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Sample records for neutron star mass

  1. Neutron Star Mass Distribution in Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-05-01

    Massive neutron stars with ∼ 2Mʘ have been observed in neutron star-white dwarf binaries. On the other hand, well-measured neutron star masses in double-neutron-star binaries are still consistent with the limit of 1.5Mʘ. These observations raised questions on the neutron star equations of state and the neutron star binary evolution processes. In this presentation, a hypothesis of super-Eddington accretion and its implications are discussed. We argue that a 2Mʘ neutron star is an outcome of the super-Eddington accretion during the evolution of neutron star-white dwarf binary progenitors. We also suggest the possibility of the existence of new type of neutron star binary which consists of a typical neutron star and a massive compact companion (high-mass neutron star or black hole) with M ≥ 2Mʘ.

  2. Symmetry energy: nuclear masses and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, J. M.; Chamel, N.; Fantina, A. F.; Goriely, S.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the main features of our most recent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear mass models, based on 16-parameter generalized Skyrme forces. They have been fitted to the data of the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation, and favour a value of 30MeV for the symmetry coefficient J , the corresponding root-mean square deviation being 0.549MeV. We find that this conclusion is compatible with measurements of neutron-skin thickness. By constraining the underlying interactions to fit various equations of state of neutron matter calculated ab initio our models are well adapted to a realistic and unified treatment of all regions of neutron stars. We use our models to calculate the composition, the equation of state, the mass-radius relation and the maximum mass. Comparison with observations of neutron stars again favours a value of J = 30 MeV.

  3. ON THE MASS DISTRIBUTION AND BIRTH MASSES OF NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Santos Villarreal, Antonio; Narayan, Ramesh

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the distribution of neutron star masses in different populations of binaries, employing Bayesian statistical techniques. In particular, we explore the differences in neutron star masses between sources that have experienced distinct evolutionary paths and accretion episodes. We find that the distribution of neutron star masses in non-recycled eclipsing high-mass binaries as well as of slow pulsars, which are all believed to be near their birth masses, has a mean of 1.28 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.24 M{sub Sun }. These values are consistent with expectations for neutron star formation in core-collapse supernovae. On the other hand, double neutron stars, which are also believed to be near their birth masses, have a much narrower mass distribution, peaking at 1.33 M{sub Sun }, but with a dispersion of only 0.05 M{sub Sun }. Such a small dispersion cannot easily be understood and perhaps points to a particular and rare formation channel. The mass distribution of neutron stars that have been recycled has a mean of 1.48 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.2 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the expectation that they have experienced extended mass accretion episodes. The fact that only a very small fraction of recycled neutron stars in the inferred distribution have masses that exceed {approx}2 M{sub Sun} suggests that only a few of these neutron stars cross the mass threshold to form low-mass black holes.

  4. On the mass distribution of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentim, R.; Rangel, E.; Horvath, J. E.

    2011-06-01

    The distribution of masses for neutron stars is analysed using the Bayesian statistical inference, evaluating the likelihood of the proposed Gaussian peaks by using 54 measured points obtained in a variety of systems. The results strongly suggest the existence of a bimodal distribution of the masses, with the first peak around 1.37 M⊙ and a much wider second peak at 1.73 M⊙. The results support earlier views related to the different evolutionary histories of the members for the first two peaks, which produces a natural separation (even if no attempt to 'label' the systems has been made here). They also accommodate the recent findings of ˜M⊙ masses quite naturally. Finally, we explore the existence of a subgroup around 1.25 M⊙, finding weak, if any, evidence for it. This recently claimed low-mass subgroup, possibly related to the O-Mg-Ne core collapse events, has a monotonically decreasing likelihood and does not stand out clearly from the rest of the sample.

  5. Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottam, J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars were discovered almost 40 years ago, and yet many of their most fundamental properties remain mysteries. There have been many attempts to measure the mass and radius of a neutron star and thereby constrain the equation of state of the dense nuclear matter at their cores. These have been complicated by unknown parameters such as the source distance and burning fractions. A clean, straightforward way to access the neutron star parameters is with high-resolution spectroscopy. I will present the results of searches for gravitationally red-shifted absorption lines from the neutron star atmosphere using XMM-Newton and Chandra.

  6. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, Jacob; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    The recent discovery of cyclotron lines from gamma-ray bursts indicates that the strong magnetic fields of isolated neutron stars might not decay. The possible inverse correlation between the strength of the magnetic field and the mass accreted by the neutron star suggests that mass accretion itself may lead to the decay of the magnetic field. The spin and magnetic field evolution of the neutron star was calculated under the hypothesis of the accretion-induced field decay. It is shown that the calculated results are consistent with the observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars.

  7. Gamow's calculation of the neutron star's critical mass revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hendrik; Ruffini, Remo

    2014-09-01

    It has at times been indicated that Landau introduced neutron stars in his classic paper of 1932. This is clearly impossible because the discovery of the neutron by Chadwick was submitted more than one month after Landau's work. Therefore, and according to his calculations, what Landau really did was to study white dwarfs, and the critical mass he obtained clearly matched the value derived by Stoner and later by Chandrasekhar. The birth of the concept of a neutron star is still today unclear. Clearly, in 1934, the work of Baade and Zwicky pointed to neutron stars as originating from supernovae. Oppenheimer in 1939 is also well known to have introduced general relativity (GR) in the study of neutron stars. The aim of this note is to point out that the crucial idea for treating the neutron star has been advanced in Newtonian theory by Gamow. However, this pioneering work was plagued by mistakes. The critical mass he should have obtained was 6.9 M ⊙, not the one he declared, namely, 1.5 M ⊙. Probably, he was taken to this result by the work of Landau on white dwarfs. We revise Gamow's calculation of the critical mass regarding calculational and conceptual aspects and discuss whether it is justified to consider it the first neutron-star critical mass. We compare Gamow's approach to other early and modern approaches to the problem.

  8. Mass ejection from black hole-neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, Koutarou; Ioka, Kunihito; Shibata, Masaru

    2014-03-01

    Black hole-neutron star binaries are ones of the most promising sources of gravitational waves for upcoming second-generation detectors. To confirm gravitational-wave detection and obtain as much information as possible, it is desirable to observe electromagnetic counterparts simultaneously. It has been pointed out by many authors that various electromagnetic signals are reasonably expected if substantial material is ejected during the binary merger. One plausible mechanism of mass ejection from black hole-neutron star binaries is tidal disruption of neutron stars by the tidal force exerted by black holes. A quantitative study of this dynamical mass ejection requires numerical-relativity simulations. We perform simulations of black hole-neutron star binaries focusing on the dynamical mass ejection for a range of binary parameters including equations of state of neutron star matter. We present important results such as masses and velocities of ejecta obtained by our simulations, and also discuss possible characteristics of electromagnetic counterparts to black hole-neutron star binaries. In particular, we focus on anisotropy and bulk velocity (i.e., the velocity component other than the expansion velocity) of the ejecta, and electromagnetic features resulting from them.

  9. Prompt merger collapse and the maximum mass of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Bauswein, A; Baumgarte, T W; Janka, H-T

    2013-09-27

    We perform hydrodynamical simulations of neutron-star mergers for a large sample of temperature-dependent nuclear equations of state and determine the threshold mass above which the merger remnant promptly collapses to form a black hole. We find that, depending on the equation of state, the threshold mass is larger than the maximum mass of a nonrotating star in isolation by between 30 and 70 percent. Our simulations also show that the ratio between the threshold mass and maximum mass is tightly correlated with the compactness of the nonrotating maximum-mass configuration. We speculate on how this relation can be used to derive constraints on neutron-star properties from future observations.

  10. The neutron star and black hole initial mass function

    SciTech Connect

    Timmes, F.X. |

    1996-02-01

    Using recently calculated models for massive stellar evolution and supernovae coupled to a model for Galactic chemical evolution, neutron star and black hole birth functions (number of neutron stars and black holes as a function of their mass) are determined for the Milky Way galaxy. For these stars that explode as Type II supernovae, the models give birth functions that are bimodal with peaks at 1.27 and 1.76 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}} and average masses within those peaks of 1.28 and 1.73 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}. For these stars that explode as Type Ib there is a narrower spread of remnant masses, the average being 1.32 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}, and less evidence for bimodality. These values will be increased, especially in the more massive Type II supernovae, if significant accretion continues during the initial launching of the shock, and the number of heavier neutron stars could be depleted by black hole formation. The principal reason for the dichotomy in remnant masses for Type II is the difference in the presupernova structure of stars above and below 19 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}, the mass separating stars that burn carbon convectively from those that produce less carbon and burn radiatively. The Type Ib{close_quote}s and the lower mass group of the Type II{close_quote}s compare favorably with measured neutron star masses, and in particular to the Thorsett {ital et} {ital al}. (1993) determination of the average neutron star mass in 17 systems; 1.35{plus_minus}0.27 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}. Variations in the exponent of a Salpeter initial mass function are shown not to affect the locations of the two peaks in the distribution function, but do affect their relative amplitudes. Sources of uncertainty, in particular placement of the mass cut and sensitivity to the explosion energy, are discussed, and estimates of the total number of neutron stars and black holes in the Galaxy are given. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Accreting Millisecond Pulsars: Neutron Star Masses and Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2004-01-01

    High amplitude X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries. The recent discovery of X-ray burst oscillations from two accreting millisecond pulsars has confirmed this basic picture and provided a new route to measuring neutron star properties and constraining the dense matter equation of state. I will briefly summarize the current observational understanding of accreting millisecond pulsars, and describe recent attempts to determine the mass and radius of the neutron star in XTE J1814-338.

  12. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints Using Evolutionary Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. L.; Fiege, J. D.; Leahy, D. A.; Morsink, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron stars. The pulse profiles, constructed using spherical and oblate neutron star models, are comparable to what would be observed by a next-generation X-ray timing instrument like ASTROSAT, NICER, or a mission similar to LOFT. In this paper, we showcase the use of an evolutionary optimization algorithm to fit pulse profiles to determine the best-fit masses and radii. By fitting synthetic data, we assess how well the optimization algorithm can recover the input parameters. Multiple Poisson realizations of the synthetic pulse profiles, constructed with 1.6 million counts and no background, were fitted with the Ferret algorithm to analyze both statistical and degeneracy-related uncertainty and to explore how the goodness of fit depends on the input parameters. For the regions of parameter space sampled by our tests, the best-determined parameter is the projected velocity of the spot along the observer’s line of sight, with an accuracy of ≤3% compared to the true value and with ≤5% statistical uncertainty. The next best determined are the mass and radius; for a neutron star with a spin frequency of 600 Hz, the best-fit mass and radius are accurate to ≤5%, with respective uncertainties of ≤7% and ≤10%. The accuracy and precision depend on the observer inclination and spot colatitude, with values of ˜1% achievable in mass and radius if both the inclination and colatitude are ≳60°.

  13. Dynamical mass ejection from black hole-neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, Koutarou; Ioka, Kunihito; Okawa, Hirotada; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2015-08-01

    We investigate properties of material ejected dynamically in the merger of black hole-neutron star binaries by numerical-relativity simulations. We systematically study the dependence of ejecta properties on the mass ratio of the binary, spin of the black hole, and equation of state of the neutron-star matter. Dynamical mass ejection is driven primarily by tidal torque, and the ejecta is much more anisotropic than that from binary neutron star mergers. In particular, the dynamical ejecta is concentrated around the orbital plane with a half opening angle of 10°-20° and often sweeps out only a half of the plane. The ejecta mass can be as large as ˜0.1 M⊙, and the velocity is subrelativistic with ˜0.2 - 0.3 c for typical cases. The ratio of the ejecta mass to the bound mass (disk and fallback components) is larger, and the ejecta velocity is larger, for larger values of the binary mass ratio, i.e., for larger values of the black-hole mass. The remnant black hole-disk system receives a kick velocity of O (100 ) km s-1 due to the ejecta linear momentum, and this easily dominates the kick velocity due to gravitational radiation. Structures of postmerger material, velocity distribution of the dynamical ejecta, fallback rates, and gravitational waves are also investigated. We also discuss the effect of ejecta anisotropy on electromagnetic counterparts, specifically a macronova/kilonova and synchrotron radio emission, developing analytic models.

  14. Neutron star formation in theoretical supernovae. Low mass stars and white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    The presupernova evolution of stars that form semi-degenerate or strongly degenerate O + Ne + Mg cores is discussed. For the 10 to 13 Msub solar stars, behavior of off-center neon flashes is crucial. The 8 to 10 m/sub solar stars do not ignite neon and eventually collapse due to electron captures. Properties of supernova explosions and neutron stars expected from these low mass progenitors are compared with the Crab nebula. The conditions for which neutron stars form from accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs in clsoe binary systems is also examined.

  15. Masses, Radii, and the Equation of State of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Freire, Paulo

    2016-09-01

    We summarize our current knowledge of neutron-star masses and radii. Recent instrumentation and computational advances have resulted in a rapid increase in the discovery rate and precise timing of radio pulsars in binaries in the past few years, leading to a large number of mass measurements. These discoveries show that the neutron-star mass distribution is much wider than previously thought, with three known pulsars now firmly in the 1.9-2.0-M⊙ mass range. For radii, large, high-quality data sets from X-ray satellites as well as significant progress in theoretical modeling led to considerable progress in the measurements, placing them in the 10-11.5-km range and shrinking their uncertainties, owing to a better understanding of the sources of systematic errors. The combination of the massive-neutron-star discoveries, the tighter radius measurements, and improved laboratory constraints of the properties of dense matter has already made a substantial impact on our understanding of the composition and bulk properties of cold nuclear matter at densities higher than that of the atomic nucleus, a major unsolved problem in modern physics.

  16. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  17. Mass transport in a neutron star magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruit, H. C.; Taam, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between a thin Keplerian accretion disk and a magnetosphere surrounding a central object is investigated within the framework of an analytical description for the magnetic field configuration. The commonly held assumption that all accreting plasma flows from the magnetospheric boundary to the stellar surface is shown to be overly restrictive. If the magnetospheric boundary is defined as the distance where the rotation starts deviating significantly from the Kepler rate, it is found that there is an extensive region inside this boundary where gas, nearly corotating with the star, drifts inward across the field by an interchange instability. The linear analysis of this instability is presented. It is also found that gas tied to field lines can be in equilibrium at positions off the midplane, and that gas can plausibly flow from the midplane to these positions, in certain circumstances. The observational consequences of such a picture are briefly discussed.

  18. Neutron star kicks and their relationship to supernovae ejecta mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, J. C.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a simple model to explain the velocity of young neutron stars. We attempt to confirm a relationship between the amount of mass ejected in the formation of the neutron star and the `kick' velocity imparted to the compact remnant resulting from the process. We assume that the velocity is given by vkick = α (Mejecta/Mremnant) + β . To test this simple relationship, we use the BPASS (Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis) code to create stellar population models from both single and binary star evolutionary pathways. We then use our Remnant Ejecta and Progenitor Explosion Relationship (REAPER) code to apply different α and β values, and three different `kick' orientations then record the resulting velocity probability distributions. We find that while a single star population provides a poor fit to the observational data, the binary population provides an excellent fit. Values of α = 70 km s-1 and β = 110 km s-1 reproduce the Hobbs et al. observed two-dimensional velocities, and α = 70 km s-1 and β = 120 km s-1 reproduce their inferred three-dimensional velocity distribution for nearby single neutron stars with ages less than 3 Myr. After testing isotropic, spin-axis aligned and orthogonal to spin-axis `kick' orientations, we find no statistical preference for a `kick' orientation. While ejecta mass cannot be the only factor that determines the velocity of supernova compact remnants, we suggest that it is a significant contributor and that the ejecta-based `kick' should replace the Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution currently used in many population synthesis codes.

  19. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, J.; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    Adopting the hypothesis of accretion-induced magnetic field decay in neutron stars, the consequent evolution of a neutron star's spin and magnetic field are calculated. The results are consistent with observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Thermomagnetic effects could provide a possible physical mechanism for such accretion-induced field decay.

  20. Mass transfer in white dwarf-neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrick, Alexey; Davies, Melvyn B.; Church, Ross P.

    2017-05-01

    We perform hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in binaries that contain a white dwarf and a neutron star (WD-NS binaries), and measure the specific angular momentum of material lost from the binary in disc winds. By incorporating our results within a long-term evolution model, we measure the long-term stability of mass transfer in these binaries. We find that only binaries containing helium white dwarfs (WDs) with masses less than a critical mass of MWD, crit = 0.2 M⊙ undergo stable mass transfer and evolve into ultracompact X-ray binaries. Systems with higher mass WDs experience unstable mass transfer, which leads to tidal disruption of the WD. Our low critical mass compared to the standard jet-only model of mass-loss arises from the efficient removal of angular momentum in the mechanical disc winds, which develop at highly super-Eddington mass-transfer rates. We find that the eccentricities expected for WD-NS binaries when they come into contact do not affect the loss of angular momentum, and can only affect the long-term evolution if they change on shorter time-scales than the mass-transfer rate. Our results are broadly consistent with the observed numbers of both ultracompact X-ray binaries and radio pulsars with WD companions. The observed calcium-rich gap transients are consistent with the merger rate of unstable systems with higher mass WDs.

  1. The masses and spins of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Miller, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    Stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars represent extremes in gravity, density, and magnetic fields. They therefore serve as key objects in the study of multiple frontiers of physics. In addition, their origin (mainly in core-collapse supernovae) and evolution (via accretion or, for neutron stars, magnetic spindown and reconfiguration) touch upon multiple open issues in astrophysics. In this review, we discuss current mass and spin measurements and their reliability for neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes, as well as the overall importance of spins and masses for compact object astrophysics. Current masses are obtained primarily through electromagnetic observations of binaries, although future microlensing observations promise to enhance our understanding substantially. The spins of neutron stars are straightforward to measure for pulsars, but the birth spins of neutron stars are more difficult to determine. In contrast, even the current spins of stellar-mass black holes are challenging to measure. As we discuss, major inroads have been made in black hole spin estimates via analysis of iron lines and continuum emission, with reasonable agreement when both types of estimate are possible for individual objects, and future X-ray polarization measurements may provide additional independent information. We conclude by exploring the exciting prospects for mass and spin measurements from future gravitational wave detections, which are expected to revolutionize our understanding of strong gravity and compact objects.

  2. Atmospheres of Quiescent Low-Mass Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Platon; Medin, Zachary; Calder, Alan; Lattimer, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the neutron stars in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries are important for determining their masses and radii which can lead to powerful constraints on the dense matter nuclear equation of state. The interpretation of these sources is complex and their spectra differ appreciably from blackbodies. Further progress hinges on reducing the uncertainties stemming from models of neutron star atmospheres. We present a suite of low-temperature neutron star atmospheres of different chemical compositions (pure H and He). Our models are constructed over a range of temperatures [log(T/1 K)=5.3, 5.6, 5.9, 6.2, 6.5] and surface gravities [log(g/1 cm/s2)=14.0, 14.2, 14.4, 14.6]. We generated model atmospheres using zcode - a radiation transfer code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In order to facilitate analytic studies, we developed three-parameter fits to our models, and also compared them to diluted blackbodies in the energy range of 0.4-5 keV (CXO/MGE). From the latter, we extract color-correction factors (fc), which represent the shift of the spectra as compared to a blackbody with the same effective temperature. These diluted blackbodies are also useful for studies of photspheric expansion X-ray bursts. We provide a comparison of our models to previous calculations using the McGill Planar Hydrogen Atmosphere Code (McPHAC). These results enhance our ability to interpret thermal emission from neutron stars and to constrain the mass-radius relationship of these exotic objects.This research was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-87ER40317 and by resources at the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at Stony Brook University. This research was carried out in part under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy at Los Alamos National Laboratory and supported by Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  3. Neutron star masses and radii from quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.; Steiner, Andrew W. E-mail: steiner3@uw.edu

    2014-04-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of neutron star radius constraints from five quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and examine how they depend on measurements of their distances and amounts of intervening absorbing material, as well as their assumed atmospheric compositions. We construct and calibrate to published results a semi-analytic model of the neutron star atmosphere which approximates these effects for the predicted masses and radii. Starting from mass and radius probability distributions established from hydrogen-atmosphere spectral fits of quiescent sources, we apply this model to compute alternate sets of probability distributions. We perform Bayesian analyses to estimate neutron star mass-radius curves and equation of state (EOS) parameters that best-fit each set of distributions, assuming the existence of a known low-density neutron star crustal EOS, a simple model for the high-density EOS, causality, and the observation that the neutron star maximum mass exceeds 2 M {sub ☉}. We compute the posterior probabilities for each set of distance measurements and assumptions about absorption and composition. We find that, within the context of our assumptions and our parameterized EOS models, some absorption models are disfavored. We find that neutron stars composed of hadrons are favored relative to those with exotic matter with strong phase transitions. In addition, models in which all five stars have hydrogen atmospheres are found to be weakly disfavored. Our most likely models predict neutron star radii that are consistent with current experimental results concerning the nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction near the nuclear saturation density.

  4. Effect of nuclear saturation parameters on a possible maximum mass of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime

    2017-02-01

    To systematically examine the possible maximum mass of neutron stars, which is one of the important properties characterizing the physics in high-density regions, I construct neutron star models by adopting phenomenological equations of state with various values of nuclear saturation parameters for low-density regions, which are connected to the equation of state for high-density regions characterized by the possible maximum sound velocity in medium. I derive an empirical formula for the possible maximum mass of neutron stars. If massive neutron stars are observed, it could be possible to get a constraint on the possible maximum sound velocity for high-density regions.

  5. Maximum mass of neutron stars with quark matter core

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Masuda, Kota

    2012-11-12

    We propose a new strategy to construct the equation of state (EOS) for neutron stars (NSs) with hadron-quark (H-Q) phase transition, by considering three density-regions. We supplement the EOS at H-Q region, very uncertain due to the confinement-deconfinement problems, by sandwitching in between and matching to the relatively 'well known' EOSs, i.e., the EOS at lower densities (H-phase up to several times nuclear density, calculated from a G-matrix approach) and that at ultra high densities (Q-phase, form a view of asymptotic freedom). Here, as a first step, we try a simple case and discuss the maximum mass of NSs.

  6. Determining the nuclear equation of state from neutron-star masses and radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindblom, Lee

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed for determining the nuclear equation of state directly from a knowledge of the masses and radii of neutron stars. This analysis assumes only that equilibrium neutron-star matter has the stress-energy tensor of an isotropic fluid with a barotropic equation of state, and that general relativity describes a neutron star's internal gravitational field. We present numerical examples which illustrate how well this method will determine the equation of state when the appropriate observational data become available.

  7. Bayesian Analysis of the Mass Distribution of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentim, Rodolfo; Horvath, Jorge E.; Rangel, Eraldo M.

    The distribution of masses for neutron stars is analyzed using the Bayesian statistical inference, evaluating the likelihood of two a priori gaussian peaks distribution by using fifty-five measured points obtained in a variety of systems. The results strongly suggest the existence of a bimodal distribution of the masses, with the first peak around 1.35M⊙ ± 0.06M⊙ and a much wider second peak at 1.73M⊙ ± 0.36M⊙. We compared the two gaussian's model centered at 1.35M⊙ and 1.55M⊙ against a "single gaussian" model with 1.50M⊙ ± 0.11M⊙ using 3σ that provided a wide peak covering objects the full range of observed of masses. In order to compare models, BIC (Baysesian Information Criterion) can be used and a strong evidence for two distributions model against one peak model was found. The results support earlier views related to the different evolutionary histories of the members for the first two peaks, which produces a natural separation (in spite that no attempt to "label" the systems has been made). However, the recently claimed low-mass group, possibly related to O - Mg - Ne core collapse events, has a monotonically decreasing likelihood and has not been identified within this sample.

  8. Neutron Star Compared to Manhattan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A pulsar is a neutron star, the crushed core of a star that has exploded. Neutron stars crush half a million times more mass than Earth into a sphere no larger than Manhattan, as animated in this s...

  9. Hyperons in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1986-04-01

    Generalized beta equilibrium involving nucleons, hyperons, and isobars is examined for neutron star matter. The hyperons produce a considerable softening of the equation of state. It is shown that the observed masses of neutron stars can be used to settle a recent controversy concerning the nuclear compressibility. Compressibilities less than 200 MeV are incompatible with observed masses. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Mass and Radius of Neutron Stars Constrained by Photospheric Radius Expansion X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Kim, Myungkuk; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    Simultaneous measurement of mass and radius of a neutron star is important because it provides strong constraint on the equation of state for nuclear matter inside a neutron star. Type I X-ray Bursts (XRBs) that have been observed in low-mass X-ray binaries sometimes show photospheric radius expansion (PRE). By combining observed fluxes, X-ray spectra, and distances of PRE XRBs and using a statistical analysis, it is possible to simultaneously constrain the mass and radius of a neutron star. However, the mass and radius of a neutron star estimated in this method depends on the opacity of accreted material. We investigate the effect of the opacity on the mass and radius estimation by taking into account the cases that the hydrogen mass fraction of accreted material has narrowly-distributed values. We present preliminary results that are investigated with three different values of hydrogen mass fraction and compare our results with previous studies.

  11. Dynamical mass ejection from binary neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radice, David; Galeazzi, Filippo; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.; Ott, Christian D.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    We present fully general-relativistic simulations of binary neutron star mergers with a temperature and composition dependent nuclear equation of state. We study the dynamical mass ejection from both quasi-circular and dynamical-capture eccentric mergers. We systematically vary the level of our treatment of the microphysics to isolate the effects of neutrino cooling and heating and we compute the nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta. We find that eccentric binaries can eject significantly more material than quasi-circular binaries and generate bright infrared and radio emission. In all our simulations the outflow is composed of a combination of tidally- and shock-driven ejecta, mostly distributed over a broad ˜60° angle from the orbital plane, and, to a lesser extent, by thermally driven winds at high latitudes. Ejecta from eccentric mergers are typically more neutron rich than those of quasi-circular mergers. We find neutrino cooling and heating to affect, quantitatively and qualitatively, composition, morphology, and total mass of the outflows. This is also reflected in the infrared and radio signatures of the binary. The final nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta are robust and insensitive to input physics or merger type in the regions of the second and third r-process peaks. The yields for elements on the first peak vary between our simulations, but none of our models is able to explain the Solar abundances of first-peak elements without invoking additional first-peak contributions from either neutrino and viscously-driven winds operating on longer time-scales after the mergers, or from core-collapse supernovae.

  12. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Sotani, Hajime; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range 1.0-1.1 M⊙, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass M/M⊙ = 1.174 ± 0.004 (Martinez et al. 2015) in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al. recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of non-rotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter η ≡ (K0L2)1/3, where K0 is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and L is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al. to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love number and apsidal constant of slowly rotating neutron stars by integrating the Hartle-Thorne equations at second order in rotation, and we fit all of these quantities as functions of η and of the central density. These fits may be used to constrain η, either via observations of binary pulsars in the electromagnetic spectrum, or via near-future observations of inspiralling compact binaries in the gravitational-wave spectrum.

  13. Prospects for measuring neutron-star masses and radii with X-ray pulse profile modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Chakrabarty, Deepto E-mail: fozel@email.arizona.edu

    2014-06-01

    Modeling the amplitudes and shapes of the X-ray pulsations observed from hot, rotating neutron stars provides a direct method for measuring neutron-star properties. This technique constitutes an important part of the science case for the forthcoming NICER and proposed LOFT X-ray missions. In this paper, we determine the number of distinct observables that can be derived from pulse profile modeling and show that using only bolometric pulse profiles is insufficient for breaking the degeneracy between inferred neutron-star radius and mass. However, we also show that for moderately spinning (300-800 Hz) neutron stars, analysis of pulse profiles in two different energy bands provides additional constraints that allow a unique determination of the neutron-star properties. Using the fractional amplitudes of the fundamental and the second harmonic of the pulse profile in addition to the amplitude and phase difference of the spectral color oscillations, we quantify the signal-to-noise ratio necessary to achieve a specified measurement precision for neutron star radius. We find that accumulating 10{sup 6} counts in a pulse profile is sufficient to achieve a ≲ 5% uncertainty in the neutron star radius, which is the level of accuracy required to determine the equation of state of neutron-star matter. Finally, we formally derive the background limits that can be tolerated in the measurements of the various pulsation amplitudes as a function of the system parameters.

  14. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  15. Putting Neutron Stars On A New Scale: The Underlying Mass Distribution of Pulsars from Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiziltan, Bulent; Kottas, A.; Thorsett, S. E.

    2010-01-01

    The interpretation of the possible range of masses a neutron star can attain has been a topic of great interest, and debate, among astronomers as well as physicists since it was theoretically predicted to be about 1.4 solar masses in the early 1930s. While the number of precise pulsar mass measurements from which we can extract this information still constitutes only the tip of the iceberg, we now have robust tools at our disposal to make rigorous predictions about the underlying comprehensive neutron star mass distribution. Here, we will present the range of masses at which we can expect neutron stars to form and thereafter continue to support before it collapses into a black hole. We will elaborate on the signatures of different evolutionary histories and physical processes on the plausible mass range and briefly discuss the tools we developed to make these assessments. Finally, we will point to the ensuing broad range of ramifications.

  16. Maximum mass of neutron stars and strange neutron-star cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdunik, J. L.; Haensel, P.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The recent measurement of mass of PSR J1614-2230 rules out most existing models of the equation of state (EOS) of dense matter with high-density softening due to hyperonization that were based on the recent hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon interactions, which leads to a "hyperon puzzle". Aims: We study a specific solution of this hyperon puzzle that consists of replacing a too soft hyperon core by a sufficiently stiff quark core. In terms of the quark structure of the matter, one replaces a strangeness-carrying baryon phase of confined quark triplets, some of them involving s quarks, by a quark plasma of deconfined u, d, and s quarks. Methods: We constructed an analytic approximation that fits modern EOSs of the two flavor (2SC) and the color-flavor-locked (CFL) color-superconducting phases of quark matter very well. Then, we used it to generate a continuum of EOSs of quark matter. This allowed us to simulate continua of sequences of first-order phase transitions at prescribed pressures, from hadronic matter to the 2SC and then to the CFL state of color-superconducting quark matter. Results: We obtain constraints in the parameter space of the EOS of superconducting quark cores, EOS.Q, resulting from Mmax > 2 M⊙. These constraints depend on the assumed EOS of baryon phase, EOS.B. We also derive constraints that would result from significantly higher measured masses. For 2.4 M⊙ the required stiffness of the CFL quark core is close to the causality limit while the density jump at the phase transition is very small. Conclusions: The condition Mmax > 2 M⊙ puts strong constraints on the EOSs of the 2SC and CFL phases of quark matter. Density jumps at the phase transitions have to be sufficiently small and sound speeds in quark matter sufficiently large. The condition of thermodynamic stability of the quark phase results in a maximum mass of hybrid stars similar to that of purely baryon stars. This is due to the phase transition of quark matter back to

  17. Anisotropic mass ejection from black hole-neutron star binaries: Diversity of electromagnetic counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, Koutarou; Ioka, Kunihito; Shibata, Masaru

    2013-08-01

    The merger of black hole-neutron star binaries can eject substantial material with the mass ˜0.01-0.1M⊙ when the neutron star is disrupted prior to the merger. The ejecta shows significant anisotropy, and travels in a particular direction with the bulk velocity ˜0.2c. This is drastically different from the binary neutron star merger, for which ejecta is nearly isotropic. Anisotropic ejecta brings electromagnetic-counterpart diversity which is unique to black hole-neutron star binaries, such as viewing-angle dependence, polarization, and proper motion. The kick velocity of the black hole, gravitational-wave memory emission, and cosmic-ray acceleration are also discussed.

  18. Lower limit on radius as a function of mass for neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Glendenning, N K

    2000-08-07

    A model-independent limit on neutron star radius as a function of mass based only on well-accepted principles is derived. We discuss our limit in connection with a recent interpretation of x-ray pulsations from SAX J1808.4-3658 as indicating a strange-star candidate, and show that this object can also be a normal neutron star, though one whose central core has very high density. The most plausible high-density phase of hadronic matter, which is also expected to be very compressible, is quark matter. So an alternative to the strange star interpretation of SAX J1808.4-3658 is that it is a hybrid neutron star.

  19. Gravitational waves and mass ejecta from binary neutron star mergers: Effect of the mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    We present new (3 +1 )D numerical relativity simulations of the binary neutron star (BNS) merger and postmerger phase. We focus on a previously inaccessible region of the binary parameter space spanning the binary's mass ratio q ˜1.00 - 1.75 for different total masses and equations of state, and up to q ˜2 for a stiff BNS system. We study the mass ratio effect on the gravitational waves (GWs) and on the possible electromagnetic (EM) emission associated with dynamical mass ejecta. We compute waveforms, spectra, and spectrograms of the GW strain including all the multipoles up to l =4 . The mass ratio has a specific imprint on the GW multipoles in the late-inspiral-merger signal, and it affects qualitatively the spectra of the merger remnant. The multipole effect is also studied by considering the dependency of the GW spectrograms on the source's sky location. Unequal mass BNSs produce more ejecta than equal mass systems with ejecta masses and kinetic energies depending almost linearly on q . We estimate luminosity peaks and light curves of macronova events associated with the mergers using a simple approach. For q ˜2 the luminosity peak is delayed for several days and can be up to 4 times larger than for the q =1 cases. The macronova emission associated with the q ˜2 BNS is more persistent in time and could be observed for weeks instead of a few days (q =1 ) in the near infrared. Finally, we estimate the flux of possible radio flares produced by the interaction of relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium. Also in this case a large q can significantly enhance the emission and delay the peak luminosity. Overall, our results indicate that the BNS merger with a large mass ratio has EM signatures distinct from the equal mass case and more similar to black hole-neutron star binaries.

  20. Accuracy in measuring the neutron star mass in the gravitational wave parameter estimation for black hole-neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hee-Suk

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two gravitational wave (GW) signals, named as GW150914 and GW151226, have been detected by the two LIGO detectors. Although both signals were identified as originating from merging black hole (BH) binaries, GWs from systems containing neutron stars (NSs) are also expected to be detected in the near future by the advanced detector network. In this work, we assess the accuracy in measuring the NS mass ( M NS) for the GWs from BH-NS binaries adopting the Advanced LIGO sensitivity with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10. By using the Fisher matrix method, we calculate the measurement errors ( σ) in M NS assuming a NS mass of 1 ≤ M NS/ M ⊙ ≤ 2 and low-mass BHs with masses in the range of 4 ≤ M BH/ M ⊙ ≤ 10. We use the TaylorF2 waveform model in which the spins are aligned with the orbital angular momentum, but here we only consider the BH spins. We find that the fractional errors ( σ/ M NS × 100) are in the range of 10% - 50% in our mass region for a given dimensionless BH spin χBH = 0. The errors tend to increase as the BH spin increases, and this tendency is stronger for higher NS masses (or higher total masses). In particular, for the highest mass NSs ( M NS = 2 M ⊙), the errors σ can be larger than the true value of M NS if the dimensionless BH spin exceeds ~ 0.6.

  1. Matter accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the fundamental neutron star parameters, such as the mass and the magnetic field strength, were experimentally determined in accreting neutron star systems. Some of the relevant data and the models used to derive useful information from them, are reviewed concentrating mainly on X-ray pulsars. The latest advances in our understanding of the radiation mechanisms and the transfer in the strongly magnetized polar cap regions are discussed.

  2. Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, Ed

    Radio pulsars are unique laboratories for a wide range of physics and astrophysics. Understanding how they are created, how they evolve and where we find them in the Galaxy, with or without binary companions, is highly constraining of theories of stellar and binary evolution. Pulsars' relationship with a recently discovered variety of apparently different classes of neutron stars is an interesting modern astrophysical puzzle which we consider in Part I of this review. Radio pulsars are also famous for allowing us to probe the laws of nature at a fundamental level. They act as precise cosmic clocks and, when in a binary system with a companion star, provide indispensable venues for precision tests of gravity. The different applications of radio pulsars for fundamental physics will be discussed in Part II. We finish by making mention of the newly discovered class of astrophysical objects, the Fast Radio Bursts, which may or may not be related to radio pulsars or neutron stars, but which were discovered in observations of the latter.

  3. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O. Silva, Hector; Berti, Emanuele; Sotani, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects such as neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories to test our understanding of the fundamental interactions in the regime of supranuclear densities, unachievable by terrestrial experiments. Despite recent progress, the description of matter (i.e., the equation of state) at such densities is still debatable. This translates into uncertainties in the bulk properties of neutron stars, masses and radii for instance. Here we will consider low-mass neutron stars. Such stars are expected to carry important information on nuclear matter near the nuclear saturation point. It has recently been shown that the masses and surface redshifts of low-mass neutron stars smoothly depend on simple functions of the central density and of a characteristic parameter η associated with the choice of equation of state. Here we extend these results to slowly-rotating and tidally deformed stars and obtain empirical relations for various quantities, such as the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment and ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love numbers, and rotational apsidal constants. We discuss how these relations might be used to constrain the equation of state by future observations in the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra.

  4. Maximum mass limit of neutron stars in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2017-02-01

    The maximum mass limits of neutron stars in scalar-tensor gravity is discussed and compared with the limits set by general relativity. The limit is parametrized with respect to the combination of the nuclear saturation parameters and the maximum sound velocity in the core. It is shown that, for smaller values of the sound velocity in the core, the maximum mass limit of the scalarized neutron stars is larger than that in general relativity. However, for stiff equations of state with sound velocity higher than 79% of the velocity of light, the maximum mass limit in general relativity is larger than that in scalar-tensor gravity. The results suggest that future observations of massive neutron stars may constrain the maximum sound velocity as well as the coupling parameter in scalar-tensor gravity.

  5. A two-solar-mass neutron star measured using Shapiro delay.

    PubMed

    Demorest, P B; Pennucci, T; Ransom, S M; Roberts, M S E; Hessels, J W T

    2010-10-28

    Neutron stars are composed of the densest form of matter known to exist in our Universe, the composition and properties of which are still theoretically uncertain. Measurements of the masses or radii of these objects can strongly constrain the neutron star matter equation of state and rule out theoretical models of their composition. The observed range of neutron star masses, however, has hitherto been too narrow to rule out many predictions of 'exotic' non-nucleonic components. The Shapiro delay is a general-relativistic increase in light travel time through the curved space-time near a massive body. For highly inclined (nearly edge-on) binary millisecond radio pulsar systems, this effect allows us to infer the masses of both the neutron star and its binary companion to high precision. Here we present radio timing observations of the binary millisecond pulsar J1614-2230 that show a strong Shapiro delay signature. We calculate the pulsar mass to be (1.97 ± 0.04)M(⊙), which rules out almost all currently proposed hyperon or boson condensate equations of state (M(⊙), solar mass). Quark matter can support a star this massive only if the quarks are strongly interacting and are therefore not 'free' quarks.

  6. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  7. Effect of the equation of state on the maximum mass of differentially rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studzińska, A. M.; Kucaba, M.; Gondek-Rosińska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2016-12-01

    Knowing the value of the maximum mass of a differentially rotating relativistic star is a key step towards the understanding of the signals to be expected from the merger of binary neutron stars, one of the most awaited alternative sources of gravitational waves after binary black holes. In this paper, we study the effects of differential rotation and of the equation of state on the maximum mass of rotating neutron stars modelled as relativistic polytropes with various adiabatic indices. Calculations are performed using a highly accurate numerical code, based on a multidomain spectral method. We thoroughly explore the parameter space and determine how the maximum mass depends on the stiffness, on the degree of differential rotation and on the maximal density, taking into account all the types of solutions that were proven to exist in a preceding paper. The highest increase with respect to the maximum mass for non-rotating stars with the same equation of state is reached for a moderate stiffness. With differential rotation, the maximum mass can even be 3-4 times higher than it is for static stars. This result may have important consequences for the gravitational wave signal from coalescing neutron star binaries or for some supernovae events.

  8. Gravitational waves and mass ejecta from binary neutron star mergers: Effect of the stars' rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    We present new (3 +1 )-dimensional numerical relativity simulations of the binary neutron star (BNS) mergers that take into account the NS spins. We consider different spin configurations, aligned or antialigned to the orbital angular momentum, for equal- and unequal-mass BNSs and for two equations of state. All the simulations employ quasiequilibrium circular initial data in the constant rotational velocity approach, i.e. they are consistent with the Einstein equations and in hydrodynamical equilibrium. We study the NS rotation effect on the energetics, the gravitational waves (GWs) and on the possible electromagnetic (EM) emission associated to dynamical mass ejecta. For dimensionless spin magnitudes of χ ˜0.1 we find that both spin-orbit interactions and spin-induced quadrupole deformations affect the late-inspiral merger dynamics. The latter is, however, dominated by finite-size effects. Spin (tidal) effects contribute to GW phase differences up to ˜5 (20) radians accumulated during the last eight orbits to merger. Similarly, after merger the collapse time of the remnant and the GW spectrogram are affected by the NSs rotation. Spin effects in dynamical ejecta are clearly observed in unequal-mass systems in which mass ejection originates from the tidal tail of the companion. Consequently kilonovae and other EM counterparts are affected by spins. We find that spin aligned to the orbital angular momentum leads to brighter EM counterparts than antialigned spin with luminosities up to a factor of 2 higher.

  9. Masses And Radii Of Neutron Stars Measured From Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.

    2011-09-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that show thermonuclear bursts are ideal targets for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. The analysis of the time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra allow a measurement of the Eddington limits and the apparent radii of neutron stars. Combined with an independent distance estimate, these spectroscopic quantities lead to the measurement of neutron star masses and radii. I will discuss the results of the application of this method to a number of X-ray binaries including EXO 1745-248, 4U 1820-30, 4U 1608-52,KS 1731-260, and SAX J1748.9-2021. I will also present the results from a comprehensive analysis of the entire RXTE archive of X-ray burst observations, which allows for a better quantification of the systematic uncertainties in these measurements.

  10. Bursting neutron stars: Spectral formation theory and its application to mass and radius determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai

    2004-09-01

    The processes of spectral formation in the atmosphere of neutron star during Type I X-ray burst is considered in detail. Separate treatment is presented for expansion and decay stages. Special effort is made to develop self- consistent models, applicable for data analysis. All crucial physical factors are accounted for including Comptonization, free-free absorption and emission. Newton gravity is assumed. Analytical expressions are provided for color temperature hardening/softening factors. Spectral shapes are presented as functions of input parameters, i.e. neutron star mass and radius, chemical conmposition of an atmosphere and source distance. Models are applied to observational data in order to constrain neutron star mass-radius relation. X-ray burst data for bursters 4U 1728 34, 4U 1820 30, Cygnus X-2, EXO 0748 676 and GS 1826 24 collected by Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer is used.

  11. The Lowest-Mass Stellar Black Holes: Catastrophic Death of Neutron Stars in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belczynski, K.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Kalogera, V.; Rasio, F.; Taam, R. E.; Bulik, T.

    2008-06-01

    Mergers of double neutron stars are considered the most likely progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed, such a merger can produce a black hole with a transient accreting torus of nuclear matter, and the conversion of a fraction of the torus mass-energy to radiation can power a gamma-ray burst. Using available binary pulsar observations supported by our extensive evolutionary calculations of double neutron star formation, we demonstrate that the fraction of mergers that can form a black hole-torus system depends very sensitively on the (largely unknown) maximum neutron star mass. We show that the available observations and models put a very stringent constraint on this maximum mass under the assumption that black hole formation is required to produce a short gamma-ray burst in a double neutron star merger. Specifically, we find that the maximum neutron star mass must be within 2-2.5 M⊙. Moreover, a single unambiguous measurement of a neutron star mass above 2.5 M⊙ would exclude a black hole-torus central engine model of short gamma-ray bursts in double neutron star mergers. Such an observation would also indicate that if in fact short gamma-ray bursts are connected to neutron star mergers, the gamma-ray burst engine is best explained by the lesser known model invoking a highly magnetized massive neutron star.

  12. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, Gandolfi; Steiner, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  13. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, S.; Steiner, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron- rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  14. Time-of-flight mass measurements for nuclear processes in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Estrade, Alfredo; Matos, M.; Schatz, Hendrik; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Beard, Mary; Becerril, A.; Brown, Edward; Elliot, T; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; George, S.; Gupta, Sanjib; Hix, William Raphael; Lau, Rita; Moeller, Peter; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Shapira, Dan; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.; Wiescher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The location of electron capture heat sources in the crust of accreting neutron stars depends on the masses of extremely neutron-rich nuclei. We present first results from a new implementation of the time-of-flight technique to measure nuclear masses of rare isotopes at the National Supercon- ducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the Sc Ni element range were determined simultaneously, improving the accuracy compared to previous data in 12 cases. The masses of 61V, 63Cr, 66Mn, and 74Ni were measured for the first time with mass excesses of 30.510(890) MeV, 35.280(650) MeV, 36.900(790) MeV, and 49.210(990) MeV, respectively. With the measurement of the 66Mn mass, the location of the two dominant heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars, which exhibit so called superbursts, is now experimentally constrained. We find that the location of the 66Fe 66Mn electron capture transition occurs sig- nificantly closer to the surface than previously assumed because our new experimental Q-value is 2.1 MeV smaller than predicted by the FRDM mass model. The results also provide new insights into the structure of neutron-rich nuclei around N = 40.

  15. Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During the five-year period, our study of "Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries" has been focused on the following aspects: observations, data analysis, Monte-Carlo simulations, numerical calculations, and theoretical modeling. Most of the results of our study have been published in refereed journals and conference presentations.

  16. Constraining the mass-radius relation of neutron stars through superbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In't Zand, Jean

    2011-10-01

    Superbursts are thermonuclear X-ray flashes on neutron stars that last up to 14~hr. We propose to carry out 2 quick 25 ks XMM-Newton triggered observations on superbursts from any of 30 (candidate) superbursters that persistently radiate at 30% of Eddington or slower, with the purpose to carry out X-ray spectroscopy of the neutron star surface and constrain the mass-radius relation and equation of state of neutron stars. We will make use of superburst alerts from INTEGRAL/IBIS, Swift/BAT and ISS-MAXI. The potential of this program is at least as good as that of the program on EXO 0748-676, but at much reduced exposure requirements (50 ks in total).

  17. Constraining the mass-radius relation of neutron stars through superbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in't Zand, Jean

    2010-10-01

    Superbursts are thermonuclear X-ray flashes on neutron stars that last up to 14 hr. We propose to carry out 2 quick 25 ks XMM-Newton triggered observations on superbursts from any of 23 (candidate) superbursters that persistently radiate at 30% of Eddington or slower, to carry out high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the neutron star surface and constrain the mass-radius relation and equation of state of neutron stars. We will make use of superburst alerts from INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT. The potential of this program is at least as good as that of the program on EXO 0748-676, but at much reduced exposure requirements (50 ks in total).

  18. Tidal heating and mass loss in neutron star binaries - Implications for gamma-ray burst models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    A neutron star in a close binary orbit around another neutron star (or stellar-mass black hole) spirals inward owing to gravitational radiation. We discuss the effects of tidal dissipation during this process. Tidal energy dissipated in the neutron star's core escapes mainly as neutrinos, but heating of the crust, and outward diffusion of photons, blows off the outer layers of the star. This photon-driven mass loss precedes the final coalescence. The presence of this eject material impedes the escape of gamma-rays created via neutrino interactions. If an e(+) - e(-) fireball, created in the late stages of coalescence, were loaded with (or surrounded by) material with the mean column density of the ejecta, it could not be an efficient source of gamma-rays. Models for cosmologically distant gamma-rays burst that involve neutron stars must therefore be anisotropic, so that the fireball expands preferentially in directions where the column density of previously blown-off material is far below the spherically averaged value which we have calculated. Some possible 'scenarios' along these lines are briefly discussed.

  19. Coupled Spin, Mass, Magnetic field, and Orbital Evolution of Accreting Neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirtorabi, M.; Javadi Khasraghi, A.; Abdolrahimi, S.

    2006-08-01

    The present study is mainly addressed to the coupled spin, mass, magnetic field, orbital separation, and orbital period evolution of a neutron star entering a close binary system with a low mass main sequence companion, which loses mass in form of homogenous stellar wind. We apply flux expulsion of the magnetic field from the superfluid superconductive core of a neutron star , based on different equation of states, and its subsequent decay in the crust , which also depends on conductivity of the crust, and hence on the temperature, T, and the neutron star age. The initial core and surface magnetic field are of the same order of magnitude. To derive the rate of expulsion of the magnetic flux out of the core we consider various forces which act on the fluxoids in the interior of a neutron star, including a force due to their pinning interaction with the moving neutron vortices, buoyancy force, curvature force, and viscous drag force due to magnetic scattering of electrons. Various effects accompanying mass exchange in binaries can influence the evolution of spin and magnetic field of the neutron star. The orbital separation of the binary clearly affects the estimated value of , and it itself evolves due to mass exchange between the components, mass loss from the system, and two other sinks of the orbital angular momentum namely magnetic braking and gravitational waves. The neutron star passes through four evolutionary phases ( isolated pulsar- propeller- accretion from the wind of a companion- accretion resulting from Roche-lobe overflow). Models for a range of parameters, and initial orbital period, magnetic field and spin period are constructed. The impurity parameter, Q, is assumed to be constant during the whole evolution of the star and range from 1 to 0.001. Final magnetic field, spin and orbital period are presented in this paper. The surface magnetic field weakens by a factor of .The suggested mechanism can explain the lower magnetic field and faster spins of

  20. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy and the Mass-Radius Relation of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James

    2017-01-01

    The assumptions that i) neutron stars have hadronic crusts, ii) the equation of state is causal, iii) GR is the correct theory of gravity, and iv) their largest observed mass is 2 solar masses, when coupled with recent results from nuclear experiment and theoretical studies of neutron matter, generate powerful constraints on their structure. These include restriction of the radii of typical neutron stars to the range 11-13 km, as well as significant correlations among their masses, compactnesses, moments of inertia, binding energies, and tidal deformabilities. In addition, properties of quark matter, including the location and magnitude of the quark-hadron phase transition, can also be limited. The implications of recent and forthcoming experiments, such as those pertaining to the neutron skin thickness and astrophysical measurements of various structural properties is discussed. For the latter, emphasis is placed on pulsar timing, X-ray observations, supernova neutrino detections, and gravitational waves from mergers involving neutron stars. Supported in part by the US DOE grant DE-AC02-87ER40317.

  1. Neutron star crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, C. P.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    We calculate properties of neutron star matter at subnuclear densities using an improved nuclear Hamiltonian. Nuclei disappear and the matter becomes uniform at a density of about 0.6n(s), where n(s) of about 0.16/cu fm is the saturation density of nuclear matter. As a consequence, the mass of matter in the crusts of neutron stars is only about half as large as previously estimated. In about half of that crustal mass, nuclear matter occurs in shapes very different from the roughly spherical nuclei familiar at lower densities. The thinner crust and the unusual nuclear shape have important consequences for theories of the rotational and thermal evolution of neutron stars, especialy theories of glitches.

  2. THE DISTANCE, MASS, AND RADIUS OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN 4U 1608-52

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal; Wroblewski, Patricia; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) that show thermonuclear bursts are ideal sources for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. The lack of independent distance measurements for most of these sources, however, prevent a systematic exploration of the masses and radii of the neutron stars, hence limiting the equation-of-state studies. We present here a measurement of the distance to the LMXB 4U 1608-52 that is based on the study of the interstellar extinction toward the source. We first model the individual absorption edges of the elements Ne and Mg in the high-resolution X-ray spectrum obtained with XMM-Newton. We then combine this information with a measurement of the run of reddening with distance using red clump stars and determine a minimum distance to the source of 3.9 kpc, with a most probable value of 5.8 kpc. Finally, we analyze time-resolved X-ray spectra of Type I X-ray bursts observed from this source to measure the mass and the radius of the neutron star. We find a mass of M = 1.74 +- 0.14 M{sub sun} and a radius of R = 9.3 +- 1.0 km, respectively. This mass and radius can be achieved by several multi-nucleon equations of state.

  3. A New View on the Maximum Mass of Differentially Rotating Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondek-Rosińska, D.; Kowalska, I.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.; Kucaba, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the main astrophysical properties of differentially rotating neutron stars described as stationary and axisymmetric configurations of a moderately stiff {{Γ }}=2 polytropic fluid. The high level of accuracy and of stability of our relativistic multidomain pseudo-spectral code enables us to explore the whole solution space for broad ranges of the degree of differential rotation, but also of the stellar density and oblateness. Staying within an astrophysically motivated range of rotation profiles, we investigate the characteristics of neutron stars with maximal mass for all types of families of differentially rotating relativistic objects identified in a previous article. We find that the maximum mass depends on both the degree of differential rotation and the type of solution. It turns out that the maximum allowed mass can be up to 4 times higher than what it is for nonrotating stars with the same equation of state. Such values are obtained for a modest degree of differential rotation but for one of the newly discovered types of solutions. Since such configurations of stars are not that extreme, this result may have important consequences for the gravitational wave signal expected from coalescing neutron star binaries or from some supernova events.

  4. Origin of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    1999-12-01

    The origin of the concept of neutron stars can be traced to two brief, incredibly insightful publications. Work on the earlier paper by Lev Landau (Phys. Z. Sowjetunion, 1, 285, 1932) actually predated the discovery of neutrons. Nonetheless, Landau arrived at the notion of a collapsed star with the density of a nucleus (really a "nucleus star") and demonstrated (at about the same time as, and independent of, Chandrasekhar) that there is an upper mass limit for dense stellar objects of about 1.5 solar masses. Perhaps even more remarkable is the abstract of a talk presented at the December 1933 meeting of the American Physical Society published by Walter Baade and Fritz Zwicky in 1934 (Phys. Rev. 45, 138). It followed the discovery of the neutron by just over a year. Their report, which was about the same length as the present abstract: (1) invented the concept and word supernova; (2) suggested that cosmic rays are produced by supernovae; and (3) in the authors own words, proposed "with all reserve ... the view that supernovae represent the transitions from ordinary stars to neutron stars (italics), which in their final stages consist of extremely closely packed neutrons." The abstract by Baade and Zwicky probably contains the highest density of new, important (and correct) ideas in high energy astrophysics ever published in a single paper. In this talk, we will discuss some of the facts and myths surrounding these two publications.

  5. Role of the electron mass in damping chiral plasma instability in Supernovae and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Dorota; Kaplan, David B.; Reddy, Sanjay

    2015-04-01

    We show that the nonzero electron mass plays a critical role in determining the magnetic properties of neutron stars by suppressing the generation of the chiral charge density needed to trigger a strong chiral plasma instability during the core collapse of supernovae. This instability has been proposed as a plausible mechanism for generating extremely large helical magnetic fields in neutron stars at their birth; the mechanism relies on the generation of a large nonequilibrium chiral charge density via electron capture reactions that selectively deplete left-handed electrons during core collapse and the early evolution of the protoneutron star. Our calculation shows that the electron chirality violation rate induced by Rutherford scattering, despite being suppressed by the smallness of the electron mass relative to the electron chemical potential, is still fast compared to the weak interaction electron capture rate. The resulting asymmetry between right- and left-handed electron densities is therefore unlikely to attain an astrophysically relevant magnitude.

  6. Explosive nucleosynthesis in SN 1987A. II - Composition, radioactivities, and the neutron star mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Hashimoto, Masa-Aki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    1990-01-01

    The 20 solar mass model of Nomoto and Hashimoto (1988) is utilized with a 6 solar mass. He core is used to perform explosive nucleosynthesis calculations. The employed explosion energy of 10 to the 51st ergs lies within the uncertainty range inferred from the bolometric light curve. The nucleosynthesis processes and their burning products are discussed in detail. The results are compared with abundances from IR observations of SN 1987A and the average nucleosynthesis expected for Type II supernovae in Galactic chemical evolution. The abundances of long-lived radioactive nuclei and their importance for the late light curve and gamma-ray observations are predicted. The position of the mass cut between the neutron star and the ejecta is deduced from the total amount of ejected Ni-56. This requires a neutron star with a baryonic mass of 1.6 + or - 0.045 solar mass, which corresponds to a gravitational mass of 1.43 + or - 0.05 solar mass after subtracting the binding energy of a nonrotating neutron star.

  7. Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements for Nuclear Processes in Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estradé, A.; Matoš, M.; Schatz, H.; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Beard, M.; Becerril, A.; Brown, E. F.; Cyburt, R.; Elliot, T.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; George, S.; Gupta, S. S.; Hix, W. R.; Lau, R.; Lorusso, G.; Möller, P.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.; Wiescher, M.

    2011-10-01

    We present results from time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory that are relevant for neutron star crust models. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the scandium-nickel range were determined simultaneously, with the masses of V61, Cr63, Mn66, and Ni74 measured for the first time with mass excesses of -30.510(890)MeV, -35.280(650)MeV, -36.900(790)MeV, and -49.210(990)MeV, respectively. With these results the locations of the dominant electron capture heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars that exhibit super bursts are now experimentally constrained. We find the experimental Q value for the Fe66→Mn66 electron capture to be 2.1 MeV (2.6σ) smaller than predicted, resulting in the transition occurring significantly closer to the neutron star surface.

  8. Time-of-flight mass measurements for nuclear processes in neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Estradé, A; Matoš, M; Schatz, H; Amthor, A M; Bazin, D; Beard, M; Becerril, A; Brown, E F; Cyburt, R; Elliot, T; Gade, A; Galaviz, D; George, S; Gupta, S S; Hix, W R; Lau, R; Lorusso, G; Möller, P; Pereira, J; Portillo, M; Rogers, A M; Shapira, D; Smith, E; Stolz, A; Wallace, M; Wiescher, M

    2011-10-21

    We present results from time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory that are relevant for neutron star crust models. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the scandium-nickel range were determined simultaneously, with the masses of (61)V, (63)Cr, (66)Mn, and (74)Ni measured for the first time with mass excesses of -30.510(890) MeV, -35.280(650) MeV, -36.900(790) MeV, and -49.210(990) MeV, respectively. With these results the locations of the dominant electron capture heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars that exhibit super bursts are now experimentally constrained. We find the experimental Q value for the (66)Fe→(66)Mn electron capture to be 2.1 MeV (2.6σ) smaller than predicted, resulting in the transition occurring significantly closer to the neutron star surface. © 2011 American Physical Society

  9. A toroidal vortex field as an origin of the narrow mass spectrum of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    The evolution and collapse of a gaseous, self-gravitating sphere in the presence of an internal massive toroidal vortex analogous to the vortex created by the toroidal magnetic field of the Sun is considered. When thermal pressure is taken into account, for sufficiently high masses, the instability is preserved even for a polytropic index γ < 4/3. In the case of a degenerate gas, the evolution of the electrons and neutrons differs appreciably. In the ultrarelativistic limit, an interval of stablemasses arises in a neutron gas, between a minimum mass that depends on the circulation velocity in the vortex and the critical mass for the formation of a black hole. This suggests toroidal vortex fields as a possible physical origin for the observed narrow spectrum of neutron-star masses.

  10. Model for the explosion of a critical-mass neutron star in a binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukovskii, K. V.

    2010-03-01

    A series of numerical models has been constructed for the three-dimensional explosion dynamics of a low-mass neutron star in a binary system that results from the collapse of the rotating iron core of a massive supernova. The numerical solution has been obtained by the particle method with an adaptive time step that allows the computational accuracy to be controlled automatically. The constructed numerical models include the proper motion of the massive component in the binary system of neutron stars, their finite sizes, the graduality of energy release during the explosive disruption of a critical-mass neutron star, and the nonuniform expansion velocity distribution of iron ejecta. The extent to which each of the listed parameters affects the explosion characteristics has been determined. The total explosion energy and the pulsar escape velocity have been estimated. A sizable fraction of the material of the exploded neutron star has been found to remain gravitationally bound to the massive component of the binary system. A further study of its dynamics is of interest in its own right, because the captured material can be considered as an additional source of muon neutrinos.

  11. Properties of the outer crust of neutron stars from Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass models

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. M.; Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.

    2011-06-15

    We have calculated the zero-temperature properties of the outer crust of neutron stars for four nuclear-mass models based on the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method: the three most recent Skyrme-force models (HFB-19, HFB-20, and HFB-21) and the Gogny-force model D1M. While the equation of state is substantially the same for the four models, the nuclidic composition varies considerably from one model to another. We solve the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations by integrating inward from the surface and thereby determine the abundance of each nuclide in the outer crust of a typical neutron star of mass 1.5M{sub {center_dot}} and radius 13 km. Although the total mass of the outer crust is slightly model dependent, its thickness is essentially the same for all four models.

  12. Neutron star mass limit at 2M⊙ supports the existence of a CEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Castillo, D.; Benic, S.; Blaschke, D.; Han, Sophia; Typel, S.

    2016-08-01

    We point out that the very existence of a "horizontal branch" in the mass-radius characteristics for neutron stars indicates a strong first-order phase transition and thus supports the existence of a critical endpoint (CEP) of first-order phase transitions in the QCD phase diagram. This branch would sample a sequence of hybrid stars with quark matter core, leading to the endpoint of stable compact star configurations with the highest possible baryon densities. Since we know of the existence of compact stars with 2 M_{⊙}, this hypothetical branch has to lie in the vicinity of this mass value, if it exists. We report here a correlation between the maximal radius of the horizontal branch and the pressure at the onset of hadron-to-quark matter phase transition, which is likely to be a universal quantity of utmost relevance to the upcoming experiments with heavy-ion collisions at NICA and FAIR.

  13. Oscillations of red dwarfs in evolved low-mass binaries with neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarna, Marek J.; Lee, Umin; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate a novel aspect of a problem related to the properties of low-mass binaries (LMBs) with millisecond pulsars: the pulsations of the red dwarf (donor) companion of the neutron star (NS). The illumination of the donor star by the pulsar's high-energy nonthermal radiation and relativistic wind may substantially affect its structure. We present a quantitative analysis of the oscillation spectrum of a red dwarf which has evolved in an LMB and has undergone the stage of evaporation. We calculate the p- and g-modes for red dwarfs with masses in the interval (0.2-0.6) stellar mass. For comparison, similar calculations are presented for zero age main-sequence (ZAMS) stars of the same masses. For less massive donor stars (approximately 0.2 stellar mass) the oscillation spectrum becomes quantitatively different from that of their ZAMS counterparts. The differnce is due to the fact that a ZAMS star of 0.2 stellar mass is fully convective, while the donor star in an LMB is expected to be far from thermal equilibrium and not fully convective. As a result, in contrast to a low-mass ZAMS star, a red dwarf of the same mass in an LMB allows the existence of g-modes. We also consider tidally forced g-modes, and perform a linear analysis of these oscillations for different degrees of nonsynchronism between the orbital and spin rotation of the red dwarf component. We demonstrate the existence of a series of reasonances for the low-order g-modes which may occur in LMBs at a late stage of their evolution. We discuss the possibility that these oscillations may trigger Roche lobe overflow and sudden mass loss by the donor star. Further implications of this effect for gamma- and X-ray burst phenomena are outlined.

  14. Axion mass limit from observations of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Leinson, Lev B.

    2014-08-01

    Direct Chandra observations of a surface temperature of isolated neutron star in Cassiopeia A (Cas A NS) and its cooling scenario which has been recently simultaneously suggested by several scientific teams put stringent constraints on poorly known properties of the superfluid neutron star core. It was found also that the thermal energy losses from Cas A NS are approximately twice more intensive than it can be explained by the neutrino emission. We use these unique data and well-defined cooling scenario to estimate the strength of KSVZ axion interactions with neutrons. We speculate that enlarged energy losses occur owing to emission of axions from superfluid core of the neutron star. If the axion and neutrino losses are comparable we find c{sub n}{sup 2}m{sub a}{sup 2}∼ 5.7× 10{sup -6} eV{sup 2}, where m{sub a} is the axion mass, and c{sub n} is the effective Peccei-Quinn charge of the neutron. (Given the QCD uncertainties of the hadronic axion models, the dimensionless constant c{sub n} could range from -0.05 to  0.14.)

  15. Equation of State for Nucleonic and Hyperonic Neutron Stars with Mass and Radius Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Centelles, Mario; Ramos, Angels

    2017-01-01

    We obtain a new equation of state for the nucleonic and hyperonic inner core of neutron stars that fulfils the 2 M⊙ observations as well as the recent determinations of stellar radii below 13 km. The nucleonic equation of state is obtained from a new parameterization of the FSU2 relativistic mean-field functional that satisfies these latest astrophysical constraints and, at the same time, reproduces the properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei while fulfilling the restrictions on high-density matter deduced from heavy-ion collisions. On the one hand, the equation of state of neutron star matter is softened around saturation density, which increases the compactness of canonical neutron stars leading to stellar radii below 13 km. On the other hand, the equation of state is stiff enough at higher densities to fulfil the 2 M⊙ limit. By a slight modification of the parameterization, we also find that the constraints of 2 M⊙ neutron stars with radii around 13 km are satisfied when hyperons are considered. The inclusion of the high magnetic fields present in magnetars further stiffens the equation of state. Hyperonic magnetars with magnetic fields in the surface of ∼1015 G and with values of ∼1018 G in the interior can reach maximum masses of 2 M⊙ with radii in the 12–13 km range.

  16. Low mass binary neutron star mergers : gravitational waves and neutrino emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; SXS Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present numerical simulations of low mass binary neutron star mergers (1 . 2M⊙ - 1 . 2M⊙) with the SpEC code for a set of three nuclear-theory based, finite temperature equations of state. The merger remnant is a massive neutron star which is either permanently stable or long-lived. We focus on the post-merger gravitational wave signal, and on neutrino-matter interactions in the merger remnant. We show that the frequency peaks of the post-merger gravitational wave signal are in good agreement with predictions obtained from simulations using a simpler treatment of gravity. We then estimate the neutrino emission of the remnant using a neutrino leakage scheme and, in one case, compare these results with a gray two-moment neutrino transport scheme. We confirm the complex geometry of the neutrino emission, also observed in previous simulations with neutrino leakage, and show explicitly the presence of important differences in the neutrino luminosity, disk composition, and outflow properties between the neutrino leakage and transport schemes. We discuss the impact of our results on our ability to measure the neutron star equation of state, and on the post-merger electromagnetic signal and r-process nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers. Einstein Fellow.

  17. The physics of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Lattimer, J M; Prakash, M

    2004-04-23

    Neutron stars are some of the densest manifestations of massive objects in the universe. They are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of dense matter physics and provide connections among nuclear physics, particle physics, and astrophysics. Neutron stars may exhibit conditions and phenomena not observed elsewhere, such as hyperon-dominated matter, deconfined quark matter, superfluidity and superconductivity with critical temperatures near 10(10) kelvin, opaqueness to neutrinos, and magnetic fields in excess of 10(13) Gauss. Here, we describe the formation, structure, internal composition, and evolution of neutron stars. Observations that include studies of pulsars in binary systems, thermal emission from isolated neutron stars, glitches from pulsars, and quasi-periodic oscillations from accreting neutron stars provide information about neutron star masses, radii, temperatures, ages, and internal compositions.

  18. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-11-07

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  19. The lowest-mass stellar black holes: catastrophic death of neutron stars in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Saughnessy, Richard; Belczynski, Kristof; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Rasio, Fred; Taam, Ron; Bulik, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Mergers of double neutron stars are considered the most likely progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed such a merger can produce a black hole with a transient accreting torus of nuclear matter and the conversion of the torus mass-energy to radiation can power a gamma-ray burst. Using available binary pulsar observations supported by our extensive evolutionary calculations of double neutron star formation, we demonstrate that the fraction of mergers that can form a black hole -- torus system depends very sensitively on the (largely unknown) maximum neutron star mass. We show that the available observations and models put a very stringent constraint on this maximum mass under the assumption that a majority of short gamma-ray bursts originate in double neutron star mergers. Specifically, we find that the maximum neutron star mass must be within 2--2.5 Msun. Moreover, a single unambiguous measurement of a neutron star mass above 2.5 Msun would exclude double neutron star mergers as short gamma-ray burst progenitors.

  20. A hydrodynamical model for the explosion of a neutron star just below the minimum mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colpi, Monica; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1993-01-01

    The instability of a neutron star at the minimum mass is investigated using a hydrodynamical model to follow the evolution of the unstable star. A detailed analysis of the linear stability of the equilibrium configurations near the minimum mass is performed by solving the radial eigenvalue problem for the fundamental mode. The minimum mass configuration M(mmc) of 0.196 solar mass is found to be stable to small perturbations. Stability to radial perturbations is lost only at a lower critical mass of 0.16 solar mass, corresponding to about 0.8 M(mmc). It is shown that a simple dynamical model constructed using a 3-polytrope equation of state for hot dense matter reproduces the key dynamical features of the instability in the explosion phase.

  1. Hyperons and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaña, Isaac

    2015-02-01

    In this lecture I will briefly review some of the effects of hyperons on the properties of neutron and proto-neutron stars. In particular, I will revise the problem of the strong softening of the EoS, and the consequent reduction of the maximum mass, induced by the presence of hyperons, a puzzle which has become more intringuing and difficult to solve due the recent measurements of the unusually high masses of the millisecond pulsars PSR J1903+0327 (1.667±0.021M⊙), PSR J1614-2230 (1.97±0.04M⊙), and PSR J0348+0432 (2.01±0.04M⊙). Finally, I will also examine the role of hyperons on the cooling properties of newly born neutron stars and on the so-called r-mode instability.

  2. Hyperons in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaña, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    In this work I briefly review some of the effects of hyperons on the properties of neutron and proto-neutron stars. In particular, I revise the problem of the strong softening of the EoS, and the consequent reduction of the maximum mass, induced by the presence of hyperons, a puzzle which has become more intringuing and difficult to solve because of the recent measurements of the unusually high masses of the millisecond pulsars PSR J1903+0327 (1.667 ± 0.021M⊙), PSR J1614-2230 (1.97 ± 0.04M⊙), and PSR J0348+0432 (2.01 ± 0.04M⊙). Some of the solutions proposed to tackle this problem are discussed. Finally, I re-examine also the role of hyperons on the cooling properties of newly born neutron stars and on the so-called r-mode instability.

  3. Hyperons and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Vidaña, Isaac

    2015-02-24

    In this lecture I will briefly review some of the effects of hyperons on the properties of neutron and proto-neutron stars. In particular, I will revise the problem of the strong softening of the EoS, and the consequent reduction of the maximum mass, induced by the presence of hyperons, a puzzle which has become more intringuing and difficult to solve due the recent measurements of the unusually high masses of the millisecond pulsars PSR J1903+0327 (1.667±0.021M{sub ⊙}), PSR J1614–2230 (1.97±0.04M{sub ⊙}), and PSR J0348+0432 (2.01±0.04M{sub ⊙}). Finally, I will also examine the role of hyperons on the cooling properties of newly born neutron stars and on the so-called r-mode instability.

  4. Mass, radius and composition of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    The properties and composition of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by applying the model of Baym, Pethick and Sutherland, which was extended by including higher order corrections of the atomic binding, screening, exchange and zero-point energy. The most recent experimental nuclear data from the atomic mass table of Audi, Wapstra and Thibault from 2003 are used. Extrapolation to the drip line is utilized by various state-of-the-art theoretical nuclear models (finite range droplet, relativistic nuclear field and non-relativistic Skyrme Hartree Fock parameterizations). The different nuclear models are compared with respect to the mass and radius of the outer crust for different neutron star configurations and the nuclear compositions of the outer crust.

  5. Neutrino Transport in Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries: Dynamical Mass Ejection and Neutrino-Driven Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, K.; Kiuchi, K.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present our recent results of numerical-relativity simulations of black hole-neutron star binary mergers incorporating approximate neutrino transport. We in particular discuss dynamical mass ejection and neutrino-driven wind.

  6. Dynamical mass ejection from binary neutron star mergers: Radiation-hydrodynamics study in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    We perform radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of binary neutron-star mergers in numerical relativity on the Japanese "K" supercomputer, taking into account neutrino cooling and heating by an updated leakage-plus-transfer scheme for the first time. Neutron stars are modeled by three modern finite-temperature equations of state (EOS) developed by Hempel and his collaborators. We find that the properties of the dynamical ejecta of the merger such as total mass, average electron fraction, and thermal energy depend strongly on the EOS. Only for a soft EOS (the so-called SFHo), the ejecta mass exceeds 0.01 M⊙ . In this case, the distribution of the electron fraction of the ejecta becomes broad due to the shock heating during the merger. These properties are well-suited for the production of the solar-like r -process abundance. For the other stiff EOS (DD2 and TM1), for which a long-lived massive neutron star is formed after the merger, the ejecta mass is smaller than 0.01 M⊙, although broad electron-fraction distributions are achieved by the positron capture and the neutrino heating.

  7. Measuring neutron star masses and radii using NICER observations of X-ray oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-04-01

    Precise and reliable simultaneous measurements of the mass and radius of several neutron stars with different masses would provide valuable guidance for improving models of the properties of cold dense matter. The prime scientific goal of the Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is to make such measurements by fitting energy-dependent waveform models to the thermal X-ray oscillations observed from rotation-powered millisecond pulsars. These oscillations are thought to be produced as hotter regions of the stellar surface near one or both of the star’s magnetic poles rotate around the star at the star's spin frequency. We first discuss the phenomenology and modeling of these oscillations. We then present the results of parameter estimation studies using synthetic waveform data and Bayesian statistical methods. The synthetic and model waveforms used in this study were computed using the X-ray spectra and radiation beaming patterns given by models of the cool hydrogen atmospheres that NICER is expected to observe. Finally, we discuss the causes and expected sizes of the uncertainties in radius and mass estimates that will be made by NICER using this method.

  8. Compactness of Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J

    2015-10-16

    Recent progress in the determination of both masses and radii of neutron stars is starting to place stringent constraints on the dense matter equation of state. In particular, new theoretical developments together with improved statistical tools seem to favor stellar radii that are significantly smaller than those predicted by models using purely nucleonic equations of state. Given that the underlying equation of state must also account for the observation of 2M⊙ neutron stars, theoretical approaches to the study of the dense matter equation of state are facing serious challenges. In response to this challenge, we compute the underlying equation of state associated with an assumed mass-radius template similar to the "common radius" assumption used in recent studies. Once such a mass-radius template is adopted, the equation of state follows directly from the implementation of Lindblom's algorithm; assumptions on the nature or composition of the dense stellar core are not required. By analyzing mass-radius profiles with a maximum mass consistent with observation and common radii in the 8-11 km range, a lower limit on the stellar radius of a 1.4M⊙ neutron star of RNS≳10.7  km is required to prevent the equation of state from violating causality.

  9. Estimating the masses and radii of neutron stars using NICER pulse waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2017-08-01

    The key scientific objective of the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is to precisely and reliably measure the mass M and radius R of several neutron stars, in order to tightly constrain the properties of cold ultradense matter. M and R will be measured by fitting energy-dependent pulse waveform models to the observed soft X-ray pulse waveforms of selected rotation-powered millisecond pulsars. These waveforms are thought to be produced by rotation with the stellar surface of hot spots located near the pulsar's magnetic polar caps. We have explored the accuracies and precisions with which NICER should be able to determine M and R, by analyzing synthetic waveform data using Bayesian statistical methods. Here we describe the pulse waveform models that will be used by the NICER mission, the scaling of the uncertainties in M and R estimates with the total number of counts, and the dependence of the uncertainties in M and R estimates on the rotational colatitudes of the hot spots and the inclination of the observer. We show that the shapes of the hot spots and modest variations in the temperature of the emission across them are unlikely to produce significant systematic errors. We find that NICER should be able to measure the masses and radii of a few neutron stars to within 5%.

  10. Low mass binary neutron star mergers: Gravitational waves and neutrino emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; Haas, Roland; Duez, Matthew D.; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Roberts, Luke; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Lippuner, Jonas; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Scheel, Mark A.

    2016-02-01

    Neutron star mergers are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves for advanced ground-based detectors. These mergers are also expected to power bright electromagnetic signals, in the form of short gamma-ray bursts, infrared/optical transients powered by r-process nucleosynthesis in neutron-rich material ejected by the merger, and radio emission from the interaction of that ejecta with the interstellar medium. Simulations of these mergers with fully general relativistic codes are critical to understand the merger and postmerger gravitational wave signals and their neutrinos and electromagnetic counterparts. In this paper, we employ the Spectral Einstein Code to simulate the merger of low mass neutron star binaries (two 1.2 M⊙ neutron stars) for a set of three nuclear-theory-based, finite temperature equations of state. We show that the frequency peaks of the postmerger gravitational wave signal are in good agreement with predictions obtained from recent simulations using a simpler treatment of gravity. We find, however, that only the fundamental mode of the remnant is excited for long periods of time: emission at the secondary peaks is damped on a millisecond time scale in the simulated binaries. For such low mass systems, the remnant is a massive neutron star which, depending on the equation of state, is either permanently stable or long lived (i.e. rapid uniform rotation is sufficient to prevent its collapse). We observe strong excitations of l =2 , m =2 modes, both in the massive neutron star and in the form of hot, shocked tidal arms in the surrounding accretion torus. We estimate the neutrino emission of the remnant using a neutrino leakage scheme and, in one case, compare these results with a gray two-moment neutrino transport scheme. We confirm the complex geometry of the neutrino emission, also observed in previous simulations with neutrino leakage, and show explicitly the presence of important differences in the neutrino luminosity, disk

  11. Neutron star high-mass binaries as the origin of SGR/AXP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2016-03-01

    A close high-mass binary system consisting of a neutron star (NS) and a massive OB supergiant companion is expected to lead to a Thorne-Żytkow object (TZO) structure, which consists of a NS core and a stellar envelope. We use the scenario machine program to calculate the formation tracks of TZOs in close high-mass NS binaries and their subsequent evolution. We propose and demonstrate that the explosion and instant contraction of a TZO structure leave its stellar remnant as a soft gamma-ray repeater and an anomalous X-ray pulsar respectively.

  12. Evolution of the Spin Periods of Neutron Stars in Low-mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. T.; Zhu, Z. L.

    2016-11-01

    We present numerical analysis of the spin evolution of the neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, trying to explain the discrepancy in the spin period distribution between observations of millisecond pulsars and theoretical results. In our calculations, we take account of possible effect of radiation pressure, and irradiation-induced instability on the structure of the disk, and the evolution of the mass transfer rate, respectively. We report the following results: (1) Radiation pressure leads to a slight increase of the spin periods, and irradiation-induced mass transfer cycles can shorten the spin-down phase of evolution. (2) The calculated results in the model combining radiation pressure and irradiation-induced mass transfer cycles show that accretion is strongly limited by radiation pressure in high mass transfer phase. (3) The accreted mass and the critical fastness parameter can affect the number of systems in equilibrium state.

  13. On neutron stars in f(R) theories: Small radii, large masses and large energy emitted in a merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio Resco, Miguel; de la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Llanes Estrada, Felipe J.; Zapatero Castrillo, Víctor

    2016-09-01

    In the context of f(R) gravity theories, we show that the apparent mass of a neutron star as seen from an observer at infinity is numerically calculable but requires careful matching, first at the star's edge, between interior and exterior solutions, none of them being totally Schwarzschild-like but presenting instead small oscillations of the curvature scalar R; and second at large radii, where the Newtonian potential is used to identify the mass of the neutron star. We find that for the same equation of state, this mass definition is always larger than its general relativistic counterpart. We exemplify this with quadratic R2 and Hu-Sawicki-like modifications of the standard General Relativity action. Therefore, the finding of two-solar mass neutron stars basically imposes no constraint on stable f(R) theories. However, star radii are in general smaller than in General Relativity, which can give an observational handle on such classes of models at the astrophysical level. Both larger masses and smaller matter radii are due to much of the apparent effective energy residing in the outer metric for scalar-tensor theories. Finally, because the f(R) neutron star masses can be much larger than General Relativity counterparts, the total energy available for radiating gravitational waves could be of order several solar masses, and thus a merger of these stars constitutes an interesting wave source.

  14. General Relativistic Simulations of Low-Mass Magnetized Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    We will present general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations of binary neutron star (BNS) systems that produce long-lived neutron stars (NSs) after merger. While the standard scenario for short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) requires the formation after merger of a spinning black hole surrounded by an accretion disk, other theoretical models, such as the time-reversal scenario, predict the formation of a long-lived magnetar. The formation of a long-lived magnetar could in particular explain the X-ray plateaus that have been observed in some SGRBs. Moreover, observations of NSs with masses of 2 solar masses indicate that the equation of state of NS matter should support masses larger than that. Therefore a significant fraction of BNS mergers will produce long-lived NSs. This has important consequences both on the emission of gravitational wave signals and on their electromagnetic counterparts. We will discuss GRMHD simulations of ``low-mass'' magnetized BNS systems with different equations of state and mass ratios. We will describe the properties of their post-merger remnants and of their gravitational and electromagnetic emission.

  15. Detecting and Measuring the Masses of Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2011-10-01

    We propose a 3-year program of monitoring of 12 fields in the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our primary aim is to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated black holes {BHs} and neutron stars {NSs} in the Galactic disk and bulge.The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, provided by the HST event light curve, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. We will detect 120 microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses. Of these, about 18 lenses are expected to be BHs and 14 of them NSs, along with about 22 events due to main-sequence stars.To date, BH and NS masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. A survey of the scope proposed here is the only means available at present for measuring the mass function of isolated BHs and NSs, and moreover one that is normalized to that of luminous stars. The results will provide a quantitative estimate of the mass content in the form of stellar remnants in the young Galactic disk and old bulge, and important constraints on SN/GRB explosion mechanisms that produce NSs and BHs.Our data will also be useful for other investigations, including a more accurate determination of the microlensing optical depth, faint variable stars, bulge proper motions and kinematics, and a deep luminosity function of the disk and bulge stars.

  16. Detecting and Measuring the Masses of Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2012-10-01

    We propose a 3-year program of monitoring of 12 fields in the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our primary aim is to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated black holes {BHs} and neutron stars {NSs} in the Galactic disk and bulge.The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, provided by the HST event light curve, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. We will detect 120 microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses. Of these, about 18 lenses are expected to be BHs and 14 of them NSs, along with about 22 events due to main-sequence stars.To date, BH and NS masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. A survey of the scope proposed here is the only means available at present for measuring the mass function of isolated BHs and NSs, and moreover one that is normalized to that of luminous stars. The results will provide a quantitative estimate of the mass content in the form of stellar remnants in the young Galactic disk and old bulge, and important constraints on SN/GRB explosion mechanisms that produce NSs and BHs.Our data will also be useful for other investigations, including a more accurate determination of the microlensing optical depth, faint variable stars, bulge proper motions and kinematics, and a deep luminosity function of the disk and bulge stars.

  17. Detecting and Measuring the Masses of Isolated Black Holes and Neutron Stars through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2013-10-01

    We propose a 3-year program of monitoring of 12 fields in the Galactic bulge, containing a total of 1.5 million stars down to V=28. Our primary aim is to detect microlensing events caused by non-luminous isolated black holes {BHs} and neutron stars {NSs} in the Galactic disk and bulge.The unique capability of HST imaging for microlensing observations is the addition of high-precision astrometry, allowing detection of the astrometric shift of the source during the event. Combined with the lens parallax, provided by the HST event light curve, the astrometric shift provides a direct measurement of the lens mass. We will detect 120 microlensing events, of which 45% will show astrometric deflections, leading to direct determinations of the lens masses. Of these, about 18 lenses are expected to be BHs and 14 of them NSs, along with about 22 events due to main-sequence stars.To date, BH and NS masses have been directly measured only in binaries; no isolated BH has been detected unambiguously within our Galaxy. A survey of the scope proposed here is the only means available at present for measuring the mass function of isolated BHs and NSs, and moreover one that is normalized to that of luminous stars. The results will provide a quantitative estimate of the mass content in the form of stellar remnants in the young Galactic disk and old bulge, and important constraints on SN/GRB explosion mechanisms that produce NSs and BHs.Our data will also be useful for other investigations, including a more accurate determination of the microlensing optical depth, faint variable stars, bulge proper motions and kinematics, and a deep luminosity function of the disk and bulge stars.

  18. Cracking on anisotropic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, A. M.; Sulaksono, A.

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of cracking of a local anisotropic neutron star (NS) due to small density fluctuations. It is assumed that the neutron star core consists of leptons, nucleons and hyperons. The relativistic mean field model is used to describe the core of equation of state (EOS). For the crust, we use the EOS introduced by Miyatsu et al. [1]. Furthermore, two models are used to describe pressure anisotropic in neutron star matter. One is proposed by Doneva-Yazadjiev (DY) [2] and the other is proposed by Herrera-Barreto (HB) [3]. The anisotropic parameter of DY and HB models are adjusted in order the predicted maximum mass compatible to the mass of PSR J1614-2230 [4] and PSR J0348+0432 [5]. We have found that cracking can potentially present in the region close to the neutron star surface. The instability due cracking is quite sensitive to the NS mass and anisotropic parameter used.

  19. Neutron star moments of inertia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravenhall, D. G.; Pethick, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    An approximation for the moment of inertia of a neutron star in terms of only its mass and radius is presented, and insight into it is obtained by examining the behavior of the relativistic structural equations. The approximation is accurate to approximately 10% for a variety of nuclear equations of state, for all except very low mass stars. It is combined with information about the neutron-star crust to obtain a simple expression (again in terms only of mass and radius) for the fractional moment of inertia of the crust.

  20. Neutron star structure from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Eduardo S.; Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-03-01

    In this review article, we argue that our current understanding of the thermodynamic properties of cold QCD matter, originating from first principles calculations at high and low densities, can be used to efficiently constrain the macroscopic properties of neutron stars. In particular, we demonstrate that combining state-of-the-art results from Chiral Effective Theory and perturbative QCD with the current bounds on neutron star masses, the Equation of State of neutron star matter can be obtained to an accuracy better than 30% at all densities.

  1. Neutron star crustal plate tectonics. I. Magnetic dipole evolution in millisecond pulsars and low-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Crust lattices in spinning-up or spinning-down neutron stars have growing shear stresses caused by neutron superfluid vortex lines pinned to lattice nuclei. For the most rapidly spinning stars, this stress will break and move the crust before vortex unpinning occurs. In spinning-down neutron stars, crustal plates will move an equatorial subduction zone in which the plates are forced into the stellar core below the crust. The opposite plate motion occurs in spinning-up stars. Magnetic fields which pass through the crust or have sources in it move with the crust. Spun-up neutron stars in accreting low-mass X-ray binaries LMXBs should then have almost axially symmetric magnetic fields. Spun-down ones with very weak magnetic fields should have external magnetic fields which enter and leave the neutron star surface only near its equator. The lowest field millisecond radiopulsars seem to be orthogonal rotators implying that they have not previously been spun-up in LMXBs but are neutron stars initially formed with periods near 0.001 s that subsequently spin down to their present periods. Accretion-induced white dwarf collapse is then the most plausible genesis for them. 29 refs.

  2. The Fate of Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    A rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron star is one possible outcome when two smaller neutron stars merge. [Casey Reed/Penn State University]When two neutron stars collide, the new object that they make can reveal information about the interior physics of neutron stars. New theoretical work explores what we should be seeing, and what it can teach us.Neutron Star or Black Hole?So far, the only systems from which weve detected gravitational waves are merging black holes. But other compact-object binaries exist and are expected to merge on observable timescales in particular, binary neutron stars. When two neutron stars merge, the resulting object falls into one of three categories:a stable neutron star,a black hole, ora supramassive neutron star, a large neutron star thats supported by its rotation but will eventually collapse to a black hole after it loses angular momentum.Histograms of the initial (left) and final (right) distributions of objects in the authors simulations, for five different equations of state. Most cases resulted primarily in the formation of neutron stars (NSs) or supramassive neutron stars (sNSs), not black holes (BHs). [Piro et al. 2017]Whether a binary-neutron-star merger results in another neutron star, a black hole, or a supramassive neutron star depends on the final mass of the remnant and what the correct equation of state is that describes the interiors of neutron stars a longstanding astrophysical puzzle.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Anthony Piro (Carnegie Observatories) estimated which of these outcomes we should expect for mergers of binary neutron stars. The teams results along with future observations of binary neutron stars may help us to eventually pin down the equation of state for neutron stars.Merger OutcomesPiro and collaborators used relativistic calculations of spinning and non-spinning neutron stars to estimate the mass range that neutron stars would have for several different realistic equations of

  3. Quark deconfinement in Neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Ouyed, R.; Jaikumar, P.

    2006-06-01

    We study the role of spin-down of isolated neutron stars in driving quark deconfinement in their high density core. Assuming spin-down to be solely due to magnetic braking, we obtain typical timescales to quark deconfinement for neutron stars that are born with Keplerian frequencies. Employing different equations of state (EOS), we determine the minimum and maximum neutron star masses that will allow for deconfinement via spin-down only. We find that the time to reach deconfinement is strongly dependent on the magnetic field and that this time is least for EOS that support the largest minimum mass at zero spin, unless rotational effects on stellar structure are large. For a fiducial critical density of five times nuclear saturation density for the transition to the quark phase, we find that neutron stars lighter than 1.5 solar masses cannot reach a deconfined phase. Depending on the EOS, neutron stars of more than 1.5 solar masses can enter a quark phase only if they are spinning faster than about 3 milliseconds as observed now, whereas larger spin periods imply that they are either already quark stars or will never become one.

  4. Theoretical constraints on the properties of low-mass neutron stars from the equation of state of nuclear matter in the inner crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yong-Mei; Wen, De-Hua

    2017-06-01

    By employing four typical equation of states (EOSs) of nuclear matter in the inner crust, the properties of low-mass neutron stars are investigated theoretically. Based on the well-known fact that there is a big gap between the neutron stars and white dwarfs in the mass-radius sequence of compact stars, according to the mass-radius relations of the four adopted EOSs, we conclude that there is a rough forbidden region for the central density and stellar radius to form a compact star; that is, there is no compact star in nature having central density in the region from about 1012kgm-3 to 1017kgm-3 , and there is also no compact star having a radius in the region from about 400 km to 2000 km. Moreover, the properties of the low-mass neutron stars are also explored. It is shown that for a stable neutron star near the minimum mass point, the stellar size (with radius >200 km) is much larger than that of normal neutron stars, and there is a compact "core" concentrated at about 95% of the stellar mass in the inner core with a radius of about 13 km and density higher than the neutron-drip point (4.3 ×1014kgm-3) . This property totally differs from that of normal neutron stars and white dwarfs. Furthermore, the Keplerian period, the moment of inertia, and the surface gravitational redshift of the star near the minimum-mass point are also investigated.

  5. CONSTRAINTS ON THE MASS AND RADIUS OF THE ACCRETING NEUTRON STAR IN THE RAPID BURSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Sala, G.; Jose, J.; Parikh, A.; Longland, R.; Pardo, L. C.; Andersen, M.

    2012-06-20

    The Rapid Burster (MXB 1730-335) is a unique object, showing both type I and type II X-ray bursts. A type I burst of the Rapid Burster was observed with Swift/X-Ray Telescope on 2009 March 5, showing photospheric radius expansion (PRE) for the first time in this source. We report here on the mass and radius determination from this PRE burst using a Bayesian approach. After marginalization over the likely distance of the system (5.8-10 kpc), we obtain M = 1.1 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} and R = 9.6 {+-} 1.5 km (1{sigma} uncertainties) for the compact object, ruling out the stiffest equations of state for the neutron star. We study the sensitivity of the results to the distance, the color correction factor, and the hydrogen mass fraction in the envelope. We find that only the distance plays a crucial role.

  6. Neutron stars - General review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Canuto, V.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of those properties of neutron stars upon which there is general agreement and of those areas which currently remain in doubt. Developments in theoretical physics of neutron star interiors are summarized with particular attention devoted to hyperon interactions and the structure of interior layers. Determination of energy states and the composition of matter is described for successive layers, beginning with the surface and proceeding through the central region into the core. Problems encountered in determining the behavior of matter in the ultra-high density regime are discussed, and the effects of the magnetic field of a neutron star are evaluated along with the behavior of atomic structures in the field. The evolution of a neutron star is outlined with discussion centering on carbon detonation, cooling, vibrational damping, rotation, and pulsar glitches. The role of neutron stars in cosmic-ray propagation is considered.

  7. Modeling equal and unequal mass binary neutron star mergers using public codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pietri, Roberto; Feo, Alessandra; Maione, Francesco; Löffler, Frank

    2016-03-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations of the dynamics of binary neutron star mergers from the late stage of the inspiral process up to ˜20 ms after the system has merged, either to form a hypermassive neutron star or a rotating black hole. We investigate five equal mass models of total gravitational mass 2.207, 2.373, 2.537, 2.697, and 2.854 M⊙, respectively, and four unequal mass models with MADM≃2.53 M⊙ and q ≃0.94 , 0.88, 0.83, and 0.77 (where q =M(1 )/M(2 ) is the mass ratio). We use a semirealistic equation of state, namely, the seven-segment piecewise polytropic SLyPP with a thermal component given by Γth=1.8 . We have also compared the resulting dynamics (for one model) using both the BSSN-NOK and CCZ4 methods for the evolution of the gravitational sector and also different reconstruction methods for the matter sector, namely, PPM, WENO, and MP5. Our results show agreement at high resolution, but superiority of BSSN-NOK supplemented by WENO reconstruction at lower resolutions. One of the important characteristics of the present investigation is that for the first time it has been done using only publicly available open source software: the Einstein Toolkit code, deployed for the dynamical evolution, and the LORENE code, for the generation of the initial models. All of the source code and parameters used for the simulations have been made publicly available. This not only makes it possible to rerun and reanalyze our data but also enables others to directly build upon this work for future research.

  8. Accuracy in measuring the neutron star mass in gravitational wave parameter estimates for nonspinning compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hee-Suk

    2015-09-01

    In gravitational wave (GW) data analysis, the parameter estimate is performed to find the physical parameters of GW sources. The result of the parameter estimate is given by a posterior probability density function, and the measurement errors can be computed by using the Fisher matrix method. Using this method, we investigate the accuracy in estimates of neutron star (NS) masses ( M NS) for GWs emitted from merging compact binaries. As GW sources, we consider nonspinning binaries in which the primary component is assumed to be a NS and the companion is assumed to be a NS or a stellar-mass black hole (BH). Adopting GW signals with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 for Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) sensitivity, we calculate measurement errors (σ) of M NS. We find that the errors strongly depend on the mass ratio of the companion mass ( M com) to the NS mass ( M NS). For NS-NS binaries, the fractional errors (σ/ M NS) are larger than 10% only in the symmetric mass region. For BH-NS binaries, the fractional errors tend to decrease with increasing mass ratio ( M com/ M NS), and the measurement accuracies are better than those for NS-NS binaries. In this case, the errors are always smaller than ~ 3%.

  9. The initial stellar masses for the formation of white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges

    As is well known a star may end its nuclear lifetime as a white dwarf, neutron star, black hole or may, in certain circumstances, leave no remnant at all. The main question to be addressed in this review is the following: what are the progenitors of these different final stages? After a brief review of the major physical principles governing stellar evolution, we present the different evolutionary scenarios resulting from numerical calculations. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of mass loss on theoretical determinations of the mass limits M WD and MBH which are respectively the maximum initial mass leading to the formation of a white dwarf and the minimum initial mass for the formation of a black hole. We terminate this review by the presentation of some relevant observational results. The bulk of this paper is devoted to the discussion of the evolution of single Population I stars. Les étoiles terminent leur évolution soit comme naines blanches, étoiles à neutrons, ou trous noirs, il peut également arriver qu'aucun résidu ne subsiste, l'étoile étant complètement détruite dans ses phases ultimes. La question à laquelle nous allons essayer de répondre dans cet article est la suivante : quels sont les progéniteurs de ces états finaux? Après un bref rappel de quelques principes importants gouvernant l'évolution stellaire, les différents scénarios évolutifs, tels qu'ils sont proposés par les modèles numériques, sont présentés. Les valeurs de la masse initiale maximale pour la formation des naines blanches ainsi que celles de la masse initiale minimale pour la formation des trous noirs sont discutées tant du point de vue théorique, qu'observationnel. La majeure partie de cet article concerne l'évolution d'étoiles simples et de composition chimique solaire.

  10. THE MASS AND RADIUS OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN THE BULGE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY KS 1731-260

    SciTech Connect

    Oezel, Feryal; Guever, Tolga; Gould, Andrew E-mail: tguver@email.arizona.edu

    2012-03-20

    Measurements of neutron star masses and radii are instrumental in determining the equation of state of their interiors, understanding the dividing line between neutron stars and black holes, and obtaining accurate statistics of source populations in the Galaxy. We report here on the measurement of the mass and radius of the neutron star in the low-mass X-ray binary KS 1731-260. The analysis of the spectroscopic data on multiple thermonuclear bursts yields well-constrained values for the apparent angular area and the Eddington flux of the source, both of which depend in a distinct way on the mass and radius of the neutron star. The binary KS 1731-260 is in the direction of the Galactic bulge, allowing a distance estimate based on the density of stars in that direction. Making use of the Han and Gould model, we determine the probability distribution over the distance to the source, which is approximately flat between 7 and 9 kpc. Combining these measurements, we place a strong upper bound on the radius of the neutron star, R {<=} 12.5 km, while confining its mass to M {<=} 2.1 M{sub Sun }.

  11. Dynamical mass ejection from the merger of asymmetric binary neutron stars: Radiation-hydrodynamics study in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    We perform neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for the merger of asymmetric binary neutron stars in numerical relativity. Neutron stars are modeled by soft and moderately stiff finite-temperature equations of state (EOS). We find that the properties of the dynamical ejecta such as the total mass, neutron richness profile, and specific entropy profile depend on the mass ratio of the binary systems for a given EOS in a unique manner. For a soft EOS (SFHo), the total ejecta mass depends weakly on the mass ratio, but the average of electron number per baryon (Ye ) and specific entropy (s ) of the ejecta decreases significantly with the increase of the degree of mass asymmetry. For a stiff EOS (DD2), with the increase of the mass asymmetry degree, the total ejecta mass significantly increases while the average of Ye and s moderately decreases. We find again that only for the SFHo, the total ejecta mass exceeds 0.01 M⊙ irrespective of the mass ratio chosen in this paper. The ejecta have a variety of electron number per baryon with an average approximately between Ye˜0.2 and ˜0.3 irrespective of the EOS employed, which is well suited for the production of the rapid neutron capture process heavy elements (second and third peaks), although its averaged value decreases with the increase of the degree of mass asymmetry.

  12. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  13. The neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary H 1658-298 back in quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Aastha; Wijnands, Rudy; Bahramian, Arash; Degenaar, Nathalie; Heinke, Craig

    2017-03-01

    The transient and eclipsing neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary H 1658-298 began its most recent outburst in August 2015 as determined using MAXI (ATel #7943) and we continued to monitor the outburst using Swift/XRT (e.g., ATel #7957, #8046).

  14. Neutron Stars versus Black Holes: Probing the Mass Gap with LIGO/Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.; Farr, Ben; Coughlin, Scott; Kalogera, Vicky; Holz, Daniel E.

    2015-07-01

    Inspirals and mergers of black hole (BH) and/or neutron star (NS) binaries are expected to be abundant sources for ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. We assess the capabilities of Advanced LIGO and Virgo to measure component masses using inspiral waveform models including spin-precession effects using a large ensemble of GW sources randomly oriented and distributed uniformly in volume. For 1000 sources this yields signal-to-noise ratios between 7 and 200. We make quantitative predictions for how well LIGO and Virgo will distinguish between BHs and NSs and appraise the prospect of using LIGO/Virgo (LV) observations to definitively confirm, or reject, the existence of a putative “mass gap” between NSs (m≤slant 3 {M}⊙ ) and BHs (m≥slant 5 {M}⊙ ). We find sources with the smaller mass component satisfying {m}2≲ 1.5 {M}⊙ to be unambiguously identified as containing at least one NS, while systems with {m}2≳ 6 {M}⊙ will be confirmed binary BHs. Binary BHs with {m}2\\lt 5 {M}⊙ (i.e., in the gap) cannot generically be distinguished from NSBH binaries. High-mass NSs (2\\lt m\\lt 3 {M}⊙ ) are often consistent with low-mass BHs (m\\lt 5 {M}⊙ ), posing a challenge for determining the maximum NS mass from LV observations alone. Individual sources will seldom be measured well enough to confirm objects in the mass gap and statistical inferences drawn from the detected population will be strongly dependent on the underlying distribution. If nature happens to provide a mass distribution with the populations relatively cleanly separated in chirp mass space, as some population synthesis models suggest, then NSs and BHs will be more easily distinguishable.

  15. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Supid

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes neutron stars and thermonuclear x ray bursts. The contents include: 1) Neutron Stars: why do we care?; 2) Thermonuclear Bursts: why do we care?; 3) Neutron Stars: Mass, Radius and Spin: a. Continuum Spectroscopy of Bursts b. Spectral Lines from Bursts c. Timing Properties of Bursts; 4) Neutron Star Atmosphere: Thermonuclear Flame Spreading; and 5) Future Prospects and Conclusions.

  16. An improved algorithm for inferring neutron star masses and radii using NICER waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new, faster Bayesian analysis algorithm that enables us to use energy-resolved waveforms of X-ray burst oscillations, like those that will be obtained using NICER, to estimate quickly the masses and radii of rapidly rotating, oblate neutron stars and determine the uncertainties in these estimates. We use the oblate-Schwarzschild (OS) approximation, which Cadeau et al. (2007) showed provides a very accurate description of the waveforms produced by hot spots on rapidly rotating, oblate neutron stars. We show that the angular radius of the hot spot and a phase-independent but otherwise arbitrary background must be included as part of the fit; to do otherwise is observationally incorrect and leads to misleadingly tight constraints on the mass and radius. A simple, single-hot-spot waveform model with 30 energy channels has 38 parameters. If the waveform data is informative, i.e., if they tightly constrain the mass M and the equatorial radius R of the star, the high-probability regions of the full parameter space are small. A grid search of this space would therefore require a prohibitive number of waveform computations. Here we describe a different procedure that is much more efficient. This new procedure (1) generates waveforms by interpolating in a table of pre-computed waveforms and (2) computes bounding ellipsoids that encompass points in the waveform parameter space that have interestingly high likelihoods. Using these bounding ellipsoids typically reduces the volume of the Monte Carlo integration by a factor ~ 30. The net result of these improvements is that whereas the analysis procedure used in Lo et al. (2013) took 50-150 clock hours on a 150-core cluster and did not search the (M,R) volume of interest, the new analysis procedure takes 50-150 clock hours on a 5-core desktop computer to perform a completely blind search of the full volume, despite the additional complexity of the OS waveform model used in the new algorithm.

  17. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  18. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  19. Very hard states in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, A. S.; Wijnands, R.; Degenaar, N.; Altamirano, D.; Patruno, A.; Gusinskaia, N. V.; Hessels, J. W. T.

    2017-07-01

    We report on unusually very hard spectral states in three confirmed neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries (1RXS J180408.9-342058, EXO 1745-248 and IGR J18245-2452) at a luminosity between ˜1036 and 1037 erg s-1. When fitting the Swift X-ray spectra (0.5-10 keV) in those states with an absorbed power-law model, we found photon indices of Γ ˜ 1, significantly lower than the Γ = 1.5-2.0 typically seen when such systems are in their so called hard state. For individual sources, very hard spectra were already previously identified, but here we show for the first time that likely our sources were in a distinct spectral state (i.e. different from the hard state) when they exhibited such very hard spectra. It is unclear how such very hard spectra can be formed; if the emission mechanism is similar to that operating in their hard states (i.e. up-scattering of soft photons due to hot electrons), then the electrons should have higher temperatures or a higher optical depth in the very hard state compared to those observed in the hard state. By using our obtained Γ as a tracer for the spectral evolution with luminosity, we have compared our results with those obtained by Wijnands et al. Our sample of sources follows the same track as the other neutron star systems in Wijnands et al., confirming their general results. However, we do not find that the accreting millisecond pulsars are systematically harder than the non-pulsating systems.

  20. Time-of-flight mass measurements of neutron-rich chromium isotopes up to N = 40 and implications for the accreted neutron star crust

    DOE PAGES

    Meisel, Z.; George, S.; Ahn, S.; ...

    2016-03-22

    Here, we present the mass excesses of 59-64Cr, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The mass of 64Cr is determined for the first time, with an atomic mass excess of -33.48(44) MeV. We find a significantly different two-neutron separation energy S2n trend for neutron-rich isotopes of chromium, removing the previously observed enhancement in binding at N = 38. Additionally, we extend the S2n trend for chromium to N = 40, revealing behavior consistent with the previously identified island of inversion in this region. We compare our results to state-of-the-artmore » shell-model calculations performed with a modified Lenzi-Nowacki-Poves-Sieja interaction in the fp shell, including the g9/2 and d5/2 orbits for the neutron valence space. We employ our result for the mass of 64Cr in accreted neutron star crust network calculations and find a reduction in the strength and depth of electron-capture heating from the A = 64 isobaric chain, resulting in a cooler than expected accreted neutron star crust. This reduced heating is found to be due to the >1-MeV reduction in binding for 64Cr with respect to values from commonly used global mass models.« less

  1. Neutron Stars are Follicly Challenged

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunes, Nicolas; Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo; Pappas, George; Apostolatos, Theocharis; Kyutoku, Koutarou

    2015-04-01

    Black holes satisfy certain no-hair relations through which all multipole moments of the spacetime can be specified in terms of just a few quantities, like their mass and spin angular momentum. I will describe how neutron stars and quark stars also satisfy similar no-hair relations that are approximately independent of their equation of state. I will show how these results hold for both slowly- and rapidly-rotating stars in full General Relativity, provided the stars are uniformly rotating and uncharged. I will then explain why such relations may be relevant to observations of the pulse profile of hot spots on rotating neutron stars with NICER, as well as how they could be used to test General Relativity with binary pulsar and gravitational wave observations. I acknowledge support from the NSF CAREER Award PHY-1250636.

  2. Binary neutron stars with generic spin, eccentricity, mass ratio, and compactness: Quasi-equilibrium sequences and first evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Moldenhauer, Niclas; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K.; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Markakis, Charalampos M.; Brügmann, Bernd; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Information about the last stages of a binary neutron star inspiral and the final merger can be extracted from quasiequilibrium configurations and dynamical evolutions. In this article, we construct quasiequilibrium configurations for different spins, eccentricities, mass ratios, compactnesses, and equations of state. For this purpose we employ the sgrid code, which allows us to construct such data in previously inaccessible regions of the parameter space. In particular, we consider spinning neutron stars in isolation and in binary systems; we incorporate new methods to produce highly eccentric and eccentricity-reduced data; we present the possibility of computing data for significantly unequal-mass binaries with mass ratios q ≃2 ; and we create equal-mass binaries with individual compactness up to C ≃0.23 . As a proof of principle, we explore the dynamical evolution of three new configurations. First, we simulate a q =2.06 mass ratio which is the highest mass ratio for a binary neutron star evolved in numerical relativity to date. We find that mass transfer from the companion star sets in a few revolutions before merger and a rest mass of ˜10-2M⊙ is transferred between the two stars. This amount of mass accretion corresponds to ˜1051 ergs of accretion energy. This configuration also ejects a large amount of material during merger (˜7.6 ×1 0-2M⊙), imparting a substantial kick to the remnant neutron star. Second, we simulate the first merger of a precessing binary neutron star. We present the dominant modes of the gravitational waves for the precessing simulation, where a clear imprint of the precession is visible in the (2,1) mode. Finally, we quantify the effect of an eccentricity-reduction procedure on the gravitational waveform. The procedure improves the waveform quality and should be employed in future precision studies. However, one also needs to reduce other errors in the waveforms, notably truncation errors, in order for the improvement due to

  3. High braking index pulsar PSR J1640-4631: low-mass neutron star with a large inclination angle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Cong

    2016-08-01

    Recent timing observation constrained the braking index of the X-ray pulsar PSR J1640-4631 to be n = 3.15 ± 0.03, which is the highest value of all pulsars with measured braking indices so far. In this Letter, we investigate whether pulsar braking by combined between the magnetic dipole emission and the gravitational radiation might have a braking index greater than three. For conventional neutron star and low mass quark star candidates, the inferred ellipticities derived by the observed braking index are obviously much larger than the theoretical estimated maximum value. If PSR J1640-4631 is a low-mass neutron star with a mass of 0.1 M⊙, the inferred ellipticity can be approximately equal to the theoretical estimated maximum value. Because of the radio-quiet nature of this source, we employ the vacuum gap model developed by Ruderman and Sutherland to constrain the inclination angle to be 87.2 - 90°. Based on this, we propose that a low-mass neutron star with a large inclination angle can interpret the high braking index and the radio-quiet nature of this source. Future observations such as gravitational wave detection and long-term timing for this source are required to confirm or confute our scenario.

  4. On the robustness of the r-process in neutron-star mergers against variations of nuclear masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Temis, J. J.; Wu, M. R.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Langanke, K.; Bauswein, A.; Janka, H.-T.; Frank, A.

    2016-07-01

    r-process calculations have been performed for matter ejected dynamically in neutron star mergers (NSM), such calculations are based on a complete set of trajectories from a three-dimensional relativistic smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulation. Our calculations consider an extended nuclear reaction network, including spontaneous, β- and neutron-induced fission and adopting fission yield distributions from the ABLA code. In this contribution we have studied the sensitivity of the r-process abundances to nuclear masses by using diferent mass models for the calculation of neutron capture cross sections via the statistical model. Most of the trajectories, corresponding to 90% of the ejected mass, follow a relatively slow expansion allowing for all neutrons to be captured. The resulting abundances are very similar to each other and reproduce the general features of the observed r-process abundance (the second and third peaks, the rare-earth peak and the lead peak) for all mass models as they are mainly determined by the fission yields. We find distinct differences in the predictions of the mass models at and just above the third peak, which can be traced back to different predictions of neutron separation energies for r-process nuclei around neutron number N = 130.

  5. Remnant massive neutron stars of binary neutron star mergers: Evolution process and gravitational waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Muranushi, Takayuki; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichiro; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2013-08-01

    Massive (hypermassive and supramassive) neutron stars are likely to be often formed after the merger of binary neutron stars. We explore the evolution process of the remnant massive neutron stars and gravitational waves emitted by them, based on numerical-relativity simulations for binary neutron star mergers employing a variety of equations of state and choosing a plausible range of the neutron star mass of binaries. We show that the lifetime of remnant hypermassive neutron stars depends strongly on the total binary mass and also on the equations of state. Gravitational waves emitted by the remnant massive neutron stars universally have a quasiperiodic nature of an approximately constant frequency although the frequency varies with time. We also show that the frequency and time-variation feature of gravitational waves depend strongly on the equations of state. We derive a fitting formula for the quasiperiodic gravitational waveforms, which may be used for the data analysis of a gravitational-wave signal.

  6. NO NEUTRON STAR COMPANION TO THE LOWEST MASS SDSS WHITE DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Agueeros, Marcel A.; Camilo, Fernando; Heinke, Craig; Kilic, Mukremin; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Freire, Paulo; Kleinman, Scot J.; Liebert, James W.

    2009-08-01

    SDSS J091709.55+463821.8 (hereafter J0917+4638) is the lowest surface gravity white dwarf (WD) currently known, with log g = 5.55 {+-} 0.05 (M {approx} 0.17 M{sub sun}). Such low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs) are believed to originate in binaries that evolve into WD/WD or WD/neutron star (NS) systems. An optical search for J0917+4638's companion showed that it must be a compact object with a mass {>=}0.28 M{sub sun}. Here we report on Green Bank Telescope 820 MHz and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of J0917+4638 intended to uncover a potential NS companion to the LMWD. No convincing pulsar signal is detected in our radio data. Our X-ray observation also failed to detect X-ray emission from J0917+4638's companion, while we would have detected any of the millisecond radio pulsars in 47 Tuc. We conclude that the companion is almost certainly another WD.

  7. Neutron star evolutionary sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. B.; Van Horn, H. M.; Ratcliff, K. F.; Malone, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed numerical calculations which are solutions of the full set of general relativistic equations describing the evolution of a spherical star are presented, for the case of the evolution of neutron stars that are cooling over the central temperatures range of 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 7th K. The effects of nucleon superfluidity in the inner crust and core are included, and models are constructed with and without a pion condensate at high densities. It is found that the localized neutrino cooling which dominates the early evolution of neutron stars is so rapid that heat transport within the star cannot keep pace, and temperature distribution is not isothermal. The residual contraction of the neutron star during the early cooling phase contributes little to the heat budget of the star, and most of the gravitational energy released raises the Fermi energy of the degenerate nucleons. It is concluded that since calculations with and without pion condensate are consistent with the upper limits of current observations, these are not sufficient in distinguishing between the various models of neutron star cooling.

  8. THE MASS AND THE RADIUS OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN THE TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SAX J1748.9-2021

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal

    2013-03-01

    We use time-resolved spectroscopy of thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed from SAX J1748.9-2021 to infer the mass and the radius of the neutron star in the binary. Four X-ray bursts observed from the source with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer enable us to measure the angular size and the Eddington limit on the neutron star surface. Combined with a distance measurement to the globular cluster NGC 6440, in which SAX J1748.9-2021 resides, we obtain two solutions for the neutron star radius and mass, R = 8.18 {+-} 1.62 km and M = 1.78 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} or R = 10.93 {+-} 2.09 km and M = 1.33 {+-} 0.33 M{sub Sun }.

  9. Neutron Star Structure From Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James

    2006-10-01

    Neutron stars are laboratories for dense matter physics. Observations of neutron stars, in the form of radio pulsars, X-ray binaries, X-ray bursters, and thermally-emitting isolated stars, are rapidly accumulating. Especially interesting are the radio pulsars PSR J0751+1807, Terzan 5 I and Terzan 5 J (with suprisingly large measured masses of 2.1±0.2, 1.69±0.1 and 1.85±0.05 solar masses, respectively), the pulsar PSR J1748-2446ad with the most rapid spin rate of 716 Hz, and the radio pulsar binary PSR J0737-3039 for which a moment of inertia of one of the neutron stars might be measured within a few years. Extremely massive neutron stars are important because they set limits to the maximum mass and upper limits to the maximum density found in cold, static, objects, and might limit the appearance of exotic matter such as hyperons, Bose condensates or deconfined quarks in a star's interior. The spin rate sets an upper limit to the radius of a star of a given mass, and the moment of inertia, being roughly proportional to M R^2, is a sensitive measure of neutron star radius. While the maximum mass speaks to the relative stiffness of the high-density equation of state at several times nuclear matter density, the radius is a measure of the relative stiffness of the low-density equation of state in the vicinity of the nuclear saturation density. For the nearly pure neutron matter found in neutron stars, it is a direct measure of the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Other promising observational constraints might be obtained from neutron star seismology (which limits the relative crustal thickness) and Eddington limited fluxes observed from bursting sources, and from thermal emissions from cooling neutron stars. The latter have the potential of constraining R∞=R/√1-2GM/Rc^2 if the source's distance can be accurately assessed. The distances of two nearby isolated sources, RX J1856-3754 and Geminga, have been determined by parallax. However, there

  10. Gravitational waves from neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan

    With H. A. Bethe, G. E. Brown worked on the merger rate of neutron star binaries for the gravitational wave detection. Their prediction has to be modified significantly due to the observations of 2M⊙ neutron stars and the detection of gravitational waves. There still, however, remains a possibility that neutron star-low mass black hole binaries are significant sources of gravitational waves for the ground-based detectors. In this paper, I review the evolution of neutron star binaries with super-Eddington accretion and discuss the future prospect.

  11. CONTINUED COOLING OF THE CRUST IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY KS 1731-260

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Brown, Edward F.; Cumming, Andrew; Degenaar, Nathalie; Wijnands, Rudy

    2010-10-20

    Some neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries have very long outbursts (lasting several years) which can generate a significant amount of heat in the neutron star crust. After the system has returned to quiescence, the crust then thermally relaxes. This provides a rare opportunity to study the thermal properties of neutron star crusts, putting constraints on the thermal conductivity and hence the structure and composition of the crust. KS 1731-260 is one of only four systems where this crustal cooling has been observed. Here, we present a new Chandra observation of this source approximately eight years after the end of the last outburst and four years since the last observation. We find that the source has continued to cool, with the cooling curve displaying a simple power-law decay. This suggests that the crust has not fully thermally relaxed yet and may continue to cool further. A simple power-law decay is in contrast to theoretical cooling models of the crust, which predict that the crust should now have cooled to the same temperature as the neutron star core.

  12. SYSTEMATICS OF DYNAMICAL MASS EJECTION, NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND RADIOACTIVELY POWERED ELECTROMAGNETIC SIGNALS FROM NEUTRON-STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bauswein, A.; Janka, H.-T.; Goriely, S.

    2013-08-10

    We investigate systematically the dynamical mass ejection, r-process nucleosynthesis, and properties of electromagnetic counterparts of neutron-star (NS) mergers in dependence on the uncertain properties of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) by employing 40 representative, microphysical high-density EOSs in relativistic, hydrodynamical simulations. The crucial parameter determining the ejecta mass is the radius R{sub 1.35} of a 1.35 M{sub Sun} NS. NSs with smaller R{sub 1.35} (''soft'' EOS) eject systematically higher masses. These range from {approx}10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} to {approx}10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} for 1.35-1.35 M{sub Sun} binaries and from {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} to {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} for 1.2-1.5 M{sub Sun} systems (with kinetic energies between {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg and 10{sup 51} erg). Correspondingly, the bolometric peak luminosities of the optical transients of symmetric (asymmetric) mergers vary between 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} and 14 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} (9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} and 14.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}) on timescales between {approx}2 hr and {approx}12 hr. If these signals with absolute bolometric magnitudes from -15.0 to -16.7 are measured, the tight correlation of their properties with those of the merging NSs might provide valuable constraints on the high-density EOS. The r-process nucleosynthesis exhibits a remarkable robustness independent of the EOS, producing a nearly solar abundance pattern above mass number 130. By the r-process content of the Galaxy and the average production per event the Galactic merger rate is limited to 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1} (4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} yr{sup -1}) for a soft (stiff) NS EOS, if NS mergers are the main source of heavy r-nuclei. The production ratio of radioactive {sup 232}Th to {sup 238}U attains a

  13. The unique opportunity to determine the mass of an accreting neutron star: the eclipsing accretion powered X-ray pulsar SWIFTJ1749.4-2807

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonker, Peter; Eikenberry, Steve; Torres, Manuel; Steeghs, Daniel; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2014-02-01

    In 2010 it was discovered that the peculiar transient SWIFT J1749.4-2807 exhibits pulsations at 518 Hz. Furthermore, it turned out that the source was eclipsing in a 8.8 hr orbit thereby holding the promise of a model independent neutron star mass determination. Optical or near-infrared dynamical studies offer the best prospects for constraining the neutron star equation of state, as they do not rely on any specific models concerning the neutron star itself. Using Gemini NIRI observations we identified the NIR counterpart to the pulsar. Here, we propose for Gemini near-infrared spectroscopy with FLAMINGOS-2 to obtain spectra over the orbit to measure the radial velocity semi-amplitude of the mass donor star, which will lead to a model independent mass measurement of the neutron star.

  14. Explaining observations of rapidly rotating neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakov, Mikhail E.; Chugunov, Andrey I.; Kantor, Elena M.

    2014-09-01

    In a previous paper [M. E. Gusakov, A. I. Chugunov, and E. M. Kantor, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 151101 (2014)], we introduced a new scenario that explains the existence of rapidly rotating warm neutron stars (NSs) observed in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs). Here it is described in more detail. The scenario takes into account the interaction between superfluid inertial modes and the normal (quadrupole) m=2 r mode, which can be driven unstable by the Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz (CFS) mechanism. This interaction can only occur at some fixed "resonance" stellar temperatures; it leads to formation of the "stability peaks" which stabilize a star in the vicinity of these temperatures. We demonstrate that a NS in LMXB spends a substantial fraction of time on the stability peak, that is, in the region of stellar temperatures and spin frequencies that has been previously thought to be CFS unstable with respect to excitation of r modes. We also find that the spin frequencies of NSs are limited by the CFS instability of normal (octupole) m=3 r mode rather than by m=2 r mode. This result agrees with the predicted value of the cutoff spin frequency ˜730 Hz in the spin distribution of accreting millisecond x-ray pulsars. In addition, we analyze evolution of a NS after the end of the accretion phase and demonstrate that millisecond pulsars can be born in LMXBs within our scenario. Besides millisecond pulsars, our scenario also predicts a new class of LMXB descendants—hot and rapidly rotating nonaccreting NSs ("hot widows"/HOFNARs). Further comparison of the proposed theory with observations of rotating NSs can impose new important constraints on the properties of superdense matter.

  15. Hypernuclei and massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, M.; Avancini, S. S.; Providência, C.; Vidaña, I.

    2017-06-01

    Background: The recent accurate measurement of the mass of two pulsars close to or above 2 M⊙ has raised the question of whether such large pulsar masses allow for the existence of exotic degrees of freedom, such as hyperons, inside neutron stars. Purpose: In the present work, we will investigate, within a phenomenological relativistic mean field approach, how the existing hypernuclei properties may constrain the neutron star equation of state and confront the neutron star maximum masses obtained with equations of state calibrated to hypernuclei properties with the astrophysical 2 M⊙ constraint. Method: The study is performed using a relativistic mean field approach to describe both the hypernuclei and the neutron star equations of state. Unified equations of state are obtained. A set of five models that describe 2 M⊙ when only nucleonic degrees of freedom are employed. Some of these models also satisfy other well-established laboratory or theoretical constraints. Results: The Λ -meson couplings are determined for all the models considered, and the Λ potential in symmetric nuclear matter and Λ matter at saturation are calculated. Maximum neutron star masses are determined for two values of the Λ -ω meson coupling, gω Λ=2 gω N/3 and gω Λ=gω N , and a wide range of values for gϕ Λ. Hyperonic stars with the complete baryonic octet are studied, restricting the coupling of the Σ and Ξ hyperons to the ω ,ρ , and σ mesons due to the lack of experimental data, and maximum star masses calculated. Conclusions: We conclude that, within a phenomenological relativistic mean field approach, the currently available hypernuclei experimental data and the lack of constraints on the asymmetric equation of state of nuclear matter at high densities set only a limited number of constraints on the neutron star matter equation of state using the recent 2 M⊙ observations. It is shown that the Λ potential in symmetric nuclear matter takes a value of ˜30 -32 Me

  16. Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star Binaries LTSA98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Wei

    2000-01-01

    My group, in close collaboration with Dr. Zhang's group at University of Alabama-Huntsville, have been systematically analyzing and re-analyzing a substantial amount of archival data from previous and ongoing X-ray missions, in order to study possible relativistic effects around stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars. Our effort has been focused primarily on the data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We carefully studied interesting quasi-periodic X-ray variability in newly discovered black hole candidates (XTE J1859+226 and XTE J1550-564), which, as we had proposed earlier, could be caused by general relativistic process (e.g., frame dragging) around the central black hole. We also discovered an intriguing temporal correlation between X-ray photons at different energies that is associated with the quasi-periodic signals of interest. The results provided new insights into the physical origin of the phenomena. Furthermore, we studied the spectral lines of black hole candidates which provide another avenue for studying general relativistic processes around black holes. The lines-may originate in the relativistic jets (which could be powered by the spin of the black hole) or in the disk around the black hole, as in the cases of 4U 1630-47 and GX 339-4 (two well-known black hole candidates), and may thus be distorted or shifted due to relativistic effects. Of course, neutron star systems were not forgotten either. After examining the properties of newly discovered fast quasi-periodic variability (at kiloHertz) associated with such systems, we proposed a relativistic model to explain the origin of the signals. We have also started to use new great observatories in orbit (such as Chandra and XMM-Newton) to observe the sources that are of interest to us. Finally, interesting results were also been obtained from our collaborations with other groups who are interested in some of the same objects. Such collaborative efforts have greatly enhanced the project and will

  17. Neutrino Processes in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of these lectures is to introduce basic processes responsible for cooling of neutron stars and to show how to calculate the neutrino production rate in dense strongly interacting nuclear medium. The formalism is presented that treats on equal footing one-nucleon and multiple-nucleon processes and reactions with virtual bosonic modes and condensates. We demonstrate that neutrino emission from dense hadronic component in neutron stars is subject of strong modifications due to collective effects in the nuclear matter. With the most important in-medium processes incorporated in the cooling code an overall agreement with available soft X ray data can be easily achieved. With these findings the so-called “standard” and “non-standard” cooling scenarios are replaced by one general “nuclear medium cooling scenario” which relates slow and rapid neutron star coolings to the star masses (interior densities). The lectures are split in four parts. Part I: After short introduction to the neutron star cooling problem we show how to calculate neutrino reaction rates of the most efficient one-nucleon and two-nucleon processes. No medium effects are taken into account in this instance. The effects of a possible nucleon pairing are discussed. We demonstrate that the data on neutron star cooling cannot be described without inclusion of medium effects. It motivates an assumption that masses of the neutron stars are different and that neutrino reaction rates should be strongly density dependent. Part II: We introduce the Green’s function diagram technique for systems in and out of equilibrium and the optical theorem formalism. The latter allows to perform calculations of production rates with full Green’s functions including all off-mass-shell effects. We demonstrate how this formalism works within the quasiparticle approximation. Part III: The basic concepts of the nuclear Fermi liquid approach are introduced. We show how strong interaction effects can be

  18. Merger of binary neutron stars to a black hole: Disk mass, short gamma-ray bursts, and quasinormal mode ringing

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2006-03-15

    Three-dimensional simulations for the merger of binary neutron stars are performed in the framework of full general relativity. We pay particular attention to the black hole formation case and to the resulting mass of the surrounding disk for exploring the possibility for formation of the central engine of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Hybrid equations of state are adopted mimicking realistic, stiff nuclear equations of state (EOSs), for which the maximum allowed gravitational mass of cold and spherical neutron stars, M{sub sph}, is larger than 2M{sub {center_dot}}. Such stiff EOSs are adopted motivated by the recent possible discovery of a heavy neutron star of mass {approx}2.1{+-}0.2M{sub {center_dot}}. For the simulations, we focus on binary neutron stars of the ADM mass M > or approx. 2.6M{sub {center_dot}}. For an ADM mass larger than the threshold mass M{sub thr}, the merger results in prompt formation of a black hole irrespective of the mass ratio Q{sub M} with 0.65 < or approx. Q{sub M}{<=}1. The value of M{sub thr} depends on the EOSs and is approximately written as 1.3-1.35M{sub sph} for the chosen EOSs. For the black hole formation case, we evolve the space-time using a black hole excision technique and determine the mass of a quasistationary disk surrounding the black hole. The disk mass steeply increases with decreasing the value of Q{sub M} for given ADM mass and EOS. This suggests that a merger with small value of Q{sub M} is a candidate for producing central engine of SGRBs. For Mneutron star of a large ellipticity. Because of the nonaxisymmetry, angular momentum is transported outward. If the hypermassive neutron star collapses to a black hole after the long-term angular momentum transport, the disk mass may be (> or approx. 0.01M{sub {center_dot}} irrespective of Q{sub M}. Gravitational waves are computed in terms of a gauge-invariant wave extraction technique. In the formation of the

  19. Neutrinos from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    A calculation of the flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars is presented. The calculation is used to determine the number of point sources detectable at the sensitivity threshold of a proposed deep underwater muon and neutrino detector array. The detector array would have a point source detection threshold of about 100 eV/sq cm-sec. Analysis of neutrino luminosities and the number of detectable sources suggests that the deep underwater detector may make a few discoveries. In particular, a suspected neutron star in the Cyg X-3 source seems a promising target for the deep underwater array.

  20. The neutron star zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2013-12-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission.

  1. Planets Around Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolszczan, Alexander; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Anderson, Stuart B.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to continue investigations of neutron star planetary systems in an effort to describe and understand their origin, orbital dynamics, basic physical properties and their relationship to planets around normal stars. This research represents an important element of the process of constraining the physics of planet formation around various types of stars. The research goals of this project included long-term timing measurements of the planets pulsar, PSR B1257+12, to search for more planets around it and to study the dynamics of the whole system, and sensitive searches for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of old, rapidly spinning neutron stars with planetary systems. The instrumentation used in our project included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM), the 100-m Green Bank Telescope with the Berkeley- Caltech Pulsar Machine (BCPM), and the 100-m Effelsberg and 64-m Parkes telescopes equipped with the observatory supplied backend hardware.

  2. Spectral-Timing Analysis of Kilohetrz Quasi-Periodic Osciallations in Neutron Star Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Jon; Peille, Philippe; Cackett, Edward; Barret, Didier

    2017-08-01

    Kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations or kHz QPOs are intensity variations that occur in the X-ray band observed in neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems. In such systems, matter is transferred from a secondary low-mass star to a neutron star via the process of accretion. kHz QPOs occur on the timescale of the inner accretion flow and may carry signatures of the physics of strong gravity (c2 ~ GM/R) and possibly clues to constraining the neutron star equation of state (EOS). Both the timing behavior of kHz QPOs and the time-averaged spectra of these systems have been studied extensively. No model derived from these techniques has been able to illuminate the origin of kHz QPOs. Spectral-timing is an analysis technique that can be used to derive information about the nature of physical processes occurring within the accretion flow on the timescale of the kHz QPO. To date, kHz QPOs of (4) neutron star LMXB systems have been studied with spectral-timing techniques. We present a comprehensive study of spectral-timing products of kHz QPOs from systems where data is available in the RXTE archive to demonstrate the promise of this technique to gain insights regarding the origin of kHz QPOs. Specifically, we show correlated time-lags as a function of QPO frequency and energy for the various LMXB systems where kHz QPOs are detected.

  3. Neutron Star Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1998-01-01

    Various phenomena involving neutron stars are addressed. Electron-positron production in the near magnetosphere of gamma-ray pulsars is discussed along with magnetic field evolution in spun-up and spinning-down pulsars. Glitches and gamma-ray central engines are also discussed.

  4. Time-of-flight mass measurements of neutron-rich chromium isotopes up to N = 40 and implications for the accreted neutron star crust

    SciTech Connect

    Meisel, Z.; George, S.; Ahn, S.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Browne, J.; Carpino, J. F.; Chung, H.; Cyburt, R. H.; Estrade, A.; Famiano, M.; Gade, A.; Langer, C.; Matos, M.; Mittig, W.; Montes, F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pereira, J.; Schatz, H.; Schatz, J.; Scott, M.; Shapira, Dan; Sieja, K.; Smith, K.; Stevens, J.; Tan, W.; Tarasov, O.; Towers, S.; Wimmer, K.; Winkelbauer, J. R.; Yurkon, J.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2016-03-22

    Here, we present the mass excesses of 59-64Cr, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The mass of 64Cr is determined for the first time, with an atomic mass excess of -33.48(44) MeV. We find a significantly different two-neutron separation energy S2n trend for neutron-rich isotopes of chromium, removing the previously observed enhancement in binding at N = 38. Additionally, we extend the S2n trend for chromium to N = 40, revealing behavior consistent with the previously identified island of inversion in this region. We compare our results to state-of-the-art shell-model calculations performed with a modified Lenzi-Nowacki-Poves-Sieja interaction in the fp shell, including the g9/2 and d5/2 orbits for the neutron valence space. We employ our result for the mass of 64Cr in accreted neutron star crust network calculations and find a reduction in the strength and depth of electron-capture heating from the A = 64 isobaric chain, resulting in a cooler than expected accreted neutron star crust. This reduced heating is found to be due to the >1-MeV reduction in binding for 64Cr with respect to values from commonly used global mass models.

  5. Neutrinos from SN 1987A - Implications for cooling of the nascent neutron star and the mass of the electron antineutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1989-01-01

    Data on neutrinos from SN 1987A are compared here with parameterized models of the neutrino emission using a consistent and straightforward statistical methodology. The empirically measured detector background spectra are included in the analysis, and the data are compared with a much wider variety of neutrino emission models than was explored previously. It is shown that the inferred neutrino emission model parameters are strongly correlated. The analysis confirms that simple models of the neutrino cooling of the nascent neutron star formed by the SN adequately explain the data. The inferred radius and binding energy of the neutron star are in excellent agreement with model calculations based on a wide range of equations of state. The results also raise the upper limit of the electron antineutrino rest mass to roughly 25 eV at the 95 percent confidence level, roughly 1.5-5 times higher than found previously.

  6. Neutrinos from SN 1987A - Implications for cooling of the nascent neutron star and the mass of the electron antineutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1989-01-01

    Data on neutrinos from SN 1987A are compared here with parameterized models of the neutrino emission using a consistent and straightforward statistical methodology. The empirically measured detector background spectra are included in the analysis, and the data are compared with a much wider variety of neutrino emission models than was explored previously. It is shown that the inferred neutrino emission model parameters are strongly correlated. The analysis confirms that simple models of the neutrino cooling of the nascent neutron star formed by the SN adequately explain the data. The inferred radius and binding energy of the neutron star are in excellent agreement with model calculations based on a wide range of equations of state. The results also raise the upper limit of the electron antineutrino rest mass to roughly 25 eV at the 95 percent confidence level, roughly 1.5-5 times higher than found previously.

  7. Quark Deconfinement in Rotating Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, Richard; Weber, Fridolin; Spinella, William; Contrera, Gustavo; Orsaria, Milva

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we use a three flavor non-local Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, an~improved effective model of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at low energies, to investigate the existence of deconfined quarks in the cores of neutron stars. Particular emphasis is put on the possible existence of quark matter in the cores of rotating neutron stars (pulsars). In contrast to non-rotating neutron stars, whose particle compositions do not change with time (are frozen in), the type and structure of the matter in the cores of rotating neutron stars depends on the spin frequencies of these stars, which opens up a possible new window on the nature of matter deep in the cores of neutron stars. Our study shows that, depending on mass and rotational frequency, up to around 8% of the mass of a massive neutron star may be in the mixed quark-hadron phase, if the phase transition is treated as a Gibbs transition. We also find that the gravitational mass at which quark deconfinement occurs in rotating neutron stars varies quadratically with spin frequency, which can be fitted by a simple formula.

  8. Numerical Relativity Simulations of Black Holes Binaries, Neutron Star Binaries, and Neutron Star Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosofsky, Shawn; Gold, Roman; Chirenti, Cecilia; Miller, Cole

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of numerical relativity simulations, using the Einstein Toolkit, of black hole binaries, neutron star binaries, and neutron star oscillations. The black hole binary simulations represent the source of LIGO's first gravitational wave detection, GW150914. We compare the gravitational wave output of this simulation with the LIGO data LIGO on GW150914. The neutron star binaries we simulated have different mass ratios and equations of state. These simulations were compared with each other to illustrate the effect of different mass ratios and equations of state on binary evolution and gravitational wave emission. To perform the neutron star oscillation simulations, we applied pressure and density perturbations to the star using specific eigenmodes. These evolutions of the stars were then compared to the expected oscillation frequencies of those excited eigemodes and contrasted with simulations of unperturbed neutron stars.

  9. MASS/RADIUS CONSTRAINTS ON THE QUIESCENT NEUTRON STAR IN M13 USING HYDROGEN AND HELIUM ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Catuneanu, A.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Ho, W. C. G.; Servillat, M.

    2013-02-20

    The mass and radius of the neutron star (NS) in low-mass X-ray binaries can be obtained by fitting the X-ray spectrum of the NS in quiescence, and the mass and radius constrains the properties of dense matter in NS cores. A critical ingredient for spectral fits is the composition of the NS atmosphere: hydrogen atmospheres are assumed in most prior work, but helium atmospheres are possible if the donor star is a helium white dwarf. Here we perform spectral fits to XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT data of a quiescent NS in the globular cluster M13. This NS has the smallest inferred radius from previous spectral fitting. Assuming an atmosphere composed of hydrogen, we find a significantly larger radius, more consistent with those from other quiescent NSs. With a helium atmosphere (an equally acceptable fit), we find even larger values for the radius.

  10. Pulsar observations and neutron star models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, G.; Cohen, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Information about the physical parameters of neutron stars is obtained from pulsar observations. The energy balance of the Crab nebula and the Vela X remnant allows derivation of limits for the masses of the Crab and Vela pulsars. Glitch observations provide further clues on the masses of these two pulsars. The degree of confidence in the derived numbers is pointed out. The possibility of observing neutron stars in binary systems as pulsating X-ray sources is discussed. The importance of observing redshifted gamma ray lines from the surface of neutron stars, and thus directly measuring either individual or statistical properties of these objects is pointed out.

  11. Jets from Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes, its especially important to understand the electromagnetic signals resulting from mergers of compact objects. New simulations successfully follow a merger of two neutron stars that produces a short burst of energy via a jet consistent with short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) detections.Still from the authors simulation showing the two neutron stars, and their magnetic fields, before merger. [Adapted from Ruiz et al. 2016]Challenging SystemWe have long suspected that sGRBs are produced by the mergers of compact objects, but this model has been difficult to prove. One major hitch is that modeling the process of merger and sGRB launch is very difficult, due to the fact that these extreme systems involve magnetic fields, fluids and full general relativity.Traditionally, simulations are only able to track such mergers over short periods of time. But in a recent study, Milton Ruiz (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Industrial University of Santander, Colombia) and coauthors Ryan Lang, Vasileios Paschalidis and Stuart Shapiro have modeled a binary neutron star system all the way through the process of inspiral, merger, and the launch of a jet.A Merger TimelineHow does this happen? Lets walk through one of the teams simulations, in which dipole magnetic field lines thread through the interior of each neutron star and extend beyond its surface(like magnetic fields found in pulsars). In this example, the two neutron stars each have a mass of 1.625 solar masses.Simulation start (0 ms)Loss of energy via gravitational waves cause the neutron stars to inspiral.Merger (3.5 ms)The neutron stars are stretched by tidal effects and make contact. Their merger produces a hypermassive neutron star that is supported against collapse by its differential (nonuniform) rotation.Delayed collapse into a black hole (21.5 ms)Once the differential rotation is redistributed by magnetic fields and partially

  12. The Neutron Star Zoo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission. XXX Neutron stars are found in a wide variety of sources, displaying an amazing array of behavior. They can be isolated or in binary systems, accreting, heating, cooling, spinning down, spinning up, pulsing, flaring and bursting. The one property that seems to determine their behavior most strongly is their magnetic field strength, structure and evolution. The hot polar caps, bursts and flares of magnetars are likely due to the rapid decay and twisting of their superstrong magnetic fields, whose very existence requires some kind of early dynamo activity. The intermediate-strength magnetic fields of RPPs determines their spin-down behavior and radiation properties. However, the overlap of the magnetar and RPP populations is not understood at present. Why don't high-field RPPs burst or flare? Why don't lower-field magnetars sometimes behave more like RPPs? INS may be old magnetars whose high fields have decayed, but they do not account for the existence of younger RPPs with magnetar-strength fields. Not only the strength of the magnetic field but also its configuration may be important in making a NS a magnetar or a RPP. Magnetic field decay is a critical link between other NS populations as well. "Decay" of the magnetic field is necessary for normal RPPs to evolve into MSPs through accretion and spin up in LMXBs. Some kind of accretion-driven field reduction is the most likely mechanism, but it is controversial since it is not

  13. Accuracy of Mass and Radius Determination for Neutron Stars in X-ray Bursters from Simulated LOFT Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majczyna, A.; Madej, J.; Różańska, A.; Należyty, M.

    2017-06-01

    We present a simulation of an X-ray spectrum of a hot neutron star, as would be seen by the LAD detector on board of LOFT satellite. We also compute a grid of theoretical spectra corresponding to a range of effective temperatures Teff and surface gravities log g with values corresponding to compact stars in Type I X-ray bursters. A neutron star with the mass M=1.64 M⊙ and the radius R=11.95 km (which yields the surface gravity log g=14.30 [cgs] and the surface redshift z=0.30) is used in simulation. Accuracy of mass and radius determination by fitting theoretical spectra to the observed one is found to be M=1.64+0.16-0.02 M⊙ and R=11.95+1.57-0.40 km (2σ). The confidence contours for these two variables are narrow but elongated, and therefore the resulting constraints on the EOS cannot be strong. Note, that in this paper we aim to discuss error contours of NS mass and radius, whereas discussion of EOS is beyond the scope of this work.

  14. Crustal Cooling in the Neutron Star Low-Mass X-Ray Binary KS 1731-260

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Rachael L.

    Neutron stars in binary systems can undergo periods of accretion (outburst), where in- falling material heats the crust of the star out of thermal equilibrium with the core. When accretion stops (quiescence), we can directly observe the thermal relaxation of the crust. Crustal cooling of accretion-heated neutron stars provides insight into the stellar interior of neutron stars. The neutron star X-ray transient, KS 1731-260, was in outburst for 12.5 years before returning to quiescence in 2001. Here, we present a 150 ks Chandra observation of KS 1731-260 taken in August 2015, about 14.5 years into quiescence. We find that the neutron star surface temperature is consistent with the previous observation, suggesting the crust has reached thermal equilibrium with the core. Using a theoretical thermal evolution code, we fit the observed cooling curves and constrain the core temperature, composition, and the required level of extra shallow heating.

  15. The Maximum Mass of Rotating Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, M.; Gondek-Rosiń; ska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2012-12-01

    Strange quark stars are considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars as compact objects (e.g. Weber 2003). A hot compact star (a proto-neutron star or a strange star) born in a supernova explosion or a remnant of neutron stars binary merger are expected to rotate differentially and be important sources of gravitational waves. We present results of the first relativistic calculations of differentially rotating strange quark stars for broad ranges of degree of differential rotation and maximum densities. Using a highly accurate, relativistic code we show that rotation may cause a significant increase of maximum allowed mass of strange stars, much larger than in the case of neutron stars with the same degree of differential rotation. Depending on the maximum allowed mass a massive neutron star (strange star) can be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation or collapse to a black hole.

  16. Position annihilation radiation from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Borner, G. A.; Cohen, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Matter accreted on the surfaces of neutron stars consists of energetic particles of a few tens to a couple hundred MeV/nucleon, depending on the neutron star mass. In addition to heat, such particles produce nuclear reactions with the surface material. It is proposed that the recently observed 473 + or - 30 keV spectral feature from the galactic center is gravitationally red-shifted positron annihilation radiation produced at the surfaces of old neutron stars. The principal observational tests of the model would be the detection of nuclear gamma ray lines from the galactic center and red-shifted positron annihilation radiation from the galactic disk.

  17. Positron-annihilation radiation from neutron stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Borner, G.; Cohen, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Matter accreted on the surfaces of neutron stars consists of energetic particles of a few tens to one or two hundred MeV per nucleon, depending on the neutron-star mass. In addition to heat, such particles produce nuclear reactions with the surface material. It is proposed that the recently observed 473 plus or minus 30 keV spectral feature from the galactic center is gravitationally redshifted positron-annihilation radiation produced at the surfaces of neutron stars. The principal observational tests of the model would be the detection of nuclear gamma-ray lines from the galactic center.

  18. Thermonuclear runaways on neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, R. E.; Picklum, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thermonuclear runaways which develop when neutron stars of 0.476 solar masses accrete hydrogen-rich material at 10 to the -10th and 2 x 10 to the -9th solar masses/year have been followed using a numerical model. It is found that a thermal instability occurs at densities in excess of 10 to the 5th g/cu cm and that the maximum accumulated mass required to initiate the runaway is 0.7 x 10 to the -12th and 2.1 x 10 to the -12th solar masses for the mass accretion rates of 10 to the -10th and 2 x 10 to the -9th solar masses/year, respectively. Heating the of the neutron star envelope by hydrogen burning leads to the ignition of helium. The nonequilibrium burning of helium by a combination of (alpha, p), (p, gamma), and (alpha, gamma) reactions involving O-14, O-15, and other heavy nuclei provides the energy for an X-ray burst. The gross properties of these models bear suggestive resemblance to those observed for some X-ray burst sources.

  19. Upper Bounds on r-Mode Amplitudes from Observations of Low-Mass X-Ray Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2013-01-01

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations and gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates in low-mass X-ray binary neutron stars, under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. For masses <2M solar mass we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1×10(exp-8) to 1.5×10(exp-6). For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar sources with known quiescent spin-down rates, these limits suggest that approx. less than 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the source with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6440, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all sources considered here, our amplitude limits suggest that gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21M solar mass) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. In the absence of other significant sources of internal heat, these results could be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they were made of hadronic matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

  20. Dark neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2017-06-01

    There is good evidence that electron-positron pair formation is not present in that section of the pulsar open magnetosphere, which is the source of coherent radio emission, but the possibility of two-photon pair creation in an outer gap remains. Calculation of transition rates for this process based on measured whole-surface temperatures, combined with a survey of γ-ray, X-ray and optical luminosities, expressed per primary beam lepton, shows that few Fermi-LAT pulsars have significant outer-gap pair creation. For radio-loud pulsars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density and an ion-proton plasma, there must be an outward flow of electrons from some other part of the magnetosphere to maintain a constant net charge on the star. In the absence of pair creation, it is likely that this current is the source of GeV γ-emission observed by the Fermi-LAT and its origin is in the region of the outer gap. With negative polar-cap corotational charge density, the compensating current in the absence of pair creation can consist only of ions or protons. These neutron stars are likely to be radio-quiet, have no observable γ-emission, and hence can be described as dark neutron stars.

  1. Beyond the Horizon Distance: LIGO-Virgo can Boost Gravitational-Wave Detection Rates by Exploiting the Mass Distribution of Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Bartos, I; Márka, S

    2015-12-04

    The masses of neutron stars in neutron star binaries are observed to fall in a narrow mass range around ∼1.33M_{⊙}. We explore the advantage of focusing on this region of the parameter space in gravitational-wave searches. We find that an all-sky (externally triggered) search with an optimally reduced template bank is expected to detect 14% (61%) more binary mergers than without the reduction. A reduced template bank can also represent significant improvement in technical cost. We also develop a more detailed search method using binary mass distribution, and find a sensitivity increase similar to that due to the reduced template bank.

  2. Effects of the gravitational waves emission on the orbit of the binary neutron stars considering the mass variation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabrouk, Zeinab; Rahoma, W. A.

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational waves which have been announced finally to be detected in February 11, 2016 are believed to be emitted from many sources and phenomena in the universe, the binary neutron stars systems specially the inspirals are one kind of them. In this paper we are going to calculate the effects of this emission on the elements of the elliptical orbits of such binary neutron stars before the onset of the mass exchange. We based our work on the Imshennik and Popov (1994) paper then we do some modifications. The main and important results that Imshennik and Popov get were the rate of change of the eccentricity e, the rate of change of the semi major axis a, and the monotonic dependence between them a=a(e). Finally they concluded the smallness of the final eccentricity which make the orbits to be near-circular due to the emission of the gravitational waves. Our modification is to consider the masses of the two binary stars to be varied using the famous Eddington-Jeams law, then we expand them around the time t using Taylor expansion. we do this variation first for one mass with the constancy of the second one, then we let both mosses to vary together. We start the algorithm from the beginning substituting with our new series of masses in the two main equations, the average rate of change of the total energy of the system (dE/dt) , and the average rate of change of the angular momentum (dJ/dt). This modification leads to new expressions of the previous mentioned rate of changes of the orbital elements obtained by Imshennik and Popov, some of them we obtained and still working in the rest.

  3. Theoretical Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    2003-01-01

    Among the newly discovered classes of X-ray sources which have attracted wide attention are close binary systems in which mass is transferred via Roche lobe overflow from a low mass donor star to its neutron star companion. Many of these sources exhibit intense bursts of X-ray radiation as well as periodic and quasi-periodic phenomena. Intensive analysis of these sources as a class has provided insight into the accretion process in binary star systems and into the magnetic field, rotational, and nuclear evolution of the underlying neutron star. In this proposal we have focused on theoretical studies of the hydrodynamical and nuclear processes that take place on the surface of accreting neutron stars in these systems. The investigation of these processes is critical for providing an understanding of a number of outstanding problems related to their transient behavior and evolution.

  4. Neutron stars as laboratories for gravity physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deliduman, Cemsinan

    2014-01-01

    We study the structure of neutron stars in R+αR² gravity model with perturbative method. We obtain mass-radius relations for four representative equations of state (EoS). We find that, for |α|~10⁹ cm², the results differ substantially from the results of general relativity. The effects of modified gravity are seen as mimicking a stiff or soft EoS for neutron stars depending upon whether α is negative or positive, respectively. Some of the soft EoS that are excluded within the framework of general relativity can be reconciled for certain values of α of this order with the 2 solar mass neutron star recently observed. Indeed, if the EoS is ever established to be soft, modified gravity of the sort studied here may be required to explain neutron star masses as large as 2 M{sub ⊙}. The associated length scale √(α)~10⁵ cm is of the order of the the typical radius of neutron stars implying that this is the smallest value we could find by using neutron stars as a probe. We thus conclude that the true value of α is most likely much smaller than 10⁹ cm².

  5. On magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Luiz; Menezes, Debora E-mail: debora.p.m@ufsc.br

    2015-08-01

    In this work we review the formalism normally used in the literature about the effects of density-dependent magnetic fields on the properties of neutron and quark stars, expose some ambiguities that arise and propose a way to solve the related problem. Our approach explores more deeply the concept of pressure, yielding the so called chaotic magnetic field formalism for the stress tensor. We also use a different way of introducing a variable magnetic field, which depends on the energy density rather than on the baryonic density, which allows us to build a parameter free model.

  6. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüster, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  7. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruester, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen

    2006-03-15

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  8. Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Sushan

    2017-09-01

    This article briefly reviews our current understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in neutron stars, which basically defines the evolutionary pathways between different observational classes of neutron stars. The emphasis here is on the evolution in binary systems and the newly emergent classes of millisecond pulsars.

  9. KAON CONDENSATION IN NEUTRON STARS.

    SciTech Connect

    RAMOS,A.; SCHAFFNER-BIELICH,J.; WAMBACH,J.

    2001-04-24

    We discuss the kaon-nucleon interaction and its consequences for the change of the properties of the kaon in the medium. The onset of kaon condensation in neutron stars under various scenarios as well its effects for neutron star properties are reviewed.

  10. UPPER BOUNDS ON r-MODE AMPLITUDES FROM OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2013-08-20

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations and gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates in low-mass X-ray binary neutron stars, under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. For masses <2 M{sub Sun} we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} to 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}. For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar sources with known quiescent spin-down rates, these limits suggest that {approx}< 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the source with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6440, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all sources considered here, our amplitude limits suggest that gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21 M{sub Sun }) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. In the absence of other significant sources of internal heat, these results could be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they were made of hadronic matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

  11. COMMON PATTERNS IN THE EVOLUTION BETWEEN THE LUMINOUS NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SUBCLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fridriksson, Joel K.; Homan, Jeroen; Remillard, Ronald A.

    2015-08-10

    The X-ray transient XTE J1701–462 was the first source observed to evolve through all known subclasses of low-magnetic-field neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), as a result of large changes in its mass accretion rate. To investigate to what extent similar evolution is seen in other NS-LMXBs we have performed a detailed study of the color–color and hardness–intensity diagrams (CDs and HIDs) of Cyg X-2, Cir X-1, and GX 13+1—three luminous X-ray binaries, containing weakly magnetized neutron stars, known to exhibit strong secular changes in their CD/HID tracks. Using the full set of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array data collected for the sources over the 16 year duration of the mission, we show that Cyg X-2 and Cir X-1 display CD/HID evolution with close similarities to XTE J1701–462. Although GX 13+1 shows behavior that is in some ways unique, it also exhibits similarities to XTE J1701–462, and we conclude that its overall CD/HID properties strongly indicate that it should be classified as a Z source, rather than as an atoll source. We conjecture that the secular evolution of Cyg X-2, Cir X-1, and GX 13+1—illustrated by sequences of CD/HID tracks we construct—arises from changes in the mass accretion rate. Our results strengthen previous suggestions that within single sources Cyg-like Z source behavior takes place at higher luminosities and mass accretion rates than Sco-like Z behavior, and lend support to the notion that the mass accretion rate is the primary physical parameter distinguishing the various NS-LMXB subclasses.

  12. Antikaon condensation and deconfinement phase transition in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Jianfa; Guo Hua; Xu Furong; Li Xiguo; Liu Yuxin

    2006-05-15

    Antikaon condensation and deconfinement phase transition in neutron stars are investigated in a chiral hadronic model (also referred as to the FST model) for the hadronic phase and in the MIT bag model for the deconfined quark matter phase. It is shown that the existence of quark matter phase makes antikaon condensation impossible in neutron stars. The properties of neutron stars are sensitive to the bag constant. For the small values of the bag constant, the pure quark matter core appears and hyperons are strongly suppressed in neutron stars, whereas for the large bag constant, the hadron-quark mixed phase exists in the center of neutron stars. The maximum masses of neutron stars with the quark matter phase are lower than those without the quark matter phase; meanwhile, the maximum masses of neutron stars with the quark matter phase increase with the bag constant.

  13. ULXs: Neutron stars versus black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Andrew; Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We consider ultraluminous X-ray systems (ULXs) where the accretor is a neutron star rather than a black hole. We show that the recently discovered example (M82 X-2) fits naturally into the simple picture of ULXs as beamed X-ray sources fed at super-Eddington rates, provided that its magnetic field is weaker (≃1011G) than a new-born X-ray pulsar, as expected if there has been mass gain. Continuing accretion is likely to weaken the field to the point that pulsing stops, and make the system indistinguishable from a ULX containing a black hole. Accordingly we suggest that a significant fraction of all ULXs may actually contain neutron star accretors rather than black holes, reflecting the neutron-star fraction among their X-ray binary progenitors. We emphasize that neutron-star ULXs are likely to have higher apparent luminosities than black hole ULXs for a given mass transfer rate, as their tighter beaming outweighs their lower Eddington luminosities. This further increases the likely proportion of neutron-star accretors among all ULXs. Cygnus X-2 is probably a typical descendant of neutron-star ULXs, which may therefore ultimately end as millisecond pulsar binaries with massive white dwarf companions.

  14. Grand unification of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Kaspi, Victoria M

    2010-04-20

    The last decade has shown us that the observational properties of neutron stars are remarkably diverse. From magnetars to rotating radio transients, from radio pulsars to isolated neutron stars, from central compact objects to millisecond pulsars, observational manifestations of neutron stars are surprisingly varied, with most properties totally unpredicted. The challenge is to establish an overarching physical theory of neutron stars and their birth properties that can explain this great diversity. Here I survey the disparate neutron stars classes, describe their properties, and highlight results made possible by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, in celebration of its 10th anniversary. Finally, I describe the current status of efforts at physical "grand unification" of this wealth of observational phenomena, and comment on possibilities for Chandra's next decade in this field.

  15. Grand unification of neutron stars

    PubMed Central

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has shown us that the observational properties of neutron stars are remarkably diverse. From magnetars to rotating radio transients, from radio pulsars to isolated neutron stars, from central compact objects to millisecond pulsars, observational manifestations of neutron stars are surprisingly varied, with most properties totally unpredicted. The challenge is to establish an overarching physical theory of neutron stars and their birth properties that can explain this great diversity. Here I survey the disparate neutron stars classes, describe their properties, and highlight results made possible by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, in celebration of its 10th anniversary. Finally, I describe the current status of efforts at physical “grand unification” of this wealth of observational phenomena, and comment on possibilities for Chandra’s next decade in this field. PMID:20404205

  16. DETERMINING NEUTRON STAR MASSES AND RADII USING ENERGY-RESOLVED WAVEFORMS OF X-RAY BURST OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Ka Ho; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2013-10-10

    Simultaneous, precise measurements of the mass M and radius R of neutron stars can yield uniquely valuable information about the still uncertain properties of cold matter at several times the density of nuclear matter. One method that could be used to measure M and R is to analyze the energy-dependent waveforms of the X-ray flux oscillations seen during some thermonuclear bursts from some neutron stars. These oscillations are thought to be produced by X-ray emission from hotter regions on the surface of the star that are rotating at or near the spin frequency of the star. Here we explore how well M and R could be determined by generating and analyzing, using Bayesian techniques, synthetic energy-resolved X-ray data that we produce assuming a future space mission having 2-30 keV energy coverage and an effective area of 10 m{sup 2}, such as the proposed Large Observatory for X-Ray Timing or Advanced X-Ray Timing Array missions. We find that waveforms from hot spots within 10° of the rotation equator usually constrain both M and R with an uncertainty of about 10%, if there are 10{sup 6} total counts from the spot, whereas waveforms from spots within 20° of the rotation pole provide no useful constraints. The constraints we report can usually be achieved even if the burst oscillations vary with time and data from multiple bursts must be used to obtain 10{sup 6} counts from the hot spot. This is therefore a promising method to constrain M and R tightly enough to discriminate strongly between competing models of cold, high-density matter.

  17. NuSTAR observations of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GX 349+2 throughout its Z-track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughenour, Benjamin; Cackett, Edward; Miller, Jon M.

    2017-08-01

    Although the brightest class of neutron star low mass X-ray binaries, known as Z-sources, have been well studied, their behavior is not fully understood. In particular, what causes these sources to trace out the characteristic Z-shaped pattern on color-color or hardness-intensity diagrams is not well known. By studying the physical properties of the different spectral states of these sources, we may better understand such variability. With that goal in mind, we present a recent NuSTAR observation of the Z-source GX 349+2, which spans approximately 2 days, and covers all its spectral states. By creating a hardness-intensity diagram we were able to extract four spectra and trace the change in spectral parameters throughout the Z track. GX 349+2 shows a strong, broad Fe Kα line in all states. Through modeling of the reflection spectrum and Fe Kα line we find that in most states the inner disk radius is consistent with remaining unchanged, and being close to the neutron star. However, during the brightest flaring branch the inner disk radius from reflection is not well constrained.

  18. QPO Constraints on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. Coleman

    2005-01-01

    The kilohertz frequencies of QPOs from accreting neutron star systems imply that they are generated in regions of strong gravity, close to the star. This suggests that observations of the QPOs can be used to constrain the properties of neutron stars themselves, and in particular to inform us about the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear densities. Here we discuss some relatively model-insensitive constraints that emerge from the kilohertz QPOs, as well as recent developments that may hint at phenomena related to unstable circular orbits outside neutron stars.

  19. Limiting rotational period of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    1992-11-01

    We seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties in which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M=1.442Msolar neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). A still lower curve, based only on the structure of Einstein's equations, limits any star whatsoever to lie in the plane above it. Hypothetical stars such as strange stars, if the matter of which they are made is self-bound in bulk at a sufficiently large equilibrium energy density, can lie in the region above the general-relativistic forbidden region, and in the region forbidden to neutron stars.

  20. Limiting rotational period of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K. )

    1992-11-15

    We seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties in which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a {ital M}=1.442{ital M}{sub {circle dot}} neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). A still lower curve, based only on the structure of Einstein's equations, limits any star whatsoever to lie in the plane above it. Hypothetical stars such as strange stars, if the matter of which they are made is self-bound in bulk at a sufficiently large equilibrium energy density, can lie in the region above the general-relativistic forbidden region, and in the region forbidden to neutron stars.

  1. Suzaku spectra of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yajuan; Zhang, Haotong; zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    We present the spectral analysis of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 using data from four Suzaku observations in 2010 March. 4U 1608-52 is a transient atoll source, and the analyzed observations contain the “island” and “banana” states, corresponding transitional, and soft states. The spectra are fitted with the hybrid model for the soft states, which consists of two thermal components (a multicolor accretion disk and a single-temperature blackbody) plus a broken power law. The fitting results show that the continuum spectra evolve during the different states. Fe emission line is often detected in low-mass X-ray binary, however, no obviously Fe line is detected in the four observations of 4U 1608-52.

  2. Novel modelling of ultracompact X-ray binary evolution - stable mass transfer from white dwarfs to neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengar, Rahul; Tauris, Thomas M.; Langer, Norbert; Istrate, Alina G.

    2017-09-01

    Tight binaries of helium white dwarfs (He WDs) orbiting millisecond pulsars (MSPs) will eventually 'merge' due to gravitational damping of the orbit. The outcome has been predicted to be the production of long-lived ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs), in which the WD transfers material to the accreting neutron star (NS). Here we present complete numerical computations, for the first time, of such stable mass transfer from a He WD to a NS. We have calculated a number of complete binary stellar evolution tracks, starting from pre-low-mass X-ray binary systems, and evolved these to detached MSP+WD systems and further on to UCXBs. The minimum orbital period is found to be as short as 5.6 min. We followed the subsequent widening of the systems until the donor stars become planets with a mass of ∼0.005 M⊙ after roughly a Hubble time. Our models are able to explain the properties of observed UCXBs with high helium abundances and we can identify these sources on the ascending or descending branch in a diagram displaying mass-transfer rate versus orbital period.

  3. Mass Measurement of 56Sc Reveals a Small A=56 Odd-Even Mass Staggering, Implying a Cooler Accreted Neutron Star Crust

    SciTech Connect

    Meisel, Z.; George, S.; Ahn, S.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Browne, J.; Carpino, J. F.; Chung, H.; Cole, A. L.; Cyburt, R. H.; Estrade, A.; Famiano, M.; Gade, A.; Langer, C.; Matos, M.; Mittig, W.; Montes, F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pereira, J.; Schatz, H.; Schatz, J.; Scott, M.; Shapira, Dan; Smith, K.; Stevens, J.; Tan, W.; Tarasov, O.; Towers, S.; Wimmer, K.; Winkelbauer, J. R.; Yurkon, J.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2015-01-01

    We present the mass excesses of 52-57Sc, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The masses of 56Sc and 57Sc were determined for the first time with atomic mass excesses of -24.85(59)((+0)(-54)) MeV and -21.0(1.3) MeV, respectively, where the asymmetric uncertainty for 56Sc was included due to possible contamination from a long-lived isomer. The 56Sc mass indicates a small odd-even mass staggering in the A = 56 mass chain towards the neutron drip line, significantly deviating from trends predicted by the global FRDM mass model and favoring trends predicted by the UNEDF0 and UNEDF1 density functional calculations. Together with new shell-model calculations of the electron-capture strength function of 56Sc, our results strongly reduce uncertainties in model calculations of the heating and cooling at the 56Ti electron-capture layer in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars. We find that, in contrast to previous studies, neither strong neutrino cooling nor strong heating occurs in this layer. We conclude that Urca cooling in the outer crusts of accreting neutron stars that exhibit superbursts or high temperature steady-state burning, which are predicted to be rich in A approximate to 56 nuclei, is considerably weaker than predicted. Urca cooling must instead be dominated by electron capture on the small amounts of adjacent odd-A nuclei contained in the superburst and high temperature steady-state burning ashes. This may explain the absence of strong crust Urca cooling inferred from the observed cooling light curve of the transiently accreting x-ray source MAXI J0556-332.

  4. Mass Measurement of 56Sc Reveals a Small A=56 Odd-Even Mass Staggering, Implying a Cooler Accreted Neutron Star Crust

    DOE PAGES

    Meisel, Z.; George, S.; Ahn, S.; ...

    2015-01-01

    We present the mass excesses of 52-57Sc, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The masses of 56Sc and 57Sc were determined for the first time with atomic mass excesses of -24.85(59)((+0)(-54)) MeV and -21.0(1.3) MeV, respectively, where the asymmetric uncertainty for 56Sc was included due to possible contamination from a long-lived isomer. The 56Sc mass indicates a small odd-even mass staggering in the A = 56 mass chain towards the neutron drip line, significantly deviating from trends predicted by the global FRDM mass model and favoring trends predicted bymore » the UNEDF0 and UNEDF1 density functional calculations. Together with new shell-model calculations of the electron-capture strength function of 56Sc, our results strongly reduce uncertainties in model calculations of the heating and cooling at the 56Ti electron-capture layer in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars. We find that, in contrast to previous studies, neither strong neutrino cooling nor strong heating occurs in this layer. We conclude that Urca cooling in the outer crusts of accreting neutron stars that exhibit superbursts or high temperature steady-state burning, which are predicted to be rich in A approximate to 56 nuclei, is considerably weaker than predicted. Urca cooling must instead be dominated by electron capture on the small amounts of adjacent odd-A nuclei contained in the superburst and high temperature steady-state burning ashes. This may explain the absence of strong crust Urca cooling inferred from the observed cooling light curve of the transiently accreting x-ray source MAXI J0556-332.« less

  5. Mass Measurement of 56Sc Reveals a Small A = 56 Odd-Even Mass Staggering, Implying a Cooler Accreted Neutron Star Crust.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Z; George, S; Ahn, S; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Browne, J; Carpino, J F; Chung, H; Cole, A L; Cyburt, R H; Estradé, A; Famiano, M; Gade, A; Langer, C; Matoš, M; Mittig, W; Montes, F; Morrissey, D J; Pereira, J; Schatz, H; Schatz, J; Scott, M; Shapira, D; Smith, K; Stevens, J; Tan, W; Tarasov, O; Towers, S; Wimmer, K; Winkelbauer, J R; Yurkon, J; Zegers, R G T

    2015-10-16

    We present the mass excesses of (52-57)Sc, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The masses of 56Sc and 57Sc were determined for the first time with atomic mass excesses of -24.85(59)((-54)(+0))  MeV and -21.0(1.3)  MeV, respectively, where the asymmetric uncertainty for 56Sc was included due to possible contamination from a long-lived isomer. The 56Sc mass indicates a small odd-even mass staggering in the A = 56 mass chain towards the neutron drip line, significantly deviating from trends predicted by the global FRDM mass model and favoring trends predicted by the UNEDF0 and UNEDF1 density functional calculations. Together with new shell-model calculations of the electron-capture strength function of 56Sc, our results strongly reduce uncertainties in model calculations of the heating and cooling at the 56Ti electron-capture layer in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars. We find that, in contrast to previous studies, neither strong neutrino cooling nor strong heating occurs in this layer. We conclude that Urca cooling in the outer crusts of accreting neutron stars that exhibit superbursts or high temperature steady-state burning, which are predicted to be rich in A≈56 nuclei, is considerably weaker than predicted. Urca cooling must instead be dominated by electron capture on the small amounts of adjacent odd-A nuclei contained in the superburst and high temperature steady-state burning ashes. This may explain the absence of strong crust Urca cooling inferred from the observed cooling light curve of the transiently accreting x-ray source MAXI J0556-332.

  6. Planetary Systems Around Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolszczan, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    This project was initiated in 1993, about one year after the announcement of two planets around PSR B1257+12. Its goal was to investigate planetary systems around neutron stars using high precision timing of radio pulsars as a tool. A microsecond precision of the pulse timing analysis, which is equivalent to a millimeter-per-second radial velocity resolution, makes it possible to detect asteroid-mass bodies in orbit around pulsars and to study the dynamics of pulsar planetary systems. The project originally consisted of two longterm efforts: (i) routine observations and timing analysis of the millisecond pulsar PSR B1257+12 which was found to be orbited by at least two earth-mass bodies (Wolszczan and Frail, Nature, 355, 145) and (ii) a sensitive all-sky search for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of neutron stars with planetary systems. In the third year of the project, it was expanded to include long-term timing observations of slow pulsars in search for planetary systems around these younger neutron stars. The instrumentation used to conduct these investigations included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM-1), the 100-m Effelsberg telescope with the local pulse timing hardware, and the 32-m paraboloid of the Torun Centre for Astronomy in Torun, Poland (TCFA) with the PSPM-2, the second pulsar machine built at Penn State. The PI's collaborators included pulsar groups led by D. Backer (Berkeley), R. Foster (NRL), S. Kulkarni (Caltech), J. Taylor (Princeton) and R. Wielebinski (Bonn). One postdoc (Stuart Anderson), one graduate student (Brian Cadwell) and several undergraduates have been engaged in various aspects of research related to this project.

  7. Planetary Systems Around Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolszczan, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    This project was initiated in 1993, about one year after the announcement of two planets around PSR B1257+12. Its goal was to investigate planetary systems around neutron stars using high precision timing of radio pulsars as a tool. A microsecond precision of the pulse timing analysis, which is equivalent to a millimeter-per-second radial velocity resolution, makes it possible to detect asteroid-mass bodies in orbit around pulsars and to study the dynamics of pulsar planetary systems. The project originally consisted of two longterm efforts: (i) routine observations and timing analysis of the millisecond pulsar PSR B1257+12 which was found to be orbited by at least two earth-mass bodies (Wolszczan and Frail, Nature, 355, 145) and (ii) a sensitive all-sky search for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of neutron stars with planetary systems. In the third year of the project, it was expanded to include long-term timing observations of slow pulsars in search for planetary systems around these younger neutron stars. The instrumentation used to conduct these investigations included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM-1), the 100-m Effelsberg telescope with the local pulse timing hardware, and the 32-m paraboloid of the Torun Centre for Astronomy in Torun, Poland (TCFA) with the PSPM-2, the second pulsar machine built at Penn State. The PI's collaborators included pulsar groups led by D. Backer (Berkeley), R. Foster (NRL), S. Kulkarni (Caltech), J. Taylor (Princeton) and R. Wielebinski (Bonn). One postdoc (Stuart Anderson), one graduate student (Brian Cadwell) and several undergraduates have been engaged in various aspects of research related to this project.

  8. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkotas, Konstantinos

    2016-03-01

    Neutron stars are the densest objects in the present Universe, attaining physical conditions of matter that cannot be replicated on Earth. These unique and irreproducible laboratories allow us to study physics in some of its most extreme regimes. More importantly, however, neutron stars allow us to formulate a number of fundamental questions that explore, in an intricate manner, the boundaries of our understanding of physics and of the Universe. The multifaceted nature of neutron stars involves a delicate interplay among astrophysics, gravitational physics, and nuclear physics. The research in the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars is expected to flourish and thrive in the next decade. The imminent direct detection of gravitational waves will turn gravitational physics into an observational science, and will provide us with a unique opportunity to make major breakthroughs in gravitational physics, in particle and high-energy astrophysics. These waves, which represent a basic prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity but have yet to be detected directly, are produced in copious amounts, for instance, by tight binary neutron star and black hole systems, supernovae explosions, non-axisymmetric or unstable spinning neutron stars. The focus of the talk will be on the neutron star instabilities induced by rotation and the magnetic field. The conditions for the onset of these instabilities and their efficiency in gravitational waves will be presented. Finally, the dependence of the results and their impact on astrophysics and especially nuclear physics will be discussed.

  9. Axion cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    Cooling simulations of neutron stars and their comparison with the data from thermally emitting x-ray sources put constraints on the properties of axions, and by extension, of any light pseudoscalar dark matter particles, whose existence has been postulated to solve the strong-C P problem of QCD. We incorporate the axion emission by pair-breaking and formation processes by S - and P -wave nucleonic condensates in a benchmark code for cooling simulations, as well as provide fit formulas for the rates of these processes. Axion cooling of neutron stars has been simulated for 24 models covering the mass range 1 to 1.8 solar masses, featuring nonaccreted iron and accreted light-element envelopes, and a range of nucleon-axion couplings. The models are based on an equation state predicting conservative physics of superdense nuclear matter that does not allow for the onset of fast cooling processes induced by phase transitions to non-nucleonic forms of matter or high proton concentration. The cooling tracks in the temperature vs age plane were confronted with the (time-averaged) measured surface temperature of the central compact object in the Cas A supernova remnant as well as surface temperatures of three nearby middle-aged thermally emitting pulsars. We find that the axion coupling is limited to fa/107 GeV ≥(5 - 10 ) , which translates into an upper bound on axion mass ma≤(0.06 - 0.12 ) eV for Peccei-Quinn charges of the neutron |Cn|˜0.04 and proton |Cp|˜0.4 characteristic for hadronic models of axions.

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON NEUTRON STAR MASS AND RADIUS IN GS 1826-24 FROM SUB-EDDINGTON X-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zamfir, Michael; Cumming, Andrew; Galloway, Duncan K. E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca

    2012-04-10

    We investigate the constraints on neutron star mass and radius in GS 1826-24 from models of light curves and spectral evolution of type I X-ray bursts. This source shows remarkable agreement with theoretical calculations of burst energies, recurrence times, and light curves. We first exploit this agreement to set the overall luminosity scale of the observed bursts. When combined with a measured blackbody normalization, this leads to a distance- and anisotropy-independent measurement of the ratio between the redshift 1 + z and color-correction factor f{sub c}. We find 1 + z = 1.19-1.28 for f{sub c} = 1.4-1.5. We then compare the evolution of the blackbody normalization with flux in the cooling tail of bursts with predictions from spectral models of Suleimanov et al. The observations are well described by the models at luminosities greater than about one-third of the peak luminosity, with deviations emerging at luminosities below that. We show that this comparison leads to distance-independent upper limits on R{sub {infinity}} and neutron star mass of R{sub {infinity}} {approx}< 9.0-13.2 km and M < 1.2-1.7 M{sub Sun }, respectively, for solar abundance of hydrogen at the photosphere and a range of metallicity and surface gravity. The radius limits are low in comparison to previous measurements. This may be indicative of a subsolar hydrogen fraction in the GS 1826-24 photosphere, or of larger color corrections than that predicted by spectral models. Our analysis also gives an upper limit on the distance to GS 1826-24 of d < 4.0-5.5 kpc {xi}{sup -1/2}{sub b}, where {xi}{sub b} is the degree of anisotropy of the burst emission.

  11. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-15

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars.

  12. Radio luminosity upper limits of the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GRO J1744-28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas; Degenaar, Nathalie; Miller-Jones, James; Tudor, Vlad

    2017-02-01

    Following the new outburst of the Galactic neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and 2.1 Hz X-ray pulsar GRO J1744-28 (ATels #10073, #10079), we performed target of opportunity observations of this source with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA).

  13. Cyg X-1 - A massive neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, I.

    1981-01-01

    The expected X-ray emission from Cyg X-1, considered a massive neutron star (8-15 solar masses) according to some gravity theories, is studied within the framework of Rosen's bimetric gravity theory (1973, 1974). It is shown that in such massive neutron stars, the innermost stable orbit lies far outside the star surface, and therefore the X-ray spectrum consists of two components: a soft one emitted from a cold accretion disk and a hard one emitted by the matter striking the neutron star surface after spiraling down freely from the disk. The proposed model is shown to be in good agreement with the observed luminosities. The model predicts a surface gravitational redshift of 3.16 which could be tested by the future X- and gamma-ray detectors.

  14. Statistical theory of thermal evolution of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznogov, M. V.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-02-01

    Thermal evolution of neutron stars is known to depend on the properties of superdense matter in neutron star cores. We suggest a statistical analysis of isolated cooling middle-aged neutron stars and old transiently accreting quasi-stationary neutron stars warmed up by deep crustal heating in low-mass X-ray binaries. The method is based on simulations of the evolution of stars of different masses and on averaging the results over respective mass distributions. This gives theoretical distributions of isolated neutron stars in the surface temperature-age plane and of accreting stars in the photon thermal luminosity-mean mass accretion rate plane to be compared with observations. This approach permits to explore not only superdense matter but also the mass distributions of isolated and accreting neutron stars. We show that the observations of these stars can be reasonably well explained by assuming the presence of the powerful direct Urca process of neutrino emission in the inner cores of massive stars, introducing a slight broadening of the direct Urca threshold (for instance, by proton superfluidity), and by tuning mass distributions of isolated and accreted neutron stars.

  15. Dynamical stability of nascent neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuk Tung

    This thesis presents a study of the dynamical stability of nascent neutron stars resulting from the accretion induced collapse of rapidly rotating white dwarfs. Chapter 2 and part of Chapter 3 study the equilibrium models for these neutron stars. They are constructed by assuming that the neutron stars have the same masses, angular momenta, and specific angular momentum distributions as the pre-collapse white dwarfs. If the pre-collapse white dwarf is rapidly rotating, the collapsed object will contain a high density central core of size about 20 km, surrounded by a massive accretion torus extending to hundreds of kilometers from the rotation axis. The ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to gravitational binding energy, β, of these neutron stars is all found to be less than 0.27. Chapter 3 studies the dynamical stability of these neutron stars by numerically evolving the linearized hydrodynamical equations. A dynamical bar-mode instability is observed when the β of the star is greater than the critical value β d ≈ 0.25. It is expected that the unstable mode will persist until a substantial amount of angular momentum is carried away by gravitational radiation. The detectability of these sources is studied and it is estimated that LIGO II is unlikely to detect them unless the event rate is greater than 10-6/year/galaxy. All the calculations on the structure and stability of the neutron stars in Chapters 2 and 3 are carried out using Newtonian hydrodynamics and gravity. Chapter 4 studies the relativistic effects on the structure of these neutron stars. New techniques are developed and used to construct neutron star models to the first post- Newtonian (1PN) order. The structures of the ON models are qualitatively similar to the corresponding Newtonian models, but the values of β are somewhat smaller. The maximum β for these ON neutron stars is found to be 0.24, which is 8% smaller than the Newtonian result (0.26). However, relativistic effects will also change

  16. Chandra Captures Neutron Star Action

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This movie from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows a fast moving jet of particles produced by a rapidly rotating neutron star, and may provide new insight into the nature of some of the densest...

  17. Neutron stars : Seen my way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang

    2001-09-01

    An unconventional survey is presented of the observable properties of neutron stars and of all astrophysical phenomena possibly related to them, such as their pulsing, clock irregularities, bursting, flickering, and occasional super-Eddington brightness, the generation of cosmic rays, of gamma-ray bursts, of jets, and of synchrotron nebulae, their birth, and their occasional transient appearance as 'supersoft' X-ray sources. The msec pulsars are argued to be born fast, the black-hole candidates to be neutron stars inside of massive disks, and the gamma-ray bursts to be sparks from dense 'blades' accreting spasmodically onto the surfaces of (generally old) neutron stars within " 0.3 Kpc from the Sun. Supernovae - the likely birth events of neutron stars - are thick-walled explosions, not to be described by Sedov-Taylor waves, which illuminate their gaseous environs via collisions of their 'splinters'.

  18. Close binary neutron star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marronetti, Pedro

    1999-12-01

    We present a method to calculate solutions to the initial value problem in (3 + 1) general relativity corresponding to binary neutron-star systems (BNS) in irrotational quasi-equilibrium orbits. The initial value equations are solved using a conformally flat spatial metric tensor. The stellar fluid dynamics corresponds to that of systems with zero vorticity in the inertial reference frame. Irrotational systems like the ones analyzed in the present work are likely to resemble the final stages of the evolution of neutron-star binaries, thus providing insights on the inspiral process. The fluid velocity is derived from the gradient of a scalar potential. A numerical program was developed to solve the elliptic equations for the metric fields and the fluid velocity potential. We discuss the different numerical techniques employed to achieve high resolution across the stellar volume, as well as the methods used to find solutions to the Poisson-like equations with their corresponding boundary conditions. We present sequences of quasi-stable circular orbits which conserve baryonic mass. These sequences mimic the time evolution of the inspiral and are obtained without solving the complex evolution equations. They also provide sets of initial value data for future time evolution codes, which should be valid very close to the final merger. We evaluate the emission of gravitational radiation during the evolution through multipole expansions methods.

  19. Semi-analytic derivation of the threshold mass for prompt collapse in binary neutron-star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauswein, Andreas; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-11-01

    The threshold mass for prompt collapse in binary neutron-star (NS) mergers was empirically found to depend on the stellar properties of the maximum-mass non-rotating NS model. Here, we present a semi-analytic derivation of this empirical relation, which suggests that it is rather insensitive to thermal effects, to deviations from axisymmetry and to the exact rotation law in merger remnants. We utilize axisymmetric, cold equilibrium models with differential rotation and determine the threshold mass for collapse from the comparison between an empirical relation that describes the angular momentum in the remnant for a given total binary mass and the sequence of rotating equilibrium models at the threshold to collapse (the latter assumed to be near the turning point of fixed-angular-momentum sequences). In spite of the various simplifying assumptions, the empirical relation for prompt collapse is reproduced with good accuracy, which demonstrates its robustness. We discuss implications of our methodology and results for understanding other empirical relations satisfied by NS merger remnants that have been discovered by numerical simulations and that play a key role in constraining the high-density equation of state through gravitational-wave observations.

  20. Neutron star news and puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Madappa

    2014-08-01

    Gerry Brown has had the most influence on my career in Physics, and my life after graduate studies. This article gives a brief account of some of the many ways in which Gerry shaped my research. Focus is placed on the significant strides on neutron star research made by the group at Stony Brook, which Gerry built from scratch. Selected puzzles about neutron stars that remain to be solved are noted.

  1. The Zoo of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.

    2008-12-01

    In these lecture notes, I briefly discuss the present day situation and new discoveries in astrophysics of neutron stars focusing on isolated objects. The latter include soft gamma repeaters, anomalous x-ray pulsars, central compact objects in supernova remnants, the Magnificent Seven, and rotating radio transients. In the last part of the paper, I describe available tests of cooling curves of neutron stars and discuss different additional constraints that can help to confront theoretical calculations of cooling with observational data.

  2. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON-STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. II. EDDINGTON LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2012-03-01

    Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of thermonuclear bursts observed from low-mass X-ray binaries offer a unique tool to measure neutron-star masses and radii. In this paper, we continue our systematic analysis of all the X-ray bursts observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from X-ray binaries. We determine the events that show clear evidence for photospheric radius expansion and measure the Eddington limits for these accreting neutron stars using the bolometric fluxes attained at the touchdown moments of each X-ray burst. We employ a Bayesian technique to investigate the degree to which the Eddington limit for each source remains constant between bursts. We find that for sources with a large number of radius expansion bursts, systematic uncertainties are at a 5%-10% level. Moreover, in six sources with only pairs of Eddington-limited bursts, the distribution of fluxes is consistent with a {approx}10% fractional dispersion. This indicates that the spectroscopic measurements of neutron-star masses and radii using thermonuclear X-ray bursts can reach the level of accuracy required to distinguish between different neutron-star equations of state, provided that uncertainties related to the overall flux calibration of X-ray detectors are of comparable magnitude.

  3. Carbon Atmosphere Discovered On Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Evidence for a thin veil of carbon has been found on the neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, resolves a ten-year mystery surrounding this object. "The compact star at the center of this famous supernova remnant has been an enigma since its discovery," said Wynn Ho of the University of Southampton and lead author of a paper that appears in the latest issue of Nature. "Now we finally understand that it can be produced by a hot neutron star with a carbon atmosphere." By analyzing Chandra's X-ray spectrum - akin to a fingerprint of energy - and applying it to theoretical models, Ho and his colleague Craig Heinke, from the University of Alberta, determined that the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, has an ultra-thin coating of carbon. This is the first time the composition of an atmosphere of an isolated neutron star has been confirmed. The Chandra "First Light" image of Cas A in 1999 revealed a previously undetected point-like source of X-rays at the center. This object was presumed to be a neutron star, the typical remnant of an exploded star, but researchers were unable to understand its properties. Defying astronomers' expectations, this object did not show any X-ray or radio pulsations or any signs of radio pulsar activity. By applying a model of a neutron star with a carbon atmosphere to this object, Ho and Heinke found that the region emitting X-rays would uniformly cover a typical neutron star. This would explain the lack of X-ray pulsations because -- like a lightbulb that shines consistently in all directions -- this neutron star would be unlikely to display any changes in its intensity as it rotates. Scientists previously have used a neutron star model with a hydrogen atmosphere giving a much smaller emission area, corresponding to a hot spot on a typical neutron star, which should produce X-ray pulsations as it rotates. Interpreting the hydrogen atmosphere model

  4. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HIGH-MASS γ-RAY BINARY 1FGL J1018.6−5856: A PROBABLE NEUTRON STAR PRIMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Peacock, Mark; Cheung, C. C.; Salinas, Ricardo

    2015-11-10

    We present medium-resolution optical spectroscopy with the SOAR telescope of the O star secondary of the high-mass γ-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856 to help determine whether the primary is a neutron star or black hole. We find that the secondary has a low radial velocity semi-amplitude of 11–12 km s{sup −1}, with consistent values obtained for H and He absorption lines. This low value strongly favors a neutron star primary: while a black hole cannot be excluded if the system is close to face on, such inclinations are disallowed by the observed rotation of the secondary. We also find the high-energy (X-ray and γ-ray) flux maxima occur when the star is behind the compact object along our line of sight, inconsistent with a simple model of anisotropic inverse Compton scattering for the γ-ray photons.

  5. Rapidly rotating neutron star progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K. A.; Kuranov, A. G.; Kolesnikov, D. A.; Popov, S. B.; Porayko, N. K.

    2016-12-01

    Rotating proto-neutron stars can be important sources of gravitational waves to be searched for by present-day and future interferometric detectors. It was demonstrated by Imshennik that in extreme cases the rapid rotation of a collapsing stellar core may lead to fission and formation of a binary proto-neutron star which subsequently merges due to gravitational wave emission. In this paper, we show that such dynamically unstable collapsing stellar cores may be the product of a former merger process of two stellar cores in a common envelope. We applied population synthesis calculations to assess the expected fraction of such rapidly rotating stellar cores which may lead to fission and formation of a pair of proto-neutron stars. We have used the BSE (Binary Star Evolution) population synthesis code supplemented with a new treatment of stellar core rotation during the evolution via effective core-envelope coupling, characterized by the coupling time, τc. The validity of this approach is checked by direct MESA calculations of the evolution of a rotating 15 M⊙ star. From comparison of the calculated spin distribution of young neutron stars with the observed one, reported by Popov and Turolla, we infer the value τc ≃ 5 × 105 yr. We show that merging of stellar cores in common envelopes can lead to collapses with dynamically unstable proto-neutron stars, with their formation rate being ˜0.1-1 per cent of the total core collapses, depending on the common envelope efficiency.

  6. HYPERACCRETING NEUTRON STAR DISKS AND NEUTRINO ANNIHILATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dong; Dai, Z. G. E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.c

    2009-09-20

    Newborn neutron stars surrounded by hyperaccreting and neutrino-cooled disks may exist in some gamma-ray bursts and/or supernovae. In this paper, we further study the structure of such a neutron star disk based on the two-region (i.e., inner and outer) disk scenario following our previous work, and calculate the neutrino annihilation luminosity from the disk in various cases. We investigate the effects of the viscosity parameter {alpha}, energy parameter {epsilon} (measuring the neutrino cooling efficiency of the inner disk), and outflow strength on the structure of the entire disk as well as the effect of emission from the neutron star surface boundary emission on the total neutrino annihilation rate. The inner disk satisfies the entropy-conservation self-similar structure for the energy parameter {epsilon} {approx_equal} 1 and the advection-dominated structure for {epsilon} < 1. An outflow from the disk decreases the density and pressure but increases the thickness of the disk. Moreover, compared with the black hole disk, the neutrino annihilation luminosity above the neutron star disk is higher, and the neutrino emission from the boundary layer could increase the neutrino annihilation luminosity by about one order of magnitude higher than the disk without boundary emission. The neutron star disk with the advection-dominated inner disk could produce the highest neutrino luminosity while the disk with an outflow has the lowest. Although a heavily mass-loaded outflow from the neutron star surface at early times of neutron star formation prevents the outflow material from being accelerated to a high bulk Lorentz factor, an energetic ultrarelativistic jet via neutrino annihilation can be produced above the stellar polar region at late times if the disk accretion rate and the neutrino emission luminosity from the surface boundary layer are sufficiently high.

  7. Neutron Star - Magnetosphere Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, Marcelo; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    In this work we report results of the interaction of a neutron star magnetosphere in both collapsing and moving scenarios interacting with an ambient magnetic field. In recent works [1,2], it has been shown the important role and realism associated with studies of electromagnetic environments in some particular regimes, such as: ideal-MHD, force-free, and electro-vacuum. Motivated by this and their astrophysical implications for BBH and hybrid BH-NS mergers [3,4], we study the following cases: collapse of a magnetized NS, head-on collision of a BH-NS, and orbiting merger of a BH-NS. Based in the results from our simulations, we draw some relevant conclusions to the production of jets as described within the force-free formalism. [4pt] [1] C.Palenzuela, L.Lehner and S.Liebling, Science 329, 927 (2010).[0pt] [2] C.Palenzuela, T.Garrett, et al., Phys.Rev.D 82, 044045 (2010).[0pt] [3] L.Lehner, C.Palenzuela, et al., 2011.[0pt] [4] S.Liebling, L.Lehner, et al., Phys.Rev.D 81, 124023 (2010).

  8. The direct cooling tail method for X-ray burst analysis to constrain neutron star masses and radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, Valery F.; Poutanen, Juri; Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J. E.; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G.; Werner, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Determining neutron star (NS) radii and masses can help to understand the properties of matter at supra-nuclear densities. Thermal emission during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from NSs in low-mass X-ray binaries provides a unique opportunity to study NS parameters, because of the high fluxes, large luminosity variations and the related changes in the spectral properties. The standard cooling tail method uses hot NS atmosphere models to convert the observed spectral evolution during cooling stages of X-ray bursts to the Eddington flux FEdd and the stellar angular size Ω. These are then translated to the constraints on the NS mass M and radius R. Here we present the improved, direct cooling tail method that generalizes the standard approach. First, we adjust the cooling tail method to account for the bolometric correction to the flux. Then, we fit the observed dependence of the blackbody normalization on flux with a theoretical model directly on the M-R plane by interpolating theoretical dependences to a given gravity, hence ensuring only weakly informative priors for M and R instead of FEdd and Ω. The direct cooling method is demonstrated using a photospheric radius expansion burst from SAX J1810.8-2609, which has happened when the system was in the hard state. Comparing to the standard cooling tail method, the confidence regions are shifted by 1σ towards larger radii, giving R = 11.5-13.0 km at M = 1.3-1.8 M⊙ for this NS.

  9. Neutron star accretion and the neutrino fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy

    1993-05-01

    We suggest a mechanism for driving supernova explosions through neutrino energy deposition beyond the formation and the cooling of the neutron star. The mechanism depends upon convection next to the neutron star and terminates when the entropy of buoyant bubbles increases sufficiently due to neutrino heating to shut off the down flow of low entropy matter. This convection is initially caused by the heat deposited from neutrinos emitted by the cooling neutron star in a region gravitationally dominated by the neutron star. This convection by providing an efficient heat transport mechanism avoids the overheating and excessive neutrino energy losses in the regions close to the neutron stars and has been recently modeled by Herant, Benz and Colgate. In this model the explosion shock, initially driven by the bounce followed by neutron star derived neutrino heating is further driven by the up flow of the bouyant, high entropy bubbles. The down flow between the bubbles of low entropy matter originating from behind the bounce and later the explosion shock will build up a modest entropy atmosphere in pressure equilibrium with the surface of the cooling neutron star. For modest entropies, Srad ~ 10 or Stotal ~ 18 and condensed neutron stars, R/M ~ 10 km per solar mass, the total mass of such an atmosphere is small, 1.7 × 10-3 Msolar, but the temperature at the base of such an atmosphere is extremely high, T ~ 10 MeV. The paradoxical result of neutrino emission is to further condense the atmosphere and increase the temperature until the compression heating is exceeded by the neutrino emission. The absolute limit of compression heating is free fall collapse, which may be approached but not exceeded. Such an accretion event approaching this limit may reach a temperature high enough to create a neutrino ``fireball'', a region hot enough, ~ 11 MeV, so as to be partially opaque to its own (neutrino) radiation. The further heating of the already high entropy bubbles by the neutrino

  10. Dissipative processes in superfluid neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Colucci, Giuseppe; Manuel, Cristina

    2011-05-23

    We present some results about a novel damping mechanism of r-mode oscillations in neutron stars due to processes that change the number of protons, neutrons and electrons. Deviations from equilibrium of the number densities of the various species lead to the appearance in the Euler equations of the system of a dissipative mechanism, the so-called rocket effect. The evolution of the r-mode oscillations of a rotating neutron star are influenced by the rocket effect and we present estimates of the corresponding damping timescales. In the description of the system we employ a two-fluid model, with one fluid consisting of all the charged components locked together by the electromagnetic interaction, while the second fluid consists of superfluid neutrons. Both components can oscillate however the rocket effect can only efficiently damp the countermoving r-mode oscillations, with the two fluids oscillating out of phase. In our analysis we include the mutual friction dissipative process between the neutron superfluid and the charged component. We neglect the interaction between the two r-mode oscillations as well as effects related with the crust of the star. Moreover, we use a simplified model of neutron star assuming a uniform mass distribution.

  11. The nuclear physics of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2014-05-01

    We explore the unique and fascinating structure of neutron stars. Although neutron stars are of interest in many areas of Physics, our aim is to provide an intellectual bridge between Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. We argue against the naive perception of a neutron star as a uniform assembly of neutrons packed to enormous densities. Rather, by focusing on the many exotic phases that are speculated to exist in a neutron star, we show how the reality is different and far more interesting.

  12. The nuclear physics of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2014-05-09

    We explore the unique and fascinating structure of neutron stars. Although neutron stars are of interest in many areas of Physics, our aim is to provide an intellectual bridge between Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. We argue against the naive perception of a neutron star as a uniform assembly of neutrons packed to enormous densities. Rather, by focusing on the many exotic phases that are speculated to exist in a neutron star, we show how the reality is different and far more interesting.

  13. Ultrahigh energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the production rate of ultrahigh energy (UHE) neutrinos from galactic neutron stars. The statistics of various stellar populations are reviewed as well as an evolutionary scheme linking several neutron star environments. An observational test for predicting stellar evolution is made using two mass ratio intervals of less than 0.3 and greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, which is supported by kinematical evidence. Attention is given to the problem of the target material that is required by UHE protons accelerated from the pulsar's surface to their rotational kinetic energy, and to the detectability of neutron stars in the UHE neutrinos by employing the deep underwater muon and neutrino detector (DUMAND) array.

  14. Ultrahigh energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the production rate of ultrahigh energy (UHE) neutrinos from galactic neutron stars. The statistics of various stellar populations are reviewed as well as an evolutionary scheme linking several neutron star environments. An observational test for predicting stellar evolution is made using two mass ratio intervals of less than 0.3 and greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, which is supported by kinematical evidence. Attention is given to the problem of the target material that is required by UHE protons accelerated from the pulsar's surface to their rotational kinetic energy, and to the detectability of neutron stars in the UHE neutrinos by employing the deep underwater muon and neutrino detector (DUMAND) array.

  15. A COMPARISON OF BROAD IRON EMISSION LINES IN ARCHIVAL DATA OF NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Barret, Didier

    2012-08-10

    Relativistic X-ray disklines have been found in multiple neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, in close analogy with black holes across the mass scale. These lines have tremendous diagnostic power and have been used to constrain stellar radii and magnetic fields, often finding values that are consistent with independent timing techniques. Here, we compare CCD-based data from Suzaku with Fe K line profiles from archival data taken with gas-based spectrometers. In general, we find good consistency between the gas-based line profiles from EXOSAT, BeppoSAX, and RXTE and the CCD data from Suzaku, demonstrating that the broad profiles seen are intrinsic to the line and not broad due to instrumental issues. However, we do find that when fitting with a Gaussian line profile, the width of the Gaussian can depend on the continuum model in instruments with low spectral resolution, though when the different models fit equally well the line widths generally agree. We also demonstrate that three BeppoSAX observations show evidence for asymmetric lines, with a relativistic diskline model providing a significantly better fit than a Gaussian. We test this by using the posterior predictive p-value method, and bootstrapping of the spectra to show that such deviations from a Gaussian are unlikely to be observed by chance.

  16. Impact of phase transition from neutrons to hyperons in neutron star properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrizal, Sulaksono, A.

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the impact of phase transition from neutrons to hyperons in the properties of neutron star using BSP parameter set of relativistic mean field (RMF) model. Similar to the work reported in Reference [1], the significance of the phase transition is observed from the impact gσ∗Λ/gσN variation on the corresponding neutron stars equation of state and mass versus radius relation. The impact of anisotropic pressure on equation of state and mass versus radius relation of neutron stars is also investigated. It is found that equation of state of neutron stars is very sensitive to gσ∗Λ/gσN coupling constant variation. However, different to the result of Reference [1], we do not obtain hyperon stars with very small radii R˜ 8 km. We do not also find significant effect of anisotropic pressure to change the behavior of neutron star properties due to phase transition.

  17. Old and new neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M.

    1984-09-01

    The youngest known radiopulsar in the rapidly spinning magnetized neutron star which powers the Crab Nebula, the remnant of the historical supernova explosion of 1054 AD. Similar neutron stars are probably born at least every few hundred years, but are less frequent than Galactic supernova explosions. They are initially sources of extreme relativistic electron and/or positron winds (approx.10/sup 38/s/sup -1/ of 10/sup 12/ eV leptons) which greatly decrease as the neutron stars spin down to become mature pulsars. After several million years these neutron stars are no longer observed as radiopulsars, perhaps because of large magnetic field decay. However, a substantial fraction of the 10/sup 8/ old dead pulsars in the Galaxy are the most probable source for the isotropically distributed ..gamma..-ray burst detected several times per week at the earth. Some old neutron stars are spun-up by accretion from companions to be resurrected as rapidly spinning low magnetic field radiopulsars. 52 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Neutron Star Seismology with Accreting Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    Neutron stars provide natural laboratories for the study of a number of important topics in fundamental physics, including the composition and equation of state (EOS) of cold matter at the highest densities achievable in nature. The physical conditions in their deep interiors cannot be replicated in terrestrial laboratories, and the nature of matter under such extreme conditions remains one of the major unsolved problems in physics. Direct measurement of the mass - radius relationship for neutron stars is very important for constraining the EOS of dense matter, however, since different phases of dense matter can have similar equations of state, mass and radius measurements alone are not very efficient in determining their interior composition. Additional, complementary observables are needed to more definitively probe the composition of neutron star cores. Asteroseismology, the measurement of the characteristic frequencies of the normal modes of oscillation of stars, can provide a powerful probe of their interiors. For example, helioseismology has provided unprecedented insights about the deep interior of the Sun. Comparable capabilities for neutron star seismology have not yet been achieved, but our recent work indicates that sensitive searches for the signatures of neutron star oscillations can be carried out using the high time resolution, pulse timing data obtained by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)-and in the case of a single source the XMM-Newton pn camera-from the population of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars (AMXPs, Strohmayer & Mahmoodifar 2014a), and in some thermonuclear burst sources (Strohmayer & Mahmoodifar 2014b). It is the primary aim of this proposal to carry out the first such comprehensive search for global oscillation modes across this entire source class of neutron stars using approximately 6 M-sec of RXTE and 100 k-sec of XMMNewton archival data, and thereby significantly advance the nascent field of neutron star seismology. We will

  19. Accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Pines, D

    1980-02-08

    During the past 8 years, extended temporal and broadband spectroscopic studies carried out by x-ray astronomical satellites have led to the identification of specific compact x-ray sources as accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars in close binary systems. Such sources provide a unique opportunity to study matter under extreme conditions not accessible in the terrestrial laboratory. Quantitative theoretical models have been developed which demonstrate that detailed studies of these sources will lead to a greatly increased understanding of dense and superdense hadron matter, hadron superfluidity, high-temperature plasma in superstrong magnetic fields, and physical processes in strong gravitational fields. Through a combination of theory and observation such studies will make possible the determination of the mass, radius, magnetic field, and structure of neutron stars and degenerate dwarf stars and the identification of further candidate black holes, and will contribute appreciably to our understanding of the physics of accretion by compact astronomical objects.

  20. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2014-05-09

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ρ0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ρ0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ρ0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  1. Neutron stars structure in the context of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Bordbar, G. H.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by the recent interests in spin-2 massive gravitons, we study the structure of neutron star in the context of massive gravity. The modifications of TOV equation in the presence of massive gravity are explored in 4 and higher dimensions. Next, by considering the modern equation of state for the neutron star matter (which is extracted by the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method with the AV18 potential), different physical properties of the neutron star (such as Le Chatelier's principle, stability and energy conditions) are investigated. It is shown that consideration of the massive gravity has specific contributions into the structure of neutron star and introduces new prescriptions for the massive astrophysical objects. The mass-radius relation is examined and the effects of massive gravity on the Schwarzschild radius, average density, compactness, gravitational redshift and dynamical stability are studied. Finally, a relation between mass and radius of neutron star versus the Planck mass is extracted.

  2. A cold neutron star in the transient low-mass X-ray binary HETE J1900.1-2455 after 10 yr of active accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Ootes, L. S.; Reynolds, M. T.; Wijnands, R.; Page, D.

    2017-02-01

    The neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and intermittent millisecond X-ray pulsar HETE J1900.1-2455 returned to quiescence in late 2015, after a prolonged accretion outburst of ≃10 yr. Using a Chandra observation taken ≃180 d into quiescence, we detect the source at a luminosity of ≃4.5 × 1031 (D/4.7 kpc)2 erg s-1 (0.5-10 keV). The X-ray spectrum can be described by a neutron star atmosphere model with a temperature of ≃54 eV for an observer at infinity. We perform thermal evolution calculations based on the 2016 quiescent data and a ≲98 eV temperature upper limit inferred from a Swift observation taken during an unusually brief (≲2 weeks) quiescent episode in 2007. We find no evidence in the present data that the thermal properties of the crust, such as the heating rate and thermal conductivity, are different than those of non-pulsating neutron stars. Finding this neutron star so cold after its long outburst imposes interesting constraints on the heat capacity of the stellar core; these become even stronger if further cooling were to occur.

  3. Neutron stars are gold mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James M.

    Neutron stars are not only mines for clues to dense matter physics but may also be the auspicious sources of half of all nuclei heavier than A = 60 in the universe, including the auric isotopes. Although the cold dense matter above the nuclear saturation density cannot be directly explored in the laboratory, gilded constraints on the properties of matter from 1 to 10 times higher density can now be panned from neutron star observations. We show how upcoming observations, such as gravitational wave from mergers, precision timing of pulsars, neutrinos from neutron star birth and X-rays from bursts and thermal emissions, will provide the bullion from which further advances can be smelted.

  4. Constraining the neutron star equation of state with gravitational wave signals from coalescing binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agathos, M.; Meidam, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Li, T. G. F.; Tompitak, M.; Veitch, J.; Vitale, S.; Van Den Broeck, C.

    2015-07-01

    Recently exploratory studies were performed on the possibility of constraining the neutron star equation of state (EOS) using signals from coalescing binary neutron stars, or neutron star-black hole systems, as they will be seen in upcoming advanced gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. In particular, it was estimated to what extent the combined information from multiple detections would enable one to distinguish between different equations of state through hypothesis ranking or parameter estimation. Under the assumption of zero neutron star spins both in signals and in template waveforms and considering tidal effects to 1 post-Newtonian (1PN) order, it was found that O (20 ) sources would suffice to distinguish between a stiff, moderate, and soft equation of state. Here we revisit these results, this time including neutron star tidal effects to the highest order currently known, termination of gravitational waveforms at the contact frequency, neutron star spins, and the resulting quadrupole-monopole interaction. We also take the masses of neutron stars in simulated sources to be distributed according to a relatively strongly peaked Gaussian, as hinted at by observations, but without assuming that the data analyst will necessarily have accurate knowledge of this distribution for use as a mass prior. We find that especially the effect of the latter is dramatic, necessitating many more detections to distinguish between different EOSs and causing systematic biases in parameter estimation, on top of biases due to imperfect understanding of the signal model pointed out in earlier work. This would get mitigated if reliable prior information about the mass distribution could be folded into the analyses.

  5. Superfluidity and Superconductivity in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, N.

    2017-09-01

    Neutron stars, the compact stellar remnants of core-collapse supernova explosions, are unique cosmic laboratories for exploring novel phases of matter under extreme conditions. In particular, the occurrence of superfluidity and superconductivity in neutron stars will be briefly reviewed.

  6. The magnetohydrodynamical model of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-10

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

  7. The Magnetohydrodynamical Model of Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binaries (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

  8. Jet quenching in the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusinskaia, N. V.; Deller, A. T.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Degenaar, N.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wijnands, R.; Parikh, A. S.; Russell, T. D.; Altamirano, D.

    2017-09-01

    We present quasi-simultaneous radio (VLA) and X-ray (Swift) observations of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (NS-LMXB) 1RXS J180408.9-342058 (J1804) during its 2015 outburst. We found that the radio jet of J1804 was bright (232 ± 4 μJy at 10 GHz) during the initial hard X-ray state, before being quenched by more than an order of magnitude during the soft X-ray state (19 ± 4 μJy). The source then was undetected in radio (<13 μJy) as it faded to quiescence. In NS-LMXBs, possible jet quenching has been observed in only three sources and the J1804 jet quenching we show here is the deepest and clearest example to date. Radio observations when the source was fading towards quiescence (LX = 1034-35 erg s-1) show that J1804 must follow a steep track in the radio/X-ray luminosity plane with β > 0.7 (where L_R ∝ L_X^{β }). Few other sources have been studied in this faint regime, but a steep track is inconsistent with the suggested behaviour for the recently identified class of transitional millisecond pulsars. J1804 also shows fainter radio emission at LX < 1035 erg s-1 than what is typically observed for accreting millisecond pulsars. This suggests that J1804 is likely not an accreting X-ray or transitional millisecond pulsar.

  9. High resolution magnetohydrodynamic simulation of black hole-neutron star merger: Mass ejection and short gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Wada, Tomohide

    2015-09-01

    We report results of a high resolution numerical-relativity simulation for the merger of black hole-magnetized neutron star binaries on Japanese supercomputer "K." We focus on a binary that is subject to tidal disruption and subsequent formation of a massive accretion torus. We find the launch of thermally driven torus wind, subsequent formation of a funnel wall above the torus and a magnetosphere with collimated poloidal magnetic field, and high Blandford-Znajek luminosity. We show for the first time this picture in a self-consistent simulation. The turbulencelike motion induced by the nonaxisymmetric magnetorotational instability as well as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability inside the accretion torus works as an agent to drive the mass accretion and converts the accretion energy to thermal energy, which results in the generation of a strong wind. By an in-depth resolution study, we reveal that high resolution is essential to draw such a picture. We also discuss the implication for the r-process nucleosynthesis, the radioactively powered transient emission, and short gamma ray bursts.

  10. The effect of accretion on the measurement of neutron star mass and radius in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutanen, Juri; Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J. E.; Latvala, Outi-Marja; Galloway, Duncan K.; Kuulkers, Erik; Suleimanov, Valery F.

    2014-08-01

    Spectral measurements of thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries have been used to measure neutron star (NS) masses and radii. A number of systematic issues affect such measurements and have raised concerns as to the robustness of the methods. We present analysis of the X-ray emission from bursts observed from 4U 1608-52 at various persistent fluxes. We find a strong dependence of the burst properties on the flux and spectral hardness of the persistent emission before burst. Bursts occurring during the low accretion rate (hard) state exhibit evolution of the blackbody normalization consistent with the theoretical predictions of NS atmosphere models. However, bursts occurring during the high accretion rate (soft) state show roughly constant normalization, which is inconsistent with the NS atmosphere models and therefore these bursts cannot be easily used to determine NS parameters. We analyse the hard-state burst to put the lower limit on the NS radius R in 4U 1608-52 of 12 km (for masses 1.0-2.4 M⊙). We constrain R to be between 13 and 16 km for masses 1.2-1.6 M⊙. The best agreement with the theoretical NS mass-radius relations is achieved for source distances in the range 3.1-3.7 kpc. We expect that the radius limit will be 10 per cent lower if spectral models including rapid rotation are used instead.

  11. A CHANGE IN THE QUIESCENT X-RAY SPECTRUM OF THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY MXB 1659-29

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, E. M.; Brown, E. F.; Cumming, A.; Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Wijnands, R.; Homan, J.

    2013-09-10

    The quasi-persistent neutron star low-mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29 went into quiescence in 2001, and we have followed its quiescent X-ray evolution since. Observations over the first 4 yr showed a rapid drop in flux and temperature of the neutron star atmosphere, interpreted as cooling of the neutron star crust which had been heated during the 2.5 yr outburst. However, observations taken approximately 1400 and 2400 days into quiescence were consistent with each other, suggesting the crust had reached thermal equilibrium with the core. Here we present a new Chandra observation of MXB 1659-29 taken 11 yr into quiescence and 4 yr since the last Chandra observation. This new observation shows an unexpected factor of {approx}3 drop in count rate and change in spectral shape since the last observation, which cannot be explained simply by continued cooling. Two possible scenarios are that either the neutron star temperature has remained unchanged and there has been an increase in the column density, or, alternatively the neutron star temperature has dropped precipitously and the spectrum is now dominated by a power-law component. The first scenario may be possible given that MXB 1659-29 is a near edge-on system, and an increase in column density could be due to build-up of material in, and a thickening of, a truncated accretion disk during quiescence. But, a large change in disk height may not be plausible if standard accretion disk theory holds during quiescence. Alternatively, the disk may be precessing, leading to a higher column density during this latest observation.

  12. Theory of cooling neutron stars versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Gnedin, O. Y.; Kaminker, A. D.; Potekhin, A. Y.

    2008-02-27

    We review current state of neutron star cooling theory and discuss the prospects to constrain the equation of state, neutrino emission and superfluid properties of neutron star cores by comparing the cooling theory with observations of thermal radiation from isolated neutron stars.

  13. Neutron Stars: Laboratories for Fundamental Physics Under Extreme Astrophysical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2017-09-01

    We discuss different exotic phases and components of matter from the crust to the core of neutron stars based on theoretical models for equations of state relevant to core collapse supernova simulations and neutron star merger. Parameters of the models are constrained from laboratory experiments. It is observed that equations of state involving strangeness degrees of freedom such as hyperons and Bose-Einstein condensates are compatible with 2{M}_{solar} neutron stars. The role of hyperons is explored on the evolution and stability of the protoneutron star in the context of SN1987A. Moment of inertia, mass and radius which are direct probes of neutron star interior are computed and their observational consequences are discussed. We continue our study on the dense matter under strong magnetic fields and its application to magnetoelastic oscillations of neutron stars.

  14. From neutron stars to quark stars in mimetic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2016-09-01

    Realistic models of neutron and quark stars in the framework of mimetic gravity with a Lagrange multiplier constraint are presented. We discuss the effect of a mimetic scalar aiming to describe dark matter on the mass-radius relation and the moment of inertia for slowly rotating relativistic stars. The mass-radius relation and moment of inertia depend on the value of the mimetic scalar in the center of the star. This fact leads to the ambiguity in the mass-radius relation for a given equation of state. Such ambiguity allows us to explain some observational facts better than in standard general relativity. The case of mimetic potential V (ϕ )˜A eC ϕ2 is considered in detail. The relative deviation of the maximal moment of inertia is approximately twice as large as the relative deviation of the maximal stellar mass. We also briefly discuss the mimetic f (R ) gravity. In the case of f (R )=R +a R2 mimetic gravity, it is expected that the increase of maximal mass and maximal moment of inertia due to the mimetic scalar becomes much stronger with bigger parameter a . The influence of the scalar field in mimetic gravity can lead to the possible existence of extreme neutron stars with large masses.

  15. Observations and Modeling of the Companions of Short Period Binary Millisecond Pulsars: Evidence for High-mass Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Joshua; Halpern, Jules

    2014-10-01

    We present observations of fields containing eight recently discovered binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, we present the fully phase-resolved B, V, and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135 for which we employ model fitting using the eclipsing light curve (ELC) model of Orosz & Hauschildt to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744, we find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio observations to be M NS > 1.75 M ⊙ at the 3σ level. We also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object, which we interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (M c > 0.1 M ⊙), we propose that similar to the binary pulsar systems PSR J1023+0038 and IGR J18245-2452, the pulsar may transition between accretion- and rotation-powered modes.

  16. Observations and modeling of the companions of short period binary millisecond pulsars: evidence for high-mass neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Joshua; Halpern, Jules

    2014-10-01

    We present observations of fields containing eight recently discovered binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, we present the fully phase-resolved B, V, and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135 for which we employ model fitting using the eclipsing light curve (ELC) model of Orosz and Hauschildt to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744, we find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio observations to be M {sub NS} > 1.75 M {sub ☉} at the 3σ level. We also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object, which we interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (M {sub c} > 0.1 M {sub ☉}), we propose that similar to the binary pulsar systems PSR J1023+0038 and IGR J18245–2452, the pulsar may transition between accretion- and rotation-powered modes.

  17. Accreting neutron stars by QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    the negative charge from ionosphere electrons again rotate, thereby come into being the solar basal magnetic field. The solar surface plasma with additional electrons get the dynamic balance between the upwards force of stable positive charge distribution in the solar upside gas and the downwards force of the vacuum net nuν _{0} flux pressure (solar gravity). When the Jupiter enter into the connecting line of the Sun and the center of the Galaxy, the pressure (solar gravity) observed from earth will weaken because of the Jupiter stop (shield) the net nuν _{0} flux which shoot to Sun from the center of Galaxy. The dynamic balance of forces on the solar surface plasma at once is broken and the plasma will upwards eject as the solar wind with redundant negative charge. At the same time, the solar surface remain a cavity as a sunspot whorl with the positive electric potential relative to around plasma. The whorl is caused by the reaction of plasma eject front and upwards with the different velocity at different latitude of solar rotation, it leads to the cavity around in the downwards and backwards helix movement. The solar rotation more slow, when the cavity is filled by around plasma in the reverse turn direction and return to carry-over negative charge, the Jupiter at front had been produced a new cavity carry-over positive charge, so we had observe the sunspot pair with different whorl directions and different magnetic polarity. Jupiter possess half mass of all planets in solar system, its action to stop net nuν _{0} flux is primary, so that Jupiter’s period of 11.8 sidereal years accord basically with the period of sunspot eruptions. In my paper ‘Nonlinear superposition of strong gravitational field of compact stars’(E15-0039-08), according to QFT it is deduced that: let q is a positive shielding coefficient, 1- q show the gravity weaken degree, the earth (104 km) as a obstructing layer q = 4.6*10 (-10) . A spherical shell of neutron star as obstructing

  18. Electric field in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, R. I. Sulaksono, A.

    2016-04-19

    In a compact star, an electric field is generated by the charge polarization effect. We investigate the charge polarization effect due to a significant difference of core and crust densities in the form of a combination of two Gaussian functions. The results indicate that the electric field only occurs significantly on the crust of the compact star. As a consequence, the mass-radius relationship only affects compact stars with mass ≤ 1.0 M{sub ⊙}.

  19. Probing dense matter in neutron stars with axial w modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Debarati; Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2009-07-15

    We study the problem of extracting information about composition and equation of state of dense matter in neutron star interior using axial w modes. We determine complex frequencies of axial w modes for a set of equations of state involving hyperons as well as Bose-Einstein condensates of antikaons adopting the continued fraction method. Hyperons and antikaon condensates result in softer equations of state leading to higher frequencies and lower damping times of first axial w modes than those of the nuclear matter case. The presence of condensates may lead to the appearance of a new stable branch of superdense stars beyond the neutron star branch called the third family. The existence of the same mass compact stars in both branches is known as neutron star twins. Further investigation of twins reveals that first axial w-mode frequencies of superdense stars in the third family are higher than those of the corresponding twins in the neutron star branch.

  20. NSCool: Neutron star cooling code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Dany

    2016-09-01

    NSCool is a 1D (i.e., spherically symmetric) neutron star cooling code written in Fortran 77. The package also contains a series of EOSs (equation of state) to build stars, a series of pre-built stars, and a TOV (Tolman- Oppenheimer-Volkoff) integrator to build stars from an EOS. It can also handle “strange stars” that have a huge density discontinuity between the quark matter and the covering thin baryonic crust. NSCool solves the heat transport and energy balance equations in whole GR, resulting in a time sequence of temperature profiles (and, in particular, a Teff - age curve). Several heating processes are included, and more can easily be incorporated. In particular it can evolve a star undergoing accretion with the resulting deep crustal heating, under a steady or time-variable accretion rate. NSCool is robust, very fast, and highly modular, making it easy to add new subroutines for new processes.

  1. The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction as a neutron source for the s-process in AGB low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M.R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Maiorca, E.; Palmerini, S.

    2014-05-09

    The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction is considered to be the most important neutron source for producing the main component of the s-process in low mass stars. In this paper we focus our attention on two of the main open problems concerning its operation as a driver for the slow neutron captures. Recently, a new measurement of the {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction rate was performed via the Trojan Horse Method greatly increasing the accuracy. Contemporarily, on the modelling side, magnetic mechanisms were suggested to justify the production of the {sup 13}C pocket, thus putting the s-process in stars on safe physical ground. These inputs allow us to reproduce satisfactorily the solar distribution of elements.

  2. The 13C(α,n)16O reaction as a neutron source for the s-process in AGB low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Maiorca, E.; Palmerini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Spartà, R.

    2014-05-01

    The 13C(α,n)16O reaction is considered to be the most important neutron source for producing the main component of the s-process in low mass stars. In this paper we focus our attention on two of the main open problems concerning its operation as a driver for the slow neutron captures. Recently, a new measurement of the 13C(α,n)16O reaction rate was performed via the Trojan Horse Method greatly increasing the accuracy. Contemporarily, on the modelling side, magnetic mechanisms were suggested to justify the production of the 13C pocket, thus putting the s-process in stars on safe physical ground. These inputs allow us to reproduce satisfactorily the solar distribution of elements.

  3. Cooling of neutron stars with diffusive envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznogov, M. V.; Fortin, M.; Haensel, P.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Zdunik, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    We study the effects of heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars on their cooling. To this aim, we perform cooling simulations using newly constructed models of the envelopes composed of binary ion mixtures (H-He, He-C, C-Fe) varying the mass of lighter ions (H, He or C) in the envelope. The results are compared with those calculated using the standard models of the envelopes which contain the layers of lighter (accreted) elements (H, He and C) on top of the Fe layer, varying the mass of accreted elements. The main effect is that the chemical composition of the envelopes influences their thermal conductivity and, hence, thermal insulation of the star. For illustration, we apply these results to estimate the internal temperature of the Vela pulsar and to study the cooling of neutron stars of ages of 105-106 yr at the photon cooling stage. The uncertainties of the cooling models associated with our poor knowledge of chemical composition of the heat insulating envelopes strongly complicate theoretical reconstruction of the internal structure of cooling neutron stars from observations of their thermal surface emission.

  4. Theory of Radiation Transfer in Neutron Star Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav

    2006-01-01

    The possibility for direct investigation of thermal emission from isolated neutron stars opened about a quarter of century ago with the launch of the first X-ray observatories Einstein and EXOSAT stimulated developing models of the neutron star surface radiation which began at the end of 80's. Confronting observational data with theoretical models of thermal emission allows one to infer the surface temperatures, magnetic fields, chemical composition, and neutron star masses and radii. This information, supplemented with the model equations of state and neutron star cooling models, provides an opportunity to understand the fundamental properties of the superdense matter in the stars' interiors. Almost all available models are based on the assumption that thermal radiation emitted by a neutron star is formed in the superficial star's layers--atmosphere. The neutron star atmospheres are very different from those of usual stars due to the immense gravity and huge magnetic fields. In this presentation we review the current status of the neutron star atmosphere modeling, present most important results, discuss problems and possible future developments.

  5. A New Comptonization Model for Weakly Magnetized, Accreting Neutron Stars in Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinelli, Ruben; Titarchuk, Lev; Paizis, Ada; Frontera, Filippo

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a new model for the X-ray spectral fitting package XSPEC that takes into account the effects of both thermal and dynamical (i.e., bulk) Comptonization. The model consists of two components: one is the direct blackbody-like emission due to seed photons that are not subjected to effective Compton scattering, while the other is a convolution of the Green's function of the energy operator with a blackbody-like seed photon spectrum. When combined thermal and bulk effects are considered, the analytical form of the Green's function may be obtained as a solution of the diffusion equation describing Comptonization. Using data from the BeppoSAX, INTEGRAL, and RXTE satellites, we test our model on the spectra of a sample of six bright neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries with low magnetic fields, covering three different spectral states. Particular attention is given to the transient power-law-like hard X-ray (gtrsim30 keV) tails, which we interpret in the framework of the bulk motion Comptonization process. We show that the values of the best-fit δ-parameter, which represents the importance of bulk with respect to thermal Comptonization, can be physically meaningful and can at least qualitatively describe the physical conditions of the environment in the innermost part of the system. Moreover, we show that in fitting the thermal Comptonization spectra to the X-ray spectra of these systems, the best-fit parameters of our model are in excellent agreement with those from compTT, a broadly used and well-established XSPEC model.

  6. Links between quasi-periodic oscillations and accretion states in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, S. E.; Rouco-Escorial, A.; Kuulkers, E.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Sanna, A.

    2017-06-01

    We analysed the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data from a sample of bright accreting neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). With the aim of studying the quasi-periodic variability as a function of the accretion regime, we carried out a systematic search of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the X-ray time series of these systems, using the integrated fractional variability as a tracker for the accretion states. We found that the three QPO types originally identified in the 1980s for the brightest LMXBs, the so-called Z sources, i.e. horizontal, normal and flaring branch oscillations (HBOs, NBOs and FBOs, respectively), are also identified in the slightly less bright NS LMXBs, the so-called atoll sources, where we see QPOs with a behaviour consistent with the HBOs and FBOs. We compared the quasi-periodic variability properties of our NS sample with those of a sample of black hole (BH) LMXBs. We confirm the association between HBOs, NBOs and FBOs observed in Z sources, with the type-C, type-B and type-A QPOs, respectively, observed in BH systems, and we extended the comparison to the HBO-like and FBO-like QPOs seen in atoll sources. We conclude that the variability properties of BH and weakly magnetized NS LMXBs show strong similarities, with QPOs only weakly sensitive to the nature of the central compact object in both classes of systems. We find that the historical association between kHz QPOs and high-frequency QPOs, seen around NSs and BHs, respectively, is not obvious when comparing similar accretion states in the two kinds of systems.

  7. Exploration of spin-down rate of neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lang; Liu, Xi-Wei; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-04-01

    We use the evolutionary population synthesis method to investigate the statistical properties of the wind-fed neutron-star (NS) compact (Porb < 10 d) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in our Galaxy, based on different spin-down models. Model 1 assumes that the surrounding material is treated as forming a quasi-static atmosphere. Model 2 assumes that the characteristic velocity of matter and the typical Alfvén velocity of material in the magnetospheric boundary layer are comparable to the sound speed in the external medium. We find that the spin-down rate in the supersonic propeller phase in either model 1 or model 2 is too low to produce the observed number of compact HMXBs. Model 3 assumes that the infalling material is ejected with the corotation velocity at the magnetospheric radius when the magnetospheric radius is larger than the corotation radius. Model 4 uses simple integration of the magnetic torque over the magnetosphere. Both models 3 and 4 have a larger spin down rate than that given by model 1 or 2. We also find that models 3 and 4 can predict a reasonable number of observed wind-fed NS compact HMXBs. By comparing our calculated results with the observed particular distributions of wind-fed NS compact HMXBs in a Ps versus Porb diagram, we find that the subsonic propeller phase may not exist at all. However, the spin-down rates in models 3 and 4 both seem reasonable to produce the observed distribution of wind-fed NS compact HMXBs in the Ps versus Porb diagram. We cannot find which spin-down rate seems more reasonable from our calculations.

  8. Neutron Star Discovered Where a Black Hole Was Expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    A very massive star collapsed to form a neutron star and not a black hole as expected, according to new results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This discovery shows that nature has a harder time making black holes than previously thought. Scientists found this neutron star -- a dense whirling ball of neutrons about 12 miles in diameter -- in an extremely young star cluster. Astronomers were able to use well-determined properties of other stars in the cluster to deduce that the progenitor of this neutron star was at least 40 times the mass of the Sun. ESO Optical Image of Westerlund 1 ESO Optical Image of Westerlund 1 "Our discovery shows that some of the most massive stars do not collapse to form black holes as predicted, but instead form neutron stars," said Michael Muno, a UCLA postdoctoral Hubble Fellow and lead author of a paper to be published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. When very massive stars make neutron stars and not black holes, they will have a greater influence on the composition of future generations of stars. When the star collapses to form the neutron star, more than 95% of its mass, much of which is metal-rich material from its core, is returned to the space around it. "This means that enormous amounts of heavy elements are put back into circulation and can form other stars and planets," said J. Simon Clark of the Open University in the United Kingdom. Animation: Dissolve from Optical to X-ray Image of Westerlund 1 Animation: Dissolve from Optical to X-ray Image of Westerlund 1 Astronomers do not completely understand how massive a star must be to form a black hole rather than a neutron star. The most reliable method for estimating the mass of the progenitor star is to show that the neutron star or black hole is a member of a cluster of stars, all of which are close to the same age. Because more massive stars evolve faster than less massive ones, the mass of a star can be estimated from if its evolutionary stage is known. Neutron

  9. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints of the Quiescent Low-mass X-Ray Binaries X7 and X5 in the Globular Cluster 47 Tuc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Heinke, Craig O.; Özel, Feryal; Güver, Tolga

    2016-11-01

    We present Chandra/ACIS-S subarray observations of the quiescent neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries X7 and X5 in the globular cluster 47 Tuc. The large reduction in photon pile-up compared to previous deep exposures enables a substantial improvement in the spectroscopic determination of the NS radius and mass of these NSs. Modeling the thermal emission from the NS surface with a non-magnetized hydrogen atmosphere and accounting for numerous sources of uncertainties, we obtain for the NS in X7 a radius of R={11.1}-0.7+0.8 km for an assumed stellar mass of M = 1.4 M ⊙ (68% confidence level). We argue, based on astrophysical grounds, that the presence of a He atmosphere is unlikely for this source. Due to the excision of data affected by eclipses and variable absorption, the quiescent low-mass X-ray binary X5 provides less stringent constraints, leading to a radius of R={9.6}-1.1+0.9 km, assuming a hydrogen atmosphere and a mass of M = 1.4 M ⊙. When combined with all existing spectroscopic radius measurements from other quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and Type I X-ray bursts, these measurements strongly favor radii in the 9.9-11.2 km range for a ˜1.5 M ⊙ NS and point to a dense matter equation of state that is somewhat softer than the nucleonic ones that are consistent with laboratory experiments at low densities.

  10. Probing thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keek, L.

    2008-12-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact stars that can be directly observed, which makes them ideal laboratories to study physics at extreme densities. Neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries accrete hydrogen and helium from a lower-mass companion star through Roche lobe overflow. This matter undergoes thermonuclear burning in the neutron star envelope, creating carbon and heavier elements. The fusion process may proceed in an unstable manner, resulting in a thermonuclear runaway. Within one second the entire surface is burned, which is observable as a sharp rise in the emitted X-ray flux: a type I X-ray burst. Afterwards the neutron star surface cools down on a timescale of ten to one hundred seconds. During these bursts the surface of an accreting neutron star can be observed directly, which makes them instrumental for studying this type of stars. We have studied rare kinds of X-ray bursts. One such rare burst is the superburst, which lasts a thousand times longer than an ordinary burst. Superbursts are thought to result from the explosive burning of a thick carbon layer, which lies deeper inside the neutron star, close to a layer known as the crust. A prerequisite for the occurrence of a superburst is a high enough temperature, which is set by the temperature of the crust and the heat conductivity of the envelope. The latter is lowered by the presence of heavy elements that are produced during normal X-ray bursts. Using a large set of observations from the Wide Field Camera's onboard the BeppoSAX satellite, we find that, at high accretion rate, sources which do not exhibit normal bursts likely have a longer superburst recurrence time, than the observed superburst recurrence time of one burster. We analyze in detail the first superburst from a transient source, which went into outburst only 55 days before the superburst. Recent models of the neutron star crust predict that this is too small a time to heat the crust sufficiently for superburst ignition, indicating

  11. Gravitational waves from surface inhomogeneities of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Sushan; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Sarkar, Prakash

    2016-11-01

    Surface asymmetries of accreting neutron stars are investigated for their mass quadrupole moment content. Though the amplitude of the gravitational waves from such asymmetries seems to be beyond the limit of detectability of the present generation of detectors, it appears that rapidly rotating neutron stars with strong magnetic fields residing in high-mass x-ray binaries would be worth considering for a targeted search for continuous gravitational waves with the next generation of instruments.

  12. Neutron Star Structure in the Presence of Scalar Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by the possible presence of scalar fields on astrophysical scales, suggested by the apparent acceleration of the universe implied by the supernovae surveys, we present models of neutron star structure including the contribution of a (massless) scalar field to the stress energy momentum tensor, in addition to that made by the normal matter. To that end we solve the coupled Einstein -- scalar field -- hydrostatic balance equations to compute the effect of the presence of the scalar field on the neutron star structure. We find that the presence of the scalar field does change the structure of the neutron star, especially in cases of strong coupling between the scalar field and the matter density. We present the neutron star radius as a function of the matter--scalar field coupling constant for different values of the neutron star central density. The presence of the scalar field affects both the maximum neutron star mass and Its radius, the latter increasing with the value of the above coupling constant. We also compute particle and photon geodesics in the geometry of these neutron stars as well as to the geometry of black holes with different values of the scalar field. Our results may be testable with timing observations of accreting neutron stars.

  13. Model Atmospheres for X-Ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Zach; von Steinkirch, Marina; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-12-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  14. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zachary James; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-11-21

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Also, observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Lastly, here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  15. Non-identical neutron star twins

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.; Kettner, Christiane

    1998-07-01

    The work of J. A. Wheeler in the mid 1960's showed that forsmooth equations of state no stable stellar configurations with centraldensities above that corresponding to the limiting mass of 'neutronstars' (in the generic sense) were stable against acoustical vibrationalmodes. A perturbation would cause any such star to collapse to a blackhole or explode. Accordingly, there has been no reason to expect that astable degenerate family of stars with higher density than the knownwhite dwarfs and neutron stars might exist. We have found a class ofexceptions corresponding to certain equations of state that describe afirst order phase transition. We discuss how such a higher density familyof stars could be formed in nature, and how the promising new explorationof oscillations in the X-ray brightness of accreting neutron stars mightprovide a means of identifying them. Our proof of the possible existenceof a third family of degenerate stars is one of principle and rests ongeneral principles like causality, microstability of matter and GeneralRelativity.

  16. Thermally driven neutron star glitches

    SciTech Connect

    Link, B. |; Epstein, R.I.

    1996-02-01

    We examine the thermal and dynamical response of a neutron star to a sudden perturbation of the inner crust temperature. During the star{close_quote}s evolution, starquakes and other processes may deposit {approx_gt}10{sup 42} ergs, causing significant internal heating and increased frictional coupling between the crust and the more rapidly rotating neutron superfluid the star is expected to contain. Through numerical simulation we study the propagation of the thermal wave created by the energy deposition, the induced motion of the interior superfluid, and the resulting spin evolution of the crust. We find that energy depositions of {approximately}10{sup 40} ergs produce gradual spin-ups above the timing noise level, while larger energy depositions produce sudden spin jumps resembling pulsar glitches. For a star with a temperature in the observed range of the Vela pulsar, an energy deposition of {approximately}10{sup 42} ergs produces a large spin-up taking place over minutes, similar to the Vela {open_quote}{open_quote}Christmas{close_quote}{close_quote} glitch. Comparable energy deposition in a younger and hotter {open_quote}{open_quote}Crab-like{close_quote}{close_quote} star produces a smaller spin-up taking place over {approximately}1{sup d}, similar to that seen during the partially time-resolved Crab glitch of 1989. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Astronomical Society.}

  17. A Test of the Nature of the Fe K Line in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Barret, Didier; Fabian, Andy C.; D'Aì, Antonino; Parker, Michael L.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Burderi, Luciano; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Egron, Elise; Homan, Jeroen; Iaria, Rosario; Lin, Dacheng; Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-04-01

    Broad Fe K emission lines have been widely observed in the X-ray spectra of black hole systems as well as in neutron star systems. The intrinsically narrow Fe K fluorescent line is generally believed to be part of the reflection spectrum originating in an illuminated accretion disk which is broadened by strong relativistic effects. However, the nature of the lines in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) has been a matter of debate. We therefore obtained the longest, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a neutron star LMXB to date with a 300 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observation of Serpens X-1. The observation was taken under the “continuous clocking” mode, and thus was free of photon pile-up effects. We carry out a systematic analysis and find that the blurred reflection model fits the Fe line of Serpens X-1 significantly better than a broad Gaussian component does, implying that the relativistic reflection scenario is much preferred. Chandra HETGS also provides a highest spectral resolution view of the Fe K region and we find no strong evidence for additional narrow lines.

  18. Potential cooling of an accretion-heated neutron star crust in the low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, A. S.; Wijnands, R.; Degenaar, N.; Ootes, L. S.; Page, D.; Altamirano, D.; Cackett, E. M.; Deller, A. T.; Gusinskaia, N.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Homan, J.; Linares, M.; Miller, J. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.

    2017-04-01

    We have monitored the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 in quiescence after its ˜4.5 month outburst in 2015. The source has been observed using Swift and XMM-Newton. Its X-ray spectra were dominated by a thermal component. The thermal evolution showed a gradual X-ray luminosity decay from ˜18 × 1032 to ˜4 × 1032 (D/5.8 kpc)2 erg s-1 between ˜8 and ˜379 d in quiescence, and the inferred neutron star surface temperature (for an observer at infinity; using a neutron star atmosphere model) decreased from ˜100 to ˜71 eV. This can be interpreted as cooling of an accretion-heated neutron star crust. Modelling the observed temperature curve (using nscool) indicated that the source required ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon of shallow heating in addition to the standard deep crustal heating to explain its thermal evolution. Alternatively, the decay could also be modelled without the presence of deep crustal heating, only having a shallow heat source (again ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon was required). However, the XMM-Newton data statistically required an additional power-law component. This component contributed ˜30 per cent of the total unabsorbed flux in 0.5-10 keV energy range. The physical origin of this component is unknown. One possibility is that it arises from low-level accretion. The presence of this component in the spectrum complicates our cooling crust interpretation because it might indicate that the smooth luminosity and temperature decay curves we observed may not be due to crust cooling but due to some other process.

  19. Hard-tail emission in the soft state of low-mass X-ray binaries and their relation to the neutron star magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Mastuoka, Masaru; Sugizaki, Mutsumi

    2016-08-01

    Average hard-tail X-ray emission in the soft state of nine bright Atoll low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) are investigated by using the light curves of MAXI/GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope). Two sources (4U 1820-30 and 4U 1735-44) exhibit a large hardness ratio (15-50 keV/2-10 keV: HR >0.1), while the other sources distribute at HR ≲ 0.1. In either case, HR does not depend on the 2-10 keV luminosity. Therefore the difference of HR is due to the 15-50 keV luminosity, which is Comptonized emission. The Compton cloud is assumed to be around the neutron star. The size of the Compton cloud would affect the value of HR. Although the magnetic field of an NS-LMXB is weak, we could expect a larger Alfvén radius than the innermost stable circular orbit or the neutron star radius in some sources. In such cases, the accretion inflow is stopped at the Alfvén radius and would create a relatively large Compton cloud. This would result in the observed larger Comptonized emission. By attributing the difference of the size of Compton cloud to the Alfvén radius, we can estimate the magnetic fields of neutron stars. The obtained lower/upper limits are consistent with the previous results.

  20. Potential cooling of an accretion-heated neutron star crust in the low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, A. S.; Wijnands, R.; Degenaar, N.; Ootes, L. S.; Page, D.; Altamirano, D.; Cackett, E. M.; Deller, A. T.; Gusinskaia, N.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Homan, J.; Linares, M.; Miller, J. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.

    2017-01-01

    We have monitored the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 in quiescence after its ˜4.5 month outburst in 2015. The source has been observed using Swift and XMM-Newton. Its X-ray spectra were dominated by a thermal component. The thermal evolution showed a gradual X-ray luminosity decay from ˜18 × 1032 to ˜4 × 1032 (D/5.8 kpc)2 erg s-1 between ˜8 to ˜379 days in quiescence and the inferred neutron star surface temperature (for an observer at infinity; using a neutron star atmosphere model) decreased from ˜100 to ˜71 eV. This can be interpreted as cooling of an accretion heated neutron star crust. Modeling the observed temperature curve (using NSCOOL) indicated that the source required ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon of shallow heating in addition to the standard deep crustal heating to explain its thermal evolution. Alternatively, the decay could also be modelled without the presence of deep crustal heating, only having a shallow heat source (again ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon was required). However, the XMM-Newton data statistically required an additional power-law component. This component contributed ˜30 per cent of the total unabsorbed flux in 0.5 - 10 keV energy range. The physical origin of this component is unknown. One possibility is that it arises from low-level accretion. The presence of this component in the spectrum complicates our cooling crust interpretation because it might indicate that the smooth luminosity and temperature decay curves we observed may not be due to crust cooling but due to some other process.

  1. Properties of neutron star critical collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mew-Bing

    Critical phenomena in gravitational collapse opened a new mathematical vista into the theory of general relativity and may ultimately entail fundamental physical implication in the astrophysical realm, especially in gravitational collapse scenarios. However, at present, the dynamics of critical phenomena in realistic astrophysical gravitational collapse scenarios are still largely unknown. My thesis seeks to understand the properties of the neutron star critical solution, understand the properties of the threshold in the solution space of the Einstein field equations between the black hole and a neutron star phases, and clarify the implication these results on realistic astrophysical scenarios. We develop a new set of neutron star-like initial data to establish the universality of the neutron star critical solution and analyze the structure of neutron star and neutron star-like critical collapses via the framework of phase spaces. We also study the different time scales involved in the neutron star critical solution and analyze the properties of the critical index via comparisons between neutron star and neutron star-like initial data. Finally, we explore the boundary of the attraction basin of the neutron star critical solution and its transition to a known set of non-critical fixed points.

  2. Properties of Neutron Star Critical Collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mew-Bing

    2010-01-01

    Critical phenomena in gravitational collapse opened a new mathematical vista into the theory of general relativity and may ultimately entail fundamental physical implication in observations. However, at present, the dynamics of critical phenomena in gravitational collapse scenarios are still largely unknown. My thesis seeks to understand the properties of the threshold in the solution space of the Einstein field equations between the black hole and neutron star phases, understand the properties of the neutron star critical solution and clarify the implication of these results on realistic astrophysical scenarios. We develop a new set of neutron star-like initial data to establish the universality of the neutron star critical solution and analyze the structure of neutron star and neutron star-like critical collapses via the study of the phase spaces. We also study the different time scales involved in the neutron star critical solution and analyze the properties of the critical index via comparisons between neutron star and neutron star-like initial data. Finally, we explore the boundary of the attraction basin of the neutron star critical solution and its transition to a known set of non-critical fixed points.

  3. Birth accelerations of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heras, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    We suggest that neutron stars experienced at birth three related physical changes, which may originate in magneto-rotational instabilities: (i) an increase in period from the initial value P 0 to the current value Ps , implying a change of rotational energy Δ E rot; (ii) an exponential decay of its magnetic field from the initial value B 0 to the current surface value Bs , implying a change of radiative energy Δ E rad; and (iii) an increase of space velocity from the initial value v 0 to the current value v, implying a change of kinetic energy Δ E kin. These changes are assumed to be connected by Δ E rad + Δ E kin = Δ E rot. This means that the radiation loss and increase of kinetic energy are both at the expense of a rotational energy loss. It is shown that this energy conversion occurs during times of order of 10-4 s if the neutron stars are born with magnetic fields in the range of 1015-1016 G and initial periods in range 1-20 ms. It is shown that the birth accelerations of neutron stars are of the order of 108g.

  4. 'Tertiary' nuclear burning - Neutron star deflagration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    A motivation is presented for the idea that dense nuclear matter can burn to a new class of stable particles. One of several possibilities is an 'octet' particle which is the 16 baryon extension of alpha particle, but now composed of a pair of each of the two nucleons, (3Sigma, Delta, and 2Xi). Such 'tertiary' nuclear burning (here 'primary' is H-He and 'secondary' is He-Fe) may lead to neutron star explosions rather than collapse to a black hole, analogous to some Type I supernovae models wherein accreting white dwarfs are pushed over the Chandrasekhar mass limit but explode rather than collapse to form neutron stars. Such explosions could possibly give gamma-ray bursts and power quasars, with efficient particle acceleration in the resultant relativistic shocks. The new stable particles themselves could possibly be the sought-after weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) or 'dark' matter.

  5. 'Tertiary' nuclear burning - Neutron star deflagration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    A motivation is presented for the idea that dense nuclear matter can burn to a new class of stable particles. One of several possibilities is an 'octet' particle which is the 16 baryon extension of alpha particle, but now composed of a pair of each of the two nucleons, (3Sigma, Delta, and 2Xi). Such 'tertiary' nuclear burning (here 'primary' is H-He and 'secondary' is He-Fe) may lead to neutron star explosions rather than collapse to a black hole, analogous to some Type I supernovae models wherein accreting white dwarfs are pushed over the Chandrasekhar mass limit but explode rather than collapse to form neutron stars. Such explosions could possibly give gamma-ray bursts and power quasars, with efficient particle acceleration in the resultant relativistic shocks. The new stable particles themselves could possibly be the sought-after weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) or 'dark' matter.

  6. Cooling rates of neutron stars and the young neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Shternin, Peter S.; Heinke, Craig O.; Potekhin, Alexander Y.

    2011-03-01

    We explore the thermal state of the neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant using the recent result of Ho & Heinke that the thermal radiation of this star is well described by a carbon atmosphere model and the emission comes from the entire stellar surface. Starting from neutron star cooling theory, we formulate a robust method to extract neutrino cooling rates of thermally relaxed stars at the neutrino cooling stage from observations of thermal surface radiation. We show how to compare these rates with the rates of standard candles - stars with non-superfluid nucleon cores cooling slowly via the modified Urca process. We find that the internal temperature of standard candles is a well-defined function of the stellar compactness parameter x=rg/R, irrespective of the equation of state of neutron star matter (R and rg are circumferential and gravitational radii, respectively). We demonstrate that the data on the Cassiopeia A neutron star can be explained in terms of three parameters: fℓ, the neutrino cooling efficiency with respect to the standard candle; the compactness x; and the amount of light elements in the heat-blanketing envelope. For an ordinary (iron) heat-blanketing envelope or a low-mass (≲ 10-13 M⊙) carbon envelope, we find the efficiency fℓ˜ 1 (standard cooling) for x≲ 0.5 and fℓ˜ 0.02 (slower cooling) for a maximum compactness x≈ 0.7. A heat blanket containing the maximum mass (˜10-8 M⊙) of light elements increases fℓ by a factor of 50. We also examine the (unlikely) possibility that the star is still thermally non-relaxed.

  7. I-Love-Q: unexpected universal relations for neutron stars and quark stars.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2013-07-26

    Neutron stars and quark stars are not only characterized by their mass and radius but also by how fast they spin, through their moment of inertia, and how much they can be deformed, through their Love number and quadrupole moment. These depend sensitively on the star's internal structure and thus on unknown nuclear physics. We find universal relations between the moment of inertia, the Love number, and the quadrupole moment that are independent of the neutron and quark star's internal structure. These can be used to learn about neutron star deformability through observations of the moment of inertia, break degeneracies in gravitational wave detection to measure spin in binary inspirals, distinguish neutron stars from quark stars, and test general relativity in a nuclear structure-independent fashion.

  8. General relativistic viscous hydrodynamics of differentially rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaru; Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichiro

    2017-04-01

    Employing a simplified version of the Israel-Stewart formalism for general-relativistic shear-viscous hydrodynamics, we perform axisymmetric general-relativistic simulations for a rotating neutron star surrounded by a massive torus, which can be formed from differentially rotating stars. We show that with our choice of a shear-viscous hydrodynamics formalism, the simulations can be stably performed for a long time scale. We also demonstrate that with a possibly high shear-viscous coefficient, not only viscous angular momentum transport works but also an outflow could be driven from a hot envelope around the neutron star for a time scale ≳100 ms with the ejecta mass ≳10-2 M⊙ , which is comparable to the typical mass for dynamical ejecta of binary neutron-star mergers. This suggests that massive neutron stars surrounded by a massive torus, which are typical outcomes formed after the merger of binary neutron stars, could be the dominant source for providing neutron-rich ejecta, if the effective shear viscosity is sufficiently high, i.e., if the viscous α parameter is ≳10-2. The present numerical result indicates the importance of a future high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulation that is the unique approach to clarify the viscous effect in the merger remnants of binary neutron stars by the first-principle manner.

  9. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star approaching EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. +k Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts - modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. +k Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  10. Understanding Neutron Stars using Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star = EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts = modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  11. THE LANDSCAPE OF THE NEUTRINO MECHANISM OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: NEUTRON STAR AND BLACK HOLE MASS FUNCTIONS, EXPLOSION ENERGIES, AND NICKEL YIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Thompson, Todd A. E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2015-03-10

    If the neutrino luminosity from the proto-neutron star formed during a massive star core collapse exceeds a critical threshold, a supernova (SN) results. Using spherical quasi-static evolutionary sequences for hundreds of progenitors over a range of metallicities, we study how the explosion threshold maps onto observables, including the fraction of successful explosions, the neutron star (NS) and black hole (BH) mass functions, the explosion energies (E {sub SN}) and nickel yields (M {sub Ni}), and their mutual correlations. Successful explosions are intertwined with failures in a complex pattern that is not simply related to initial progenitor mass or compactness. We predict that progenitors with initial masses of 15 ± 1, 19 ± 1, and ∼21-26 M {sub ☉} are most likely to form BHs, that the BH formation probability is non-zero at solar-metallicity and increases significantly at low metallicity, and that low luminosity, low Ni-yield SNe come from progenitors close to success/failure interfaces. We qualitatively reproduce the observed E {sub SN}-M {sub Ni} correlation, we predict a correlation between the mean and width of the NS mass and E {sub SN} distributions, and that the means of the NS and BH mass distributions are correlated. We show that the observed mean NS mass of ≅ 1.33 M {sub ☉} implies that the successful explosion fraction is higher than 0.35. Overall, we show that the neutrino mechanism can in principle explain the observed properties of SNe and their compact objects. We argue that the rugged landscape of progenitors and outcomes mandates that SN theory should focus on reproducing the wide ranging distributions of observed SN properties.

  12. Neutron Stars in Binaries and in Isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancopoulos, Sophia

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is a study of neutron stars in three distinct classes. After a brief overview of neutron stars in Chapter 1, the three systems are discussed in order of decreasing luminosity. In Chapter 2, we present a new model for the normal branch of a class of low mass X-ray binaries which show quasiperiodic oscillations: a quasi -periodic modulation in the intensity of their X-ray signal. Chapter 3 discusses a particular radio pulsar which we observed in X-rays with the ROSAT PSPC. Chapter 4 rounds out the thesis with a discussion of a class of neutron stars which have not, to date, been definitively shown to exist. We describe a search for these isolated old neutron stars in the Einstein database, and present the results of our finds. As part of a search for thermal surface radiation from nearby neutron stars, we have carried out a 45,000 s observation of the nearby radio pulsar PSR 1929+10 with the ROSAT PSPC. After background subtraction, a net of 420+/-25 photons in the 0.1-2.0 keV band were detected at the position of the pulsar, corresponding to a luminosity of position of the pulsar, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.2 times 1030 erg/s for a source distance of 250 pc, or {~}3 times 10^{-4} of the pulsar's spin-down luminosity. We find coherent pulsations from PSR 1929+10 at the radio period of 0.2265 s. The folded light curve is well fit by a sinusoidal oscillation with a pulsed fraction of about 30%. The total spectrum is fit by a blackbody with a temperature T_ infty~3.2times10^6 K; the implied emitting area has a radius of less than 50 meters. The maximum of the X-ray light curve coincides with the radio pulse, suggesting we are detecting the hot magnetic polar cap of the star. We discuss the implications of our results for the temperature distribution over the surface of the star, and use this detection to constrain various heating mechanisms for rotation-powered neutron stars. We also use a simple model of general relativistic light bending near the

  13. Sound Velocity Bound and Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaque, Paulo; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-01-21

    A conjecture that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by sqrt(3). Simple arguments support this bound in nonrelativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. Moreover, the bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. Here, we point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at low densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  14. Sound Velocity Bound and Neutron Stars

    DOE PAGES

    Bedaque, Paulo; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-01-21

    A conjecture that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by sqrt(3). Simple arguments support this bound in nonrelativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. Moreover, the bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. Here, we point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at low densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  15. Sound velocity bound and neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Bedaque, Paulo; Steiner, Andrew W

    2015-01-23

    It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by sqrt[3]. Simple arguments support this bound in nonrelativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  16. Burst Oscillations: Watching Neutron Stars Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2010-01-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the first detection of rotationally modulated emission from X-ray bursting neutron stars, "burst oscillations," This phenomenon enables us to see neutron stars spin, as the X-ray burst flux asymmetrically lights up the surface. It has enabled a new way to probe the neutron star spin frequency distribution, as well as to elucidate the multidimensional nature of nuclear burning on neutron stars. I will review our current observational understanding of the phenomenon, with an eye toward highlighting some of the interesting remaining puzzles, of which there is no shortage.

  17. White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, P.

    1977-01-01

    The three possible fates of burned-out stars: white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, are described in elementary terms. Characteristics of these celestial bodies, as provided by Einstein's work, are described. (CP)

  18. White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, P.

    1977-01-01

    The three possible fates of burned-out stars: white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, are described in elementary terms. Characteristics of these celestial bodies, as provided by Einstein's work, are described. (CP)

  19. Hybrid stars that masquerade as neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Paris; Mark Alford; Matt Braby; Sanjay Reddy

    2004-11-01

    We show that a hybrid (nuclear + quark matter) star can have a mass-radius relationship very similar to that predicted for a star made of purely nucleonic matter. We show this for a generic parameterization of the quark matter equation of state, and also for an MIT bag model, each including a phenomenological correction based on gluonic corrections to the equation of state. We obtain hybrid stars as heavy as 2 M{sub solar} for reasonable values of the bag model parameters. For nuclear matter, we use the equation of state calculated by Akmal, Pandharipande, and Ravenhall using many-body techniques. Both mixed and homogeneous phases of nuclear and quark matter are considered.

  20. Superfluidity in the Core of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Dany

    2013-04-01

    The year (1958) after the publication of the BCS theory, Bohr, Mottelson & Pines showed that nuclei should also contain superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons. In 1959, A. Migdal proposed that neutron superfluidity should also occur in the interior of neutron stars. Pairing in nuclei forms Cooper pairs with zero spin, but the relevant component of the nuclear interaction becomes repulsive at densities larger than the nuclear matter density. It has been proposed that neutron-neutron interaction in the spin-triplet state, and L=1 orbital angular momentum, that is known to be attractive from laboratory experiments, may result in a new form of neutron superfluidity in the neutron star interior. I will review our present understanding of the structure of neutron stars and describe how superfluidity strongly affects their thermal evolution. I will show how a ``Minimal Model'' that excludes the presence of ``exotic'' matter (Bose condensates, quarks, etc.) is compatible with most observations of the surface temperatures of young isolated neutron stars in the case this neutron superfluid exists. Compared to the case of isotropic spin-zero Cooper pairs, the formation of anisotropic spin-one Cooper pairs results in a strong neutrino emission that leads to an enhanced cooling of neutron stars after the onset of the pairing phase transition and allows the Minimal Cooling scenario to be compatible with most observations. In the case the pairing critical temperature Tc is less than about 6 x10^8 K, the resulting rapid cooling of the neutron star may be observable. It was recently reported that 10 years of Chandra observations of the 333 year young neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant revealed that its temperature has dropped by about 5%. This result indicates that neutrons in this star are presently becoming superfluid and, if confirmed, provides us with the first direct observational evidence for neutron superfluidity at supra-nuclear densities.

  1. Numerical relativity simulations of binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thierfelder, Marcus; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd

    2011-08-01

    We present a new numerical relativity code designed for simulations of compact binaries involving matter. The code is an upgrade of the BAM code to include general relativistic hydrodynamics and implements state-of-the-art high-resolution-shock-capturing schemes on a hierarchy of mesh refined Cartesian grids with moving boxes. We test and validate the code in a series of standard experiments involving single neutron star spacetimes. We present test evolutions of quasiequilibrium equal-mass irrotational binary neutron star configurations in quasicircular orbits which describe the late inspiral to merger phases. Neutron star matter is modeled as a zero-temperature fluid; thermal effects can be included by means of a simple ideal gas prescription. We analyze the impact that the use of different values of damping parameter in the Gamma-driver shift condition has on the dynamics of the system. The use of different reconstruction schemes and their impact in the post-merger dynamics is investigated. We compute and characterize the gravitational radiation emitted by the system. Self-convergence of the waves is tested, and we consistently estimate error bars on the numerically generated waveforms in the inspiral phase.

  2. R-mode constraints from neutron star equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazoglou, M. C.; Moustakidis, C. C.

    2016-03-01

    The gravitational radiation has been proposed a long time before, as an explanation for the observed relatively low spin frequencies of young neutron stars and of accreting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries as well. In the present work we studied the effects of the neutron star equation of state on the r-mode instability window of rotating neutron stars. Firstly, we employed a set of analytical solution of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations with special emphasis on the Tolman VII solution. In particular, we tried to clarify the effects of the bulk neutron star properties (mass, radius, density distribution, crust size and elasticity) on the r-mode instability window. We found that the critical angular velocity \\varOmegac depends mainly on the neutron star radius. The effects of the gravitational mass and the mass distribution are almost negligible. Secondly, we studied the effect of the elasticity of the crust, via to the slippage factor S and also the effect of the nuclear equation of state, via the slope parameter L, on the instability window. We found that the crust effects are more pronounced, compared to those originated from the equation of state. Moreover, we proposed simple analytical expressions which relate the macroscopic quantity \\varOmegac to the radius, the parameter L and the factor {S}. We also investigated the possibility to measure the radius of a neutron star and the factor {S} with the help of accurate measures of \\varOmegac and the neutron star temperature. Finally, we studied the effects of the mutual friction on the instability window and discussed the results in comparison with previous similar studies.

  3. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, D.; Pons, J. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Rea, N.

    2015-05-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  4. Unifying neutron stars getting to GUNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshev, A. P.; Popov, S. B.; Turolla, R.

    2014-03-01

    The variety of the observational appearance of young isolated neutron stars must find an explanation in the framework of some unifying approach. Nowadays it is believed that such scenario must include magnetic field decay, the possibility of magnetic field emergence on a time scale of ≲ 104-105 yr, significant contribution of non-dipolar fields, and appropriate initial parameter distributions. We present our results on the initial spin period distribution, and suggest that inconsistencies between distributions derived by different methods for samples with different average ages can uncover field decay or/and emerging field. We describe a new method to probe the magnetic field decay in normal pulsars. The method is a modified pulsar current approach, where we study pulsar flow along the line of increasing characteristic age for constant field. Our calculations, performed with this method, can be fitted with an exponential decay for ages in the range of 8× 104-3.5 × 105 yr with a time scale of ˜ 5 × 105 yr. We discuss several issues related to the unifying scenario. At first, we note that the dichotomy, among local thermally emitting neutron stars, between normal pulsars and the Magnificent Seven remains unexplained. Then we discuss the role of high-mass X-ray binaries in the unification of neutron star evolution. We note, that such systems allow to check evolutionary effects on a time scale longer than what can be probed with normal pulsars alone. We conclude with a brief discussion of the importance of discovering old neutron stars accreting from the interstellar medium.

  5. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, V. F.; Poutanen, J.; Klochkov, D.; Werner, K.

    2016-02-01

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutron star radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1-4MK) and ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed.

  6. NEUTRON STAR STRUCTURE IN THE PRESENCE OF SCALAR FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, James P.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2009-08-20

    Motivated by the possible presence of scalar fields on cosmological scales, suggested by the recent measurement of the deceleration parameter by supernovae surveys, we present models of neutron star structure under the assumption that a scalar field makes a significant contribution to the stress energy momentum tensor, in addition to that made by the normal matter. To that end we solve the coupled Einstein-scalar field-hydrostatic balance equations to compute the effect of the presence of the scalar field on the neutron star structure. We find that the presence of the scalar field does change the structure of the neutron star, especially in cases of strong coupling between the scalar field and the matter density. We present the neutron star radius as a function of the matter-scalar field coupling constant for different values of the neutron star central density. The presence of the scalar field does affect both the maximum neutron star mass and its radius, the latter increasing with the value of the above coupling constant. Our results can provide limits to the scalar field-matter coupling through spectro-temporal observations of accreting or isolated neutron stars.

  7. Tidal polarizability effects in neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernuzzi, S.; Nagar, A.; Balmelli, S.; Dietrich, T.; Ujevic, M.

    2015-05-01

    Using the analytical effective-one-body model and nonlinear 3+1 numerical relativity simulations, we investigate binary neutron star mergers. It is found that, for nonspinning binaries, both the mass-rescaled gravitational wave frequency at merger and the specific binding energy at merger almost uniquely depend on the tidal coupling constants κT2, which are functions of the stars’ Love numbers, compactnesses and mass ratio. These relations are quasiuniversal in the sense that there is an additional dependence on the spins, which is linear for realistic spins values χ ≲ 0.1. In the effective-one-body model, the quasiuniversality is a direct consequence of the conservative dynamics of tidally interacting bodies. In the context of gravitational wave astronomy, our findings may be used to constrain the neutron stars’ equation of state using waveforms that accurately model the merger.

  8. Initial data for black hole-neutron star binaries, with rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacik, Nick; Foucart, Francois; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Muhlberger, Curran; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2016-11-01

    The coalescence of a neutron star with a black hole is a primary science target of ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Constraining or measuring the neutron star spin directly from gravitational wave observations requires knowledge of the dependence of the emission properties of these systems on the neutron star spin. This paper lays foundations for this task, by developing a numerical method to construct initial data for black hole-neutron star binaries with arbitrary spin on the neutron star. We demonstrate the robustness of the code by constructing initial-data sets in large regions of the parameter space. In addition to varying the neutron star spin-magnitude and spin-direction, we also explore neutron star compactness, mass-ratio, black hole spin, and black hole spin-direction. Specifically, we are able to construct initial data sets with neutron stars spinning near centrifugal break-up, and with black hole spins as large as {S}{BH}/{M}{BH}2=0.99.

  9. Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith C.; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation contains an overview of the mission of the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICE), a proposed International Space Station (ISS) payload dedicated ot the study of neutron stars. There are also reviews of the Science Objectives of the payload,the science measurements, the design and the expected performance for the instruments for NICE,

  10. Neutrinos from Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Torres, Diego F.; McCauley, Thomas P.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Aharonian, Felix A.

    2003-05-01

    The magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars develop electrostatic gaps with huge potential drops. Protons and ions, accelerated in these gaps along the dipolar magnetic field lines to energies greater than 100 TeV, can impact onto the surrounding accretion disk. A proton-induced cascade develops, and charged pion decays produce ν emission. With extensive disk shower simulations using DPMJET and GEANT4, we have calculated the resulting ν spectrum. We show that the spectrum produced out of the proton beam is a power law. We use this result to propose accretion-powered X-ray binaries (with highly magnetized neutron stars) as a new population of pointlike ν sources for kilometer-scale detectors such as ICECUBE. As a particular example, we discuss the case of A0535+26. We show that ICECUBE should find A0535+26 to be a periodic ν source, one for which the formation and loss of its accretion disk can be fully detected. Finally, we comment briefly on the possibility that smaller telescopes such as AMANDA could also detect A0535+26 by folding observations with the orbital period.

  11. Microscopic calculations of nuclear and neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    DOE PAGES

    Gandolfi, S.

    2015-02-01

    We present Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the equation of state of neutron matter. The equation of state is directly related to the symmetry energy and determines the mass and radius of neutron stars, providing then a connection between terrestrial experiments and astronomical observations. As a result, we also show preliminary results of the equation of state of nuclear matter.

  12. Analytic description of neutron star cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofengeim, D. D.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2017-05-01

    We have derived analytic expressions that describe cooling of isolated neutron stars with nucleon cores after reaching the state of internal thermal relaxation. The results are valid for a wide class of equations of state of nucleonic matter and, in this sense, are universal. Moreover, they accurately reproduce the evolution of neutron stars at the neutrino and photon cooling stages as well as during transition from one stage to the other. These results greatly simplify theoretical analysis of internal structure of cooling neutron stars. For illustration, we analyse the thermal state of the bright nearby neutron star RX J1856.5-3754 and present arguments that this star has already left the neutrino cooling stage and contains superfluidity of neutrons and protons inside. We discuss possible efficiency of its neutrino cooling and heat capacity of its core.

  13. Where a Neutron Star's Accretion Disk Ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    In X-ray binaries that consist of a neutron star and a companion star, gas funnels from the companion into an accretion disk surrounding the neutron star, spiraling around until it is eventually accreted. How do the powerful magnetic fields threading through the neutron star affect this accretion disk? Recent observations provide evidence that they may push the accretion disk away from the neutron stars surface.Truncated DisksTheoretical models have indicated that neutron star accretion disks may not extend all the way in to the surface of a neutron star, but may instead be truncated at a distance. This prediction has been difficult to test observationally, however, due to the challenge of measuring the location of the inner disk edge in neutron-star X-ray binaries.In a new study, however, a team of scientists led by Ashley King (Einstein Fellow at Stanford University) has managed to measure the location of the inner edge of the disk in Aquila X-1, a neutron-star X-ray binary located 17,000 light-years away.Iron line feature detected by Swift (red) and NuSTAR (black). The symmetry of the line is one of the indicators that the disk is located far from the neutron star; if the inner regions of the disk were close to the neutron star, severe relativistic effects would skew the line to be asymmetric. [King et al. 2016]Measurements from ReflectionsKing and collaborators used observations made by NuSTAR and Swift/XRT both X-ray space observatories of Aquila X-1 during the peak of an X-ray outburst. By observing the reflection of Aquila X-1s emission off of the inner regions of the accretion disk, the authors were able to estimate the location of the inner edge of the disk.The authors find that this inner edge sits at ~15 gravitational radii. Since the neutron stars surface is at ~5 gravitational radii, this means that the accretion disk is truncated far from the stars surface. In spite of this truncation, material still manages to cross the gap and accrete onto the

  14. Searching for substellar companions of young isolated neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, B.; Neuhäuser, R.; Haberl, F.

    2009-03-01

    Context: Only two planetary systems orbiting old ms-pulsars have been discovered. Young radio pulsars and radio-quiet neutron stars cannot be analysed by the usually-applied radio-pulse-timing technique. However, finding substellar companions orbiting these neutron stars would be of significant importance: the companion may have had an exotic formation, its observation may also enable us to study neutron-star physics. Aims: We investigate the closest young neutron stars to Earth to search for orbiting substellar companions. Methods: Young, thus warm substellar companions are visible in the Near infrared, in which the neutron star itself is much fainter. Four young neutron stars are at sufficient speed to enable a common proper-motion search for substellar companions within few years. Results: For Geminga, RX J0720.4-3125, RX J1856.6-3754, and PSR J1932+1059 we found no comoving companion of masses as low as 12, 15, 11, and 42 Jupiter masses, respectively, for assumed ages of 1, 1, 1, and 3.1 Myr, and distances of 250, 361, 167, and 361 pc, respectively. Near infrared limits are presented for these four and five additional neutron stars for which we have observations for only one epoch. Conclusions: We conclude that young, isolated neutron stars rarely have brown-dwarf companions. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories under programme IDs: 66.D-0135, 71.C-0189, 72.C-0051, 74.C-0596, 077.C-0162, 78.C-0686, 79.C-0570.

  15. Compact Object Binaries with Spinning Neutron Stars in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacik, Nicholas A.

    The inspiral and merger of binary neutron stars (BNS) is one of the most promising potential sources of gravitational waves for ground-based detectors like Advanced LIGO. BNS mergers are also likely a source of counterpart electromagnetic radiation. It is important to perform simulations of BNS to better understand and model their gravitational wave emission as well as their electromagnetic emission. The parameter space of BNS binaries is quite large, and one aspect that has not been well studied in neutron star spin. In this thesis, we focus on investigating spinning neutron stars in compact object binaries. Using the SpEC code, developed by the SXS collaboration, we begin by presenting a new code to create initial data for binary neutron stars with arbitrary spins. We introduce a novel method of measuring neutron star spin, and show that it is accurate and robust. We evolve several spinning binary configurations and show that their properties agree remarkably well with Post-Newtonian predictions. We also show that we are able to control the eccentricity of the binaries to 0.1%. Thereafter, we proceed to extend our code to black hole.neutron star (BHNS) binaries. We create many data sets across the BHNS parameter space, varying neutron star spin magnitude, spin direction, compactness, and black hole mass, spin and spin direction. We are able to create initial data sets with neutron star spins near the mass shedding limit, and nearly extremal black hole spins. Finally, we investigate spurious gravitational radiation in binary black hole systems. We study its parameter space dependence, by introducing three diagnostics, investigating them as a function of black hole spin and black hole separation, and comparing two different methods of constructing initial data.

  16. How loud are neutron star mergers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Radice, David; Ott, Christian D.; Roberts, Luke F.; Mösta, Philipp; Galeazzi, Filippo

    2016-07-01

    We present results from the first large parameter study of neutron star mergers using fully general relativistic simulations with finite-temperature microphysical equations of state and neutrino cooling. We consider equal and unequal-mass binaries drawn from the galactic population and simulate each binary with three different equations of state. Our focus is on the emission of energy and angular momentum in gravitational waves in the postmerger phase. We find that the emitted gravitational-wave energy in the first ˜10 ms of the life of the resulting hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) is about twice the energy emitted over the entire inspiral history of the binary. The total radiated energy per binary mass is comparable to or larger than that of nonspinning black hole inspiral-mergers. About 0.8-2.5% of the binary mass-energy is emitted at kHz frequencies in the early HMNS evolution. We find a clear dependence of the postmerger gravitational wave emission on binary configuration and equation of state and show that it can be encoded as a broad function of the binary tidal coupling constant κ2T. Our results also demonstrate that the dimensionless spin of black holes resulting from subsequent HMNS collapse are limited to ≲0.7 - 0.8 . This may significantly impact the neutrino pair annihilation mechanism for powering short gamma-ray bursts (sGRB).

  17. Using a Neutron Star as a Stellar Wind Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, P. C.; Neish, C.

    2002-12-01

    LS I+61o303 is a remarkable X-ray and γ -ray emitting Be + neutron star binary, with periodic (26.5 day) radio outbursts. A recent Bayesian analysis demonstrates that the orbital phase and peak flux density of the radio outbursts exhibit a 4.6 year periodic modulation. We present a model that accounts for the radio properties of LS I+61o303 in terms of variable accretion by the neutron star in an eccentric orbit embedded within the dense equatorial wind from the rapidly rotating Be star. The neutron star thus acts as a probe of the wind speed and density. The analysis indicates that the 4.6 year modulation in radio properties results from an outward moving density enhancement or shell in the Be star equatorial disk. We propose that each new shell ejection may be triggered by the interaction of a short lived relativistic wind (ejector phase) from the neutron star, with the rapidly rotating Be star. Our best estimates of the mass accretion rate of the neutron star are in the range ~ 0.001 to ~ 0.01 of the Eddington accretion limit. This translates to an expected luminosity range of ~ 1035 to ~ 1036 ergs s-1 which is comparable to estimates of the total X-ray and γ -ray luminosity for LS I +61o 303. This research was supported in part by a grant from the Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council at the University of British Columbia.

  18. Quasiequilibrium black hole-neutron star binaries in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Keisuke; Faber, Joshua A.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2007-04-15

    We construct quasiequilibrium sequences of black hole-neutron star binaries in general relativity. We solve Einstein's constraint equations in the conformal thin-sandwich formalism, subject to black hole boundary conditions imposed on the surface of an excised sphere, together with the relativistic equations of hydrostatic equilibrium. In contrast to our previous calculations we adopt a flat spatial background geometry and do not assume extreme mass ratios. We adopt a {gamma}=2 polytropic equation of state and focus on irrotational neutron star configurations as well as approximately nonspinning black holes. We present numerical results for ratios of the black hole's irreducible mass to the neutron star's ADM mass in isolation of M{sub irr}{sup BH}/M{sub ADM,0}{sup NS}=1, 2, 3, 5, and 10. We consider neutron stars of baryon rest mass M{sub B}{sup NS}/M{sub B}{sup max}=83% and 56%, where M{sub B}{sup max} is the maximum allowed rest mass of a spherical star in isolation for our equation of state. For these sequences, we locate the onset of tidal disruption and, in cases with sufficiently large mass ratios and neutron star compactions, the innermost stable circular orbit. We compare with previous results for black hole-neutron star binaries and find excellent agreement with third-order post-Newtonian results, especially for large binary separations. We also use our results to estimate the energy spectrum of the outgoing gravitational radiation emitted during the inspiral phase for these binaries.

  19. Extensive population synthesis of isolated neutron stars with field decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.; Boldin, P. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Pons, J. A.; Posselt, B.

    2011-09-01

    We perform population synthesis studies of different types of neutron stars (thermally emitting isolated neutron stars, normal radio pulsars, magnetars) taking into account the magnetic field decay and using results from the most recent advances in neutron star cooling theory. For the first time, we confront our results with observations using simultaneously the Log N--Log S distribution for nearby isolated neutron stars, the Log N--Log L distribution for magnetars, and the distribution of radio pulsars in the P--Ṗ diagram. For this purpose, we fix a baseline neutron star model (all microphysics input), and other relevant parameters to standard values (velocity distribution, mass spectrum, etc.), only allowing to vary the initial magnetic field strength. We find that our theoretical model is consistent with all sets of data if the initial magnetic field distribution function follows a log-normal law with < log(B0/[G])>~13.25 and σlog B0~0.6. The typical scenario includes about 10% of neutron stars born as magnetars, significant magnetic field decay during the first million years of a NS life (only about a factor of 2 for low field neutron stars but more than an order of magnitude for magnetars), and a mass distribution function dominated by low mass objects. This model explains satisfactorily all known populations. Evolutionary links between different subclasses may exist, although robust conclusions are not yet possible. We apply the obtained field distribution and the model of decay to study long-term evolution of neuton stars till the stage of accretion from the interstellar medium. It is shown that though the subsonic propeller stage can be relatively long, initially highly magnetized neutron stars (B0>~1013 G) reach the accretion regime within the Galactic lifetime if their kick velocities are not too large. The fact that in previous studies made >10 years ago, such objects were not considered results in a slight increase of the Accretor fraction in

  20. Collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binary populations of galaxies. II. Pre-low-mass X-ray binary properties, formation rates, and constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadkamkar, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our exploration of the collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binaries in the stellar fields (i.e., outside globular clusters) of normal galaxies. In Paper I of this series, we considered high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this paper (Paper II), we consider low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whose evolutionary scenario is very different from that of HMXBs. We consider the evolution of primordial binaries up to the stage where the neutron star just formed in the supernova explosion of the primary is in a binary with its low-mass, unevolved companion, and this binary has circularized tidally, producing what we call a pre-low-mass X-ray binary (pre-LMXB). We study the constraints on the formation of such pre-LMXBs in detail (since these are low-probability events), and calculate their collective properties and formation rates. To this end, we first consider the changes in the binary parameters in the various steps involved, viz., the common-envelope phase, the supernova, and the tidal evolution. This naturally leads to a clarification of the constraints. We then describe our calculation of the evolution of the distributions of primordial binary parameters into those of pre-LMXB parameters, following the standard evolutionary scenario for individual binaries. We display the latter as both bivariate and monovariate distributions, discuss their essential properties, and indicate the influences of some essential factors on these. Finally, we calculate the formation rate of these pre-LMXBs. The results of this paper will be used in a subsequent one to compute the expected X-ray luminosity function of LMXBs.

  1. ON THE GEOMETRIC NATURE OF LOW-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN NEUTRON-STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Jeroen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Fridriksson, Joel K.

    2015-10-10

    We report on a detailed analysis of the so-called ∼1 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the eclipsing and dipping neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748–676. This type of QPO has previously been shown to have a geometric origin. Our study focuses on the evolution of the QPO as the source moves through the color–color diagram in which it traces out an atoll-source-like track. The QPO frequency increases from ∼0.4 Hz in the hard state to ∼25 Hz as the source approaches the soft state. Combining power spectra based on QPO frequency reveals additional features that strongly resemble those seen in non-dipping/eclipsing atoll sources. We show that the low-frequency QPOs in atoll sources and the ∼1 Hz QPO in EXO 0748–676 follow similar relations with respect to the noise components in their power spectra. We conclude that the frequencies of both types of QPOs are likely set by (the same) precession of a misaligned inner accretion disk. For high-inclination systems like EXO 0748–676 this results in modulations of the neutron-star emission due to obscuration or scattering, while for lower-inclination systems the modulations likely arise from relativistic Doppler-boosting and light-bending effects.

  2. Starquakes, Heating Anomalies, and Nuclear Reactions in the Neutron Star Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Alex Thomas

    When the most massive stars perish, their cores may remain intact in the form of extremely dense and compact stars. These stellar remnants, called neutron stars, are on the cusp of becoming black holes and reach mass densities greater than an atomic nucleus in their centers. Although the interiors of neutron stars were difficult to investigate at the time of their discovery, the advent of modern space-based telescopes (e.g., Chandra X-ray Observatory) has pushed our understanding of the neutron star interior into exciting new realms. It has been shown that the neutron star interior spans an enormous range of densities and contains many phases of matter, and further theoretical progress must rely on numerical calculations of neutron star phenomena built with detailed nuclear physics input. To further investigate the properties of the neutron star interior, this dissertation constructs numerical models of neutron stars, applies models to various observations of neutron star high-energy phenomena, and draws new conclusions about the neutron star interior from these analyses. In particular, we model the neutron star's outermost ? 1 km that encompasses the neutron star's envelope, ocean, and crust. The model must implement detailed nuclear physics to properly simulate the hydrostatic and thermal structure of the neutron star. We then apply our model to phenomena that occur in these layers, such as: thermonuclear bursts in the envelope, g-modes in the ocean, torsional oscillations of the crust, and crust cooling of neutron star transients. A comparison of models to observations provides new insights on the properties of dense matter that are often difficult to probe through terrestrial experiments. For example, models of the quiescent cooling of neutron stars, such as the accreting transient MAXI J0556-332, at late times into quiescence probe the thermal transport properties of the deep neutron star crust. This modeling provides independent data from astronomical

  3. Surface composition of magnetic neutron stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, L. C.; Cameron, A. G. W.

    1972-01-01

    The relative abundances of seven constituent nuclei, He4, C12, O16, Ne20, Mg24, Si28, and Fe56, are calculated as a function of time for neutron star atmospheres within which exist magnetic fields of the order of 10 to the 13th G. The opacity, equation of state of the electrons, and cooling rate of the magnetic star are discussed, and it is shown to be a reasonable approximation to assume an atmosphere to be isothermal. The effects of particle diffusion are included in the nuclear reaction network. Computations are performed both for a constant mass atmosphere and for an atmosphere in which mass is being ejected. It is found that the final abundances are model-independent, as long as the initial model contains predominantly He4. The relative abundances are compared to the cosmic ray spectrum. For both the constant-mass and mass-loss atmospheres, nucleosynthesis proceeds virtually completely to Fe56. However the outermost layers of the envelope, in which no mass is being ejected, are composed almost entirely of He4 with trace amounts of Fe56. After the loss of about 10 to the 21st g, only Fe56 is ejected from atmospheres expelling mass.

  4. Neutron star natal kicks and the long-term survival of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contenta, Filippo; Varri, Anna Lisa; Heggie, Douglas C.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the dynamical evolution of a star cluster in an external tidal field by using N-body simulations, with focus on the effects of the presence or absence of neutron star natal velocity kicks. We show that, even if neutron stars typically represent less than 2 per cent of the total bound mass of a star cluster, their primordial kinematic properties may affect the lifetime of the system by up to almost a factor of 4. We interpret this result in the light of two known modes of star cluster dissolution, dominated by either early stellar evolution mass-loss or two-body relaxation. The competition between these effects shapes the mass-loss profile of star clusters, which may either dissolve abruptly (`jumping'), in the pre-core-collapse phase, or gradually (`skiing'), after having reached core collapse.

  5. Equilibrium spin pulsars unite neutron star populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wynn; Klus, Helen; Coe, Malcolm; Andersson, Nils

    2015-08-01

    We compare the large number of recent torque measurements of accreting pulsars with a high-mass companion to the standard model for how accretion affects the pulsar spin period. We find that many long spin period (P > 100 s) pulsars must possess either extremely weak (B < 10^10 G) or extremely strong (B > 10^14 G) magnetic fields. We argue that the strong-field solution is more compelling, in which case these pulsars are near spin equilibrium. Our results provide evidence for a fundamental link between pulsars with the slowest spin periods and strong magnetic fields around high-mass companions and pulsars with the fastest spin periods and weak fields around low-mass companions. The strong magnetic fields also connect our pulsars to magnetars and strong-field isolated radio/X-ray pulsars. The strong field and old age of our sources suggests their magnetic field penetrates into the superconducting core of the neutron star.

  6. Astronomers Discover Most Massive Neutron Star Yet Known

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have discovered the most massive neutron star yet found, a discovery with strong and wide-ranging impacts across several fields of physics and astrophysics. "This neutron star is twice as massive as our Sun. This is surprising, and that much mass means that several theoretical models for the internal composition of neutron stars now are ruled out," said Paul Demorest, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This mass measurement also has implications for our understanding of all matter at extremely high densities and many details of nuclear physics," he added. Neutron stars are the superdense "corpses" of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae. With all their mass packed into a sphere the size of a small city, their protons and electrons are crushed together into neutrons. A neutron star can be several times more dense than an atomic nucleus, and a thimbleful of neutron-star material would weigh more than 500 million tons. This tremendous density makes neutron stars an ideal natural "laboratory" for studying the most dense and exotic states of matter known to physics. The scientists used an effect of Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity to measure the mass of the neutron star and its orbiting companion, a white dwarf star. The neutron star is a pulsar, emitting lighthouse-like beams of radio waves that sweep through space as it rotates. This pulsar, called PSR J1614-2230, spins 317 times per second, and the companion completes an orbit in just under nine days. The pair, some 3,000 light-years distant, are in an orbit seen almost exactly edge-on from Earth. That orientation was the key to making the mass measurement. As the orbit carries the white dwarf directly in front of the pulsar, the radio waves from the pulsar that reach Earth must travel very close to the white dwarf. This close passage causes them to be delayed in their arrival by the distortion of

  7. Neutron stars within a relativistic central variational method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinniu; Shen, Hong; Toki, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    The properties of neutron stars are investigated within the relativistic central variational method by using a realistic nucleon-nucleon (N N ) interaction. The strong repulsion of realistic N N interactions at short distances is treated by a Jastrow central correlation function, whose form is completely determined through minimization of the total energy of the nuclear many-body system. The relativistic Hartree-Fock wave functions are chosen as the trial wave function. In this framework, the equation of state of the neutron star matter in β equilibrium is obtained self-consistently. We further determine the properties of neutron stars via the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation using Bonn A, B, and C potentials. The maximum masses of neutron stars with these realistic potentials are around 2.18 M⊙ and their corresponding radii are around 11 km. These results are in accordance with the calculations of the relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory with the same potentials. Furthermore, we also find that the splitting of proton-neutron effective masses will be reversed at high density in the neutron star matter, which are caused by the contribution of short-range correlation on kinetic energy.

  8. Probing Neutron Star Evolution with Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.

    1996-02-01

    The research sponsored by this grant was conducted in two fields of high-energy astrophysics: gamma-ray bursts and evolution of neutron stars. It is unknown at this time whether they are related. The work performed in each area is discussed followed by a full list of publications supported by the grant. My research (with E. Fenimore, L. Lubin, B. Paczyiiski, and A. Ulmer) has focussed on devising tests that could distinguish between BATSE and galactic-halo distance scales using the available data. In the first instance, the issue was whether the early BATSE peak flux distribution could be used to extract more than just a slope of the log N(greater than P) distribution, and whether it joined smoothly to the steeper peak flux distribution of bright bursts. To this end, we analysed the peak flux distribution for the presence of a change in slope. This was done both by fitting models with a core radius to see whether a significant value for it could be found, and by developing a completely model-independent test to search for slope changes in arbitrary distributions that are nearly power laws. A slope change was marginally detected in the first-year BATSE data. Good progress has been made in understanding the evolution of neutron stars and their magnetic fields. Having shown in earlier work that magnetic fields in some neutron stars, particularly Her X-1, do not decay spontaneously on million-year time scales, we set out to check whether such spontaneous decay was needed in isolated radio pulsars, as claimed by many. We found that it is not; rather long decay times or no decay are preferred. Since there are neutron stars with low magnetic fields, one must conclude that there is something in their past that distinguishes them from most pulsars. These so-called recycled pulsars are in binaries much more often than normal pulsars. My research concentrates on the class of scenarios in which the recycled pulsars are initially the same as ordinary high-field radio pulsars

  9. Instability windows and evolution of rapidly rotating neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Gusakov, Mikhail E; Chugunov, Andrey I; Kantor, Elena M

    2014-04-18

    We consider an instability of rapidly rotating neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) with respect to excitation of r modes (which are analogous to Earth's Rossby waves controlled by the Coriolis force). We argue that finite temperature effects in the superfluid core of a neutron star lead to a resonance coupling and enhanced damping (and hence stability) of oscillation modes at certain stellar temperatures. Using a simple phenomenological model we demonstrate that neutron stars with high spin frequency may spend a substantial amount of time at these "resonance" temperatures. This finding allows us to explain puzzling observations of hot rapidly rotating neutron stars in LMXBs and to predict a new class of hot, nonaccreting, rapidly rotating neutron stars, some of which may have already been observed and tentatively identified as quiescent LMXB candidates. We also impose a new theoretical limit on the neutron star spin frequency, which can explain the cutoff spin frequency ∼730  Hz, following from the statistical analysis of accreting millisecond x-ray pulsars. In addition to explaining the observations, our model provides a new tool to constrain superdense matter properties by comparing measured and theoretically predicted resonance temperatures.

  10. Validating Neutron Star Radius Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2010-09-01

    Spectral analysis of transient neutron star X-ray emission during bursts and quiescence were both used to estimate the NS radii for different sources. The validities of these methods need to be verified by performing them on the same source respectively. Transient type-I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursters are excellent candidates for testing the consistency between these methods, since they were detected in both bursts and quiescence. Out of 3 candidates: Cen X-4, Aql X-1 and 4U 1608-52, 4U 1608-52 turns out to be the best one due to the lack of archival RXTE burst data for Cen X-4 and the previous reported significant luminosity and temperature variability for Aql X-1 in quiescence. Therefore, we propose a 25 ks Chandra/ACIS-S observation of 4U 1608-52.

  11. The dynamics and outcomes of rapid infall onto neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, C.L.; Benz, W.; Herant, M.

    1996-04-01

    We present an extensive study of accretion onto neutron stars in which the velocity of the neutron star and structure of the surrounding medium is such that the Bondi-Hoyle accretion exceeds 10{sup 4} {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup 1}. Two types of initial conditions are considered for a range of entropies and chemical compositions: an atmosphere in pressure equilibrium above the neutron star, and a freely falling inflow of matter from infinity (also parameterized by the infall rate). We then evolve the system with one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamic codes to determine the outcome. For most cases, hypercritical (also termed ``super Eddington``) accretion caused by rapid neutrino cooling allows the neutron star to accrete above the Bondi-Hoyle rate as previously pointed out by Chevalier. However, for a subset of simulations which corresponds to evolutionarily common events, convection driven by neutrino heating can lead to explosions by a mechanism similar to that found in core-collapse supernovae. Armed with the results from our calculations, we are in a position to predict the fate of a range of rapid-infall neutron star accretors present in certain low-mass X-ray binaries, common envelope systems, supernova fallbacks, and Thorne-Zytkow objects (TZOs). A majority of the common envelope systems that we considered led to explosions expelling the envelope, halting the neutron star{close_quote}s inward spiral, and allowing the formation of close binary systems. As a result, the smothered neutron stars produced in the collisions studied by Davies & Benz may also explode, probably preventing them from forming millisecond pulsars. For the most massive supernovae, in which the fallback of material toward the neutron star after a successful explosion is large, we find that a black hole is formed in a few seconds. Finally, we argue that the current set of TZO formation scenarios is inadequate and leads instead to hypercritical accretion and black hole formation.

  12. Magnetic fields in superconducting neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Lander, S K

    2013-02-15

    The interior of a neutron star is likely to be predominantly a mixture of superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons. This results in the quantization of the star's magnetic field into an array of thin flux tubes, producing a macroscopic force very different from the Lorentz force of normal matter. We show that in an axisymmetric superconducting equilibrium the behavior of a magnetic field is governed by a single differential equation. Solving this, we present the first self-consistent superconducting neutron star equilibria with poloidal and mixed poloidal-toroidal fields and also give the first quantitative results for the corresponding magnetically induced distortions to the star. The poloidal component is dominant in all our configurations. We suggest that the transition from normal to superconducting matter in a young neutron star may cause a large-scale field rearrangement.

  13. The breaking strain of neutron star crust

    SciTech Connect

    Kadau, Kai; Horowitz, C J

    2009-01-01

    Mountains on rapidly rotating neutron stars efficiently radiate gravitational waves. The maximum possible size of these mountains depends on the breaking strain of neutron star crust. With multimillion ion molecular dynamics simulations of Coulomb solids representing the crust, we show that the breaking strain of pure single crystals is very large and that impurities, defects, and grain boundaries only modestly reduce the breaking strain to around 0.1. Due to the collective behavior of the ions during failure found in our simulations, the neutron star crust is likely very strong and can support mountains large enough so that their gTavitational wave radiation could limit the spin periods of some stars and might be detectable in large scale interferometers. Furthermore, our microscopic modeling of neutron star crust material can help analyze mechanisms relevant in Magnetar Giant and Micro Flares.

  14. XTE J1701-462 AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE NATURE OF SUBCLASSES IN LOW-MAGNETIC-FIELD NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Van der Klis, Michiel; Wijnands, Rudy; Altamirano, Diego; Mendez, Mariano; Lin Dacheng; Casella, Piergiorgio; Belloni, Tomaso M.

    2010-08-10

    We report on an analysis of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (NS-LMXB) XTE J1701-462, obtained during its 2006-2007 outburst. The X-ray properties of the source changed between those of various types of NS-LMXB subclasses. At high luminosities, the source switched between two types of Z source behavior and at low luminosities we observed a transition from Z source to atoll source behavior. These transitions between subclasses primarily manifest themselves as changes in the shapes of the tracks in X-ray color-color (CD) and hardness-intensity diagrams (HID), but they are accompanied by changes in the kHz quasi-periodic oscillations, broadband variability, burst behavior, and/or X-ray spectra. We find that for most of the outburst the low-energy X-ray flux is a good parameter to track the gradual evolution of the tracks in CD and HID, allowing us to resolve the evolution of the source in greater detail than before and relate the observed properties to other NS-LMXBs. We further find that during the transition from Z to atoll, characteristic behavior known as the atoll upper banana can equivalently be described as the final stage of a weakening Z source flaring branch, thereby blurring the line between the two subclasses. Our findings strongly suggest that the wide variety in behavior observed in NS-LXMBs with different luminosities can be linked through changes in a single variable parameter, namely the mass accretion rate, without the need for additional differences in the neutron star parameters or viewing angle. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for the spectral changes observed in NS-LMXBs and suggest that, contrary to what is often assumed, the position along the color-color tracks of Z sources is not determined by the instantaneous mass accretion rate.

  15. Observations of Neutron Stars with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an approved NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity that will be deployed as an attached payload on the International Space Station in August of 2016. By virtue of its unprecedented combination of throughput and fast timing capabilities, NICER will enable an empirical determination of the neutron star equation of state via realistic modeling of the pulsed X-ray radiation from millisecond pulsars. In this talk, I will describe the NICER instrument and measurement techniques it will employ, as well as the expected constraints on neutron star structure, and by extension the behavior of matter at supra-nuclear densities.

  16. Stability of precessing superfluid neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Glampedakis, K; Andersson, N; Jones, D I

    2008-02-29

    We discuss a new superfluid instability occurring in the interior of mature neutron stars with implications for free precession. This instability is similar to the instability which is responsible for the formation of turbulence in superfluid helium. We demonstrate that the instability is unlikely to affect slowly precessing systems with weak superfluid coupling. In contrast, fast precession in systems with strong coupling appears to be generically unstable. This raises serious questions about our understanding of neutron star precession and complicates attempts to constrain neutron star interiors using such observations.

  17. Cyclotron Lines in Accreting Neutron Star Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Jörn; Schönherr, Gabriele; Schmid, Julia; Dauser, Thomas; Kreykenbohm, Ingo

    2009-05-01

    Cyclotron lines are formed through transitions of electrons between discrete Landau levels in the accretion columns of accreting neutron stars with strong (1012 G) magnetic fields. We summarize recent results on the formation of the spectral continuum of such systems, describe recent advances in the modeling of the lines based on a modification of the commonly used Monte Carlo approach, and discuss new results on the dependence of the measured cyclotron line energy from the luminosity of transient neutron star systems. Finally, we show that Simbol-X will be ideally suited to build and improve the observational database of accreting and strongly magnetized neutron stars.

  18. Discovery of the Near-infrared Counterpart to the Luminous Neutron-star Low-mass X-Ray Binary GX 3+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen; Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Linares, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Using the High Resolution Camera on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we have measured an accurate position for the bright persistent neutron star X-ray binary and atoll source GX 3+1. At a location that is consistent with this new position, we have discovered the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 3+1 in images taken with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. The identification of this Ks = 15.8 ± 0.1 mag star as the counterpart is based on the presence of a Br γ emission line in an NIR spectrum taken with the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph on the Baade Telescope. The absolute magnitude derived from the best available distance estimate to GX 3+1 indicates that the mass donor in the system is not a late-type giant. We find that the NIR light in GX 3+1 is likely dominated by the contribution from a heated outer accretion disk. This is similar to what has been found for the NIR flux from the brighter class of Z sources, but unlike the behavior of atolls fainter (LX ≈ 1036-1037 erg s-1) than GX 3+1, where optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet probably dominates the NIR flux. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  19. Discovery of the near-infrared counterpart to the luminous neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary GX 3+1

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Berg, Maureen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Homan, Jeroen; Linares, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Using the High Resolution Camera on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we have measured an accurate position for the bright persistent neutron star X-ray binary and atoll source GX 3+1. At a location that is consistent with this new position, we have discovered the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 3+1 in images taken with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. The identification of this K{sub s} = 15.8 ± 0.1 mag star as the counterpart is based on the presence of a Br γ emission line in an NIR spectrum taken with the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph on the Baade Telescope. The absolute magnitude derived from the best available distance estimate to GX 3+1 indicates that the mass donor in the system is not a late-type giant. We find that the NIR light in GX 3+1 is likely dominated by the contribution from a heated outer accretion disk. This is similar to what has been found for the NIR flux from the brighter class of Z sources, but unlike the behavior of atolls fainter (L{sub X} ≈ 10{sup 36}-10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}) than GX 3+1, where optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet probably dominates the NIR flux.

  20. On the Origin of the Near-infrared Emission from the Neutron-star Low-mass X-Ray Binary GX 9+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen; Homan, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    We have determined an improved position for the luminous persistent neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary and atoll source GX 9+1 from archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data. The new position significantly differs from a previously published Chandra position for this source. Based on the revised X-ray position we have identified a new near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 9+1 in Ks-band images obtained with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. NIR spectra of this {K}s=16.5+/- 0.1 mag star, taken with the FIRE spectrograph on the Baade Telescope, show a strong Br γ emission line, which is a clear signature that we discovered the true NIR counterpart to GX 9+1. The mass donor in GX 9+1 cannot be a late-type giant, as such a star would be brighter than the estimated absolute Ks magnitude of the NIR counterpart. The slope of the dereddened NIR spectrum is poorly constrained due to uncertainties in the column density NH and NIR extinction. Considering the source’s distance and X-ray luminosity, we argue that NH likely lies near the high end of the previously suggested range. If this is indeed the case, the NIR spectrum is consistent with thermal emission from a heated accretion disk, possibly with a contribution from the secondary. In this respect, GX 9+1 is similar to other bright atolls and the Z sources, whose NIR spectra do not show the slope that is expected for a dominant contribution from optically thin synchrotron emission from the inner regions of a jet. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  1. Neutron star structure with chiral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logoteta, Domenico; Bombaci, Ignazio

    2017-06-01

    We use two-body and three-body nuclear interactions derived in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) with and without the explicit ∆ isobar contributions to calculate the energy per particle of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter employing the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach. In particular, we present nuclear matter calculations using the new fully local in coordinate-space two-nucleon interaction at the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N3LO) of ChPT with ∆ isobar intermediate states (N3LO∆) recently developed by Piarulli et al. [1]. We compute the β-equilibrium equation of state and determine the neutron star mass-radius and mass-central density sequences. We find that the adopted interactions are able to provide satisfactory properties of nuclear matter at saturation density as well as to fulfill the limit of two-solar mass for the maximum mass configuration as required by recent observations.

  2. Neutron Star Dense Matter Equation of State Constraints with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Guillot, Sebastien; Kust Harding, Alice; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Miller, M. Coleman; Morsink, Sharon; Ozel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Ray, Paul S.; Riley, Tom; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Watts, Anna; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Gendreau, Keith

    2017-08-01

    One of the principal goals of the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is to place constraints on the dense matter equation of state through sensitive X-ray observations of neutron stars. The NICER mission will focus on measuring the masses and radii of several relatively bright, thermally-emitting, rotation-powered millisecond pulsars, by fitting models that incorporate all relevant relativistic effects and atmospheric radiation transfer processes to their periodic soft X-ray modulations. Here, we provide an overview of the targets NICER will observe and tthe technique and models that have been developed by the NICER team to estimate the masses and radii of these pulsars.

  3. MHD instabilities in accretion mounds on neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Mignone, Andrea

    We have numerically solved the Grad-Shafranov equation for axisymmetric static MHD equilibria of matter confined to the polar cap of neutron stars. From the equilibrium solutions we explore the stability of the accretion mounds using the PLUTO MHD code. We find that pressure driven modes disrupt the equilibria beyond a threshold mound mass, forming dynamic structures, as matter spreads over the neutron star surface. Our results show that local variation of magnetic field will significantly affect the shape and nature of the cyclotron features observed in the spectra of High Mass X-ray Binaries.

  4. Neutron-star matter within the energy-density functional theory and neutron-star structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fantina, A. F.; Chamel, N.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    2015-02-24

    In this lecture, we will present some nucleonic equations of state of neutron-star matter calculated within the nuclear energy-density functional theory using generalized Skyrme functionals developed by the Brussels-Montreal collaboration. These equations of state provide a consistent description of all regions of a neutron star. The global structure of neutron stars predicted by these equations of state will be discussed in connection with recent astrophysical observations.

  5. Energy density functional for nuclei and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, J.; Horowitz, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rafalski, M.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2013-04-01

    Background: Recent observational data on neutron star masses and radii provide stringent constraints on the equation of state of neutron rich matter [Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci.ARPSDF0163-899810.1146/annurev-nucl-102711-095018 62, 485 (2012)].Purpose: We aim to develop a nuclear energy density functional that can be simultaneously applied to finite nuclei and neutron stars.Methods: We use the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory (DFT) with Skyrme energy density functionals and covariance analysis to assess correlations between observables for finite nuclei and neutron stars. In a first step two energy functionals—a high density energy functional giving reasonable neutron properties, and a low density functional fitted to nuclear properties—are matched. In a second step, we optimize a new functional using exactly the same protocol as in earlier studies pertaining to nuclei but now including neutron star data. This allows direct comparisons of performance of the new functional relative to the standard one.Results: The new functional TOV-min yields results for nuclear bulk properties (energy, rms radius, diffraction radius, and surface thickness) that are of the same quality as those obtained with the established Skyrme functionals, including SV-min. When comparing SV-min and TOV-min, isoscalar nuclear matter indicators vary slightly while isovector properties are changed considerably. We discuss neutron skins, dipole polarizability, separation energies of the heaviest elements, and proton and neutron drip lines. We confirm a correlation between the neutron skin of 208Pb and the neutron star radius.Conclusions: We demonstrate that standard energy density functionals optimized to nuclear data do not carry information on the expected maximum neutron star mass, and that predictions can only be made within an extremely broad uncertainty band. For atomic nuclei, the new functional TOV-min performs at least as well as the standard nuclear functionals, but

  6. Plasma physics of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concepts and phenomena that are needed to understand X- and gamma-ray sources are discussed. The capture of material from the wind or from the atmosphere or envelope of a binary companion star is described and the resulting types of accretion flows discussed. The reasons for the formation of a magnetosphere around the neutron star are explained. The qualitative features of the magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars are then described and compared with the qualitative features of the geomagnetosphere. The conditions for stable flow and for angular and linear momentum conservation are explained in the context of accretion by magnetic neutron stars and applied to obtain rough estimates of the scale of the magnetosphere. Accretion from Keplerian disks is then considered in some detail. The radial structure of geometrically thin disk flows, the interaction of disk flows with the neutron star magnetosphere, and models of steady accretion from Keplerian disks are described. Accretion torques and the resulting changes in the spin frequencies of rotating neutron stars are considered. The predicted behavior is then compared with observations of accretion-powered pulsars. Magnetospheric processes that may accelerate particles to very high energies, producing GeV and, perhaps, TeV gamma-rays are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms that decelerate and eventually stop accreting plasma at the surfaces of strongly magnetic neutron stars are described.

  7. Neutron Star Science with the NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J. K.

    2015-10-16

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), launched in June 2012, helped scientists obtain for the first time a sensitive high-­energy X-­ray map of the sky with extraordinary resolution. This pioneering telescope has aided in the understanding of how stars explode and neutron stars are born. LLNL is a founding member of the NuSTAR project, with key personnel on its optics and science team. We used NuSTAR to observe and analyze the observations of different neutron star classes identified in the last decade that are still poorly understood. These studies not only help to comprehend newly discovered astrophysical phenomena and emission processes for members of the neutron star family, but also expand the utility of such observations for addressing broader questions in astrophysics and other physics disciplines. For example, neutron stars provide an excellent laboratory to study exotic and extreme phenomena, such as the equation of state of the densest matter known, the behavior of matter in extreme magnetic fields, and the effects of general relativity. At the same time, knowing their accurate populations has profound implications for understanding the life cycle of massive stars, star collapse, and overall galactic evolution.

  8. Fast radio bursts: the last sign of supramassive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcke, Heino; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2014-02-01

    Context. Several fast radio bursts have been discovered recently, showing a bright, highly dispersed millisecond radio pulse. The pulses do not repeat and are not associated with a known pulsar or gamma-ray burst. The high dispersion suggests sources at cosmological distances, hence implying an extremely high radio luminosity, far larger than the power of single pulses from a pulsar. Aims: We suggest that a fast radio burst represents the final signal of a supramassive rotating neutron star that collapses to a black hole due to magnetic braking. The neutron star is initially above the critical mass for non-rotating models and is supported by rapid rotation. As magnetic braking constantly reduces the spin, the neutron star will suddenly collapse to a black hole several thousand to million years after its birth. Methods: We discuss several formation scenarios for supramassive neutron stars and estimate the possible observational signatures making use of the results of recent numerical general-relativistic calculations. Results: While the collapse will hide the stellar surface behind an event horizon, the magnetic-field lines will snap violently. This can turn an almost ordinary pulsar into a bright radio "blitzar": accelerated electrons from the travelling magnetic shock dissipate a significant fraction of the magnetosphere and produce a massive radio burst that is observable out to z > 0.7. Only a few per cent of the neutron stars need to be supramassive in order to explain the observed rate. Conclusions: We suggest the intriguing possibility that fast radio bursts might trace the solitary and almost silent formation of stellar mass black holes at high redshifts. These bursts could be an electromagnetic complement to gravitational-wave emission and reveal a new formation and evolutionary channel for black holes and neutron stars that are not seen as gamma-ray bursts. If supramassive neutron stars are formed at birth and not by accretion, radio observations of these

  9. Neutron-star formation in the carbon-detonation supernova.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. C.; Buchler, J.-R.; Barkat, Z. K.

    1973-01-01

    Neutrino losses, such as those driven by the convective Urca process, may affect the evolution of stars in the mass range from 4 to 8 solar masses so as to lead to collapse of their degenerate carbon/oxygen cores. A corresponding hydrodynamic model is computed which leads to the formation of a 1.3 to 1.4 solar mass neutron star with the expulsion of a small fraction of the mass, about 0.l solar mass at about 20,000 km/sec into the overlying hydrogen envelope. This sets the stage for the Ostriker-Gunn mechanism in which Type II supernovae and pulsars are formed.

  10. The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith C.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICE) will be a Mission of Opportunity dedicated to the study of neutron stars, the only places in the universe where all four fundamental forces of nature are simultaneously in play. NICE will explore the exotic states of matter within neutron stars, revealing their interior and surface compositions through rotation resolved X-ray spectroscopy. Absolute time-referenced data will allow NICE to probe the extreme physical environments associated with neutron stars, leveraging observations across the electromagnetic spectrum to answer decades-old questions about one of the most powerful cosmic accelerators known. Finally, NICE will definitively measure stabilities of pulsars as clocks, with implications for navigation, a pulsar-based timescale, and gravitational-wave detection. NICE will fly on the International Space Station, while GLAST is on orbit and post-RXTE, and will allow for the discovery of new high-energy pulsars and provide continuity in X-ray timing astrophysics.

  11. Transport coefficients in superfluid neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tolos, Laura; Manuel, Cristina; Sarkar, Sreemoyee; Tarrus, Jaume

    2016-01-22

    We study the shear and bulk viscosity coefficients as well as the thermal conductivity as arising from the collisions among phonons in superfluid neutron stars. We use effective field theory techniques to extract the allowed phonon collisional processes, written as a function of the equation of state and the gap of the system. The shear viscosity due to phonon scattering is compared to calculations of that coming from electron collisions. We also comment on the possible consequences for r-mode damping in superfluid neutron stars. Moreover, we find that phonon collisions give the leading contribution to the bulk viscosities in the core of the neutron stars. We finally obtain a temperature-independent thermal conductivity from phonon collisions and compare it with the electron-muon thermal conductivity in superfluid neutron stars.

  12. The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith C.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICE) will be a Mission of Opportunity dedicated to the study of neutron stars, the only places in the universe where all four fundamental forces of nature are simultaneously in play. NICE will explore the exotic states of matter within neutron stars, revealing their interior and surface compositions through rotation resolved X-ray spectroscopy. Absolute time-referenced data will allow NICE to probe the extreme physical environments associated with neutron stars, leveraging observations across the electromagnetic spectrum to answer decades-old questions about one of the most powerful cosmic accelerators known. Finally, NICE will definitively measure stabilities of pulsars as clocks, with implications for navigation, a pulsar-based timescale, and gravitational-wave detection. NICE will fly on the International Space Station, while GLAST is on orbit and post-RXTE, and will allow for the discovery of new high-energy pulsars and provide continuity in X-ray timing astrophysics.

  13. Early neutron stars and quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You-chen; Kong, Xiao-jun; Wei, Cheng-wen; Ge, Yun-zhao

    1988-03-01

    There may exist quark matter inside early hot neutron stars. Using the general method of Baym and Chin, we evaluated the pressure and density at neutron matter — quark matter phase transition for different temperatures and compared the values for stable hot neutron stars. We found (1) that whenever the neutron star temperature exceeds (+10)K, there will be a core of quark matter; (2) that the bag constant B is the most important determining factor of the quark core size. For a given temperature, the core is the larger, the smaller B is; (3) that by the conservation of baryon number, the total energy released by a star during its cooling is about (+53) ergs.

  14. Physics of systems containing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1996-01-01

    This grant dealt with several topics related to the dynamics of systems containing a compact object. Most of the research dealt with systems containing Neutron Stars (NS's), but a Black Hole (BH) or a White Dwarf (WD) in situations relevant to NS systems were also addressed. Among the systems were isolated regular pulsars, Millisecond Pulsars (MSP's) that are either Single (SMP's) or in a binary (BMP's), Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXB's) and Cataclysmic Variables (CV's). Also dealt with was one aspect of NS structure, namely NS superfluidity. A large fraction of the research dealt with irradiation-driven winds from companions which turned out to be of importance in the evolution of LMXB's and MSP's, be they SMP's or BMP's. While their role during LMXB evolution (i.e. during the accretion phase) is not yet clear, they may play an important role in turning BMP's into SMP's and also in bringing about the formation of planets around MSP's. Work was concentrated on the following four problems: The Windy Pulsar B197+20 and its Evolution; Wind 'Echoes' in Tight Binaries; Post Nova X-ray Emission in CV's; and Dynamics of Pinned Superfluids in Neutron Stars.

  15. Neutron star accretion and the neutrino fireball

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Herant, M.E.; Benz, W.

    1991-11-26

    The mixing necessary to explain the ``Fe`` line widths and possibly the observed red shifts of 1987A is explained in terms of large scale, entropy conserving, up and down flows (calculated with a smooth particle 2-D code) taking place between the neutron star and the explosion shock wave due to the gravity and neutrino deposition. Depending upon conditions of entropy and mass flux further accretion takes place in single events, similar to relaxation oscillator, fed by the downward flows of low entropy matter. The shock, in turn, is driven by the upflow of the buoyant high entropy bubbles. Some accretion events will reach a temperature high enough to create a neutrino ``fireball,`` a region hot enough, 11 Mev, so as to be partially opaque to its own (neutrino) radiation. The continuing neutrino deposition drives the explosion shock until the entropy of matter flowing downwards onto the neutron star is high enough to prevent further accretion. This process should result in a robust supernova explosion.

  16. Constraining decaying dark matter with neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The amount of decaying dark matter, accumulated in the central regions in neutron stars together with the energy deposition rate from decays, may set a limit on the neutron star survival rate against transitions to more compact objects provided nuclear matter is not the ultimate stable state of matter and that dark matter indeed is unstable. More generally, this limit sets constraints on the dark matter particle decay time, τχ. We find that in the range of uncertainties intrinsic to such a scenario, masses (mχ /TeV) ≳ 9 ×10-4 or (mχ /TeV) ≳ 5 ×10-2 and lifetimes τχ ≲1055 s and τχ ≲1053 s can be excluded in the bosonic or fermionic decay cases, respectively, in an optimistic estimate, while more conservatively, it decreases τχ by a factor ≳1020. We discuss the validity under which these results may improve with other current constraints.

  17. A propelling neutron star in the enigmatic Be-star γ Cassiopeia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K.; Oskinova, L.; Torrejón, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    γ Cassiopeia (γ Cas), is known to be a binary system consisting of a Be-type star and a low-mass (M ˜ 1 M⊙) companion of unknown nature orbiting in the Be-disc plane. Here, we apply the quasi-spherical accretion theory on to a compact magnetized star and show that if the low-mass companion of γ Cas is a fast spinning neutron star, the key observational signatures of γ Cas are remarkably well reproduced. Direct accretion on to this fast rotating neutron star is impeded by the propeller mechanism. In this case, around the neutron star magnetosphere a hot shell is formed which emits thermal X-rays in qualitative and quantitative agreement with observed properties of the X-ray emission from γ Cas. We suggest that γ Cas and its analogues constitute a new subclass of Be-type X-ray binaries hosting rapidly rotating neutron stars formed in supernova explosions with small kicks. The subsequent evolutionary stage of γ Cas and its analogues should be the X Per-type binaries comprising low-luminosity slowly rotating X-ray pulsars. The model explains the enigmatic X-ray emission from γ Cas, and also establishes evolutionary connections between various types of rotating magnetized neutron stars in Be-binaries.

  18. Thermonuclear runaways in thick hydrogen rich envelopes of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code is used to evolve thermonuclear runaways in the accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes of 1.0-solar-mass neutron stars with radii of 10 km and 20 km. The simulations produce outbursts lasting from approximately 750 seconds to approximately one week. The peak effective temperatures and luminosities are 2.6 x 10 to the 7th K and 8 x 10 to the 4th solar luminosities for the 10 km study and 5.3 x 10 to the 6th K and 600 solar luminosities for the 20 km study. It is found that hydrodynamic expansion on the 10 km neutron star produced a precursor lasting approximately 0.0001 second. The study assumes that the bursters and transient X-ray sources occur as a result of mass transfer from a secondary onto a neutron star in a fashion analogous to the nova phenomena. The peak temperatures and luminosities are found to be inversely proportional to the radius of the neutron stars and the calculations here, together with those in the literature, indicate that the actual radii of most neutron stars must be closer to 10 km than 20 km.

  19. The Fate of the Compact Remnant in Neutron Star Mergers

    DOE PAGES

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztoff; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; ...

    2015-10-06

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star - black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts. They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the coresmore » of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3-2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing gamma-ray bursts, LIGO observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.« less

  20. The Fate of the Compact Remnant in Neutron Star Mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztoff; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rosswog, Stephan; Shen, Gang; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-10-06

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star - black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts. They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the cores of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3-2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing gamma-ray bursts, LIGO observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.

  1. Direct URCA process in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattimer, James M.; Prakash, Madappa; Pethick, C. J.; Haensel, Pawel

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the direct URCA process can occur in neutron stars if the proton concentration exceeds some critical value in the range 11-15 percent. The proton concentration, which is determined by the poorly known symmetry energy of matter above nuclear density, exceeds the critical value in many current calculations. If it occurs, the direct URCA process enhances neutrino emission and neutron star cooling rates by a large factor compared to any process considered previously.

  2. Chandra Observations of Isolated Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We present a review of the first six years of Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of isolated neutron stars. The outstanding spatial and spectral resolution of this great observatory have allowed for observations of unprecedented clarity and accuracy. Many of these observations have provided new insights into neutron star physics. We present a (biased) overview of six years of these observations, highlighting new discoveries made possible by the Observatory's unique capabilities.

  3. The decompression of cold neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattimer, J. M.; Mackie, F.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Schramm, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    The ejection of cold neutron-star matter is examined, and an attempt is made to determine whether the final composition of this matter may be similar to that normally associated with the hot high-neutron-flux r-process. A semiempirical liquid-drop model is used for the nucleus, and the equilibrium composition of the matter is determined by assuming it to be in its absolute ground state at a given density. Physical mechanisms operating during the expansion are analyzed, and the composition of the ejected matter is found as a function of its density during expansion. The results indicate that it is virtually impossible for deuterium to form, that neutrons can be captured only after beta decay increases the atomic numbers of nuclei, and that no free neutrons can escape. It is concluded that neutron-star ejecta can produce heavy neutron-rich nuclei and may produce somewhat heavier nuclei than a standard r-process.

  4. Magnetic field decay in isolated neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, Peter; Reisenegger, Andreas

    1992-01-01

    Three mechanisms that promote the loss of magnetic flux from an isolated neutron star - Ohmic decay, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall drift - are investigated. Equations of motions are solved for charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and a fixed background of neutrons, while allowing for the creation and destruction of particles by weak interactions. Although these equations apply to normal neutrons and protons, the present interpretations of their solutions are extended to cover cases of neutron superfluidity and proton superconductivity. The equations are manipulated to prove that, in the presence of a magnetic force, the charged particles cannot be simultaneously in magnetostatic equilibrium and chemical equilibrium with the neutrons. The application of the results to real neutron stars is discussed.

  5. The decompression of cold neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattimer, J. M.; Mackie, F.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Schramm, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    The ejection of cold neutron-star matter is examined, and an attempt is made to determine whether the final composition of this matter may be similar to that normally associated with the hot high-neutron-flux r-process. A semiempirical liquid-drop model is used for the nucleus, and the equilibrium composition of the matter is determined by assuming it to be in its absolute ground state at a given density. Physical mechanisms operating during the expansion are analyzed, and the composition of the ejected matter is found as a function of its density during expansion. The results indicate that it is virtually impossible for deuterium to form, that neutrons can be captured only after beta decay increases the atomic numbers of nuclei, and that no free neutrons can escape. It is concluded that neutron-star ejecta can produce heavy neutron-rich nuclei and may produce somewhat heavier nuclei than a standard r-process.

  6. Neutron star cooling: effects of envelope physics

    SciTech Connect

    Van Riper, K.A.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron star cooling calculations are reported which employ improved physics in the calculation of the temperature drop through the atmosphere. The atmosphere microphysics is discussed briefly. The predicted neutron star surface temperatures, in the interesting interval 200 less than or equal to t (yr) less than or equal to 10/sup 5/, do not differ appreciably from the earlier results of Van Riper and Lamb (1981) for a non-magnetic star; for a magnetic star, the surface temperature is lower than in the previous work. Comparison with observational limits show that an exotic cooling mechanism, such as neutrino emission from a pion condensate or in the presence of percolating quarks, is not required unless the existence of a neutron star in the Tycho or SN1006 SNRs is established.

  7. On the electrostatic structure of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo; Xue, S.-S.

    2010-03-24

    We consider neutron stars composed by, (1) a core of degenerate neutrons, protons, and electrons above nuclear density; (2) an inner crust of nuclei in a gas of neutrons and electrons; and (3) an outer crust of nuclei in a gas of electrons. We use for the strong interaction model for the baryonic matter in the core an equation of state based on the phenomenological Weizsacker mass formula, and to determine the properties of the inner and the outer crust below nuclear saturation density we adopt the well-known equation of state of Baym-Bethe-Pethick. The integration of the Einstein--Maxwell equations is carried out under the constraints of beta-equilibrium and global charge neutrality. We obtain baryon densities that sharply go to zero at nuclear density and electron densities matching smoothly the electron component of the crust. We show that a family of equilibrium configurations exists fulfilling overall neutrality and characterized by a non-trivial electrodynamical structure at the interface between the core and the crust. We find that the electric field is overcritical and that the thickness of the transition surface-shell separating core and crust is of the order of the electron Compton wavelength.

  8. Cooling of Accretion-Heated Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnands, Rudy; Degenaar, Nathalie; Page, Dany

    2017-09-01

    We present a brief, observational review about the study of the cooling behaviour of accretion-heated neutron stars and the inferences about the neutron-star crust and core that have been obtained from these studies. Accretion of matter during outbursts can heat the crust out of thermal equilibrium with the core and after the accretion episodes are over, the crust will cool down until crust-core equilibrium is restored. We discuss the observed properties of the crust cooling sources and what has been learned about the physics of neutron-star crusts. We also briefly discuss those systems that have been observed long after their outbursts were over, i.e, during times when the crust and core are expected to be in thermal equilibrium. The surface temperature is then a direct probe for the core temperature. By comparing the expected temperatures based on estimates of the accretion history of the targets with the observed ones, the physics of neutron-star cores can be investigated. Finally, we discuss similar studies performed for strongly magnetized neutron stars in which the magnetic field might play an important role in the heating and cooling of the neutron stars.

  9. Determination of mass of an isolated neutron star using continuous gravitational waves with two frequency modes: an effect of a misalignment angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Kazunari; Ono, Kenji; Itoh, Yousuke

    2016-05-01

    A rapidly spinning neutron star (NS) would emit a continuous gravitational wave (GW) detectable by the advanced LIGO, advanced Virgo, KAGRA and proposed third generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope (ET). Such a GW does not propagate freely, but is affected by the Coulomb-type gravitational field of the NS itself. This effect appears as a phase shift in the GW depending on the NS mass. We have shown that mass of an isolated NS can, in principle, be determined if we could detect the continuous GW with two or more frequency modes. Indeed, our Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that mass of a NS with its ellipticity 10-6 at 1 kpc is typically measurable with precision of 20% using the ET, if the NS is precessing or has a pinned superfluid core and emits GWs with once and twice the spin frequencies. After briefly explaining our idea and results, this paper concerns with the effect of misalignment angle (“wobble angle” in the case of a precessing NS) on the mass measurement precision.

  10. A debris disk around an isolated young neutron star.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Kaplan, David L

    2006-04-06

    Pulsars are rotating, magnetized neutron stars that are born in supernova explosions following the collapse of the cores of massive stars. If some of the explosion ejecta fails to escape, it may fall back onto the neutron star or it may possess sufficient angular momentum to form a disk. Such 'fallback' is both a general prediction of current supernova models and, if the material pushes the neutron star over its stability limit, a possible mode of black hole formation. Fallback disks could dramatically affect the early evolution of pulsars, yet there are few observational constraints on whether significant fallback occurs or even the actual existence of such disks. Here we report the discovery of mid-infrared emission from a cool disk around an isolated young X-ray pulsar. The disk does not power the pulsar's X-ray emission but is passively illuminated by these X-rays. The estimated mass of the disk is of the order of 10 Earth masses, and its lifetime (> or = 10(6) years) significantly exceeds the spin-down age of the pulsar, supporting a supernova fallback origin. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks seen around ordinary young stars, suggesting the possibility of planet formation around young neutron stars.

  11. Two-fluid models of superfluid neutron star cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, N.

    2008-08-01

    Both relativistic and non-relativistic two-fluid models of neutron star cores are constructed, using the constrained variational formalism developed by Brandon Carter and co-workers. We consider a mixture of superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons at zero temperature, taking into account mutual entrainment effects. Leptons, which affect the interior composition of the neutron star and contribute to the pressure, are also included. We provide the analytic expression of the Lagrangian density of the system, the so-called master function, from which the dynamical equations can be obtained. All the microscopic parameters of the models are calculated consistently using the non-relativistic nuclear energy density functional theory. For comparison, we have also considered relativistic mean field models. The correspondence between relativistic and non-relativistic hydrodynamical models is discussed in the framework of the recently developed 4D covariant formalism of Newtonian multifluid hydrodynamics. We have shown that entrainment effects can be interpreted in terms of dynamical effective masses that are larger in the relativistic case than in the Newtonian case. With the nuclear models considered in this work, we have found that the neutron relativistic effective mass is even greater than the bare neutron mass in the liquid core of neutron stars.

  12. Superfluid hydrodynamics in the inner crust of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Noël; Urban, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The inner crust of neutron stars is supposed to be inhomogeneous and composed of dense structures (clusters) that are immersed in a dilute gas of unbound neutrons. Here we consider spherical clusters forming a body-centered cubic (BCC) crystal and cylindrical rods arranged in a hexagonal lattice. We study the relative motion of these dense structures and the neutron gas using superfluid hydrodynamics. Within this approach, which relies on the assumption that Cooper pairs are small compared to the crystalline structures, we find that the entrainment of neutrons by the clusters is very weak since neutrons of the gas can flow through the clusters. Consequently, we obtain a low effective mass of the clusters and a superfluid density that is even higher than the density of unbound neutrons. Consequences for the constraints from glitch observations are discussed.

  13. Formation of Double Neutron Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauris, T. M.; Kramer, M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Wex, N.; Janka, H.-T.; Langer, N.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Bozzo, E.; Chaty, S.; Kruckow, M. U.; van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; Antoniadis, J.; Breton, R. P.; Champion, D. J.

    2017-09-01

    Double neutron star (DNS) systems represent extreme physical objects and the endpoint of an exotic journey of stellar evolution and binary interactions. Large numbers of DNS systems and their mergers are anticipated to be discovered using the Square Kilometre Array searching for radio pulsars, and the high-frequency gravitational wave detectors (LIGO/VIRGO), respectively. Here we discuss all key properties of DNS systems, as well as selection effects, and combine the latest observational data with new theoretical progress on various physical processes with the aim of advancing our knowledge on their formation. We examine key interactions of their progenitor systems and evaluate their accretion history during the high-mass X-ray binary stage, the common envelope phase, and the subsequent Case BB mass transfer, and argue that the first-formed NSs have accreted at most ∼ 0.02 {M}ȯ . We investigate DNS masses, spins, and velocities, and in particular correlations between spin period, orbital period, and eccentricity. Numerous Monte Carlo simulations of the second supernova (SN) events are performed to extrapolate pre-SN stellar properties and probe the explosions. All known close-orbit DNS systems are consistent with ultra-stripped exploding stars. Although their resulting NS kicks are often small, we demonstrate a large spread in kick magnitudes that may, in general, depend on the past interaction history of the exploding star and thus correlate with the NS mass. We analyze and discuss NS kick directions based on our SN simulations. Finally, we discuss the terminal evolution of close-orbit DNS systems until they merge and possibly produce a short γ-ray burst.

  14. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D. E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu

    2013-10-10

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ☉} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ☉} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ☉} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ☉} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ∼ 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ν} ∼ 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  15. Dark matter, neutron stars, and strange quark matter.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, M Angeles; Silk, Joseph; Stone, Jirina R

    2010-10-01

    We show that self-annihilating weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter accreted onto neutron stars may provide a mechanism to seed compact objects with long-lived lumps of strange quark matter, or strangelets, for WIMP masses above a few GeV. This effect may trigger a conversion of most of the star into a strange star. We use an energy estimate for the long-lived strangelet based on the Fermi-gas model combined with the MIT bag model to set a new limit on the possible values of the WIMP mass that can be especially relevant for subdominant species of massive neutralinos.

  16. Neutron Stars and the Discovery of Pulsars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, George

    1985-01-01

    Part one recounted the story of the discovery of pulsars and examined the Crab Nebula, supernovae, and neutron stars. This part (experts from the book "Frozen Star") shows how an understanding of the nature of pulsars allowed astronomers to tie these together. (JN)

  17. Neutron Stars and the Discovery of Pulsars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, George

    1985-01-01

    Part one recounted the story of the discovery of pulsars and examined the Crab Nebula, supernovae, and neutron stars. This part (experts from the book "Frozen Star") shows how an understanding of the nature of pulsars allowed astronomers to tie these together. (JN)

  18. Rotational properties of hypermassive neutron stars from binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Takami, Kentaro; Bovard, Luke; Rezzolla, Luciano; Font, José A.; Galeazzi, Filippo; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-08-01

    Determining the differential-rotation law of compact stellar objects produced in binary neutron stars mergers or core-collapse supernovae is an old problem in relativistic astrophysics. Addressing this problem is important because it impacts directly on the maximum mass these objects can attain and, hence, on the threshold to black-hole formation under realistic conditions. Using the results from a large number of numerical simulations in full general relativity of binary neutron star mergers described with various equations of state and masses, we study the rotational properties of the resulting hypermassive neutron stars. We find that the angular-velocity distribution shows only a modest dependence on the equation of state, thus exhibiting the traits of "quasiuniversality" found in other aspects of compact stars, both isolated and in binary systems. The distributions are characterized by an almost uniformly rotating core and a "disk." Such a configuration is significantly different from the j -constant differential-rotation law that is commonly adopted in equilibrium models of differentially rotating stars. Furthermore, the rest-mass contained in such a disk can be quite large, ranging from ≃0.03 M⊙ in the case of high-mass binaries with stiff equations of state, up to ≃0.2 M⊙ for low-mass binaries with soft equations of state. We comment on the astrophysical implications of our findings and on the long-term evolutionary scenarios that can be conjectured on the basis of our simulations.

  19. The Evolution of High-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.; Hirschi, Raphael

    The evolution of stars more massive than 8 M⊙ is discussed in this chapter. On the main sequence, these stars have spectral types of B2 or earlier, but depending on their mass can evolve into red supergiants, blue supergiants, Cepheids, Wolf-Rayet stars, Of stars, or luminous blue variables before ending their evolution as core collapse supernovae and neutron stars or black holes. The chapter begins with a general discussion of the energy production in the interior of a massive star as it evolves. The main fusion reactions that generate the star's energy are listed. Some observed properties of the O and early B main-sequence stars and their evolved products are discussed including the best determinations of their masses. The computation of contemporary evolutionary tracks that include stellar rotation and magnetic fields is detailed. The equations of stellar structure including those for energy conservation, momentum transfer, mass conservation, and energy transport are listed. The discussion includes the meridional circulation in the interior of a rotating massive star and its effect on the transport of nuclear-processed material to the surface and the impact of rotation, mass loss, and metallicity on the evolutionary tracks. Recent evolutionary tracks from the Geneva group are presented. Finally the newest evolutionary tracks and the surface abundances predicted by the calculations are compared with recent observations.

  20. Local distribution of old neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frei, Szolt; Huang, Xiaolan; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1992-01-01

    The local distribution of old disk neutron stars is approximated with a 1D model, in which the steady state distribution in the direction perpendicular to the Galactic plane is calculated, assuming a variety of the initial radio pulsar positions and velocities, and various Galactic potentials. It is found that the local distribution of old neutron stars is dominated by those that were born with very low velocities. The high-velocity neutron stars spend most of their lifetime far in the Galactic halo and do not contribute much to the local density. Therefore, the rms velocity at birth is not a good indicator of the scale height of the old population. The most likely half-density scale height for the old disk neutron stars is approximately 350 pc, the same as for the old disk G, K, and M stars. If gamma-ray bursts originate on old disk neutron stars, then 350 pc should also be the scale height for the bursters.

  1. Very massive neutron stars in Ni's theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that in Ni's theory of gravity, which is identical to general relativity in the post-Newtonian limit, neutron stars of arbitrarily large mass are possible. This result is independent, within reasonable bounds, of the equation of state of matter at supernuclear densities.

  2. Probing the interior of neutron stars with gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Tsui, L K; Leung, P T

    2005-10-07

    We show here how the internal structure of a neutron star can be inferred from its gravitational wave spectrum. Under the premise that the frequencies and damping rates of a few w-mode oscillations are found, we apply an inversion scheme to determine its mass, radius, and density distribution. In addition, an accurate equation of state of nuclear matter can also be determined.

  3. Very massive neutron stars in Ni's theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that in Ni's theory of gravity, which is identical to general relativity in the post-Newtonian limit, neutron stars of arbitrarily large mass are possible. This result is independent, within reasonable bounds, of the equation of state of matter at supernuclear densities.

  4. X-ray bursts and neutron-star thermonuclear flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a model concerning the production of X-ray bursts by thermonuclear flashes in the freshly accreted matter near the surface of an accreting neutron star. An investigation is conducted regarding the physical processes relevant to such thermonuclear flashes. It is concluded that thermonuclear flashes may account for some, but not all, of the observed X-ray burst sources. Attention is given to a neutron star undergoing accretion of mass from a binary stellar companion, aspects of energetics, nuclear reactions, and heat transport mechanisms.

  5. X-ray bursts and neutron-star thermonuclear flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a model concerning the production of X-ray bursts by thermonuclear flashes in the freshly accreted matter near the surface of an accreting neutron star. An investigation is conducted regarding the physical processes relevant to such thermonuclear flashes. It is concluded that thermonuclear flashes may account for some, but not all, of the observed X-ray burst sources. Attention is given to a neutron star undergoing accretion of mass from a binary stellar companion, aspects of energetics, nuclear reactions, and heat transport mechanisms.

  6. Observations of Millisecond Variability from Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    1997-04-01

    Observations carried out over the past year by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have revealed both quasiperiodic and nearly coherent oscillations with frequencies from 300 - 1200 Hz in at least 10 low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems. The X-ray luminosity from these systems is the result of accretion of matter into the deep gravitational potential well of a neutron star. Four of these sources show nearly coherent oscillations during some thermonuclear X-ray bursts which very likely reveal the long sought millisecond spin periods of neutron stars in at least some LMXB. The millisecond timescales of the quasiperiodic oscillations (QPO) are characteristic of processes occuring in the immediate vicinity of the neutron star and provide a new means to investigate the physics of neutron stars and their environs. I will review the discovery and current understanding of these kHz QPO, as they have come to be known, and briefly discuss what their study can teach us about neutron stars.

  7. Measuring Neutron Star Radii via Pulse Profile Modeling with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Morsink, Sharon; Bauböck, Michi

    2016-11-01

    The Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer is an X-ray astrophysics payload that will be placed on the International Space Station. Its primary science goal is to measure with high accuracy the pulse profiles that arise from the non-uniform thermal surface emission of rotation-powered pulsars. Modeling general relativistic effects on the profiles will lead to measuring the radii of these neutron stars and to constraining their equation of state. Achieving this goal will depend, among other things, on accurate knowledge of the source, sky, and instrument backgrounds. We use here simple analytic estimates to quantify the level at which these backgrounds need to be known in order for the upcoming measurements to provide significant constraints on the properties of neutron stars. We show that, even in the minimal-information scenario, knowledge of the background at a few percent level for a background-to-source countrate ratio of 0.2 allows for a measurement of the neutron star compactness to better than 10% uncertainty for most of the parameter space. These constraints improve further when more realistic assumptions are made about the neutron star emission and spin, and when additional information about the source itself, such as its mass or distance, are incorporated.

  8. Optically thick envelopes around ULXs powered by accreating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Ingram, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Magnetized neutron stars power at least some ultra-luminous X-ray sources. The accretion flow in these cases is interrupted at the magnetospheric radius and then reaches the surface of a neutron star following magnetic field lines. Accreting matter moving along magnetic field lines forms the accretion envelope around the central object. We show that, in case of high mass accretion rates ≳ 1019 g s-1 the envelope becomes closed and optically thick, which influences the dynamics of the accretion flow and the observational manifestation of the neutron star hidden behind the envelope. Particularly, the optically thick accretion envelope results in a multi-color black-body spectrum originating from the magnetospheric surface. The spectrum and photon energy flux vary with the viewing angle, which gives rise to pulsations characterized by high pulsed fraction and typically smooth pulse profiles. The reprocessing of radiation due to interaction with the envelope leads to the disappearance of cyclotron scattering features from the spectrum. We speculate that the super-orbital variability of ultra-luminous X-ray sources powered by accreting neutron stars can be attributed to precession of the neutron star due to interaction of magnetic dipole with the accretion disc.

  9. Optically thick envelopes around ULXs powered by accreating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Ingram, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Magnetized neutron stars power at least some ultraluminous X-ray sources. The accretion flow in these cases is interrupted at the magnetospheric radius and then reaches the surface of a neutron star following magnetic field lines. Accreting matter moving along magnetic field lines forms the accretion envelope around the central object. We show that in case of high-mass accretion rates ≳ 1019 g s-1 the envelope becomes closed and optically thick, which influences the dynamics of the accretion flow and the observational manifestation of the neutron star hidden behind the envelope. Particularly, the optically thick accretion envelope results in a multi-colour blackbody spectrum originating from the magnetospheric surface. The spectrum and photon energy flux vary with the viewing angle, which gives rise to pulsations characterized by high pulsed fraction and typically smooth pulse profiles. The reprocessing of radiation due to interaction with the envelope leads to the disappearance of cyclotron scattering features from the spectrum. We speculate that the super-orbital variability of ultraluminous X-ray sources powered by accreting neutron stars can be attributed to precession of the neutron star due to interaction of magnetic dipole with the accretion disc.

  10. Forecasting neutron star temperatures: predictability and variability.

    PubMed

    Page, Dany; Reddy, Sanjay

    2013-12-13

    It is now possible to model thermal relaxation of neutron stars after bouts of accretion during which the star is heated out of equilibrium by nuclear reactions in its crust. Major uncertainties in these models can be encapsulated in modest variations of a handful of control parameters that change the fiducial crustal thermal conductivity, specific heat, and heating rates. Observations of thermal relaxation constrain these parameters and allow us to predict longer term variability in terms of the neutron star core temperature. We demonstrate this explicitly by modeling ongoing thermal relaxation in the neutron star XTE J1701-462. Its future cooling, over the next 5 to 30 years, is strongly constrained and depends mostly on its core temperature, uncertainties in crust physics having essentially been pinned down by fitting to the first three years of observations.

  11. Measuring neutron-star properties via gravitational waves from neutron-star mergers.

    PubMed

    Bauswein, A; Janka, H-T

    2012-01-06

    We demonstrate by a large set of merger simulations for symmetric binary neutron stars (NSs) that there is a tight correlation between the frequency peak of the postmerger gravitational-wave (GW) emission and the physical properties of the nuclear equation of state (EoS), e.g., expressed by the radius of the maximum-mass Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhoff configuration. Therefore, a single measurement of the peak frequency of the postmerger GW signal will constrain the NS EoS significantly. For optimistic merger-rate estimates a corresponding detection with Advanced LIGO is expected to happen within an operation time of roughly a year.

  12. THE FATE OF THE COMPACT REMNANT IN NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztoff; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rosswog, Stephan; Shen, Gang; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-10-10

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star–black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and advanced VIRGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of Newtonian merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the cores of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3–2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing GRBs, LIGO/Virgo observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.

  13. Ultrarelativistic electromagnetic counterpart to binary neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, Koutarou; Ioka, Kunihito; Shibata, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    We propose a possibility of ultrarelativistic electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers at nearly all the viewing angles. Our proposed mechanism relies on the merger-shock propagation accelerating a smaller mass in the outer parts of the neutron star crust to a larger Lorentz factor Γ with smaller energy ˜1047Γ-1 erg. This mechanism is difficult to resolve by current 3D numerical simulations. The outflows emit synchrotron flares for seconds to days by shocking the ambient medium. Ultrarelativistic flares shine at an early time and in high-energy bands, potentially detectable by current X-ray to radio instruments, such as Swift XRT and Pan-STARRS, and even in low ambient density ˜10-2 cm-3 by EVLA. The flares probe the merger position and time, and the merger types as black hole-neutron star outflows would be non-/mildly relativistic.

  14. Predicting neutron star properties based on chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laduke, Alison; Sammarruca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    The energy per nucleon as a function of density, known as the nuclear equation of state, is the crucial input in the structure equations of neutron stars and thus establishes the connection between nuclear physics and compact astrophysical objects. More precisely, the pressure which supports the star against gravitational collapse is mostly determined by the nature of the equation of state of highly neutron-rich matter. In this contribution, we will report on our work in progress to calculate neutron star masses and radii. The equation of state is obtained microscopically from Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations based on state-of-the-art nuclear forces which have been developed within the framework of chiral effective field theory. The latter has become popular in recent years as a fundamental and systematic approach firmly connected to low-energy quantum chromodynamics. Supported by the Hill Undergraduate Fellowship and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. r-MODE Runaway and Rapidly Rotating Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Andersson, Nils; Jones, David Ian

    2002-12-01

    We present a simple spin evolution model that predicts that rapidly rotating accreting neutron stars will mainly be confined to a narrow range of spin-frequencies; P = 1.5 - 5 ms. This is in agreement with current observations of both neutron stars in the Low-Mass X-ray Binaries and millisecond radio pulsars. The main ingredients in the model are: i) the instability of r-modes above a critical spin rate, ii) thermal runaway due to heat released as viscous damping mechanisms counteract the r-mode growth, and iii) a revised estimate of the strength of dissipation due to the presence of a viscous boundary layer at the base of the crust in an old and relatively cold neutron star...

  16. r-Process nucleosynthesis in neutron star merger disk outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Fernandez, Rodrigo; Roberts, Luke; Foucart, Francois; Kasen, Dan; Metzger, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Neutron star mergers are the most promising site of heavy element synthesis via the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process). Just before the neutron stars merge, they tidally disrupt each other, which unbinds extremely neutron-rich material where nucleosynthesis can easily reach the third r-process peak. After the merger, an accretion disk forms around the central compact object, which is either a black hole or a hypermassive neutron star (HMNS). Neutrino emissions from the disk (and HMNS if there is one) and angular momentum transport processes within the disk drive a neutron-rich outflow off the disk's surface where r-process nucleosynthesis can take place. In this work we investigate r-process nucleosynthesis in the disk outflow and we pay special attention to how the nucleosynthesis depends on the lifetime of the HMNS. Increasing the lifetime of the HMNS not only results in a significantly larger ejecta mass, but also makes the ejecta less neutron-rich thus preventing the r-process from reaching the third peak.

  17. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    DOE PAGES

    Medin, Zachary James; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.; ...

    2016-11-21

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Also, observations from X-raymore » telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Lastly, here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.« less

  18. Mass loss of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we review the properties of the winds of massive stars. We focus on OB stars, red supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and Wolf-Rayet stars. For each type of star, we summarize the main wind properties and we give a brief description of the physical mechanism(s) responsible for mass loss.

  19. Quasiparticle Interactions in Neutron Matter for Applications in Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambach, J; Ainsworth, T. L.; Pines, D.

    1993-01-01

    A microscopic model for the quasiparticle interaction in neutron matter is presented. Both-particle (pp) and particle-hole (ph) correlations are included. The pp correlations are treated in semi-empirical way, while ph correlations are incorporated by solving coupled two-body equations for particle-hole interaction and the scattering amplitude of the Fermi sphere. The resulting integral equations self-consistently sum the ph reducible diagrams. Antisymmetry is kept at all stages and hence the forward-scattering sum rules for the scattering amplitude are obeyed. Results for Landau parameters and transport coefficients in a density regime representing the crust of a neutron star are presented. We also estimate the (1)S(sub 0) gap parameter for neutron superfluidity and comment briefly on neutron-star implications.

  20. Quasiparticle Interactions in Neutron Matter for Applications in Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambach, J.; Anisworth, T. L.; Pines, D.

    1993-01-01

    A microscopic model for the quaisiparticle interaction in neutron matter is presented. Both particle-particle (pp) and particle-hole (ph) correlation are are included. The pp correlations are treated in semi-empirical way, while ph correlations are incorporated by solving coupled two-body equations for the particle hole interaction and the scattering amplitude on the Fermi sphere. The resulting integral equations self-consistently sum the ph reducible diagrams. Antisymmetry is kept at all stages and hence the forward-scattering sum rules are obeyed. Results for Landau parameters and transport coefficients in a density regime representing the crust of a neutron star are presented. We also estimate the S-1 gap parameter for neutron superfluidity and comment briefly on neutron-star implications.

  1. Multimessenger Observations of Neutron Star Mergers: Probing the Physics of High-Density Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radice, David

    2016-09-01

    Neutron star mergers are Nature's ultimate hadron colliders. They are extremely violent events resulting in gravitational-waves and electromagnetic emissions that could be detected at distances of several hundred mega-parsecs. Imprinted in these signals are important clues on the properties of high-density matter, waiting to be harnessed by us. In this talk, I will review our current knowledge of neutron star mergers from the theoretical side. I will discuss the prospects of measuring neutron star radii and masses using gravitational-wave observations of the late-inspiral of merging neutron stars. Then, I will show how multimessenger observations of the merger and post-merger evolution of merging neutron stars could be used to place further constrains on the nuclear equation of state at very high densities. Finally, I will discuss the possible role of neutron star mergers in the creation of the r-process nuclei in the Universe.

  2. DISCOVERY OF A NEUTRON STAR OSCILLATION MODE DURING A SUPERBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmayer, Tod; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2014-10-01

    Neutron stars are among the most compact objects in the universe and provide a unique laboratory for the study of cold ultra-dense matter. While asteroseismology can provide a powerful probe of the interiors of stars, for example, helioseismology has provided unprecedented insights about the interior of the Sun, comparable capabilities for neutron star seismology have not yet been achieved. Here, we report the discovery of a coherent X-ray modulation from the neutron star 4U 1636–536 during the 2001 February 22 thermonuclear superburst seen with NASA's Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) that is very likely produced by a global oscillation mode. The observed frequency is 835.6440 ± 0.0002 Hz (1.43546 times the stellar spin frequency of 582.14323 Hz) and the modulation is well described by a sinusoid (A + Bsin (φ – φ{sub 0})) with a fractional half-amplitude of B/A = 0.19 ± 0.04% (4-15 keV). The observed frequency is consistent with the expected inertial frame frequency of a rotationally modified surface g-mode, an interfacial mode in the ocean-crust interface, or perhaps an r-mode. Observing an inertial frame frequency—as opposed to a co-rotating frame frequency—appears consistent with the superburst's thermal emission arising from the entire surface of the neutron star, and the mode may become visible by perturbing the local surface temperature. We briefly discuss the implications of the mode detection for the neutron star's projected velocity and mass. Our results provide further strong evidence that global oscillation modes can produce observable modulations in the X-ray flux from neutron stars.

  3. Neutron Stars in X-ray Binaries and their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2017-09-01

    Neutron stars in X-ray binary systems are fascinating objects that display a wide range of timing and spectral phenomena in the X-rays. Not only parameters of the neutron stars, like magnetic field strength and spin period evolve in their active binary phase, the neutron stars also affect the binary systems and their immediate surroundings in many ways. Here we discuss some aspects of the interactions of the neutron stars with their environments that are revelaed from their X-ray emission. We discuss some recent developments involving the process of accretion onto high magnetic field neutron stars: accretion stream structure and formation, shape of pulse profile and its changes with accretion torque. Various recent studies of reprocessing of X-rays in the accretion disk surface, vertical structures of the accretion disk and wind of companion star are also discussed here. The X-ray pulsars among the binary neutron stars provide excellent handle to make accurate measurement of the orbital parameters and thus also evolution of the binray orbits that take place over time scale of a fraction of a million years to tens of millions of years. The orbital period evolution of X-ray binaries have shown them to be rather complex systems. Orbital evolution of X-ray binaries can also be carried out from timing of the X-ray eclipses and there have been some surprising results in that direction, including orbital period glitches in two X-ray binaries and possible detection of the most massive circum-binary planet around a Low Mass X-ray Binary.

  4. Search for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and accretion-related parameters in the ensemble of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çatmabacak, Önder; Erkut, M. Hakan; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of neutron star sources in the ensemble of low-mass X-ray binaries shows no evidence for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies and X-ray luminosity. Sources differing by orders of magnitude in luminosity can exhibit similar range of QPO frequencies. We study the possibility for the existence of a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and accretion related parameters. The parameters such as the mass accretion rate and the size of the boundary region in the innermost disk are expected to be related to X-ray luminosity. Using the up-to-date data of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, we search for a possible correlation between lower kHz QPO frequencies and mass accretion rate through the mass and radius values predicted by different equations of state for the neutron star. The range of mass accretion rate for each source can be estimated if the accretion luminosity is assumed to be represented well by the X-ray luminosity of the source. Although we find no correlation between mass accretion rate and QPO frequencies, the source distribution seems to be in accordance with a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and the parameter combining the neutron star magnetic field and the mas accretion rate. The model function we employ to descibe the correlation is able to account for the scattering of individual sources around a simple power law. The correlation argues disk-magnetosphere interaction as the origin of these millisecond oscillations.

  5. The Case of the Neutron Star With a Wayward Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    A long observation with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed important new details of a neutron star that is spewing out a wake of high-energy particles as it races through space. The deduced location of the neutron star on the edge of a supernova remnant, and the peculiar orientation of the neutron star wake, pose mysteries that remain unresolved. "Like a kite flying in the wind, the behavior of this neutron star and its wake tell us what sort of gas it must be plowing through," said Bryan Gaensler of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass., and lead author of a paper accepted to The Astrophysical Journal. "Yet we're still not sure how the neutron star got to its present location." Animation: Sequence of images of J0617 in IC 443 Animation: Sequence of images of J0617 in IC 443 The neutron star, known as CXOU J061705.3+222127, or J0617 for short, appears to lie near the outer edge of an expanding bubble of hot gas associated with the supernova remnant IC 443. Presumably, J0617 was created at the time of the supernova -- approximately 30,000 years ago -- and propelled away from the site of the explosion at about 500,000 miles per hour. However, the neutron star's wake is oriented almost perpendicularly to the direction expected if the neutron star were moving away from the center of the supernova remnant. This apparent misalignment had previously raised doubts about the association of the speeding neutron star with the supernova remnant. Gaensler and his colleagues provide strong evidence that J0617 was indeed born in the same explosion that created the supernova remnant. First, the shape of the neutron star's wake indicates it is moving a little faster than the speed of sound in Composite Images of SNR IC 443 Composite Images of SNR IC 443 the remnant's multimillion-degree gas. The velocity that one can then calculate from this conclusion closely matches the predicted pace of the neutron star. In contrast, if the neutron

  6. Neutron Stars Rip Each Other Apart to Form Black Hole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Simulation frames from this NASA Goddard neutron star merger animation: bit.ly/1jolBYY Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center This supercomputer simulation shows one of the most violent events in the universe: a pair of neutron stars colliding, merging and forming a black hole. A neutron star is the compressed core left behind when a star born with between eight and 30 times the sun's mass explodes as a supernova. Neutron stars pack about 1.5 times the mass of the sun — equivalent to about half a million Earths — into a ball just 12 miles (20 km) across. As the simulation begins, we view an unequally matched pair of neutron stars weighing 1.4 and 1.7 solar masses. They are separated by only about 11 miles, slightly less distance than their own diameters. Redder colors show regions of progressively lower density. As the stars spiral toward each other, intense tides begin to deform them, possibly cracking their crusts. Neutron stars possess incredible density, but their surfaces are comparatively thin, with densities about a million times greater than gold. Their interiors crush matter to a much greater degree densities rise by 100 million times in their centers. To begin to imagine such mind-boggling densities, consider that a cubic centimeter of neutron star matter outweighs Mount Everest. By 7 milliseconds, tidal forces overwhelm and shatter the lesser star. Its superdense contents erupt into the system and curl a spiral arm of incredibly hot material. At 13 milliseconds, the more massive star has accumulated too much mass to support it against gravity and collapses, and a new black hole is born. The black hole's event horizon — its point of no return — is shown by the gray sphere. While most of the matter from both neutron stars will fall into the black hole, some of the less dense, faster moving matter manages to orbit around it, quickly forming a large and rapidly rotating torus. This torus extends for about 124 miles (200 km) and contains the

  7. The population of highly magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. O.; Dexheimer, V.; Franzon, B.; Schramm, S.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we study the effects of strong magnetic field configurations on the population of neutron stars. The stellar matter is described within a relativistic mean field formalism which considers many-body force contributions in the scalar couplings. We choose the parametrization of the model that reproduces nuclear matter properties at saturation and also describes massive hyperon stars. Hadronic matter is modeled at zero temperature, in beta-equilibrium, charge neutral and populated by the baryonic octet, electrons and muons. Magnetic effects are taken into account in the structure of stars by the solution of the Einstein-Maxwell equations with the assumption of a poloidal magnetic field distribution. Our results show that magnetic neutron stars are populated essencialy by nucleons and leptons, due to the fact that strong magnetic fields decrease the central density of stars and, hence, supress the appearance of exotic particles.

  8. ECCENTRIC MERGERS OF BLACK HOLES WITH SPINNING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    East, William E.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pretorius, Frans

    2015-07-01

    We study dynamical capture binary black hole–neutron star (BH–NS) mergers focusing on the effects of the neutron star spin. These events may arise in dense stellar regions, such as globular clusters, where the majority of neutron stars are expected to be rapidly rotating. We initialize the BH–NS systems with positions and velocities corresponding to marginally unbound Newtonian orbits, and evolve them using general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations. We find that even moderate spins can significantly increase the amount of mass in unbound material. In some of the more extreme cases, there can be up to a third of a solar mass in unbound matter. Similarly, large amounts of tidally stripped material can remain bound and eventually accrete onto the BH—as much as a tenth of a solar mass in some cases. These simulations demonstrate that it is important to treat neutron star spin in order to make reliable predictions of the gravitational wave and electromagnetic transient signals accompanying these sources.

  9. The spectra of weakly magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Albert; Taam, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The continuum spectrum of a rotating equatorial emitting region on the surface of an accreting neutron star is investigated within the Schwarzschild spacetime. It is found that the dominant general relativistic effect is the increase in apparent emission area from the neutron star surface due to gravitational light bending. For typical neutron star parameters, the apparent area of the accretion belt is remarkably independent of the viewing angle and, hence, the contribution for a boundary layer to the total X-ray luminosity is found to depend only weakly on the inclination angle of the binary system. For a blackbody spectrum in the local rest frame of the emitting surface, the distortion of the spectral shape by longitudinal and transverse Doppler shifts is minimal for neutron stars rotating at periods greater than about 2 ms. It is shown that the failure to detect a blackbody component from the weakly magnetized neutron star surface in some X-ray burst sources during their quiescent state may be related to the presence of temperature variations along the vertical extent of the boundary layer.

  10. Truncation of the Accretion Disk at One-third of the Eddington Limit in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Aquila X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlam, R. M.; Miller, J. M.; Degenaar, N.; Sanna, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Altamirano, D.; King, A. L.

    2017-10-01

    We perform a reflection study on a new observation of the neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Aquila X-1 taken with NuSTAR during the 2016 August outburst and compare with the 2014 July outburst. The source was captured at ∼32% L Edd, which is over four times more luminous than the previous observation during the 2014 outburst. Both observations exhibit a broadened Fe line profile. Through reflection modeling, we determine that the inner disk is truncated {R}{in,2016}={11}-1+2 {R}g (where R g = GM/c 2) and {R}{in,2014}=14+/- 2 {R}g (errors quoted at the 90% confidence level). Fiducial NS parameters (M NS = 1.4 M ⊙, R NS = 10 km) give a stellar radius of R NS = 4.85 R g ; our measurements rule out a disk extending to that radius at more than the 6σ level of confidence. We are able to place an upper limit on the magnetic field strength of B ≤ 3.0–4.5 × 109 G at the magnetic poles, assuming that the disk is truncated at the magnetospheric radius in each case. This is consistent with previous estimates of the magnetic field strength for Aquila X-1. However, if the magnetosphere is not responsible for truncating the disk prior to the NS surface, we estimate a boundary layer with a maximum extent of {R}{BL,2016}∼ 10 {R}g and {R}{BL,2014}∼ 6 {R}g. Additionally, we compare the magnetic field strength inferred from the Fe line profile of Aquila X-1 and other NS low-mass X-ray binaries to known accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars.

  11. Parameters of rotating neutron stars with and without hyperons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejger, M.

    2013-04-01

    Context. The discovery of a 2 M⊙ neutron star provided a robust constraint for the theory of exotic dense matter, bringing into question the existence of strange baryons in the interiors of neutron stars. Although many theories fail to reproduce this observational result, several equations of state containing hyperons are consistent with it. Aims: We study global properties of stars using equations of state containing hyperons, and compare them to those without hyperons to find similarities, differences, and limits that can be compared with the astrophysical observations. Methods: Rotating, axisymmetric, and stationary stellar configurations in general relativity are obtained, and their global parameters are studied. Results: Approximate formulæ describing the behavior of the maximum and minimum stellar mass, compactness, surface redshifts, and moments of inertia as functions of spin frequency are provided. We also study the thin disk accretion and compare the spin-up evolution of stars with different moments of inertia.

  12. Outflows from neutron star merger remnant disks: nucleosynthesis and kilonovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Foucart, Francois; Metzger, Brian; Kasen, Daniel; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-03-01

    The accretion disk formed in a neutron star merger can drive powerful winds on timescales of 100ms to seconds after coalescence. The wind material is more strongly irradiated by neutrinos than the dynamical ejecta, and hence has a less neutron-rich composition, with implications for r-process element synthesis and the radioactively-powered kilonova transient. This talk will present preliminary results from projects aimed at quantifying (1) the nucleosynthesis yield from disks around hypermassive neutron stars, (2) the effect of MHD turbulence on mass ejection when a black hole sits at the center, and (3) the interaction between disk wind and dynamical ejecta when the relative masses of these components vary.

  13. Upper Limits on the Rates of Binary Neutron Star and Neutron Star-Black Hole Mergers from Advanced LIGO’s First Observing Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio., M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report here the non-detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary-neutron star systems and neutron star-black hole systems during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). In particular, we searched for gravitational-wave signals from binary-neutron star systems with component masses \\in [1,3] {M}⊙ and component dimensionless spins <0.05. We also searched for neutron star-black hole systems with the same neutron star parameters, black hole mass \\in [2,99] {M}⊙ , and no restriction on the black hole spin magnitude. We assess the sensitivity of the two LIGO detectors to these systems and find that they could have detected the merger of binary-neutron star systems with component mass distributions of 1.35 ± 0.13 M ⊙ at a volume-weighted average distance of ˜70 Mpc, and for neutron star-black hole systems with neutron star masses of 1.4 M ⊙ and black hole masses of at least 5 M ⊙, a volume-weighted average distance of at least ˜110 Mpc. From this we constrain with 90% confidence the merger rate to be less than 12,600 Gpc-3 yr-1 for binary-neutron star systems and less than 3600 Gpc-3 yr-1 for neutron star-black hole systems. We discuss the astrophysical implications of these results, which we find to be in conflict with only the most optimistic predictions. However, we find that if no detection of neutron star-binary mergers is made in the next two Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observing runs we would place significant constraints on the merger rates. Finally, assuming a rate of {10}-7+20 Gpc-3 yr-1, short gamma-ray bursts beamed toward the Earth, and assuming that all short gamma-ray bursts have binary-neutron star (neutron star-black hole) progenitors, we can use our 90% confidence rate upper limits to constrain the beaming angle of the gamma-ray burst to be greater than 2\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {3}-1.1+1.7 (4\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {3}-1.9+3.1).

  14. Further stable neutron star models from f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Capozziello, Salvatore; Odintsov, Sergei D. E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it

    2013-12-01

    Neutron star models in perturbative f(R) gravity are considered with realistic equations of state. In particular, we consider the FPS, SLy and other equations of state and a case of piecewise equation of state for stars with quark cores. The mass-radius relations for f(R) = R+R(e{sup −R/R{sub 0}}−1) model and for R{sup 2} models with logarithmic and cubic corrections are obtained. In the case of R{sup 2} gravity with cubic corrections, we obtain that at high central densities (ρ > 10ρ{sub ns}, where ρ{sub ns} = 2.7 × 10{sup 14} g/cm{sup 3} is the nuclear saturation density), stable star configurations exist. The minimal radius of such stars is close to 9 km with maximal mass ∼ 1.9M{sub ⊙} (SLy equation). A similar situation takes place for AP4 and BSK20 EoS. Such an effect can give rise to more compact stars than in General Relativity. If observationally identified, such objects could constitute a formidable signature for modified gravity at astrophysical level. Another interesting result can be achieved in modified gravity with only a cubic correction. For some EoS, the upper limit of neutron star mass increases and therefore these EoS can describe realistic star configurations (although, in General Relativity, these EoS are excluded by observational constraints)

  15. Evolutions of magnetized and rotating neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Liebling, Steven L.; Lehner, Luis; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2010-06-15

    We study the evolution of magnetized and rigidly rotating neutron stars within a fully general relativistic implementation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics with no assumed symmetries in three spatial dimensions. The stars are modeled as rotating, magnetized polytropic stars, and we examine diverse scenarios to study their dynamics and stability properties. In particular, we concentrate on the stability of the stars and possible critical behavior. In addition to their intrinsic physical significance, we use these evolutions as further tests of our implementation, which incorporates new developments to handle magnetized systems.

  16. Can Stellar Mass Black Holes BE Quark Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Cheng, K. S.; Kovács, Zoltán

    We investigate the possibility that stellar mass black holes, with masses in the range of 3:8M⊙ and 6M⊙, respectively, could be in fact quark stars in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase. Depending on the value of the gap parameter, rapidly rotating CFL quark stars can achieve much higher masses than standard neutron stars, thus making them possible stellar mass black hole candidates. Moreover, quark stars have a very low luminosity and a completely absorbing surface - the infalling matter on the surface of the quark star is converted into quark matter. A possibility of distinguishing CFL quark stars from stellar mass black holes could be through the study of thin accretion disks around rapidly rotating quark stars and Kerr type black holes, respectively. Strange stars exhibit a low luminosity, but high temperature bremsstrahlung spectrum, which, in combination with the emission properties of the accretion disk, may be the key signature to differentiate massive strange stars from black hole.

  17. Transient phenomena from accreting magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, Dmitry

    In this contribution, I will review the recent progress in the research of accreting magnetized neutron stars (observed as X-ray pulsars) based on the study of their variability on different time scales. Specifically, I will focus on the properties of the X-ray emitting region. In recent years, the high-quality observational data accumulated with the new generation of X-ray observatories have triggered a renewed interest in these systems. The new studies are primarily focused on the detailed structure of the two physical regions of the objects: (i) the emitting area above the polar caps of the neutron star and (ii) the magnetospheric boundary, where the infalling matter couples to the accretoŕs magnetic field. The modulation of the matter supply from the binary companion as well as the instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the transient character of the majority of X-ray pulsars. The observations show that the "persistent" pulsars also exhibit numerous types of variabilities over a broad range of time scales (off-states, pulse-to-pulse variability, switches of spectral states, alternation of the pulsar's spin-up/spin-down episodes etc.). Of particular importance are the observed variations of the cyclotron absorption features (cyclotron lines), whose centroid energies are directly proportional to the magnetic field strength at the site of the line formation. The detailed studies of these variabilities have lead to the development of new theoretical models describing the physics in the emitting region and at the magnetospheric boundary. It has been proposed that the configuration and geometry of the two areas may change abruptly when the mass accretion rate reaches certain critical values. Such changes cause transitions between different accretion modes. A particular mode is expected to be characterized by certain variability patterns and can thus be inferred from the observations. I will describe these recent observations and the models which are aimed at

  18. Neutrino flavor evolution in neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, James Y.; Patwardhan, Amol V.; Fuller, George M.

    2017-08-01

    We examine the flavor evolution of neutrinos emitted from the disklike remnant (hereafter called "neutrino disk") of a binary neutron star (BNS) merger. We specifically follow the neutrinos emitted from the center of the disk, along the polar axis perpendicular to the equatorial plane. We carried out two-flavor simulations using a variety of different possible initial neutrino luminosities and energy spectra and, for comparison, three-flavor simulations in specific cases. In all simulations, the normal neutrino mass hierarchy was used. The flavor evolution was found to be highly dependent on the initial neutrino luminosities and energy spectra; in particular, we found two broad classes of results depending on the sign of the initial net electron neutrino lepton number (i.e., the number of neutrinos minus the number of antineutrinos). In the antineutrino-dominated case, we found that the matter-neutrino resonance effect dominates, consistent with previous results, whereas in the neutrino-dominated case, a bipolar spectral swap develops. The neutrino-dominated conditions required for this latter result have been realized, e.g., in a BNS merger simulation that employs the "DD2" equation of state for neutron star matter [Phys. Rev. D 93, 044019 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.044019]. For this case, in addition to the swap at low energies, a collective Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein mechanism generates a high-energy electron neutrino tail. The enhanced population of high-energy electron neutrinos in this scenario could have implications for the prospects of r -process nucleosynthesis in the material ejected outside the plane of the neutrino disk.

  19. The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Gendreau, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an approved NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity dedicated to the study of the extraordinary gravitational, electromagnetic, and nuclear-physics environments embodied by neutron stars. Scheduled to be launched in 2016 as an International Space Station payload, NICER will explore the exotic states of matter, using rotation-resolved spectroscopy of the thermal and non-thermal emissions of neutron stars in the soft (0.2-12 keV) X-ray band. Grazing-incidence "concentrator" optics coupled with silicon drift detectors, actively pointed for a full hemisphere of sky coverage, will provide photon-counting spectroscopy and timing registered to GPS time and position, with high throughput and relatively low background. The NICER project plans to implement a Guest Observer Program, which includes competitively selected user targets after the first year of flight operations. I will describe NICER and discuss ideas for potential Be/X-ray binary science.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Coalescing binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1999-06-01

    Coalescing compact binaries with neutron star or black hole components provide the most promising sources of gravitational radiation for detection by the LIGO/VIRGO/GEO/TAMA laser interferometers now under construction. This fact has motivated several different theoretical studies of the inspiral and hydrodynamic merging of compact binaries. Analytic analyses of the inspiral waveforms have been performed in the post-Newtonian approximation. Analytic and numerical treatments of the coalescence waveforms from binary neutron stars have been performed using Newtonian hydrodynamics and the quadrupole radiation approximation. Numerical simulations of coalescing black hole and neutron star binaries are also underway in full general relativity. Recent results from each of these approaches will be described and their virtues and limitations summarized.

  1. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  2. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  3. Magnetic field evolution in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, F.; Reisenegger, A.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    Neutron stars contain the strongest magnetic fields known in the Universe. Using numerical simulations restricted to axially symmetric geometry, we study the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the interior of an isolated neutron star under the effect of ambipolar diffusion, i.e. the drift of the magnetic field and the charged particles relative to the neutrons. We model the stellar interior as an electrically neutral fluid composed of neutrons, protons and electrons; these species can be converted into each other by weak interactions (beta decays), suffer binary collisions, and be affected by each other's macroscopic electromagnetic fields. We show that, in the restricted case of pure ambipolar diffusion, neglecting weak interactions, the magnetic fields evolves towards a stable MHD equilibria configuration, in the timescales analytically expected.

  4. Neutron stars as type-I superconductors.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Kirk B W; Metlitski, Max A; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R

    2004-04-16

    In a recent paper by Link, it was pointed out that the standard picture of the neutron star core composed of a mixture of a neutron superfluid and a proton type-II superconductor is inconsistent with observations of a long period precession in isolated pulsars. In the following we will show that an appropriate treatment of the interacting two-component superfluid (made of neutron and proton Cooper pairs), when the structure of proton vortices is strongly modified, may dramatically change the standard picture, resulting in a type-I superconductor. In this case the magnetic field is expelled from the superconducting regions of the neutron star, leading to the formation of the intermediate state when alternating domains of superconducting matter and normal matter coexist.

  5. Towards a metallurgy of neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Kobyakov, D; Pethick, C J

    2014-03-21

    In the standard picture of the crust of a neutron star, matter there is simple: a body-centered-cubic lattice of nuclei immersed in an essentially uniform electron gas. We show that, at densities above that for neutron drip (∼ 4 × 1 0(11)  g cm(-3) or roughly one-thousandth of nuclear matter density), the interstitial neutrons give rise to an attractive interaction between nuclei that renders the lattice unstable. We argue that the likely equilibrium structure is similar to that in displacive ferroelectric materials such as BaTiO3. As a consequence, the properties of matter in the inner crust are expected to be much richer than previously appreciated, and we mention possible consequences for observable neutron star properties.

  6. Relativistic tidal properties of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Nagar, Alessandro

    2009-10-15

    We study the various linear responses of neutron stars to external relativistic tidal fields. We focus on three different tidal responses, associated to three different tidal coefficients: (i) a gravito-electric-type coefficient G{mu}{sub l}=[length]{sup 2l+1} measuring the lth-order mass multipolar moment GM{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}} induced in a star by an external lth-order gravito-electric tidal field G{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}}; (ii) a gravito-magnetic-type coefficient G{sigma}{sub l}=[length]{sup 2l+1} measuring the lth spin multipole moment GS{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}} induced in a star by an external lth-order gravito-magnetic tidal field H{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}}; and (iii) a dimensionless 'shape' Love number h{sub l} measuring the distortion of the shape of the surface of a star by an external lth-order gravito-electric tidal field. All the dimensionless tidal coefficients G{mu}{sub l}/R{sup 2l+1}, G{sigma}{sub l}/R{sup 2l+1}, and h{sub l} (where R is the radius of the star) are found to have a strong sensitivity to the value of the star's 'compactness'c{identical_to}GM/(c{sub 0}{sup 2}R) (where we indicate by c{sub 0} the speed of light). In particular, G{mu}{sub l}/R{sup 2l+1}{approx}k{sub l} is found to strongly decrease, as c increases, down to a zero value as c is formally extended to the 'black hole (BH) limit'c{sup BH}=1/2. The shape Love number h{sub l} is also found to significantly decrease as c increases, though it does not vanish in the formal limit c{yields}c{sup BH}, but is rather found to agree with the recently determined shape Love numbers of black holes. The formal vanishing of {mu}{sub l} and {sigma}{sub l} as c{yields}c{sup BH} is a consequence of the no-hair properties of black holes. This vanishing suggests, but in no way proves, that the effective action describing the gravitational interactions of black holes may not need to be augmented by nonminimal worldline couplings.

  7. Spin paramagnetic deformation of a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Melatos, A.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum mechanical corrections to the hydromagnetic force balance equation, derived from the microscopic Schrödinger-Pauli theory of quantum plasmas, modify the equilibrium structure and hence the mass quadrupole moment of a neutron star. It is shown here that the dominant effect - spin paramagnetism - is most significant in a magnetar, where one typically has μ _B|B|≳ k_B T_e, where μB is the Bohr magneton, B is the magnetic field, and Te is the electron temperature. The spin paramagnetic deformation of a non-barotropic magnetar with a linked poloidal-toroidal magnetic field is calculated to be up to ˜10 times greater than the deformation caused solely by the Lorentz force. It depends on the degree of Pauli blocking by conduction electrons and the propensity to form magnetic domains, processes which are incompletely modelled at magnetar field strengths. The star becomes more oblate, as the toroidal field component strengthens. The result implies that existing classical predictions underestimate the maximum strength of the gravitational wave signal from rapidly spinning magnetars at birth. Turning the argument around, future gravitational-wave upper limits of increasing sensitivity will place ever-stricter constraints on the physics of Pauli blocking and magnetic domain formation under magnetar conditions.

  8. Physics in Strong Magnetic Fields Near Neutron Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the behaviors of particles and energies in the magnetic fields of neutron stars. Different types of possible research using neutron stars as a laboratory for the study of strong magnetic fields are proposed. (CW)

  9. Physics in Strong Magnetic Fields Near Neutron Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the behaviors of particles and energies in the magnetic fields of neutron stars. Different types of possible research using neutron stars as a laboratory for the study of strong magnetic fields are proposed. (CW)

  10. Neutron stars. [quantum mechanical processes associated with magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical processes associated with the presence of high magnetic fields and the effect of such fields on the evolution of neutron stars are reviewed. A technical description of the interior of a neutron star is presented. The neutron star-pulsar relation is reviewed and consideration is given to supernovae explosions, flux conservation in neutron stars, gauge-invariant derivation of the equation of state for a strongly magnetized gas, neutron beta-decay, and the stability condition for a neutron star.

  11. Disruption of light He companions in accreting neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, M. A.; Shaham, J.

    1985-02-01

    An old neutron star, being spun up to become a radio pulsar by accretion from a very low-mass He secondary, will ultimately tidally disrupt the secondary before the latter's mass reaches 4×10-3M_sun;. Even if angular momentum loss from the binary is carried away only by gravitational radiation, the formation of an isolated, rapidly spinning pulsar in this way will take less than 1010yr.

  12. Perspectives on the Equation of State in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James M.

    The assumption that neutron stars have hadronic crusts, when coupled with the assumptions of causality and that GR is the correct theory of gravity, places interesting constraints on their structural properties, including the maximum mass and their typical radii, moments of inertia and binding energies. With additional recent results from nuclear experiment and from theoretical studies of neutron matter, further limitations are possible. The implications of recent and forthcoming mass, radii and moment of inertia estimates from pulsar, X-ray and gravitational wave astronomy will be discussed.

  13. An instability in neutron stars at birth.

    PubMed

    Burrows, A; Fryxell, B A

    1992-10-16

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supemova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this "convective" instability is pivotal to the supemova mechanism, pulsar magnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  14. An instability in neutron stars at birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Adam; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supernova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this 'convective' instability is pivotal to the supernova mechanism, pulsar nagnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  15. An instability in neutron stars at birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Adam; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supernova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this 'convective' instability is pivotal to the supernova mechanism, pulsar nagnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  16. Chandra Observations of Neutron Stars: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Karovska, M.; Pavlov, G. G.; Zavlin, V. E.; Clarke, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    We present a brief review of Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of neutron stars. The outstanding spatial and spectral resolution of this great observatory have allowed for observations of unprecedented clarity and accuracy. Many of these observations have provided new insights into neutron star physics. We present an admittedly biased and overly brief overview of these observations, highlighting some new discoveries made possible by the Observatory's unique capabilities. We also include our analysis of recent multiwavelength observations of the putative pulsar and its pulsar-wind nebula in the IC 443 SNR.

  17. ASTROPHYSICS: Neutron Stars Imply Relativity's a Drag.

    PubMed

    Schilling, G

    2000-09-01

    A new finding, based on x-rays from distant neutron stars, could be the first clear evidence of a weird relativistic effect called frame dragging, in which a heavy chunk of spinning matter wrenches the space-time around it like an eggbeater. Using data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, three astronomers in Amsterdam found circumstantial evidence for frame dragging in the flickering of three neutron stars in binary systems. They announced their results in the 1 September issue of The Astrophysical Journal.

  18. Early neutron stars and quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You-Chen; Kong, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Cheng-Wen; Ge, Yun-Zhao

    1988-03-01

    The existence of quark matter (QM) in hot early neutron stars is considered theoretically, using the method of Baym and Chin (1976) to calculate the pressure and density at the phase transition between neutron and quark matter for various temperatures. The results are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. It is found that QM cores can exist whenever the temperature exceeds 10 to the 10th K, and that their radii increase with decreasing QM bag constant. The total energy emitted by a star during cooling is estimated as 10 to the 53rd erg, assuming conservation of baryon number.

  19. Probing the internal composition of neutron stars with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Yagi, Kent; Klein, Antoine; Cornish, Neil; Yunes, Nicolás

    2015-11-01

    Gravitational waves from neutron star binary inspirals contain information about the as yet unknown equation of state of supranuclear matter. In the absence of definitive experimental evidence that determines the correct equation of state, a number of diverse models that give the pressure inside a neutron star as function of its density have been constructed by nuclear physicists. These models differ not only in the approximations and techniques they employ to solve the many-body Schrödinger equation, but also in the internal neutron star composition they assume. We study whether gravitational wave observations of neutron star binaries in quasicircular inspirals up to contact will allow us to distinguish between equations of state of differing internal composition, thereby providing important information about the properties and behavior of extremely high density matter. We carry out a Bayesian model selection analysis, and find that second generation gravitational wave detectors can heavily constrain equations of state that contain only quark matter, but hybrid stars containing both normal and quark matter are typically harder to distinguish from normal matter stars. A gravitational wave detection with a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 and masses around 1.4 M⊙ would provide indications of the existence or absence of strange quark stars, while a signal-to-noise ratio 30 detection could either detect or rule out strange quark stars with a 20 to 1 confidence. The presence of kaon condensates or hyperons in neutron star inner cores cannot be easily confirmed. For example, for the equations of state studied in this paper, even a gravitational wave signal with a signal-to-noise ratio as high as 60 would not allow us to claim a detection of kaon condensates or hyperons with confidence greater than 5 to 1. On the other hand, if kaon condensates and hyperons do not form in neutron stars, a gravitational wave signal with similar signal-to-noise ratio would be able to

  20. Neutron Star Cooling with Various Superfluid and Superconducting States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Tsuneo; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Matsuo, Yasuhide; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    A neutron star is a highly dense object which lasts after a supernova explosion. The density of a neutron star overcomes the nuclear density, and the temperature is high at the beginning of its history. An isolated neutron star does not have any heat sources, and it cools down emitting thermal energy by neutrinos. The neutrino emission process depends on the state of interior matter of the neutron star. To compare theoretical simulations and observations of neutron stars, it can constrain the nuclear theory of high density region. We create a model of neutron stars with colour superconducting quark matter and nucleon superfluidity/superconductivity, to satisfy recent observations, including two 2M ⊙ neutron stars. We parameterize these super-states and demonstrate the cooling curves, which show heavy stars do not always cool faster than lighter stars.

  1. Can neutron stars have auroras ? : electromagnetic coupling process between neutron star and magnetized accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.; Iwakiri, W. B.; Enoto, T.; Wada, T.; Tao, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the binary neutron star system, angular momentum transfer from accretion disk to a star is essential process for spin-up/down of stars. The angular momentum transfer has been well formulated for the accretion disk strongly magnetized by the neutron star [e.g., Ghosh and Lamb, 1978, 1979a, b]. However, the electromagnetic (EM) coupling between the neutron star and accretion disk has not been self-consistently solved in the previous studies although the magnetic field lines from the star are strongly tied with the accretion disk. In this study, we applied the planet-magnetosphere coupling process established for Jupiter [Hill, 1979] to the binary neutron star system. Angular momentum distribution is solved based on the torque balance between the neutron star's surface and accretion disk coupled by the magnetic field tensions. We found the EM coupling can transfer significantly larger fraction of the angular momentum from the magnetized accretion disk to the star than the unmagnetized case. The resultant spin-up rate is estimated to ~10^-14 [sec/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters, which is comparable with or larger than the other common spin-down/up processes: e.g., the magnetic dipole radiation spin-down. The Joule heating energy dissipated in the EM coupling is estimated to be up to ~10^36 [erg/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters. The release is comparable to that of gravitation energy directly caused by the matters accreting onto the neutron star. This suggests the EM coupling at the neutron star can accompany the observable radiation as auroras with a similar manner to those at the rotating planetary magnetospheres like Jupiter, Saturn, and other gas giants.

  2. Gravitational wave background from rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2012-11-01

    The background of gravitational waves produced by the ensemble of rotating neutron stars (which includes pulsars, magnetars, and gravitars) is investigated. A formula for Ω(f) (a function that is commonly used to quantify the background, and is directly related to its energy density) is derived, without making the usual assumption that each radiating system evolves on a short time scale compared to the Hubble time; the time evolution of the systems since their formation until the present day is properly taken into account. Moreover, the formula allows one to distinguish the different parts of the background: the unresolvable (which forms a stochastic background or confusion noise, since the waveforms composing it cannot be either individually observed or subtracted out of the data of a detector) and the resolvable. Several estimations of the background are obtained, for different assumptions on the parameters that characterize neutron stars and their population. In particular, different initial spin period distributions lead to very different results. For one of the models, with slow initial spins, the detection of the background by present or planned detectors can be rejected. However, other models do predict the detection of the background, that would be unresolvable, by the future ground-based gravitational wave detector ET. A robust upper limit for the background of rotating neutron stars is obtained; it does not exceed the detection threshold of two cross-correlated Advanced LIGO interferometers. If gravitars exist and constitute more than a few percent of the neutron star population, then they produce an unresolvable background that could be detected by ET. Under the most reasonable assumptions on the parameters characterizing a neutron star, the background is too faint to be detected. Previous papers have suggested neutron star models in which large magnetic fields (like the ones that characterize magnetars) induce big deformations in the star, which

  3. Eclipsing Binary B-Star Mass Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Amanda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    B-stars in binary pairs provide a laboratory for key astrophysical measurements of massive stars, including key insights for the formation of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes). In their paper, Martayan et al (2004) find 23 Be binary star pairs in NGC2004 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, five of which are both eclipsing and spectroscopic binaries with archival data from VLT-Giraffe and photometric data from MACHO. By using the Wilson eclipsing binary code (e.g., Wilson, 1971), we can determine preliminary stellar masses of the binary components. We present the first results from this analysis. This study also serves as proof-of-concept for future observations with the Photonic Synthesis Telescope Array (Eikenberry et al., in prep) that we are currently building for low-cost, precision spectroscopic observations. With higher resolution and dedicated time for observations, we can follow-up observations of these Be stars as well as Be/X-ray binaries, for improved mass measurements of neutron stars and black holes and better constraints on their origin/formation.

  4. Neutron Stars Rip Each Other Apart to Form Black Hole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    This supercomputer simulation shows one of the most violent events in the universe: a pair of neutron stars colliding, merging and forming a black hole. A neutron star is the compressed core left behind when a star born with between eight and 30 times the sun's mass explodes as a supernova. Neutron stars pack about 1.5 times the mass of the sun — equivalent to about half a million Earths — into a ball just 12 miles (20 km) across. As the simulation begins, we view an unequally matched pair of neutron stars weighing 1.4 and 1.7 solar masses. They are separated by only about 11 miles, slightly less distance than their own diameters. Redder colors show regions of progressively lower density. As the stars spiral toward each other, intense tides begin to deform them, possibly cracking their crusts. Neutron stars possess incredible density, but their surfaces are comparatively thin, with densities about a million times greater than gold. Their interiors crush matter to a much greater degree densities rise by 100 million times in their centers. To begin to imagine such mind-boggling densities, consider that a cubic centimeter of neutron star matter outweighs Mount Everest. By 7 milliseconds, tidal forces overwhelm and shatter the lesser star. Its superdense contents erupt into the system and curl a spiral arm of incredibly hot material. At 13 milliseconds, the more massive star has accumulated too much mass to support it against gravity and collapses, and a new black hole is born. The black hole's event horizon — its point of no return — is shown by the gray sphere. While most of the matter from both neutron stars will fall into the black hole, some of the less dense, faster moving matter manages to orbit around it, quickly forming a large and rapidly rotating torus. This torus extends for about 124 miles (200 km) and contains the equivalent of 1/5th the mass of our sun. Scientists think neutron star mergers like this produce short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Short

  5. Exceptional Stars Origins, Companions, Masses and Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hansen, Bradley M. S.; Phinney, Sterl; vanKerkwijk, Martin H.; Vasisht, Gautam

    2004-01-01

    As SIM Interdisciplinary Scientist, we will study the formation, nature and planetary companions of the exotic endpoints of stellar evolution. Our science begins with stars evolving from asymptotic branch giants into white dwarfs. We will determine the parallax and orbital inclination of several iron-deficient post-AGB stars, who peculiar abundances and infrared excesses are evidence that they are accreting gas depleted of dust from a circumbinary disk. Measurement of the orbital inclination, companion mass arid parallax will provide critical constraints. One of these stars is a prime candidate for trying nulling observations, which should reveal light reflected from both the circumbinary and Roche disks. The circumbinary disks seem favorable sites for planet formation. Next, we will search for planets around white dwarfs, both survivors froni the main-sequence stage, and ones newly formed from the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or in white dwarf mergers. Moving up in mass, we will measure the orbital reflex of OB/Be companions to pulsars, determine natal kicks and presupernova orbits, and expand the sample of well-determined neutron star masses. We will obtain the parallax of a transient X-ray binary, whose quiescent emission may be thermal emission from the neutron star, aiming for precise measurement of the neutron star radius. Finally, black holes. We will measure the reflex motions of the companion of what appear to be the most massive stellar black holes. The visual orbits will determine natal kicks, and test the assumptions underlying mass estimates made from the radial velocity curves, projected rotation, and ellipsoidal variations. In addition, we will attempt to observe the visual orbit of SS 433, as well as the proper motion of the emission line clumps in its relativistic jets. Additional information is included in the original document.

  6. Exceptional Stars Origins, Companions, Masses and Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hansen, Bradley M. S.; Phinney, Sterl; vanKerkwijk, Martin H.; Vasisht, Gautam

    2004-01-01

    As SIM Interdisciplinary Scientist, we will study the formation, nature and planetary companions of the exotic endpoints of stellar evolution. Our science begins with stars evolving from asymptotic branch giants into white dwarfs. We will determine the parallax and orbital inclination of several iron-deficient post-AGB stars, who peculiar abundances and infrared excesses are evidence that they are accreting gas depleted of dust from a circumbinary disk. Measurement of the orbital inclination, companion mass arid parallax will provide critical constraints. One of these stars is a prime candidate for trying nulling observations, which should reveal light reflected from both the circumbinary and Roche disks. The circumbinary disks seem favorable sites for planet formation. Next, we will search for planets around white dwarfs, both survivors froni the main-sequence stage, and ones newly formed from the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or in white dwarf mergers. Moving up in mass, we will measure the orbital reflex of OB/Be companions to pulsars, determine natal kicks and presupernova orbits, and expand the sample of well-determined neutron star masses. We will obtain the parallax of a transient X-ray binary, whose quiescent emission may be thermal emission from the neutron star, aiming for precise measurement of the neutron star radius. Finally, black holes. We will measure the reflex motions of the companion of what appear to be the most massive stellar black holes. The visual orbits will determine natal kicks, and test the assumptions underlying mass estimates made from the radial velocity curves, projected rotation, and ellipsoidal variations. In addition, we will attempt to observe the visual orbit of SS 433, as well as the proper motion of the emission line clumps in its relativistic jets. Additional information is included in the original document.

  7. Neutron stars: A cosmic hadron physics laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, David

    1989-01-01

    A progress report is given on neutron stars as a cosmic hadron physics laboratory. Particular attention is paid to the crustal neutron superfluid, and to the information concerning its properties which may be deduced from observations of pulsar glitches and postglitch behavior. Current observational evidence concerning the softness or stiffness of the high density neutron matter equation of state is reviewed briefly, and the (revolutionary) implications of a confirmation of the existence of a 0.5 ms pulsar at the core of (Supernova) SN1987A are discussed.

  8. Neutron stars - A cosmic hadron physics laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, David

    1989-01-01

    A progress report is given on neutron stars as a cosmic hadron physics laboratory. Particular attention is paid to the crustal neutron superfluid, and to the information concerning its properties which may be deduced from observations of pulsar glitches and postglitch behavior. Current observational evidence concerning the softness or stiffness of the high density neutron matter equation of state is reviewed briefly, and the (revolutionary) implications of a confirmation of the existence of a 0.5 ms pulsar at the core of (Supernova) SN1987A are discussed.

  9. Constraining Neutron Star Matter with Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Fraga, Eduardo S.; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, there have been several successful attempts to constrain the equation of state of neutron star matter using input from low-energy nuclear physics and observational data. We demonstrate that significant further restrictions can be placed by additionally requiring the pressure to approach that of deconfined quark matter at high densities. Remarkably, the new constraints turn out to be highly insensitive to the amount—or even presence—of quark matter inside the stars.

  10. Constraining neutron star matter with quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Fraga, Eduardo S.; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2014-07-10

    In recent years, there have been several successful attempts to constrain the equation of state of neutron star matter using input from low-energy nuclear physics and observational data. We demonstrate that significant further restrictions can be placed by additionally requiring the pressure to approach that of deconfined quark matter at high densities. Remarkably, the new constraints turn out to be highly insensitive to the amount—or even presence—of quark matter inside the stars.

  11. PULSE PROFILES FROM THERMALLY EMITTING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Turolla, R.; Nobili, L.

    2013-05-10

    The problem of computing the pulse profiles from thermally emitting spots on the surface of a neutron star in general relativity is reconsidered. We show that it is possible to extend Beloborodov's approach to include (multiple) spots of finite size in different positions on the star surface. The results for the pulse profiles are expressed by comparatively simple analytical formulae which involve only elementary functions.

  12. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Chia - Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of approx. 8 R(sub G), which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L(sub Edd) approx. 0.4-0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  13. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of ˜8 R G, which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L Edd ˜ 0.4-0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  14. SPIN-PRECESSION: BREAKING THE BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR DEGENERACY

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Cornish, Neil; Klein, Antoine; Yunes, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Mergers of compact stellar remnants are prime targets for the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave detectors. The gravitational wave signals from these merger events can be used to study the mass and spin distribution of stellar remnants, and provide information about black hole horizons and the material properties of neutron stars. However, it has been suggested that degeneracies in the way that the star's mass and spin are imprinted in the waveforms may make it impossible to distinguish between black holes and neutron stars. Here we show that the precession of the orbital plane due to spin-orbit coupling breaks the mass-spin degeneracy, and allows us to distinguish between standard neutron stars and alternative possibilities, such as black holes or exotic neutron stars with large masses and spins.

  15. Extreme neutron stars from Extended Theories of Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Capozziello, Salvatore; Odintsov, Sergei D. E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it

    2015-01-01

    We discuss neutron stars with strong magnetic mean fields in the framework of Extended Theories of Gravity. In particular, we take into account models derived from f(R) and f(G) extensions of General Relativity where functions of the Ricci curvature invariant R and the Gauss-Bonnet invariant G are respectively considered. Dense matter in magnetic mean field, generated by magnetic properties of particles, is described by assuming a model with three meson fields and baryons octet. As result, the considerable increasing of maximal mass of neutron stars can be achieved by cubic corrections in f(R) gravity. In principle, massive stars with M > 4M{sub ☉} can be obtained. On the other hand, stable stars with high strangeness fraction (with central densities ρ{sub c} ∼ 1.5–2.0 GeV/fm{sup 3}) are possible considering quadratic corrections of f(G) gravity. The magnetic field strength in the star center is of order 6–8 × 10{sup 18} G. In general, we can say that other branches of massive neutron stars are possible considering the extra pressure contributions coming from gravity extensions. Such a feature can constitute both a probe for alternative theories and a way out to address anomalous self-gravitating compact systems.

  16. Few-Body Effects in Neutron Star Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takibayev, N.

    2017-03-01

    Neutron resonances in systems of few nuclei, electron capture reactions with formation of excited nuclei, and density oscillation in the neutron star envelopes are investigated. These results allow to propose the special experiments to verify the neutron resonances in the few-body systems and understand the origin of some processes that are going in the neutron star crusts.

  17. Neutron stars including the effects of chaotic magnetic fields and anomalous magnetic moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fei; Wu, Chen; Ren, Zhong-Zhou

    2017-04-01

    The relativistic mean field (RMF) FSUGold model extended to include hyperons is employed to study the properties of neutron stars with strong magnetic fields. The chaotic magnetic field approximation is utilized. The effect of anomalous magnetic moments (AMMs) is also investigated. It is shown that the equation of state (EOS) of neutron star matter is stiffened by the presence of the magnetic field, which increases the maximum mass of a neutron star by around 6%. The AMMs only have a small influence on the EOS of neutron star matter, and increase the maximum mass of a neutron star by 0.02M sun. Neutral particles are spin polarized due to the presence of the AMMs. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11535004, 11375086, 11120101005, 11175085, 11235001), 973 National Major State Basic Research and Development of China (2013CB834400), and Science and Technology Development Fund of Macau (068/2011/A)

  18. Axial Symmetric Solutions to Einstein's Field Equations for Deformed Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubairi, Omair; Weber, Fridolin

    2016-03-01

    Traditional models of neutron stars are constructed under of assumption that they are perfect spheres. This is not correct, however, if the matter inside of neutron stars is described by an non-isotropic model for the equation of state. Examples of such stars are magnetars and neutron stars that would contain color-superconducting quark matter. In this work, we derive the stellar structure equations which describe the properties of non-isotropic neutron stars. The equations are solved numerically in two dimensions. We calculate stellar properties such as masses and radii along with pressure and density profiles and investigate any changes from conventional spherically symmetric neutron stars. This work was supported through the National Science Foundation under Grants PHYS-1411708 and DUE-1259951. Additional computing resources were provided by the CSRC at SDSU and the Department of Sciences at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

  19. Neutrino luminosities and heat capacities of neutron stars in analytic form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofengeim, D. D.; Fortin, M.; Haensel, P.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Zdunik, J. L.

    2017-08-01

    We derive analytic approximations for the neutrino luminosities and the heat capacities of neutron stars with isothermal nucleon cores as functions of the mass and radius of stars. The neutrino luminosities are approximated for the three basic neutrino emission mechanisms, and the heat capacities for the five basic combinations of the partial heat capacities. The approximations are valid for a wide class of equations of state of dense nucleon matter. The results significantly simplify the theoretical interpretation of observations of cooling neutron stars as well as of quasistationary thermal states of neutron stars in x-ray transients. For illustration, we present an analysis of the neutrino cooling functions of nine isolated neutron stars taking into account the effects of their magnetic fields and of the presence of light elements in their heat blanketing envelopes. These results allow one to investigate the superfluid properties of neutron star cores.

  20. Entrainment parameters in a cold superfluid neutron star core

    SciTech Connect

    Chamel, Nicolas; Haensel, Pawel

    2006-04-15

    Hydrodynamic simulations of neutron star cores that are based on a two-fluid description in terms of a neutron-proton superfluid mixture require the knowledge of the Andreev-Bashkin entrainment matrix which relates the momentum of one constituent to the currents of both constituents. This matrix is derived for arbitrary nuclear asymmetry at zero temperature and in the limits of small relative currents in the framework of the energy density functional theory. The Skyrme energy density functional is considered as a particular case. General analytic formulas for the entrainment parameters and various corresponding effective masses are obtained. These formulas are applied to the liquid core of a neutron star composed of homogeneous plasma of nucleons, electrons, and possibly muons in {beta} equilibrium.

  1. Stellar encounters involving neutron stars in globular cluster cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Encounters between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star and a 0.8 solar mass red giant (RG) and between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star (NS) and an 0.8 solar mass main-sequence (MS) star have been successfully simulated. In the case of encounters involving an RG, bound systems are produced when the separation at periastron passage R(MIN) is less than about 2.5 R(RG). At least 70 percent of these bound systems are composed of the RG core and NS forming a binary engulfed in a common envelope of what remains of the former RG envelope. Once the envelope is ejected, a tight white dwarf-NS binary remains. For MS stars, encounters with NSs will produce bound systems when R(MIN) is less than about 3.5 R(MS). Some 50 percent of these systems will be single objects with the NS engulfed in a thick disk of gas almost as massive as the original MS star. The ultimate fate of such systems is unclear.

  2. Gravitational waves from remnant massive neutron stars of binary neutron star merger: Viscous hydrodynamics effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaru; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2017-06-01

    Employing a simplified version of the Israel-Stewart formalism of general-relativistic shear-viscous hydrodynamics, we explore the evolution of a remnant massive neutron star of binary neutron star merger and pay special attention to the resulting gravitational waveforms. We find that for the plausible values of the so-called viscous alpha parameter of the order 10-2 the degree of the differential rotation in the remnant massive neutron star is significantly reduced in the viscous time scale, ≲5 ms . Associated with this, the degree of nonaxisymmetric deformation is also reduced quickly, and as a consequence, the amplitude of quasiperiodic gravitational waves emitted also decays in the viscous time scale. Our results indicate that for modeling the evolution of the merger remnants of binary neutron stars we would have to take into account magnetohydrodynamics effects, which in nature could provide the viscous effects.

  3. The Mystery of the Lonely Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-09-01

    The VLT Reveals Bowshock Nebula around RX J1856.5-3754 Deep inside the Milky Way, an old and lonely neutron star plows its way through interstellar space. Known as RX J1856.5-3754 , it measures only ~ 20 km across. Although it is unusually hot for its age, about 700,000 °C, earlier observations did not reveal any activity at all, contrary to all other neutron stars known so far. In order to better understand this extreme type of object, a detailed study of RX J1856.5-3754 was undertaken by Marten van Kerkwijk (Institute of Astronomy of the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands) and Shri Kulkarni (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA). To the astronomers' delight and surprise, images and spectra obtained with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) now show a small nearby cone-shaped ("bowshock") nebula. It shines in the light from hydrogen atoms and is obviously a product of some kind of interaction with this strange star. Neutron stars - remnants of supernova explosions Neutron stars are among the most extreme objects in the Universe. They are formed when a massive star dies in a "supernova explosion" . During this dramatic event, the core of the star suddenly collapses under its own weight and the outer parts are violently ejected into surrounding space. One of the best known examples is the Crab Nebula in the constellation Taurus (The Bull). It is the gaseous remnant of a star that exploded in the year 1054 and also left behind a pulsar , i.e., a rotating neutron star [1]. A supernova explosion is a very complex event that is still not well understood. Nor is the structure of a neutron star known in any detail. It depends on the extreme properties of matter that has been compressed to incredibly high densities, far beyond the reach of physics experiments on Earth [2]. The ultimate fate of a neutron star is also unclear. From the observed rates of supernova explosions in other galaxies, it appears that several hundred million neutron stars

  4. Stars Just Got Bigger - A 300 Solar Mass Star Uncovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    raises the challenge to theorists still further. "Either they were born so big or smaller stars merged together to produce them," explains Crowther. Stars between about 8 and 150 solar masses explode at the end of their short lives as supernovae, leaving behind exotic remnants, either neutron stars or black holes. Having now established the existence of stars weighing between 150 and 300 solar masses, the astronomers' findings raise the prospect of the existence of exceptionally bright, "pair instability supernovae" that completely blow themselves apart, failing to leave behind any remnant and dispersing up to ten solar masses of iron into their surroundings. A few candidates for such explosions have already been proposed in recent years. Not only is R136a1 the most massive star ever found, but it also has the highest luminosity too, close to 10 million times greater than the Sun. "Owing to the rarity of these monsters, I think it is unlikely that this new record will be broken any time soon," concludes Crowther. Notes [1] The star A1 in NGC 3603 is a double star, with an orbital period of 3.77 days. The two stars in the system have, respectively, 120 and 92 times the mass of the Sun, which means that they have formed as stars weighing, respectively, 148 and 106 solar masses. [2] The team used the SINFONI, ISAAC and MAD instruments, all attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile. [3] (note added on 26 July 2010) The "bigger" in the title does not imply that these stars are the biggest observed. Such stars, called red supergiants, can have radii up to about a thousand solar radii, while R136a1, which is blue, is about 35 times as large as the Sun. However, R136a1 is the star with the greatest mass known to date. More information This work is presented in an article published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society ("The R136 star cluster hosts several stars whose individual masses greatly exceed the accepted 150 Msun stellar mass limit", by

  5. Nuclear physics problems for accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.K.; Woosley, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of p(e/sup -/nu)n and of (p,..gamma..) reactions on /sup 56/Ni during a thermonuclear runaway on a neutron star surface is pointed out. A fast 16-isotope approximate nuclear reaction network is developed that is suitable for use in hydrodynamic calculations of such events.

  6. Temperature effects in pulsating superfluid neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, Elena M.; Gusakov, Mikhail E.

    2011-05-15

    We study the effects of finite stellar temperatures on the oscillations of superfluid neutron stars. The importance of these effects is illustrated with a simple example of a radially pulsating general relativistic star. Two main effects are taken into account: (i) temperature dependence of the entrainment matrix and (ii) the variation of the size of superfluid region with temperature. Four models are considered, which include either one or both of these two effects. Pulsation spectra are calculated for these models, and asymptotes for eigenfrequencies at temperatures close to critical temperature of neutron superfluidity are derived. It is demonstrated that models that allow for the temperature effect (ii) but disregard the effect (i), yield unrealistic results. Eigenfunctions for the normal- and superfluid-type pulsations are analyzed. It is shown that superfluid pulsation modes practically do not appear at the neutron-star surface and, therefore, can hardly be observed by measuring the modulation of the electromagnetic radiation from the star. The e-folding times for damping of pulsations due to the shear viscosity and nonequilibrium modified Urca processes are calculated and their asymptotes at temperatures close to the neutron critical temperature, are obtained. It is demonstrated that superfluid pulsation modes are damped by 1-3 orders of magnitude faster than normal modes.

  7. Daily multiwavelength Swift monitoring of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cen X-4: evidence for accretion and reprocessing during quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; Cackett, E. M.; Brown, E. F.; D'Angelo, C.; Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Reynolds, M.; Wijnands, R.

    2013-12-01

    We conducted the first long-term (60 d), multiwavelength (optical, ultraviolet, UV, and X-ray) simultaneous monitoring of Cen X-4 with daily Swift observations from 2012 June to August, with the goal of understanding variability in the low-mass X-ray binary Cen X-4 during quiescence. We found Cen X-4 to be highly variable in all energy bands on time-scales from days to months, with the strongest quiescent variability a factor of 22 drop in the X-ray count rate in only 4 d. The X-ray, UV and optical (V band) emission are correlated on time-scales down to less than 110 s. The shape of the correlation is a power law with index γ about 0.2-0.6. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a hydrogen neutron star (NS) atmosphere (kT = 59-80 eV) and a power law (with spectral index Γ = 1.4-2.0), with the spectral shape remaining constant as the flux varies. Both components vary in tandem, with each responsible for about 50 per cent of the total X-ray flux, implying that they are physically linked. We conclude that the X-rays are likely generated by matter accreting down to the NS surface. Moreover, based on the short time-scale of the correlation, we also unambiguously demonstrate that the UV emission cannot be due to either thermal emission from the stream impact point, or a standard optically thick, geometrically thin disc. The spectral energy distribution shows a small UV emitting region, too hot to arise from the accretion disc, that we identified as a hotspot on the companion star. Therefore, the UV emission is most likely produced by reprocessing from the companion star, indeed the vertical size of the disc is small and can only reprocess a marginal fraction of the X-ray emission. We also found the accretion disc in quiescence to likely be UV faint, with a minimal contribution to the whole UV flux.

  8. Colliding Neutron Stars as the Source of Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Where do the heavy elements the chemical elements beyond iron in our universe come from? One of the primary candidate sources is the merger of two neutron stars, but recent observations have cast doubt on this model. Can neutron-star mergers really be responsible?Elements from Collisions?Periodic table showing the origin of each chemical element. Those produced by the r-process are shaded orange and attributed to supernovae in this image; though supernovae are one proposed source of r-process elements, an alternative source is the merger of two neutron stars. [Cmglee]When a binary-neutron-star system inspirals and the two neutron stars smash into each other, a shower of neutrons are released. These neutrons are thought to bombard the surrounding atoms, rapidly producing heavy elements in what is known as r-process nucleosynthesis.So could these mergers be responsible for producing the majority of the universes heavy r-process elements? Proponents of this model argue that its supported by observations. The overall amount of heavy r-process material in the Milky Way, for instance, is consistent with the expected ejection amounts from mergers, based both on predicted merger rates for neutron stars in the galaxy, and on the observed rates of soft gamma-ray bursts (which are thought to accompany double-neutron-star mergers).Challenges from Ultra-Faint DwarfsRecently, however, r-process elements have been observed in ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies. This discovery raises two major challenges to the merger model for heavy-element production:When neutron stars are born during a core-collapse supernova, mass is ejected, providing the stars with asymmetric natal kicks. During the second collapse in a double-neutron-star binary, wouldnt the kick exceed the low escape velocity of an ultra-faint dwarf, ejecting the binary before it could merge and enrich the galaxy?Ultra-faint dwarfs have very old stellar populations and the observation of r-process elements in these stars

  9. Neutron Star Structure in the Presence of Conformally Coupled Scalar Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-01-01

    Neutron star models are studied in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, using two different numerical equations of state (EoS) representing different degrees of stiffness. In both cases we obtain a complete solution by matching the interior numerical solution of the coupled Einstein-scalar field hydrostatic equations, with an exact metric on the surface of the star. These are then used to find the effect of the scalar field and its coupling to geometry, on the neutron star structure, particularly the maximum neutron star mass and radius. We show that in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, neutron stars are less dense and have smaller masses and radii than their counterparts in the minimally coupled case, and the effect increases with the magnitude of the scalar field at the center of the star.

  10. Quasiequilibrium sequences of black-hole-neutron-star binaries in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Keisuke; Faber, Joshua A.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2006-08-15

    We construct quasiequilibrium sequences of black-hole-neutron-star binaries for arbitrary mass ratios by solving the constraint equations of general relativity in the conformal thin-sandwich decomposition. We model the neutron star as a stationary polytrope satisfying the relativistic equations of hydrodynamics and account for the black hole by imposing equilibrium boundary conditions on the surface of an excised sphere (the apparent horizon). In this paper we focus on irrotational configurations, meaning that both the neutron star and the black hole are approximately nonspinning in an inertial frame. We present results for a binary with polytropic index n=1, mass ratio M{sub irr}{sup BH}/M{sub B}{sup NS}=5, and neutron star compaction M{sub ADM,0}{sup NS}/R{sub 0}=0.0879, where M{sub irr}{sup BH} is the irreducible mass of the black hole, M{sub B}{sup NS} the neutron star baryon rest mass, and M{sub ADM,0}{sup NS} and R{sub 0} the neutron star Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass and areal radius in isolation, respectively. Our models represent valid solutions to Einstein's constraint equations and may therefore be employed as initial data for dynamical simulations of black-hole-neutron-star binaries.

  11. Modified TOV in gravity’s rainbow: properties of neutron stars and dynamical stability conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendi, S.H.; Bordbar, G.H.; Panah, B. Eslam; Panahiyan, S.

    2016-09-09

    In this paper, we consider a spherical symmetric metric to extract the hydrostatic equilibrium equation of stars in (3+1)-dimensional gravity’s rainbow in the presence of cosmological constant. Then, we generalize the hydrostatic equilibrium equation to d-dimensions and obtain the hydrostatic equilibrium equation for this gravity. Also, we obtain the maximum mass of neutron star using the modern equations of state of neutron star matter derived from the microscopic calculations. It is notable that, in this paper, we consider the effects of rainbow functions on the diagrams related to the mass-central mass density (M-ρ{sub c}) relation and also the mass-radius (M-R) relation of neutron star. We also study the effects of rainbow functions on the other properties of neutron star such as the Schwarzschild radius, average density, strength of gravity and gravitational redshift. Then, we apply the cosmological constant to this theory to obtain the diagrams of M-ρ{sub c} (or M-R) and other properties of these stars. Next, we investigate the dynamical stability condition for these stars in gravity’s rainbow and show that these stars have dynamical stability. We also obtain a relation between mass of neutron stars and Planck mass. In addition, we compare obtained results of this theory with the observational data.

  12. Modified TOV in gravity's rainbow: properties of neutron stars and dynamical stability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Bordbar, G. H.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a spherical symmetric metric to extract the hydrostatic equilibrium equation of stars in (3+1)-dimensional gravity's rainbow in the presence of cosmological constant. Then, we generalize the hydrostatic equilibrium equation to d-dimensions and obtain the hydrostatic equilibrium equation for this gravity. Also, we obtain the maximum mass of neutron star using the modern equations of state of neutron star matter derived from the microscopic calculations. It is notable that, in this paper, we consider the effects of rainbow functions on the diagrams related to the mass-central mass density (M-ρc) relation and also the mass-radius (M-R) relation of neutron star. We also study the effects of rainbow functions on the other properties of neutron star such as the Schwarzschild radius, average density, strength of gravity and gravitational redshift. Then, we apply the cosmological constant to this theory to obtain the diagrams of M-ρc (or M-R) and other properties of these stars. Next, we investigate the dynamical stability condition for these stars in gravity's rainbow and show that these stars have dynamical stability. We also obtain a relation between mass of neutron stars and Planck mass. In addition, we compare obtained results of this theory with the observational data.

  13. Spin evolution of a proto-neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camelio, Giovanni; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pons, José A.; Ferrari, Valeria

    2016-07-01

    We study the evolution of the rotation rate of a proto-neutron star, born in a core-collapse supernova, in the first seconds of its life. During this phase, the star evolution can be described as a sequence of stationary configurations, which we determine by solving the neutrino transport and the stellar structure equations in general relativity. We include in our model the angular momentum loss due to neutrino emission. We find that the requirement of a rotation rate not exceeding the mass-shedding limit at the beginning of the evolution implies a strict bound on the rotation rate at later times. Moreover, assuming that the proto-neutron star is born with a finite ellipticity, we determine the emitted gravitational wave signal and estimate its detectability by present and future ground-based interferometric detectors.

  14. Light dark matter scattering in outer neutron star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermeño, Marina; Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We calculate for the first time the phonon excitation rate in the outer crust of a neutron star due to scattering from light dark matter (LDM) particles gravitationally boosted into the star. We consider dark matter particles in the sub-GeV mass range scattering off a periodic array of nuclei through an effective scalar-vector interaction with nucleons. We find that LDM effects cause a modification of the net number of phonons in the lattice as compared to the standard thermal result. In addition, we estimate the contribution of LDM to the ion-ion thermal conductivity in the outer crust and find that it can be significantly enhanced at large densities. Our results imply that for magnetized neutron stars the LDM-enhanced global conductivity in the outer crust will tend to reduce the anisotropic heat conduction between perpendicular and parallel directions to the magnetic field.

  15. r-Mode Runaway and Rapidly Rotating Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Andersson; Jones; Kokkotas; Stergioulas

    2000-05-01

    We present a simple spin-evolution model that predicts that rapidly rotating accreting neutron stars will be confined mainly to a narrow range of spin frequencies: P=1.5-5 ms. This is in agreement with current observations of neutron stars in both the low-mass X-ray binaries and the millisecond radio pulsars. The main ingredients in the model are (1) the instability of r-modes above a critical spin rate, (2) the thermal runaway that is due to the heat released as viscous damping mechanisms counteract the r-mode growth, and (3) a revised estimate of the strength of the dissipation that is due to the presence of a viscous boundary layer at the base of the crust in an old and relatively cold neutron star. We discuss the gravitational waves that are radiated during the brief r-mode-driven spin-down phase. We also briefly touch on how the new estimates affect the predicted initial spin periods of hot young neutron stars.

  16. Successive X-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.; Woosley, S. E.; Weaver, T. A.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of a neutron star undergoing a series of thermonuclear flashes in its accreted hydrogen-rich layer has been numerically followed to determine the effects of the history of the neutron star's thermal and compositional structure on the properties of the emitted X-ray bursts. Burst characteristics are studied for a range of mass accretion rates, CNO abundances in the accreted matter, and initial thermal states of the underlying neutron star core; the bursts exhibit erratic behavior for low CNO metal abundances and cool neutron star cores, with the burst recurrence time scales varying by 1-2 orders of magnitude. There is typically a continued presence of a substantial amount of unburnt hydrogen in the accreted layer throughout the series of the X-ray burst events. Convective mixing during the quiescent phase leads to the inward transport of helium to high densities and eventually to the initiation of the next outburst. The resulting bursts can be weak and, in such cases, are characterized by short recurrence time scales (1-2 hr), low peak luminosities (0.1-0.2 times the Eddington value), and low alpha-values (about 20).

  17. Flux-Vortex Pinning and Neutron Star Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpar, M. Ali

    2017-09-01

    G. Srinivasan et al. (1990) proposed a simple and elegant explanation for the reduction of the neutron star magnetic dipole moment during binary evolution leading to low mass X-ray binaries and eventually to millisecond pulsars: Quantized vortex lines in the neutron star core superfluid will pin against the quantized flux lines of the proton superconductor. As the neutron star spins down in the wind accretion phase of binary evolution, outward motion of vortex lines will reduce the dipole magnetic moment in proportion to the rotation rate. The presence of a toroidal array of flux lines makes this mechanism inevitable and independent of the angle between the rotation and magnetic axes. The incompressibility of the flux-line array (Abrikosov lattice) determines the epoch when the mechanism will be effective throughout the neutron star. Flux vortex pinning will not be effective during the initial young radio pulsar phase. It will, however, be effective and reduce the dipole moment in proportion with the rotation rate during the epoch of spindown by wind accretion as proposed by Srinivasan et al. The mechanism operates also in the presence of vortex creep.

  18. Successive X-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.; Woosley, S. E.; Weaver, T. A.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of a neutron star undergoing a series of thermonuclear flashes in its accreted hydrogen-rich layer has been numerically followed to determine the effects of the history of the neutron star's thermal and compositional structure on the properties of the emitted X-ray bursts. Burst characteristics are studied for a range of mass accretion rates, CNO abundances in the accreted matter, and initial thermal states of the underlying neutron star core; the bursts exhibit erratic behavior for low CNO metal abundances and cool neutron star cores, with the burst recurrence time scales varying by 1-2 orders of magnitude. There is typically a continued presence of a substantial amount of unburnt hydrogen in the accreted layer throughout the series of the X-ray burst events. Convective mixing during the quiescent phase leads to the inward transport of helium to high densities and eventually to the initiation of the next outburst. The resulting bursts can be weak and, in such cases, are characterized by short recurrence time scales (1-2 hr), low peak luminosities (0.1-0.2 times the Eddington value), and low alpha-values (about 20).

  19. Thermonuclear processes on accreting neutron stars - A systematic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayasli, S.; Joss, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    A series of model calculations for the evolution of the surface layers of an accreting neutron star is carried out. The neutron star mass, radius, core temperature, and surface magnetic field strength are systematically varied, as are the accretion rate onto the neutron star surface and the metallicity of the accreting matter, in order to determine the effects of these parameters on the properties of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers and the emitted X-ray bursts that result from such flashes. The core temperatures required for thermal equilibrium are found to be approximately a factor of 2 lower than estimated in earlier work. Owing to the effects of the gravitational redshift, the emitted X-ray bursts have lower peak luminosities and longer durations than those calculated in the Newtonian approximation. The entrainment of hydrogen into helium flashes can cause the flashes to exhibit a rather wide range of observable effects and can decrease by a factor of more than 2 the ratio of persistent accretion-driven luminosity to time-averaged burst luminosity emitted by the neutron star.

  20. Tidal Love Numbers of Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderer, Tanja

    2008-04-20

    For a variety of fully relativistic polytropic neutron star models we calculate the star's tidal Love number k{sub 2}. Most realistic equations of state for neutron stars can be approximated as a polytrope with an effective index n {approx} 0.5-1.0. The equilibrium stellar model is obtained by numerical integration of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhov equations. We calculate the linear l = 2 static perturbations to the Schwarzschild spacetime following the method of Thorne and Campolattaro. Combining the perturbed Einstein equations into a single second-order differential equation for the perturbation to the metric coefficient g{sub tt} and matching the exterior solution to the asymptotic expansion of the metric in the star's local asymptotic rest frame gives the Love number. Our results agree well with the Newtonian results in the weak field limit. The fully relativistic values differ from the Newtonian values by up to {approx}24%. The Love number is potentially measurable in gravitational wave signals from inspiralling binary neutron stars.

  1. Fallback Disks, Magnetars and Other Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpar, M. Ali; Çalışkan, Ş.; Ertan, Ü.

    2013-02-01

    The presence of matter with angular momentum, in the form of a fallback disk around a young isolated neutron star will determine its evolution. This leads to an understanding of many properties of different classes of young neutron stars, in particular a natural explanation for the period clustering of AXPs, SGRs and XDINs. The spindown or spinup properties of a neutron star are determined by the dipole component of the magnetic field. The natural possibility that magnetars and other neutron stars may have different strengths of the dipole and higher multipole components of the magnetic field is now actually required by observations on the spindown rates of some magnetars. This talk gives a broad overview and some applications of the fallback disk model to particular neutron stars. Salient points are: (i) A fallback disk has already been observed around the AXP 4U 0142+61 some years ago. (ii) The low observed spindown rate of the SGR 0418+5729 provides direct evidence that the dipole component of the field is in the 1012 G range. All properties of the SGR 0418+5729 at its present age can be explained by spindown under torques from a fallback disk. (iii) The anomalous braking index of PSR J1734-3333 can also be explained by the fallback disk model which gives the luminosity, period, period derivative and the period second derivative at the present age. (iv) These and all applications to a variety of other sources employ the same disk physics and evolution, differing only in the initial conditions of the disk.

  2. A test of the nature of the Fe K Line in the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Cackett, Edward; Miller, Jon M.; Barret, Didier; Fabian, Andrew C.; D'Ai, Antonino; Parker, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Burderi, Luciano; Salvo, Tiziana; Egron, Elise; Homan, Jeroen; Iaria, Rosario; Lin, Dacheng; Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-04-01

    Broad Fe K emission lines have been widely observed in the X-ray spectra of black hole systems, and in neutron star systems as well. The intrinsically narrow Fe K fluorescent line is generally believed to be part of the reflection spectrum originating in an illuminated accretion disk, and broadened by strong relativistic effects. However, the nature of the lines in neutron star LMXBs has been under debate. We therefore obtained the longest, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a neutron star LMXB to date with a 300 ks Chandra HETGS observation of Serpens X-1. The observation was taken under the "continuous clocking" mode and thus free of photon pile-up effects. We carry out a systematic analysis and find that the blurred reflection model fits the Fe line of Serpens X-1 significantly better than a broad Gaussian component does, implying that the relativistic reflection scenario is much preferred. Chandra HETGS also provides highest spectral resolution view of the Fe K region and we find no strong evidence for additional narrow lines.

  3. Effective no-hair relations for neutron stars and quark stars: Relativistic results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Pappas, George; Yunes, Nicolás; Apostolatos, Theocharis A.

    2014-06-01

    Astrophysical charge-free black holes are known to satisfy no-hair relations through which all multipole moments can be specified in terms of just their mass and spin angular momentum. We here investigate the possible existence of no-hair-like relations among multipole moments for neutron stars and quark stars that are independent of their equation of state. We calculate the multipole moments of these stars up to hexadecapole order by constructing uniformly rotating and unmagnetized stellar solutions to the Einstein equations. For slowly rotating stars, we construct stellar solutions to quartic order in spin in a slow-rotation expansion, while for rapidly rotating stars, we solve the Einstein equations numerically with the LORENE and RNS codes. We find that the multipole moments extracted from these numerical solutions are consistent with each other and agree with the quartic-order slow-rotation approximation for spin frequencies below roughly 500 Hz. We also confirm that the current dipole is related to the mass quadrupole in an approximately equation-of-state-independent fashion, which does not break for rapidly rotating neutron stars or quark stars. We further find that the current-octupole and the mass-hexadecapole moments are related to the mass quadrupole in an approximately equation-of-state-independent way to roughly O(10%), worsening in the hexadecapole case. All of our findings are in good agreement with previous work that considered stellar solutions to leading order in a weak-field, Newtonian expansion. In fact, the hexadecapole-quadrupole relation agrees with the Newtonian one quite well even in moderately relativistic regimes. The quartic in spin, slowly rotating solutions found here allows us to estimate the systematic errors in the measurement of the neutron star's mass and radius with future x-ray observations, such as Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) and Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT). We find that the effect of these

  4. Diversity of neutron star properties at the fixed neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Sulaksono, A.; Agrawal, B. K.

    2015-07-01

    We study the diversities in the properties of the neutron stars arising due to the different choices for the cross coupling between various mesons, which governs the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy in the extended relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. For this purpose, we obtain two different families of the extended RMF model corresponding to different nonlinear cross-coupling terms in the isovector part of the effective Lagrangian density. The lowest-order contributions for the δ mesons are also included. The different models within the same family yield wide variation in the value of neutron-skin thickness in the 208Pb nucleus. These models are employed to compute the neutron-star properties such as core-crust transition density, radius and red shift at canonical mass ( 1.4 M⊙) , tidal polarizability parameter, and threshold mass required for the enhanced cooling through the direct Urca process. Most of the neutron-star properties considered are significantly different(10-40%) for the different families of models at a smaller neutron-skin thickness (˜0.15 fm ) in the 208Pb nucleus.

  5. Black Holes and Neutron Stars in Nearby Galaxies: Insights with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulic, Neven; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Wik, Daniel R.; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Zezas, Andreas; Lehmer, Bret

    2017-08-01

    There are a handful of diagnostics that permit determination of compact object identity in X-ray binaries (XRBs), and most of these are confined to bright Galactic sources for which a large number of photons can be gathered. We report on recent work using sensitive hard X-ray constraints to separate black holes from neutron stars in external galaxies with NuSTAR. Determining the ratio of XRBs that are black holes or neutron stars in different galactic environments reveals critical clues about the formation and evolution of binary systems. We analyze a NuSTAR-selected sample of ≈10 nearby galaxies within 5 Mpc that represent a range of star formation rates (0.1 - 10 M⊙ yr-1) and stellar masses (109-11 M⊙). Using color-color and color-intensity diagnostics we classify sources by their accretion states and compact object types. We analyze the 12-25 keV X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of our sample scaled by specific star formation rate and compare with the 0.5-8 keV analogues. Our diagnostic methods allow us to produce black hole-only and neutron star-only extragalactic XLFs for the first time.

  6. Confirming a substellar companion candidate around a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, Bettina; Luhman, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    In a search for substellar companions around young neutron stars, we found an indication for a very faint near-infrared source at the position of the isolated neutron star RXJ0806.4-4123. The suspected near-IR source cannot be the neutron star itself because the latter is much too faint to be detected. Recent Herschel 160 microm observations of the field point to an additional dusty belt around the neutron star. The outer location of the dusty belt could be explained by the presence of a substellar companion around the neutron star. We propose deeper near-infrared observations with FLAMINGOS-2 to confirm that the near-infrared source is real. The observation could provide the first direct detection of a substellar companion around a neutron star. However, even a non-detection would be interesting to constrain evolution models of the dusty belt around the neutron star.

  7. Ferromagnetism in neutron matter and its implication for the neutron star equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, J. P. W.; Scholtz, F. G.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the possible contribution of the ferromagnetic phase of neutron matter in the neutron star interior to the star's magnetic field. We introduce a relativistic, self-consistent calculation of the ferromagnetic phase in neutron matter within the context of the relativistic mean-field approximation. The presence of the ferromagnetic phase stiffens the star's equation of state which implies a larger neutron star radius compared to the non-ferromagnetic case.

  8. Ferromagnetism in neutron matter and its implication for the neutron star equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, J. P. W.; Scholtz, F. G.

    2011-09-21

    We investigate the possible contribution of the ferromagnetic phase of neutron matter in the neutron star interior to the star's magnetic field. We introduce a relativistic, self-consistent calculation of the ferromagnetic phase in neutron matter within the context of the relativistic mean-field approximation. The presence of the ferromagnetic phase stiffens the star's equation of state which implies a larger neutron star radius compared to the non-ferromagnetic case.

  9. Neutron star matter in an effective model

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, T. K.; Raina, P. K.; Panda, P. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2006-11-15

    We study an equation of state (EOS) for dense matter in the core of a compact star with hyperons and calculate the star's structure in an effective model using a mean-field approach. With varying incompressibility and effective nucleon mass, we analyze the resulting EOS with hyperons in {beta} equilibrium and their underlying effect on the gross properties of the compact star sequences. The results obtained in our analysis are compared with predictions of other theoretical models and observations. The maximum mass of a compact star lies in the range 1.21-1.96M{sub {center_dot}} for the different EOS obtained in the model.

  10. Strangeness in nuclei and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonardoni, Diego

    2017-01-01

    The presence of exotic particles in the core of neutron stars (NS) has been questioned for a long time. At present, it is still an unsolved problem that drives intense research efforts, both theoretical and experimental. The appearance of strange baryons in the inner regions of a NS, where the density can exceed several times the nuclear saturation density, is likely to happen due to energetic considerations. The onset of strange degrees of freedom is considered as an effective mechanism to soften the equation of state (EoS). This softening affects the entire structure of the star, reducing the pressure and therefore the maximum mass that the star can stably support. The observation of two very massive NS with masses of the order of 2M⊙ seems instead to rule out soft EoS, apparently excluding the possibility of hyperon formation in the core of the star. This inconsistency, usually referred to as the hyperon puzzle, is based on what we currently know about the interaction between strange particles and normal nucleons. The combination of a poor knowledge of the hypernuclear interactions and the difficulty of obtaining clear astrophysical evidence of the presence of hyperons in NS makes the understanding of the behavior of strange degrees of freedom in NS an intriguing theoretical challenge. We give our contribution to the discussion by studying the general problem of the hyperon-nucleon interaction. We attack this issue by employing a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) technique, that has proven to be successful in the description of strongly correlated Fermion systems, to the study of finite size nuclear systems including strange degrees of freedom, i.e. hypernuclei. We show that many-body hypernuclear forces are fundamental to properly reproduce the ground state physics of Λ hypernuclei from light- to medium-heavy. However, the poor abundance of experimental data on strange nuclei leaves room for a good deal of indetermination in the construction of hypernuclear

  11. Modeling the Complete Gravitational Wave Spectrum of Neutron Star Mergers.

    PubMed

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim; Nagar, Alessandro

    2015-08-28

    In the context of neutron star mergers, we study the gravitational wave spectrum of the merger remnant using numerical relativity simulations. Postmerger spectra are characterized by a main peak frequency f2 related to the particular structure and dynamics of the remnant hot hypermassive neutron star. We show that f(2) is correlated with the tidal coupling constant κ(2)^T that characterizes the binary tidal interactions during the late-inspiral merger. The relation f(2)(κ(2)^T) depends very weakly on the binary total mass, mass ratio, equation of state, and thermal effects. This observation opens up the possibility of developing a model of the gravitational spectrum of every merger unifying the late-inspiral and postmerger descriptions.

  12. Strange Stars, Neutron Stars and Pulsar Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; Horvath, J. E.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se ha conjeturado que una partlecula de dieciocho quarks, sin Carga, sin espi'n y sin colar (quark-alfa) podri'a ser estable a ba5as tern peraturas y presiones aiTh COfl respecto a materia extrafla. Presentamos en este trabajo la estmctura de estrellas extraflas incluyendo los efectos y apariencia de parti'culas uark-alfa en las capas exteriores. La estruc tura interna ya no es hoinogenea del centro a la superficie, sino que muestra un centro de materia extrafla, capas s6lidas y una costra delgada de materia normal en la superficie. La superficie de materia nonnal permite la fornaci6n de una magnetosfera, la que se piensa sea el sitlo en donde ocurre la emisi6n del pulsar. La superficie de superflui'do ayuda a explicar el fen6rneno de `glitch', el cual ba sido observado en muchos pulsares. Se discute la ecuaci6n de estado para rnateria quark-alfa relevante en este regimen. ABSTIZACT:It has been conjectured that an quark, uncharged, spinless and colorless particle Cquark-alpha) could be stable at low pressures and temperatures even with respect to strange matter. We present in work tlie structure of stars including the effects of the appearance of quark-alpi' particles ii their outer layers. The internal structure is no longer from tlie center to the surface, but show a strange matter core, a solid and superfluid layers and a thin crust of normal matter at the surface. The normal matter surface allows tlie fon tion of a magnetosphere, whicl is to be tl place where pulsar emission occurs. A superfluid layer helps to explain tlie glitch , wlflch has been observed in . equation of state for quark-alpha matter relevant in regime is also discussed. Keq LA)OtL : ARY S - OF STATF - ?.ACT

  13. Three-body forces and neutron star structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. R.; Burgio, G. F.; Lombardo, U.; Schulze, H.-J.; Zuo, W.

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the nucleonic equation of state within the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone formalism using the Argonne υ18 two-body interaction and a three-body interaction. We adopt two different three-body forces: the phenomenological Urbana IX model and a microscopic meson-exchange force including nucleon virtual excitations and nucleon-antinucleon excitations. We compare their respective predictions regarding the structure of neutron stars, in particular the mass-radius relation.

  14. Quark matter nucleation in neutron stars and astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, Ignazio; Logoteta, Domenico; Vidaña, Isaac; Providência, Constança

    2016-03-01

    A phase of strong interacting matter with deconfined quarks is expected in the core of massive neutron stars. We investigate the quark deconfinement phase transition in cold (T=0 and hot β -stable hadronic matter. Assuming a first order phase transition, we calculate and compare the nucleation rate and the nucleation time due to quantum and thermal nucleation mechanisms. We show that above a threshold value of the central pressure a pure hadronic star (HS) (i.e. a compact star with no fraction of deconfined quark matter) is metastable to the conversion to a quark star (QS) (i.e. a hybrid star or a strange star). This process liberates an enormous amount of energy, of the order of 1053erg, which causes a powerful neutrino burst, likely accompanied by intense gravitational waves emission, and possibly by a second delayed (with respect to the supernova explosion forming the HS) explosion which could be the energy source of a powerful gamma-ray burst (GRB). This stellar conversion process populates the QS branch of compact stars, thus one has in the Universe two coexisting families of compact stars: pure hadronic stars and quark stars. We introduce the concept of critical mass M_{cr} for cold HSs and proto-hadronic stars (PHSs), and the concept of limiting conversion temperature for PHSs. We show that PHSs with a mass M < M_{cr} could survive the early stages of their evolution without decaying to QSs. Finally, we discuss the possible evolutionary paths of proto-hadronic stars.

  15. Physics of systems containing neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1995-01-01

    This grant deals with several topics related to the dynamics of systems containing a compact object. Most of our research in 1994 dealt with systems containing Neutron Stars (NS's), but we also addressed systems containing a Black Hole (BH) or a White Dwarf (WD) in situations relevant to NS systems. Among the systems were isolated regular pulsars, Millisecond Pulsars (MSP's) that are either Single (SMP's) or in a binary (BMP's) Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMX's) and Cataclysmic Variables (CV's). We also dealt with one aspect of NS structure, namely NS superfluidity. A large fraction of our research dealt with irradiation-driven winds from companions. These winds turned out to be of some importance in the evolution of LMXB's and MSP's, be they SMP's or BMP's. While their role during LMXB evolution (i.e. during the accretion phase) is not yet clear, they may play an important role in turning BMP's into SMP's and also in bringing about the formation of planets around MSP's.

  16. Physics of systems containing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1995-01-01

    This grant deals with several topics related to the dynamics of systems containing a compact object. Most of our research in 1994 dealt with systems containing Neutron Stars (NS's), but we also addressed systems containing a Black Hole (BH) or a White Dwarf (WD) in situations relevant to NS systems. Among the systems were isolated regular pulsars, Millisecond Pulsars (MSP's) that are either Single (SMP's) or in a binary (BMP's) Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMX's) and Cataclysmic Variables (CV's). We also dealt with one aspect of NS structure, namely NS superfluidity. A large fraction of our research dealt with irradiation-driven winds from companions. These winds turned out to be of some importance in the evolution of LMXB's and MSP's, be they SMP's or BMP's. While their role during LMXB evolution (i.e. during the accretion phase) is not yet clear, they may play an important role in turning BMP's into SMP's and also in bringing about the formation of planets around MSP's.

  17. Analysing neutron star in HESS J1731-347 from thermal emission and cooling theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofengeim, D. D.; Kaminker, A. D.; Klochkov, D.; Suleimanov, V.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The central compact object in the supernova remnant HESS J1731-347 appears to be the hottest observed isolated cooling neutron star. The cooling theory of neutron stars enables one to explain observations of this star by assuming the presence of strong proton superfluidity in the stellar core and the existence of the surface heat blanketing envelope which almost fully consists of carbon. The cooling model of this star is elaborated to take proper account of the neutrino emission due to neutron-neutron collisions which is not suppressed by proton superfluidity. Using the results of spectral fits of observed thermal spectra for the distance of 3.2 kpc and the cooling theory for the neutron star of age 27 kyr, new constraints on the stellar mass and radius are obtained which are more stringent than those derived from the spectral fits alone.

  18. Constraining the State of Ultra-dense Matter with the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-04-01

    [This presentation is submitted on behalf of the entire NICER Science Team] The state of cold matter at densities exceeding those of atomic nuclei remains one of the principal outstanding problems in modern physics. Neutron stars provide the only known setting in the universe where these physical conditions can be explored. Thermal X-ray radiation from the physical surface of a neutron star can serve as a powerful tool for probing the poorly understood behavior of the matter in the dense stellar interior. For instance, realistic modeling of the thermal X-ray modulations observed from rotation-powered millisecond pulsars can produce stringent constraints on the neutron star mass-radius relation, and by extension the state of supra-nuclear matter. I will describe the prospects for precision neutron star equation of state constraints with millisecond pulsars using the forthcoming Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) X-ray timing mission.

  19. Relativistic simulations of eccentric binary neutron star mergers: One-arm spiral instability and effects of neutron star spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, William E.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pretorius, Frans; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    We perform general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of dynamical capture binary neutron star mergers, emphasizing the role played by the neutron star spin. Dynamical capture mergers may take place in globular clusters, as well as other dense stellar systems, where most neutron stars have large spins. We find significant variability in the merger outcome as a function of initial neutron star spin. For cases where the spin is aligned with the orbital angular momentum, the additional centrifugal support in the remnant hypermassive neutron star can prevent the prompt collapse to a black hole, while for antialigned cases the decreased total angular momentum can facilitate the collapse to a black hole. We show that even moderate spins can significantly increase the amount of ejected material, including the amount unbound with velocities greater than half the speed of light, leading to brighter electromagnetic signatures associated with kilonovae and interaction of the ejecta with the interstellar medium. Furthermore, we find that the initial neutron star spin can strongly affect the already rich phenomenology in the postmerger gravitational wave signatures that arise from the oscillation modes of the hypermassive neutron star. In several of our simulations, the resulting hypermassive neutron star develops the one-arm (m =1 ) spiral instability, the most pronounced cases being those with small but non-negligible neutron star spins. For long-lived hypermassive neutron stars, the presence of this instability leads to improved prospects for detecting these events through gravitational waves, and thus may give information about the neutron star equation of state.

  20. NUCLEAR CONSTRAINTS ON PROPERTIES OF NEUTRON STAR CRUSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Jun; Chen Liewen; Ma Hongru; Li Baoan E-mail: hrma@sjtu.edu.cn E-mail: Bao-An_Li@tamu-commerce.edu

    2009-06-01

    The transition density {rho} {sub t} and pressure P{sub t} at the inner edge separating the liquid core from the solid crust of neutron stars are systematically studied using a modified Gogny (MDI) and 51 popular Skyrme interactions within well established dynamical and thermodynamical methods. First of all, it is shown that the widely used parabolic approximation to the full equation of state (EOS) of isospin asymmetric nuclear matter may lead to huge errors in estimating the transition density and pressure, especially for stiffer symmetry energy functionals E {sub sym}({rho}), compared to calculations using the full EOS within both the dynamical and thermodynamical methods mainly because of the energy curvatures involved. Thus, fine details of the EOS of asymmetric nuclear matter are important for locating accurately the inner edge of the neutron star crust. Second, the transition density and pressure decrease roughly linearly with increasing slope parameter L of E {sub sym}({rho}) at normal nuclear matter density using the full EOS within both the dynamical and thermodynamical methods. It is also shown that the thickness, fractional mass, and moment of inertia of the neutron star crust are all very sensitive to the parameter L through the transition density {rho} {sub t} whether one uses the full EOS or its parabolic approximation. Moreover, it is shown that E {sub sym}({rho}) constrained in the same subsaturation density range as the neutron star crust by the isospin diffusion data in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies limits the transition density and pressure to 0.040 fm{sup -3} {<=}{rho} {sub t} {<=} 0.065 fm{sup -3} and 0.01 MeV fm{sup -3} {<=}P{sub t} {<=} 0.26 MeV fm{sup -3}, respectively. These constrained values for the transition density and pressure are significantly lower than their fiducial values currently used in the literature. Furthermore, the mass-radius relation and several other properties closely related to the neutron star crust

  1. Free fall onto magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salpeter, E. E.

    Some compact X-ray sources show evidence of cyclotron line radiation from excited electron Landau orbits, powered by hydrogen and helium falling onto a neutron star atmosphere along the magnetic field. The slowing of the incident matter is discussed, including the spread in energy loss due to Coulomb scattering and direct nuclear reactions for disintegrating the α particles. The α disintegrations, followed by neutron capture, lead to nuclear γ rays; the γ-ray intensity is (indirectly) coupled to the Coulomb energy loss and the cyclotron line emission.

  2. MEASUREMENT OF THE RADIUS OF NEUTRON STARS WITH HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE QUIESCENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, Robert E.; Servillat, Mathieu; Webb, Natalie A. E-mail: rutledge@physics.mcgill.ca

    2013-07-20

    This paper presents the measurement of the neutron star (NS) radius using the thermal spectra from quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) inside globular clusters (GCs). Recent observations of NSs have presented evidence that cold ultra dense matter-present in the core of NSs-is best described by ''normal matter'' equations of state (EoSs). Such EoSs predict that the radii of NSs, R{sub NS}, are quasi-constant (within measurement errors, of {approx}10%) for astrophysically relevant masses (M{sub NS}>0.5 M{sub Sun }). The present work adopts this theoretical prediction as an assumption, and uses it to constrain a single R{sub NS} value from five qLMXB targets with available high signal-to-noise X-ray spectroscopic data. Employing a Markov chain Monte-Carlo approach, we produce the marginalized posterior distribution for R{sub NS}, constrained to be the same value for all five NSs in the sample. An effort was made to include all quantifiable sources of uncertainty into the uncertainty of the quoted radius measurement. These include the uncertainties in the distances to the GCs, the uncertainties due to the Galactic absorption in the direction of the GCs, and the possibility of a hard power-law spectral component for count excesses at high photon energy, which are observed in some qLMXBs in the Galactic plane. Using conservative assumptions, we found that the radius, common to the five qLMXBs and constant for a wide range of masses, lies in the low range of possible NS radii, R{sub NS}=9.1{sup +1.3}{sub -1.5} km (90%-confidence). Such a value is consistent with low-R{sub NS} equations of state. We compare this result with previous radius measurements of NSs from various analyses of different types of systems. In addition, we compare the spectral analyses of individual qLMXBs to previous works.

  3. Axisymmetric toroidal modes of general relativistic magnetized neutron star models

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Hidetaka; Lee, Umin E-mail: lee@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-07-20

    We calculate axisymmetric toroidal modes of magnetized neutron stars with a solid crust in the general relativistic Cowling approximation. We assume that the interior of the star is threaded by a poloidal magnetic field, which is continuous at the surface with an outside dipole field. We examine the cases of the field strength B{sub S} ∼ 10{sup 16} G at the surface. Since separation of variables is not possible for the oscillations of magnetized stars, we employ finite series expansions for the perturbations using spherical harmonic functions. We find discrete normal toroidal modes of odd parity, but no toroidal modes of even parity are found. The frequencies of the toroidal modes form distinct mode sequences and the frequency in a given mode sequence gradually decreases as the number of radial nodes of the eigenfunction increases. From the frequency spectra computed for neutron stars of different masses, we find that the frequency is almost exactly proportional to B{sub S} and is well represented by a linear function of R/M for a given B{sub S}, where M and R are the mass and radius of the star. The toroidal mode frequencies for B{sub S} ∼ 10{