution focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) imaging on samples from the Gothic shale and Marine Tuscaloosa Group. Small angle neutron scattering was performed on unreacted and reacted caprocks at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. New precipitates and pores are observed in high-resolution images of the reacted samples. The precipitates have been preliminarily identified as gypsum or anhydrite, and sulfide minerals. Results from small angle neutron scattering, a technique that provides information about pores and pore/mineral interfaces at scales ~ 5 to 300 nm, show an increased porosity and specific surface area after reaction with brine and CO2. However, there appear to be differences in how the pore networks change between the two samples that are related to sample mineralogy and original pore network structure. Changes to pores and formation of new pores may lead to different capillary sealing behavior and permeability. This combination of controlled laboratory experiments, neutron scattering and high-resolution imaging provides detailed information about the geochemical processes that occur at the pore scale as CO2 reacts with rocks underground. Such information is integral to the evaluation of large-scale CO2 sequestration as a feasible technology

  16. Spin-phonon coupling, high-pressure phase transitions, and thermal expansion of multiferroic GaFeO3: A combined first principles and inelastic neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mayanak Kumar; Mittal, Ranjan; Zbiri, Mohamed; Singh, Ripandeep; Rols, Stephane; Schober, Helmut; Chaplot, Samrath Lal

    2014-10-01

    We have carried out an extensive phonon study on multiferroic GaFeO3 to elucidate its dynamical behavior. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements are performed over a wide temperature range, 150 to 1198 K. First principles lattice dynamical calculations are done for the sake of the analysis and interpretation of the observations. The comparison of the phonon spectra from magnetic and nonmagnetic calculations highlights pronounced differences. The energy range of the vibrational atomistic contributions of the Fe and O ions are found to differ significantly in the two calculation types. Therefore, magnetism induced by the active spin degrees of freedom of Fe cations plays a key role in stabilizing the structure and dynamics of GaFeO3. Moreover, the computed enthalpy in various phases of GaFeO3 is used to gain deeper insights into the high-pressure phase stability of this material. Further, the volume dependence of the phonon spectra is used to determine its thermal expansion behavior.

  17. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  18. Neutron Compton scattering from selectively deuterated acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Fielding, A. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    With the aim of developing the application of neutron Compton scattering (NCS) to molecular systems of biophysical interest, we are using the Compton spectrometer EVS at ISIS to characterize the momentum distribution of protons in peptide groups. In this contribution we present NCS measurements of the recoil peak (Compton profile) due to the amide proton in otherwise fully deuterated acetanilide (ACN), a widely studied model system for H-bonding and energy transfer in biomolecules. We obtain values for the average width of the potential well of the amide proton and its mean kinetic energy. Deviations from the Gaussian form of the Compton profile, analyzed on the basis of an expansion due to Sears, provide data relating to the Laplacian of the proton potential.

  19. Characterization of hydrogen in concrete by cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis and neutron incoherent scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.L.; Chen-Mayer, H.H.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Blaauw, M.

    2000-07-01

    A combination of cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) and neutron incoherent scattering (NIS) has been used for nondestructive characterization of hydrogen as a function of position in slabs of wet concrete of different composition. Hydrogen was determined by PGAA by scanning each sample across of 5 mm diameter neutron beam in 10 mm increments, and measuring the 2223 keV prompt gamma ray. NIS measurements were performed by scanning the samples across a 5 mm diameter neutron beam at 5 mm increments and detecting scattered neutrons. The measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the techniques for 2D compositional mapping of hydrogen and other elements in materials, and indicate the potential of these methods for monitoring the uniformity of drying concrete.

  20. Neutron scattering investigations of frustated magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, Tom

    This thesis describes the experimental investigation of frustrated magnetic systems based on the pyrochlore lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. Ho2Ti207 and Dy2Ti207 are examples of spin ices, in which the manifold of disordered magnetic groundstates maps onto that of the proton positions in ice. Using single crystal neutron scattering to measure Bragg and diffuse scattering, the effect of applying magnetic fields along different directions in the crystal was investigated. Different schemes of degeneracy removal were observed for different directions. Long and short range order, and the coexistence of both could be observed by this technique.The field and temperature dependence of magnetic ordering was studied in Ho2Ti207 and Dy2Ti207. Ho2Ti2()7 has been more extensively investigated. The field was applied on [00l], [hh0], [hhh] and [hh2h]. Dy2Ti207 was studied with the field applied on [00l] and [hho] but more detailed information about the evolution of the scattering pattern across a large area of reciprocal space was obtained.With the field applied on [00l] both materials showed complete degeneracy removal. A long range ordered structure was formed. Any magnetic diffuse scattering vanished and was entirely replaced by strong magnetic Bragg scattering. At T =0.05 K both materials show unusual magnetization curves, with a prominent step and hysteresis. This was attributed to the extremely slow dynamics of spin ice materials at this temperature.Both materials were studied in greatest detail with the field applied on [hh0]. The coexistence of long and short range order was observed when the field was raised at T = 0.05 K. The application of a field in this direction separated the spin system into two populations. One could be ordered by the field, and one remained disordered. However, via spin-spin interactions, the field restricted the degeneracy of the disordered spin population. The neutron scattering pattern of Dy2Ti207 shows that the spin system was separated

  1. Topography of neutron scattering from diblock copolymer film

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Russell, T.P.

    1994-10-01

    The surface structure of a multilayered film of symmetric perdeuterated diblock copolymers of polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate, denoted P(d-S-b-d-MMA), was investigated by neutron scattering at grazing incidence. The film surfaces were covered by islands or holes of uniform height with a lateral size of several micrometers. With the angle of incidence fixed, the off-specular neutron scattering was measured as function of scattering angle and neutron wavelength. The off-specular scattering intensity shows ridges at constant q{sub z}, the momentum transfer along the surface normal. The scattering arises from the surface domains. It was found that the off-specular ridges developed from minima in the oscillations in the specular profile corresponding to domain height. The characteristic of the off-specular scattering, which is different from that of the off-specular scattering due to the conformal roughness in a multilayered film, is interpreted in terms of the correlations of the surface domains.

  2. Magnetism in the actinides: the role of neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron scattering has played a crucial and unique role of elucidating the magnetism in actinide compounds. Examples are given of elastic scattering to determine magnetic structures, measure spatial correlations in the critical regime, and magnetic form factors, and of inelastic scattering to measure the (often elusive) spin excitations. Some future directions will be discussed.

  3. Neutron beam characterization measurements at the Manuel Lujan Jr. neutron scattering center

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Muhrer, Guenter; Daemen, Luke L; Kelsey, Charles T; Duran, Michael A; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the neutron beam characteristics of neutron moderators at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE. The absolute thermal neutron flux, energy spectra and time emission spectra were measured for the high resolution and high intensity decoupled water, partially coupled liquid hydrogen and partially coupled water moderators. The results of our experimental study will provide an insight into aging of different target-moderator-reflector-shield components as well as new experimental data for benchmarking of neutron transport codes.

  4. Point Scattered Function (PScF) for fast neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mohamed H.

    2009-08-01

    Fast neutron radiography opened up a new range of possibilities to image extremely dense objects. The removal of the scattering effect is one of the most challenging problems in neutron imaging. Neutron scattering in fast neutron radiography did not receive much attention compared with X-ray and thermal neutron radiography. The purpose of this work is to investigate the behavior of the Point Scattered Function (PScF) as applied in fast neutron radiography. The PScF was calculated using MCNP as a spatial distribution of scattered neutrons over the detector surface for one emitting source element. Armament and explosives materials, namely, Rifle steel, brass, aluminum and trinitrotoluene (TNT) were simulated. Effect of various sample thickness and sample-to-detector distance were considered. Simulated sample geometries included a slab with varying thickness, a sphere with varying radii, and a cylinder with varying base radii. Different neutron sources, namely, Cf-252, DT as well as DD neutron sources were considered. Neutron beams with zero degree divergence angle; and beams with varying angles related to the normal to the source plane were simulated. Curve fitting of the obtained PScF, in the form of Gaussian function, were given to be used in future work using image restoration codes. Analytical representation of the height as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the obtained Gaussian functions eliminates the need to calculate the PScF for sample parameters that were not investigated in this study.

  5. Reverse Monte Carlo analysis of the local order in liquid Ge{sub 0.15}Te{sub 0.85} alloys combining neutron scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Coulet, Marie-Vanessa; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Gaspard, Jean-Pierre; Bichara, Christophe

    2005-11-01

    The structure of liquid Ge{sub 0.15}Te{sub 0.85} alloys that exhibit a density anomaly between 633 K and 733 K at ambient pressure was investigated using x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ge K edge. Using a reverse Monte Carlo method to combine the present results with neutron scattering data, we show that the volume contraction is associated with an increase of the first neighbor coordination number around both Ge and Te by about one atom. The coordination number of Ge increases from 3{+-}0.3 to 4.1{+-}0.3. These results support an interpretation of the density anomaly in terms of the same Peierls-like distortion mechanism acting in the liquid state and in the neighboring (pure Te and GeTe compound) phases.

  6. Early history of neutron scattering at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, M.K.

    1985-07-01

    Most of the early development of neutron scattering techniques utilizing reactor neutrons occurred at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the years immediately following World War II. C.G. Shull, E.O. Wollan, and their associates systematically established neutron diffraction as a quantitative research tool and then applied this technique to important problems in nuclear physics, chemical crystallography, and magnetism. This article briefly summarizes the very important research at ORNL during this period, which laid the foundation for the establishment of neutron scattering programs throughout the world. 47 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd–Fe–B nanocrystalline magnet

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P.; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd–Fe–B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd–Fe–B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd–Fe–B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters. PMID:27321149

  8. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-06-20

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd-Fe-B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters.

  9. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd-Fe-B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters. PMID:27321149

  10. A neutron imaging device for sample alignment in a pulsed neutron scattering instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Grazzi, F.; Scherillo, A.; Zoppi, M.

    2009-09-15

    A neutron-imaging device for alignment purposes has been tested on the INES beamline at ISIS, the pulsed neutron source of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (U.K.). Its use, in conjunction with a set of movable jaws, turns out extremely useful for scattering application to complex samples where a precise and well-defined determination of the scattering volume is needed.

  11. Modern Techniques for Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawari, A. I.

    2014-04-01

    A predictive approach based on ab initio quantum mechanics and/or classical molecular dynamics simulations has been formulated to calculate the scattering law, S(κ⇀,ω), and the thermal neutron scattering cross sections of materials. In principle, these atomistic methods make it possible to generate the inelastic thermal neutron scattering cross sections of any material and to accurately reflect the physical conditions of the medium (i.e, temperature, pressure, etc.). In addition, the generated cross sections are free from assumptions such as the incoherent approximation of scattering theory and, in the case of solids, crystalline perfection. As a result, new and improved thermal neutron scattering data libraries have been generated for a variety of materials. Among these are materials used for reactor moderators and reflectors such as reactor-grade graphite and beryllium (including the coherent inelastic scattering component), silicon carbide, cold neutron media such as solid methane, and neutron beam filters such as sapphire and bismuth. Consequently, it is anticipated that the above approach will play a major role in providing the nuclear science and engineering community with its needs of thermal neutron scattering data especially when considering new materials where experimental information may be scarce or nonexistent.

  12. Neutron scattering of iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shamoto, S; Wakimoto, S; Kodama, K.; Ishikado, Motoyuki; Christianson, Andrew D; Lumsden, Mark D; Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Arai, Masatoshi; Kakurai, K.; Esaka, Fumitaka; Iyo, Akira; Kito, Hijiri; Eisaki, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Low-energy spin excitations have been studied on polycrystalline LaFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} samples by inelastic neutron scattering. The Q-integrated dynamical spin susceptibility {chi}{double_prime}({omega}) of the superconducting samples is found to be comparable to that of the magnetically ordered parent sample. On the other hand, {chi}{double_prime}({omega}) almost vanishes at x = 0.158, where the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} is suppressed to 7 K. In addition, {chi}{double_prime}({omega}) in optimally doped LaFeAsO{sub 0.918}F{sub 0.082} with T{sub c} = 29 K exhibits a spin resonance mode. The peak energy, E{sub res}, when scaled by k{sub B}T{sub c} is similar to the value of about 4.7 reported in other high-T{sub c} iron-based superconductors. This result suggests that there is intimate relationship between the dynamical spin susceptibility and high-T{sub c} superconductivity in iron-based superconductors, and is consistent with a nesting condition between Fermi surfaces at the {Gamma} and M points.

  13. Neutron Scattering from Magnetically Frustrated Ruthenium Pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Collin

    2008-03-01

    Spin-1 ruthenium pyrochlores feature strong exchange interactions and deeply suppressed N'eel ordering. In addition a doping induced metallic phase has been demonstrated. I discuss neutron scattering experiments that explore the strongly frustrated quantum magnetism of Y2Ru2O7 [1] and Pr2-xBixRu2O7 [2]. In Y2Ru2O7 (θCW= --1100 K, TN=77 K) much of the magnetic spectral weight is concentrated in a 20 meV spectral peak above an 11 meV low temperature gap in the excitation spectrum. In Pr2-xBixRu2O7 magnetic order which occurs for T

  14. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  15. Response of the Hanford Combination Neutron Dosimeter in plutonium environments

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, A.W.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents response characteristics and the development of dose algorithms for the Hanford Combination Neutron Dosimeter (HCNO) implemented on January 1, 1995. The HCND was accredited under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) during 1994. The HCND employs two neutron dose components consisting of (1) an albedo thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), and (2) a track-etch dosimeter (TED). Response characteristics of these two dosimeter components were measured under the low-scatter conditions of the Hanford 318 Building Calibration Laboratory, and under the high-scatter conditions in the workplace at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The majority of personnel neutron dose at Hanford (currently and historically) occurs at the PFP. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable sources were used to characterize dosimeter response in the laboratory. At the PFP, neutron spectra and dose-measuring instruments, including a multisphere spectrometer, tissue equivalent proportional counters, and specially calibrated rem meters, were used to determine the neutron dose under several configurations from three different plutonium sources: (1) plutonium tetrafluoride, (2) plutonium metal, and (3) plutonium oxide. In addition, measurements were performed at many selected work locations. The HCNDs were included in all measurements. Comparison of dosimeter- and instrument-measured dose equivalents provided the data necessary to develop HCND dose algorithms and to assess the accuracy of estimated neutron dose under actual work conditions.

  16. Small angle neutron scattering from nanometer grain sized materials

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Siegel, R.W.

    1991-11-01

    Small angie neutron scattering has been utilized, along with a number of complementary characterization methods suitable to the nanometer size scale, to investigate the structures of cluster-assembled nanophase materials. Results of these investigations are described and problems and opportunities in using small angle scattering for elucidating nanostructures are discussed.

  17. Understanding inelastically scattered neutrons from water on a time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Changwoo; Heller, William T.; Stanley, Christopher; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Doucet, Mathieu; Smith, Gregory S.

    2014-02-01

    It is generally assumed by most of the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) user community that a neutron's energy is unchanged during SANS measurements. Here, the scattering from water, specifically light water, was measured on the EQ-SANS instrument, a time-of-flight (TOF) SANS instrument located at the Spallation Neutron Source of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A significant inelastic process was observed in the TOF spectra of neutrons scattered from water. Analysis of the TOF spectra from the sample showed that the scattered neutrons have energies consistent with room-temperature thermal energies (~20 meV) regardless of the incident neutron's energy. With the aid of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations, we conclude that the thermalization process within the sample results in faster neutrons that arrive at the detector earlier than expected based on the incident neutron energies. This thermalization process impacts the measured SANS intensities in a manner that will ultimately be sample- and temperature-dependent, necessitating careful processing of the raw data into the SANS cross-section.

  18. Elastic Neutron Scattering at 96 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, A.; Blomgren, J.; Ataç, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Mermod, P.; Nilsson, L.; Pomp, S.; Österlund, M.; Dangtip, s.; Tippawan, U.; Phansuke, P.; Jonsson, O.; Renberg, P.-U.; Prokofiev, A.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Elmgren, K.; Olsson, N.; Blideanu, V.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.-F.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Louvel, M.; Marie-Noury, N.; Schweitzer, C.; Eudes, Ph.; Haddad, F.; Lebrun, C.; Koning, A. J.

    2005-05-01

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50-130 MeV, SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy), has recently been installed at the 20 - 180-MeV neutron beam line of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. Elastic neutron scattering from 12C, 16O, 56Fe, 89Y, and 208Pb has been studied at 96 MeV in the 10 - 70° interval. The results from 12C and 208Pb have recently been published,6 while the data from 16O, 56Fe, and 89Y are under analysis. The achieved energy resolution, 3.7 MeV, is about an order of magnitude better than for any previous experiment above 65 MeV incident energy. The present experiment represents the highest neutron energy where the ground state has been resolved from the first excited state in neutron scattering. A novel method for normalization of the absolute scale of the cross section has been used. The estimated normalization uncertainty, 3%, is unprecedented for a neutron-induced differential cross section measurement on a nuclear target. The results are compared with modern optical model predictions, based on phenomenology or microscopic theory. Applications for these measurements are nuclear-waste incineration, single-event upsets in electronics, and fast-neutron therapy.

  19. Enhanced off-specular scattering in magnetic neutron waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, S. V.; Ott, F.; Kentzinger, E.; Paul, A.

    2007-07-01

    We are developing magnetic neutron waveguides (NWG) consisting of thin films of low-optical index sandwiched between two layers of high-optical index. In such structures, the neutron wave function is strongly localized in the guiding layer and the sensitivity to interface scattering effects is enhanced. The samples were characterized on the reflectometer HADAS (FZ Jülich, Germany) by specular reflectivity and off-specular scattering for different magnetic states of the permalloy layers. We show that the waveguide structure strongly enhances the off-specular scattering.

  20. Spin echo small angle neutron scattering using a continuously pumped {sup 3}He neutron polarisation analyser

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, S. R.; Li, K.; Yan, H.; Stonaha, P.; Li, F.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V.; Snow, W. M.; Washington, A. L.; Walsh, A.; Chen, W. C.; Parnell, A. J.; Fairclough, J. P. A.; Pynn, R.

    2015-02-15

    We present a new instrument for spin echo small angle neutron scattering (SESANS) developed at the Low Energy Neutron Source at Indiana University. A description of the various instrument components is given along with the performance of these components. At the heart of the instrument are a series of resistive coils to encode the neutron trajectory into the neutron polarisation. These are shown to work well over a broad range of neutron wavelengths. Neutron polarisation analysis is accomplished using a continuously operating neutron spin filter polarised by Rb spin-exchange optical pumping of {sup 3}He. We describe the performance of the analyser along with a study of the {sup 3}He polarisation stability and its implications for SESANS measurements. Scattering from silica Stöber particles is investigated and agrees with samples run on similar instruments.

  1. Monte Carlo code for neutron scattering instrumentation design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Daemen, L.; Fitzsimmons, M.; Hjelm, R.; Olah, G.; Roberts, J.; Seeger, P.; Smith, G.; Thelliez, T.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The development of next generation, accelerator based neutron sources calls for the design of new instruments for neutron scattering studies of materials. It will be necessary, in the near future, to evaluate accurately and rapidly the performance of new and traditional neutron instruments at short- and long-pulse spallation neutron sources, as well as continuous sources. We have developed a code that is a design tool to assist the instrument designer model new or existing instruments, test their performance, and optimize their most important features.

  2. Data acquisition system for the neutron scattering instruments at the intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Daly, R.T.; Haumann, J.R.; Hitterman, R.L.; Morgan, C.B.; Ostrowski, G.E.; Worlton, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a major new user-oriented facility which is now coming on line for basic research in neutron scattering and neutron radiation damage. This paper describes the data-acquisition system which will handle data acquisition and instrument control for the time-of-flight neutron-scattering instruments at IPNS. This discussion covers the scientific and operational requirements for this system, and the system architecture that was chosen to satisfy these requirements. It also provides an overview of the current system implementation including brief descriptions of the hardware and software which have been developed.

  3. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Mechanism and Measurement of Neutron Asymmetry Using Time of Flight Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Al Azzawe, A. J. M.

    2007-02-14

    Inelastic scattering is an essential reaction for other nuclear reactions to detect the optical model and compound nucleus formation within the range of (0.4- 5.0) MeV neutron incident energy by using time of flight technique. The time of flight system (TOFS) installed on the horizontal channel reactor RRA has been used to measure the asymmetry of scattered fast neutrons, when data acquisition and system control were recorded event by event by HP - computer via CAMAC system. Eight NE 213 neutron counters were used in order to detect neutron inelastic scattering in the forward direction (4 neutron counters at 0 deg. angle) and in the backward direction (4 neutron counters at 180 deg. angle) to measure the asymmetry of fast neutron. Each neutron counter was 50cm in length and 8cm in diameter, viewed by two (58 - DVP) photomultiplier tubes. The contribution of direct interaction to the compound nucleus formation was deduced from the asymmetry in the neutron detection at the same direction of these eight neutron counters. A time resolution of 8.2 ns between the eight neutron counters and one of the two Ge(Li) detectors has been obtained.

  4. Combination neutron-gamma ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Stuart, Travis P.; Tipton, Wilbur J.

    1976-10-26

    A radiation detection system capable of detecting neutron and gamma events and distinguishing therebetween. The system includes a detector for a photomultiplier which utilizes a combination of two phosphor materials, the first of which is in the form of small glass beads which scintillate primarily in response to neutrons and the second of which is a plastic matrix which scintillates in response to gammas. A combination of pulse shape and pulse height discrimination techniques is utilized to provide an essentially complete separation of the neutron and gamma events.

  5. X-ray and Neutron Scattering of Water.

    PubMed

    Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire; Bove, Livia E; Loerting, Thomas; Nilsson, Anders; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Schlesinger, Daniel; Skinner, Lawrie

    2016-07-13

    This review article focuses on the most recent advances in X-ray and neutron scattering studies of water structure, from ambient temperature to the deeply supercooled and amorphous states, and of water diffusive and collective dynamics, in disparate thermodynamic conditions and environments. In particular, the ability to measure X-ray and neutron diffraction of water with unprecedented high accuracy in an extended range of momentum transfers has allowed the derivation of detailed O-O pair correlation functions. A panorama of the diffusive dynamics of water in a wide range of temperatures (from 400 K down to supercooled water) and pressures (from ambient up to multiple gigapascals) is presented. The recent results obtained by quasi-elastic neutron scattering under high pressure are compared with the existing data from nuclear magnetic resonance, dielectric and infrared measurements, and modeling. A detailed description of the vibrational dynamics of water as measured by inelastic neutron scattering is presented. The dependence of the water vibrational density of states on temperature and pressure, and in the presence of biological molecules, is discussed. Results about the collective dynamics of water and its dispersion curves as measured by coherent inelastic neutron scattering and inelastic X-ray scattering in different thermodynamic conditions are reported. PMID:27195477

  6. Fluence-compensated down-scattered neutron imaging using the neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, D. T.; Volegov, P. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Munro, D. H.; Grim, G. P.; Landen, O. L.; Spears, B. K.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Field, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility is used to observe the primary ˜14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV) from the assembled shell. Due to the strong spatial dependence of the primary neutron fluence through the dense shell, the down-scattered image is convolved with the primary-neutron fluence much like a backlighter profile. Using a characteristic scattering angle assumption, we estimate the primary neutron fluence and compensate the down-scattered image, which reveals information about asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without invoking complicated models.

  7. A compact neutron scatter camera for field deployment.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, John E M; Gerling, Mark D; Brennan, James S

    2016-08-01

    We describe a very compact (0.9 m high, 0.4 m diameter, 40 kg) battery operable neutron scatter camera designed for field deployment. Unlike most other systems, the configuration of the sixteen liquid-scintillator detection cells are arranged to provide omnidirectional (4π) imaging with sensitivity comparable to a conventional two-plane system. Although designed primarily to operate as a neutron scatter camera for localizing energetic neutron sources, it also functions as a Compton camera for localizing gamma sources. In addition to describing the radionuclide source localization capabilities of this system, we demonstrate how it provides neutron spectra that can distinguish plutonium metal from plutonium oxide sources, in addition to the easier task of distinguishing AmBe from fission sources. PMID:27587113

  8. Neutron-scattering characterization of nanostructured materials relevant to biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loong, C.-K.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Kolesnikov, A. I.

    2004-10-01

    Biomedical nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that encompasses many disciplines including medicine, molecular biology, materials physics and chemistry, engineering, etc. The complexity of the targeted systems demands cross-disciplinary research and international collaboration. In the materials front, understanding the fundamental properties at molecular level is important to the realization of the full potential of substances and the fruition of eventual technological applications. Neutron-scattering characterization of biomolecular systems can in principle provide unique information pertinent to nanotechnological applications. But the method is not widely utilized because neutron facilities are not normally located at industrial laboratories and university campuses. We introduce the techniques of neutron scattering for studying the organization of nanoscale structural units and their dynamic response to physical-chemical conditions. Examples are given to illustrate neutron characterization of nanostructured biomaterials and the implications for biotechnology.

  9. A compact neutron scatter camera for field deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, John E. M.; Gerling, Mark D.; Brennan, James S.

    2016-08-01

    We describe a very compact (0.9 m high, 0.4 m diameter, 40 kg) battery operable neutron scatter camera designed for field deployment. Unlike most other systems, the configuration of the sixteen liquid-scintillator detection cells are arranged to provide omnidirectional (4π) imaging with sensitivity comparable to a conventional two-plane system. Although designed primarily to operate as a neutron scatter camera for localizing energetic neutron sources, it also functions as a Compton camera for localizing gamma sources. In addition to describing the radionuclide source localization capabilities of this system, we demonstrate how it provides neutron spectra that can distinguish plutonium metal from plutonium oxide sources, in addition to the easier task of distinguishing AmBe from fission sources.

  10. Fragility of complexity biophysical systems by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Bellocco, Ersilia; Laganà, Giuseppina; Mondelli, Claudia

    2006-11-01

    Neutron scattering is an exceptional tool to investigate structural and dynamical properties of systems of biophysical interest, such as proteins, enzymes, lipids and sugars. Moreover, elastic neutron scattering enhances the investigation of atomic motions in hydrated proteins in a wide temperature range and on the picosecond timescale. Homologous disaccharides, such as trehalose, maltose and sucrose, are cryptobiotic substances, since they allow to many organisms to undergo in a “suspended life” state, known as cryptobiosis in extreme environmental conditions. The present paper is aimed to discuss the fragility degree of disaccharides, as evaluated of the temperature dependence of the mean square displacement by elastic neutron scattering, in order to link this feature with their bioprotective functions.

  11. Development and prospects of Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuo, Tai-Sen; Cheng, He; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) is an upgrade of the traditional Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique which can cover three orders of magnitude of length scale from one nanometer to one micrometer. It is a powerful tool for structure calibration in polymer science, biology, material science and condensed matter physics. Since the first VSANS instrument, D11 in Grenoble, was built in 1972, new collimation techniques, focusing optics (multi-beam converging apertures, material or magnetic lenses, and focusing mirrors) and higher resolution detectors combined with the long flight paths and long incident neutron wavelengths have been developed. In this paper, a detailed review is given of the development, principles and application conditions of various VSANS techniques. Then, beam current gain factors are calculated to evaluate those techniques. A VSANS design for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is thereby presented. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (21474119, 11305191)

  12. Neutron inelastic scattering spectrum of footballene C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Coulombeau, C.; Jobic, H.; Bernier, P.

    1992-01-09

    The authors report results of a neutron inelastic scattering study of C{sub 60}. They prepared a 1.63 g sample, and using the ISIS pulsed neutron source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, obtained spectral scans at 25K using a crystal analyzer. Of the 46 calculated nondegenerate frequencies in the vibrational spectrum, they have located 28 of them, including all the optically observed lines.

  13. Neutron densities in 120Sn observed by polarized proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, H.; Takeda, H.; Taki, T.; Yosoi, M.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Uchida, M.; Tsukahara, N.; Noro, T.; Yoshimura, M.; Fujimura, H.; Yoshida, H.; Obayashi, E.; Tamii, A.; Akimune, H.

    2001-06-01

    Cross sections, analyzing powers and spin rotation parameters of proton elastic scattering from 58Ni and 120Sn have been measured at intermediate energies. By elastic scattering off N~=Z nuclei like 58Ni at intermediate energies we can study medium modification of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction inside the nucleus, because proton distributions in target nuclei are constrained by charge distributions measured by electron scattering and neutron distributions can be assumed to be the same as proton's. In order to explain our experimental data of 58Ni at large scattering angles, it was found to be necessary to use experimental densities deduced from charge densities measured by electron scattering and to modify the coupling constants and the masses of exchanged σ and ω mesons in the RIA, assuming linear dependencies of meson properties to nuclear densities. Parameters of the medium effect have been searched to reproduce the data. For N≠Z nuclei, neutron density distribution can be extracted from the elastic scattering, assuming the same medium modifications fixed by the 58Ni data and using proton distributions obtained from charge distributions. We have searched neutron density distributions obtained from charge distributions. We have searched neutron density distribution so as to reproduce 120Sn data at the proton incident energy of 300 MeV. Deduced neutron distribution has an increase at the nuclear center, which is consistent with the 3s1/2 orbit wave function as expected in 120Sn. At energies other than 300 MeV, experimental data of 120Sn have been also well reproduced by the neutron distribution obtained at 300 MeV. .

  14. Polarised neutron scattering from dynamic polarised targets in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, W.; Hirai, M.; Olah, G.; Meerwinck, W.; Schink, H.-J.; Stuhrman, H. B.; Wagner, R.; Wenkow-EsSouni, M.; Zhao, J.; Schärpf, O.; Crichton, R. R.; Krumpolc, M.; Nierhaus, K. H.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Rijllart, A.

    1991-10-01

    The contrast giving rise to neutron small-angle scattering can be enhanced considerably by polarisation of the hydrogen nuclei [J. des Coizeaux and G. Jannink, Les Polymères en Solution, Les Editions de Physique, F-91944 Les Ulis, France (1987)]. Using polarised neutrons the scattering from protonated labels in a deuterated matrix will increase by an order of magnitude. This is the basis of nuclear spin contrast variation, a method which is of particular interest for the in situ structure determination of macromolecular components. A new polarised target for neutron scattering has been designed by CERN and tested successfully at FRG-1 of the GKSS research centre. For the purpose of thermal-neutron scattering the frozen solutions of biomolecules are immersed in liquid helium 4, which is thermally coupled to the cooling mixture of helium 3/helium 4 of the dilution refrigerator. The nuclear spins are aligned with respect to the external magnetic field-parallel or antiparallel-by dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP). The gain in neutron scattering compared to earlier experiments using direct cooling of the sample by helium 3 is a factor of 30. Another factor of 30 arises from the installation of the cold source and the beryllium reflector in FRG-1 [W. Knop et al., J. Appl. Cryst. 22 (1989) 352]. Pure nuclear spin targets are produced from dynamic polarised targets by selective depolarisation. In biological material only the hydrogen isotopes contribute significantly to polarised neutron scattering. Thus, saturation of the proton NMR yields a deuteron target, provided the target material has been enriched by the latter isotope. A proton target is obtained from the dynamic polarised target by saturation of deuteron NMR. This leads to six additional scattering functions reflecting the proton and deuteron spin densities and the correlations between the polarised isotopes. Polarised neutron scattering from nuclear spin targets of apoferritin and various derivatives of the

  15. Ultrathin aluminum sample cans for single crystal inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Matthew B; Loguillo, Mark; Abernathy, Douglas L

    2011-01-01

    Single crystal inelastic neutron scattering measurements are often performed using a sample environment for controlling sample temperature. One difficulty associated with this is establishing appropriate thermal coupling from the sample to the temperature controlled portion of the sample environment. This is usually accomplished via a sample can which thermally couples the sample environment to the sample can and the sample can to the sample via an exchange gas. Unfortunately, this can will contribute additional background signal to ones measurement. We present here the design of an ultrathin aluminum sample can based upon established technology for producing aluminum beverage cans. This design minimizes parasitic sample can scattering. Neutron scattering measurements comparing a machined sample can to our beverage can design clearly indicate a large reduction in scattering intensity and texture when using the ultrathin sample can design. We also examine the possibility of using standard commercial beverage cans as sample cans.

  16. Ultrathin aluminum sample cans for single crystal inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M. B.; Loguillo, M. J.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2011-05-01

    Single crystal inelastic neutron scattering measurements are often performed using a sample environment for controlling sample temperature. One difficulty associated with this is establishing appropriate thermal coupling from the sample to the temperature controlled portion of the sample environment. This is usually accomplished via a sample can which thermally couples the sample environment to the sample can and the sample can to the sample via an exchange gas. Unfortunately, this can will contribute additional background signal to one's measurement. We present here the design of an ultrathin aluminum sample can based upon established technology for producing aluminum beverage cans. This design minimizes parasitic sample can scattering. Neutron scattering measurements comparing a machined sample can to our beverage can design clearly indicate a large reduction in scattering intensity and texture when using the ultrathin sample can design. We also examine the possibility of using standard commercial beverage cans as sample cans.

  17. Event-based processing of neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik

    2015-12-01

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to recording individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode which preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final uncertainties compared to traditional methods, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniques will be shown for comparison.

  18. A molecular beam epitaxy facility for in situ neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dura, J. A.; LaRock, J.

    2009-07-15

    A molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) facility has been built to enable in situ neutron scattering measurements during growth of epitaxial layers. While retaining the full capabilities of a research MBE chamber, this facility has been optimized for polarized neutron reflectometry measurements. Optimization includes a compact lightweight portable design, a neutron window, controllable magnetic field, deposition across a large 76 mm diameter sample with exceptional flux uniformity, and sample temperatures continuously controllable from 38 to 1375 K. A load lock chamber allows for sample insertion, storage of up to 4 samples, and docking with other facilities. The design and performance of this chamber are described here.

  19. Event-Based Processing of Neutron Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik L.

    2015-09-16

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to the recording of individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode that preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final errors, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniques will be shown for comparison.

  20. Scattered Neutron Tomography Based on A Neutron Transport Inverse Problem

    SciTech Connect

    William Charlton

    2007-07-01

    Neutron radiography and computed tomography are commonly used techniques to non-destructively examine materials. Tomography refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object from either transmission or reflection data collected by illuminating the object from many different directions.

  1. Development of the methods for simulating the neutron spectrometers and neutron-scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoshin, S. A.; Belushkin, A. V.; Ioffe, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Reviewed are the results of simulating the neutron scattering instruments with the program package VITESS upgraded by the routines for treating the polarized neutrons, as developed by the authors. The reported investigations have been carried out at the Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics at JINR in collaboration with the Juelich research center (Germany). The performance of the resonance and gradient adiabatic spin flippers, the Drabkin resonator, the classical and resonance spin-echo spectrometers, the spin-echo diffractometer for the small-angle neutron scattering, and the spin-echo spectrometer with rotating magnetic fields is successfully modeled. The methods for using the 3D map of the magnetic field from the input file, either mapped experimentally or computed using the finite-elements technique, in the VITESS computer code, are considered in detail. The results of neutron-polarimetry experiments are adequately reproduced by our simulations.

  2. Neutron scattering characterization of pure and rare-earth modified zirconia catalysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Loong, C.-K.; Ozawa, M.; Richardson, J. W., Jr.; Suzuki, S.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-11-18

    The combined application of neutron powder diffraction, small angle neutron scattering and neutron inelastic scattering has led to improved understanding of the crystal phases, defect structure, microstructure and hydroxyl/water dynamics in pure and lanthanide-modified zirconia catalysts. Powder diffraction experiments quantified the degree of stabilization and provided evidence for static, oxygen vacancy-induced atomic displacements in stabilized zirconia. Quantitative assessment of Bragg peak breadths led to measurements of ''grain size'', representing coherency length of long-range ordered atomic arrangements (crystals). Small angle neutron scattering provided a separate measurement of ''grain size'', representing the average size of the primary particles in the aggregates, and the evolution of porosity (micro- versus meso-) and surface roughness caused by RE modification and heat treatment. Finally, the dynamics of hydrogen atoms associated with surface hydroxyls and adsorbed water was investigated by neutron-inelastic scattering, revealing changes in frequency and band breadth of O-H stretch, H-O-H bend, and librational motion of water molecules.

  3. A workshop on enhanced national capability for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, Alan J; Rhyne, James J; Lewis, Paul S

    2009-01-01

    This two-day workshop will engage the international neutron scattering community to vet and improve the Lujan Center Strategic Plan 2007-2013 (SP07). Sponsored by the LANL SC Program Office and the University of California, the workshop will be hosted by LANSCE Professor Sunny Sinha (UCSD). Endorsement by the Spallation Neutron Source will be requested. The discussion will focus on the role that the Lujan Center will play in the national neutron scattering landscape assuming full utilization of beamlines, a refurbished LANSCE, and a 1.4-MW SNS. Because the Lujan Strategic Plan is intended to set the stage for the Signature Facility era at LANSCE, there will be some discussion of the long-pulse spallation source at Los Alamos. Breakout groups will cover several new instrument concepts, upgrades to present instruments, expanded sample environment capabilities, and a look to the future. The workshop is in keeping with a request by BES to update the Lujan strategic plan in coordination with the SNS and the broader neutron community. Workshop invitees will be drawn from the LANSCE User Group and a broad cross section of the US, European, and Pacific Rim neutron scattering research communities.

  4. Dynamics of a hydrogenated silica xerogel: A neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, A.; Orsingher, L.; Rossi, F.

    2006-11-01

    Neutron scattering measurements of a hydrogenated vitreous silica (or xerogel) sample reveal an unexpectedly high mean-square displacement of the silanol hydrogen atoms at 150 and 300 K. At 150 K, the spectrum mimics the boson peak of vitreous silica. The finding suggests a large local displacement of the boson peak modes at the breaking points of the continuous random network.

  5. Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Porous Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Reshma R.; Desa, J. A. Erwin; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.

    2011-07-15

    Compacts of silica micro-spheres prepared for different times at sintering temperatures of 640 deg. C and 740 deg. C have been studied by Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Stress versus strain measurements display several breakage points related to a range of nearest neighbour coordination around each microsphere.

  6. Benchmarking the inelastic neutron scattering soil carbon method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herein described inelastic neutron scattering (INS) method of measuring soil carbon was based on a new procedure for extracting the net carbon signal (NCS) from the measured gamma spectra and determination of the average carbon weight percent (AvgCw%) in the upper soil layer (~8 cm). The NCS ext...

  7. Time reversal invariance violation in neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-06-15

    Time reversal invariance-violating (TRIV) effects in low-energy elastic neutron-deuteron scattering are calculated using meson exchange and EFT-type TRIV potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation with realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving the three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The relation between TRIV and parity-violating observables is discussed.

  8. Neutron scattering effects on fusion ion temperature measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Lee; Starner, Jason R.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Franklin, James Kenneth; Casey, Daniel T.

    2006-06-01

    To support the nuclear fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), a consistent and verifiable method to determine fusion ion temperatures needs to be developed. Since the fusion temperature directly affects the width in the spread of neutron energies produced, a measurement of the neutron energy width can yield the fusion temperature. Traditionally, the spread in neutron energies is measured by using time-of-flight to convert a spread in neutron energies at the source to a spread in time at detector. One potential obstacle to using this technique at the Z facility at SNL is the need to shield the neutron detectors from the intense bremsstrahlung produced. The shielding consists of eight inches of lead and the concern is that neutrons will scatter in the lead, artificially broaden the neutron pulse width and lead to an erroneous measurement. To address this issue, experiments were performed at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, which demonstrated that a reliable ion temperature measurement can be achieved behind eight inches of lead shielding. To further expand upon this finding, Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) was used to simulate the experimental geometric conditions and perform the neutron transport. MCNPX was able to confidently estimate results observed at the University of Rochester.

  9. Cryogen-free cryostat for neutron scattering sample environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Evans, B. E.; Dudman, M. P.; Keeping, J.; Down, R. B. E.; Kirichek, O.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2011-03-01

    Today all advanced neutron facilities maintain a fleet of Orange cryostats, or similar systems, to provide low temperature sample environment in neutron scattering experiments. However recent liquid helium cost increases, caused by global helium supply problems, have raised significant concern about the affordability of such cryostats. The ISIS facility is carrying out a development programme intended to substitute conventional cryostats with cryogen-free systems preferably based on pulse tube refrigerators. The main aim of the development is to create a cryogen-free system as a potential replacement for the conventional Orange cryostat. This paper describes the design and test results of a cryogen-free cryostat, based on a pulse tube refrigerator, with 50 mm diameter top-loading sample facilities for neutron scattering experiments. The sample temperature range is 1.45-300 K in the continuous flow regime. The cryostat may also be used with ultra-low temperature dilution refrigerator inserts.

  10. Opportunities in Inelastic Neutron Scattering at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granroth, Garrett E.

    2007-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) are the two world class neutron scattering user facilities located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Inelastic scattering instruments designed to optimally utilize their source are either in, or will soon enter, the user program. The HFIR has three thermal and plans for two cold, neutron triple axis spectrometers in the user program. These instruments examine localized regions of Q and φ space with tunable resolution. The spectrometers at the SNS cover broad ranges of Q and φ space. The BASIS instrument, in the user program, uses near backscattering analyzer crystals to provide 3μeV φ resolution. The ARCS thermal to epithermal neutron spectrometer is in commissioning and the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer will enter commissioning soon. These instruments provide moderate, tunable resolution, and detector coverage out to 140^o. The SEQUOIA spectrometer, complete in 2008, is the fine resolution complement of ARCS. The finest resolution is provided by the Spin-Echo spectrometer; complete in 2009. The HYSPEC spectrometer, available in 2011, will provide polarized capabilities and optimized flux for neutrons of thermal energies. Finally, the Vision chemical spectrometer will use crystal analyzers to access φ in the epithermal range. These instruments, along with representative science to be performed on each, will be presented.

  11. Long-Lifetime Low-Scatter Neutron Polarization Target

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jonathan M. Richardson

    2004-07-09

    Polarized neutrons scattering is an important technology for characterizing magnetic and other materials. Polarized helium three (P-3He) is a novel technology for creating polarized beams and, perhaps more importantly, for the analysis of polarization in highly divergent scattered beams. Analysis of scattered beams requires specialized targets with complex geometries to ensure accurate results. Special materials and handling procedures are required to give the targets a long useful lifetime. In most cases, the targets must be shielded from stray magnetic fields from nearby equipment. SRL has developed and demonstrated hybrid targets made from glass and aluminum. We have also developed and calibrated a low-field NMR system for measuring polarization lifetimes. We have demonstrated that our low-field system is able to measure NMR signals in the presence of conducting (metallic) cell elements. We have also demonstrated a non-magnetic valve that can be used to seal the cells. We feel that these accomplishments in Phase I are sufficient to ensure a successful Phase II program. The commercial market for this technology is solid. There are over nine neutron scattering centers in the US and Canada and over 22 abroad. Currently, the US plans to build a new $1.4B scattering facility called the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The technology developed in this project will allow SRL to supply targets to both existing and future facilities. SRL is also involved with the application of P-3He to medical imaging.

  12. Fast-neutron scattering cross sections of elemental silver

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-05-01

    Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of elemental silver are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 200 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160/sup 0/. Inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to the excitation of levels at; 328 +- 13, 419 +- 50, 748 +- 25, 908 +- 26, 1150 +- 38, 1286 +- 25, 1507 +- 20, 1623 +- 30, 1835 +- 20 and 1944 +- 26 keV. The experimental results are used to derive an optical-statistical model that provides a good description of the observed cross sections. The measured values are compared with corresponding quantities given in ENDF/B-V.

  13. Incoherent neutron scattering in acetanilide and three deuterated derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Mariette; Almairac, Robert; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Moret, Jacques; Currat, Roland; Dianoux, José

    1991-03-01

    Incoherent-neutron-scattering measurements of the vibrational density of states of acetanilide and three deuterated derivatives are presented. These data allow one to identify an intense maximum, assigned to the N-H out-of-plane bending mode. The data display the specific behavior of the methyl torsional modes: large isotopic shift and strong low-temperature intensity; confirm our previous inelastic-neutron-scattering studies, indicating no obvious anomalies in the range of frequency of the acoustic phonons. In addition, the data show the existence of thermally activated quasielastic scattering above 100 K, assigned to the random diffusive motion of the methyl protons. These results are discussed in the light of recent theoretical models proposed to explain the anomalous optical properties of this crystal.

  14. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J K; Robertson, J L; Herwig, Kenneth W; Gallmeier, Franz X; Riemer, Bernard W

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter).

  15. Neutron-deuteron scattering calculation for evaluated neutron data libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.; Kozier, K. S.

    2008-12-01

    In the low-energy regime, differential cross sections for n + d elastic scattering are not well described in existing nuclear data libraries, such as ENDF/B-VII.0. Supporting experimental data in this energy region are old, sparse and often inconsistent. We have carried out calculations with the AGS three-body theory and the Bonn-B nucleon-nucleon potential at energies 50 keV to 10.0 MeV.

  16. Pores in Marcellus Shale: A Neutron Scattering and FIB-SEM Study

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, Xin; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Mildner, David F. R.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-01-26

    The production of natural gas has become more and more important in the United States because of the development of hydraulic fracturing techniques, which significantly increase the permeability and fracture network of black shales. The pore structure of shale is a controlling factor for hydrocarbon storage and gas migration. In this work, we investigated the porosity of the Union Springs (Shamokin) Member of the Marcellus Formation from a core drilled in Centre County, PA, USA, using ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), and nitrogen gas adsorption. The scattering of neutrons bymore » Marcellus shale depends on the sample orientation: for thin sections cut in the plane of bedding, the scattering pattern is isotropic, while for thin sections cut perpendicular to the bedding, the scattering pattern is anisotropic. The FIB-SEM observations allow attribution of the anisotropic scattering patterns to elongated pores predominantly associated with clay. The apparent porosities calculated from scattering data from the bedding plane sections are lower than those calculated from sections cut perpendicular to the bedding. A preliminary method for estimating the total porosity from the measurements made on the two orientations is presented. This method is in good agreement with nitrogen adsorption for both porosity and specific surface area measurements. Neutron scattering combined with FIB-SEM reveals that the dominant nanosized pores in organic-poor, clay-rich shale samples are water-accessible sheetlike pores within clay aggregates. In contrast, bubble-like organophilic pores in kerogen dominate organic-rich samples. Lastly, developing a better understanding of the distribution of the water-accessible pores will promote more accurate models of water–mineral interactions during hydrofracturing.« less

  17. Pores in Marcellus Shale: A Neutron Scattering and FIB-SEM Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xin; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Mildner, David F. R.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-01-26

    The production of natural gas has become more and more important in the United States because of the development of hydraulic fracturing techniques, which significantly increase the permeability and fracture network of black shales. The pore structure of shale is a controlling factor for hydrocarbon storage and gas migration. In this work, we investigated the porosity of the Union Springs (Shamokin) Member of the Marcellus Formation from a core drilled in Centre County, PA, USA, using ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), and nitrogen gas adsorption. The scattering of neutrons by Marcellus shale depends on the sample orientation: for thin sections cut in the plane of bedding, the scattering pattern is isotropic, while for thin sections cut perpendicular to the bedding, the scattering pattern is anisotropic. The FIB-SEM observations allow attribution of the anisotropic scattering patterns to elongated pores predominantly associated with clay. The apparent porosities calculated from scattering data from the bedding plane sections are lower than those calculated from sections cut perpendicular to the bedding. A preliminary method for estimating the total porosity from the measurements made on the two orientations is presented. This method is in good agreement with nitrogen adsorption for both porosity and specific surface area measurements. Neutron scattering combined with FIB-SEM reveals that the dominant nanosized pores in organic-poor, clay-rich shale samples are water-accessible sheetlike pores within clay aggregates. In contrast, bubble-like organophilic pores in kerogen dominate organic-rich samples. Lastly, developing a better understanding of the distribution of the water-accessible pores will promote more accurate models of water–mineral interactions during hydrofracturing.

  18. Concentration of hydrogen in titanium measured by neutron incoherent scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen-Mayer, H.H.; Mildner, D.F.R.; Lamaze, G.P.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Paul, R.L.; Kvardakov, V.V.; Richards, W.J.

    1998-12-31

    Mass fractions of hydrogen in titanium matrices have been measured using neutron incoherent scattering (NIS) and compared with results from prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). Qualitatively, NIS is a more efficient technique than PGAA which involves neutron absorption, and the former may be suitable for on-line analysis. However, for NIS the scattering contribution comes from both the hydrogen and the matrix, whereas prompt gamma emission has minimal matrix effect. To isolate the signal due to hydrogen scattering, a set of polypropylene films is used to simulate the increasing amount of hydrogen, and the scattered intensity is monitored. From this response, an unknown amount of the hydrogen can be deduced empirically. The authors have further attempted a first principle calculation of the intensity of the scattered signal from the experimental systems, and have obtained good agreement between calculation and the measurements. The study can be used as a reference for future applications of the scattering method to other hydrogen-in-metal systems.

  19. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of sup 58 Ni and nuclear models

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F. ); Chiba, S. . Tokai Research Establishment)

    1991-07-01

    The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white-source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 MeV intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to 4.8 MeV. The measured results, combined with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical and coupled-channels model using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results nd their interpretation are discussed in the contexts of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical, and coupled-channels models. 61 refs.

  20. US-Japan Cooperative Program on neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, M.K.; Blume, M.; Stevens, D.K.; Iizumi, M.; Yamada, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The US-Japan Cooperative Program on Neutron Scattering was implemented through arrangements by the United States Department of Energy with the Science and Technology Agency (STA) and the Ministry of Science, Education, and Culture (Monbusho) of Japan. It involves research collaboration in neutron scattering by Japanese scientists with scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the construction of new neutron scattering equipment at both laboratories with funds provided by the Japanese government. The United States provides neutrons in exchange for the new equipment, and other costs of the program are equally shared by the two countries. The assignments of Japanese scientists to ORNL and BNL vary in length, but they correspond to about two person years annually at each laboratory. An equal number of US scientists also participate in the research program. The main research collaboration is centered around the new equipment provided by the Japanese, but other facilities are utilized when they are needed. The new equipment includes a new type of wide-angle diffractometer and equipment for maintaining extreme sample environments at ORNL and a sophisticated polarized-beam triple-axis spectrometer at BNL. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Neutron Scattering of Aromatic and Aliphatic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Falkowska, Marta; Bowron, Daniel T.; Manyar, Haresh G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Organic solvents, such as cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene, are widely used as both reagents and solvents in industrial processes. Despite the ubiquity of these liquids, the local structures that govern the chemical properties have not been studied extensively. Herein, we report neutron diffraction measurements on liquid cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene at 298 K to obtain a detailed description of the local structure in these compounds. The radial distribution functions of the centres of the molecules, as well as the partial distribution functions for the double bond for cyclohexene and methyl group for methylcyclohexane and toluene have been calculated. Additionally, probability density functions and angular radial distribution functions were extracted to provide a full description of the local structure within the chosen liquids. Structural motifs are discussed and compared for all liquids, referring specifically to the functional group and aromaticity present in the different liquids. PMID:26990367

  2. Elastic neutron scattering at 96 MeV from 12C and 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, J.; Blomgren, J.; Ataç, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Mermod, P.; Nilsson, L.; Pomp, S.; Tippawan, U.; Elmgren, K.; Olsson, N.; Jonsson, O.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Renberg, P.-U.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Dangtip, S.; Phansuke, P.; Österlund, M.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J. F.; Lecolley, F. R.; Louvel, M.; Marie-Noury, N.; Schweitzer, C.; Eudes, Ph.; Haddad, F.; Lebrun, C.; Koning, A. J.; Bauge, E.; Delaroche, J. P.; Girod, M.; Ledoux, X.; Romain, P.; Madland, D. G.; Amos, K.; Deb, P. K.; Karataglidis, S.; Crespo, R.; Moro, A. M.

    2003-03-01

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50 130 MeV, scattered nucleon detection assembly, has recently been installed at the 20 180 MeV neutron beam line of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. First results on elastic neutron scattering from 12C and 208Pb at 96 MeV incident neutron energy are presented. This experiment represents the highest neutron energy where the ground state has been resolved from the first excited state in neutron scattering. The results are compared with modern optical model predictions.

  3. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  4. Neutron-neutron quasifree scattering in nd breakup at 10 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, R. C.; Crowe, B.; Crowell, A. S.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Esterline, J. H.; Fallin, B. A.; Friesen, F. Q. L.; Han, Z.; Howell, C. R.; Markoff, D.; Ticehurst, D.; Tornow, W.; Witała, H.

    2016-03-01

    The neutron-deuteron (nd) breakup reaction provides a rich environment for testing theoretical models of the neutron-neutron (nn) interaction. Current theoretical predictions based on rigorous ab-initio calculations agree well with most experimental data for this system, but there remain a few notable discrepancies. The cross section for nn quasifree (QFS) scattering is one such anomaly. Two recent experiments reported cross sections for this particular nd breakup configuration that exceed theoretical calculations by almost 20% at incident neutron energies of 26 and 25 MeV [1, 2]. The theoretical values can be brought into agreement with these results by increasing the strength of the 1S0 nn potential matrix element by roughly 10%. However, this modification of the nn effective range parameter and/or the 1S0 scattering length causes substantial charge-symmetry breaking in the nucleon-nucleon force and suggests the possibility of a weakly bound di-neutron state [3]. We are conducting new measurements of the cross section for nn QFS in nd breakup. The measurements are performed at incident neutron beam energies below 20 MeV. The neutron beam is produced via the 2H(d, n)3He reaction. The target is a deuterated plastic cylinder. Our measurements utilize time-of-flight techniques with a pulsed neutron beam and detection of the two emitted neutrons in coincidence. A description of our initial measurements at 10 MeV for a single scattering angle will be presented along with preliminary results. Also, plans for measurements at other energies with broad angular coverage will be discussed.

  5. THERMAL: A routine designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1995-02-24

    THERMAL is designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering that is isotropic in the center of mass system. At low energy thermal motion will be included. At high energies the target nuclei are assumed to be stationary. The point of transition between low and high energies has been defined to insure a smooth transition. It is assumed that at low energy the elastic cross section is constant in the center of mass system. At high energy the cross section can be of any form. You can use this routine for all energies where the elastic scattering is isotropic in the center of mass system. In most materials this will be a fairly high energy.

  6. Fast-neutron scattering cross sections of elemental zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-12-01

    Differential neturon-elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental zirconium are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 200 keV. Inelastic-neutron-scattering cross sections corresponding to the excitation of levels at observed energies of: 914 +- 25, 1476 +- 37, 1787 +- 23, 2101 +- 26, 2221 +- 17, 2363 +- 14, 2791 +- 15 and 3101 +- 25 keV are determined. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of the optical-statistical model and are compared with corresponding quantities given in ENDF/B-V.

  7. Spin observables in neutron-proton elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmidouch, A.; Arnold, J.; van den Brandt, B.; Daum, M.; Demierre, P.; Drevenak, R.; Finger, M. |; Finger, M. Jr.; Franz, J.; Goujon, N.; Hautle, P.; Janout, Z. Jr.; Hajdas, W.; Heer, E.; Hess, R.; Koger, R.; Konter, J.A.; Lacker, H.; Lechanoine-LeLuc, C.; Lehar, F.; Mango, S.; Mascarini, C.; Rapin, D.; Roessle, E.; Schmelzbach, P.A.; Schmitt, H.; Sereni, P.; Slunecka, M.

    1995-07-15

    We describe here two experiments presently running at PSI using the NA2 polarized neutron beam. They are devoted to the measurement of 2- and 3-spin observables in {ital np} elastic scattering for kinetic energies from 230 to 590 MeV with a center of mass angular range from 60 to 180 degrees. The goal is to determine the five {ital NN} scattering amplitudes for isospin 0 in a model independent way. Preliminary results for {ital K}{sub {ital OSKO}} and {ital K}{sub {ital OSSO}} spin-transfers are presented.

  8. Light dark matter scattering in outer neutron star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermeño, Marina; Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We calculate for the first time the phonon excitation rate in the outer crust of a neutron star due to scattering from light dark matter (LDM) particles gravitationally boosted into the star. We consider dark matter particles in the sub-GeV mass range scattering off a periodic array of nuclei through an effective scalar-vector interaction with nucleons. We find that LDM effects cause a modification of the net number of phonons in the lattice as compared to the standard thermal result. In addition, we estimate the contribution of LDM to the ion-ion thermal conductivity in the outer crust and find that it can be significantly enhanced at large densities. Our results imply that for magnetized neutron stars the LDM-enhanced global conductivity in the outer crust will tend to reduce the anisotropic heat conduction between perpendicular and parallel directions to the magnetic field.

  9. Accurate Development of Thermal Neutron Scattering Cross Section Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman; Dunn, Michael

    2014-06-10

    The objective of this project is to develop a holistic (fundamental and accurate) approach for generating thermal neutron scattering cross section libraries for a collection of important enutron moderators and reflectors. The primary components of this approach are the physcial accuracy and completeness of the generated data libraries. Consequently, for the first time, thermal neutron scattering cross section data libraries will be generated that are based on accurate theoretical models, that are carefully benchmarked against experimental and computational data, and that contain complete covariance information that can be used in propagating the data uncertainties through the various components of the nuclear design and execution process. To achieve this objective, computational and experimental investigations will be performed on a carefully selected subset of materials that play a key role in all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  10. Neutron and Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Studies of Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tranquada,J.M.

    2008-09-01

    Superconductors hold the promise for a more stable and efficient electrical grid, but new isotropic, high-temperature superconductors are needed in order to reduce cable manufacturing costs. The effort to understand high-temperature superconductivity, especially in the layered cuprates, provides guidance to the search for new superconductors. Neutron scattering has long provided an important probe of the collective excitations that are involved in the pairing mechanism. For the cuprates, neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques also provide information on competing types of order, such as charge and spin stripes, that appear to be closely connected to the superconductivity. Recently, inelastic x-ray scattering has become competitive for studying phonons and may soon provide valuable information on electronic excitations. Examples of how these techniques contribute to our understanding of superconductivity are presented.

  11. PREFACE: 5th European Conference on Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikula, Pavel; Hlinka, Jiří; Prokeš, Karel; Dohnálek, Jan; Šittner, Petr; Javorský, Pavel

    2012-02-01

    This volume contains proceedings of ECNS 2011, held in Prague, Czech Republic, 17-22 July 2011. ECNS 2011 was the fifth Conference in a series of meetings organized in various European cities under patronage of the European Neutron Scattering Association, and was preceded by the European Neutron Scattering Conferences in Interlaken (1996), Budapest (1999), Montpellier (2003) and Lund (2007). The positive atmosphere of the Prague meeting of the neutron community can certainly be attributed to recent progress in the extension of the European neutron experimental base, in particular the completion of the ISIS second target station and considerable progress in the European Spallation Source project in Lund. The success of ECNS 2011 has been manifested by the participation of 698 scientists from 36 countries, who presented 231 talks and 534 posters. This proceedings contains 112 papers from authors who wished to have the written versions of their contributions published. The contributions illustrate the broad scale of scientific problems investigated by neutron scattering methods and give a picture of growing activities in the field. The conference chairmen wish to express their thanks to all colleagues who contributed to the organization and preparation of ECNS 2011, in particular the members of the International Advisory Committee, the International Program Committee and the Local Organizing Committee. We very much appreciate the role of Professor Michael Steiner, the President of ENSA, and all ENSA representatives who contributed valuable conceptual input and advice in the preparatory phase of the conference organization. Special thanks go to the editors and all the referees who helped us to publish the ECNS 2011 Proceedings in such a short time. Vladimír SechovskýPetr Lukáš Conference chairmen The PDF contains photographs from the conference and a full list of participants.

  12. UB Matrix Implementation for Inelastic Neutron Scattering Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsden, Mark D; Robertson, Lee; Yethiraj, Mohana

    2005-01-01

    The UB matrix approach has been extended to handle inelastic neutron scattering experiments with differing k{sub i} and k{sub f}. We have considered the typical goniometer employed on triple-axis and time-of-flight spectrometers. Expressions are derived to allow for calculation of the UB matrix and for converting from observables to Q-energy space. In addition, we have developed appropriate modes for calculation of angles for a specified Q-energy position.

  13. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of POSS ligand dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jalarvo, Niina H; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Crawford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Polyoligosilsesquioxanes are molecules having cage-like structures composed of silicon and oxygen. These molecules can have a wide variety of functional ligands attached to them. Depending on the nature of the ligand, interesting properties and applications are found. In this work we present results from quasielastic neutron scattering measurements of four different POSS molecules that illustrate the presence of strong coupling between the ligand dynamics and the POSS crystal structures.

  14. SANS (small-angle neutron scattering) from polymers and colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been remarkably successful in providing detailed quantitative structural information on complex everyday materials, such as polymers and colloids, which are often of considerable industrial as well as academic interest. This paper reviews some recent SANS experiments on polymers and colloids, including ferrofluids, and discusses the use of these apparently complex systems as general physical models of the liquid or solid state.

  15. Bragg optics computer codes for neutron scattering instrument design

    SciTech Connect

    Popovici, M.; Yelon, W.B.; Berliner, R.R.; Stoica, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Computer codes for neutron crystal spectrometer design, optimization and experiment planning are described. Phase space distributions, linewidths and absolute intensities are calculated by matrix methods in an extension of the Cooper-Nathans resolution function formalism. For modeling the Bragg reflection on bent crystals the lamellar approximation is used. Optimization is done by satisfying conditions of focusing in scattering and in real space, and by numerically maximizing figures of merit. Examples for three-axis and two-axis spectrometers are given.

  16. Neutron scattering from amorphous, disordered and nanocrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.

    1994-10-01

    The author has described the power of neutron diffraction and inelastic scattering techniques for determining the structure and dynamics of disordered systems, using the archetypal glass SiO{sub 2} as a detailed example. Of course the field of amorphous and disordered systems contains a much greater variety of types of materials exhibiting a wide range of possible types of disorder. The author gives a brief review of the varieties of order and disorder exhibited by condensed matter.

  17. Event-Based Processing of Neutron Scattering Data

    DOE PAGES

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik L.

    2015-09-16

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to the recording of individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode that preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final errors, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniquesmore » will be shown for comparison.« less

  18. Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J.

    1984-01-01

    The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

  19. The MCLIB library: Monte Carlo simulation of neutron scattering instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    Monte Carlo is a method to integrate over a large number of variables. Random numbers are used to select a value for each variable, and the integrand is evaluated. The process is repeated a large number of times and the resulting values are averaged. For a neutron transport problem, first select a neutron from the source distribution, and project it through the instrument using either deterministic or probabilistic algorithms to describe its interaction whenever it hits something, and then (if it hits the detector) tally it in a histogram representing where and when it was detected. This is intended to simulate the process of running an actual experiment (but it is much slower). This report describes the philosophy and structure of MCLIB, a Fortran library of Monte Carlo subroutines which has been developed for design of neutron scattering instruments. A pair of programs (LQDGEOM and MC{_}RUN) which use the library are shown as an example.

  20. Three Classes of Motion in the Dynamic Neutron-Scattering Susceptibility of a Globular Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Liang; Lindner, Benjamin; Smolin, Nikolai; Sokolov, Alexei P; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    A simplified description of the 295 K dynamics of a globular protein over a wide frequency range (1 1000 GHz) is obtained by combining neutron scattering of lysozyme with molecular dynamics simulation. The molecular dynamics simulation agrees quantitatively with experiment for both the protein and the hydration water and shows that, whereas the hydration water molecules subdiffuse, the protein atoms undergo confined motion decomposable into three distinct classes: localized diffusion, methyl group rotations, and jumps. Each of the three classes gives rise to a characteristic neutron susceptibility signal.

  1. Precision neutron interferometric measurement of the n- 3He coherent neutron scattering length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; Jacobson, D. L.; Schoen, K.; Arif, M.; Black, T. C.; Snow, W. M.; Werner, S. A.

    2004-07-01

    A measurement of the n- 3He coherent scattering length using neutron interferometry is reported. The result, bc =(5.8572±0.0072) fm , improves the measured precision of any single measurement of bc by a factor of eight; the previous world average, bc =(5.74±0.04) fm , now becomes bc =(5.853±0.007) fm . Measurements of the n-p , n-d , and n- 3He coherent scattering lengths have now been performed using the same technique, thus allowing one to extract the scattering length ratios: parameters that minimize systematic errors. We obtain values of bn 3He / bnp =(-1.5668±0.0021) and bnd / bnp =(-1.7828±0.0014) . Using the new world average value of bc and recent high-precision spin-dependent scattering length data also determined by neutron optical techniques, we extract new values for the bound singlet and triple scattering lengths of b0 =(9.949±0.027) fm and b1 =(4.488±0.017) fm for the n- 3He system. The free nuclear singlet and triplet scattering lengths are a0 =(7.456±0.020) fm and a1 =(3.363±0.013) fm . The coherent scattering cross section is σc =(4.305±0.007) b and the total scattering cross section is σs =(5.837±0.014) b . Comparisons of a0 and a1 to the only existing high-precision theoretical predictions for the n- 3He system, calculated using a resonating group technique with nucleon-nucleon potentials incorporating three-nucleon forces, have been performed. Neutron scattering length measurements in few-body systems are now sensitive enough to probe small effects not yet adequately treated in present theoretical models.

  2. Elastic and inelastic scattering of neutrons from 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Anthony Paul; McEllistrem, M. T.; Liu, S. H.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Peters, E. E.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Harrison, T. D.; Rice, B. G.; Thompson, B. K.; Hicks, S. F.; Howard, T. J.; Jackson, D. T.; Lenzen, P. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Pecha, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    The differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattered neutrons from 56Fe have been measured at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (www.pa.uky.edu/accelerator) for incident neutron energies between 2.0 and 8.0 MeV and for the angular range 30° to 150°. Time-of-flight techniques and pulse-shape discrimination were employed for enhancing the neutron energy spectra and for reducing background. An overview of the experimental procedures and data analysis for the conversion of neutron yields to differential cross sections will be presented. These include the determination of the energy-dependent detection efficiencies, the normalization of the measured differential cross sections, and the attenuation and multiple scattering corrections. Our results will also be compared to evaluated cross section databases and reaction model calculations using the TALYS code. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Universities Program: NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05, and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  3. Recent neutron scattering results from Gd-based pyrochlore oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason

    2009-03-01

    In my presentation I will present recent results that have determined the spin-spin correlations in the geometrically frustrated magnets Gd2Sn2O7 and Gd2Ti2O7. This will include polarised neutron diffraction, inelastic neutron scattering and neutron spin echo data. One sample of particular interest is Gd2Sn2O7 which is believed to be a good approximation to a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a pyrochlore lattice with exchange and dipole-dipole interactions. Theoretically such a system is expected to enter long range ordered ground state known as the ``Palmer Chalker'' state [1]. We show conclusively, through neutron scattering data, that the system indeed enters an ordered state with the Palmer-Chalker spin configuration below Tc = 1 K [2-3]. Within this state we have also observed long range collective spin dynamics, spin waves. This work has been performed in collaboration with many research groups including G. Ehlers (SNS), R. Stewart (ISIS). [0pt] [1] S. E. Palmer and J. T. Chalker, Phys. Rev. B 62, 488 (2000). [0pt] [2] J. R. Stewart, G. Ehlers, A. S. Wills, S. T. Bramwell, and J. S. Gardner, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, L321 (2004). [0pt] [3] J R Stewart, J S Gardner, Y. Qiu and G Ehlers, Phys. Rev. B. 78, 132410 (2008)

  4. Elastic and inelastic scattering of neutrons on 238U nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, R.; Trkov, A.; Sin, M.; Herman, M. W.; Soukhovitskiĩ, E. Sh.

    2014-04-01

    Advanced modelling of neutron induced reactions on the 238U nucleus is aimed at improving our knowledge of neutron scattering. Capture and fission channels are well constrained by available experimental data and neutron standard evaluation. A focus of this contribution is on elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections. The employed nuclear reaction model includes - a new rotational-vibrational dispersive optical model potential coupling the low-lying collective bands of vibrational character observed in even-even actinides; - the Engelbrecht-Weidenmüller transformation allowing for inclusion of compound-direct interference effects; - and a multi-humped fission barrier with absorption in the secondary well described within the optical model for fission. Impact of the advanced modelling on elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections including angular distributions and emission spectra is assessed both by comparison with selected microscopic experimental data and integral criticality benchmarks including measured reaction rates (e.g. JEMIMA, FLAPTOP and BIG TEN). Benchmark calculations provided feedback to improve the reaction modelling. Improvement of existing libraries will be discussed.

  5. Quasi-free Compton scattering and the polarizabilities of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossert, K.; Camen, M.; Wissmann, F.; Ahrens, J.; Annand, J. R. M.; Arends, H.-J.; Beck, R.; Caselotti, G.; Grabmayr, P.; Jahn, O.; Jennewein, P.; Levchuk, M. I.; L'vov, A. I.; McGeorge, J. C.; Natter, A.; Olmos de León, V.; Petrun'kin, V. A.; Rosner, G.; Schumacher, M.; Seitz, B.; Smend, F.; Thomas, A.; Weihofen, W.; Zapadtka, F.

    Differential cross-sections for quasi-free Compton scattering from the proton and neutron bound in the deuteron have been measured using the Glasgow/Mainz photon tagging spectrometer at the Mainz MAMI accelerator together with the Mainz [48]cm ;SPMOslash; × [64]cm NaI(Tl) photon detector and the Göttingen SENECA recoil detector. The data cover photon energies ranging from [200]MeV to [400]MeV at θLABγ = 136.2°. Liquid deuterium and hydrogen targets allowed direct comparison of free and quasi-free scattering from the proton. The neutron detection efficiency of the SENECA detector was measured via the reaction p(γ,π+n). The ``free'' proton Compton scattering cross-sections extracted from the bound proton data are in reasonable agreement with those for the free proton which gives confidence in the method to extract the differential cross-section for free scattering from quasi-free data. Differential cross-sections on the free neutron have been extracted and the difference of the electromagnetic polarizabilities of the neutron has been determined to be αn - βn = 9.8+/-3.6(stat)+2.1-1.1(syst)+/-2.2(model) in units of [10-4]fm3. In combination with the polarizability sum αn + βn = 15.2+/-0.5 deduced from photoabsorption data, the neutron electric and magnetic polarizabilities, αn = 12.5+/-1.8(stat)+1.1-0.6(syst)+/-1.1(model) and βn = 2.7+/-1.8(stat)+0.6-1.1(syst)+/-1.1(model) are obtained. The backward spin polarizability of the neutron was determined to be γ(n)π = (58.6+/-4.0)×10-4fm4.

  6. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, Jennifer L; Stone, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80~K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  7. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, J. L.; Stone, M. B.

    2014-09-08

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80 K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  8. Survey of background scattering from materials found in small-angle neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Barker, J. G.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of beam attenuation and background scattering for common materials placed in a neutron beam are presented over the temperature range of 300–700 K. Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements have also been made, to determine the fraction of the background that is either inelastic or quasi-elastic scattering as measured with a 3He detector. Other background sources considered include double Bragg diffraction from windows or samples, scattering from gases, and phonon scattering from solids. Background from the residual air in detector vacuum vessels and scattering from the 3He detector dome are presented. The thickness dependence of the multiple scattering correction for forward scattering from water is calculated. Inelastic phonon background scattering at small angles for crystalline solids is both modeled and compared with measurements. Methods of maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio by material selection, choice of sample thickness and wavelength, removal of inelastic background by TOF or Be filters, and removal of spin-flip scattering with polarized beam analysis are discussed. PMID:26306088

  9. Small-angle neutron scattering from samples of expanded carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, S. G. Valiev, E. Z.; Dorofeev, Yu. A.; Pirogov, A. N.; Skryabin, Yu. N.; Makotchenko, V. G.; Nazarov, A. S.; Fedorov, V. E.

    2006-12-15

    The subatomic structure of expanded graphite has been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. Samples were synthesized during quick thermal decomposition of intercalated compounds based on oxidized graphite. They had a low bulk density (up to 0.1 g/cm{sup 3}) and were characterized by considerable small-angle scattering. It has been established that majority of the volume of expanded graphite samples is occupied by participles with characteristic sizes in two ranges: from 6 to 8 nm and from 20 to 30 nm. Small particles have properties of a surface fractal with the dimension D{sub s} = 2.4-2.6, whereas the larger particles are mainly smooth and have the dimension D{sub s} = 2.0-2.1. The specific surface of the samples studied was determined from the small-angle scattering data.

  10. Monte Carlo Code System for Calculation of Multiple Scattering of Neutrons in the Resonance Region.

    1983-01-25

    Version 00 MCRTOF systematically calculates capture and scattering probabilities for neutrons incident on a material disk, with neutron cross sections calculated from the resonance parameters. Capture, front and rear face scattering, transmission, etc., probabilities are obtained from the average destinations of the incident neutrons.

  11. Forward scattering of neutrons from polymeric and magnetic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Felcher, G.P.

    1993-08-01

    Grazing incidence neutrons are not only reflected and refracted from imperfect layers, but also partially scattered by lateral dishomogeneities. In general, scattering may take place both in the reflection plane ({open_quotes}forward scattering{close_quotes}) and out of it. The forward scattering from multilayers is highly structured in ridges, whose maxima can be indexed in terms of the multilayer spacings. In experiments on diverse diblock copolymers two kind of ridges were found, either at constant-k{sub z} loci or else at constant-q{sub z} loci. The relative intensity of the ridges appears to be related to the type and size of imperfections of the lamellar structure. Constant-q{sub z} streaks of magnetic nature were also found in the forward scattering of metallic superlattices (Fe/Cr, Co/Ru, Fe/Nb) in the antiferromagnetic state. Here the diffuse scattering appears around the antiferromagnetic peaks while absent from the structural peaks, as if the crystalline superlattice were to partition into antiferromagnetic domains of limited lateral extension and columnar character.

  12. Chiral Three-Nucleon Interactions in Light Nuclei, NeutronScattering, and Neutron Matter.

    PubMed

    Lynn, J E; Tews, I; Carlson, J; Gandolfi, S; Gezerlis, A; Schmidt, K E; Schwenk, A

    2016-02-12

    We present quantum Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei, neutronscattering, and neutron matter using local two- and three-nucleon (3N) interactions derived from chiral effective field theory up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N(2)LO). The two undetermined 3N low-energy couplings are fit to the (4)He binding energy and, for the first time, to the spin-orbit splitting in the neutron-α P-wave phase shifts. Furthermore, we investigate different choices of local 3N-operator structures and find that chiral interactions at N(2)LO are able to simultaneously reproduce the properties of A=3,4,5 systems and of neutron matter, in contrast to commonly used phenomenological 3N interactions.

  13. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    DOE PAGES

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component)more » using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.« less

  14. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  15. Dynamics of water in prussian blue analogues: Neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V. K.; Mitra, S.; Thakur, N.; Yusuf, S. M.; Mukhopadhyay, R.; Juranyi, Fanni

    2014-07-21

    Dynamics of crystal water in Prussian blue (PB), Fe(III){sub 4}[Fe(II)(CN){sub 6}]{sub 3}.14H{sub 2}O and its analogue Prussian green (PG), ferriferricynaide, Fe(III){sub 4}[Fe(III)(CN){sub 6}]{sub 4}.16H{sub 2}O have been investigated using Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) technique. PB and its analogue compounds are important materials for their various interesting multifunctional properties. It is known that crystal water plays a crucial role towards the multifunctional properties of Prussian blue analogue compounds. Three structurally distinguishable water molecules: (i) coordinated water molecules at empty nitrogen sites, (ii) non-coordinated water molecules in the spherical cavities, and (iii) at interstitial sites exist in PB. Here spherical cavities are created due to the vacant sites of Fe(CN){sub 6} units. However, PG does not have any such vacant N or Fe(CN){sub 6} units, and only one kind of water molecules, exists only at interstitial sites. QENS experiments have been carried out on both the compounds in the temperature range of 260–360 K to elucidate the dynamical behavior of different kinds of water molecules. Dynamics is found to be much more pronounced in case of PB, compared to PG. A detailed data analysis showed that localized translational diffusion model could describe the observed data for both PB and PG systems. The average diffusion coefficient is found to be much larger in the PB than PG. The obtained domain of dynamics is found to be consistent with the geometry of the structure of the two systems. Combining the data of the two systems, a quantitative estimate of the dynamics, corresponding to the water molecules at different locations is made.

  16. The bound coherent neutron scattering lengths of the oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Henry E.; Simonson, J. Mike; Neuefeind, Jörg C.; Lemmel, Hartmut; Rauch, Helmut; Zeidler, Anita; Salmon, Philip S.

    2012-12-01

    The technique of neutron interferometry was used to measure the bound coherent neutron scattering length bcoh of the oxygen isotopes 17O and 18O. From the measured difference in optical path between two water samples, either H217O or H218O versus H2natO, where nat denotes the natural isotopic composition, we obtain bcoh,17O = 5.867(4) fm and bcoh,18O = 6.009(5) fm, based on the accurately known value of bcoh,natO = 5.805(4) fm which is equal to bcoh,16O within the experimental uncertainty. Our results for bcoh,17O and bcoh,18O differ appreciably from the standard tabulated values of 5.6(5) fm and 5.84(7) fm, respectively. In particular, our measured scattering-length contrast of 0.204(3) fm between 18O and natO is nearly a factor of 6 greater than the tabulated value, which renders feasible neutron diffraction experiments using 18O isotope substitution and thereby offers new possibilities for measuring the partial structure factors of oxygen-containing compounds, such as water.

  17. The bound coherent neutron scattering length of the oxygen isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Henry E; Simonson, J Michael {Mike}; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Lemmel, Hartmut; Rauch, Helmut; Zeidler, Anita; Salmon, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of neutron interferometry was used to measure the bound coherent neutron scattering length bcoh of the oxygen isotopes 17O and 18O. From the measured difference in optical path between two water samples, either H2 17O or H2 18O versus H2 natO, where nat denotes the natural isotopic composition, we obtain bcoh , 17O = 5.867(4) fm and bcoh , 18O = 6.009(5) fm, based on the accurately known value of bcoh , natO = 5.805(4) fm which is equal to bcoh , 16O within the experimental uncertainty. Our results for bcoh , 17O and bcoh , 18O differ appreciably from the standard tabulated values of 5.6(5) fm and 5.84(7) fm, respectively. In particular, our measured scattering length contrast of 0.204(3) fm between 18O and natO is nearly a factor of 6 greater than the tabulated value, which renders feasible neutron diffraction experiments using 18O isotope substitution and thereby offers new possibilites for measuring the partial structure factors of oxygen-containing compounds, such as water.

  18. Advanced Two-Dimensional Thermal Neutron Detectors for Scattering Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, J.; Harder, J.; Mahler, G.J.; Makowiecki, D.S.; Mead, J.A.; Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B.

    2002-11-18

    Advances in neutron scattering studies will be given a large boost with the advent of new spallation and reactor sources at present under consideration or construction. An important element for future experiments is a commensurate improvement in neutron detection techniques. At Brookhaven, a development program is under way for greatly increasing the angular coverage, rate capability and resolution of detectors for scattering studies. For example, a curved detector with angular coverage of 120{sup o} by 15{sup o} has recently been developed for protein crystallography at a spallation source. Based on neutron detection using {sup 3}He, the detector has the following major, new attributes: eight identical proportional wire segments operating in parallel, a single gas volume with seamless readout at segment boundaries, parallax errors eliminated in the horizontal plane by the detector's appropriate radius of curvature, high-throughput front-end electronics, position decoding based on high performance digital signal processing. The detector has a global rate capability greater than 1 million per second, position resolution less than 1.5 mm FWHM, timing resolution about 1 {micro}s, efficiency of 50% and 90% at 1{angstrom} and 4 {angstrom} respectively, and an active area 1.5 m x 20 cm.

  19. Electron Scattering From High-Momentum Neutrons in Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Klimenko; S.E. Kuhn

    2005-10-12

    We report results from an experiment measuring the semi-inclusive reaction D(e,e'p{sub s}) where the proton p{sub s} is moving at a large angle relative to the momentum transfer. If we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred. This method, known as spectator tagging, can be used to study electron scattering from high-momentum (off-shell) neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. A reduced cross section was extracted for different values of final-state missing mass W*, backward proton momentum {rvec p}{sub s} and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The data are compared to a simple PWIA spectator model. A strong enhancement in the data observed at transverse kinematics is not reproduced by the PWIA model. This enhancement can likely be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. A ''bound neutron structure function'' F{sub 2n}{sup eff} was extracted as a function of W* and the scaling variable x* at extreme backward kinematics, where effects of FSI appear to be smaller. For p{sub s} > 400 MeV/c, where the neutron is far off-shell, the model overestimates the value of F{sub 2n}{sup eff} in the region of x* between 0.25 and 0.6. A modification of the bound neutron structure function is one of possible effects that can cause the observed deviation.

  20. Inelastic neutron scattering from damped collective vibrations of macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneller, Gerald R.

    2000-11-01

    The present article describes the theory of neutron scattering from harmonically vibrating molecules in the framework of classical Langevin and Smoluchowski dynamics. For both levels of description, the input quantities are a positive definite matrix of force constants and a positive definite friction matrix. Starting from the Fokker-Planck equation of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, the intermediate scattering functions for coherent and incoherent scattering as well as related static correlation functions are derived. It is demonstrated that the Langevin description on a coarse-grained time scale is identical with the Smoluchowski description if friction dominates. Inelastic neutron spectra are discussed in terms of the coherent and incoherent dynamic structure factors and the vibrational density of states. It is shown that incorporating friction on the atomic level is not equivalent to broadening the lines of the corresponding normal mode spectrum. The theory is applicable to low frequency and large amplitude motions of macromolecules as proteins and DNA. Vibrations at higher frequencies can be treated as long as they can be described in the classical approximation.

  1. Inelastic neutron scattering from carbon, iron, yttrium and lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Cecilia; Blomgren, Jan; Hellesen, Carl; Öhrn, Angelica; Pomp, Stephan

    2012-02-01

    Double-differential cross sections and angular distributions of inelastic neutron scattering on 12C, 56Fe, 89Y and 208Pb have been measured at 96 MeV at The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. Results on elastic neutron scattering at 96 MeV from these nuclei have been reported previously [1-3]. To obtain the inelastic cross sections, a forward-folding technique has been applied. A physically reasonable trial spectrum has been folded with the response function of the detector system and the output has been compared with the experimental data. To create the trial spectrum, a Gaussian has been used for the elastic part and the PRECO code [4-7] for the inelastic part. Other models were tested for the pre-equilibrium contribution and the method was found to be model independent. The response function of the detector setup has been obtained experimentally at the smallest possible angle, in this case at 9 deg. The resulting preliminary inelastic scattering data cover an excitation energy range up to 45 MeV and the angular intervals 28 to 58 degrees for 12C, 26 to 65 degrees for 56Fe and 26 to 52 degrees for 89Y and 208Pb. The preliminary results are discussed and compared to several model codes as well as existing experimental data for (n,n'x), (n,p'x) and (p,p'x). Possible improvements of the analysis are also discussed.

  2. Continued development of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE) for lunar and planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandler, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current progress is reported on the inelastic scattering, capture, and activation gamma ray portions of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE). Experiments are described which have enabled a reduction in weight of the experimental probe to 7.3 kg. Parametric studies are described which enabled the optimization of experimental parameters (e.g., gate time settings, neutron pulse rate, etc.). Estimated detection sensitivities using this light weight probe and the optimized experimental parameters are discussed.

  3. Measurement of nuclear fuel pin hydriding utilizing epithermal neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.; Farkas, D.M.; Lutz, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    The measurement of hydrogen or zirconium hydriding in fuel cladding has long been of interest to the nuclear power industry. The detection of this hydrogen currently requires either destructive analysis (with sensitivities down to 1 {mu}g/g) or nondestructive thermal neutron radiography (with sensitivities on the order of a few weight percent). The detection of hydrogen in metals can also be determined by measuring the slowing down of neutrons as they collide and rapidly lose energy via scattering with hydrogen. This phenomenon is the basis for the {open_quotes}notched neutron spectrum{close_quotes} technique, also referred to as the Hysen method. This technique has been improved with the {open_quotes}modified{close_quotes} notched neutron spectrum technique that has demonstrated detection of hydrogen below 1 {mu}g/g in steel. The technique is nondestructive and can be used on radioactive materials. It is proposed that this technique be applied to the measurement of hydriding in zirconium fuel pins. This paper summarizes a method for such measurements.

  4. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  5. A novel small-angle neutron scattering detector geometry.

    PubMed

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; Jackson, Andrew; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Piscitelli, Francesco; Kirstein, Oliver; Andersen, Ken H

    2013-08-01

    A novel 2π detector geometry for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) applications is presented and its theoretical performance evaluated. Such a novel geometry is ideally suited for a SANS instrument at the European Spallation Source (ESS). Motivated by the low availability and high price of (3)He, the new concept utilizes gaseous detectors with (10)B as the neutron converter. The shape of the detector is inspired by an optimization process based on the properties of the conversion material. Advantages over the detector geometry traditionally used on SANS instruments are discussed. The angular and time resolutions of the proposed detector concept are shown to satisfy the requirements of the particular SANS instrument.

  6. A novel small-angle neutron scattering detector geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; Jackson, Andrew; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Piscitelli, Francesco; Kirstein, Oliver; Andersen, Ken H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel 2π detector geometry for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) applications is presented and its theoretical performance evaluated. Such a novel geometry is ideally suited for a SANS instrument at the European Spallation Source (ESS). Motivated by the low availability and high price of 3He, the new concept utilizes gaseous detectors with 10B as the neutron converter. The shape of the detector is inspired by an optimization process based on the properties of the conversion material. Advantages over the detector geometry traditionally used on SANS instruments are discussed. The angular and time resolutions of the proposed detector concept are shown to satisfy the requirements of the particular SANS instrument. PMID:24046504

  7. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region. Progress report, August 1, 1988--July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Beghian, L.E.; Kegel, G.H.R.

    1991-08-01

    During the report period we have investigated the following areas: Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering measurements on {sup 14}N, {sup 181}Ta, {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu; Prompt fission spectra for {sup 232}Th, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu; Theoretical studies of neutron scattering; Neutron filters; New detector systems; and Upgrading of neutron target assembly, data acquisition system, and accelerator/beam-line apparatus.

  8. Neutron and x-ray scattering studies of premartensitic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron and x-ray investigations of some metallic alloys which are known to exhibit martensitic transformations. It is shown that precursor effects are usually present in the diffuse scattering and in the phonon dispersion curves, but the transition cannot be described in terms of the soft mode picture used in the Landau and Devonshire theory to describe structural phase transitions. In addition, it is noted that it is inappropriate to look at these microstructures as incommensurate systems, but more correctly as a coherent coexistence of two phases.

  9. Thermal Denaturation of DNA Studied with Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wildes, Andrew; Theodorakopoulos, Nikos; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Peyrard, Michel; Garden, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-28

    The melting transition of DNA, whereby the strands of the double-helix structure completely separate at a certain temperature, has been characterized using neutron scattering. A Bragg peak from B-form fiber DNA has been measured as a function of temperature, and its widths and integrated intensities have been interpreted using the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model with only one free parameter. The experiment is unique, as it gives spatial correlation along the molecule through the melting transition where other techniques cannot.

  10. Time Delay in Neutron-Alpha Resonant Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hoop, Bernard; Hale, Gerald M.

    2011-10-24

    Time delay analysis of neutron-alpha resonant scattering cross sections supports characterization of the lowest 3/2{sup +} level in {sup 5}He as fundamentally an n-{alpha} resonance on the second Riemann energy sheet of both n-{alpha} and deuteron-{sup 3}H channels, with an associated shadow pole on a different unphysical sheet that, through its associated zero on the physical sheet, contributes to the large {sup 4}He(n,d){sup 3}H cross section.

  11. Parity violation in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-01-15

    Parity-violating effects for low-energy elastic neutron deuteron scattering are calculated for Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) and effective field theory types of weak potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation, using realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The resulting relation between physical observables and low-energy constants can be used to fix low-energy constants from experiments. Potential model dependencies of parity-violating effects are discussed.

  12. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structure related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron scatter studies have been performed at LANSCE, LANL and at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France. In the previous progress report (April 1, 1988--July 1, 1988) the following objectives were listed: shape of the histone octamer; location of the N-terminal domains of histone in the nucleosome core particle (specific aim 1 of original grant proposal); effect of acetylation on nucleosome structure (specific aim 2); location of the globular domain of histone H1 (specific aim 6); and complexes of the transcription factor 3A with its DNA binding site. Progress is briefly discussed.

  13. Asymptotic neutron scattering laws for anomalously diffusing quantum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneller, Gerald R.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a model-free approach to the analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering intensities from anomalously diffusing quantum particles. All quantities are inferred from the asymptotic form of their time-dependent mean square displacements which grow ∝tα, with 0 ≤ α < 2. Confined diffusion (α = 0) is here explicitly included. We discuss in particular the intermediate scattering function for long times and the Fourier spectrum of the velocity autocorrelation function for small frequencies. Quantum effects enter in both cases through the general symmetry properties of quantum time correlation functions. It is shown that the fractional diffusion constant can be expressed by a Green-Kubo type relation involving the real part of the velocity autocorrelation function. The theory is exact in the diffusive regime and at moderate momentum transfers.

  14. The role of neutron scattering in molecular and cellular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, D. L.

    1982-09-01

    Neutron scattering measurements of biological macromolecules and materials have provided answers to numerous questions about molecular assemblies and arrangements. Studies of ribosomes, viruses, membranes, and other biological structures are reviewed, with emphasis on the importance of both deuterium labelling and contrast variation with H2O/D2O exchange. Although many studies of biological molecules have been made using contrast variation alone, it is the deuterium labelling experiments that have provided the most precise information and answers to major biological questions. This is largely the result of the low resolution of scattering data and the consequent rapid increase of information content that specific deuterium labelling provides. Procedures for specific deuterium labelling `in vivo' are described for recent work on myelin membranes together with basic aspects of such labelling useful for future research.

  15. Asymptotic neutron scattering laws for anomalously diffusing quantum particles.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Gerald R

    2016-07-28

    The paper deals with a model-free approach to the analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering intensities from anomalously diffusing quantum particles. All quantities are inferred from the asymptotic form of their time-dependent mean square displacements which grow ∝t(α), with 0 ≤ α < 2. Confined diffusion (α = 0) is here explicitly included. We discuss in particular the intermediate scattering function for long times and the Fourier spectrum of the velocity autocorrelation function for small frequencies. Quantum effects enter in both cases through the general symmetry properties of quantum time correlation functions. It is shown that the fractional diffusion constant can be expressed by a Green-Kubo type relation involving the real part of the velocity autocorrelation function. The theory is exact in the diffusive regime and at moderate momentum transfers. PMID:27475344

  16. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. The aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry. PMID:27275140

  17. Characterization of photosynthetic supramolecular assemblies using small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tiede, D.M.; Marone, P.; Wagner, A.M.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1995-12-31

    We are using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to resolve structural features of supramolecular assemblies of photosynthetic proteins in liquid and frozen solutions. SANS resolves the size, shape, and structural homogeneity of macromolecular assemblies in samples identical to those used for spectroscopic assays of photosynthetic function. Likely molecular structures of the supramolecular assemblies can be identified by comparing experimental scattering data with scattering profiles calculated for model supramolecular assemblies built from crystal structures of the individual proteins. SANS studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center, RC, presented here, show that the detergent solubilized RC exists in a variety of monomeric and aggregation states. The distribution between monomer and aggregate was found to depend strongly upon detergent, temperature and nature of additives, such as ethylene glycol used for low temperature spectroscopy and polyethylene glycol used for crystallization. Likely aggregate structures are being identified by fitting the experimental scattering profiles with those calculated for model aggregates built-up using the RC crystal structure. This work establishes the foundation for using SANS to identify intermediates in the RC crystallization pathways, and for determining likely structures of complexes formed between the RC and its physiological reaction partners, cytochrome c, and the LHI antenna complex.

  18. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  19. Small-angle neutron scattering of nanocrystalline terbium with random paramagnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Balaji, G; Ghosh, S; Döbrich, F; Eckerlebe, H; Weissmüller, J

    2008-06-01

    We report magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data for the nanocrystalline rare earth metal Terbium in its paramagnetic state. Whereas critical scattering dominates at large momentum transfer, q, the (magnetic-) field response of the scattering at small q arises from the spatial nonuniformity of the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor. The finding of an interrelation between SANS and the susceptibility suggests a way for characterizing the nonuniform magnetic interactions in hard magnets by neutron scattering. PMID:18643454

  20. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Dynamics of Glass-Forming Materials in Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorn, Reiner

    2015-03-01

    The study of the dynamics of glass-forming liquids in nanoscopic confinement may contribute to the understanding of the glass transition. Especially, the question of a cooperativity length scale may be addressed. In this presentation, results obtained by inelastic neutron scattering are presented. The first experiments were done to study the α relaxation of glass-forming liquids and polymers in nanoporous silica. Neutron scattering is a suitable method to study such composite materials because the scattering of the liquid component can be emphasized by proper choice of isotopes. By combining time-of-flight spectroscopy and backscattering spectroscopy it is possible to cover the large dynamical range spanned by the dynamics of glass-forming materials. The experiments demonstrated a broadening of the spectrum of relaxation times with faster as well as slower components compared to the bulk. In later experiments `soft' confinement in a microemulsion was used to reduce surface effects. In this system a definite acceleration of the dynamics was observed. In all cases the glass-specific fast vibrational dynamics (boson peak) was also studied, revealing a characteristic confinement dependence which allows conclusions on its nature. Finally, studies were carried out on polymers by neutron spin echo spectroscopy with the aim of observing the confinement effect on polymer specific dynamics (Rouse motion). These studies showed that a comparatively simple model is able to explain the deviation from bulk behavior.

  1. Neutron scattering from the Kondo Insulator SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Collin

    A review of neutron scattering work probing the Kondo insulator SmB6 is presented with special emphasis on assessing the topology of the underlying strongly renormalized band structure. A 14 meV excition dominates the spectrum and is evidence of strong electron correlations [1]. Though the data generally supports the proposal that SmB6 is a topological Kondo insulator, specific heat and high-resolution neutron scattering data show a continuum of states well below the bulk transport gap, which enrich the problem and may connect to the recent surprising de Haas van Alpen results. ``Interaction Driven Subgap Spin Exciton in the Kondo Insulator SmB6,'' W. T. Fuhrman, J. Leiner, P. Nikolic, G. E. Granroth, M. B. Stone, M. D. Lumsden, L. DeBeer-Schmitt, P. A. Alekseev, J.-M. Mignot, S. M. Koohpayeh, P. Cottingham, W. Adam Phelan, L. Schoop, T. M. McQueen, and C. Broholm, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 036401 (2015). Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Material Sciences and Engineering, under Grant No. DEFG02-08ER46544 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  2. Rhodopsin Photoactivation Dynamics Revealed by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchhithranga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision. During photoactivation, the chromophore retinal dissociates from protein yielding the opsin apoprotein. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks individual hydrogen atom motion because of the much higher neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen than other atoms. We used protein with CHAPS detergent hydrated with heavy water. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. The QENS experiments at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate an increase in protein dynamic behavior with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin is faster compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which unlike protein, manifests localized motions.

  3. Compact turnkey focussing neutron guide system for inelastic scattering investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, G.; Georgii, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the performance of a compact neutron guide module which boosts the intensity in inelastic neutron scattering experiments by approximately a factor of 40. The module consists of two housings containing truly curved elliptic focussing guide elements, positioned before and after the sample. The advantage of the module lies in the ease with which it may be reproducibly mounted on a spectrometer within a few hours, on the same timescale as conventional sample environments. It is particularly well suited for samples with a volume of a few mm3, thus enabling the investigation of materials which to date would have been considered prohibitively small or samples exposed to extreme environments, where there are space constraints. We benchmark the excellent performance of the module by measurements of the structural and magnetic excitations in single crystals of model systems. In particular, we report the phonon dispersion in the simple element lead. We also determine the magnon dispersion in the spinel ZnCr2Se4 (V = 12.5 mm3), where strong magnetic diffuse scattering at low temperatures evolves into distinct helical order.

  4. Magnetic small-angle neutron scattering of bulk ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Michels, Andreas

    2014-09-24

    We summarize recent theoretical and experimental work in the field of magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) of bulk ferromagnets. The response of the magnetization to spatially inhomogeneous magnetic anisotropy and magnetostatic stray fields is computed using linearized micromagnetic theory, and the ensuing spin-misalignment SANS is deduced. Analysis of experimental magnetic-field-dependent SANS data of various nanocrystalline ferromagnets corroborates the usefulness of the approach, which provides important quantitative information on the magnetic-interaction parameters such as the exchange-stiffness constant, the mean magnetic anisotropy field, and the mean magnetostatic field due to jumps ΔM of the magnetization at internal interfaces. Besides the value of the applied magnetic field, it turns out to be the ratio of the magnetic anisotropy field Hp to ΔM, which determines the properties of the magnetic SANS cross-section of bulk ferromagnets; specifically, the angular anisotropy on a two-dimensional detector, the asymptotic power-law exponent, and the characteristic decay length of spin-misalignment fluctuations. For the two most often employed scattering geometries where the externally applied magnetic field H0 is either perpendicular or parallel to the wave vector k0 of the incoming neutron beam, we provide a compilation of the various unpolarized, half-polarized (SANSPOL), and uniaxial fully-polarized (POLARIS) SANS cross-sections of magnetic materials. PMID:25180625

  5. Compact turnkey focussing neutron guide system for inelastic scattering investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, G.; Georgii, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2015-12-21

    We demonstrate the performance of a compact neutron guide module which boosts the intensity in inelastic neutron scattering experiments by approximately a factor of 40. The module consists of two housings containing truly curved elliptic focussing guide elements, positioned before and after the sample. The advantage of the module lies in the ease with which it may be reproducibly mounted on a spectrometer within a few hours, on the same timescale as conventional sample environments. It is particularly well suited for samples with a volume of a few mm{sup 3}, thus enabling the investigation of materials which to date would have been considered prohibitively small or samples exposed to extreme environments, where there are space constraints. We benchmark the excellent performance of the module by measurements of the structural and magnetic excitations in single crystals of model systems. In particular, we report the phonon dispersion in the simple element lead. We also determine the magnon dispersion in the spinel ZnCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} (V = 12.5 mm{sup 3}), where strong magnetic diffuse scattering at low temperatures evolves into distinct helical order.

  6. Hierarchical Pore Morphology of Cretaceous Shale: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, J.; Melnichenko, Y. B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Furmann, Agnieszka; Clarkson, Chris R.

    2014-09-25

    Shale reservoirs are becoming an increasingly important source of oil and natural gas supply and a potential candidate for CO2 sequestration. Understanding the pore morphology in shale may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient and cost-effective. The porosity of Cretaceous shale samples from Alberta, Canada, collected from different depths with varying mineralogical compositions, has been investigated by small- and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering. Moreover these samples come from the Second White Specks and Belle Fourche formations, and their organic matter content ranges between 2 and 3%. The scattering length density of the shale specimens has been estimated using the chemical composition of the different mineral components. Scattering experiments reveal the presence of fractal and non-fractal pores. It has been shown that the porosity and specific surface area are dominated by the contribution from meso- and micropores. The fraction of closed porosity has been calculated by comparing the porosities estimated by He pycnometry and scattering techniques. There is no correlation between total porosity and mineral components, a strong correlation has been observed between closed porosity and major mineral components in the studied specimens.

  7. Hierarchical Pore Morphology of Cretaceous Shale: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, J.; Melnichenko, Y. B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Furmann, Agnieszka; Clarkson, Chris R.

    2014-09-25

    Shale reservoirs are becoming an increasingly important source of oil and natural gas supply and a potential candidate for CO2 sequestration. Understanding the pore morphology in shale may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient and cost-effective. The porosity of Cretaceous shale samples from Alberta, Canada, collected from different depths with varying mineralogical compositions, has been investigated by small- and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering. Moreover these samples come from the Second White Specks and Belle Fourche formations, and their organic matter content ranges between 2 and 3%. The scattering length density of the shale specimens has been estimated using themore » chemical composition of the different mineral components. Scattering experiments reveal the presence of fractal and non-fractal pores. It has been shown that the porosity and specific surface area are dominated by the contribution from meso- and micropores. The fraction of closed porosity has been calculated by comparing the porosities estimated by He pycnometry and scattering techniques. There is no correlation between total porosity and mineral components, a strong correlation has been observed between closed porosity and major mineral components in the studied specimens.« less

  8. Single-Volume Neutron Scatter Camera for High-Efficiency Neutron Imaging and Source Characterization. Year 2 of 3 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik

    2015-10-01

    The neutron scatter camera (NSC), an imaging spectrometer for fission energy neutrons, is an established and proven detector for nuclear security applications such as weak source detection of special nuclear material (SNM), arms control treaty verification, and emergency response. Relative to competing technologies such as coded aperture imaging, time-encoded imaging, neutron time projection chamber, and various thermal neutron imagers, the NSC provides excellent event-by-event directional information for signal/background discrimination, reasonable imaging resolution, and good energy resolution. Its primary drawback is very low detection efficiency due to the requirement for neutron elastic scatters in two detector cells. We will develop a singlevolume double-scatter neutron imager, in which both neutron scatters can occur in the same large active volume. If successful, the efficiency will be dramatically increased over the current NSC cell-based geometry. If the detection efficiency approaches that of e.g. coded aperture imaging, the other inherent advantages of double-scatter imaging would make it the most attractive fast neutron detector for a wide range of security applications.

  9. Analysis of neutron scattering data: Visualization and parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, J.J.; Fedorov, V.; Hamilton, W.A.; Yethiraj, M.

    1998-09-01

    Traditionally, small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS) data analysis requires measurements of the signal and corrections due to the empty sample container, detector efficiency and time-dependent background. These corrections are then made on a pixel-by-pixel basis and estimates of relevant parameters (e.g., the radius of gyration) are made using the corrected data. This study was carried out in order to determine whether treatment of the detector efficiency and empty sample cell in a more statistically sound way would significantly reduce the uncertainties in the parameter estimators. Elements of experiment design are shortly discussed in this paper. For instance, we studied the way the time for a measurement should be optimally divided between the counting for signal, background and detector efficiency. In Section 2 we introduce the commonly accepted models for small-angle neutron and x-scattering and confine ourselves to the Guinier and Rayleigh models and their minor generalizations. The traditional approaches of data analysis are discussed only to the extent necessary to allow their comparison with the proposed techniques. Section 3 describes the main stages of the proposed method: visual data exploration, fitting the detector sensitivity function, and fitting a compound model. This model includes three additive terms describing scattering by the sampler, scattering with an empty container and a background noise. We compare a few alternatives for the first term by applying various scatter plots and computing sums of standardized squared residuals. Possible corrections due to smearing effects and randomness of estimated parameters are also shortly discussed. In Section 4 the robustness of the estimators with respect to low and upper bounds imposed on the momentum value is discussed. We show that for the available data set the most accurate and stable estimates are generated by models containing double terms either of Guinier's or Rayleigh's type

  10. Laterally patterned spin-valve superlattice: Magnetometry and polarized neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Brüssing, F.; Devishvili, A.; Zabel, H.; Toperverg, B. P.; Badini Confalonieri, G. A.; Theis-Bröhl, K.

    2015-04-07

    The magnetization reversal of magnetic multilayers with spin-valve like characteristics, patterned into an array of parallel stripes, was structurally and magnetically analyzed, in detail, via x-ray scattering, magnetometry, and polarized neutron reflectivity. Each stripe contains a multiple repetition of the layer sequence [Fe/Cr/Co/Cr]. X-ray and neutron scattering maps of the patterned multilayer show rich details resulting from the superposition of Bragg peaks representing the lateral in-plane periodicity and the out-of-plane multilayer period. Detailed analysis of specular and off-specular polarized neutron intensity was used to ascertain the antiparallel alignment of the Co and Fe magnetization within the kink region of their combined hysteresis loop between the coercive fields of Fe and Co layers. This includes also an examination of domain formation and inter- as well as intra-stripe correlation effects upon magnetization reversal. Our combined study shows that the shape induced anisotropy via patterning is capable of overriding the four-fold crystal anisotropy but is unable to eliminate the ripple domain state of the Co layers, already present in the continuous multilayer.

  11. Laterally patterned spin-valve superlattice: Magnetometry and polarized neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüssing, F.; Toperverg, B. P.; Devishvili, A.; Badini Confalonieri, G. A.; Theis-Bröhl, K.; Zabel, H.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetization reversal of magnetic multilayers with spin-valve like characteristics, patterned into an array of parallel stripes, was structurally and magnetically analyzed, in detail, via x-ray scattering, magnetometry, and polarized neutron reflectivity. Each stripe contains a multiple repetition of the layer sequence [Fe/Cr/Co/Cr]. X-ray and neutron scattering maps of the patterned multilayer show rich details resulting from the superposition of Bragg peaks representing the lateral in-plane periodicity and the out-of-plane multilayer period. Detailed analysis of specular and off-specular polarized neutron intensity was used to ascertain the antiparallel alignment of the Co and Fe magnetization within the kink region of their combined hysteresis loop between the coercive fields of Fe and Co layers. This includes also an examination of domain formation and inter- as well as intra-stripe correlation effects upon magnetization reversal. Our combined study shows that the shape induced anisotropy via patterning is capable of overriding the four-fold crystal anisotropy but is unable to eliminate the ripple domain state of the Co layers, already present in the continuous multilayer.

  12. Local atomic structure deviation from average structure of Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3: Combined x-ray and neutron total scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksel, Elena; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Nino, Juan C.; Page, Katharine; Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2013-03-01

    The crystal structure of sodium bismuth titanate (NBT) and related compounds is of great interest, as these may form part of a new generation of ferroelectric materials used in a multitude of piezoelectric applications. This work examines the short- and long-range structure of sodium bismuth titanate in different states of synthesis using x-ray and neutron pair distribution function studies. The average structure of NBT was modeled using the monoclinic Cc space group through a combined structural refinement of x-ray and neutron diffraction data via the Rietveld method. A small box approach was used to model the local structure based on the average structure of the material, as determined from the Rietveld structural refinement, and rule out the presence of local A-site ordering in NBT. A “box-car fitting” method used to analyze the neutron pair distribution function showed that bond environments change when averaged over different length scales and the calculated bond valence of Bi3+, in particular, is different locally from its average value. A model calculated using the reverse Monte Carlo method allowed the positions of Na+ and Bi3+ to move independently, allowing the determination of their distinctive bonding environments with O2-. This method revealed that Na+ and Bi3+ have slightly different atomic positions, an effect that may be the origin of the large atomic displacement parameters calculated for the A site from the average structure model. The local structure described here is discussed in comparison with published long-range structure models.

  13. Physics of frustrated systems: A neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparovic, Goran

    Frustration refers to the inability of a system to simultaneously satisfy all interactions. The principal ingredients of frustration are (i) competition between interactions within the system, and (ii) conflicting constraints established by symmetry, or higher energy interactions. The behavior of frustrated systems is generally difficult to predict, and often results in novel cooperative states and phenomena. Frustration is common in disordered systems, in this dissertation, however, we focus on frustrated systems without quenched disorder. Effects of frustration tend to be pronounced when coupled with weak connectivity. Weak connectivity refers to a topology in which the order in one part of the system does not constrain the order in other parts. We have used neutron scattering to study structurally and magnetically frustrated systems, both strongly and weakly connected. In ZrW2O8 and Sc2(WO4) 3, anomalously large Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE) has been observed over a wide temperature range. Analysis indicates that the NTE effect in these materials is driven by folding of rigid units consisting of strongly bonded oxygen-metal polyhedra. Weak connectivity is manifested by structural under-constraint, which enables soft optical phonons. Using neutron scattering, we observed an unusually high density-of-states at low energies, and mapped the dispersion relations of the most intense phonon modes. While in conventional materials soft phonon modes typically signal an imminent structural phase transition, in NTE materials the transition is frustrated by the incompatibility between the crystal symmetry and the symmetry of the soft phonon modes. This results in the unusual NTE effect. RbFe(MoO4)2 is a frustrated, quasi-classical ( S = 5/2), quasi-two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice, with easy-plane anisotropy. In RbFe(MoO4)2, frustrated units (triangles) share edges, and are strongly connected. Although a long range magnetic order is

  14. Cross-Section Measurements for Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons from Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmullin, Sean; Kidd, Mary; Tornow, Werner; Howell, Calvin; Brown, Michael; Henning, Reyco

    2010-11-01

    Neutron backgrounds are a significant concern to experiments that attempt to directly detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter. Recoil nuclei produced by neutron elastic scattering can mimic WIMP signatures. There is insufficient experimental data available for the scattering cross-sections of neutrons with noble gases (Ne, Ar, Xe), which are candidate target materials for such experiments. Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from neon of natural abundance was investigated at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at neutron energies relevant to (α,n) and low-energy spallation neutron backgrounds in these experiments. The differential cross-section was measured using a time-of-flight technique at neutron energies of 8.0 and 5.0 MeV. Details of the experimental technique and current status of measurements will be presented.

  15. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  16. Neutron scattering analysis with microscopic optical model potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.

    1991-09-03

    A review of microscopic optical model potentials used in the analysis of neutron scattering and analyzing power data below 100 MeV (5 {le}E{sub n}{le}100 MeV) is presented. The quality of the fits to the data over a wide massd ({sup 6}Li-{sup 239}Pu) and energy range is discussed. It is shown that reasonably good agreement with the data is obtained with only three parameters, {lambda}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub W}, and {lambda}{sub SO}, which show a smooth mass and energy dependence. These parameters are normalizing constants to the real (V), and imaginary (W) central potentials and the real spin-orbit (V{sub SO}) potential. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of water confined in carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Chathoth, S. M.; Mamontov, E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Gogotsi, Y.; Wesolowski, D. J.

    2011-07-26

    Microscopic dynamics of water confined in nanometer and sub-nanometer pores of carbide-derived carbon (CDC) were investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The temperature dependence of the average relaxation time, ‹τ›, exhibits super-Arrhenius behavior that could be described by Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) law in the range from 250 K to 190 K; below this temperature, ‹τ› follows Arrhenius temperature dependence. The temperature of the dynamic crossover between the two regimes in water confined in the CDC pores is similar to that observed for water in hydrophobic confinement of the larger size, such as 14 Å ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK) and 16 Å double-wall carbon nanotubes. Thus, the dynamical behavior of water remains qualitatively unchanged even in the very small hydrophobic pores.

  18. The use of neutron scattering in nuclear weapons research

    SciTech Connect

    Juzaitis, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    We had a weapons science breakout session last week. Although it would have been better to hold it closer in time to this workshop, I think that it was very valuable. it may have been less of a {open_quotes}short-sleeve{close_quotes} workshop environment than we would have liked, but as the first time two communities-the weapons community and the neutron scattering community- got together, it was a wonderful opportunity to transfer information during the 24 presentations that were made. This report contains discussions on the fundamental analysis of documentation of the enduring stockpile; LANSCE`s contribution to weapons; spallation is critical to understanding; weapons safety assessments; applied nuclear physics requires cross section information; fission models need refinement; and establishing teams on collaborative projects.

  19. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  20. Neutron and synchrotron radiation scattering by nonpolar magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Avdeev, M. V.; Shulenina, A. V.; Zubavichus, Y. V.; Veligzhanin, A. A.; Rosta, L.; Garamus, V. M.; Vekas, L.

    2011-09-01

    The complex approach (which comprises different physical methods, including neutron and synchrotron radiation scattering) is justified in the structural analysis of magnetic fluids (MFs). Investigations of MFs based on nonpolar organic solvents with magnetite nanoparticles (2-20 nm in size) coated by various monocarboxylic acids have been performed. It is shown that the use of saturated linear acids with various alkyl chain (C12-C18) lengths instead of unsaturated oleic acid (alkyl chain C18 with a kink in the middle due to the double bond in the cis-configuration) in the classical stabilization procedure for the given type of magnetic fluids leads to a decrease in the mean size and polydispersity of nanoparticles in the final systems.

  1. Coherent Neutron Scattering and Collective Dynamics in the Protein, GFP

    PubMed Central

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Perticaroli, Stefania; O’Neill, Hugh; Zhang, Qiu; Ehlers, Georg; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2013-01-01

    Collective dynamics are considered to be one of the major properties of soft materials, including biological macromolecules. We present coherent neutron scattering studies of the low-frequency vibrations, the so-called boson peak, in fully deuterated green fluorescent protein (GFP). Our analysis revealed unexpectedly low coherence of the atomic motions in GFP. This result implies a low amount of in-phase collective motion of the secondary structural units contributing to the boson peak vibrations and fast conformational fluctuations on the picosecond timescale. These observations are in contrast to earlier studies of polymers and glass-forming systems, and suggest that random or out-of-phase motions of the β-strands contribute greater than two-thirds of the intensity to the low-frequency vibrational spectra of GFP. PMID:24209864

  2. Small angle neutron scattering studies of vesicle stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, J.T.; Hjelm, R.P.

    1997-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate the structure of mixed colloids of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) with the bile salt, cholylglycine (CG), in D{sub 2}O as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). At atmospheric pressure, the system forms an isotropic phase of mixed, single bilayer vesicles (SLV`s). Increasing the external hydrostatic pressure brought about significant changes in particle morphology. At T = 25 C, application of a pressure of 3.5 MPa resulted in the collapse of the SLV`s. Further increase of P, up to 51.8 MPa, resulted in a transition from a phase of ordered (stacked), collapsed vesicles to one of stacked, ribbon-like particles. A similar collapse of the vesicles was observed at higher temperature (T = 37 C) with increasing P, but at this temperature, no ribbon phase was found at the highest pressure explored.

  3. An inelastic neutron scattering study of dietary phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Marques, M Paula M; Batista de Carvalho, Luís A E; Valero, Rosendo; Machado, Nelson F L; Parker, Stewart F

    2014-04-28

    The conformational preferences and hydrogen-bonding motifs of several potential chemopreventive hydroxycinnamic derivatives were determined by inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy. The aim is to understand their recognized beneficial activity and establish reliable structure-activity relationships for these types of dietary phytochemicals. A series of phenolic acids with different hydroxyl/methoxyl ring substitution patterns were studied: trans-cinnamic, p-coumaric, m-coumaric, trans-caffeic and ferulic acids. Their INS spectra were completely assigned by theoretical calculations performed at the Density Functional Theory level, for the isolated molecule, dimeric centrosymmetric species and the solid (using plane-wave expansion approaches). Access to the low energy vibrational region of the spectra enabled the identification of particular modes associated with intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions, which are the determinants of the main conformational preferences and antioxidant capacity of these systems.

  4. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed a study on the structure of trypsin trimmed histone octamers using small angle neutron and X-ray scattering studies and nuclear magnetic resonance. We have also completed studies on the structure of TFIIIA induced DNA bending by a circular permutation gel electrophoresis assay. Individual acetylated species of core histones from butyrate treated HeLa cells were isolated and reconstituted into nucleosomes using a 5S rDNA nucleosome positioning DNA sequence from sea urchin. These nucleosomes were characterized by sulfhydryl group probing, nucleoprotein particle gel electrophoresis and DNase I footprinting. Fully acetylated species of histones H3 and H4 were also reconstituted in closed circular minichromosomes and the effect of DNA topology changes caused by acetylation was studied. Finally, protamines isolated from human sperm were characterized and a full set of core histones were isolated and characterized. 7 refs.

  5. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of water confined in carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Mavila Chathoth, Suresh; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Wesolowski, David J

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic dynamics of water confined in nanometer and sub-nanometer pores of carbide-derived carbon (CDC) were investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The temperature dependence of the average relaxation time, {tau}, exhibits super-Arrhenius behavior that could be described by Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) law in the range from 250 K to 190 K; below this temperature, {tau} follows Arrhenius temperature dependence. The temperature of the dynamic crossover between the two regimes in water confined in the CDC pores is similar to that observed for water in hydrophobic confinement of the larger size, such as 14 {angstrom} ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK) and 16 {angstrom} double-wall carbon nanotubes. Thus, the dynamical behavior of water remains qualitatively unchanged even in the very small hydrophobic pores.

  6. Rhodopsin photoactivation dynamics revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchithranga M.d.c.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang -Qiang

    2015-01-27

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision under dim light conditions. During rhodopsin photoactivation, the chromophore retinal undergoes cis-trans isomerization, and subsequently dissociates from the protein yielding the opsin apoprotein [1]. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the rhodopsin photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of the dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks the individual hydrogen atom motions in the protein molecules, because the neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen is much higher than other atoms [2-4]. We used protein (rhodopsin/opsin) samples with CHAPSmore » detergent hydrated with heavy water. The solvent signal is suppressed due to the heavy water, so that only the signals from proteins and detergents are detected. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by the mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. Our QENS experiments conducted at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate that the protein dynamic behavior increases with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin was longer compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which forms a band around the protein molecule in the micelle. Unlike the protein, the CHAPS detergent manifests localized motions that are the same as in the bulk empty micelles. Furthermore QENS provides unique understanding of the key dynamics involved in the activation of the GPCR involved in the visual process.« less

  7. Inelastic neutron scattering from single crystal Zn under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. G.; von Dreele, R. B.; Wochner, P.; Shapiro, S. M.

    1996-07-01

    Inelastic neutron-scattering experiments have been performed for single crystals of Zn under pressures up to 8.8 GPa at 300 K. The phonon modes q/qmax=ξ=0.075 and ξ=0.10 were measured in the transverse acoustic branch Σ3, where q=0 corresponds with the elastic constant C44. The phonon energy showed a substantial hardening with increasing pressure. The experimental data below 6.8 GPa for ξ=0.075 yield a constant Grüneisen mode γi=-lnωi/lnV of 2.25 in good agreement with a previous calculation [H. Ledbetter, Phys. Status Solidi B 181, 81 (1994)]. Above 6.8 GPa, there is a very rapid increase of γi which is indicative of the presence of a giant Kohn anomaly. This rapid divergence at high pressure indicates that a phonon softening may occur at pressures higher than 8.8 GPa caused by the collapse of the giant Kohn anomaly via an electronic topological transition (ETT). In an earlier Mössbauer Zn study at 4 K [W. Potzel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1139 (1994)], a drastic drop of the Lamb-Mössbauer factor was observed at 6.6 GPa, which was interpreted as being due to phonon softening, indicating this ETT had occurred. This paper also compares the compressibility data for single crystal Zn and Zn powder using neutron scattering. The results were found to be similar to an earlier x-ray Zn powder experiment [O. Schulte et al., High Pressure Res. 6, 169 (1991)].

  8. Rhodopsin photoactivation dynamics revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchithranga M.d.c.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang -Qiang

    2015-01-27

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision under dim light conditions. During rhodopsin photoactivation, the chromophore retinal undergoes cis-trans isomerization, and subsequently dissociates from the protein yielding the opsin apoprotein [1]. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the rhodopsin photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of the dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks the individual hydrogen atom motions in the protein molecules, because the neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen is much higher than other atoms [2-4]. We used protein (rhodopsin/opsin) samples with CHAPS detergent hydrated with heavy water. The solvent signal is suppressed due to the heavy water, so that only the signals from proteins and detergents are detected. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by the mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. Our QENS experiments conducted at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate that the protein dynamic behavior increases with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin was longer compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which forms a band around the protein molecule in the micelle. Unlike the protein, the CHAPS detergent manifests localized motions that are the same as in the bulk empty micelles. Furthermore QENS provides unique understanding of the key dynamics involved in the activation of the GPCR involved in the visual process.

  9. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the interaction of methyl propanoate with silica.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Andrew R; Geller, Hannah; Silverwood, Ian P; Cooper, Richard I; Watkin, David J; Parker, Stewart F; Winfield, John M; Lennon, David

    2016-06-29

    A modern industrial route for the manufacture of methyl methacrylate involves the reaction of methyl propanoate and formaldehyde over a silica-supported Cs catalyst. Although the process has been successfully commercialised, little is known about the surface interactions responsible for the forward chemistry. This work concentrates upon the interaction of methyl propanoate over a representative silica. A combination of infrared spectroscopy, inelastic neutron scattering, DFT calculations, X-ray diffraction and temperature-programmed desorption is used to deduce how the ester interacts with the silica surface. PMID:27182815

  10. Modeling of relay helix functional dynamics and feasibility of experimental verification by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satarić, Miljko V.; Zdravković, Slobodan; Tuszyński, Jack A.

    2011-12-01

    Cellular long-range transport involves motor proteins (MPs) (especially, kinesin and myosin) which contain a so-called relay helix. Its motion is of crucial importance to the conversion of chemical energy released in ATP hydrolysis into the coordinated mechanical movement of the entire motor protein. In this paper, we propose two combined nonlinear mechanisms for this particular functional activity and suggest the application of neutron scattering assays to experimentally determine the incoherent dynamic structure factor S(q ,ω). We argue that this type of experiment is not only feasible but it could offer significant insights into the mechanism of MP function at a molecular level.

  11. Proceedings of a workshop on methods for neutron scattering instrumentation design

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.

    1997-09-01

    The future of neutron and x-ray scattering instrument development and international cooperation was the focus of the workshop. The international gathering of about 50 participants representing 15 national facilities, universities and corporations featured oral presentations, posters, discussions and demonstrations. Participants looked at a number of issues concerning neutron scattering instruments and the tools used in instrument design. Objectives included: (1) determining the needs of the neutron scattering community in instrument design computer code and information sharing to aid future instrument development, (2) providing for a means of training scientists in neutron scattering and neutron instrument techniques, and (3) facilitating the involvement of other scientists in determining the characteristics of new instruments that meet future scientific objectives, and (4) fostering international cooperation in meeting these needs. The scope of the meeting included: (1) a review of x-ray scattering instrument design tools, (2) a look at the present status of neutron scattering instrument design tools and models of neutron optical elements, and (3) discussions of the present and future needs of the neutron scattering community. Selected papers were abstracted separately for inclusion to the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. A United Effort for Crystal Growth, Neutron Scattering, and X-ray Scattering Studies of Novel Correlated Electron Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young S.

    2015-02-12

    The research accomplishments during the award involved experimental studies of correlated electron systems and quantum magnetism. The techniques of crystal growth, neutron scattering, x-ray scattering, and thermodynamic & transport measurements were employed, and graduate students and postdoctoral research associates were trained in these techniques.

  13. Small-angle neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in biological, chemical, physical, and engineering research mandates that all intense neutron sources be equipped with SANS instruments. Four existing instruments are described, and the general differences between pulsed-source and reactor-based instrument designs are discussed. The basic geometries are identical, but dynamic range is achieved by using a broad band of wavelengths (with time-of-flight analysis) rather than by moving the detector. This allows a more optimized collimation system. Data acquisition requirements at a pulsed source are more severe, requiring large, fast histogramming memories. Data reduction is also more complex, as all wave length-dependent and angle-dependent backgrounds and non-linearities must be accounted for before data can be transformed to intensity vs Q. A comparison is shown between the Los Alamos pulsed instrument and D-11 (Institute Laue-Langevin), and examples from the four major topics of the conference are shown. The general conclusion is that reactor-based instruments remain superior at very low Q or if only a narrow range of Q is required, but that the current generation of pulsed-source instruments is competitive at moderate Q and may be faster when a wide range of Q is required. In principle, a user should choose which facility to use on the basis of optimizing the experiment; in practice the tradeoffs are not severe and the choice is usually made on the basis of availability.

  14. New Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Every, E.; Deyhim, A.; Kulesza, J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of a new Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument for use in National Institute of Standards And Technology (NIST) will be discussed. This instrument is similar to a shorter instrument we designed and delivered to ANSTO in Australia called the Bilby SANS instrument. The NIST VSANS and the ANSTO Bilby SANS instruments have very similar dimensions for length and diameter and have similar requirements for internal detector motion, top access port, walkway supports, and ports; however, the Bilby SANS instrument vacuum requirement was lower (7.5×10-5 Torr) and the entire (60,000 pound) vessel was required to move 1.5 meters on external rails with a repeatability of 100 um, which ADC achieved. The NIST VSANS length is 24 meter, internal diameter 2.3 meter with three internal carriages. The NIST VSANS instrument, which covers the usual SANS range will also allow configuration to cover the range between q ∼⃒ 10-4 A-1 to 10-3 A-1 with a sample beam current of (104 neutrons/s). The key requirements are a second position-sensitive detector system having a 1 mm pixel size and a longer sample-detector flight path of 20 m (i.e., a 40 m instrument).

  15. Neutron scattering studies on URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdarot, Frederic; Raymond, Stephane; Regnault, Louis-Pierre

    2014-11-01

    This paper aims to review some of the neutron scattering studies performed on URu2Si2 in Grenoble. This compound has been studied for a quarter of century because of a so-called hidden-order ground state visible by most of the bulk experiments but almost invisible by microscopic probes like neutrons, muons NMR or X-ray. We stress on some aspects that were not addressed previously. Firstly, the comparison of the cell parameters in the 1-2-2 systems seems to point that the magnetic properties of URu2Si2 are leading by an U4+ electronic state. Secondly, a compilation of the different studies of the tiny antiferromagnetic moment indicates that the tiny antiferromagnetic moment has a constant value which may indicate that it is not necessarily extrinsic. We also present the last development on the magnetic form factor measurement in which the magnetic density rotates when entering in the hidden-order state. To end, the thermal dependence of the two most intense magnetic excitations at Q0 = (1,0,0) and Q1 = (0.6,0,0) seems to indicate two different origins or processes for these excitations.

  16. Molecular-dynamics study of ionic motions and neutron inelastic scattering in α-AgI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarotti, Guido L.; Jacucci, G.; Rahman, A.

    1986-11-01

    Contrary to the current interpretation of inelastic-neutron-scattering data on α-AgI, molecular-dynamics calculations show that inelastic neutron scattering is dominated by coherent scattering from Ag+ ions. The calculations agree with the available data. Ag+ ions diffuse by jumps between tetrahedral sites, the consequences being in complete accord with the Chudley-Elliot model only if the full geometrical complexity of these sites is included. Phonon modes due to I- motions are predicted for certain wave vectors.

  17. Investigating the Defect Structures in Transparent Conducting Oxides Using X-ray and Neutron Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    González, Gabriela B.

    2012-10-23

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) materials are implemented into a wide variety of commercial devices because they possess a unique combination of high optical transparency and high electrical conductivity. Created during the processing of the TCOs, defects within the atomic-scale structure are responsible for their desirable optical and electrical properties. Therefore, studying the defect structure is essential to a better understanding of the behavior of transparent conductors. X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are powerful tools to investigate the atomic lattice structural defects in these materials. This review paper presents some of the current developments in the study of structural defects in n-type TCOs using x-ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), pair distribution functions (PDFs), and x-ray fluorescence (XRF).

  18. Liquid 1-propanol studied by neutron scattering, near-infrared, and dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sillrén, P; Matic, A; Karlsson, M; Koza, M; Maccarini, M; Fouquet, P; Götz, M; Bauer, Th; Gulich, R; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A; Mattsson, J; Gainaru, C; Vynokur, E; Schildmann, S; Bauer, S; Böhmer, R

    2014-03-28

    Liquid monohydroxy alcohols exhibit unusual dynamics related to their hydrogen bonding induced structures. The connection between structure and dynamics is studied for liquid 1-propanol using quasi-elastic neutron scattering, combining time-of-flight and neutron spin-echo techniques, with a focus on the dynamics at length scales corresponding to the main peak and the pre-peak of the structure factor. At the main peak, the structural relaxation times are probed. These correspond well to mechanical relaxation times calculated from literature data. At the pre-peak, corresponding to length scales related to H-bonded structures, the relaxation times are almost an order of magnitude longer. According to previous work [C. Gainaru, R. Meier, S. Schildmann, C. Lederle, W. Hiller, E. Rössler, and R. Böhmer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 258303 (2010)] this time scale difference is connected to the average size of H-bonded clusters. The relation between the relaxation times from neutron scattering and those determined from dielectric spectroscopy is discussed on the basis of broad-band permittivity data of 1-propanol. Moreover, in 1-propanol the dielectric relaxation strength as well as the near-infrared absorbance reveal anomalous behavior below ambient temperature. A corresponding feature could not be found in the polyalcohols propylene glycol and glycerol.

  19. Practical applications of small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Hollamby, Martin J

    2013-07-14

    Recent improvements in beam-line accessibility and technology have led to small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) becoming more frequently applied to materials problems. SANS has been used to study the assembly, dispersion, alignment and mixing of nanoscale condensed matter, as well as to characterise the internal structure of organic thin films, porous structures and inclusions within steel. Using time-resolved SANS, growth mechanisms in materials systems and soft matter phase transitions can also be explored. This review is intended for newcomers to SANS as well as experts. Therefore, the basic knowledge required for its use is first summarised. After this introduction, various examples are given of the types of soft and hard matter that have been studied by SANS. The information that can be extracted from the data is highlighted, alongside the methods used to obtain it. In addition to presenting the findings, explanations are provided on how the SANS measurements were optimised, such as the use of contrast variation to highlight specific parts of a structure. Emphasis is placed on the use of complementary techniques to improve data quality (e.g. using other scattering methods) and the accuracy of data analysis (e.g. using microscopy to separately determine shape and size). This is done with a view to providing guidance on how best to design and analyse future SANS measurements on materials not listed below. PMID:23552189

  20. Dynamics of camphor sulphonic acid: a quasielastic neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bée, M.; Djurado, D.; Combet, J.; Gonzalez, M. A.

    2002-03-01

    Molecular motions in mono-hydrated racemic camphor sulphonic acid (±)-10-C 10H 16O 4S --H 3O + which is abbreviated as (CSA-H 2O) were investigated using incoherent neutron scattering techniques. Analysis of the intensity of the purely elastic scattering over a wide temperature range (4-340 K) carried out with a high-resolution backscattering spectrometer revealed the onset of molecular motions at ca. 100 K which could be observed on the 10 -10 s time-scale up to T=180 K. These motions were identified as 120° jumps of the methyl groups. Quasielastic measurements using both the backscattering and the time-of-flight techniques enabled to study this movement from 150 to 340 K. The corresponding characteristic time was found to follow an Arrhenius law with an activation energy ΔH=12.0±0.2 kJ mol -1. All the methyl groups appear as dynamically equivalent. That result is at contrast with earlier studies on conducting polymers where CSA was introduced as a counter-ion and for which the intermolecular effects were found to strongly influence the dynamics. Inspection of the low frequency part of the vibrational spectrum evidences deformations of the C-C-S angle and rotational oscillations of the hydration molecules.

  1. Modeling neutron scattering in disperse, nonuniformly labeled commercial polyolefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habersberger, Brian; Hart, Kyle; Gillespie, David; Huang, Tianzi

    In spite of their chemically simple monomer elements, understanding of many structural, thermodynamic, and other aspects of polyolefins has remained elusive. Scattering studies on polyolefins are challenged by their nearly identical density in the melt, requiring the use of deuterium-labeling to provide contrast for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Until recently, labeling of commercial polyolefins has been prohibitively costly, leading SANS investigations on polyolefins to focus on non-disperse model systems. Commercial polyolefins often have broad molecular weight and composition distributions, and such dispersity plays an important role in their rheology, crystallization, and mechanical properties. Recent reports have described facile hydrogen-deuterium exchange reactions that preserve the chain architecture of polyolefins. However, such exchange is not uniformly distributed across the chain population. Here, we report a generalized application of the Random Phase Approximation prediction for SANS from homogeneous polymer blends to account for such dispersity. A Monte-Carlo method is used to calculate the deuterium distribution that corresponds to SANS measurements. These methods provide powerful tools for probing the structure of disperse polymer architectures.

  2. Practical applications of small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Hollamby, Martin J

    2013-07-14

    Recent improvements in beam-line accessibility and technology have led to small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) becoming more frequently applied to materials problems. SANS has been used to study the assembly, dispersion, alignment and mixing of nanoscale condensed matter, as well as to characterise the internal structure of organic thin films, porous structures and inclusions within steel. Using time-resolved SANS, growth mechanisms in materials systems and soft matter phase transitions can also be explored. This review is intended for newcomers to SANS as well as experts. Therefore, the basic knowledge required for its use is first summarised. After this introduction, various examples are given of the types of soft and hard matter that have been studied by SANS. The information that can be extracted from the data is highlighted, alongside the methods used to obtain it. In addition to presenting the findings, explanations are provided on how the SANS measurements were optimised, such as the use of contrast variation to highlight specific parts of a structure. Emphasis is placed on the use of complementary techniques to improve data quality (e.g. using other scattering methods) and the accuracy of data analysis (e.g. using microscopy to separately determine shape and size). This is done with a view to providing guidance on how best to design and analyse future SANS measurements on materials not listed below.

  3. Neutron and Gamma Ray Scattering Measurements for Subsurface Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Darwin V.

    1990-10-01

    Developed for the oil industry, well logging instrumentation based on electrical, acoustic, and nuclear measurements has been providing information about the localization and evaluation of hydrocarbon-bearing strata for petroleum geologists and engineers since 1927. This method of exploring properties of the earth's crust without taking physical samples is attracting a growing audience of geologists and geophysicists because of recent developments that permit nondestructive measurements of subsurface geochemistry. A combination of nuclear measurement techniques, which use gamma ray and neutron sources, can provide detailed information on rock composition of interest to both industry and academia.

  4. Measured Total Cross Sections of Slow Neutrons Scattered by Solid Deuterium and Implications for Ultracold Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, F.; Blau, B.; Brandt, B. van den; Brys, T.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; Hautle, P.; Henneck, R.; Heule, S.; Kirch, K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Kuehne, G.; Konter, J.A.; Pichlmaier, A.; Wokaun, A.; Bodek, K.; Kasprzak, M.; Kuzniak, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    2005-10-28

    The total scattering cross sections for slow neutrons with energies in the range 100 neV to 3 meV for solid ortho-{sup 2}H{sub 2} at 18 and 5 K, frozen from the liquid, have been measured. The 18 K cross sections are found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical expectations and for ultracold neutrons dominated by thermal up scattering. At 5 K the total scattering cross sections are found to be dominated by the crystal defects originating in temperature induced stress but not deteriorated by temperature cycles between 5 and 10 K.

  5. Dynamics of biopolymers on nanomaterials studied by quasielastic neutron scattering and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.

    Neutron scattering has been proved to be a powerful tool to study the dynamics of biological systems under various conditions. This thesis intends to utilize neutron scattering techniques, combining with MD simulations, to develop fundamental understanding of several biologically interesting systems. Our systems include a drug delivery system containing Nanodiamonds with nucleic acid (RNA), and two specific model proteins, beta-Casein and Inorganic Pyrophosphatase (IPPase). RNA and nanodiamond (ND) both are suitable for drug-delivery applications in nano-biotechnology. The architecturally flexible RNA with catalytic functionality forms nanocomposites that can treat life-threatening diseases. The non-toxic ND has excellent mechanical and optical properties and functionalizable high surface area, and thus actively considered for biomedical applications. In this thesis, we utilized two tools, quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and Molecular Dynamics Simulations to probe the effect of ND on RNA dynamics. Our work provides fundamental understanding of how hydrated RNA motions are affected in the RNA-ND nanocomposites. From the experimental and Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MD), we found that hydrated RNA motion is faster on ND surface than a freestanding one. MD Simulation results showed that the failure of Stokes Einstein relation results the presence of dynamic heterogeneities in the biomacromolecules. Radial pair distribution function from MD Simulation confirmed that the hydrophilic nature of ND attracts more water than RNA results the de-confinement of RNA on ND. Therefore, RNA exhibits faster motion in the presence of ND than freestanding RNA. In the second project, we studied the dynamics of a natively disordered protein beta-Casein which lacks secondary structures. In this study, the temperature and hydration effects on the dynamics of beta-Casein are explored by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS). We investigated the mean square displacement (MSD) of

  6. In situ shape and distance measurements in neutron scattering and diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Satoru; Mendelson, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering combined with selective isotopic labeling and contrast matching is useful for obtaining in situ structural information about a selected particle, or particles, in a macromolecular complex. The observed intensities, however, may be distorted by inter-complex interference and by scattering-length-density fluctuations of the (otherwise) contrast-matched portions. Methods have been proposed to cancel out such distortions (Hoppe`s method, the Statistical Labeling Method, and the Triple Isotopic Substitution Method). With these methods as well as related unmixed-sample methods, structural information about the selected particles can be obtained without these distortions. We have generalized these methods so that, in addition to globular particles in solution, they can be applied to in situ structures of systems having underlying symmetry and/or net orientation as well. The information obtainable from such experiments is discussed.

  7. Spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles investigated using polarized neutrons and nuclear resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Herlitschke, Marcus; Disch, Sabrina; Sergueev, I.; Schlage, Kai; Wetterskog, Erik; Bergstrom, Lennart; Hermann, Raphael P.

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript reports the investigation of spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles of different shape by a combination of polarized small-angle neutron scattering (SANSPOL) and nuclear forward scattering (NFS) techniques. Both methods are sensitive to magnetization on the nanoscale. SANSPOL allows for investigation of the particle morphology and spatial magnetization distribution and NFS extends this nanoscale information to the atomic scale, namely the orientation of the hyperfine field experienced by the iron nuclei. The studied nanospheres and nanocubes with diameters of 7.4nm and 10.6 nm, respectively, exhibit a significant spin disorder. This effect leads to a reduction of the magnetization to 44% and 58% of the theoretical maghemite bulk value, observed consistently by both techniques.

  8. Spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles investigated using polarized neutrons and nuclear resonant scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Herlitschke, Marcus; Disch, Sabrina; Sergueev, I.; Schlage, Kai; Wetterskog, Erik; Bergstrom, Lennart; Hermann, Raphael P.

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript reports the investigation of spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles of different shape by a combination of polarized small-angle neutron scattering (SANSPOL) and nuclear forward scattering (NFS) techniques. Both methods are sensitive to magnetization on the nanoscale. SANSPOL allows for investigation of the particle morphology and spatial magnetization distribution and NFS extends this nanoscale information to the atomic scale, namely the orientation of the hyperfine field experienced by the iron nuclei. The studied nanospheres and nanocubes with diameters of 7.4nm and 10.6 nm, respectively, exhibit a significant spin disorder. This effect leads to a reduction of the magnetization tomore » 44% and 58% of the theoretical maghemite bulk value, observed consistently by both techniques.« less

  9. HEIMDAL: A thermal neutron powder diffractometer with high and flexible resolution combined with SANS and neutron imaging - Designed for materials science studies at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Lefmann, Kim; Henry, Paul F.; Bertelsen, Mads; Schefer, Jürg; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-08-01

    HEIMDAL will be a multi length scale neutron scattering instrument for the study of structures covering almost nine orders of magnitude from 0.01 nm to 50 mm. The instrument is accepted for construction at the European Spallation Source (ESS) and features a variable resolution thermal neutron powder diffractometer (TNPD), combined with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron imaging (NI). The instrument uses a novel combination of a cold and a thermal guide to fulfill the diverse requirements for diffraction and SANS. With an instrument length of 170 m, HEIMDAL will take advantage of the high neutron flux of the long pulse at ESS, whilst maintaining a high q-resolution due to the long flight path. The q-range coverage is up to 20 Å-1 allowing low-resolution PDF analysis. With the addition of SANS, HEIMDAL will be able to cover a uniquely broad length scale within a single instrumental set-up. HEIMDAL will be able to accommodate modern materials research in a broad variety of fields, and the task of the instrument will be to study advanced functional materials in action, as in situ and in operandi at multiple length scales (0.01-100 nm) quasi simultaneously. The instrument combines state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques (TNPD, SANS, and NI) with the goal of studying real materials, in real time, under real conditions. This article describes the instrument design ideas, calculations and results of simulations and virtual experiments.

  10. Dynamic neutron scattering on incoherent systems using efficient resonance spin flip techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Häussler, Wolfgang; Kredler, Lukas

    2014-05-15

    We have performed numerical ray-tracing Monte-Carlo-simulations of incoherent dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We intend to optimize the efficiency of incoherent measurements depending on the fraction of neutrons scattered without and with spin flip at the sample. In addition to conventional spin echo, we have numerically and experimentally studied oscillating intensity techniques. The results point out the advantages of these different spin echo variants and are an important prerequisite for neutron resonance spin echo instruments like RESEDA (FRM II, Munich), to choose the most efficient technique depending on the scattering vector range and the properties of the sample system under study.

  11. Neutron Scattering Techniques in the Study of Phase Transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, Ronald Benjamin

    The properties of thermal neutrons make them particularly adept for studies of condensed matter materials and the study of phase transitions in condensed matter systems. A variety of neutron scattering techniques have been employed to study the phase transitions in Cu_3Au and CsCoBr_3, which are representatives of the two principle types of phase transitions. The binary alloy Cu_3Au undergoes a first order phase transition from its low temperature ordered phase in which the atoms preferentially occupy the sites of a simple cubic lattice, to its high temperature disordered phase at 667 +/- 3K. Although a well studied system, the results reported in this thesis shall demonstrate that there is still much that can be learned from Cu_3Au. Within the context of the Landau theory of phase transitions, there exists, in addition to the order-disorder temperature, T_{c}, upper and lower spinodal temperatures, T_{su} and T_{sl}. These mark the first temperatures upon approaching the phase transition from above and below respectively, at which metastable droplets of the second phase can fluctuate out of the first phase. Until recently, there has however been little physical evidence supporting the existence of the spinodal temperatures. Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements have been performed over an extended temperature range with an emphasis on temperatures near T_{c}. The lattice constant data, order-parameter data and phonon data provided by these measurements all indicate that there are two temperature regimes just below T_{c} with a crossover between these regimes in the range of T_{c}-35K to T _{c}-25K. This crossover temperature is interpreted as the lower spinodal temperature of Cu _3Au. CsCoBr_3 is believed to pass through at least two and possibly three magnetic phase transitions. The highest temperature transition is a second -order phase transition at approximately T_ {rm N1} = 28.3 +/- 0.1K. in the high temperature paramagnetic phase, the

  12. Current Status and Future Works of Neutron Scattering Laboratory at BATAN in Serpong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikram, A.

    2008-03-01

    Current status of neutron beam instruments using neutrons produced by the Multi Purpose Research Reactor—30MWth (MPR 30, RSG GA Siwabessy) located in Serpong is presented. Description of the reactor as the neutron source is mentioned briefly. There are six neutron beam tubes coming from the beryllium reflector surrounding half of the reactor core providing neutrons in the experimental hall of the reactor (XHR). Four of them are dedicated to R&D in materials science using neutron scattering techniques. Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF), Triple Axis Spectrometer (TAS) and Residual Stress Measurement (RSM) Diffractometer are installed respectively at beam tubes S2, S4 and S6. The largest neutron beam tube (S5) is exploited to accommodate two neutron guide tubes that transfer the neutrons to a neighbouring building called neutron guide hall (NGH). There are three other neutron beam instruments installed in this building, namely Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Spectrometer (SMARTer), High Resolution SANS (HRSANS) Spectrometer and High Resolution Powder Diffractometer (HRPD). In the XHR, a Four Circle and Texture Diffractometer (FCD/TD) is attached to one of the neutron guide tubes. These seven instruments were installed to utilize the neutrons for materials science research, and recently the RSM diffractometer has shown its capabilities in identifying different amount of stress left due to different treatments of welding in fuel cladding, while the SANS spectrometer is now gaining capabilities in identifying different sizes and shapes of macromolecules in polymers as well as investigations of magnetic samples. In the mean time, non-destructive tests using the NRF is gathering more confidence from some latest real time measurements eventhough there are still some shortcomings in the components and their alignments. Future works including improvement of each facility and its components, even replacement of some parts are necessary and have to be carried out

  13. Initial characterization of mudstone nanoporosity with small angle neutron scattering using caprocks from carbon sequestration sites.

    SciTech Connect

    McCray, John; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Mouzakis, Katherine; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot

    2010-11-01

    Geological carbon sequestration relies on the principle that CO{sub 2} injected deep into the subsurface is unable to leak to the atmosphere. Structural trapping by a relatively impermeable caprock (often mudstone such as a shale) is the main trapping mechanism that is currently relied on for the first hundreds of years. Many of the pores of the caprock are of micrometer to nanometer scale. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of porosity at these scales are poorly characterized. Differences in pore shape and size can cause variation in capillary properties and fluid transport resulting in fluid pathways with different capillary entry pressures in the same sample. Prediction of pore network properties for distinct geologic environments would result in significant advancement in our ability to model subsurface fluid flow. Specifically, prediction of fluid flow through caprocks of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs is a critical step in evaluating the risk of leakage to overlying aquifers. The micro- and nanoporosity was analyzed in four mudstones using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). These mudstones are caprocks of formations that are currently under study or being used for carbon sequestration projects and include the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Total organic carbon varies from <0.3% to 4% by weight. Expandable clay contents range from 10% to {approx}40% in the Gothic shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. Neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e. minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume of pores and their arrangement in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of

  14. a Neutron Scattering Study of Liquid HELIUM-4.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Ken Holst

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The results of high-resolution, high-accuracy, high-precision neutron inelastic measurements on liquid ^4He are presented. In the collective excitation region, the temperature -dependence of the sharp one-phonon peak is studied and seen to exhibit a qualitative change at T_ {lambda}. The Woods-Svensson hypothesis that the scattering separates naturally into parts proportional to the macroscopic normal and superfluid densities is tested and is found to be too simplistic to describe the detailed temperature dependence. A novel theoretical approach by Glyde and Griffin is evaluated. Their formulation establishes the microscopic connection between the Bose condensate and the phonon excitations in superfluid ^4He. The present parameterisation of their model describes the qualitative temperature dependence well. At high momentum transfer we obtain estimates of the momentum distribution above and below T _lambda, by extracting the Q-dependence of the fourth central moment of the scattering. The obtained n(p) at T > T_lambda is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations. Our low-temperature momentum distribution is more sharply peaked than at high temperature, but reflects the lack of higher -order terms in the short-time expansion used for extraction of the fourth moment. Estimates of the mean kinetic energy per atom are obtained and are slightly higher than previous experimental estimates, but in agreement with theoretical calculations. From this, we evaluate the magnitude of the condensate fraction, and find n_0(T=0) = 10.3 +/- 1.0%.

  15. Characterisation of porous materials by combining mercury porosimetry and scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanopoulos, K. L.; Steriotis, Th. A.; Mitropoulos, A. Ch.; Kanellopoulos, N. K.; Treimer, W.

    2004-07-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), ultra small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) and mercury porosimetry have been used to fully characterise macroporous chalk as well as Si3N4 and BaTiO3 samples. For the scattering techniques, multiple scattering effects have been studied. In addition, the scattering data have been evaluated by using a generalised form of the indirect Fourier transformation technique suitable for concentrated systems. Pore size distributions are calculated and compared to the mercury porosimetry results.

  16. Neutron and light scattering studies of light-harvesting photosynthetic antenna complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-06-28

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been employed in studying the structural information of various biological systems, particularly in systems without high-resolution structural information available. In this report, we briefly present some principles and biological applications of neutron scattering and DLS, compare the differences in information that can be obtained with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and then report recent studies of SANS and DLS, together with other biophysical approaches, for light-harvesting antenna complexes and reaction centers of purple and green phototrophic bacteria.

  17. Neutron scattering and susceptibility measurements on single crystals of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coad, S.; Lussier, J.-G.; McMorrow, D. F.; McK Paul, D.

    1996-08-01

    Single-crystal derivatives of the spin - Peierls (S - P) system, 0953-8984/8/34/014/img8, doped with Zn (0.5 to 2.4%) and Ni (1.7 to 6%) have been studied using SQUID magnetometry and neutron scattering. Our study shows that the impurities act to suppress the S - P state and produce a 3D Néel state at low temperatures. A phase diagram is constructed which shows that doping with either Zn (S = 0) or Ni (S = 1) leads to qualitatively similar results: the temperature at which the transition to the S - P state occurs decreases linearly with dopant concentration, whereas the Néel temperature, 0953-8984/8/34/014/img9, initially increases to a maximum at around 4% and then decreases for higher concentrations. These results are discussed with reference to models of defects in 1D spin chains and to earlier experimental work on this system. One difference between the Zn- and Ni-doped samples is that in the Néel state the 0953-8984/8/34/014/img10 moments in the former point along the c-axis, while in the latter they are along the a-axis.

  18. Phonon dynamics and inelastic neutron scattering of sodium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Zbiri, M.; Rols, S.; Schober, H.; Chaplot, S. L.

    2014-05-01

    Sodium niobate (NaNbO3) exhibits an extremely complex sequence of structural phase transitions in the perovskite family and therefore provides an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions. We report temperature dependence of inelastic neutron scattering measurements of phonon densities of states in sodium niobate. The measurements are carried out in various crystallographic phases of this material at various temperatures from 300 to 1048 K. The phonon spectra exhibit peaks centered on 19, 37, 51, 70, and 105 meV. Interestingly, the peak near 70 meV shifts significantly towards lower energy with increasing temperature, while the other peaks do not exhibit any appreciable shift. The phonon spectra at 783 K show prominent change and become more diffusive as compared to those at 303 K. In order to better analyze these features, we have performed first-principles lattice dynamics calculations based on the density functional theory. The computed phonon density of states is found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on our calculation we are able to assign the characteristic Raman modes in the antiferroelectric phase, which are due to the folding of the T (ω = 95 cm-1) and Δ (ω = 129 cm-1) points of the cubic Brillouin zone, to the A1g symmetry.

  19. Microvolt and millivolt molecular tunnelling spectroscopy by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. W.

    Recent improvements in the energy resolution of incoherent inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy allow spectra in the region 0.5 μeV (micro electron volts) [0.004 cm -1] to 50 meV (milli electron volts) [400 cm -1] to be measured with a resolution batter than 10% = ΔE/E. In this range tunnelling splittings of the librational grounds fates of molecules in molecular crystals, adsorbed on surfaces and intercalated in layer structures have been observed and provide a sensitive test of models for the rotational potential. The spectra for the CH 3, group in solid CH 3-CC-CC-CH 3; CH 4 adsorbed on graphite and H 2 intercalated in C 24C s are taken as examples. Two quite different types of temperature dependence for the tunnelling splittings are seen as well as temperature dependent line widths. As yet there is no satisfactory theoretical model to explain the phenomena which are related to effects seen in low temperature proton transfer kinetics.

  20. Small Angle Neutron Scattering of Solutions of Arborescent Graft Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sangwook; Briber, R. M.; Bauer, B. J.; Topp, Andreas; Gauthier, Mario

    1998-03-01

    Arborescent graft polymers are branched macromolecules resulting from successive cycles of chloromethylation and anionic grafting reactions. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to measure the size and shape of arborescent graft polymers in solution. Guinier plots were used to analyze the data at small q. The radius of gyration of arborescent graft polymers was found to be almost independent of temperature as the solution was cooled towards the phase separation temperature. The optical cloud point temperature was found to be 15 ^0C. At the phase separation temperature two peaks were observed in the I versus q SANS data. The first peak is due to the interference between molecules while the second peak comes from the single particle form factor. The value of q at the peak from the form factor was almost constant as temperature was changed from 40 ^0C to 20 ^0C. The peak position shifted to higher q at the phase separation temperature. This indicates that the size of molecules decreased as the molecules began to aggregate below the phase separation temperature. The value of A2 for arborescent graft polymers was found to be independent of temperature and close to zero.

  1. Physical characteristics of human transferrin from small angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Martel, P; Kim, S M; Powell, B M

    1980-01-01

    The technique of small angle neutron scattering has been used to determine the molecular shape, the volume, and the molecular weight of pooled human transferrin in an aqueous solution isotonic with blood. Analysis of the measurements assuming a spheroidal molecular shape indicates that an oblate spheroid with semi-axes of length 46.6 +/- 1.4, 46.6 +/- 1.4 and 15.8 +/- 3.8 A, and a molecular volume of (144 +/- 45) X 10(3) A3 is the best simple approximation to the shape of the transferrin molecule. The radius of gyration, Rg, determined from a Guinier plot is 30.25 +/- 0.49 A, in agreement with Rg calculated for the oblate spheroidal shape. The molecular weight is determined to be (75 +/- 5) X 10(3). The shape-independent molecular volume is found to be (98 +/- 10) X 10(3) A3. The difference in the two volumes suggests that transferrin is not a uniform spheroid but may have a more complex shape. PMID:7260293

  2. Amorphous polymorphis in ice investigated by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, H.; Koza, M.; Tölle, A.; Fujara, F.; Angell, C. A.; Böhmer, R.

    High-density I lda and low-density I lda amorphous have been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) with emphasis on the energy window from 0.5 to 20 meV. At variance with earlier measurements the spectra in the I lda phase show a simple ω2 behaviour in the acoustic region and the temperature dependence is found to be harmonic. I lda converts with a strongly temperature-dependent rate towards I lda ice. We have investigated in detail the time evolution of both the static and dynamic response functions at several temperatures. Elastic small-angle signals indicate the presence of strong heterogeneties at the early stages of the conversion process. At least two different time scales are present in the transition. The structural changes are reflected in the frequency distribution. The first peak in the phonon density-of-states softens appreciably when going from I lda to I lda. In the acoustic region there is evidence that I lda is softer than both I lda and crystalline cubic ice I c. No signs of a fast ps process related to melting can be detected in the dynamics.

  3. Cryogen free high magnetic field sample environment for neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Down, R. B. E.; Kouzmenko, G.; Kirichek, O.; Wotherspoon, R.; Brown, J.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2010-11-01

    Cryogenic equipment can be found in the majority of neutron scattering experiments. Recent increases in liquid helium cost caused by global helium supply problems lead to significant concern about affordability of conventional cryogenic equipment. However the latest progress in cryo-cooler technology offers a new generation of cryogenic systems in which the cryogen consumption can be significantly reduced and in some cases completely eliminated. These systems also offer the advantage of operational simplicity, require less space than conventional cryogen-cooled systems and can significantly improve user safety. At the ISIS facility it is possible to substitute conventional cryostats with cryogen free systems. Such systems are based on the pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) which possesses no cold moving parts. Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS have developed new high magnetic field sample environment equipment based on re-condensing technology. This project includes 9T wide angle chopper magnet for spectrometry and 14T magnet for diffraction. The main advantage of these systems is that all magnet operating procedures, for example cooling, running up to the field and quenching remain the same as for a standard magnet in a bath cryostat. This approach also provides a homogeneous temperature distribution, which is crucial for optimum magnet performance.

  4. Corrections on energy spectrum and scatterings for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-Quan; Bücherl, Thomas; Li, Hang; Zou, Yu-Bin; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Guo, Zhi-Yu

    2013-11-01

    Distortions caused by the neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM- II in Technische Universität München (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by the neutron spectrum, and the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve image quality. Good analysis results prove the sound effects of the above two corrections.

  5. Directional Stand-off Detection of Fast Neutrons and Gammas Using Angular Scattering Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier P. e.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.; Forman, L.

    2009-10-25

    We have investigated the response of a DoubleScatter Neutron Spectrometer (DSNS) for sources at long distances (gr than 200 meters). We find that an alternative method for analyzing double scatter data avoids some uncertainties introduced by amplitude measurements in plastic scintillators.Time of flight is used to discriminate between gamma and neutron events, and the kinematic distributions of scattering angles are assumed to apply. Non-relativistic neutrons are most likely to scatter at 45°, while gammas with energies greater than 2 MeV are most likely to be forward scattered. The distribution of scattering angles of fission neutrons arriving from a distant point source generates a 45° cone, which can be back-projected to give the source direction. At the same time, the distribution of Compton-scattered gammas has a maximum in the forward direction, and can be made narrower by selecting events that deposit minimal energy in the first scattering event. We have further determined that the shape of spontaneous fission neutron spectra at ranges gr than 110 m is still significantly different from thecosmic ray background.

  6. Neutron scattering and diffraction instrument for structural study on biology in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering and diffraction instruments in Japan which can be used for structural studies in biology are briefly introduced. Main specifications and general layouts of the instruments are shown.

  7. Neutron scattering facility for the calibration of the response to nuclear recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, J.; Chambon, B.; Drain, D.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Gascon, J.; Huber, M.; Jagemann, T.; de Jésus, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Martineau, O.; Potzel, W.; Rüdig, A.; Schnagl, J.; Simon, E.; Stark, M.; Stern, M.; Wulandari, H.

    2002-02-01

    A possibility to search for elementary particles as dark matter candidates is to detect elastic scattering with cryogenic detectors. For the interpretation of the data one has to determine the detector response to nuclear recoils, the so-called quenching factors. They can differ for the heat-, for the scintillation- and for the ionization-signal and can be measured by scattering of neutrons. The CRESST- and the EDELWEISS-collaborations have set up a neutron scattering facility for cryogenic detectors at the tandem-accelerator of the Munich `Maier-Leibniz-Labor.' The scattering angle and the time-of-flight of the neutrons are measured by an array of liquid scintillator cells. The pulsed high energy (11 MeV) neutron beam is created by nuclear reaction of a 11B on a H2-gas target. The set-up and the results of first tests are presented. .

  8. FAST NEUTRON SOURCE DETECTION AT LONG DISTANCES USING DOUBLE SCATTER SPECTROMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    FORMAN,L.VANIER,P.WELSH,K.

    2003-08-03

    Fast neutrons can be detected with relatively high efficiency, >15%, using two planes of hydrogenous scintillator detectors where a scatter in the first plane creates a start pulse and scatter in the second plane is separated by time-of-flight. Indeed, the neutron spectrum of the source can be determined as the sum of energy deposited by pulse height in the first added to the energy of the second found by time-of-flight to the second detector. Gamma rays can also create a double scatter by Compton interaction in the first with detection in the second, but these events occur in a single time window because the scattered photons all travel at the speed of light. Thus, gamma ray events can be separated from neutrons by the time-of-flight differences. We have studied this detection system with a Cf-252 source using Bicron 501A organic scintillators and report on the ability to efficiently detect fast neutrons with high neutron/gamma detection ratios. We have further studied cosmic-ray neutron background detection response that is the dominant background in long range detection. We have found that most of the neutrons are excluded from the time-of-flight window because they are either too high in energy, >10 keV, or too low, < 10 keV. Moreover, if the detection planes are position-sensitive, the angular direction of the source can be determined by the ratio of the energy of scattered protons in the first detector relative to the position and energy of the scattered neutron detected in the second. This ability to locate the source in theta is useful, but more importantly increases the signal to noise relative to cosmic-ray produced neutrons that are relatively isotropic. This technique may be used in large arrays to detect neutrons at ranges up to 0.5 kilometer.

  9. Stabilization of Model Membrane Systems by Disaccharides. Quasielastic Neutron Scattering Experiments and Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxastakis, Emmanouil; Garcia Sakai, Victoria; Ohtake, Satoshi; Maranas, Janna K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2006-03-01

    Trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose, is often used for the stabilization of cell membranes in the absence of water. This work studies the effects of trehalose on model membrane systems as they undergo a melting transition using a combination of experimental methods and atomistic molecular simulations. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments on selectively deuterated samples provide the incoherent dynamic structure over a wide time range. Elastic scans probing the lipid tail dynamics display clear evidence of a main melting transition that is significantly lowered in the presence of trehalose. Lipid headgroup mobility is considerably restricted at high temperatures and directly associated with the dynamics of the sugar in the mixture. Molecular simulations provide a detailed overview of the dynamics and their spatial and time dependence. The combined simulation and experimental methodology offers a unique, molecular view of the physics of systems commonly employed in cryopreservation and lyophilization processes.

  10. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center LANSCE experiment reports 1989 run cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, D.K.; DiStravolo, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains a listing and description of experiments carried on at the LANSCE neutron scattering facility in the following areas: High Density Powder Diffraction; Neutron Powder Diffractometer, (NPD); Single Crystal Diffractometer, (SCD); Low-Q Diffractometer, (LQD); Surface Profile Analysis Reflectometer, (SPEAR); Filter Difference Spectrometer, (FDS); and Constant-Q Spectrometer.

  11. Hot background” of the mobile inelastic neutron scattering system for soil carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The problem of gamma spectrum peaks identification arises when conducting soil carbon (and other elements) analysis using the mobile inelastic neutron scattering (MINS) system. Some gamma spectrum peaks could be associated with radioisotopes appearing due to neutron activation of both the MINS syste...

  12. The structure of fillers, polymers and their interfaces in polymer composites using neutron scattering methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.

    1998-12-01

    The neutron scattering methods, small-angle neutron scattering and neutron reflectometry, provide information on the structure of polymer composite materials that is not available from other structural probes. The unique capabilities of these methods derive from three factors. First, the length scales probed correspond to polymer conformation, molecular and domain scales and to the characteristic sizes of many fillers. Second, neutrons are able to penetrate relatively thick samples, allowing bulk samples to be measured, and enabling buried interfaces to be studied. This characteristic also allows for the construction of special sample containment needed for studying materials under stress, extremes in pressure and temperature, etc. Third, neutrons readily distinguish between different light elements, and between different isotopes of the same element. The ability to distinguish between hydrogen and deuterium is particularly important in this regard. New ways of exploiting the capabilities of neutrons are opening up with the development of improved sources and instruments in the US and elsewhere. In this talk the author will discuss the basic concepts that give rise to the unique capabilities of neutron scattering, giving several examples of the uses of neutron scattering techniques in the study of polymer composites. The examples will include the morphology of fillers, polymer binders and matrices, interfaces and defect structures.

  13. Monte-Carlo simulation of soil carbon measurements by inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring soil carbon is critical for assessing the potential impact of different land management practices on carbon sequestration. The inelastic neutron scattering (INS) of fast neutrons (with energy around 14 MeV) on carbon-12 nuclei produces gamma rays with energy of 4.43 MeV; this gamma flux ca...

  14. 16th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    ScienceCinema

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Achilles, Cherie; Cybulskis, Viktor; Gilbert, Ian

    2016-07-12

    Students talk about their experience at the 16th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering, or NXS 2014. Jointly conducted by Oak Ridge and Argonne national laboratories, NXS immerses graduate students in national user facilities to learn in a hands-on environment how to use neutrons and X-rays in their research.

  15. 16th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Achilles, Cherie; Cybulskis, Viktor; Gilbert, Ian

    2014-07-02

    Students talk about their experience at the 16th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering, or NXS 2014. Jointly conducted by Oak Ridge and Argonne national laboratories, NXS immerses graduate students in national user facilities to learn in a hands-on environment how to use neutrons and X-rays in their research.

  16. On the neutron scattering length density of proteins in H2O/D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, Y. M.; van Well, A. A.; Hanefeld, U.; Wierczinski, B.; Bouwman, W. G.

    2004-07-01

    The structure of the protein layers adsorbed at different interfaces can be determined by using neutron-reflection and small-angle neutron scattering. For highlighting the adsorbed protein layer at the interface, the technique of contrast-variation by changing the H2O/D2O ratio, is often used. For determining the scattering length density, both the protein volume in solution and the total scattering length of the protein is needed. The volume is calculated from the amino-acid sequence. For calculating the scattering length, the H/D exchange of the labile protons of the protein should be taken into account. For monitoring the H/D exchange, Positive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectroscopy was applied. We compare experimental results for the exchange in lysozyme and β-casein with theoretical calculations. The importance of using the correct protein scattering-length density is elucidated by simultaneous model fitting to neutron reflection data at different water contrasts.

  17. "Hot background" of the mobile inelastic neutron scattering system for soil carbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavetskiy, Aleksandr; Yakubova, Galina; Prior, Stephen A; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-01-01

    The problem of gamma spectrum peak identification arises when conducting soil carbon analysis using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. Some spectral peaks could be associated with radioisotopes appearing due to neutron activation of both the measurement system and soil samples. The investigation of "hot background" gamma spectra from the construction materials, whole measurement system, and soil samples over time showed that activation of (28)Al isotope can contribute noticeable additions to the soil neutron stimulated gamma spectra. PMID:26595773

  18. Scattered and (n,2n) neutrons as a measure of areal density in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Murphy, T. J.; Mead, W. C.; Disdier, L.; Houry, M.; Bayer, C.; Bourgade, J.-L.

    2001-10-01

    The fraction of low energy neutrons created from 14 MeV neutrons by elastic scattering and (n,2n) reactions on D and T can measure the areal density ρ r ( radial integral of density) of ICF targets. This may be crucial since for ignition capsules the fraction of reaction-in-flight neutrons is proportional to ρ r T and not simply ρ r^2 In simple situations the fraction of neutrons between 9.4 (the upper energy of T+T neutrons) and 13 MeV (below the Doppler broadened 14.1 MeV peak) is proportional to the ρ r at the time of neutron production. The ratio of neutrons at a specific energy (e.g. 13 MeV) to the their integral over all energies can be measured along different lines of sight. Because scattering is forward peaked, comparing these ratios provides a nearly linear measure of implosion asymmetry. Gamma rays can be a negligible background if the detector is placed inside the target chamber close enough to the target that measurements are made before the 14 MeV neutrons reach the chamber wall. Calculated gamma ray and scattered neutron backgrounds from a cryogenic target support or a diagnostic instrument do not pose a problem. A GaAs detector 2.5m from the target in the NIF chamber appears to have enough sensitivity and sufficiently rapid time response to make this measurement.

  19. Diffraction pattern from thermal neutron incoherent elastic scattering and the holographic reconstruction of the coherent scattering length distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sur, B.; Anghel, V.N.P.; Rogge, R.B.; Katsaras, J.

    2005-01-01

    The diffraction of spherical waves (S waves) interacting with a periodic scattering length distribution produces characteristic intensity patterns known as Kossel and Kikuchi lines (collectively called K lines). The K-line signal can be inverted to give the three-dimensional structure of the coherent scattering length distribution surrounding the source of S waves - a process known as 'Gabor holography' or, simply, 'holography'. This paper outlines a kinematical formulation for the diffraction pattern of monochromatic plane waves scattering from a mixed incoherent and coherent S-wave scattering length distribution. The formulation demonstrates that the diffraction pattern of plane waves incident on a sample with a uniformly random distribution of incoherent scatterers is the same as that from a sample with a single incoherent scatterer per unit cell. In practice, one can therefore reconstruct the holographic data from samples with numerous incoherent S-wave scatterers per unit cell. Thus atomic resolution thermal neutron holography is possible for materials naturally rich in incoherent thermal neutron scatterers, such as hydrogen (e.g., biological and polymeric materials). Additionally, holographic inversions from single-wavelength data have suffered from the so-called conjugate or twin-image problem. The formulation presented for holographic inversion - different from those used previously [e.g., T. Gog et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3132 (1996)] - eliminates the twin-image problem for single-wavelength data.

  20. Diffraction pattern from thermal neutron incoherent elastic scattering and the holographic reconstruction of the coherent scattering length distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, B.; Anghel, V. N. P.; Rogge, R. B.; Katsaras, J.

    2005-01-01

    The diffraction of spherical waves ( S waves) interacting with a periodic scattering length distribution produces characteristic intensity patterns known as Kossel and Kikuchi lines (collectively called K lines). The K -line signal can be inverted to give the three-dimensional structure of the coherent scattering length distribution surrounding the source of S waves—a process known as “Gabor holography” or, simply, “holography.” This paper outlines a kinematical formulation for the diffraction pattern of monochromatic plane waves scattering from a mixed incoherent and coherent S -wave scattering length distribution. The formulation demonstrates that the diffraction pattern of plane waves incident on a sample with a uniformly random distribution of incoherent scatterers is the same as that from a sample with a single incoherent scatterer per unit cell. In practice, one can therefore reconstruct the holographic data from samples with numerous incoherent S -wave scatterers per unit cell. Thus atomic resolution thermal neutron holography is possible for materials naturally rich in incoherent thermal neutron scatterers, such as hydrogen (e.g., biological and polymeric materials). Additionally, holographic inversions from single-wavelength data have suffered from the so-called conjugate or twin-image problem. The formulation presented for holographic inversion—different from those used previously [e.g., T. Gog , Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3132 (1996)]—eliminates the twin-image problem for single-wavelength data.

  1. Neutron Scattering and Dielectric Study on the Structural and Dynamical Peculiar Properties of Poly(vinyl chloride)

    SciTech Connect

    Arbe, A.; Farago, B.; Frick, B.

    2004-04-30

    In this work we have studied the anomalous dynamical behavior of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) searching its origin in the dynamical heterogeneities arising from the structural peculiarities of this polymer. For this purpose we have combined dielectric spectroscopy, coherent and incoherent neutron scattering for the dynamics investigation, and SANS for resolving the heterogeneous structure of PVC. The SANS experiments indicate the existence of structural modulations that persist in the temperature range T < 430 K. We show that a distribution of glass transition temperatures due to these density modulations causes the broadening of the response from the structural relaxation and the anomalous momentum transfer dependence of the incoherent scattering function.

  2. High Field Pulsed Magnets for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granroth, G. E.; Lee, J.; Fogh, E.; Christensen, N. B.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Nojiri, H.

    2015-03-01

    A High Field Pulsed Magnet (HFPM) setup, is in use at the Spallation Nuetron Source(SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. With this device, we recently measured the high field magnetic spin structure of LiNiPO4. The results of this study will be highlighted as an example of possible measurements that can be performed with this device. To further extend the HFPM capabilities at SNS, we have learned to design and wind these coils in house. This contribution will summarize the magnet coil design optimization procedure. Specifically by varying the geometry of the multi-layer coil, we arrive at a design that balances the maximum field strength, neutron scattering angle, and the field homogeneity for a specific set of parameters. We will show that a 6.3kJ capacitor bank, can provide a magnetic field as high as 30T for a maximum scattering angle around 40° with homogeneity of +/- 4 % in a 2mm diameter spherical volume. We will also compare the calculations to measurements from a recently wound test coil. This work was supported in part by the Lab Directors' Research and Development Fund of ORNL.

  3. Design Analyses and Shielding of HFIR Cold Neutron Scattering Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Selby, D.L.; Winn, B.; Stoica, D.; Jones, A.B.; Crow, L.

    2011-07-01

    Research reactor geometries and special characteristics present unique dosimetry analysis and measurement issues. The introduction of a cold neutron moderator and the production of cold neutron beams at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor have created the need for modified methods and devices for analyzing and measuring low energy neutron fields (0.01 to 100 meV). These methods include modifications to an MCNPX version to provide modeling of neutron mirror reflection capability. This code has been used to analyze the HFIR cold neutron beams and to design new instrument equipment that will use the beams. Calculations have been compared with time-of-flight measurements performed at the start of the neutron guides and at the end of one of the guides. The results indicate that we have a good tool for analyzing the transport of these low energy beams through neutron mirror and guide systems for distance up to 60 meters from the reactor. (authors)

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of quasi-elastic scattering and above-barrier neutrons in the neutron lifetime experiment MAMBO I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Fomin, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by the strong disagreement of a recent result for the neutron lifetime with the previous world average value we report results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron lifetime experiment MAMBO I, which was carried out some 20 years ago. In addition to all experimental parameters and procedures known to us, the analysis included quasi-elastic neutron scattering on the surface of liquid fomblin oil wall coatings of the UCN storage vessel, and above-barrier neutrons. The original analysis, leading to the published result of 887.6 ± 3 s, did not take into account these effects. For an exemplary set of model parameters we find a negative correction of 6.0 seconds, which demonstrates that these hitherto neglected effects may be very important also in the analysis of other neutron lifetime experiments using UCN storage vessels with fomblin oil coating close to room temperature.

  5. 2011 U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Jonathan; te Vethuis, Suzanne; Ekkebus, Allen E; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Budai, John D

    2012-01-01

    The 13th annual U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering was held June 11 to 25, 2011, at both Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories. This school brought together 65 early career graduate students from 56 different universities in the US and provided them with a broad introduction to the techniques available at the major large-scale neutron and synchrotron x-ray facilities. This school is focused primarily on techniques relevant to the physical sciences, but also touches on cross-disciplinary bio-related scattering measurements. During the school, students received lectures by over 30 researchers from academia, industry, and national laboratories and participated in a number of short demonstration experiments at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS) and Oak Ridge's Spallation neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) facilities to get hands-on experience in using neutron and synchrotron sources. The first week of this year's school was held at Oak Ridge National Lab, where Lab director Thom Mason welcomed the students and provided a shitorical perspective of the neutron and x-ray facilities both at Oak Ridge and Argonne. The first few days of the school were dedicated to lectures laying out the basics of scattering theory and the differences and complementarity between the neutron and x-ray probes given by Sunil Sinha. Jack Carpenter provided an introduction into how neutrons are generated and detected. After this basic introduction, the students received lectures each morning on specific techniques and conducted demonstration experiments each afternoon on one of 15 different instruments at either the SNS or HFIR. Some of the topics covered during this week of the school included inelastic neutron scattering by Bruce Gaulin, x-ray and neutron reflectivity by Chuck Majkrazak, small-angle scattering by Volker Urban, powder diffraction by Ashfia Huq and diffuse scattering by Gene Ice.

  6. Pulsed Neutron Scattering Studies of Strongly Fluctuating solids, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin Broholm

    2006-06-22

    The conventional description of a solid is based on a static atomic structure with small amplitude so-called harmonic fluctuations about it. This is a final technical report for a project that has explored materials where fluctuations are sufficiently strong to severely challenge this approach and lead to unexpected and potentially useful materials properties. Fluctuations are enhanced when a large number of configurations share the same energy. We used pulsed spallation source neutron scattering to obtain detailed microscopic information about structure and fluctuations in such materials. The results enhance our understanding of strongly fluctuating solids and their potential for technical applications. Because new materials require new experimental techniques, the project has also developed new techniques for probing strongly fluctuating solids. Examples of material that were studied are ZrW2O8 with large amplitude molecular motion that leads to negative thermal expansion, NiGa2S4 where competing interactions lead to an anomalous short range ordered magnet, Pr1- xBixRu2O7 where a partially filled electron shell (Pr) in a weakly disordered environment produces anomalous metallic properties, and TbMnO3 where competing interactions lead to a magneto-electric phase. The experiments on TbMnO3 exemplify the relationship between research funded by this project and future applications. Magneto-electric materials may produce a magnetic field when an electric field is applied or vise versa. Our experiments have clarified the reason why electric and magnetic polarization is coupled in TbMnO3. While this knowledge does not render TbMnO3 useful for applications it will focus the search for a practical room temperature magneto-electric for applications.

  7. Design and use of a 6 meter neutron small-angle scattering spectrometer at KUR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, S.; Takeda, T.; Fujii, H.; Osamura, K.; Mochiki, K.; Hasegawa, K.

    1983-05-01

    A 6 meter neutron small-angle scattering spectrometer has been constructed at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) and has been used successfully in various fields of application. The design principles and the characteristics of the spectrometer are described briefly. Some examples of the scattering measurements are presented.

  8. Neutron Scattering at Highest Magnetic Fields at the Helmholtz Centre Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeibidl, P.; Tennant, A.; Ehmler, H.; Bird, M.

    2010-04-01

    The Helmholtz Centre Berlin (HZB), formerly Hahn-Meitner Institute is a user facility for the study of structure and dynamics with neutrons and synchrotron radiation with special emphasis on experiments under extreme conditions. Neutron scattering is uniquely suited to study magnetic properties on a microscopic length scale, because neutrons have comparable wavelengths and, due to their magnetic moment, they interact with the atomic magnetic moments. At HZB a dedicated instrument for neutron scattering at extreme fields is under construction, the Extreme Environment Diffractometer ExED. It is projected according to the “time-of-flight” principle for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering and for the special geometric constraints of analysing samples in a high field magnet. The new magnet will not only allow for novel experiments, it will be at the forefront of development in magnet technology itself. The design of the magnet will follow the Series Connected Hybrid System Technology (SCH) developed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) in Tallahassee, Florida. To compromise between the needs of the magnet design for highest fields and the concept of the neutron instrument, the magnetic field will be generated by means of a coned solenoid with horizontal field orientation. By using resistive insert coils, which are mounted in the room temperature bore of a superconducting cable-in-conduit (CIC) magnet, fields above 30 Tesla can be obtained in a geometry optimised for the demands of neutron scattering.

  9. Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for fission reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Combs, B.; Crider, B. P.; Downes, L.; Girgis, J.; Kersting, L. J.; Kumar, A.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevz, F. M.; Schniederjan, J.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Watts, D.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear data important for the design and development of the next generation of light-water reactors and future fast reactors include neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections on important structural materials, such as Fe, and on coolant materials, such as Na. These reaction probabilities are needed since neutron reactions impact fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of reactors. While neutron scattering cross sections from these materials are available for certain incident neutron energies, the fast neutron region, particularly above 2 MeV, has large gaps for which no measurements exist, or the existing uncertainties are large. Measurements have been made at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory to measure neutron scattering cross sections on both Fe and Na in the region where these gaps occur and to reduce the uncertainties on scattering from the ground state and first excited state of these nuclei. Results from measurements on Fe at incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV will be presented and comparisons will be made to model calculations available from data evaluators.

  10. Neutron scattering studies of the dynamics of biopolymer-water systems using pulsed-source spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, H.D.; Miller, A.

    1994-12-31

    Energy-resolving neutron scattering techniques provide spatiotemporal data suitable for testing and refining analytical models or computer simulations of a variety of dynamical processes in biomolecular systems. This paper reviews experimental work on hydrated biopolymers at ISIS, the UK Pulsed Neutron Facility. Following an outline of basic concepts and a summary of the new instrumental capabilities, the progress made is illustrated by results from recent experiments in two areas: quasi- elastic scattering from highly hydrated polysaccharide gels (agarose and hyaluronate), and inelastic scattering from vibrational modes of slightly hydrated collagen fibers.

  11. Effect of stretching on the sub- Tg phenylene-ring dynamics of polycarbonate by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrese-Igor, Silvia; Mitxelena, Olatz; Arbe, Arantxa; Alegría, Angel; Colmenero, Juan; Frick, Bernhard

    2008-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of cold drawing on the motion of phenylene rings in bisphenol-A polycarbonate by neutron scattering. The intensity scattered by isotropic and stretched polycarbonate is different, the quasielastic broadening being larger for the isotropic sample. This difference can be well accounted for by considering that preferentially oriented rings in the stretched polymer have their motion sterically hindered. The extent of the effect of stretching on the phenylene-ring motion obtained from this neutron-scattering investigation is in good agreement with that obtained when studying the effect of cold drawing on the γ relaxation by dielectric spectroscopy.

  12. Investigation of condensed matter by means of elastic thermal-neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abov, Yu. G.; Dzheparov, F. S.; Elyutin, N. O.; Lvov, D. V.; Tyulyusov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    The application of elastic thermal-neutron scattering in investigations of condensed matter that were performed at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics is described. An account of diffraction studies with weakly absorbing crystals, including studies of the anomalous-absorption effect and coherent effects in diffuse scattering, is given. Particular attention is given to exposing the method of multiple small-angle neutron scattering (MSANS). It is shown how information about matter inhomogeneities can be obtained by this method on the basis of Molière's theory. Prospects of the development of this method are outlined, and MSANS theory is formulated for a high concentration of matter inhomogeneities.

  13. Magnetic scattering in the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering and Bragg edge transmission from steel1

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Yojiro; Morooka, Satoshi; Ohishi, Kazuki; Sato, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Rintaro; Adachi, Nozomu; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Gilbert, Elliot Paul; Sugiyama, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed neutron sources enable the simultaneous measurement of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and Bragg edge transmission. This simultaneous measurement is useful for microstructural characterization in steel. Since most steels are ferromagnetic, magnetic scattering contributions should be considered in both SANS and Bragg edge transmission analyses. An expression for the magnetic scattering contribution to Bragg edge transmission analysis has been derived. The analysis using this expression was applied to Cu steel. The ferrite crystallite size estimated from this Bragg edge transmission analysis with the magnetic scattering contribution was larger than that estimated using conventional expressions. This result indicates that magnetic scattering has to be taken into account for quantitative Bragg edge transmission analysis. In the SANS analysis, the ratio of magnetic to nuclear scattering contributions revealed that the precipitates consist of body-centered cubic Cu0.7Fe0.3 and pure Cu, which probably has 9R structure including elastic strain and vacancies. These results show that effective use of the magnetic scattering contribution allows detailed analyses of steel microstructure. PMID:27738416

  14. Neutron scattering studies of non-Fermi liquid behavior in Ce compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-G.; Adroja, D. T.; McEwen, K. A.; Murani, A. P.; So, J.-Y.; Beirne, E.; Echizen, Y.; Takabatake, T.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the inelastic neutron scattering from two Ce heavy fermion compounds, Ce(Ni0.935Cu0.065)Sn and Ce(Rh0.8Pd0.2)Sb, that are located at the magnetic-non-magnetic boundary. We find that the magnetic scattering follows a power law scaling behavior, and that the dynamical susceptibility, as deduced from the magnetic scattering, shows E/T scaling behavior with significantly different exponents for the two systems.

  15. A Clean Measurement of the Neutron Skin of 208Pb Through Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Riad Suleiman

    2003-07-01

    The difference between the neutron radius Rn of a heavy nucleus and the proton radius Rp is believed to be on the order of several percent. This qualitative feature of nuclei, which is essentially a neutron skin, has proven to be elusive to pin down experimentally in a rigorous fashion. A new Jefferson Lab experiment will measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. Since the Z-boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a measure of the size of Rn that can be interpreted with as much confidence as the traditional electron scattering data. The projected experimental precision corresponds to a 1% determination of Rn, which will have a big impact on nuclear theory and its application to neutron rich matter such as neutron stars.

  16. Self-dynamics of hydrogen gas as probed by means of inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarini, Eleonora; Orecchini, Andrea; Formisano, Ferdinando; Demmel, Franz; Petrillo, Caterina; Sacchetti, Francesco; Bafile, Ubaldo; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2005-12-01

    The neutron double-differential cross-section of molecular hydrogen at low density has been measured at two rather low scattering angles and different final neutron energies by means of three-axis spectrometry. This first inelastic scattering determination of the single-particle roto-translational dynamics of room temperature H2 allows for a detailed test of the theoretical modelling of the spectral line-shapes of such a fundamental molecule, performed by referring both to a careful quantum-mechanical treatment and to a simpler semi-classical approximation. A comprehensive report on the neutron measurements and data analysis is presented, along with an overview of the theories used for comparison with the experimental results. An encouraging picture of the present capabilities in the calculation of the true dynamic response of hydrogen gas to slow and thermal neutrons is obtained, opening new perspectives for accurate data calibration in inelastic neutron spectroscopy, with special relevance for small-angle experiments.

  17. Study of neutron scattering contribution on Hp(10) and H*(10) calibration in the Brazilian National Low Scattering Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Freitas, B M; Pereira, W W; Patrão, K C S; Fonseca, E S; Mauricio, C L P

    2014-10-01

    The neutron scattering at the Low Scattering Laboratory of the Brazilian National Neutron Laboratory has been studied using three different methods. The measurements have been done with a traceable standard (241)Am-Be from source-to-detector distances of 0.52-3.00 m. The obtained results with the variation distance methods are in agreement. Measurements with a large shadow cone are not worth for larger distances due to overshadowing. As the quantity required in a calibration is the response of the device being calibrated to the scattered neutron component in order to subtract this from the total response, for these purposes, the distance variation method must be used for each device. To quantify absolutely the scattering contribution on the quantity rates of fluence, Hp(10) and H*(10) in irradiation procedures, a Bonner sphere spectrometer with the shadow cone was employed. The evaluated scattering correction factor value may be employed for a distance of 1.00 m. PMID:24984874

  18. Probing the conformation of FhaC with small-angle neutron scattering and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Frank; Lensink, Marc F; Clantin, Bernard; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise; Villeret, Vincent; Ebel, Christine

    2014-07-01

    Probing the solution structure of membrane proteins represents a formidable challenge, particularly when using small-angle scattering. Detergent molecules often present residual scattering contributions even at their match point in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. Here, we studied the conformation of FhaC, the outer-membrane, β-barrel transporter of the Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin adhesin. SANS measurements were performed on homogeneous solutions of FhaC solubilized in n-octyl-d17-βD-glucoside and on a variant devoid of the α helix H1, which critically obstructs the FhaC pore, in two solvent conditions corresponding to the match points of the protein and the detergent, respectively. Protein-bound detergent amounted to 142 ± 10 mol/mol as determined by analytical ultracentrifugation. By using molecular modeling and starting from three distinct conformations of FhaC and its variant embedded in lipid bilayers, we generated ensembles of protein-detergent arrangement models with 120-160 detergent molecules. The scattered curves were back-calculated for each model and compared with experimental data. Good fits were obtained for relatively compact, connected detergent belts, which occasionally displayed small detergent-free patches on the outer surface of the β barrel. The combination of SANS and modeling clearly enabled us to infer the solution structure of FhaC, with H1 inside the pore as in the crystal structure. We believe that our strategy of combining explicit atomic detergent modeling with SANS measurements has significant potential for structural studies of other detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. PMID:24988353

  19. Probing the Conformation of FhaC with Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Frank; Lensink, Marc F.; Clantin, Bernard; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise; Villeret, Vincent; Ebel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Probing the solution structure of membrane proteins represents a formidable challenge, particularly when using small-angle scattering. Detergent molecules often present residual scattering contributions even at their match point in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. Here, we studied the conformation of FhaC, the outer-membrane, β-barrel transporter of the Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin adhesin. SANS measurements were performed on homogeneous solutions of FhaC solubilized in n-octyl-d17-βD-glucoside and on a variant devoid of the α helix H1, which critically obstructs the FhaC pore, in two solvent conditions corresponding to the match points of the protein and the detergent, respectively. Protein-bound detergent amounted to 142 ± 10 mol/mol as determined by analytical ultracentrifugation. By using molecular modeling and starting from three distinct conformations of FhaC and its variant embedded in lipid bilayers, we generated ensembles of protein-detergent arrangement models with 120–160 detergent molecules. The scattered curves were back-calculated for each model and compared with experimental data. Good fits were obtained for relatively compact, connected detergent belts, which occasionally displayed small detergent-free patches on the outer surface of the β barrel. The combination of SANS and modeling clearly enabled us to infer the solution structure of FhaC, with H1 inside the pore as in the crystal structure. We believe that our strategy of combining explicit atomic detergent modeling with SANS measurements has significant potential for structural studies of other detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. PMID:24988353

  20. Scattering length measurements from radiative pion capture and neutron-deuteron breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.; Tornow, W. |; Carman, T.S.

    1997-07-01

    The neutron-neutron and neutron-proton {sup 1}S{sub 0} scattering lengths a{sub nn} and a{sub np}, respectively, were determined simultaneously from the neutron-deuteron breakup reaction. Their comparison with the recommended values obtained from two body reactions gives a measure of the importance of three-nucleon force effects in the three-nucleon continuum. In order to check on the result obtained for a{sub nn} from the two-body {pi}{sup {minus}}-d capture reaction, a new measurement was performed at LANL. Preliminary results of the three experiments are given.

  1. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity-Violation in Electron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Abrahamyan, Sergey; Albataineh, Hisham; Aniol, Konrad; Armstrong, David; Armstrong, Whitney; Averett, Todd; Babineau, Benjamin; Barbieri, A.; Bellini, Vincenzo; Beminiwattha, Rakitha; et al

    2012-03-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry APV in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. APV is sensitive to the radius of the neutron distribution (Rn). The result APV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (syst) corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions Rn-Rp = 0.33-0.18+0.16 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin which is expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus.

  2. Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy (ESS): an Instrument-Concept for Dynamics of Complex (Bio-) Systems From Elastic Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, Antonio; Kearley, Gordon J.

    2016-01-01

    A new type of neutron-scattering spectroscopy is presented that is designed specifically to measure dynamics in bio-systems that are difficult to obtain in any other way. The temporal information is largely model-free and is analogous to relaxation processes measured with dielectric spectroscopy, but provides additional spacial and geometric aspects of the underlying dynamics. Numerical simulations of the basic instrument design show the neutron beam can be highly focussed, giving efficiency gains that enable the use of small samples. Although we concentrate on continuous neutron sources, the extension to pulsed neutron sources is proposed, both requiring minimal data-treatment and being broadly analogous with dielectric spectroscopy, they will open the study of dynamics to new areas of biophysics. PMID:27703184

  3. Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy (ESS): an Instrument-Concept for Dynamics of Complex (Bio-) Systems From Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Kearley, Gordon J.

    2016-10-01

    A new type of neutron-scattering spectroscopy is presented that is designed specifically to measure dynamics in bio-systems that are difficult to obtain in any other way. The temporal information is largely model-free and is analogous to relaxation processes measured with dielectric spectroscopy, but provides additional spacial and geometric aspects of the underlying dynamics. Numerical simulations of the basic instrument design show the neutron beam can be highly focussed, giving efficiency gains that enable the use of small samples. Although we concentrate on continuous neutron sources, the extension to pulsed neutron sources is proposed, both requiring minimal data-treatment and being broadly analogous with dielectric spectroscopy, they will open the study of dynamics to new areas of biophysics.

  4. Localized translational motions in semicrystalline poly(ethylene terephthalate) studied by incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Alejandro; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; García-Gutiérrez, Mari Cruz; Puente-Orench, Inés; Campo, Javier; Nogales, Aurora

    2013-03-01

    One of the simplest ways to confine polymeric materials is by self-assembling during the crystallization process. The remaining amorphous phase is then constrained by the lamellar crystals. In this manuscript, we aim to shed additional light in the understanding of the amorphous chains dynamics of semicrystalline polymers above the Tg by using incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering QENS in a nanoscopic time scale (10(-9)-10(-10)s) on poly(ethylene terephthalate). The observed dynamics is satisfactorily described by a theoretical model that considers that the proton mobility follows a random jump-diffusion in a restricted environment. We demonstrate that the combination of macroscopic with nanoscopic dynamic tools allows a complete description of the confined dynamics on a paradigmatic semicrystalline polymer like poly(ethylene terephthalate).

  5. Structure of nanocrystalline palladium and copper studied by small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R.; Barker, J.G.

    1996-12-01

    The structure of nanocrystalline palladium and copper, made by inert gas condensation and compaction, was studied using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of annealing and warm compaction were also examined with these techniques. The SANS results were interpreted using a maximum entropy routine, combined with knowledge of the Archimedes density and hydrogen concentration determined by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). Similar hydrogen concentrations were detected by SANS and PGAA. This hydrogen content, which was approximately 5 at.{percent} in samples compacted at room temperature, was reduced by both annealing and warm compaction. Defects in several size classes were observed, including missing grain pores ({approx_equal}1{endash}50 nm diameter) and defects of micrometer size. Warm compaction produced a lower number density of pores in nanocrystalline palladium, which led to increased density. The observed structure was correlated with Vickers microhardness and fracture surface morphology. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  6. Refined model of the {Fe9} magnetic molecule from low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, Larry; Demmel, Franz; Luban, Marshall; Timco, Grigore A; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E

    2014-06-01

    We present a refined model of the {Fe9} tridiminished icosahedron magnetic molecule system. This molecule was originally modeled as being composed of two ({Fe3} and {Fe6}) clusters, with the Fe3+ ions within each cluster being coupled via exchange interactions, but with no coupling between the clusters. The present inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements were used to probe the low-lying energy spectrum of {Fe9}, and these results demonstrate that the previously published model of two uncoupled clusters is incomplete. To achieve agreement between the experiment and theory, we have augmented the model with relatively small exchange coupling between the clusters. A combination of Lanczos matrix diagonalization and quantum Monte Carlo simulations have been used to achieve good agreement between the experimental data and the improved model of the full {Fe9} system despite the complexity of this model (with Hilbert space dimension >107).

  7. Relationship between solution structure and phase behavior: a neutron scattering study of concentrated aqueous hexamethylenetetramine solutions.

    PubMed

    Burton, R C; Ferrari, E S; Davey, R J; Finney, J L; Bowron, D T

    2009-04-30

    The water-hexamethylenetetramine system displays features of significant interest in the context of phase equilibria in molecular materials. First, it is possible to crystallize two solid phases depending on temperature, both hexahydrate and anhydrous forms. Second, saturated aqueous solutions in equilibrium with these forms exhibit a negative dependence of solubility (retrograde) on temperature. In this contribution, neutron scattering experiments (with isotopic substitution) of concentrated aqueous hexamethylenetetramine solutions combined with empirical potential structure refinement (EPSR) were used to investigate the time-averaged atomistic details of this system. Through the derivation of radial distribution functions, quantitative details emerge of the solution coordination, its relationship to the nature of the solid phases, and of the underlying cause of the solubility behavior of this molecule.

  8. Development of Grazing Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.; Khaykovich, B.; Liu, D.; Ramsey, B. D.; Zavlin, V. E.; Kilaru, K.; Romaine, S.; Rosati, R. E.; Bruni, R.; Moncton, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Because of their wave nature, thermal and cold neutrons can be reflected from smooth surfaces at grazing incidence angles, be reflected by multilayer coatings or be refracted at boundaries of different materials. The optical properties of materials are characterized by their refractive indices which are slightly less than unity for most elements and their isotopes in the case of cold and thermal neutrons as well as for x-rays. The motivation for the optics use for neutrons as well as for x-rays is to increase the signal rate and, by virtue of the optic's angular resolution, to improve the signal-to-noise level by reducing the background so the efficiency of the existing neutron sources use can be significantly enhanced. Both refractive and reflective optical techniques developed for x-ray applications can be applied to focus neutron beams. Typically neutron sources have lower brilliance compared to conventional x-ray sources so in order to increase the beam throughput the neutron optics has to be capable of capturing large solid angles. Because of this, the replicated optics techniques developed for x-ray astronomy applications would be a perfect match for neutron applications, so the electroformed nickel optics under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) can be applied to focus neutron beams. In this technique, nickel mirror shells are electroformed onto a figured and superpolished nickel-plated aluminum cylindrical mandrel from which they are later released by differential thermal contraction. Cylindrical mirrors with different diameters, but the same focal length, can be nested together to increase the system throughput. The throughput can be increased further with the use of the multilayer coatings deposited on the reflectivr surface of the mirror shells. While the electroformed nickel replication technique needs to be adopted for neutron focusing, the technology to coat the inside of cylindrical mirrors with neutron multilayers has to be

  9. Characterization of polybutadiene-poly(ethyleneoxide) aggregates in aqueous solution: A light-scattering and small-angle neutron-scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Fuetterer, Tobias; Nordskog, Anette; Hellweg, Thomas; Findenegg, Gerhard H.; Foerster, Stephan; Dewhurst, Charles D.

    2004-10-01

    For diblockcopolymers of polybutadiene-poly(ethyleneoxide) (PB-PEO) type, water is a selective solvent. In dependence of the length of both blocks and the block length ratio, these polymers form a multitude of self-assembled structures in solution. In the present work scattering methods are used to investigate the water-soluble polymer PB{sub 125}-PEO{sub 155}. It is found to form long rodlike micelles, which are characterized with respect to the aggregate length L, the cross sectional radius R{sub CS}, the radial scattering length density profile {sigma}(r), and the radial aggregation number N{sub rad}. Model-independent as well as model-based approaches are used for the scattering data analysis. From dynamic light scattering (DLS) and static light scattering (SLS) experiments the weight averaged length L{sub w} of these stiff elongated aggregates is determined to L{sub w}=350 nm. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) reveals a cross sectional radius of R{sub CS}=17 nm and in combination with results from the SLS the radial aggregation number is found to be N{sub rad}=70.

  10. A method for moisture measurement in porous media based on epithermal neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2015-11-01

    A method for moisture measurement in porous media was proposed. A wide beam of epithermal neutrons was obtained from a Pu-Be neutron source immersed in a cylinder made of paraffin wax. (3)He detectors (four or six) arranged in the backward direction of the incident beam were used to record scattered neutrons from investigated samples. Experiments of water absorption into clay and silicate bricks, and a sand column were investigated by neutron scattering. While the samples were absorbing water, scattered neutrons were recorded from fixed positions along the water flow direction. It was observed that, at these positions scattered neutrons increase as the water uptake increases. Obtained results are discussed in terms of the theory of macroscopic flow in porous media. It was shown that, the water absorption processes were Fickian and non Fickian in the sand column and brick samples, respectively. The advantages of applying the proposed method to study fast as well as slow flow processes in porous media are discussed. PMID:26298060

  11. A method for moisture measurement in porous media based on epithermal neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2015-11-01

    A method for moisture measurement in porous media was proposed. A wide beam of epithermal neutrons was obtained from a Pu-Be neutron source immersed in a cylinder made of paraffin wax. (3)He detectors (four or six) arranged in the backward direction of the incident beam were used to record scattered neutrons from investigated samples. Experiments of water absorption into clay and silicate bricks, and a sand column were investigated by neutron scattering. While the samples were absorbing water, scattered neutrons were recorded from fixed positions along the water flow direction. It was observed that, at these positions scattered neutrons increase as the water uptake increases. Obtained results are discussed in terms of the theory of macroscopic flow in porous media. It was shown that, the water absorption processes were Fickian and non Fickian in the sand column and brick samples, respectively. The advantages of applying the proposed method to study fast as well as slow flow processes in porous media are discussed.

  12. STUDY MAGNETIC EXCITATIONS IN DOPED TRANSITION METAL OXIDES USING INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Pengcheng

    2014-02-18

    Understanding the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity continues to be a “hot” topic in modern condensed matter physics. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in iron-based materials in 2008 provided an unique opportunity to compare and contrast these materials with traditional high-Tc copper oxide superconductors. Neutron scattering plays an important role in determining the dynamical spin properties in these materials. This proposal is a continuation of previous DOE supported proposal. This report summarizes the final progress we have made over from May 2005 till Aug. 2013. Overall, we continue to carry out extensive neutron scattering experiments on Fe-based materials, focusing on understanding their magnetic properties. In addition, we have established a materials laboratory at UT that has allowed us to grow these superconductors. Because neutron scattering typically demands a large amount of samples, by growing these materials in our own laboratory, we can now pursuit neutron scattering experiments over the entire electronic phase diagram, focusing on regions of interests. The material synthesis laboratory at UT was established entirely with the support of DOE funding. This not only allowed us to carry out neutron scattering experiments, but also permit us to provide samples to other US/International collaborators for studying these materials.

  13. N-SAP and G-SAP neutron and gamma ray albedo model scatter shield analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapovchak, B. J.; Stephenson, L. D.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates neutron or gamma ray first order scattering from a plane or cylindrical surface to a detector point. The SAP Codes, G-SAP and N-SAP, constitute a multiple scatter albedo model shield analysis.

  14. Muon capture on the deuteron and the neutron-neutron scattering length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcucci, L. E.; Machleidt, R.

    2014-11-01

    Background: We consider the muon capture reaction μ-+2H→νμ+n +n , which presents a "clean" two-neutron (n n ) system in the final state. We study here its capture rate in the doublet hyperfine initial state (ΓD). The total capture rate for the muon capture μ-+3He→νμ+3H (Γ0) is also analyzed, although, in this case, the n n system is not so clean anymore. Purpose: We investigate whether ΓD (and Γ0) could be sensitive to the n n S -wave scattering length (an n), and we check on the possibility to extract an n from an accurate measurement of ΓD. Method: The muon capture reactions are studied with nuclear potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived within chiral effective field theory. The next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order chiral potential with cutoff parameter Λ =500 MeV is used, but the low-energy constant (LEC) determining an n is varied so as to obtain an n=-18.95 ,-16.0 ,-22.0 , and +18.22 fm. The first value is the present empirical one, while the last one is chosen such as to lead to a di-neutron bound system with a binding energy of 139 keV. The LEC's cD and cE, present in the three-nucleon potential and axial-vector current (cD), are constrained to reproduce the A =3 binding energies and the triton Gamow-Teller matrix element. Results: The capture rate ΓD is found to be 399 (3 ) s-1 for an n=-18.95 and -16.0 fm; and 400 (3 ) s-1 for an n=-22.0 fm. However, in the case of an n=+18.22 fm, the result of 275 (3 ) s-1 [ 135 (3 ) s-1 ] is obtained, when the di-neutron system in the final state is unbound (bound). The total capture rate Γ0 for muon capture on 3He is found to be 1494(15), 1491(16), 1488(18), and 1475(16) s-1 for an n=-18.95 ,-16.0 ,-22.0 , and +18.22 fm, respectively. All the theoretical uncertainties are due to the fitting procedure and radiative corrections. Conclusions: Our results seem to exclude the possibility of constraining a negative an n with an uncertainty of less than ˜±3 fm through an accurate

  15. Elastic and Inelastic Neutron Scattering with a C7LYC Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. L.; Brown, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Doucet, E.; Lister, C. J.; D'Olympia, N.; Devlin, M.; Mosby, S.

    2015-10-01

    A scintillator array of 16 1'' ×1'' Cs2LiYCl6 (CLYC) detectors has been commissioned for low energy nuclear science. Standard CLYC crystals detect both gamma rays and neutrons rays with excellent pulse shape discrimination, with thermal neutrons detected via the 6Li(n, α)t reaction. Our discovery of spectroscopy-grade response of CLYC for fast neutrons via the 35Cl(n,p) reaction, with a pulse height resolution of under 10 % in the < 8 MeV range, led to our present array of 7Li enriched C7LYC detectors, where the large thermal neutron response is essentially eliminated. While the intrinsic efficiency of C7LYC for fast neutron detection is low, the array can be placed near the target since a long TOF arm is no longer needed for neutron energy measurement, thus recovering efficiency through increased solid angle coverage. The array was recently deployed at Los Alamos to test its capability in measuring differential scattering cross sections as a function of energy for 56Fe and 238U. The incident energy from a white neutron source was measured via TOF, and the scattered neutron energy via the pulse height. Techniques, analysis and first results will be discussed. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance Program under Grant DE-NA00013008.

  16. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  17. Aggregation in concentrated protein solutions: Insights from rheology, neutron scattering and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica

    Aggregation of therapeutic proteins is currently one of the major challenges in the bio-pharmaceutical industry, because aggregates could induce immunogenic responses and compromise the quality of the product. Current scientific efforts, both in industry and academia, are focused on developing rational approaches to screen different drug candidates and predict their stability under different conditions. Moreover, aggregation is promoted in highly concentrated protein solutions, which are typically required for subcutaneous injection. In order to gain further understanding about the mechanisms that lead to aggregation, an approach that combined rheology, neutron scattering, and molecular simulations was undertaken. Two model systems were studied in this work: Bovine Serum Albumin in surfactant-free Phosphate Buffered Saline at pH = 7.4 at concentrations from 11 mg/mL up to ˜519 mg/mL, and a monoclonal antibody in 20 mM Histidine/Histidine Hydrochloride at pH = 6.0 with 60 mg/mL trehalose and 0.2 mg/mL polysorbate-80 at concentrations from 53 mg/mL up to ˜220 mg/mL. The antibody used here has three mutations in the CH2 domain, which result in lower stability upon incubation at 40 °C with respect to the wild-type protein, based on size-exclusion chromatography assays. This temperature is below 49 °C, where unfolding of the least stable, CH2 domain occurs, according to differential scanning calorimetry. This dissertation focuses on identifying the role of aggregation on the viscosity of protein solutions. The protein solutions of this work show an increase in the low shear viscosity in the absence of surfactants, because proteins adsorb at the air/water interface forming a viscoelastic film that affects the measured rheology. Stable surfactant-laden protein solutions behave as simple Newtonian fluids. However, the surfactant-laden antibody solution also shows an increase in the low shear viscosity from bulk aggregation, after prolonged incubation at 40 °C. Small

  18. Experimental methods in the study of neutron scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Dragolici, Cristian A.

    2014-11-24

    Small angle scattering (SAS) is the collective name given to the techniques of small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering. They offer the possibility to analyze particles without disturbing their natural environment. In each of these techniques radiation is elastically scattered by a sample and the resulting scattering pattern is analyzed to provide information about the size, shape and orientation of some component of the sample. Accordingly, a large number of methods and experimental patterns have been developed to ease the investigation of condensed matter by use of these techniques. Some of them are the discussed in this paper.

  19. Motional heterogeneity in human acetylcholinesterase revealed by a non-Gaussian model for elastic incoherent neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Judith; Kneller, Gerald R.

    2013-10-01

    We study the dynamical transition of human acetylcholinesterase by analyzing elastic neutron scattering data with a simulation gauged analytical model that goes beyond the standard Gaussian approximation for the elastic incoherent structure factor [G. R. Kneller and K. Hinsen, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 045104 (2009)]. The model exploits the whole available momentum transfer range in the experimental data and yields not only a neutron-weighted average of the atomic mean square position fluctuations, but also an estimation for their distribution. Applied to the neutron scattering data from human acetylcholinesterase, it reveals a strong increase of the motional heterogeneity at the two transition temperatures T = 150 K and T = 220 K, respectively, which can be located with less ambiguity than with the Gaussian model. We find that the first transition is essentially characterized by a change in the form of the elastic scattering profile and the second by a homogeneous increase of all motional amplitudes. These results are in agreement with previous combined experimental and simulation studies of protein dynamics, which attribute the first transition to an onset of methyl rotations and the second to more unspecific diffusion processes involving large amplitude motions.

  20. Design of Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering (KIST-USANS) at HANARO Cold Neutron Guide, CG4B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Man-Ho

    2013-03-01

    The ultra small angle neutron scattering instrument can measure the lower limit of scattering vector to near Q ~ 2.0x10-5 Å-1 while the upper limit can reach to an intermediate scattering vector Q ~ 10-2 Å-1 of a typical small angle neutron scattering (SANS) depending on the contrast of sample. USANS is useful when measuring objects that are micron to submicron in size while SANS is useful when measuring objects that are micron to nano in size. When both USANS and SANS were used together, we could measure sizes from micron to nano scale, which is useful when studying the hierarchical structures in the wide scale of Q and total cross-section, d Σ/d Ω(Q). Recently, KIST has developed the USANS (so called KIST-USANS) at HANARO cold neutron guide hall of KAERI. We will present the instrument design, performance, future plan, and some examples of measurements that cover approximately 11 orders of magnitude in the d Σ/d Ω(Q) and 4 orders in the Q. This work was partially supported by the KIST (2v02632) and the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MEST) (No. 2012M2B2A4030220)

  1. Modeling plasmonic scattering combined with thin-film optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Klenk, R.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch; Topič, M.; Krč, J.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmonic scattering from metal nanostructures presents a promising concept for improving the conversion efficiency of solar cells. The determination of optimal nanostructures and their position within the solar cell is crucial to boost the efficiency. Therefore we established a one-dimensional optical model combining plasmonic scattering and thin-film optics to simulate optical properties of thin-film solar cells including metal nanoparticles. Scattering models based on dipole oscillations and Mie theory are presented and their integration in thin-film semi-coherent optical descriptions is explained. A plasmonic layer is introduced in the thin-film structure to simulate scattering properties as well as parasitic absorption in the metal nanoparticles. A proof of modeling concept is given for the case of metal-island grown silver nanoparticles on glass and ZnO:Al/glass substrates. Using simulations a promising application of the nanoparticle integration is shown for the case of CuGaSe2 solar cells.

  2. Parity violation in neutron deuteron scattering in pionless effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared J.

    In this dissertation the parity violating neutron deuteron scattering amplitudes are calculated using pionless effective field theory to leading order. The five low energy parity violating constants present in pionless effective field theory are estimated by matching onto the ``best" values for the parameters of the model by Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH). Using these estimates and the calculated amplitudes, predictions for the spin rotation of a neutron through a deuteron target are given with a value of 1.8 × 10-8 rad cm-1. Also given are the longitudinal analyzing power in neutron deuteron scattering with a polarized neutron yielding 2.2 × 10-8, and a polarized deuteron giving 4.0 × 10-8. These observables are discussed in the broader context of hadronic parity violation and as possible future experiments to determine the values of the five low energy parity violating constant present in pionless effective theory.

  3. In vivo deuteration strategies for neutron scattering analysis of bacterial polyhydroxyoctanoate.

    PubMed

    Russell, Robert A; Holden, Peter J; Wilde, Karyn L; Garvey, Christopher J; Hammerton, Kerie M; Foster, L John R

    2008-06-01

    The cultivation of microorganisms on deuterated substrates has allowed us to control deuterium incorporation into biopolymer systems which is important for characterisation using neutron scattering techniques. Bacterial polyhydroxyoctanoate (PHO) is a polyester formed within inclusions inside bacterial cells and was deuterated in vivo under various conditions to characterise the formation of these inclusions by neutron scattering. Manipulation of deuterated media during microbial growth and PHO production phases resulted in polymer with partial or complete substitution of hydrogen by deuterium, as shown by gas chromatography. Sequential feeding of hydrogenated and deuterated forms of the same precursor was used to demonstrate that neutron scattering analysis could be used to differentiate between chemically similar phases in these polymer inclusions. PMID:18481053

  4. Neutron Compton scattering as a molecular characterization technique: A study on NaHF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Colognesi, D.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.

    2007-11-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments were performed at intermediate and high momentum transfers, up to 85-90 A ring {sup -1}, to study the proton momentum distribution in polycrystalline sodium hydrogen fluoride (NaHF{sub 2}) at low temperature (below 5 K). The H mean kinetic energy was extracted and compared to the results from hydrogen-projected density of phonon states derived from intermediate momentum transfer inelastic neutron scattering and lattice dynamics simulations. A reasonable agreement between the two figures was found. In addition, relevant aspects of high momentum transfer neutron scattering from NaHF{sub 2} were explored in detail, ranging from an alternative evaluation of final state effects to the role played by the instrumental resolution and to the possibility to reconstruct the potential felt by a proton from its momentum distribution.

  5. Proton dynamics in oxides: insight into the mechanics of proton conduction from quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Maths

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with the use of quasielastic neutron scattering as a technique for investigation of the dynamical properties of proton conducting oxides. Currently, the main interest in these materials comes from their promise as electrolytes in future electrochemical devices and particularly through their use as electrolytes in next-generation, intermediate-temperature, fuel cells. However, the realization of such devices depends critically on the development of new, more highly proton conducting oxides. Such a development depends on increasing the current understanding of proton conduction in oxides and for this purpose quasielastic neutron scattering is an important mean. The aim of this article is to introduce the non-specialist reader to the basic principles of quasielastic neutron scattering, its advantages and disadvantages, to summarize the work that has been done on proton conducting oxides using this technique, as well as to discuss future opportunities within this field of research.

  6. Theory for Neutron Scattering from Polymers in Tubes: Lozenges, Dangling Ends and Retraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D. J.; McLeish, T. C. B.

    1997-03-01

    We present a consistent explanation for the 'lozenge' shapes in contour plots of the two-dimensional neutron scattering intensity from stretched polymer networks. By explicitly averaging over quenched variables in a tube model, we show that lozenge patterns arise as a result of chain material that is not directly deformed by the stretch. We also present a complete theory for the calculation of neutron scattering functions in the following experimental situation: a melt of partially deuterated block copolymers is stretched and sufficient time allowed for the polymers to retract along their tubes but for no further relaxation processes to occur before quenching below the glass transition temperature. The theory is necessary for the modelling of neutron scattering experiments which test the retraction theory for strongly stretched melts. We expect to be able to comment on the success of the theory for one such experiment.

  7. Determination of hydrogen in niobium by cold neutron prompt gamma ray activation analysis and neutron incoherent scattering

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Paul; H.H. Cheu-Maya; G.R. Myneni

    2002-11-01

    The presence of trace amounts of hydrogen in niobium is believed to have a detrimental effect on the mechanical and superconducting properties. Unfortunately, few techniques are capable of measuring hydrogen at these levels. We have developed two techniques for measuring hydrogen in materials. Cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) has proven useful for the determination of hydrogen and other elements in a wide variety of materials. Neutron incoherent scattering (NIS), a complementary tool to PGAA, has been used to measure trace hydrogen in titanium. Both techniques were used to study the effects of vacuum heating and chemical polishing on the hydrogen content of superconducting niobium.

  8. In situ determination of soil carbon pool by inelastic neutron scattering: Comparison with dry combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Mitra, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Lal, R.

    2011-01-01

    There is a well-documented need for new in situ technologies for elemental analysis of soil, particularly for carbon (C), that overcome the limitations of the currently established chemical method by dry combustion (DC). In this work, we evaluated the concordance between the new INS (inelastic neutron scattering) technology and the DC method. The comparisons were carried out in the high C content (30-40%) organic soils of Willard, Ohio (4 sites), in natural forest in Willard, Ohio (1 site), and in a watershed pasture, with an {approx} 10{sup o} slope, in Coshocton, Ohio (5 sites). In addition to these stationary measurements, the organic soil and the pasture were continuously scanned with the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system to obtain the transects mean C value. Both types of measurements, INS and DC, registered a decline in the surface density of C along transects in the watershed and in the organic soil. Similarly, both recorded a drop in C in the organic soil of about 0.16%. In the pastureland, declines in C levels of 0.08% and 0.10% were observed, respectively, by DC and INS. Combining the results from the three sites yielded a very satisfactory correlation between the INS- and DC-responses, with a regression coefficient, r{sup 2}, value of about 0.99. This suggests the possibility of establishing a universal regression line for various soil types. In addition, we demonstrated the ability of INS to measure the mean value over transect. In organic soil the mean value of an INS scan agreed, {approx} 0.5%, with the mean values of the DC analysis, whereas large discrepancy between these two was recorded in the pastureland. Overall, the various trends observed in C measurements by INS concurred with those determined by the DC method, so enhancing the confidence in the new INS technology.

  9. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  10. Neutron scattering and the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.B.; Engelman, D.M.; Langer, J.A.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Schindler, D.G.; Schoenborn, B.P.; Sillers, I.Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today. 30 references, 5 figures.

  11. Elastic neutron scattering at 96 MeV from 12 C and 208 Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, J.; Blomgren, J.; Ataç, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Mermod, P.; Nilsson, L.; Pomp, S.; Tippawan, U.; Elmgren, K.; Olsson, N.; Jonsson, O.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Renberg, P.-U.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Dangtip, S.; Phansuke, P.; Österlund, M.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J. F.; Lecolley, F. R.; Louvel, M.; Marie-Noury, N.; Schweitzer, C.; Eudes, Ph.; Haddad, F.; Lebrun, C.; Koning, A. J.; Ledoux, X.

    2003-12-01

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50 130 MeV , SCANDAL, has recently been installed at the 20 180 MeV neutron beam line of the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. Elastic neutron scattering from 12 C and 208 Pb has been studied at 96 MeV in the 10° 70° interval. The achieved energy resolution, 3.7 MeV , is about an order of magnitude better than for any previous experiment above 65 MeV incident energy. The present experiment represents the highest neutron energy where the ground state has been resolved from the first excited state in neutron scattering. A novel method for normalization of the absolute scale of the cross section has been used. The estimated normalization uncertainty, 3% , is unprecedented for a neutron-induced differential cross section measurement on a nuclear target. The results are compared with modern optical model predictions based on phenomenology or microscopic nuclear theory.

  12. Form fluctuations of polymer loaded spherical microemulsions studied by neutron scattering and dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttich, B.; Falus, P.; Grillo, I.; Stühn, B.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the structure and shell dynamics of the droplet phase in water/AOT/octane microemulsions with polyethyleneglycol (MW = 1500) molecules loaded in the droplets. Size and polydispersity of the droplets is determined with small angle X-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering experiments. Shell fluctuations are measured with neutron spin echo spectroscopy and related to the dynamic percolation seen in dielectric spectroscopy. Shell fluctuations are found to be well described by the bending modulus of the shell and the viscosities inside and outside the droplets. Addition of the polymer decreases the modulus for small droplets. For large droplets the opposite is found as percolation temperature shifts to higher values.

  13. Studies of parity and time reversal symmetries in neutron scattering from165Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, D. G.; Gould, C. R.; Koster, J. E.; Roberson, N. R.; Seagondollar, L. W.; Soderstrum, J. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Zhu, X.

    1988-12-01

    We describe searches for parity and time reversal violations in the scattering of polarized neutrons from polarized and aligned165Ho targets. We have completed a search with 7.1 and 11.0 MeV neutrons for PoddTodd terms in the elastic scattering forward amplitude of the form s. ( I×K), where s is the neutron spin, I is the target spin and k is the neutron momentum vector. The target was a single crystal of holmium, polarized horizontally along its b axis by a 1 Tesla magnetic field. The neutrons were polarized vertically. Differences in the neutron transmission were measured for neutrons with spins parallel (antiparallel) to I×k. The P,T violating analyzing powers were found to be consistent with zero at the few 10-3 level: ρP,T(7.1 MeV)=-0.88 (±2.02) x 10-3, ρP,T(11.0 MeV)=-0.4 (±2.88) x 10-3. We have also attempted to find enhancements with MeV neutrons in P-violation due to the term s k. We are preparing an aligned target cryostat for investigations of PevenTodd terms {bd(Ik)(I×k)s} in neutron scattering. The target will be a single crystal cylinder of165Ho cooled to 100 mK in a bath of liquid helium and rotated by a shaft from a room temperature stepping motor. The cylinder will be oriented vertically and the alignment ( c) axis oriented horizontally. Warming or rotation of the sample allows one to separate effects that mimic the sought-after time reversal violating term.

  14. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering for Structural Biology of Protein-RNA Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This chapter deals with the applications of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) for the structural study of protein-RNA complexes in solution. After a brief historical introduction, the basic theory and practical requirements (e.g., sample state) for SANS experiments will be treated. Next, model-free parameters, such as the molecular mass and the radius of gyration, which can be obtained without a priori structural information, will be introduced. A more detailed section on the specific properties of SANS (with respect to its sister technique, small-angle X-ray scattering), and their implications on possibilities and limits of model building and interpretation will be discussed with a focus on protein-RNA systems. A practical illustration of the information content of SANS data will be given by applying ab initio modeling to a tRNA-synthetase system of known high-resolution structure. Finally, two present state-of-the-art examples that combine SANS data with complementary structural biology techniques (NMR and crystallography) will be presented and possible future developments and applications will be discussed.

  15. New Insights into Pore Characteristics and Hydrocarbon Generation of Shale Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hartl, M.; Wang, Y.; Hjelm, R.

    2014-12-01

    Pore size, distribution, connectivity, and shape as well as hydrocarbon saturation and composition reflect the history of hydrocarbon maturation and migration. However, characterization of the underlying factors and processes controlling hydrocarbons behavior in tight rocks is extremely limited, especially lacking of direct experimental observations. We have studied the pore characteristics of marine and lacustrine shale from the Erdos basin, China during laboratory pyrolysis using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Our SANS results show that scattering intensity of smaller pores (< 20 nm)/larger Q values of shale samples increase systematically as temperature increase during pyrolysis from 250 oC to 600oC (Fig.1a). These results in combination with hydrocarbon fractions measurements during the same process (Fig. 1b) provide a quantitative relation between pore characteristics and hydrocarbons generation. Our results indicate that hydrocarbon expulsion primarily causes the observed changes in smaller pores. They also demonstrate that due to its sensitivity to hydrogen, SANS locates all pores whether the pore is filled or not with hydrocarbons. Thus, SANS is particularly suited for probing hydrocarbon behavior in tight shale reservoirs and the factors that impact their pore dynamics for the petroleum industry.

  16. Study on generating of thermal neutron scattering cross sections for LiH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Jiang, X.; Zhao, Z.; Chen, L.

    2013-07-01

    LiH is designated as a promising moderator and shielding material because of its low density, high melting point and large fraction of H atoms. However, lack of the thermal neutron cross sections of LiH makes numerical calculation deviate from experimental data to some extent. As a result, it is necessary to study LiH thermal kernel effect. The phonon property of LiH has been investigated by first-principles calculations using the plane-wave pseudo potential method with CASTEP code. The scattering law and the thermal neutron scattering cross sections for Li and H have been generated using this distribution. The results have been compared with zirconium hydride data. The GASKET and NJOY/LEAPR codes have been used in the calculation of scattering law, whose results have been compared with the reference; the discrepancy mainly comes from phonon spectrums and its expansion. LEAPR had the capability to compute scattering through larger energy and momentum transfers than GASKET did. By studying LiH phonon spectrum and constructing the model of LiH thermal kernel and scattering matrix, the ACE format LiH thermal neutron cross sections for MCNP software could be made and used for reactor Neutronics calculation. (authors)

  17. Fast oxygen diffusion in bismuth oxide probed by quasielastic neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, Eugene

    2016-09-24

    In this paper, we present the first, to our knowledge, study of solid state oxygen translational diffusion by quasielastic neutron scattering. Such studies in the past might have been precluded by relatively low diffusivities of oxygen anions in the temperature range amenable to neutron scattering experiments. To explore the potential of the quasielastic scattering technique, which can deduce atomic diffusion jump length of oxygen anions through the momentum transfer dependence of the scattering signal, we have selected the fastest known oxygen conductor, bismuth oxide. Finally, we have found the oxygen anion jump length in excellent agreement with the nearest oxygen-vacancymore » distance in the anion sublattice of the fluorite-related structure of bismuth oxide.« less

  18. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron: Measurements with CLAS and CLAS12 at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Daria

    Measurements of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) give access to Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs) which provide a 3D image of the nucleon and carry information on the composition of its spin. Data from both proton and neutron targets is highly desirable for an extraction of all GPDs and to allow their flavour-decomposition. Although a number of measurements have been made on proton targets, data on the neutron is almost non-existent. We present preliminary results in the extraction of beam-spin asymmetry in neutron DVCS from CLAS and the proposed experimental programme with CLAS12 at Jefferson Laboratory.

  19. International Conference on Surface X-ray and Neutron Scattering (SXNS-11)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Bedzyk

    2011-06-17

    The 11th International Surface X-ray and Neutron Scattering (SXNS) Conference was held on July 13-17, 2010, on the Northwestern University (NU) campus, in Evanston Illinois and hosted by the NU Materials Research Science and Engineering Center. This biennial conference brought together a community of 164 attendees from 16 countries. The field now makes use of a broad range of new experimental capabilities that have been made possible through the development of increasingly brilliant X-ray and neutron sources around the world, including third generation synchrotron sources, neutron reactor and spallation sources, as well as the recent development of X-ray lasers.

  20. Distributed data processing and analysis environment for neutron scattering experiments at CSNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. L.; Zhang, J. R.; Yan, L. L.; Tang, M.; Hu, L.; Zhao, D. X.; Qiu, Y. X.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhuang, J.; Du, R.

    2016-10-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is the first high-performance pulsed neutron source in China, which will meet the increasing fundamental research and technique applications demands domestically and overseas. A new distributed data processing and analysis environment has been developed, which has generic functionalities for neutron scattering experiments. The environment consists of three parts, an object-oriented data processing framework adopting a data centered architecture, a communication and data caching system based on the C/S paradigm, and data analysis and visualization software providing the 2D/3D experimental data display. This environment will be widely applied in CSNS for live data processing.

  1. Theoretical study on neutron distribution of 208Pb by parity-violating electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Cun; Ren, Zhong-Zhou; Xu, Chang

    2016-03-01

    The precise determination of neutron distribution has important implications for both nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The purpose of this paper is to study the characteristics of neutron distribution of 208Pb by parity-violating electron scattering (PVS). Parity-violating asymmetries of 208Pb with different types of neutron skins are systematically calculated and compared with the experimental data of PREx. The results indicate that the PVS experiments are very sensitive to the nuclear neutron distributions. From further PVS measurements, detailed information on nuclear neutron distributions can be extracted. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11505292, 11175085, 11235001, 11447226), by the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (BS2014SF007), by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (15CX02072A, 15CX02070A, 15CX05026A, 13CX10022A, 14CX02157A).

  2. Background Neutron Studies for Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering Measurements at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane; Coherent Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The COHERENT collaboration has proposed to measure coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE νNS) cross sections on several nuclear targets using neutrinos produced at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The largest background of concern arises from beam-induced, fast neutrons that can mimic a nuclear recoil signal event in the detector. Multiple technologies of neutron detection have been employed at prospective experiment sites at the SNS. Analysis of these data have produced a consistent picture of the backgrounds expected for a CE νNS measurement. These background studies show that at suitable locations, the fast neutrons of concern arrive mainly in the prompt 1.3 μs window and the neutrons in the delayed window are primarily of lower energies that are relatively easier to shield.

  3. IB: A Monte Carlo simulation tool for neutron scattering instrument design under PVM and MPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui

    2011-12-01

    Design of modern neutron scattering instruments relies heavily on Monte Carlo simulation tools for optimization. IB is one such tool written in C++ and implemented under Parallel Virtual Machine and the Message Passing Interface. The program was initially written for the design and optimization of the EQ-SANS instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source. One of its features is the ability to group simple instrument components into more complex ones at the user input level, e.g. grouping neutron mirrors into neutron guides and curved benders. The simulation engine manages the grouped components such that neutrons entering a group are properly operated upon by all components, multiple times if needed, before exiting the group. Thus, only a few basic optical modules are needed at the programming level. For simulations that require higher computer speeds, the program can be compiled and run in parallel modes using either the PVM or the MPI architectures.

  4. Active helium target: Neutron scalar polarizability extraction via Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Meg Hornidge, David; Annand, John; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-12-31

    Precise measurement of the neutron scalar polarizabilities has been a lasting challenge because of the lack of a free-neutron target. Led by the University of Glasgow and the Mount Allison University groups of the A2 collaboration in Mainz, Germany, preparations have begun to test a recent theoretical model with an active helium target with the hope of determining these elusive quantities with small statistical, systematic, and model-dependent errors. Apparatus testing and background-event simulations have been carried out, with the full experiment projected to run in 2015. Once determined, these values can be applied to help understand quantum chromodynamics in the nonperturbative region.

  5. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Brown, J.; Adroja, D. T.; Manuel, P.; Kouzmenko, G.; Bewley, R. I.; Wotherspoon, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  6. A 6-Meter Neutron Small-Angle Scattering Spectrometer at KUR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, Shigehiro; Takeda, Takayoshi; Fujii, Hironobu; Toyoshima, Yoshinori; Osamura, Kozo; Mochiki, Koichi; Hasegawa, Ken'ichi

    1983-02-01

    A 6-meter neutron small-angle scattering spectrometer has been constructed at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) and has been used successfully for various fields of application in these three years. This paper describes overall design principles and the characteristics of the various parts of the spectrometers which can be assembled and disassembled easily at KUR. Some examples of scattering measurements are presented to show the performance of the spectrometer.

  7. Effect of the concentration of inhomogeneities on the multiple small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Abov, Yu. G.; Dzheparov, F. S.; Elyutin, N. O.; Lvov, D. V. Tyulyusov, A. N.

    2013-03-15

    The interference effects manifested during multiple small-angle neutron scattering (MSANS) on a chaotically arranged close-packed ensemble of scatterers have been studied. MSANS measurements have been performed for mixtures of Al and Ti-Zr alloy powders. It is shown that the results can be satisfactorily described based on a theory that takes into account spatial correlations in the arrangement of powder grains.

  8. Measurement of the neutron electric form factor GEn in quasielastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Donal Day

    2003-07-15

    We have measured the electric form factor of the neutron, GEn, at two momentum transfers (Q2= 0.5 and Q2= 1.0 GeV/c2) through quasielastic scattering in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Longitudinally polarized electrons scattered from polarized deuterated ammonia and GEn was extracted from the beam-target asymmetry AVed which, in quasielastic kinematics, is particularly sensitive to GEn and insensitive to MEC and FSI.

  9. Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, D.; Bernstein, A.; BarbeauP.,; Barton, P. J.; Bolozdynya, A.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Cavanna, F.; Cianciolo, Vince; Collar, J.; Cooper, R. J.; Dean, D. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Etenko, A.; Fields, N.; Foxe, M.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fomin, N.; Gallmeier, F.; Garishvili, I.; Gerling, M.; Green, M.; Greene, Geoffrey; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hix, R.; Hogan, D.; Hornback, D.; Jovanovic, I.; Hossbach, T.; Iverson, Erik B; Klein, S. R.; Khromov, A.; Link, J.; Louis, W.; Lu, W.; Mauger, C.; Marleau, P.; Markoff, D.; Martin, R. D.; Mueller, Paul Edward; Newby, J.; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Penttila, Seppo; Patton, K.; Poon, A. W.; Radford, David C; Reyna, D.; Ray, H.; Scholberg, K.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Tayloe, R.; Vetter, K.; Virtue, C.; Wilkerson, J.; Yoo, J.; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

  10. New opportunities for quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering at steady-state sources using mechanical selection of the incident and final neutron energy

    DOE PAGES

    Mamantov, Eugene

    2015-06-12

    We propose a modification of the neutron wide-angle velocity selector (WAVES) device that enables inelastic (in particular, quasielastic) scattering measurements not relying on the neutron time-of-flight. The proposed device is highly suitable for a steady-state neutron source, somewhat similar to a triple-axis spectrometer, but with simultaneous selection of the incident and final neutron energy over a broad range of scattering momentum transfer. Both the incident and final neutron velocities are defined by the WAVES geometry and rotation frequency. The variable energy transfer is achieved through the natural variation of the velocity of the transmitted neutrons as a function of themore » scattering angle component out of the equatorial plane.« less

  11. New opportunities for quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering at steady-state sources using mechanical selection of the incident and final neutron energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, Eugene

    2015-06-12

    We propose a modification of the neutron wide-angle velocity selector (WAVES) device that enables inelastic (in particular, quasielastic) scattering measurements not relying on the neutron time-of-flight. The proposed device is highly suitable for a steady-state neutron source, somewhat similar to a triple-axis spectrometer, but with simultaneous selection of the incident and final neutron energy over a broad range of scattering momentum transfer. Both the incident and final neutron velocities are defined by the WAVES geometry and rotation frequency. The variable energy transfer is achieved through the natural variation of the velocity of the transmitted neutrons as a function of the scattering angle component out of the equatorial plane.

  12. Experimental measurements with Monte Carlo corrections and theoretical calculations of neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jun; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In has been measured by the activation technique at neutron energies of 2.95, 3.94, and 5.24 MeV with the neutron capture cross sections of 197Au as an internal standard. The effects of multiple scattering and flux attenuation were corrected using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. Based on the experimental values, the 115In neutron inelastic scattering cross sections data were theoretically calculated between the 1 and 15 MeV with the TALYS software code, the theoretical results of this study are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental results.

  13. Neutron scattered dose equivalent to a fetus from proton radiotherapy of the mother.

    PubMed

    Mesoloras, Geraldine; Sandison, George A; Stewart, Robert D; Farr, Jonathan B; Hsi, Wen C

    2006-07-01

    Scattered neutron dose equivalent to a representative point for a fetus is evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom of the mother undergoing proton radiotherapy. The effect on scattered neutron dose equivalent to the fetus of changing the incident proton beam energy, aperture size, beam location, and air gap between the beam delivery snout and skin was studied for both a small field snout and a large field snout. Measurements of the fetus scattered neutron dose equivalent were made by placing a neutron bubble detector 10 cm below the umbilicus of an anthropomorphic Rando phantom enhanced by a wax bolus to simulate a second trimester pregnancy. The neutron dose equivalent in milliSieverts (mSv) per proton treatment Gray increased with incident proton energy and decreased with aperture size, distance of the fetus representative point from the field edge, and increasing air gap. Neutron dose equivalent to the fetus varied from 0.025 to 0.450 mSv per proton Gray for the small field snout and from 0.097 to 0.871 mSv per proton Gray for the large field snout. There is likely to be no excess risk to the fetus of severe mental retardation for a typical proton treatment of 80 Gray to the mother since the scattered neutron dose to the fetus of 69.7 mSv is well below the lower confidence limit for the threshold of 300 mGy observed for the occurrence of severe mental retardation in prenatally exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, based on the linear no threshold hypothesis, and this same typical treatment for the mother, the excess risk to the fetus of radiation induced cancer death in the first 10 years of life is 17.4 per 10,000 children. PMID:16898451

  14. Neutron scattered dose equivalent to a fetus from proton radiotherapy of the mother.

    PubMed

    Mesoloras, Geraldine; Sandison, George A; Stewart, Robert D; Farr, Jonathan B; Hsi, Wen C

    2006-07-01

    Scattered neutron dose equivalent to a representative point for a fetus is evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom of the mother undergoing proton radiotherapy. The effect on scattered neutron dose equivalent to the fetus of changing the incident proton beam energy, aperture size, beam location, and air gap between the beam delivery snout and skin was studied for both a small field snout and a large field snout. Measurements of the fetus scattered neutron dose equivalent were made by placing a neutron bubble detector 10 cm below the umbilicus of an anthropomorphic Rando phantom enhanced by a wax bolus to simulate a second trimester pregnancy. The neutron dose equivalent in milliSieverts (mSv) per proton treatment Gray increased with incident proton energy and decreased with aperture size, distance of the fetus representative point from the field edge, and increasing air gap. Neutron dose equivalent to the fetus varied from 0.025 to 0.450 mSv per proton Gray for the small field snout and from 0.097 to 0.871 mSv per proton Gray for the large field snout. There is likely to be no excess risk to the fetus of severe mental retardation for a typical proton treatment of 80 Gray to the mother since the scattered neutron dose to the fetus of 69.7 mSv is well below the lower confidence limit for the threshold of 300 mGy observed for the occurrence of severe mental retardation in prenatally exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, based on the linear no threshold hypothesis, and this same typical treatment for the mother, the excess risk to the fetus of radiation induced cancer death in the first 10 years of life is 17.4 per 10,000 children.

  15. Neutron scattered dose equivalent to a fetus from proton radiotherapy of the mother

    SciTech Connect

    Mesoloras, Geraldine; Sandison, George A.; Stewart, Robert D.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Hsi, Wen C.

    2006-07-15

    Scattered neutron dose equivalent to a representative point for a fetus is evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom of the mother undergoing proton radiotherapy. The effect on scattered neutron dose equivalent to the fetus of changing the incident proton beam energy, aperture size, beam location, and air gap between the beam delivery snout and skin was studied for both a small field snout and a large field snout. Measurements of the fetus scattered neutron dose equivalent were made by placing a neutron bubble detector 10 cm below the umbilicus of an anthropomorphic Rando[reg] phantom enhanced by a wax bolus to simulate a second trimester pregnancy. The neutron dose equivalent in milliSieverts (mSv) per proton treatment Gray increased with incident proton energy and decreased with aperture size, distance of the fetus representative point from the field edge, and increasing air gap. Neutron dose equivalent to the fetus varied from 0.025 to 0.450 mSv per proton Gray for the small field snout and from 0.097 to 0.871 mSv per proton Gray for the large field snout. There is likely to be no excess risk to the fetus of severe mental retardation for a typical proton treatment of 80 Gray to the mother since the scattered neutron dose to the fetus of 69.7 mSv is well below the lower confidence limit for the threshold of 300 mGy observed for the occurrence of severe mental retardation in prenatally exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, based on the linear no threshold hypothesis, and this same typical treatment for the mother, the excess risk to the fetus of radiation induced cancer death in the first 10 years of life is 17.4 per 10 000 children.

  16. Deep inelastic neutron scattering from orthorhombic ordered HCl: Short-time proton dynamics and anomalous neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Senesi, R.; Colognesi, D.; Pietropaolo, A.; Abdul-Redah, T.

    2005-08-01

    Deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements from orthorhombic ordered HCl are presented and analyzed in order to clarify the problem of an anomalous deficit in the neutron-proton cross section found in previous experiments on various materials. A reliable model for the HCl short-time single-particle dynamics, including atomic vibrational anisotropies and deviations from the impulsive approximation, is set up. The model HCl response function is transformed into simulated time-of-flight spectra, taking carefully into account the effects of instrumental resolution and the filter absorption profile used for neutron energy analysis. Finally, the experimental values of the anomalous reduction factor for the neutron-proton cross section are extracted by comparing simulated and experimental data. Results show a 34% reduction of the H cross section, varying with the scattering angle in a range centered at 53 deg. In addition, the same approximate procedure used in earlier studies is also employed, providing results in reasonable agreement with the more rigorous ones, and confirming the substantial reliability of the past work on this subject.

  17. Current Status of the Experiment on Direct Measurement of Neutron-Neutron Scattering Length at the Reactor YAGUAR

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, W. I.; Muzichka, A. Yu.; Lychagin, E. V.; Nekhaev, G. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Strelkov, A. V.; Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Tornow, W.; Kandiev, Ya.; Levakov, B. G.; Litvin, V. I.; Lyzhin, A. E.; Tchernukhin, Yu. I.; Mitchell, G. E.

    2009-03-31

    A new experiment was proposed in 2002 to perform the first direct measurement of neutron-neutron scattering on the powerful pulsed reactor YAGUAR located at Snezhinsk, Ural region, Russia. Extensive efforts were made to model the background conditions and to optimize the set-up design. To make the experiment feasible it was necessary to suppress the background from various origins by more than 16 orders of magnitude for thermal neutrons and 14 orders of magnitude for fast neutrons. In 2003 a channel was drilled under the reactor and equipped for time-of-flight measurements. During the next two years at this channel there were carried out a series of test experiments aimed at verifying the accuracy of the background modeling. Good agreement of the measured results with the calculated values enabled us to make the final design of the full scale set-up. During 2005-2006 the experimental system was manufactured. After vacuum tests at JINR the set-up was mounted at the YAGUAR reactor hall. In 2006-2007 calibration measurements with noble gases were performed. The results confirmed the validity of the modeling of the full scale experiment and verified the calibration. The first preliminary experiments for nn-scattering were performed in April 2008. These recent results are discussed.

  18. Quasielastic scattering in the interaction of ultracold neutrons with a liquid wall and application in a reanalysis of the Mambo I neutron-lifetime experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyerl, A.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Kaufman, C.; Malik, S. S.; Desai, A. M.

    2012-06-01

    We develop a theory of ultracold and very cold neutron scattering on viscoelastic surface waves up to second-order perturbation theory. The results are applied to reanalyze the 1989 neutron-lifetime experiment using ultracold neutron storage in a Fomblin-coated vessel by Mampe [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.63.593 63, 593 (1989)]. Inclusion of this theory of the quasielastic scattering process in the data analysis shifts the neutron lifetime value from 887.6±3 to 882.5±2.1 s.

  19. Straight lines of neutron scattering in biology: a review of basic controls in SANS and EINS.

    PubMed

    Zaccai, Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Neutron and X-ray beams in scattering experiments have similar wavelengths and explore the same length scale (~1 Å or 0.1 nm). Data collection and analysis are also broadly similar for both radiation types. There are fundamental differences, however, between the interaction of X-rays and neutrons with matter, which makes them strongly complementary for structural studies in biology. The property of neutrons to distinguish natural abundance hydrogen from its deuterium isotope and the dispersion relation that leads to the energy of ~1 Å neutrons being of the order of thermal energy are well known. They form the basis, respectively, of contrast variation on the one hand and energy-resolved scattering experiments to study macromolecular dynamics-neutron-specific scattering methods on the other. Interestingly, analysis procedures for the structural and dynamics experiments display common aspects that can be expressed as straight-line relationships. These not only act as controls of good sample preparation, but also yield model-free parameters on an absolute scale that provide fundamental information on the structure and dynamics of the system under study.

  20. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of a-Si:H and a-Si:D

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, D. L.; Marr, D. W. M.; Nelson, B. P.; Iwaniczko, E.; Yang, J.; Yan, B.; Guha, S.

    2000-01-01

    The heterogeneity of hydrogen and deuterium on the nanometer scale has been probed by samll-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a-Si:H and a-Si:D films. Films were depsoited by two techniques, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) using conditions that yield high quality films and devices.

  1. A novel approach to neutron scattering instrumentation for probing multiscale dynamics in soft and biological matter

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, Eugene

    2016-06-29

    We present a concept and ray-tracing simulation results of a mechanical device that will enable inelastic neutron scattering measurements where the data at energy transfers from a few eV to several hundred meV can be collected in a single, gapless spectrum. Besides covering 5 orders of magnitude on the energy (time) scale, the device provides data over 2 orders of magnitude on the scattering momentum (length) scale in a single measurement. Such capabilities are geared primarily toward soft and biological matter, where the broad dynamical features of relaxation origin largely overlap with vibration features, thus necessitating gapless spectral coverage overmore » several orders of magnitude in time and space. Furthermore, neutron scattering experiments with such a device are performed with a fixed neutron final energy, which enables measurements, with neutron energy loss in the sample, at arbitrarily low temperatures over the same broad spectral range. Lastly, this capability is also invaluable in biological and soft matter research, as the variable temperature dependence of different relaxation components allows their separation in the scattering spectra as a function of temperature.« less

  2. Time-independent one-speed neutron transport equation with anisotropic scattering in absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Hangelbroek, R. J.

    1980-06-01

    This report treats the time-independent, one-speed neutron transport equation with anisotropic scattering in absorbing media. For nuclear gain operators existence and uniqueness of solutions to the half-space and finite-slab problems are proved in L/sub 2/-space. The formulas needed for explicit calculations are derived by the use of perturbation theory techniques.

  3. Time reversal invariance violating and parity conserving effects in neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-08-15

    Time reversal invariance violating and parity conserving effects for low-energy elastic neutron-deuteron scattering are calculated for meson exchange and effective field theory type potentials in a distorted wave-born approximation using realistic hadronic wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space.

  4. Application of Geant4 simulation for analysis of soil carbon inelastic neutron scattering measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) was applied to determine soil carbon content. Due to non-uniform soil carbon depth distribution, the correlation between INS signals with some soil carbon content parameter is not obvious; however, a proportionality between INS signals and average carbon weight per...

  5. Sub-Tg dynamics in polycarbonate by neutron scattering and its relation with secondary γ relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrese-Igor, S.; Arbe, A.; Alegría, A.; Colmenero, J.; Frick, B.

    2005-07-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of phenylene rings in glassy bisphenol-A (BPA) polycarbonate (PC) by means of quasielastic neutron scattering. Taking advantage of selective deuteration of the samples, we have studied the incoherent scattering of hydrogens in phenylene rings on the one hand, and on the other hand the coherent quasielastic scattering of all the atoms in the sample. Two different types of neutron spectrometers, time of flight and backscattering, were used in order to cover a wide dynamic range, which extends from microscopic (˜10-13s) to mesoscopic (˜10-9s) times. Moreover, neutron-diffraction experiments with polarization analysis were carried out in order to characterize the structural features, and the relative coherent and incoherent contributions of the samples investigated. In contrast with previous studies of phenylene ring dynamics in BPA polysulfone performed by us also by neutron scattering, phenylene rings in BPA PC exhibit an "extra" motion in addition to those found for BPA polysulfone's phenylene rings. This extra motion of the rings in PC perfectly correlates with the main carbonate group motion followed by dielectric spectroscopy and allows us to (i) consistently interprete the PC's γ relaxation in terms of two different motions; and (ii) experimentally confirm the relation between the motion of phenylene rings and carbonate groups within BPA PC formerly predicted by computational methods.

  6. Structure of unilamellar vesicles: Numerical analysis based on small-angle neutron scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Zemlyanaya, E. V. Kiselev, M. A.; Zbytovska, J.; Almasy, L.; Aswal, V. K.; Strunz, P.; Wartewig, S.; Neubert, R.

    2006-12-15

    The structure of polydispersed populations of unilamellar vesicles is studied by small-angle neutron scattering for three types of lipid systems, namely, single-, two-and four-component vesicular systems. Results of the numerical analysis based on the separated-form-factor model are reported.

  7. A novel approach to neutron scattering instrumentation for probing multiscale dynamics in soft and biological matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamontov, Eugene

    2016-09-01

    We present a concept and ray-tracing simulation of a mechanical device that will enable inelastic neutron scattering measurements where the data at energy transfers from a few μeV to several hundred meV can be collected in a single, gapless spectrum. Besides covering 5 orders of magnitude on the energy (time) scale, the device provides data over 2 orders of magnitude on the scattering momentum (length) scale in a single measurement. Such capabilities are geared primarily toward soft and biological matter, where the broad dynamical features of relaxation origin largely overlap with vibration features, thus necessitating gapless spectral coverage over several orders of magnitude in time and space. Furthermore, neutron scattering experiments with such a device are performed with a fixed neutron final energy, which enables measurements, with neutron energy loss in the sample, at arbitrarily low temperatures over the same broad spectral range. This capability is also invaluable in biological and soft matter research, as the variable temperature dependence of different relaxation components allows their separation in the scattering spectra as a function of temperature.

  8. Applying the neutron scatter camera to treaty verification and warhead monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Gerling, Mark; Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Mrowka, Stanley; Marleau, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The neutron scatter camera was originally developed for a range of SNM detection applications. We are now exploring the feasibility of applications in treaty verification and warhead monitoring using experimentation, maximum likelihood estimation method (MLEM), detector optimization, and MCNP-PoliMi simulations.

  9. A novel approach to neutron scattering instrumentation for probing multiscale dynamics in soft and biological matter.

    PubMed

    Mamontov, Eugene

    2016-09-01

    We present a concept and ray-tracing simulation of a mechanical device that will enable inelastic neutron scattering measurements where the data at energy transfers from a few μeV to several hundred meV can be collected in a single, gapless spectrum. Besides covering 5 orders of magnitude on the energy (time) scale, the device provides data over 2 orders of magnitude on the scattering momentum (length) scale in a single measurement. Such capabilities are geared primarily toward soft and biological matter, where the broad dynamical features of relaxation origin largely overlap with vibration features, thus necessitating gapless spectral coverage over several orders of magnitude in time and space. Furthermore, neutron scattering experiments with such a device are performed with a fixed neutron final energy, which enables measurements, with neutron energy loss in the sample, at arbitrarily low temperatures over the same broad spectral range. This capability is also invaluable in biological and soft matter research, as the variable temperature dependence of different relaxation components allows their separation in the scattering spectra as a function of temperature. PMID:27355223

  10. Gate-opening effect in ZIF-8: the first experimental proof using inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Casco, M E; Cheng, Y Q; Daemen, L L; Fairen-Jimenez, D; Ramos-Fernández, E V; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Silvestre-Albero, J

    2016-03-01

    The gate-opening phenomenon in ZIFs is of paramount importance to understand their behavior in industrial molecular separations. Here we show for the first time using in situ inelastic neutron scattering (INS) the swinging of the -CH3 groups and the imidazolate linkers in the prototypical ZIF-8 and ZIF-8@AC hybrid materials upon exposure to mild N2 pressure.

  11. Cyclotron resonant scattering in gamma-ray bursts - Line strengths and signature of neutron star rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, J. C. L.; Wasserman, I.

    1992-01-01

    We explain the relative line strengths in gamma-ray bursts in terms of cyclotron resonant scattering. We describe the line signature of neutron star rotation and discuss the possibility that variations seen in the strengths and widths of the lines in GB780325 and GB870303 are due to rotation.

  12. Extracting hadron-neutron scattering amplitudes from hadron-proton and hadron-deuteron measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented for extracting hadron-neutron scattering amplitudes from hadron-proton and hadron-deuteron measurements within the framework of the Glauber approximation. This method, which involves the solution of a linear integral equation, is applied to pn collisions between 15 and 275 GeV/c. Effects arising from inelastic intermediate states are estimated.

  13. Gate-opening effect in ZIF-8: the first experimental proof using inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Casco, M E; Cheng, Y Q; Daemen, L L; Fairen-Jimenez, D; Ramos-Fernández, E V; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Silvestre-Albero, J

    2016-03-01

    The gate-opening phenomenon in ZIFs is of paramount importance to understand their behavior in industrial molecular separations. Here we show for the first time using in situ inelastic neutron scattering (INS) the swinging of the -CH3 groups and the imidazolate linkers in the prototypical ZIF-8 and ZIF-8@AC hybrid materials upon exposure to mild N2 pressure. PMID:26845644

  14. Inter-atomic force constants of BaF{sub 2} by diffuse neutron scattering measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, Takashi Makhsun,; Sakai, Ryutaro; Xianglian; Takahashi, Haruyuki; Basar, Khairul; Igawa, Naoki; Danilkin, Sergey A.

    2015-04-16

    Diffuse neutron scattering measurement on BaF{sub 2} crystals was performed at 10 K and 295 K. Oscillatory form in the diffuse scattering intensity of BaF{sub 2} was observed at 295 K. The correlation effects among thermal displacements of F-F atoms were obtained from the analysis of oscillatory diffuse scattering intensity. The force constants among neighboring atoms in BaF{sub 2} were determined and compared to those in ionic crystals and semiconductors.

  15. The role of CP violating scatterings in baryogenesis—case study of the neutron portal

    SciTech Connect

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander; Volkas, Raymond R.; Petraki, Kalliopi E-mail: n.bell@unimelb.edu.au E-mail: kpetraki@nikhef.nl

    2014-11-01

    Many baryogenesis scenarios invoke the charge parity (CP) violating out-of-equilibrium decay of a heavy particle in order to explain the baryon asymmetry. Such scenarios will in general also allow CP violating scatterings. We study the effect of these CP violating scatterings on the final asymmetry in a neutron portal scenario. We solve the Boltzmann equations governing the evolution of the baryon number numerically and show that the CP violating scatterings play a dominant role in a significant portion of the parameter space.

  16. Neutron scattering in concrete and wood: Part II--Oblique incidence.

    PubMed

    Facure, A; Silva, A X; Rivera, J C; Falcão, R C

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge of neutron reflection coefficients is of practical interest when projecting the shielding of radiotherapy rooms, since it is known that about 75% of the neutrons at the maze entrance of these rooms are scattered neutrons. In a previous paper, the energy spectra of photoneutrons were calculated, when reflected by ordinary, high-density concrete and wood barriers, using the MCNP5 code, considering normal incidence and neutron incident energies varying between 0.1 and 10 MeV. It was found that the mean energy of the reflected neutrons does not depend on the reflection angle and that these mean energies are lower in wood and barytes concrete, compared with ordinary concrete. In the present work, the simulation of neutron reflection coefficients were completed, considering the case when these particles do not collide frontally with the barriers, which constitute the radiotherapy room walls. Some simulations were also made to evaluate how neutron equivalent doses at the position of the room door is affected when the maze walls are lined with neutron absorbing materials, such as wood itself or borated polyethylene. Finally, capture gamma rays dose at the entrance of rooms with different maze lengths were also simulated. The results were discussed in the light of the albedo concepts presented in the literature and some of these results were confronted with others, finding good agreement between them. PMID:17673488

  17. In situ characterization of liquid crystalline polymer flow using neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dadmun, M.

    1994-12-31

    The alignment during processing of a liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) results in the unusual ultimate properties and unique physics of LCPs. We are interested in understanding the coupling of shear flow to the orientation of a liquid crystalline polymer in solution. We will describe a method for determining the change in orientation of an LCP by shear flow with neutron scattering. We will discuss results of the application of this technique to solutions of poly (benzyl L-glutamate) (PBLG) in deuterated benzyl alcohol and hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) in deuterated water. It will also be shown that the neutron scattering results correlate well to the simultaneously measured shear viscosity, which allows the use of this technique to a greater audience as the neutron and viscosity measurements can be completed once and then viscosity can serve as a secondary standard in the future.

  18. Measurement of the angular distribution of neutron-proton scattering at 10 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Bateman, F.B.; Grimes, S.M.; Brient, C.E.; Massey, T.N.; Wasson, O.A.; Carlson, A.D.; Zhou, H.

    1995-12-31

    The relative angular distribution of neutrons scattered from protons was measured at an incident neutron energy of 10 MeV at the Ohio University Accelerator Laboratory. An array of 11 detector telescopes at laboratory angles of 0 to 60 degrees was used to detect recoil protons from neutron interactions with a CH{sub 2} (polypropylene) target. Data for 7 of these telescopes were obtained with one set of electronics and are presented here. These data, from 108 to 180 degrees for the center-of-mass scattering angles, have a small slope which agrees better with angular distributions predicted by the Arndt phase shifts than with the ENDF/B-VI angular distribution.

  19. Magnetic liposomes and entrapping : time-resolved neutron scattering TR-SANS and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Thomas; Rusp, Monika; May, Roland P.

    2004-07-01

    Magnetic liposomes were prepared by a novel method from stabilized iron-complex solutions and biogenic phospholipids using a pH-jump procedure. During preparation Boron was entrapped inside the liposomes. This enables the later application in Neutron capture cancer therapy, a local radiation therapy, as well as rheological experiments with magnetic tweezers. The formation of the liposomes and the internal iron oxide structure was observed by time-resolved neutron scattering TR-SANS and electron microscopy using a stopped-flow mixing device. The liposome size was estimated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) also. Under selected conditions, the iron oxide was obtained as shell located at the inner surface of the lipid layer. Thus the internal volume was free for entrapping of other material, e.g. the Boron compounds for Neutron capture or drug targetting applications. The magnetic shell liposomes revealed a typical size of 100-400nm, as required for applications in vivo.

  20. New libraries for simulating neutron scattering in dark matter detector calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan E.

    2014-03-01

    Dark matter detectors require calibrations of their energy scale and efficiency to detect nuclear recoils in the 1-50 keV range. Most calibrations use neutron scattering and require mcnp or geant4 simulations of neutron propagation through the detector. For most nuclei heavier than 16O, these simulation libraries ignore the contribution of resolved resonances to the neutron elastic differential cross section. For many isotopes and neutron energies of importance to dark matter detection, this invalid assumption can severely distort simulated nuclear recoil spectra. The correct angular distributions can be calculated from the resonance parameters using R-matrix formalism. A set of neutron scattering libraries with high-resolution angular distributions for mcnp and geant4 of 19F, 40Ar, 50,52Cr, 56Fe, 136Xe, and 206,207,208Pb is presented. An mcnpx library for simulating the production of low-energy neutrons in the 9Be(γ,n)8Be reaction is also presented. Example dark matter detector calibrations are simulated with the new libraries showing how detector sensitivity could be overestimated by factors of 2 by relying on existing mcnp and geant4 libraries.

  1. Early Years of Neutron Scattering and Its Manpower Development in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsongkohadi

    2008-03-01

    In this paper I shall give a short history of the development of neutron scattering at the Research Centre for Nuclear Techniques (PPTN), in Bandung, and the early development of a more advanced facilities at the Neutron Scattering Laboratory (NSL BATAN), Centre of Technology for Nuclear Industrial Materials, in Serpong. The first research reactor in Indonesia was the TRIGA MARK II in Bandung, which became operational in 1965, with a power of 250 KW, upgraded to 1 MW in 1971, and to 2 MW in 2000. The neutron scattering activities was started in 1967, with the design and construction of the first powder diffractometer, and put in operation in 1970. It was followed by the second instrument, the filter detector spectrometer built in 1975 in collaboration with the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India. A powder diffractometer for magnetic studies was built in 1980, and finally, a modification of the filter detector spectrometer to measure textures was made in 1986. A brief description of the design and construction of the instruments, and a highlight of some research topics will be presented. Early developments of neutron scattering activities at the 30 MW, RSG-GAS reactor in Serpong in choosing suitable research program, which will be mainly centred around materials testing/characterization, and materials/condensed matter researches has been agreed. Instrument planning and layout which were appropriate to carry out the program had been decided. Manpower development for the neutron scattering laboratory is a severe problem. The efforts to overcome this problem has been solved. International Cooperation through workshops and on the job trainings also support the supply of qualified manpower.

  2. PREFACE: Structure and dynamics determined by neutron and x-ray scattering Structure and dynamics determined by neutron and x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Neutron and x-ray scattering have emerged as powerful methods for the determination of structure and dynamics. Driven by emerging new, powerful neutron and synchrotron radiation sources, the continuous development of new instrumentation and novel scattering techniques gives rise to exciting possibilities. For example, in situ observations become possible via a high neutron or x-ray flux at the sample and, as a consequence, morphological transitions with small time constants can be detected. This special issue covers a broad range of different materials from soft to hard condensed matter. Hence, different material classes such as colloids, polymers, alloys, oxides and metals are addressed. The issue is dedicated to the 60th birthday of Professor Winfried Petry, scientific director of the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II), Germany, advisor at the physics department for the Bayerische Elite-Akademie, chair person of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Metall- und Materialphysik of the German Physical Society (DPG) and a member of the professional council of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). We would like to acknowledge and thank all contributors for their submissions, which made this special issue possible in the first place. Moreover, we would like to thank the staff at IOP Publishing for helping us with the administrative aspects and for coordinating the refereeing process, and Valeria Lauter for the beautiful cover artwork. Finally, to the readers, we hope that you find this special issue a valuable resource that provides insights into the present possibilities of neutron and x-ray scattering as powerful tools for the investigation of structure and dynamics. Structure and dynamics determined by neutron and x-ray scattering contents In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography F Kargl, M Engelhardt, F Yang, H Weis, P Schmakat, B Schillinger, A Griesche and A Meyer Magnetic spin

  3. Using Java to visualize and manipulate large arrays of neutron scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelson, D.; Worlton, T.; Chatterjee, A.; Hammonds, J.; Chen, D.

    2000-02-02

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory is a world class pulsed neutron source with thirteen instruments designed to characterize materials using time-of-flight neutron scattering techniques. For each instrument, a collimated pulse of neutrons is directed to a material sample. The neutrons are scattered by the sample and detected by arrays of detectors. The type, number and arrangement of detectors vary widely from instrument to instrument, depending on which properties of materials are being studied. In all cases, the faster, higher energy neutrons reach the detectors sooner than the lower energy neutrons. This produces a time-of-flight spectrum at each detector element. The time-of-flight spectrum produced by each detector element records the scattering intensity at hundreds to thousands of discrete time intervals. Since there are typically between two hundred and ten thousand distinct detector elements, a single set of raw data can include millions of points. Often many such datasets are collected for a single sample to determine the effect of different conditions on the microscopic structure and dynamics of the sample. In this project, Java was used to construct a portable highly interactive system for viewing and operating on large collections of time-of-flight spectra. Java performed surprisingly well in handling large amounts of data quickly was fast enough even with standard PC hardware. Although Java may not be the choice at this time for applications where computational efficiency is the primary refinement, any disadvantages in this case were outweighed by the advantages of a clean object oriented language with a portable set of GUI components. The authors anticipate that Java will prove useful for scientific computing and data visualization in situations where portability, case of use and effective use of software development manpower are critical.

  4. Comparison of discrete and continuous thermal neutron scattering treatments in MCNP5

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlou, A. T.; Brown, F. B.; Martin, W. R.; Kiedrowski, B. C.

    2012-07-01

    The standard discrete thermal neutron S({alpha},{beta}) scattering treatment in MCNP5 is compared with a continuous S({alpha},{beta}) scattering treatment using a criticality suite of 119 benchmark cases and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data. In the analysis, six bound isotopes are considered: beryllium metal, graphite, hydrogen in water, hydrogen in polyethylene, beryllium in beryllium oxide and oxygen in beryllium oxide. Overall, there are only small changes in the eigenvalue (k{sub eff}) between discrete and continuous treatments. In the comparison of 64 cases that utilize S({alpha},{beta}) scattering, 62 agreed at the 95% confidence level, and the 2 cases with differences larger than 3 {sigma} agreed within 1 {sigma} when more neutrons were run in the calculations. The results indicate that the changes in eigenvalue between continuous and discrete treatments are random, small, and well within the uncertainty of measured data for reactor criticality experiments. (authors)

  5. Thermal conductivity and impurity scattering in the accreting neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggero, Alessandro; Reddy, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the thermal conductivity of electrons for the strongly correlated multicomponent ion plasma expected in the outer layers of a neutron star's crust, employing a Path Integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) approach. This allows us to isolate the low energy response of the ions and use it to calculate the electron scattering rate and the electron thermal conductivity. We find that the scattering rate is enhanced by a factor 2-4 compared to earlier calculations based on the simpler electron-impurity scattering formalism. This finding impacts the interpretation of thermal relaxation observed in transiently accreting neutron stars, and has implications for the composition and nuclear reactions in the crust that occur during accretion.

  6. Calibration and absolute normalization procedure of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Palomino, L. A.; Blostein, J. J.; Dawidowski, J.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the calibration process of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) spectrometer, recently implemented at the Bariloche Electron LINAC (Argentina), consisting in the determination of the incident neutron spectrum, dead-time and electronic delay of the data acquisition line, and detector bank efficiency. For this purpose, samples of lead, polyethylene and graphite of different sizes were employed. Their measured spectra were corrected by multiple scattering, attenuation and detector efficiency effects, by means of an ad hoc Monte Carlo code. We show that the corrected spectra are correctly scaled with respect to the scattering power of the tested materials within a 2% of experimental error, thus allowing us to define an experimental constant that links the arbitrary experimental scale (number of recorded counts per monitor counts) with the involved cross-sections. The present work also serves to analyze the existence of possible sources of systematic errors.

  7. An infrared and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of eta-alumina and methanol.

    PubMed

    McInroy, Alastair R; Lundie, David T; Winfield, John M; Dudman, Chris C; Jones, Peter; Parker, Stewart F; Taylor, Jon W; Lennon, D

    2005-08-21

    The industrially important interaction of methanol with an eta-alumina catalyst has been investigated by a combination of infrared spectroscopy (diffuse reflectance and transmission) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy. The infrared and INS spectra together show that chemisorbed methoxy is the only surface species present. Confirmation of the assignments was provided by a periodic DFT calculation of methoxy on eta-alumina (110). The thermal conversion of adsorbed methoxy groups to form dimethylether was also followed by INS, with DFT calculations assisting assignments. An intense feature about 2600 cm(-1) was observed in the diffuse reflectance spectrum. This band is poorly described in the extensive literature on the alumina/methanol adsorption system and its observation raised the possibility of a new surface species existing on this particular catalyst surface. INS measurements established that the 2600 cm(-1) feature could be assigned to a combination band of the methyl rock with the methyl deformation modes. This assignment was reinforced by an analysis of the neutron scattering intensity at a particular energy as a function of momentum transfer, which confirmed this particular adsorbed methoxy feature to arise from a second order transition. Similar behaviour was observed in the model compound Al(OCH3)3. The anomalous infrared intensity of the 2600 cm(-1) peak in the diffuse reflectance spectrum is a consequence of the different absorption coefficients of the C-H stretch and the combination mode. The implications for catalyst studies are discussed.

  8. Neutron scattering of residual hydrogen in 1,4-dioxane d8 liquid: Understanding measurements with molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Hongjun; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Kidder, Michelle K.; de Almeida, Valmor F.

    2016-06-08

    That incoherent scattering from protiated molecular liquids adds a constant background to the measured scattering intensity is well-known, but less appreciated is the fact that coherent scattering is also induced by the presence of hydrogen in a deuterated liquid. In fact, the scattering intensity can be very sensitive, in the small-q region, with respect to the amounts and distribution of residual H in the system. We used 1,4-dioxane liquid to demonstrate that the partial structure factors of the HD and DD atom pairs contribute significantly to intermolecular scattering and that uncertainty in the extent of deuteration account for discrepancies betweenmore » simulations and measurements. Both contributions to uncertainty have similar magnitudes: scattering interference of the hydrogen–deuterium pair, and complementary interference from the deuterium–deuterium pair by virtue of chemical inhomogeneity. This situation arises in practice since deuteration of liquids is often 99% or less. A combined experimental and extensive computational study of static thermal neutron scattering of 1,4-dioxane demonstrates the foregoing. We show, through simulations, that the reason for the differences is the content of protiated dioxane (vendors quote 1%). We estimate that up to 5% (at 298 K and at 343 K) protiated molar fraction may be involved in generating the scattering differences. Finally, we find that the particular distribution of hydrogen in the protiated molecules affects the results significantly; here, we considered molecules to be either fully protiated or fully deuterated. This scenario best reconciles the computational and experimental results, and leads us to speculate that the deuteration synthesis process tends to leave a molecule either fully deuterated or fully protiated. As a result, we have used 1,4-dioxane as a model liquid, the effects described in this study extend to similar liquids, and similar systematic experimental/computational studies can be

  9. Neutron Scattering of Residual Hydrogen in 1,4-Dioxane-d8 Liquid: Understanding Measurements with Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Liu, Hongjun; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle K

    2016-06-23

    That incoherent scattering from protiated molecular liquids adds a constant background to the measured scattering intensity is well-known, but less appreciated is the fact that coherent scattering is also induced by the presence of hydrogen in a deuterated liquid. In fact, the scattering intensity can be very sensitive, in the small-q region, with respect to the amounts and distribution of residual H in the system. We used 1,4-dioxane liquid to demonstrate that the partial structure factors of the HD and DD atom pairs contribute significantly to intermolecular scattering and that uncertainty in the extent of deuteration account for discrepancies between simulations and measurements. Both contributions to uncertainty have similar magnitudes: scattering interference of the hydrogen-deuterium pair, and complementary interference from the deuterium-deuterium pair by virtue of chemical inhomogeneity. This situation arises in practice since deuteration of liquids is often 99% or less. A combined experimental and extensive computational study of static thermal neutron scattering of 1,4-dioxane demonstrates the foregoing. We show, through simulations, that the reason for the differences is the content of protiated dioxane (vendors quote 1%). We estimate that up to 5% (at 298 K and at 343 K) protiated molar fraction may be involved in generating the scattering differences. Finally, we find that the particular distribution of hydrogen in the protiated molecules affects the results significantly; here, we considered molecules to be either fully protiated or fully deuterated. This scenario best reconciles the computational and experimental results, and leads us to speculate that the deuteration synthesis process tends to leave a molecule either fully deuterated or fully protiated. Although we have used 1,4-dioxane as a model liquid, the effects described in this study extend to similar liquids, and similar systematic experimental/computational studies can be performed to

  10. Optimizing Neutron Thermal Scattering Effects in very High Temperature Reactors. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-07-08

    This project aims to develop a holistic understanding of the phenomenon of neutron thermalization in the VHTR. Neutron thermalization is dependent on the type and structure of the moderating material. The fact that the moderator (and reflector) in the VHTR is a solid material will introduce new and interesting considerations that do not apply in other (e.g. light water) reactors. The moderator structure is expected to undergo radiation induced changes as the irradiation (or burnup) history progresses. In this case, the induced changes in structure will have a direct impact on many properties including the neutronic behavior. This can be easily anticipated if one recognizes the dependence of neutron thermalization on the scattering law of the moderator. For the pebble bed reactor, it is anticipated that the moderating behavior can be tailored, e.g. using moderators that consist of composite materials, which could allow improved optimization of the moderator-to-fuel ratio.

  11. Half space albedo problem for the nonconservative vector equation of transfer with a combination of Rayleigh and isotropic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenyiğit, M.

    2016-09-01

    The half-space albedo problem has been solved for a combination of Rayleigh and isotropic scattering using HN method which is developed for the neutron transport studies. The numerical results are compared with exact values obtained using variational method and Chandrasekhar's equation for the {H}-matrix. The analytical solutions of HN method are easy to handle in comparison with the other methods. The numerical results are in good agreement with previous works in literature.

  12. Integro-differential diffusion equation and neutron scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau Fa, Kwok

    2015-02-01

    An integro-differential diffusion equation with linear force, based on the continuous time random walk model, is considered. The equation generalizes the ordinary and fractional diffusion equations which includes short, intermediate and long-time memory effects. Analytical expression for the intermediate scattering function is obtained and applied to ribonucleic acid (RNA) hydration water data from torula yeast. The model can capture the dynamics of hydrogen atoms in RNA hydration water, including the long-relaxation times.

  13. Neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering studies of films of intermediate-length alkanes adsorbed on a graphite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diama, Armand

    Over the past several years, we have conducted a variety of elastic neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments to study the structure and the dynamics of films of two intermediate-length alkane molecules (C nH2n+2), adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface. The two molecules are the normal alkane n-tetracosane [n-CH 3(CH2)22CH3] and the branched alkane squalane (C30H62 or 2, 6, 10, 15, 19, 23-hexamethyltetracosane) whose carbon backbone is the same length as teteracosane. The temperature dependence of the monolayer structure of tetracosane and squalane was investigated using elastic neutron diffraction and evidence of two phase transitions was observed. Both the low-coverage tetracosane (C 24H50) and squalane (C30H62) monolayers have crystalline-to-"smectic" and "smectic"-to-isotropic fluid phase transitions upon heating. The diffusive motion in the tetracosane and squalane monolayers has been investigated by quasielastic neutron scattering. Two different quasielastic neutron scattering spectrometers at the Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been used. The spectrometers differ in both their dynamic range and energy resolution allowing molecular motions to be investigated on time scales in the range 10-13--10 -9 s. On these time scales, we observe evidence of translational, rotational, and intermolecular diffusive motions in the tetracosane and squalane monolayers. We conclude that the molecular diffusive motion in the two monolayers is qualitatively similar. Thus, despite the three methyl sidegroups at each end of the squalane molecule, its monolayer structure, phase transitions, and dynamics are qualitatively similar to that of a monolayer of the unbranched tetracosane molecules. With the higher resolution spectrometer at NIST, we have also investigated the molecular diffusive motion in multilayer tetracosane films. The analysis of our measurements indicates slower diffusive motion in

  14. Combined Gamma Ray/neutron Spectroscopy for Mapping Lunar Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Byrd, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Masarik, J.; Moss, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Some elements in the Moon can be resources, such as hydrogen and oxygen. Other elements, like Ti or the minerals in which they occur, such as ilmenite, could be used in processing lunar materials. Certain elements can also be used as tracers for other elements or lunar processes, such as hydrogen for mature regoliths with other solar-wind-implanted elements like helium, carbon, and nitrogen. A complete knowledge of the elemental composition of a lunar region is desirable both in identifying lunar resources and in lunar geochemical studies, which also helps in identifying and using lunar resources. The use of gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy together to determine abundances of many elements in the top few tens of centimeters of the lunar surface is discussed. To date, very few discussions of elemental mapping of planetary surfaces considered measurements of both gamma rays and the full range of neutron energies. The theories for gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy of the Moon and calculations of leakage fluxes are presented here with emphasis on why combined gamma ray/neutron spectroscopy is much more powerful than measuring either radiation alone.

  15. Phase separation and ordering process in Al-Li alloys studied by small-angle neutron scattering and neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Furusaka, M.; Fujikawa, S.I.; Tranquada, J.M.

    1993-07-01

    To study phase separation kinetics of Al-9.5at.%Li polycrystalline alloys in which precipitates have ordered Al{sub 3}Li ({delta}{prime}) structure, profile analysis of small-angle neutron scattering and superlattice reflections (100) and (110) were done. A small-angle scattering instrument and a triple-axis spectrometer in elastic mode were used in the measurements. Strong texture was observed in the reflections. Therefore, measurements were done using the crystal orientation where the intensity of the reflection was at the maximum. Profiles of small-angle scattering and superlattice reflections were almost identical at higher momentum transfer side. At lower momentum transfer side, small-angle scattering showed interference effects, but superlattice reflection did not show any sign of interference. Integrated intensities of superlattice reflections were obtained and compared with small-angle scattering intensity. The order parameter was not saturated in the {delta}{prime} precipitates at the early stage of the phase separation process.

  16. Neutron Scattering Cross Section Measurements for 169Tm via the (n,n') Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Alimeti, Afrim; Kegel, Gunter H.R.; Egan, James J.; DeSimone, David J.; McKittrick, Thomas M.; Ji, Chuncheng; Tremblay, Steven E.; Roldan, Carlos; Chen Xudong; Kim, Don S.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron physics group at the University of Massachusetts Lowell (UML) has been involved in a program of scattering cross-section measurements for highly deformed nuclei such as 159Tb, 169Tm, 232Th, 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. Ko et al. have reported neutron inelastic scattering data from 169Tm for states above 100 keV via the (n,n'{gamma}) reaction at incident energies in the 0.2 MeV to 1.0 MeV range. In the present research, in which the time-of-flight method was employed, direct (n,n') measurements of neutrons scattered from 169Tm in the 0.2 to 1.0 MeV range were taken. It requires that our 5.5-MeV Van de Graaff accelerator be operated in the pulsed and bunched beam mode producing subnanosecond pulses at a 5-MHz repetition frequency. Neutrons are produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction using a thin metallic elemental lithium target.

  17. Measuring Material Microstructure Under Flow Using 1-2 Plane Flow-Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Gurnon, A. Kate; Godfrin, P. Douglas; Wagner, Norman J.; Eberle, Aaron P. R.; Butler, Paul; Porcar, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    A new small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) sample environment optimized for studying the microstructure of complex fluids under simple shear flow is presented. The SANS shear cell consists of a concentric cylinder Couette geometry that is sealed and rotating about a horizontal axis so that the vorticity direction of the flow field is aligned with the neutron beam enabling scattering from the 1-2 plane of shear (velocity-velocity gradient, respectively). This approach is an advance over previous shear cell sample environments as there is a strong coupling between the bulk rheology and microstructural features in the 1-2 plane of shear. Flow-instabilities, such as shear banding, can also be studied by spatially resolved measurements. This is accomplished in this sample environment by using a narrow aperture for the neutron beam and scanning along the velocity gradient direction. Time resolved experiments, such as flow start-ups and large amplitude oscillatory shear flow are also possible by synchronization of the shear motion and time-resolved detection of scattered neutrons. Representative results using the methods outlined here demonstrate the useful nature of spatial resolution for measuring the microstructure of a wormlike micelle solution that exhibits shear banding, a phenomenon that can only be investigated by resolving the structure along the velocity gradient direction. Finally, potential improvements to the current design are discussed along with suggestions for supplementary experiments as motivation for future experiments on a broad range of complex fluids in a variety of shear motions. PMID:24561395

  18. Dynamics of crystalline acetanilide: Analysis using neutron scattering and computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, R. L.; Middendorf, H. D.; Wanderlingh, U.; Smith, J. C.

    1995-04-01

    The unusual temperature dependence of several optical spectroscopic vibrational bands in crystalline acetanilide has been interpreted as providing evidence for dynamic localization. Here we examine the vibrational dynamics of crystalline acetanilide over a spectral range of ˜20-4000 cm-1 using incoherent neutron scattering experiments, phonon normal mode calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. A molecular mechanics energy function is parametrized and used to perform the normal mode analyses in the full configurational space of the crystal i.e., including the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom. One- and multiphonon incoherent inelastic neutron scattering intensities are calculated from harmonic analyses in the first Brillouin zone and compared with the experimental data presented here. Phonon dispersion relations and mean-square atomic displacements are derived from the harmonic model and compared with data derived from coherent inelastic neutron scattering and neutron and x-ray diffraction. To examine the temperature effects on the vibrations the full, anharmonic potential function is used in molecular dynamics simulations of the crystal at 80, 140, and 300 K. Several, but not all, of the spectral features calculated from the molecular dynamics simulations exhibit temperature-dependent behavior in agreement with experiment. The significance of the results for the interpretation of the optical spectroscopic results and possible improvements to the model are discussed.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis of small-angle neutron scattering by a solution of stearic acid in benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, R. A.; Kholmurodov, Kh. T.; Petrenko, V. I.; Rosta, L.; Avdeev, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Data of small-angle neutron scattering by a diluted solution of stearic acid in deuterated benzene have been analyzed using the results of molecular dynamics simulation. The molecular dynamics simulation approach has been used to calculate the time-averaged distribution of the neutron scattering length density at the interface between the acid molecule and the solvent. It has been shown that the organization of the solvent at the interface with the acid molecule leads to a modulation of the neutron scattering length density and makes a significant contribution to the scattering. This contribution should be taken into account when interpreting the experimental small-angle neutron scattering curves for both the considered system and its analogues.

  20. Fostering applications of neutron scattering techniques in developing countries: IAEA's role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjpe, Shriniwas K.; Mank, G.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    2006-11-01

    Over the last 60 years research reactors have played an important role in technological and socio-economical development of mankind. Neutron scattering has been the workhorse for research and development in materials science. Developing countries with moderate flux research reactors have also been involved in using this technique. The reactors and the facilities around them have a large potential for applications, while their under-utilization has been a concern for many member states. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been supporting its member states in the enhancement of utilization of their research reactors. Technical meetings focussing on the area of current interests with potential applications are organized under the project on “effective utilization of research reactors,” e.g. on residual stress measurement, neutron reflectometry. Coordinated research projects (CRPs) bring together scientists from developed and developing countries, build collaborations, and exchange expertise and technology. The CRPs on research reactor utilization include topics like development of small-angle neutron scattering applications and development of sources and imaging systems for neutron radiography. New CRPs on the measurement of residual stress and accelerator-driven neutron sources will be initiated soon. The results from these meetings of CRPs are published as technical documents of the IAEA that would act as guidelines for capacity building for research reactor managers. This paper will present some of the salient features of IAEA activities in promoting research reactor utilization.

  1. Review of the Lujan neutron scattering center: basic energy sciences prereport February 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, Alan J; Rhyne, James J; Lewis, Paul S

    2009-01-01

    The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) at LANSCE is a designated National User Facility for neutron scattering and nuclear physics studies with pulsed beams of moderated neutrons (cold, thermal, and epithermal). As one of five experimental areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), the Lujan Center hosts engineers, scientists, and students from around the world. The Lujan Center consists of Experimental Room (ER) 1 (ERl) built by the Laboratory in 1977, ER2 built by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in 1989, and the Office Building (622) also built by BES in 1989, along with a chem-bio lab, a shop, and other out-buildings. According to a 1996 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Defense Programs (DP) Office of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) and the Office of Science (SC, then the Office of Energy Research), the Lujan Center flight paths were transferred from DP to SC, including those in ERI. That MOA was updated in 2001. Under the MOA, NNSA-DP delivers neutron beam to the windows of the target crypt, outside of which BES becomes the 'landlord.' The leveraging nature of the Lujan Center on the LANSCE accelerator is a substantial annual leverage to the $11 M BES operating fund worth approximately $56 M operating cost of the linear accelerator (LINAC)-in beam delivery.

  2. Studies of the Phase Transitions in UAs with Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S. K.; Lander, G. H.; Shapiro, S. M.; Vogt, O.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium arsenide is known to order with the type-I antiferromagnetic (AF) structure at ≈126 K, and exhibit a first-order transition to the type-IA AF structure at TN/2. We have now reexamined these transitions with a single crystal. Above TN UAs exhibits critical scattering suggesting a tendency to order with an incommensurate wavevector, but then suddenly orders with the AF-I structure. The analysis of the data shows the need to consider anisotropic exchange interactions of cubic symmetry between U moments.

  3. Cryogen free sample environment for neutron scattering experiments at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Down, R. B. E.; Keeping, J.; Evans, B.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2012-02-01

    Most neutron facilities have a fleet of cryostats providing low temperature and high magnetic fields for sample environment. This large scale usage of cryogenic equipment requires significant resources and can create a number of problems including health and safety issues and the considerable cost of the required cryogens. The last problem has become more significant due to the increasing costs of liquid helium caused by global helium supply problems. The ISIS facility has an internal development programme intended to gradually substitute all conventional cryogenic systems with cryogen free systems preferably based on the pulse tube refrigerator. The programme includes a number of development projects which are aiming to deliver a range of cryogen free equipment including a top-loading 1.5 K cryostat, superconducting magnets in re-condensing cryostats and cryogen free dilution refrigerators. Here we are going to describe the design of these systems and discuss the results of prototype testing.

  4. Excess wing in glass-forming glycerol and LiCl-glycerol mixtures detected by neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Arend, N.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.; Stingaciu, L.; Jalarvo, N.; Mamontov, E.; Ohl, M.

    2015-01-22

    The relaxational dynamics in glass-forming glycerol and glycerol mixed with LiCl is investigated using different neutron scattering techniques. The performed neutron spin echo experiments, which extend up to relatively long relaxation time scales of the order of 10 ns, should allow for the detection of contributions from the so-called excess wing. This phenomenon, whose microscopic origin is controversially discussed, arises in a variety of glass formers and, until now, was almost exclusively investigated by dielectric spectroscopy and light scattering. In conclusion, we show here that the relaxational process causing the excess wing can also be detected by neutron scattering, which directly couples to density fluctuations.

  5. Neutron scattering studies of structure, hydrothermal stability and transport in porous silica catalyst supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Rachel A.

    Mesoporous materials are interesting as catalyst supports, because molecules can move efficiently in and out of the pore network, but they must be stable in water if they are to be used for the production of biofuels. Before investigating hydrothermal stability and transport properties, the pore structure of SBA-15 was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and non-local density functional theory (NLDFT) analysis of nitrogen sorption isotherms. A new Contrast Matching SANS method, using a range of probe molecules to directly probe the micropore size, gave a pore size distribution onset of 6 ± 0.2 Å, consistent with cylindrical pores formed from polymer template strands that unravel into the silica matrix. Diffraction intensity analysis of SANS measurements, combined with pore size distributions calculated from NLDFT, showed that the secondary pores are distributed relatively uniformly throughout the silica framework. The hydrothermal stability of SBA-15 was evaluated using a post-calcination hydrothermal treatment in both liquid and vapor phase water. The results were consistent with a degradation mechanism in which silica dissolves from regions of small positive curvature, e.g. near the entrance to the secondary pores, and is re-deposited deeper into the framework. Under water treatment at 115 °C, the mesopore diameter increases and the intra-wall void fraction decreases significantly. The behavior is similar for steam treatment, but occurs more slowly, suggesting that transport is faster when condensation occurs in the pores. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements of methane in SBA-15 probed the rotational and translational motion as a function of temperature and loading. A qualitative analysis of the QENS data suggested that for the initial dose of methane at 100 K, the self diffusion constant is similar in magnitude to literature values for methane in ZSM-5 and Y-zeolite, showing that the secondary pores trap methane and limit

  6. Spherical momentum distribution of the protons in hexagonal ice from modeling of inelastic neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flammini, D.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Andreani, C.; McBride, F.; Hodgson, A.; Adams, M. A.; Lin, L.; Car, R.

    2012-01-01

    The spherical momentum distribution of the protons in ice is extracted from a high resolution deep inelastic neutron scattering experiment. Following a recent path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study, data were successfully interpreted in terms of an anisotropic Gaussian model, with a statistical accuracy comparable to that of the model independent scheme used previously, but providing more detailed information on the three dimensional potential energy surface experienced by the proton. A recently proposed theoretical concept is also employed to directly calculate the mean force from the experimental neutron Compton profile, and to evaluate the accuracy required to unambiguously resolve and extract the effective proton potential from the experimental data.

  7. Spherical momentum distribution of the protons in hexagonal ice from modeling of inelastic neutron scattering data.

    PubMed

    Flammini, D; Pietropaolo, A; Senesi, R; Andreani, C; McBride, F; Hodgson, A; Adams, M A; Lin, L; Car, R

    2012-01-14

    The spherical momentum distribution of the protons in ice is extracted from a high resolution deep inelastic neutron scattering experiment. Following a recent path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study, data were successfully interpreted in terms of an anisotropic Gaussian model, with a statistical accuracy comparable to that of the model independent scheme used previously, but providing more detailed information on the three dimensional potential energy surface experienced by the proton. A recently proposed theoretical concept is also employed to directly calculate the mean force from the experimental neutron Compton profile, and to evaluate the accuracy required to unambiguously resolve and extract the effective proton potential from the experimental data. PMID:22260600

  8. Analysis of C-S-H gel and cement paste by small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Andrew J. . E-mail: andrew.allen@nist.gov; Thomas, Jeffrey J. . E-mail: jthomas@northwestern.edu

    2007-03-15

    The role of small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) in the characterization of cement is briefly reviewed. The unique information obtainable from SANS analysis of C-S-H gel in hydrating cement is compared with that obtainable by other neutron methods. Implications for the nature of C-S-H gel, as detected by SANS, are considered in relation to current models. Finally, the application of the SANS method to cement paste is demonstrated by analyzing the effects of calcium chloride acceleration and sucrose retardation on the resulting hydrated microstructure.

  9. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the Neutron: JLab Experiment E08-025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benali, Meriem; Mazouz, Malek; Fonvieille, Helene

    2016-03-01

    This paper gives the preliminary results of the experimental cross section for deeply virtual Compton scattering on the neutron (en → enγ). The E08-025 experiment was performed at Jefferson Lab Hall A. We measured the (D(e; eX - H(e; e'γ)X) unpolarized cross section and we extracted, for the first time, a non-zero contribution of (neutron-DVCS + coherent-deuteron-DVCS) at Q2 = 1.75 GeV2 and xB = 0.36.

  10. Neutron scattering investigations of the partially ordered pyrochlore Tb2Sn2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Jason; Ehlers, Georg; Rule, K; Qiu, Y.; Moskvin, E; Kiefer, K; Gerischer, S

    2009-01-01

    Neutron scattering measurements have been performed on polycrystalline Tb{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}O{sub 7} at temperatures above and below that of the phase transition, T{sub N} = 0.87 K, to investigate further the spin dynamics in the magnetically ordered state. In particular, new neutron spin echo results are presented showing a dependence on Q in the dynamics. We show evidence of the coexistence of static ferromagnetism and dynamically fluctuating spins down to 30 mK and we make a comparison of this partially ordered system to the spin liquid Tb{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

  11. Mantid - Data Analysis and Visualization Package for Neutron Scattering and $\\mu SR$ Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Owen; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M; Buts, Alex; Campbell, Stuart I; Doucet, Mathieu; Draper, Nicholas J; Ferraz Leal, Ricardo F; Gigg, Martyn; Lynch, Vickie E; Mikkelson, Dennis J; Mikkelson, Ruth L; Miller, Ross G; Perring, Toby G; Peterson, Peter F; Ren, Shelly; Reuter, Michael A; Savici, Andrei T; Taylor, Jonathan W; Taylor, Russell J; Zhou, Wenduo; Zikovsky, Janik L

    2014-11-01

    The Mantid framework is a software solution developed for the analysis and visualization of neutron scattering and muon spin measurements. The framework is jointly developed by a large team of software engineers and scientists at the ISIS Neutron and Muon Facility and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the development is to improve software quality, both in terms of performance and ease of use, for the the user community of large scale facilities. The functionality and novel design aspects of the framework are described.

  12. Neutron and X-ray scattering on Li-doped BPO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jak, M. J. G.; Verhoeven, V. W. J.; de Schepper, I. M.; Mulder, F. M.; Kelder, E. M.; Schoonman, J.

    1999-05-01

    The structure of pure BPO 4 and Li-doped BPO 4 has been studied by neutron and X-ray scattering. Rietveld refinement of the neutron and X-ray spectra of the doped material did not show additional phases or a lithium superstructure. It appears that the interstitial Li +-ions as well as the charge compensating boron vacancies and substitutionally incorporated Li +-ions on boron sites are randomly distributed over the lattice resulting only in a slight change in peak intensities. The relevance of QENS for ceramic Li-ion batteries is discussed.

  13. Neutron Scattering Analysis of Water's Glass Transition and Micropore Collapse in Amorphous Solid Water.

    PubMed

    Hill, Catherine R; Mitterdorfer, Christian; Youngs, Tristan G A; Bowron, Daniel T; Fraser, Helen J; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-05-27

    The question of the nature of water's glass transition has continued to be disputed over many years. Here we use slow heating scans (0.4  K min^{-1}) of compact amorphous solid water deposited at 77 K and an analysis of the accompanying changes in the small-angle neutron scattering signal, to study mesoscale changes in the ice network topology. From the data we infer the onset of rotational diffusion at 115 K, a sudden switchover from nondiffusive motion and enthalpy relaxation of the network at <121  K to diffusive motion across sample grains and sudden pore collapse at >121  K, in excellent agreement with the glass transition onset deduced from heat capacity and dielectric measurements. This indicates that water's glass transition is linked with long-range transport of water molecules on the time scale of minutes and, thus, clarifies its nature. Furthermore, the slow heating rates combined with the high crystallization resistance of the amorphous sample allow us to identify the glass transition end point at 136 K, which is well separated from the crystallization onset at 144 K-in contrast to all earlier experiments in the field. PMID:27284664

  14. ''Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Periodic Density Functional Studies of Hydrogen Bonded Structures''

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce S. Hudson

    2004-10-27

    This project is directed at a fundamental understanding of hydrogen bonding, the primary reversible interaction leading to defined geometries, networks and supramolecular aggregates formed by organic molecules. Hydrogen bonding is still not sufficiently well understood that the geometry of such supramolecular aggregates can be predicted. In the approach taken existing quantum chemical methods capable of treating periodic solids have been applied to hydrogen bonded systems of known structure. The equilibrium geometry for the given space group and packing arrangement were computed and compared to that observed. The second derivatives and normal modes of vibration will then be computed and from this inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra were computed using the normal mode eigenvectors to compute spectral intensities. Appropriate inclusion of spectrometer line width and shape was made in the simulation and overtones, combinations and phonon wings were be included. These computed spectra were then compared with experimental results obtained for low-temperature polycrystalline samples at INS spectrometers at several facilities. This procedure validates the computational methodology for describing these systems including both static and dynamic aspects of the material. The resulting description can be used to evaluate the relative free energies of two or more proposed structures and so ultimately to be able to predict which structure will be most stable for a given building block.

  15. Small angle neutron scattering contrast variation reveals heterogeneities of interactions in protein gels.

    PubMed

    Banc, A; Charbonneau, C; Dahesh, M; Appavou, M-S; Fu, Z; Morel, M-H; Ramos, L

    2016-06-28

    We propose a quantitative approach to probe the spatial heterogeneities of interactions in macromolecular gels, based on a combination of small angle X-ray (SAXS) and neutrons (SANS) scattering. We investigate the structure of model gluten protein gels and show that the gels display radically different SAXS and SANS profiles when the solvent is (at least partially) deuterated. The detailed analysis of the SANS signal as a function of the solvent deuteration demonstrates heterogeneities of sample deuteration at different length scales. The progressive exchange between the protons (H) of the proteins and the deuteriums (D) of the solvent is inhomogeneous and 60 nm large zones that are enriched in H are evidenced. In addition, at low protein concentration, in the sol state, solvent deuteration induces a liquid/liquid phase separation. Complementary biochemical and structure analyses show that the denser protein phase is more protonated and specifically enriched in glutenin, the polymeric fraction of gluten proteins. These findings suggest that the presence of H-rich zones in gluten gels would arise from the preferential interaction of glutenin polymers through a tight network of non-exchangeable intermolecular hydrogen bonds. PMID:27198847

  16. Neutron Scattering Analysis of Water's Glass Transition and Micropore Collapse in Amorphous Solid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Catherine R.; Mitterdorfer, Christian; Youngs, Tristan G. A.; Bowron, Daniel T.; Fraser, Helen J.; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The question of the nature of water's glass transition has continued to be disputed over many years. Here we use slow heating scans (0.4 K min-1 ) of compact amorphous solid water deposited at 77 K and an analysis of the accompanying changes in the small-angle neutron scattering signal, to study mesoscale changes in the ice network topology. From the data we infer the onset of rotational diffusion at 115 K, a sudden switchover from nondiffusive motion and enthalpy relaxation of the network at <121 K to diffusive motion across sample grains and sudden pore collapse at >121 K , in excellent agreement with the glass transition onset deduced from heat capacity and dielectric measurements. This indicates that water's glass transition is linked with long-range transport of water molecules on the time scale of minutes and, thus, clarifies its nature. Furthermore, the slow heating rates combined with the high crystallization resistance of the amorphous sample allow us to identify the glass transition end point at 136 K, which is well separated from the crystallization onset at 144 K—in contrast to all earlier experiments in the field.

  17. In situ small angle neutron scattering revealing ion sorption in microporous carbon electrical double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Boukhalfa, Sofiane; Gordon, Daniel; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Nitta, Naoki; Magasinski, Alexandre; Yushin, Gleb

    2014-03-25

    Experimental studies showed the impact of the electrolyte solvents on both the ion transport and the specific capacitance of microporous carbons. However, the related structure-property relationships remain largely unclear and the reported results are inconsistent. The details of the interactions of the charged carbon pore walls with electrolyte ions and solvent molecules at a subnanometer scale are still largely unknown. Here for the first time we utilize in situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to reveal the electroadsorption of organic electrolyte ions in carbon pores of different sizes. A 1 M solution of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEATFB) salt in deuterated acetonitrile (d-AN) was used in an activated carbon with the pore size distribution similar to that of the carbons used in commercial double layer capacitors. In spite of the incomplete wetting of the smallest carbon pores by the d-AN, we observed enhanced ion sorption in subnanometer pores under the applied potential. Such results suggest the visible impact of electrowetting phenomena counterbalancing the high energy of the carbon/electrolyte interface in small pores. This behavior may explain the characteristic butterfly wing shape of the cyclic voltammetry curve that demonstrates higher specific capacitance at higher applied potentials, when the smallest pores become more accessible to electrolyte. Our study outlines a general methodology for studying various organic salts-solvent-carbon combinations.

  18. Linking CO2 Sorption Performance to Polymer Morphology in Aminopolymer/Silica Composites through Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Holewinski, Adam; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-09-16

    Composites of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) and mesoporous silica are effective, reversible adsorbents for CO2, both from flue gas and in direct air-capture applications. The morphology of the PEI within the silica can strongly impact the overall carbon capture efficiency and rate of saturation. Here, we directly probe the spatial distribution of the supported polymer through small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Combined with textural characterization from physisorption analysis, the data indicate that PEI first forms a thin conformal coating on the pore walls, but all additional polymer aggregates into plug(s) that grow along the pore axis. This model is consistent with observed trends in amine-efficiency (CO2/N binding ratio) and pore size distributions, and points to a trade-off between achieving high chemical accessibility of the amine binding sites, which are inaccessible when they strongly interact with the silica, and high accessibility for mass transport, which can be hampered by diffusion through PEI plugs. We illustrate this design principle by demonstrating higher CO2 capacity and uptake rate for PEI supported in a hydrophobically modified silica, which exhibits repulsive interactions with the PEI, freeing up binding sites.

  19. Elastic diffuse scattering of neutrons in FeNi Invar alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Y.; Hao, L.; Shimomura, S.; Ye, F.; Robertson, J. L.; Fernandez-Baca, J.

    2008-09-01

    Elastic diffuse scattering of neutrons was found around various Bragg-peak positions in FeNi Invar alloys. The diffuse scattering intensities depend on the temperature and Ni concentration. The intensities increase with decreasing temperature and decrease with increasing Ni concentration. The distribution of diffuse scattering intensity changes from peak to peak and is well explained by the formation of clusters with a lattice deformation consisting of a shear wave propagating along the ⟨110⟩ direction and with the ⟨1-10⟩ polarization vector. The ranges of temperature and Ni concentration, for which diffuse scattering is observed, coincide with those for which the Invar anomalies are observable. The origin of the clusters together with the lattice deformation and their role with regard to the Invar effects are discussed as well as the possibility of a precursor for the fcc-bcc martensitic transformation observed in FeNi alloys.

  20. How low-energy weak reactions can constrain three-nucleon forces and the neutron-neutron scattering length.

    PubMed

    Gårdestig, A; Phillips, D R

    2006-06-16

    We show that chiral symmetry and gauge invariance enforce relations between the short-distance physics that occurs in a number of electroweak and pionic reactions on light nuclei. Within chiral perturbation theory, this is manifested via the appearance of the same axial isovector two-body contact term in pi(-)d --> nngamma, p-wave pion production in NN collisions, tritium beta decay, pp fusion, nud scattering, and the hep reaction. Using a Gamow-Teller matrix element obtained from calculations of pp fusion as input, we compute the neutron spectrum obtained in pi(-)d --> nngamma. With the short-distance physics in this process controlled from pp --> de(=)nu(e), the theoretical uncertainty in the nn scattering length extracted from pi(-)d --> nngamma is reduced by a factor larger than 3, to approximately < or = 0.05 fm. PMID:16803373

  1. Neutron scattering study of the magnetism in a nanocrystalline/amorphous material

    SciTech Connect

    Rosov, N.; Lynn, J.W. |; Fish, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    Recently developed nanocrystalline magnetic systems are of considerable interest fundamentally as well as technologically. One such material is Fe{sub 73.5}B{sub 9}Si{sub 13.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}, which can be produced by heat treating the amorphous precursor. This forms a noncrystalline phase with typical dimension of 350 {angstrom} as determined by neutron diffraction. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been employed to investigate the properties of the nanocrystallized material over the temperature range from 10 K to 725 K, a regime where no significant structural changes are expected to occur. In zero field and low temperature (10 K) the authors obtained an isotropic scattering pattern. The application of a relatively modest field to sweep out the domains changed the scattering to a butterfly wings pattern typical of patterns dominated by magnetic elastic intensity. Up to 450 K this pattern changed only modestly, while for substantially higher temperatures the ratio of inelastic to elastic scattering increased rapidly as the magnetic phase transition of the intergranular component ({approx_equal} 575 K) was approached. Triple axis inelastic measurements showed that the majority of the magnetic inelastic scattering was from the nanocrystalline phase.

  2. Br diffusion in molten NaBr explored by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Demmel, F; Alcaraz, O; Trullas, J

    2016-04-01

    Molten sodium bromide has been investigated by quasielastic neutron scattering focusing on the wave vector range around the first structure factor peak. The linewidth of the scattering function shows a narrowing around the wave number of the structure factor peak, known as deGennes narrowing. In a monatomic system, this narrowing or in the time domain slowing down, has been related to a self-diffusion process of the caged particle. Here we show that this methodology can be applied to the molten alkali halide NaBr. The incoherent scattering from the sodium ions at small wave vectors provides the self-diffusion coefficient of sodium and the dynamics of bromine ions can be studied at wave numbers around the structure factor peak. With input from molecular dynamics simulations on the partial structure factors, diffusion coefficients of the bromine ions can be obtained. These experimentally derived diffusion coefficients are in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulation results. This methodology to extract self-diffusion coefficients from coherent quasielastic neutron scattering is applicable to binary fluids in general when one particle dominates the scattering response at the structure factor maximum. PMID:27176349

  3. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering study of the NIST mAb reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Liu, Yun; Krueger, Susan; Curtis, Joseph

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of great interest to the biopharmaceutical industry because they can be engineered to target specific antigens. Due to their importance, the biomanufacturing initiative at NIST is developing an IgG1 mAb reference material `NIST mAb', which can be used by industry, academia, and regulatory authorities. As part of this collaborative effort, we aim at characterizing the reference material using neutron scattering techniques. We have studied the small-angle scattering profile of the NIST mAb in a histidine buffer at 0 and 150 mM NaCl. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate an ensemble of structures and calculate their theoretical scattering profile, which can be directly compared with experimental data. Moreover, we analyze the structure factor to understand the effect of solution conditions on the protein-protein interactions. Finally, we have measured the solution scattering of the NIST mAb, while simultaneously performing freeze/thaw cycles, in order to investigate if the solution structure was affected upon freezing. The results from neutron scattering not only support the development of the reference material, but also provide insights on its stability and guide efforts for its development under different formulations.

  4. Neutron scattering study of the vibrations in vitreous silica and germania

    SciTech Connect

    Fabiani, E.; Fontana, A.; Buchenau, U.

    2008-06-28

    The incoherent approximation for the determination of the vibrational density of states of glasses from inelastic neutron or x-ray scattering data is extended to treat the coherent scattering. The method is applied to new room temperature measurements of vitreous silica and germania on the thermal time-of-flight spectrometer IN4 at the High Flux Reactor in Grenoble. The inelastic dynamic structure factor at the boson peak turns out to agree reasonably well with simulation results, but the long-wavelength fraction exceeds the expectation of the Debye model, in particular, in germania.

  5. Investigation of the paramagnetic phase of bcc iron using polarized neutron scattering. [Fe (4%-Si)

    SciTech Connect

    Wicksted, J.P.; Shirane, G.; Steinsvoll, O.

    1983-01-01

    Recent neutron scattering experiments on Ni and Fe (4%-Si) above T/sub c/ have demonstrated that a simple paramagnetic scattering function S(Q..omega..) proportional to 1/(kappa/sub 1//sup 2/ + q/sup 2/).GAMMA/(GAMMA/sup 2/ + ..omega../sup 2/) can explain the persistent spin wave ridges previously reported by Lynn and Mook. We present our new polarized beam results on pure Fe and describe in some detail the special problems associated with the unpolarized beam studies of magnetic cross sections at high temperatures.

  6. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-11-01

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  7. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Observation of Chain Retraction after a Large Step Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.; Heinrich, M.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Richter, D.; Graham, R.S.; Likhtman, A.E.; McLeish, T.C.B.; Read, D.J.; Straube, E.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2005-10-14

    The process of retraction in entangled linear chains after a fast nonlinear stretch was detected from time-resolved but quenched small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments on long, well-entangled polyisoprene chains. The statically obtained SANS data cover the relevant time regime for retraction, and they provide a direct, microscopic verification of this nonlinear process as predicted by the tube model. Clear, quantitative agreement is found with recent theories of contour length fluctuations and convective constraint release, using parameters obtained mainly from linear rheology. The theory captures the full range of scattering vectors once the crossover to fluctuations on length scales below the tube diameter is accounted for.

  8. Neutron Scattering Studies of Pre-Transitional Effects in Solid-Solid Phase Transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S. M.

    1999-06-30

    Neutron scattering studies have played a fundamental role in understanding solid-solid phase transformations, particularly in studying the lattice dynamical behavior associated with precursor effects. A review of the studies performed on solids exhibiting Martensitic transformations is given below. The mode softening and associated elastic diffuse scattering, previously observed in NiAl alloys, will be discussed as well as more recent work on Ni{sub 2}MnGa, a system exhibiting magnetic order as well as a Martensitic transformation. Also, new results on the precursor effects in ordered and disordered FePt alloys will be presented.

  9. Small angle neutron scattering studies of HbA in concentrated solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, S; Chen, S H; Hofrichter, J; Nossal, R

    1990-01-01

    Differential cross-sections for neutrons scattered by normal human hemoglobin have been determined over the range of concentrations from 2 to approximately 35 weight percent. Data are compared with structure factors calculated from models of monodisperse hard spheres interacting through a screened Coulomb potential. Good agreement is noted when the volume fraction eta is adjusted during multivariate fitting of data, but the fitted value of eta is always lower than expected from the known Hb concentration of the samples. Calculations of cross-sections for polydisperse scatterers suggest that the samples may contain oligomers of the fundamental tetrameric Hb molecule. PMID:2207261

  10. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-10-12

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  11. Small angle neutron scattering from nanocrystalline Pd and Co compacted at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R.; Barker, J.G.; Siegel, R.W.

    1994-05-01

    Nanocrystalline (n-) Cu and Pd, prepared by inert gas condensation and in situ room temperature (RT) and elevated temperature (warm) compactions, have been studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Previous work on RT compacted and subsequently annealed n-Pd seemed to show that all the scattering could be accounted for by a distribution of pores. Analysis of more extensive SANS measurements, together with results of prompt gamma activation analysis, indicates that the SANS can be explained by the presence of pores and hydrogen. Warm compaction reduces the hydrogen impurity level, while increasing the bulk density and decreasing the pore size. This can lead to a dramatic hardness increase in these materials.

  12. On scattered waves and lipid domains: detecting membrane rafts with X-rays and neutrons.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A; Nickels, Jonathan D; Pabst, Georg; Katsaras, John

    2015-12-21

    In order to understand the biological role of lipids in cell membranes, it is necessary to determine the mesoscopic structure of well-defined model membrane systems. Neutron and X-ray scattering are non-invasive, probe-free techniques that have been used extensively in such systems to probe length scales ranging from angstroms to microns, and dynamics occurring over picosecond to millisecond time scales. Recent developments in the area of phase separated lipid systems mimicking membrane rafts will be presented, and the underlying concepts of the different scattering techniques used to study them will be discussed in detail.

  13. Laser beam combiner for Thomson scattering core LIDAR.

    PubMed

    Balboa, I; Huang, B; Naylor, G; Walsh, M; Sirinelli, A; Parsons, P; Fessey, J; Townsend, M; Beurskens, M; Conway, N; Flanagan, J; Kempenaars, M; Kirk, A

    2010-10-01

    The light detection and ranging Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic is advantageous since it only requires a single view port into the tokamak. This technique requires a short pulse laser at high energy, usually showing a limited repetition rate. Having multiple lasers will increase the repetition rate. This paper presents a scanning mirror as a laser beam combiner. Measurements of the position accuracy and jitter show that the pointing stability of the laser beam is within ±25 μrad for over tens of seconds. A control feedback loop is implemented to demonstrate the long term stability. Such a system could be applied for ITER and JET. PMID:21033888

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering on the high-frequency ultrasound in single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iolin, E.; Farago, B.; Mezei, F.; Raitman, E.; Rusevich, L.

    We have observed, for the first time, inelastic neutron scattering from the phonons externally excited in single crystals. We have used ultrasonic transducers (50-200 MHz) for the excitation and neutron spin-echo spectroscopy for observing acoustic phonons. This allowed us to trace evolution of the elastic Bragg intensity I(0) and of the phonon harmonics up to the seventh order as a function of the excitation power. In contrast to the common belief, we have found that in perfect Si ultrasound does not seriously increase I(0), but an apparent increase in the Bragg intensity is entirely due to the onset of inelastic scattering. At the highest power we observed a cross-over to a chaotic phonon behavior. In deformed Si I(0) strongly decreases at a low acoustic power. The same effect could be observed in KBr and graphite crystals where the ultrasonic field made the entire mosaic blocks vibrate.

  15. Characteristic Features of Water Dynamics in Restricted Geometries Investigated with Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Osti, Naresh C.; Mamontov, Eugene; Ramirez-cuesta, A.; Wesolowski, David J.; Diallo, S. O.

    2015-12-10

    Understanding the molecular behavior of water in spatially restricted environments is important to better understanding its role in many biological, chemical and geological processes. Here we examine the translational diffusion of water confined to a variety of substrates, from flat surfaces to nanoporous media, in the context of a recently proposed universal scaling law (Chiavazzo 2014) [1]. Using over a dozen previous neutron scattering results, we test the validity of this law, evaluating separately the influence of the hydration amount, and the effects of the size and morphology of the confining medium. Additionally, we investigate the effects of changing instrument resolutions and fitting models on the applicability of this law. Finally, we perform quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements on water confined inside nanoporous silica to further evaluate this predictive law, in the temperature range 250≤T≤290 K.

  16. Molecular motion of ferrocene in a faujasite-type zeolite: A quasielastic neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Kemner, E.; Schepper, I.M. de; Schmets, A.J.M.; Grimm, H.; Overweg, A.R.; Santen, R.A. van

    2000-02-24

    The authors study the molecular motion of ferrocene Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2} locked up in the supercages of KY zeolite at temperatures 22 K {le} T {le} 238 K by means of quasielastic neutron scattering. The geometry of the motion is determined to be a 5-fold internal jump reorientation of the cyclopentadienyl C{sub 5}H{sub 5} rings around the symmetry axis of the ferrocene molecule. The mean residence time was obtained for these jumps as well as the activation energy for the process. A comparison was made of NMR results on ferrocene in faujasite-type zeolites and quasielastic neutron scattering results on pure ferrocene.

  17. Effects of Pressure on Stability of Biomolecules in Solutions Studied by Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire-; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Gibrat, Gabriel

    Studies of the pressure dependence on protein structure and dynamics contribute not only to the basic knowledge of biological molecules but have also a considerable relevance in full technology, like in food sterilization and pharmacy. Conformational changes induced by pressure as well as the effects on the protein stability have been mostly studied by optical techniques (optical absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence), and by NMR. Most optical techniques used so far give information related to the local nature of the used probe (fluorescent or phosphorescent tryptophan). Small angle neutron scattering and quasi-elastic neutron scattering provide essential complementary information to the optical data, giving quantitative data on change of conformation of soluble globular proteins such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and on the mobility of protons belonging to the protein surface residues.

  18. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of complex confined fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S. K.

    1999-08-04

    We review recent X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of confined complex fluids. This includes the study of polymer conformations and binary fluid phase transitions in porous media using Small Angle Neutron scattering, and the use of synchrotrons radiation to study ordering and fluctuation phenomena at solid/liquid and liquid/air interfaces. Ordering of liquids near a solid surface or in confinement will be discussed, and the study, via specular and off-specular X-ray reflectivity, of capillary wave fluctuations on liquid polymer films. Finally, we shall discuss the use of high-brilliance beams from X-ray synchrotrons to study via photon correlation spectroscopy the slow dynamics of soft condensed matter systems.

  19. Characteristic Features of Water Dynamics in Restricted Geometries Investigated with Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Osti, Naresh C.; Mamontov, Eugene; Ramirez-cuesta, A.; Wesolowski, David J.; Diallo, S. O.

    2015-12-10

    Understanding the molecular behavior of water in spatially restricted environments is important to better understanding its role in many biological, chemical and geological processes. Here we examine the translational diffusion of water confined to a variety of substrates, from flat surfaces to nanoporous media, in the context of a recently proposed universal scaling law (Chiavazzo 2014) [1]. Using over a dozen previous neutron scattering results, we test the validity of this law, evaluating separately the influence of the hydration amount, and the effects of the size and morphology of the confining medium. Additionally, we investigate the effects of changing instrumentmore » resolutions and fitting models on the applicability of this law. Finally, we perform quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements on water confined inside nanoporous silica to further evaluate this predictive law, in the temperature range 250≤T≤290 K.« less

  20. Form fluctuations of polymer loaded spherical microemulsions studied by neutron scattering and dielectric spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttich, B. Stühn, B.; Falus, P.; Grillo, I.

    2014-08-28

    We investigate the structure and shell dynamics of the droplet phase in water/AOT/octane microemulsions with polyethyleneglycol (M{sub W} = 1500) molecules loaded in the droplets. Size and polydispersity of the droplets is determined with small angle X-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering experiments. Shell fluctuations are measured with neutron spin echo spectroscopy and related to the dynamic percolation seen in dielectric spectroscopy. Shell fluctuations are found to be well described by the bending modulus of the shell and the viscosities inside and outside the droplets. Addition of the polymer decreases the modulus for small droplets. For large droplets the opposite is found as percolation temperature shifts to higher values.

  1. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vortex Matter in Type-II Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Xinsheng Ling

    2012-02-02

    The proposed program is an experimental study of the fundamental properties of Abrikosov vortex matter in type-II superconductors. Most superconducting materials used in applications such as MRI are type II and their transport properties are determined by the interplay between random pinning, interaction and thermal fluctuation effects in the vortex state. Given the technological importance of these materials, a fundamental understanding of the vortex matter is necessary. The vortex lines in type-II superconductors also form a useful model system for fundamental studies of a number of important issues in condensed matter physics, such as the presence of a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the presence of random pinning. Recent advances in neutron scattering facilities such as the major upgrade of the NIST cold source and the Spallation Neutron Source are providing unprecedented opportunities in addressing some of the longstanding issues in vortex physics. The core component of the proposed program is to use small angle neutron scattering and Bitter decoration experiments to provide the most stringent test of the Bragg glass theory by measuring the structure factor in both the real and reciprocal spaces. The proposed experiments include a neutron reflectometry experiment to measure the precise Q-dependence of the structure factor of the vortex lattice in the Bragg glass state. A second set of SANS experiments will be on a shear-strained Nb single crystal for testing a recently proposed theory of the stability of Bragg glass. The objective is to artificially create a set of parallel grain boundaries into a Nb single crystal and use SANS to measure the vortex matter diffraction pattern as a function of the changing angle between the applied magnetic field to the grain boundaries. The intrinsic merits of the proposed work are a new fundamental understanding of type-II superconductors on which superconducting technology is based, and a firm understanding of phases

  2. Object-oriented data analysis framework for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Jiro; Nakatani, Takeshi; Ohhara, Takashi; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Yonemura, Masao; Morishima, Takahiro; Aoyagi, Tetsuo; Manabe, Atsushi; Otomo, Toshiya

    2009-02-01

    Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is one of the facilities that provided the highest intensity pulsed neutron and muon beams. The MLF computing environment design group organizes the computing environments of MLF and instruments. It is important that the computing environment is provided by the facility side, because meta-data formats, the analysis functions and also data analysis strategy should be shared among many instruments in MLF. The C++ class library, named Manyo-lib, is a framework software for developing data reduction and analysis softwares. The framework is composed of the class library for data reduction and analysis operators, network distributed data processing modules and data containers. The class library is wrapped by the Python interface created by SWIG. All classes of the framework can be called from Python language, and Manyo-lib will be cooperated with the data acquisition and data-visualization components through the MLF-platform, a user interface unified in MLF, which is working on Python language. Raw data in the event-data format obtained by data acquisition systems will be converted into histogram format data on Manyo-lib in high performance, and data reductions and analysis are performed with user-application software developed based on Manyo-lib. We enforce standardization of data containers with Manyo-lib, and many additional fundamental data containers in Manyo-lib have been designed and developed. Experimental and analysis data in the data containers can be converted into NeXus file. Manyo-lib is the standard framework for developing analysis software in MLF, and prototypes of data-analysis softwares for each instrument are being developed by the instrument teams.

  3. Mean square displacement evaluation by elastic neutron scattering self-distribution function.

    PubMed

    Magazù, Salvatore; Maisano, Giacomo; Migliardo, Federica; Benedetto, Antonio

    2008-06-01

    In the present work an operational recipe for the mean square displacement (MSD) determination, highlighting the connection between elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) intensity profiles and the associated self-distribution function, is presented. The determination of the thermal behavior of the total MSD and of its partial contributions is tested on EINS data collected by the backscattering spectrometer IN13 (ILL, Grenoble) on a model system such as PolyEthylene Glycol with a mean molecular weight of 400 Dalton (PEG 400).

  4. Nonreciprocal elastic scattering of unpolarized neutrons by magnetic systems with the noncoplanar magnetization distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarskiy, D. A. Udalov, O. G.; Fraerman, A. A.

    2012-10-15

    It is shown that the elastic scattering of unpolarized neutrons by systems with the noncoplanar spatial magnetic induction distribution in nonreciprocal. Two systems with the noncoplanar distribution of the magnetic field are proposed and calculated, i.e., a nanoparticle with vortex magnetization and a system of three magnetic mirrors. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the nonreciprocity is rather large and can be observed experimentally.

  5. Functional materials analysis using in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Vanessa K.; Papadakis, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    In situ and in operando studies are commonplace and necessary in functional materials research. This review highlights recent developments in the analysis of functional materials using state-of-the-art in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering and analysis. Examples are given covering a number of important materials areas, alongside a description of the types of information that can be obtained and the experimental setups used to acquire them. PMID:25866665

  6. Two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors for small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McElhaney, S.A.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, various detectors available for small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are discussed, along with some current developments being actively pursued. A section has been included to outline the various methodologies of position encoding/decoding with discussions on trends and limitations. Computer software/hardware vary greatly from institute and experiment and only a general discussion is given to this area. 85 refs., 33 figs.

  7. Pore size distribution of shaley rock by small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, P. L.; Mildner, D. F. R.; Borst, R. L.

    1983-08-01

    Information concerning pore microstructure of shaly rocks is of considerable relevance to petroleum exploration and production. Pore sizes and distributions within shaly samples have been determined by small angle neutron scattering. The data are indicative of a considerable spread of pore dimension, showing inhomogeneities with a range from 20 Å and greater. The cumulative pore volumes are compared with those derived from mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms.

  8. Pore size distribution of shaly rock by small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, P.L.; Mildner, D.F.R.; Borst, R.L.

    1983-08-01

    Information concerning pore microstructure of shaly rocks is of considerable relevance to petroleum exploration and production. Pore sizes and distributions within shaly samples have been determined by small angle neutron scattering. The data are indicative of a considerable spread of pore dimension, showing inhomogeneities with a range from 20 A and greater. The cumulative pore volumes are compared with those derived from mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms.

  9. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide as studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Mariette; Eckert, Juegen; Johnson, Susanna W.; Moret, Jacques; Swanson, Basil I.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    1992-10-01

    A study of the anomalous modes in acetanilide and five deuterated derivatives by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is reported. These data show that the dynamics of the amide and methyl groups influence each other. In addition, the anomalous temperature behaviour of the NH out-of-plane bending mode is confirmed. These observations suggest that the self-trapping mechanism in ACN may be more complex than hitherto assumed.

  10. Self-similar multiscale structure of lignin revealed by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker; Heller, William T; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Foston, Marcus B; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Lignin, a major polymeric component of plant cell walls, forms aggregates in vivo and poses a barrier to cellulosic ethanol production. Here, neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations reveal that lignin aggregates are characterized by a surface fractal dimension that is invariant under change of scale from 1 1000 A. The simulations also reveal extensive water penetration of the aggregates and heterogeneous chain dynamics corresponding to a rigid core with a fluid surface.

  11. Neutron scattering investigation of the magnetic order in single crystalline BaFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Wei; Qiu, Y; Kofu, M; Lee, S - H; Chang, S; Wu, T; Wu, G; Chen, X H

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic structure of BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} was determined from polycrystalline neutron diffraction measurements soon after the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type FeAs-based superconductors were discovered. Both the moment direction and the in-plane antiferromagnetic wavevector are along the longer a-axis of the orthorhombic unit cell. There is only one combined magnetostructural transition at {approx}140 K. However, a later single-crystal neutron diffraction work reported contradicting results. Here, we show neutron diffraction results from a single-crystal sample, grown by a self-flux method, that support the original polycrystalline work.

  12. Pronounced microheterogeneity in a sorbitol-water mixture observed through variable temperature neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shin G; Soper, Alan K; Khodadadi, Sheila; Curtis, Joseph E; Krueger, Susan; Cicerone, Marcus T; Fitch, Andrew N; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y

    2012-04-19

    In this study, the structure of concentrated d-sorbitol-water mixtures is studied by wide- and small-angle neutron scattering (WANS and SANS) as a function of temperature. The mixtures are prepared using both deuterated and regular sorbitol and water at a molar fraction of sorbitol of 0.19 (equivalent to 70% by weight of regular sorbitol in water). Retention of an amorphous structure (i.e., absence of crystallinity) is confirmed for this system over the entire temperature range, 100-298 K. The glass transition temperature, Tg, is found from differential scanning calorimetry to be approximately 200 K. WANS data are analyzed using empirical potential structure refinement, to obtain the site-site radial distribution functions (RDFs) and coordination numbers. This analysis reveals the presence of nanoscaled water clusters surrounded by (and interacting with) sorbitol molecules. The water clusters appear more structured compared to bulk water and, especially at the lowest temperatures, resemble the structure of low-density amorphous ice (LDA). Upon cooling to 100 K the peaks in the water RDFs become markedly sharper, with increased coordination number, indicating enhanced local (nanometer-scale) ordering, with changes taking place both above and well below the Tg. On the mesoscopic (submicrometer) scale, although there are no changes between 298 and 213 K, cooling the sample to 100 K results in a significant increase in the SANS signal, which is indicative of pronounced inhomogeneities. This increase in the scattering is partly reversed during heating, although some hysteresis is observed. Furthermore, a power law analysis of the SANS data indicates the existence of domains with well-defined interfaces on the submicrometer length scale, probably as a result of the appearance and growth of microscopic voids in the glassy matrix. Because of the unusual combination of small and wide scattering data used here, the present results provide new physical insight into the

  13. Evidence for a narrow N{sup *}(1685) resonance in quasifree Compton scattering on the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.; Polyakov, M. V.; Bellini, V.; Giusa, A.; Mammoliti, F.; Randieri, C.; Russo, G.; Sperduto, M. L.; Boiko, T.; Chebotaryov, S.; Dho, H.-S.; Kim, W.; Milman, E.; Ni, A.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Kim, A.; Perevalova, I. A.; Vall, A. N.; Sutera, C. M.

    2011-02-15

    The study of quasifree Compton scattering on the neutron in the energy range of E{sub {gamma}}=0.75-1.5 GeV is presented. The data reveal a narrow peak at W{approx}1.685 GeV. This result, being considered in conjunction with the recent evidence for a narrow structure at W{approx}1.68 GeV in {eta} photoproduction on the neutron, suggests the existence of a nucleon resonance with unusual properties: a mass M{approx}1.685 GeV, a narrow width {Gamma}{<=}30 MeV, and the much stronger photoexcitation on the neutron than on the proton.

  14. A new small-angle neutron scattering spectrometer at China Mianyang research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Mei; Sun, Liangwei; Chen, Liang; Sun, Guangai; Chen, Bo; Xie, Chaomei; Xia, Qingzhong; Yan, Guanyun; Tian, Qiang; Huang, Chaoqiang; Pang, Beibei; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun; Liu, Yaoguang; Kang, Wu; Gong, Jian

    2016-02-01

    A new pinhole small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectrometer, installed at the cold neutron source of the 20 MW China Mianyang Research Reactor (CMRR) in the Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, has been put into use since 2014. The spectrometer is equipped with a multi-blade mechanical velocity selector, a multi-beam collimation system, and a two-dimensional He-3 position sensitive neutron detector. The q-range of the spectrometer covers from 0.01 nm-1 to 5.0 nm-1. In this paper, the design and characteristics of the SANS spectrometer are described. The q-resolution calculations, together with calibration measurements of silver behenate and a dispersion of nearly monodisperse poly-methyl-methacrylate nanoparticles indicate that our SANS spectrometer has a good performance and is now in routine service.

  15. Computation of diffuse scattering arising from one-phonon excitations in a neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Laue diffraction experiment

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, Matthias J.; Graziano, Gabriella; Mukhopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Refson, Keith; von Zimmerman, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Direct phonon excitation in a neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Laue diffraction experiment has been observed in a single crystal of NaCl. At room temperature both phonon emission and excitation leave characteristic features in the diffuse scattering and these are well reproduced using ab initio phonons from density functional theory (DFT). A measurement at 20 K illustrates the effect of thermal population of the phonons, leaving the features corresponding to phonon excitation and strongly suppressing the phonon annihilation. A recipe is given to compute these effects combining DFT results with the geometry of the neutron experiment. PMID:26306090

  16. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized [sup 3]He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L. ); Jones, C.E. ); DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P. ); Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C. ); Lorenzon, W. )

    1994-08-01

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized [sup 3]He target. The neutron magnetic form factor [ital G][sup [ital n

  17. Wavelength-independent constant period spin-echo modulated small angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Habicht, Klaus; Tremsin, Anton; Bouwman, Wim; Strobl, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SEMSANS) in Time-of-Flight (ToF) mode has been shown to be a promising technique for measuring (very) small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signals and performing quantitative Dark-Field Imaging (DFI), i.e., SANS with 2D spatial resolution. However, the wavelength dependence of the modulation period in the ToF spin-echo mode has so far limited the useful modulation periods to those resolvable with the limited spatial resolution of the detectors available. Here we present our results of an approach to keep the period of the induced modulation constant for the wavelengths utilised in ToF. This is achieved by ramping the magnetic fields in the coils responsible for creating the spatially modulated beam in synchronisation with the neutron pulse, thus keeping the modulation period constant for all wavelengths. Such a setup enables the decoupling of the spatial detector resolution from the resolution of the modulation period by the use of slits or gratings in analogy to the approach in grating-based neutron DFI.

  18. Method for improving the angular resolution of a neutron scatter camera

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Gerling, Mark; Cooper, Robert Lee; Mrowka, Stanley; Brennan, James S.

    2012-12-25

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source wherein the neutron detection efficiency is increased has been described. Instead of the previous technique that uses a time-of-flight (TOF) between 2 widely spaced fixed planes of neutron detectors to measure scatter neutron kinetic energy, we now use the recoil proton energy deposited in the second of the 2 scatter planes which can now be repositioned either much closer together or further apart. However, by doubling the separation distance between the 2 planes from 20 cm to a distance of 40 cm we improved the angular resolution of the detector from about 12.degree. to about 10.degree.. A further doubling of the separation distance to 80 cm provided an addition improvement in angular resolution of the detector to about 6.degree. without adding additional detectors or ancillary electronics. The distance between planes also may be dynamically changed using a suitable common technique such as a gear- or motor-drive to toggle between the various positions. The angular resolution of this new configuration, therefore, is increased at the expanse of detection sensitivity. However, the diminished sensitivity may be acceptable for those applications where the detector is able to interrogate a particular site for an extended period.

  19. Research of the system response of neutron double scatter imaging for MLEM reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Peng, B. D.; Sheng, L.; Li, K. N.; Zhang, X. P.; Li, Y.; Li, B. K.; Yuan, Y.; Wang, P. W.; Zhang, X. D.; Li, C. H.

    2015-03-01

    A Maximum Likelihood image reconstruction technique has been applied to neutron scatter imaging. The response function of the imaging system can be obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, which is very time-consuming if the number of image pixels and particles is large. In this work, to improve time efficiency, an analytical approach based on the probability of neutron interaction and transport in the detector is developed to calculate the system response function. The response function was applied to calculate the relative efficiency of the neutron scatter imaging system as a function of the incident neutron energy. The calculated results agreed with simulations by the MCNP5 software. Then the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction method with the system response function was used to reconstruct data simulated by Monte Carlo method. The results showed that there was good consistency between the reconstruction position and true position. Compared with back-projection reconstruction, the improvement in image quality was obvious, and the locations could be discerned easily for multiple radiation point sources.

  20. Emission of neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs in neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Simo, I.; Amaro, J. E.; Barbaro, M. B.; De Pace, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use a recently developed model of relativistic meson-exchange currents to compute the neutron-proton and proton-proton yields in (νμ ,μ-) scattering from 12C in the 2p-2h channel. We compute the response functions and cross sections with the relativistic Fermi gas model for different kinematics from intermediate to high momentum transfers. We find a large contribution of neutron-proton configurations in the initial state, as compared to proton-proton pairs. In the case of charge-changing neutrino scattering the 2p-2h cross section of proton-proton emission (i.e., np in the initial state) is much larger than for neutron-proton emission (i.e., two neutrons in the initial state) by a (ω , q)-dependent factor. The different emission probabilities of distinct species of nucleon pairs are produced in our model only by meson-exchange currents, mainly by the Δ isobar current. We also analyze other effects including exchange contributions and the effect of the axial and vector currents.

  1. Wavelength-independent constant period spin-echo modulated small angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Habicht, Klaus; Tremsin, Anton; Bouwman, Wim; Strobl, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SEMSANS) in Time-of-Flight (ToF) mode has been shown to be a promising technique for measuring (very) small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signals and performing quantitative Dark-Field Imaging (DFI), i.e., SANS with 2D spatial resolution. However, the wavelength dependence of the modulation period in the ToF spin-echo mode has so far limited the useful modulation periods to those resolvable with the limited spatial resolution of the detectors available. Here we present our results of an approach to keep the period of the induced modulation constant for the wavelengths utilised in ToF. This is achieved by ramping the magnetic fields in the coils responsible for creating the spatially modulated beam in synchronisation with the neutron pulse, thus keeping the modulation period constant for all wavelengths. Such a setup enables the decoupling of the spatial detector resolution from the resolution of the modulation period by the use of slits or gratings in analogy to the approach in grating-based neutron DFI. PMID:27370470

  2. Wavelength-independent constant period spin-echo modulated small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Habicht, Klaus; Tremsin, Anton; Bouwman, Wim; Strobl, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SEMSANS) in Time-of-Flight (ToF) mode has been shown to be a promising technique for measuring (very) small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signals and performing quantitative Dark-Field Imaging (DFI), i.e., SANS with 2D spatial resolution. However, the wavelength dependence of the modulation period in the ToF spin-echo mode has so far limited the useful modulation periods to those resolvable with the limited spatial resolution of the detectors available. Here we present our results of an approach to keep the period of the induced modulation constant for the wavelengths utilised in ToF. This is achieved by ramping the magnetic fields in the coils responsible for creating the spatially modulated beam in synchronisation with the neutron pulse, thus keeping the modulation period constant for all wavelengths. Such a setup enables the decoupling of the spatial detector resolution from the resolution of the modulation period by the use of slits or gratings in analogy to the approach in grating-based neutron DFI.

  3. Looking at hydrogen motions in confinement. The uniqueness of Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Tsapatsaris, N.; de Paula, E.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2014-09-01

    Why in a barren and hot desert, clays can contain a significant fraction of water? Why does concrete crack? How can we demonstrate that complexation of a drug does not alter its conformation in a way that affects its functionality? In this paper we present results on various studies using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering aimed at clarifying these questions. To allow for a better understanding of neutron scattering, a brief introduction to the basics of its theory is presented. Following the theoretical part, experimental results dealing with the effects of confinement on the water dynamics caused by the interfaces in clays and the nano- and micro-pores of concrete are reviewed in detail. At the end, recent Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering investigations on the complexation of the local anesthetics Bupivacaine (BVC.HCl, C18H28N20.HCl.H2O) and Ropivacaine (RVC.HCl, C17H26N20.HCl.H2O) into the cyclic β-cyclodextrin oligosaccharide are presented. To conclude, the perspectives that the European Spallation Source brings to this subject are discussed.

  4. Structure of acetylcholine receptor dimer determined by neutron scattering and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.S.; Schoenborn, B.P.; Karlin, A.

    1981-04-10

    Previous work has shown that the predominant native form of the acetylcholine receptor from the electric tissue of Torpedo californica is a dimer of M/sub r/ = 500,000, cross-linked by a disulfide bond between the largest (delta) of the five chains (..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta gamma..delta) that comprise the monomer. Small-angle neutron scattering of purified receptor dimer in Triton X-100 solution containing 18% D/sub 2/O, in which the Triton X-100 is contrast-matched, yields a radius of gyration of the dimer of 66 A. Based on the assumptions that the dimer is symmetrical and that the radius of gyration of the monomer does not change in forming dimer, this value, together with the radius of gyration of the receptor monomer (46 A), determined previously, allows the calculation of the distance separating the centers of neutron scattering density of monomers in a dimer; the result is 96 A. Electron microscopy of negatively stained dimers permits an independent measurement of the distance between the apparent centers of mass of the monomers; the average is 96 A, in agreement with the result of the neutron scattering analysis. The electron micrographs of dimer also permit the location of the delta chains at the region of contact of the monomers. A model for the receptor dimer consistent with all available structural information is presented.

  5. Concentration dependence of vibrational properties of bioprotectant/water mixtures by inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Magazù, S; Migliardo, F; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J

    2007-02-22

    Neutron scattering has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for characterizing the structure and dynamics of biological molecules and for investigating the physical and chemical mechanisms of biophysical processes. The aim of the present work is to investigate by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) the vibrational behaviour of a class of bioprotectant systems, such as homologous disaccharides, trehalose, maltose and sucrose, in water mixtures. INS measurements have been performed on trehalose/H2O, maltose/H2O and sucrose/H2O mixtures at very low temperature as a function of concentration by using the thermal original spectrometer with cylindrical analyzers (TOSCA) spectrometer at the ISIS Facility (DRAL, UK). The findings allow the analyses of the vibrational features of the INS spectra in order to study the effect of disaccharides on the H2O hydrogen-bonded tetrahedral network. The obtained neutron scattering findings point out that disaccharides, and in particular trehalose, have a destructuring effect on the water tetrahedral network, as emphasized by the analysis of the librational modes region from 50 to 130 meV energy transfer. On the other hand, the analysis of the bending modes region (130-225 meV) shows a locally ordered structure in the disaccharide/H2O mixtures.Finally, the observed experimental evidences are linked to the different bioprotective effectiveness of disaccharides as a function of concentration.

  6. Neutron scattering in detwinned SrFe2As2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Song, Yu; Li, Yu; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Weiyi; Man, Haoran; Dai, Pengcheng

    Abstract:Large SrFe2As2 single crystals (2cm) were grown with self-flux method. The basic sample characterizations were described by XRD, MPMS and PPMS. Orthorhombic a along horizontal orientation and b along vertical orientation were determined by X-ray Laue diffraction. The crystals were cut into rectangular pieces along the [1, 1, 0] and [1,-1,0] directions by high precision wire saw. The device for sample detwinning was made of 6061 aluminum alloy with low neutron incoherent scattering cross section. Uniaxial pressure can be applied by a spring along orthorhombic [0, 1, 0] direction by tuning the screw in one end. The pressure can be calculated by the known elasticity coefficient (k = 10.5 N/mm) and the compression of the spring (Δx). Our neutron scattering experiments were carried out using the MAPS at the ISIS in England. Low Energy (such as Ei =80meV) with different temperatures ,especially around (TN = Ts = 193 K) is done in the time-of-fight experiment. It is interesting to find out the pressure induced spin excitation anisotropy. After careful analysis,we conclude that resistivity and spin excitation anisotropies are likely intimately connected. The results also compared with similar experiment in parent BaFe2As2 in Murlin at the ISIS. Keywards: neutron scattering, detwin, SrFe2As2, single crystals Figure 1, Large SrFe2As2 single crystals grown with self-flux method.

  7. Quasielastic small-angle neutron scattering from heavy water solutions of cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Kusmin, André; Lechner, Ruep E; Saenger, Wolfram

    2011-01-14

    We present a model for quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) by an aqueous solution of compact and inflexible molecules. This model accounts for time-dependent spatial pair correlations between the atoms of the same as well as of distinct molecules and includes all coherent and incoherent neutron scattering contributions. The extension of the static theory of the excluded volume effect [A. K. Soper, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 9, 2399 (1997)] to the time-dependent (dynamic) case allows us to obtain simplified model expressions for QENS spectra in the low Q region in the uniform fluid approximation. The resulting expressions describe the quasielastic small-angle neutron scattering (QESANS) spectra of D(2)O solutions of native and methylated cyclodextrins well, yielding in particular translational and rotational diffusion coefficients of these compounds in aqueous solution. Finally, we discuss the full potential of the QESANS analysis (that is, beyond the uniform fluid approximation), in particular, the information on solute-solvent interactions (e.g., hydration shell properties) that such an analysis can provide, in principle.

  8. Spin Currents Carried by Spinons in XXZ Spin Chains: Signatures in Polarized Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Leonard Patrick; Braun, Hans-Benjamin; Kulda, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Quantum spin chains serve as a paradigm for exploring truly quantum phenomena, with spinons being the elementary excitations. Motivated by compounds such as CsCoBr3 and CsCoCl3, we focus on the Ising-like antiferromagnetic Heisenberg XXZ model (spin-1/2). Here we present theoretical results for the total inelastic scattering cross section of spin-polarized neutrons in the presence of an external magnetic field, which is applied transverse to the Ising direction. In particular, we identify the spin current associated with spinons and their corresponding signatures in the neutron scattering cross section. The presence of a transverse magnetic field no longer allows for reliance on Stotz as a conserved quantity, which has traditionally been assumed in this context. As a striking consequence, we find that the spinons carry a non-vanishing spin current, even in the limit of infinitesimal fields. Our results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental neutron scattering data on CsCoBr3.

  9. Preface: Proceedings of the 4th European Conference on Neutron Scattering (Lund, Sweden, 25 29 June 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Adrian R.

    2008-03-01

    Approximately 700 delegates came to the small university city of Lund in southern Sweden at the end of June 2007 to attend the 4th European Conference on Neutron Scattering. The majority of these participants are primarily interested in specific areas of condensed matter science and use neutron techniques as a powerful tool to study the structure and dynamic behaviour of materials. These range from liquids, superconductors, magnetic materials and archaeological artefacts. The diversity of scientific problems is reflected by the attendance of many laboratories with specializations in numerous different disciplines. The maturity of the technique is shown by the fact that neutron scattering is now applied widely in so many areas. Most results from neutron scattering experiements are published as articles that primarily relate to a specific scientific discipline in the context of problem oriented research. The neutron scattering conference provided an opportunity to exchange ideas between different fields. It is hoped that this collection of papers, from participants that submitted articles on applications of neutron scattering, will continue to promote the exchange of ideas for new studies, as was seen at the conference. The papers that describe instrumentation and advances in methods of neutron scattering will appear separately in Measurement Science and Technology Worldwide activity in developing new facilities for neutron scattering and the motivation for substantial projects, such as the new target station at the ISIS facility in the UK or the proposed European Spallation Source, comes from unique information obtained from working with neutrons. The results reported in the following papers show that there is substantial exciting work still to be performed as the community of users expands into new fields. The participants, as well as the organizers, are extremely grateful to the numerous sponsors that helped to make the conference a resounding success. We are

  10. Plan for the future of neutron research on condensed matter: an Argonne National Laboratory report prepared in response to the Report of the Review Panel on Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-27

    The Review Panel on Neutron Scattering has recommended an expanded budget to allow systematic development of the field. An alternative plan for the future of neutron research on condensed matter is presented here, in case it is not possible to fund the expanded budget. This plan leads, in a rational and logical way, to a world-class neutron source that will ensure the vitality of the field and exploit the many benefits that state-of-the-art neutron facilities can bring to programs in the materials and biological sciences. 2 tables. (RWR)

  11. Exploring local atomic arrangements in amorphous and metastable phase change materials with x-ray and neutron total scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Katharine; Daemen, Luc; Proffen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Very little experimental work has conclusively explored the structural transformation between the amorphous and metastable crystalline phases of phase change chalcogenides. A recent flurry of theoretical work has supported likely mechanisms for the phase transition process in Ge-Sb-Te (GST) compositions and invigorated efforts at probing local atomic arrangements experimentally. The pair distribution function (PDF) formalism of total scattering data provides directly both local structure correlations at low real-space dimensions, and intermediate range order at higher length scales, a distinct advantage for following the relevant phase transition in phase change materials (PCM). A challenge facing the field is the difficulty in distinguishing separate peak contributions to pair correlation functions in amorphous and highly disordered samples. For example, various types of local order have been reported for Ge{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} phases, including both random mixtures and discrete structural units, and both 4-fold and 6-fold coordination around Ge. We describe our efforts in advancing capabilities for extracting and refining differential or partial pair distribution function data sets by combining neutron and x-ray total scattering, with extensions to isotopic substitution and anomalous x-ray scattering. Our results combining neutron and x-ray scattering for the Ge{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} series, for example, clearly distinguish Ge-Te and Te-Te contributions in nearest neighbor correlations. Presenting an additional challenge, phase change materials with fast switching speeds (those arguably of greatest technological interest) have stable bulk crystalline phases and do not readily form glasses until reduced to small dimensions. Thin film samples are inherently difficult to probe with conventional crystallographic methods. We demonstrate successful synchrotron x-ray total scattering experiments for PCM thin films with thicknesses between 100 nm and 1 um and describe how

  12. Medical applications of in vivo neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation analysis: Technical similarities to detection of explosives and contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, J. J.

    2001-07-01

    Nutritional status of patients can be evaluated by monitoring changes in elemental body composition. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used in vivo to assess elements characteristic of specific body compartments. There are similarities between the body composition techniques and the detection of hidden explosives and narcotics. All samples have to be examined in depth and the ratio of elements provides a "signature" of the chemical of interest. The N/H and C/O ratios measure protein and fat content in the body. Similarly, a high C/O ratio is characteristic of narcotics and a low C/O together with a strong presence of N is a signature of some explosives. The available time for medical applications is about 20 min—compared to a few seconds for the detection of explosives—but the permitted radiation exposure is limited. In vivo neutron analysis is used to measure H, O, C, N, P, Na, Cl, and Ca for the study of the mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging and wasting diseases, and to investigate methods of preserving function and quality of life in the elderly.

  13. Pore accessibility by methane and carbon dioxide in coal as determined by neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Mastalerz, Maria; Sakurovs, Richard; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell; Blach, Tomasz P

    2012-01-01

    Contrast-matching ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques were used for the first time to determine both the total pore volume and the fraction of the pore volume that is inaccessible to deuterated methane, CD{sub 4}, in four bituminous coals in the range of pore sizes between {approx}10 {angstrom} and {approx}5 {micro}m. Two samples originated from the Illinois Basin in the U.S.A., and the other two samples were commercial Australian bituminous coals from the Bowen Basin. The total and inaccessible porosity were determined in each coal using both Porod invariant and the polydisperse spherical particle (PDSP) model analysis of the scattering data acquired from coals both in vacuum and at the pressure of CD{sub 4}, at which the scattering length density of the pore-saturating fluid is equal to that of the solid coal matrix (zero average contrast pressure). The total porosity of the coals studied ranged from 7 to 13%, and the volume of pores inaccessible to CD{sub 4} varied from {approx}13 to {approx}36% of the total pore volume. The volume fraction of inaccessible pores shows no correlation with the maceral composition; however, it increases with a decreasing total pore volume. In situ measurements of the structure of one coal saturated with CO{sub 2} and CD{sub 4} were conducted as a function of the pressure in the range of 1-400 bar. The neutron scattering intensity from small pores with radii less than 35 {angstrom} in this coal increased sharply immediately after the fluid injection for both gases, which demonstrates strong condensation and densification of the invading subcritical CO{sub 2} and supercritical methane in small pores.

  14. The hydrogen anomaly in neutron Compton scattering: new experiments and a quantitative theoretical explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, E. B.; Hartmann, O.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Abdul-Redah, T.

    2016-08-01

    No consensus has been reached so far about the hydrogen anomaly problem in Compton scattering of neutrons, although strongly reduced H cross-sections were first reported almost 20 years ago. Over the years, this phenomenon has been observed in many different hydrogen-containing materials. Here, we use yttrium hydrides as test objects, YH2, YH3, YD2 and YD3, Y(H x D1-x )2 and Y(H x D1-x )3, for which we observe H anomalies increasing with transferred momentum q. We also observe reduced deuteron cross-sections in YD2 and YD3 and have followed those up to scattering angles of 140° corresponding to high momentum transfers. In addition to data taken using the standard Au-197 foils for neutron energy selection, the present work includes experiments with Rh-103 foils and comparisons were also made with data from different detector setups. The H and D anomalies are discussed in terms of the different models proposed for their interpretation. The ‘electron loss model’ (which assumes energy transfer to excited electrons) is contradicted by the present data, but it is shown here that exchange effects in scattering from two or more protons (or deuterons) in the presence of large zero-point vibrations, can explain quantitatively the reduction of the cross-sections as well as their q-dependence. Decoherence processes also play an essential role. In a scattering time representation, shake-up processes can be followed on the attosecond scale. The theory also shows that large anomalies can appear only when the neutron coherence lengths (determined by energy selection and detector geometry) are about the same size as the distance between the scatterers.

  15. The hydrogen anomaly in neutron Compton scattering: new experiments and a quantitative theoretical explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, E. B.; Hartmann, O.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Abdul-Redah, T.

    2016-08-01

    No consensus has been reached so far about the hydrogen anomaly problem in Compton scattering of neutrons, although strongly reduced H cross-sections were first reported almost 20 years ago. Over the years, this phenomenon has been observed in many different hydrogen-containing materials. Here, we use yttrium hydrides as test objects, YH2, YH3, YD2 and YD3, Y(H x D1‑x )2 and Y(H x D1‑x )3, for which we observe H anomalies increasing with transferred momentum q. We also observe reduced deuteron cross-sections in YD2 and YD3 and have followed those up to scattering angles of 140° corresponding to high momentum transfers. In addition to data taken using the standard Au-197 foils for neutron energy selection, the present work includes experiments with Rh-103 foils and comparisons were also made with data from different detector setups. The H and D anomalies are discussed in terms of the different models proposed for their interpretation. The ‘electron loss model’ (which assumes energy transfer to excited electrons) is contradicted by the present data, but it is shown here that exchange effects in scattering from two or more protons (or deuterons) in the presence of large zero-point vibrations, can explain quantitatively the reduction of the cross-sections as well as their q-dependence. Decoherence processes also play an essential role. In a scattering time representation, shake-up processes can be followed on the attosecond scale. The theory also shows that large anomalies can appear only when the neutron coherence lengths (determined by energy selection and detector geometry) are about the same size as the distance between the scatterers.

  16. Test of Time-Reversal Invariance Violation in Neutron Scattering At Spallation Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkov, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    Time Reversal Invariant Violating effects in neutron transmission through a nuclear target are discussed. A class of free from false asymmetries experiments is presented, and a comparison of a sensitivity of these transmission experiments and electric dipole moment measurements to different mechanisms of CP-violation is discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics program under Award Number DE-FG02-09ER41621.

  17. Charge-dependent conformations and dynamics of pamam dendrimers revealed by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin

    Neutron scattering and fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) are employed to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers with ethylenediamine (EDA) core under various charge conditions. Regarding to the conformational characteristics, we focus on scrutinizing density profile evolution of PAMAM dendrimers as the molecular charge of dendrimer increases from neutral state to highly charged condition. It should be noted that within the context of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), the dendrimers are composed of hydrocarbon component (dry part) and the penetrating water molecules. Though there have been SANS experiments that studied the charge-dependent structural change of PAMAM dendrimers, their results were limited to the collective behavior of the aforementioned two parts. This study is devoted to deepen the understanding towards the structural responsiveness of intra-molecular polymeric and hydration parts separately through advanced contrast variation SANS data analysis scheme available recently and unravel the governing principles through coupling with MD simulations. Two kinds of acids, namely hydrochloric and sulfuric acids, are utilized to tune the pH condition and hence the molecular charge. As far as the dynamical properties, we target at understanding the underlying mechanism that leads to segmental dynamic enhancement observed from quasielstic neutron scattering (QENS) experiment previously. PAMAM dendrimers have a wealth of potential applications, such as drug delivery agency, energy harvesting medium, and light emitting diodes. More importantly, it is regarded as an ideal system to test many theoretical predictions since dendrimers conjugate both colloid-like globular shape and polymer-like flexible chains. This Ph.D. research addresses two main challenges in studying PAMAM dendrimers. Even though neutron scattering is an ideal tool to study this PAMAM dendrimer solution due to its matching temporal and

  18. Neutron scatter and diffraction techniques applied to nucleosome and chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, E M; Baldwin, J P

    1986-12-01

    Neutron scatter and diffraction techniques have made substantial contributions to our understanding of the structure of the nucleosome, the structure of the 10-nm filament, the "10-nm----30-nm" filament transition, and the structure of the "34-nm" supercoil or solenoid of nucleosomes. Neutron techniques are unique in their properties, which allows for the separation of the spatial arrangements of histones and DNA in nucleosomes and chromatin. They have equally powerful applications in structural studies of any complex two-component biological system. A major success for the application of neutron techniques was the first clear proof that DNA was located on the outside of the histone octamer in the core particle. A full analysis of the neutron-scatter data gave the parameters of Table 3 and the low-resolution structure of the core particle in solution shown in Fig. 6. Initial low-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of core particle crystals gave a model with a lower DNA pitch of 2.7 nm. Higher-resolution X-ray diffraction studies now give a structure with a DNA pitch of 3.0 nm and a hole of 0.8 nm along the axis of the DNA supercoil. The neutron-scatter solution structure and the X-ray crystal structure of the core particle are thus in full agreement within the resolution of the neutron-scatter techniques. The model for the chromatosome is largely based on the structural parameters of the DNA supercoil in the core particle, nuclease digestion results showing protection of a 168-bp DNA length by histone H1 and H1 peptide, and the conformational properties of H1. The path of the DNA outside the chromatosome is not known, and this information is crucial for our understanding of higher chromatin structure. The interactions of the flexible basic and N- and C-terminal regions of H1 within chromatin and how these interactions are modulated by H1 phosphorylation are not known. The N- and C-terminal regions of H1 represent a new type of protein behavior, i.e., extensive

  19. Quantification of microstructural features in HMX using small angle neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, J.T.; Skidmore, C.B.; Hjelm, R.P.; Howe, P.M.

    1998-12-01

    Microstructural features in raw powders of High Explosives have been qualitatively observed by many researchers, using polarized light and scanning electron microscopy. Here, the authors present a method for non-destructive quantification of volume fraction and structure of intragranular cracks and crystallization voids in a bulk sample (100--300 mg). By employing Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) in conjunction with the method of contrast variation, they can effectively highlight different structural features of a complex system. The technique of contrast variation relies on immersing the sample in a uniform fluid of known neutron scattering length density. By selectively varying the scattering length density of the immersion fluid, scattering contributions from internal and external structures can be separated. This approach is analogous to varying the index of refraction for immersion oil relative to a sample in polarized light microscopy. SANS experiments on HMX were conducted using loose powders (261 and 10 micron mean particle diameters) and pellets made by uniaxial consolidation (without binder) to 7 and 10 volume percent porosity respectively. Detailed modeling of the SANS data indicate significant alteration of the intragranular void/crack/pore structure, with pressing, of the HMX powders.

  20. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-01-01

    We review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach produces robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). From model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.). PMID:26402708

  1. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach producesmore » robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). Finally, from model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.).« less

  2. 3D reconstruction of carbon nanotube networks from neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mostafa; Baniassadi, Majid; Baghani, Mostafa; Dadmun, Mark; Tehrani, Mehran

    2015-09-01

    Structure reconstruction from statistical descriptors, such as scattering data obtained using x-rays or neutrons, is essential in understanding various properties of nanocomposites. Scattering based reconstruction can provide a realistic model, over various length scales, that can be used for numerical simulations. In this study, 3D reconstruction of a highly loaded carbon nanotube (CNT)-conducting polymer system based on small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS, respectively) data was performed. These light-weight and flexible materials have recently shown great promise for high-performance thermoelectric energy conversion, and their further improvement requires a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationships. The first step in achieving such understanding is to generate models that contain the hierarchy of CNT networks over nano and micron scales. The studied system is a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly (styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). SANS and USANS patterns of the different samples containing 10, 30, and 50 wt% SWCNTs were measured. These curves were then utilized to calculate statistical two-point correlation functions of the nanostructure. These functions along with the geometrical information extracted from SANS data and scanning electron microscopy images were used to reconstruct a representative volume element (RVE) nanostructure. Generated RVEs can be used for simulations of various mechanical and physical properties. This work, therefore, introduces a framework for the reconstruction of 3D RVEs of high volume faction nanocomposites containing high aspect ratio fillers from scattering experiments.

  3. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach produces robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). Finally, from model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.).

  4. A new approach to quantification of metamorphism using ultra-small and small angle neutron scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Lynn, Gary W; Cole, David R

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we report the results of a study using small angle and ultra-small angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS and USANS) to examine the evolution of carbonates during contact metamorphism. Data were obtained from samples collected along two transects in the metamorphosed Hueco limestone at the Marble Canyon, Texas, contact aureole. These samples were collected from the igneous contact out to {approx}1700 m. Scattering curves obtained from these samples show mass fractal behavior at low scattering vectors, and surface fractal behavior at high scattering vectors. Significant changes are observed in the surface and mass fractal dimensions as well as the correlation lengths (pore and grain sizes), surface area to volume ratio and surface Gibbs Free energy as a function of distance, including regions of the aureole outside the range of classic metamorphic petrology. A change from mass-fractal to non-fractal behavior is observed at larger scales near the outer boundary of the aureole that implies significant reorganization of pore distributions early in the metamorphic history. Surface fractal results suggest significant smoothing of grain boundaries, coupled with changes in pore sizes. A section of the scattering curve with a slope less than -4 appears at low-Q in metamorphosed samples, which is not present in unmetamorphosed samples. A strong spike in the surface area to volume ratio is observed in rocks near the mapped metamorphic limit, which is associated with reaction of small amounts of organic material to graphite. It may also represent an increase in pore volume or permeability, suggesting that a high permeability zone forms at the boundary of the aureole and moves outwards as metamorphism progresses. Neutron scattering data also correlate well with transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations, which show formation of micro- and nanopores and microfractures during metamorphism. The scattering data are, however, quantifiable for a bulk rock

  5. A new approach to quantification of metamorphism using ultra-small and small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Lynn, Gary W.; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Allard, Lawrence F.; Hamilton, William A.; Porcar, Lionel; Kim, Man-Ho

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we report the results of a study using small angle and ultra-small angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS and USANS) to examine the evolution of carbonates during contact metamorphism. Data were obtained from samples collected along two transects in the metamorphosed Hueco limestone at the Marble Canyon, Texas, contact aureole. These samples were collected from the igneous contact out to ˜1700 m. Scattering curves obtained from these samples show mass fractal behavior at low scattering vectors, and surface fractal behavior at high scattering vectors. Significant changes are observed in the surface and mass fractal dimensions as well as the correlation lengths (pore and grain sizes), surface area to volume ratio and surface Gibbs Free energy as a function of distance, including regions of the aureole outside the range of classic metamorphic petrology. A change from mass-fractal to non-fractal behavior is observed at larger scales near the outer boundary of the aureole that implies significant reorganization of pore distributions early in the metamorphic history. Surface fractal results suggest significant smoothing of grain boundaries, coupled with changes in pore sizes. A section of the scattering curve with a slope less than -4 appears at low- Q in metamorphosed samples, which is not present in unmetamorphosed samples. A strong spike in the surface area to volume ratio is observed in rocks near the mapped metamorphic limit, which is associated with reaction of small amounts of organic material to graphite. It may also represent an increase in pore volume or permeability, suggesting that a high permeability zone forms at the boundary of the aureole and moves outwards as metamorphism progresses. Neutron scattering data also correlate well with transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations, which show formation of micro- and nanopores and microfractures during metamorphism. The scattering data are, however, quantifiable for a bulk rock in a

  6. PREFACE: 6th Meeting of the Spanish Neutron Scattering Association (SETN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The bi-annual Meeting of the Spanish Neutron Scattering Association, VI RSETN, took place in the magnificent world heritage ancient city of Segovia, Spain, from 24-27 June 2012, at the historical building ''Palacio de Mansilla''. It was the sixth in a series of successful scientific meetings, beginning in 2002 (San Sebastián), and followed by conferences in Puerto de la Cruz (Canary Islands, 2004), Jaca (Aragón, 2006), Sant Feliú de Guixols (Cataluña, 2008) and Gijón (Asturias, 2010). The conference covered a broad range of topics related to the use of neutron scattering techniques, from soft matter and biosciences to magnetism, condensed matter as well as advanced neutron instrumentation and applications. In addition to those topics, Spanish scientists working at neutron facilities reported recent upgrades of neutron instruments. The VI RSETN was organized by a group of research scientists belonging to different institutions in Madrid: CSIC, Universidad Complutense and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, in cooperation with the Spanish Society for Neutron Techniques (SETN, 'Sociedad Española de Técnicas Neutrónicas'). The meeting attracted around 90 participants. The total number of oral presentations was 36, including plenary and invited talks, both from domestic and foreign speakers. In addition, the number of posters was around 20. The success of the VI RSETN was due to the efforts of many colleagues involved at all stages of the meeting. We would like to thank the scientific committee, the local organizing committee, the chairs of the conference sessions as well as all the reviewers who agreed generously to help with the process. We would also like to emphasize the excellent scientific quality of all the presentations and posters, and we thank the support received from our sponsors (SETN, ICMM-CSIC, ESS-Bilbao, ILL, Carburos Metálicos), which was really important for the conference success. Finally, we hope that the readers will enjoy the 28

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering studies from solutions of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Stivala, S.S.; Damle, S.P.; Gregory, J.D.; Bunick, G.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering, SANS, of the proteoglycan subunit of bovine nasal cartilage in 0.15N LiCl at 25/sup 0/C yielded the radius of gyration, R/sub g/, radius of gyration of the cross-section, R/sub q/, persistence length, a, and the molecular weight, M. The following values were obtained: M = 3.9 x 10/sup 6/, R/sub g/ = 745 A, R/sub q/ = 34.6 A and a = 35.2 A. These values compare favorably with those that were obtained from small angle x-ray scattering, SAXS, of a similar extract. The scattering curve of the proteoglycan subunit in D/sub 2/O showed a characteristic broad peak in the specified angular range similar to that observed from SAXS, thus confirming the polyelectrolyte nature of the proteoglycan. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (DT)

  8. Dynamics of caged microemulsion droplets: a neutron spin echo and dynamic light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Arnaud de; Molle, Boris; Lartigue, Colette; Guillermo, Armel; Farago, Bela

    2004-07-01

    We report a neutron spin echo (NSE) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) study of droplet dynamics in a microemulsion at high droplet packing fraction ( Φdroplet∼62%). NSE measurements in range qr≫1 allow to investigate the short-range Brownian motion of droplets trapped within the cages formed by their nearest neighbors. For a particular scattering contrast, NSE also reveals, for q values around qr∼ π, the shape fluctuations of the caged droplets. In range qr≪1, DLS correlation functions reveal two independent diffusive modes with well separated decay times. Comparing DLS results with NSE and pulsed-field gradient NMR measurements allows to associate both DLS modes with collective dynamics of ‘transient-trapped’ droplets, revealing strong similarity to the long-time and short-time diffusion modes observed by light scattering in concentrated colloidal suspensions below the glass transition.

  9. Neutron production from beam-modifying devices in a modern double scattering proton therapy beam delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Newhauser, Wayne D; DeLuca, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    In this work the neutron production in a passive beam delivery system was investigated. Secondary particles including neutrons are created as the proton beam interacts with beam shaping devices in the treatment head. Stray neutron exposure to the whole body may increase the risk that the patient develops a radiogenic cancer years or decades after radiotherapy. We simulated a passive proton beam delivery system with double scattering technology to determine the neutron production and energy distribution at 200 MeV proton energy. Specifically, we studied the neutron absorbed dose per therapeutic absorbed dose, the neutron absorbed dose per source particle and the neutron energy spectrum at various locations around the nozzle. We also investigated the neutron production along the nozzle's central axis. The absorbed doses and neutron spectra were simulated with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The simulations revealed that the range modulation wheel (RMW) is the most intense neutron source of any of the beam spreading devices within the nozzle. This finding suggests that it may be helpful to refine the design of the RMW assembly, e.g., by adding local shielding, to suppress neutron-induced damage to components in the nozzle and to reduce the shielding thickness of the treatment vault. The simulations also revealed that the neutron dose to the patient is predominated by neutrons produced in the field defining collimator assembly, located just upstream of the patient. PMID:19147903

  10. Neutron scattering studies of crude oil viscosity reduction with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Enpeng

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a very powerful laboratory technique for micro structure research which is similar to the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and light scattering for microstructure investigations in various materials. In small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique, the neutrons are elastically scattered by changes of refractive index on a nanometer scale inside the sample through the interaction with the nuclei of the atoms present in the sample. Because the nuclei of all atoms are compact and of comparable size, neutrons are capable of interacting strongly with all atoms. This is in contrast to X-ray techniques where the X-rays interact weakly with hydrogen, the most abundant element in most samples. The SANS refractive index is directly related to the scattering length density and is a measure of the strength of the interaction of a neutron wave with a given nucleus. It can probe inhomogeneities in the nanometer scale from 1nm to 1000nm. Since the SANS technique probes the length scale in a very useful range, this technique provides valuable information over a wide variety of scientific and technological applications, including chemical aggregation, defects in materials, surfactants, colloids, ferromagnetic correlations in magnetism, alloy segregation, polymers, proteins, biological membranes, viruses, ribosome and macromolecules. Quoting the Nobel committee, when awarding the prize to C. Shull and B. Brockhouse in 1994: "Neutrons tell you where the atoms are and what the atoms do". At NIST, there is a single beam of neutrons generated from either reactor or pulsed neutron source and selected by velocity selector. The beam passes through a neutron guide then scattered by the sample. After the sample chamber, there are 2D gas detectors to collect the elastic scattering information. SANS usually uses collimation of the neutron beam to determine the scattering angle of a neutron, which results in an even lower signal-to-noise ratio for

  11. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering by the Magnetic Microstructure of Nanocrystalline Ferromagnets Near Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Weissmüller, J.; McMichael, R. D.; Michels, A.; Shull, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical analysis of elastic magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) due to the nonuniform magnetic microstructure in nanocrystalline ferromagnets. The reaction of the magnetization to the magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropy fields is derived using the theory of micromagnetics. In the limit where the scattering volume is a single magnetic domain, and the magnetization is nearly aligned with the direction of the magnetic field, closed form solutions are given for the differential scattering cross-section as a function of the scattering vector and of the magnetic field. These expressions involve an anisotropy field scattering function, that depends only on the Fourier components of the anisotropy field microstructure, not on the applied field, and a micromagnetic response function for SANS, that can be computed from tabulated values of the materials parameters saturation magnetization and exchange stiffness constant or spin wave stiffness constant. Based on these results, it is suggested that the anisotropy field scattering function SH can be extracted from experimental SANS data. A sum rule for SH suggests measurement of the volumetric mean square anisotropy field. When magnetocrystalline anisotropy is dominant, then a mean grain size or the grain size distribution may be determined by analysis of SH.

  12. X-ray and Neutron Scattering Study of the Formation of Core–Shell-Type Polyoxometalates

    DOE PAGES

    Yin, Panchao; Wu, Bin; Mamontov, Eugene; Daemen, Luke L.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Li, Tao; Seifert, Soenke; Hong, Kunlun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Keum, Jong Kahk; et al

    2016-02-05

    A typical type of core-shell polyoxometalates can be obtained through the Keggin-type polyoxometalate-templated growth of a layer of spherical shell structure of {Mo72Fe30}. Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the structural features and stability of the core-shell structures in aqueous solutions. Time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering is applied to monitor the synthetic reactions and a three-stage formation mechanism is proposed to describe the synthesis of the core-shell polyoxometalates based on the monitoring results. Quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scattering are used to probe the dynamics of water molecules in the core-shell structures and two different types of water molecules,more » the confined and structured water, are observed. These water molecules play an important role in bridging core and shell structures and stabilizing the cluster structures. A typical type of core shell polyoxometalates can be obtained through the Keggin-type polyoxometalate-templated growth of a layer of spherical shell structure of {Mo72Fe30}. Small-angle X-ray scattering is used to study the structural features and stability of the core shell structures in aqueous solutions. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering is applied to monitor the synthetic reactions, and a three-stage formation mechanism is proposed to describe the synthesis of the core shell polyoxometalates based on the monitoring results. New protocols have been developed by fitting the X-ray data with custom physical models, which provide more convincing, objective, and completed data interpretation. Quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scattering are used to probe the dynamics of water molecules in the core shell structures, and two different types of water molecules, the confined and structured water, are observed. These water molecules play an important role in bridging core and shell structures and stabilizing the cluster structures.« less

  13. Digenetic Changes in Macro- to Nano-Scale Porosity in the St. Peter Sandstone:L An (Ultra) Small Angle Neutron Scattering and Backscattered Electron Imagining Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Cole, David; Rother, Gernot; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Jackson, Andrew; Littrell, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Small- and Ultra-Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS and USANS) provide powerful tools for quantitative analysis of porous rocks, yielding bulk statistical information over a wide range of length scales. This study utilized (U)SANS to characterize shallowly buried quartz arenites from the St. Peter Sandstone. Backscattered electron imaging was also used to extend the data to larger scales. These samples contain significant volumes of large-scale porosity, modified by quartz overgrowths, and neutron scattering results show significant sub-micron porosity. While previous scattering data from sandstones suggest scattering is dominated by surface fractal behavior over many orders of magnitude, careful analysis of our data shows both fractal and pseudo-fractal behavior. The scattering curves are composed of subtle steps, modeled as polydispersed assemblages of pores with log-normal distributions. However, in some samples an additional surface-fractal overprint is present, while in others there is no such structure, and scattering can be explained by summation of non-fractal structures. Combined with our work on other rock-types, these data suggest that microporosity is more prevalent, and may play a much more important role than previously thought in fluid/rock interactions.

  14. Using neutron scattering to explore new magnetoelectric phenomena in both thin films and skyrmion lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Neutron scattering continues to be an invaluable tool for exploring the microscopic magnetic properties of magnetoelectric (ME) and multiferroic materials. Here I will present studies where neutron scattering techniques less commonly used for studying MEs have provided pivotal insight into new ME coupling phenomena. Firstly, we have used polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) in a study of multiferroic and strained orthorhombic (o-) LuMnO3 thin films. Unlike bulk o-LuMnO3 which is a commensurate antiferromagnet, the films display drastically different properties and are simultaneously incommensurately antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic at low temperature. The pivotal PNR experiments allowed us to measure the spatial distribution of the ferromagnetic magnetization in the films, and show that the ferromagnetism is most pronounced close to the film-substrate interface which is highly strained due to the lattice mismatch. We could further show the ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism in the film to be directly coupled, and so demonstrate the promising functional properties of these films. Secondly, we have used small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to study the topologically protected magnetic spin vortices, or skyrmions, in the chiral-lattice ME insulator Cu2OSeO3. Until 2012, skyrmions had been observed only in (semi)conducting B20 compounds where it is known that they can be manipulated by conduction electrons. From our SANS experiments on Cu2OSeO3, we show that applied electric fields can control the skyrmion lattice orientation in insulators, and in an essentially lossless manner that is dependent on both the size and sign of the electric field. These results provide the first evidence for a the electric field control of topologically protected magnetism in bulk magnetoelectrics.

  15. High-pressure/low-temperature neutron scattering of gas inclusion compounds: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xu, Hongwu; Daemen, Luke L; Lokshin, Konstantin; Tait, Kimberly T; Mao, Wendy L; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P; Hickmott, Donald D

    2007-04-01

    Alternative energy resources such as hydrogen and methane gases are becoming increasingly important for the future economy. A major challenge for using hydrogen is to develop suitable materials to store it under a variety of conditions, which requires systematic studies of the structures, stability, and kinetics of various hydrogen-storing compounds. Neutron scattering is particularly useful for these studies. We have developed high-pressure/low-temperature gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments allowing in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes. We studied the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, a group of inclusion compounds consisting of frameworks of hydrogen-bonded H(2)O molecules with gas molecules trapped inside the cages. Our results reveal that clathrate can store up to four hydrogen molecules in each of its large cages with an intermolecular H(2)-H(2) distance of only 2.93 A. This distance is much shorter than that in the solid/metallic hydrogen (3.78 A), suggesting a strong densification effect of the clathrate framework on the enclosed hydrogen molecules. The framework-pressurizing effect is striking and may exist in other inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Owing to the enormous variety and flexibility of their frameworks, inclusion compounds may offer superior properties for storage of hydrogen and/or hydrogen-rich molecules, relative to other types of compounds. We have investigated the hydrogen storage properties of two MOFs, Cu(3)[Co(CN)(6)](2) and Cu(3)(BTC)(2) (BTC = benzenetricarboxylate), and our preliminary results demonstrate that the developed neutron-scattering techniques are equally well suited for studying MOFs and other inclusion compounds. PMID:17389387

  16. Time gating for energy selection and scatter rejection: High-energy pulsed neutron imaging at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Alicia; Schirato, Richard; McKigney, Edward; Hunter, James; Temple, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a linear accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico that accelerates a proton beam to 800 MeV, which then produces spallation neutron beams. Flight path FP15R uses a tungsten target to generate neutrons of energy ranging from several hundred keV to ~600 MeV. The beam structure has micropulses of sub-ns width and period of 1.784 ns, and macropulses of 625 μs width and frequency of either 50 Hz or 100 Hz. This corresponds to 347 micropulses per macropulse, or 1.74 x 104 micropulses per second when operating at 50 Hz. Using a very fast, cooled ICCD camera (Princeton Instruments PI-Max 4), gated images of various objects were obtained on FP15R in January 2015. Objects imaged included blocks of lead and borated polyethylene; a tungsten sphere; and a tungsten, polyethylene, and steel cylinder. Images were obtained in 36 min or less, with some in as little as 6 min. This is novel because the gate widths (some as narrow as 10 ns) were selected to reject scatter and other signal not of interest (e.g. the gamma flash that precedes the neutron pulse), which has not been demonstrated at energies above 14 MeV. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that time gating is possible above 14MeV and is useful for selecting neutron energy and reducing scatter, thus forming clearer images. Future work (simulation and experimental) is being undertaken to improve camera shielding and system design and to precisely determine optical properties of the imaging system.

  17. Characterization of a Combined CARS and Interferometric Rayleigh Scattering System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Bivolaru, Daniel; Danehy, Paul M.; Weikl, M. C.; Beyrau, F.; Seeger, T.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of a combined Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy and Interferometric Rayleigh Scattering (CARS-IRS) system by reporting the accuracy and precision of the measurements of temperature, species mole fraction of N2, O2, and H2, and two-components of velocity. A near-adiabatic H2-air Hencken burner flame was used to provide known properties for measurements made with the system. The measurement system is also demonstrated in a small-scale Mach 1.6 H2-air combustion-heated supersonic jet with a co-flow of H2. The system is found to have a precision that is sufficient to resolve fluctuations of flow properties in the mixing layer of the jet.

  18. Low Resolution Structure and Dynamics of a Colicin-Receptor Complex Determined by Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, Luke A; Johnson, Christopher L; Solovyova, Alexandra; Callow, Phil; Weiss, Kevin L; Ridley, Helen; Le Brun, Anton P; Kinane, Christian; Webster, John; Holt, Stephen A; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that translocate across cell membranes need to overcome a significant hydrophobic barrier. This is usually accomplished via specialized protein complexes, which provide a polar transmembrane pore. Exceptions to this include bacterial toxins, which insert into and cross the lipid bilayer itself. We are studying the mechanism by which large antibacterial proteins enter Escherichia coli via specific outer membrane proteins. Here we describe the use of neutron scattering to investigate the interaction of colicin N with its outer membrane receptor protein OmpF. The positions of lipids, colicin N, and OmpF were separately resolved within complex structures by the use of selective deuteration. Neutron reflectivity showed, in real time, that OmpF mediates the insertion of colicin N into lipid monolayers. This data were complemented by Brewster Angle Microscopy images, which showed a lateral association of OmpF in the presence of colicin N. Small angle neutron scattering experiments then defined the three-dimensional structure of the colicin N-OmpF complex. This revealed that colicin N unfolds and binds to the OmpF-lipid interface. The implications of this unfolding step for colicin translocation across membranes are discussed.

  19. Neutron scattering studies of crude oil viscosity reduction with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Enpeng

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a very powerful laboratory technique for micro structure research which is similar to the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and light scattering for microstructure investigations in various materials. In small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique, the neutrons are elastically scattered by changes of refractive index on a nanometer scale inside the sample through the interaction with the nuclei of the atoms present in the sample. Because the nuclei of all atoms are compact and of comparable size, neutrons are capable of interacting strongly with all atoms. This is in contrast to X-ray techniques where the X-rays interact weakly with hydrogen, the most abundant element in most samples. The SANS refractive index is directly related to the scattering length density and is a measure of the strength of the interaction of a neutron wave with a given nucleus. It can probe inhomogeneities in the nanometer scale from 1nm to 1000nm. Since the SANS technique probes the length scale in a very useful range, this technique provides valuable information over a wide variety of scientific and technological applications, including chemical aggregation, defects in materials, surfactants, colloids, ferromagnetic correlations in magnetism, alloy segregation, polymers, proteins, biological membranes, viruses, ribosome and macromolecules. Quoting the Nobel committee, when awarding the prize to C. Shull and B. Brockhouse in 1994: "Neutrons tell you where the atoms are and what the atoms do". At NIST, there is a single beam of neutrons generated from either reactor or pulsed neutron source and selected by velocity selector. The beam passes through a neutron guide then scattered by the sample. After the sample chamber, there are 2D gas detectors to collect the elastic scattering information. SANS usually uses collimation of the neutron beam to determine the scattering angle of a neutron, which results in an even lower signal-to-noise ratio for

  20. Structure of spontaneously formed solid-electrolyte interphase on lithiated graphite determined using small-angle neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Sacci, Robert L.; Banuelos, Jose Leobardo; Veith, Gabriel M.; Littrell, Ken C.; Cheng, Yongqiang Q.; Wildgruber, Christoph U.; Jones, Lacy L.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Rother, Gernot; Dudney, Nancy J.

    2015-03-25

    We report the first small-angle neutron scattering of a chemically formed solid-electrolyte interphase from LixC6 reacting with ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbon solvent. This provides a different and perhaps simpler view of SEI formation than the usual electrochemically-driven reaction. We show that an organic layer coats the graphite particles filling in micro-pores and is polymeric in nature being 1-3 nm thick. We used inelastic neutron scattering to probe the chemistry, and we found that the SEI showed similar inelastic scattering to polyethylene oxide.