Science.gov

Sample records for neutron star spin

  1. Burst Oscillations: Watching Neutron Stars Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2010-01-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the first detection of rotationally modulated emission from X-ray bursting neutron stars, "burst oscillations," This phenomenon enables us to see neutron stars spin, as the X-ray burst flux asymmetrically lights up the surface. It has enabled a new way to probe the neutron star spin frequency distribution, as well as to elucidate the multidimensional nature of nuclear burning on neutron stars. I will review our current observational understanding of the phenomenon, with an eye toward highlighting some of the interesting remaining puzzles, of which there is no shortage.

  2. Binary Neutron Star Mergers with Initial Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastaun, Wolfgang; Galeazzi, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    Recently, we performed simulations of binary neutron star mergers which included both nuclear physics equations of state and stars with initial spin for the first time. The focus was on systems resulting in hyper-massive neutron stars. I will discuss the influence of realistic amounts of spin on the outcome, in particular regarding the gravitational wave signal. We also investigated the structure and dynamics of the remnant in detail, revealing some interesting new aspects. For example, we observe rotational profiles not fitting the standard notion of a rapidly rotating core, and show that strong quasi-radial oscillations in the post merger phase have an impact on the gravitational wave spectrum via a modulation of the m=2 mode frequency, offering an alternative to recent interpretations of high frequency side-peaks as non-linear combination frequencies. Finally, we discuss a possible mechanism in which the initial neutron star spins can influence the amount of ejected matter in some cases.

  3. Binary neutron stars with realistic spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Wolfgang; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim; Bruegmann, Bernd

    2014-03-01

    Astrophysical neutron stars are expected to be spinning. We present the first, fully nonlinear general relativistic dynamical evolutions of the last three orbits for constraint satisfying initial data of spinning neutron star binaries, with astrophysically realistic spins aligned and anti-aligned to the orbital angular momentum. The dynamics of the systems are analyzed in terms of gauge-invariant binding energy vs. orbital angular momentum curves. By comparing to a binary black hole configuration we can estimate the different tidal and spin contributions to the binding energy for the first time. First results on the gravitational wave forms are presented. The phase evolution of the gravitational waves during the orbital motion is significantly affected by spin-orbit interactions, leading to delayed or early mergers. Furthermore, a frequency shift in the main emission mode of the hyper massive neutron star is observed. Our results suggest that a detailed modeling of merger waveforms requires the inclusion of spin, even for the moderate magnitudes observed in binary neutron star systems. This work was supported by NSF grants PHY-1204334, PHY-1305387 and DFG grant SFB/Transregio 7.

  4. Spin paramagnetic deformation of a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Melatos, A.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum mechanical corrections to the hydromagnetic force balance equation, derived from the microscopic Schrödinger-Pauli theory of quantum plasmas, modify the equilibrium structure and hence the mass quadrupole moment of a neutron star. It is shown here that the dominant effect - spin paramagnetism - is most significant in a magnetar, where one typically has μ _B|B|≳ k_B T_e, where μB is the Bohr magneton, B is the magnetic field, and Te is the electron temperature. The spin paramagnetic deformation of a non-barotropic magnetar with a linked poloidal-toroidal magnetic field is calculated to be up to ˜10 times greater than the deformation caused solely by the Lorentz force. It depends on the degree of Pauli blocking by conduction electrons and the propensity to form magnetic domains, processes which are incompletely modelled at magnetar field strengths. The star becomes more oblate, as the toroidal field component strengthens. The result implies that existing classical predictions underestimate the maximum strength of the gravitational wave signal from rapidly spinning magnetars at birth. Turning the argument around, future gravitational-wave upper limits of increasing sensitivity will place ever-stricter constraints on the physics of Pauli blocking and magnetic domain formation under magnetar conditions.

  5. NARROW ATOMIC FEATURES FROM RAPIDLY SPINNING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bauboeck, Michi; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu

    2013-04-01

    Neutron stars spinning at moderate rates ({approx}300-600 Hz) become oblate in shape and acquire a nonzero quadrupole moment. In this paper, we calculate the profiles of atomic features from such neutron stars using a ray-tracing algorithm in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. We show that line profiles acquire cores that are much narrower than the widths expected from pure Doppler effects for a large range of observer inclinations. As a result, the effects of both the oblateness and the quadrupole moments of neutron stars need to be taken into account when aiming to measure neutron-star radii from rotationally broadened lines. Moreover, the presence of these narrow cores substantially increases the likelihood of detecting atomic lines from rapidly spinning neutron stars.

  6. Measuring Neutron-Star Spins via Burst Oscillations (core Program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measuring the spin of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries is one of the great strengths and highest priorities for RXTE. We propose targeted observations of known thermonuclear burst sources which do not have confirmed burst oscillations, as well as previously unknown sources, in order to detect new examples of burst oscillations and thus add to the sample of neutron star spins. We will target sources in states of frequent, bright bursts by triggering on the detection of bursts by INTEGRAL and/or Swift. Detection of neutron stars spinning beyond the present maximum will allow us to significantly constrain the neutron-star equation of state, presently an area of major uncertainty.

  7. Relativistic simulations of eccentric binary neutron star mergers: One-arm spiral instability and effects of neutron star spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, William E.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pretorius, Frans; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    We perform general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of dynamical capture binary neutron star mergers, emphasizing the role played by the neutron star spin. Dynamical capture mergers may take place in globular clusters, as well as other dense stellar systems, where most neutron stars have large spins. We find significant variability in the merger outcome as a function of initial neutron star spin. For cases where the spin is aligned with the orbital angular momentum, the additional centrifugal support in the remnant hypermassive neutron star can prevent the prompt collapse to a black hole, while for antialigned cases the decreased total angular momentum can facilitate the collapse to a black hole. We show that even moderate spins can significantly increase the amount of ejected material, including the amount unbound with velocities greater than half the speed of light, leading to brighter electromagnetic signatures associated with kilonovae and interaction of the ejecta with the interstellar medium. Furthermore, we find that the initial neutron star spin can strongly affect the already rich phenomenology in the postmerger gravitational wave signatures that arise from the oscillation modes of the hypermassive neutron star. In several of our simulations, the resulting hypermassive neutron star develops the one-arm (m =1 ) spiral instability, the most pronounced cases being those with small but non-negligible neutron star spins. For long-lived hypermassive neutron stars, the presence of this instability leads to improved prospects for detecting these events through gravitational waves, and thus may give information about the neutron star equation of state.

  8. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND THE MAXIMUM SPIN FREQUENCY OF NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Patruno, Alessandro; Haskell, Brynmor; D'Angelo, Caroline

    2012-02-10

    In this paper, we re-examine the idea that gravitational waves are required as a braking mechanism to explain the observed maximum spin frequency of neutron stars. We show that for millisecond X-ray pulsars, the existence of spin equilibrium as set by the disk/magnetosphere interaction is sufficient to explain the observations. We show as well that no clear correlation exists between the neutron star magnetic field B and the X-ray outburst luminosity L{sub X} when considering an enlarged sample size of millisecond X-ray pulsars.

  9. ECCENTRIC MERGERS OF BLACK HOLES WITH SPINNING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    East, William E.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pretorius, Frans

    2015-07-01

    We study dynamical capture binary black hole–neutron star (BH–NS) mergers focusing on the effects of the neutron star spin. These events may arise in dense stellar regions, such as globular clusters, where the majority of neutron stars are expected to be rapidly rotating. We initialize the BH–NS systems with positions and velocities corresponding to marginally unbound Newtonian orbits, and evolve them using general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations. We find that even moderate spins can significantly increase the amount of mass in unbound material. In some of the more extreme cases, there can be up to a third of a solar mass in unbound matter. Similarly, large amounts of tidally stripped material can remain bound and eventually accrete onto the BH—as much as a tenth of a solar mass in some cases. These simulations demonstrate that it is important to treat neutron star spin in order to make reliable predictions of the gravitational wave and electromagnetic transient signals accompanying these sources.

  10. Lense-Thirring precession around neutron stars with known spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Doesburgh, Marieke; van der Klis, Michiel

    2016-07-01

    Quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) between 300 and 1200 Hz in the X-ray emission from low mass X-ray binaries have been linked to Keplerian orbital motion at the inner edge of accretion disks. Lense-Thirring precession is precession of the line of nodes of inclined orbits with respect to the equatorial plane of a rotating object due to the general relativistic effect of frame dragging. The Lense-Thirring model of Stella and Vietri (1998) explains QPOs observed in neutron star low mass X-ray binaries at frequencies of a few tens of Hz by the nodal precession of the orbits at the inner disk edge at a precession frequency, ν_{LT} , identical to the Lense-Thirring precession of a test particle orbit. A quadratic relation between ν_{LT} and the Keplerian orbital frequency, and a linear dependence on spin frequency are predicted. In early work (van Straaten et al., 2003) this quadratic relation was confirmed to remarkable precision in three objects of uncertain spin. Since the initial work, many neutron star spin frequencies have been measured in X-ray sources that show QPOs at both low and high frequency. Using archival data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, we compare the Lense-Thirring prediction to the properties of quasi periodic oscillations measured in a sample of 14 low mass X-ray binaries of which the neutron star spin frequencies can be inferred from their bursting behaviour. We find that in the range predicted for the precession frequency, we can distinguish two different oscillations that often occur simultaneously. In previous works, these two oscillations have often been confused. For both frequencies, we find correlations with inferred Keplerian frequency characterized by power laws with indices that differ significantly from the prediction of 2.0 and therefore inconsistent with the Lense-Thirring model. Also, the specific moment of inertia of the neutron star required by the observed frequencies exceeds values predicted for realistic equations of

  11. SPIN-PRECESSION: BREAKING THE BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR DEGENERACY

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Cornish, Neil; Klein, Antoine; Yunes, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Mergers of compact stellar remnants are prime targets for the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave detectors. The gravitational wave signals from these merger events can be used to study the mass and spin distribution of stellar remnants, and provide information about black hole horizons and the material properties of neutron stars. However, it has been suggested that degeneracies in the way that the star's mass and spin are imprinted in the waveforms may make it impossible to distinguish between black holes and neutron stars. Here we show that the precession of the orbital plane due to spin-orbit coupling breaks the mass-spin degeneracy, and allows us to distinguish between standard neutron stars and alternative possibilities, such as black holes or exotic neutron stars with large masses and spins.

  12. The masses and spins of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Miller, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    Stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars represent extremes in gravity, density, and magnetic fields. They therefore serve as key objects in the study of multiple frontiers of physics. In addition, their origin (mainly in core-collapse supernovae) and evolution (via accretion or, for neutron stars, magnetic spindown and reconfiguration) touch upon multiple open issues in astrophysics. In this review, we discuss current mass and spin measurements and their reliability for neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes, as well as the overall importance of spins and masses for compact object astrophysics. Current masses are obtained primarily through electromagnetic observations of binaries, although future microlensing observations promise to enhance our understanding substantially. The spins of neutron stars are straightforward to measure for pulsars, but the birth spins of neutron stars are more difficult to determine. In contrast, even the current spins of stellar-mass black holes are challenging to measure. As we discuss, major inroads have been made in black hole spin estimates via analysis of iron lines and continuum emission, with reasonable agreement when both types of estimate are possible for individual objects, and future X-ray polarization measurements may provide additional independent information. We conclude by exploring the exciting prospects for mass and spin measurements from future gravitational wave detections, which are expected to revolutionize our understanding of strong gravity and compact objects.

  13. Spin evolution of a proto-neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camelio, Giovanni; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pons, José A.; Ferrari, Valeria

    2016-07-01

    We study the evolution of the rotation rate of a proto-neutron star, born in a core-collapse supernova, in the first seconds of its life. During this phase, the star evolution can be described as a sequence of stationary configurations, which we determine by solving the neutrino transport and the stellar structure equations in general relativity. We include in our model the angular momentum loss due to neutrino emission. We find that the requirement of a rotation rate not exceeding the mass-shedding limit at the beginning of the evolution implies a strict bound on the rotation rate at later times. Moreover, assuming that the proto-neutron star is born with a finite ellipticity, we determine the emitted gravitational wave signal and estimate its detectability by present and future ground-based interferometric detectors.

  14. Spin change of a proto-neutron star by the emission of neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Chung-Yeol; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the structure of proto-neutron stars (PNSs) with trapped neutrinos by using a quark-meson coupling model. We adopt a phenomenological lepton density which is diffuse near the surface. We calculate the populations of baryons and leptons, the equations of state, and the mass-radius relation for isentropic PNS models. In addition, the moment of inertia is calculated for both PNS and cold-neutron-star (CNS) models as a means to study the change of the spin period due to the neutrino emission from a PNS. Neutrino emission from a hyperonic neutron star is shown to increase the spin by about 10% of the initial spin, while the spin of a nucleonic neutron star with a central density above ρC≈5ρ0 is decreased by a few % by the emission of neutrinos. Therefore, the spin change owing to the leakage of neutrinos from a PNS is a small (<10%) correction compared to other processes related to the spin change.

  15. A RAY-TRACING ALGORITHM FOR SPINNING COMPACT OBJECT SPACETIMES WITH ARBITRARY QUADRUPOLE MOMENTS. II. NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bauboeck, Michi; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal; Johannsen, Tim E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu E-mail: timj@email.arizona.edu

    2012-07-10

    A moderately spinning neutron star acquires an oblate shape and a spacetime with a significant quadrupole moment. These two properties affect its apparent surface area for an observer at infinity, as well as the light curve arising from a hot spot on its surface. In this paper, we develop a ray-tracing algorithm to calculate the apparent surface areas of moderately spinning neutron stars making use of the Hartle-Thorne metric. This analytic metric allows us to calculate various observables of the neutron star in a way that depends only on its macroscopic properties and not on the details of its equation of state. We use this algorithm to calculate the changes in the apparent surface area, which could play a role in measurements of neutron-star radii and, therefore, in constraining their equation of state. We show that whether a spinning neutron star appears larger or smaller than its non-rotating counterpart depends primarily on its equatorial radius. For neutron stars with radii {approx}10 km, the corrections to the Schwarzschild spacetime cause the apparent surface area to increase with spin frequency. In contrast, for neutron stars with radii {approx}15 km, the oblateness of the star dominates the spacetime corrections and causes the apparent surface area to decrease with increasing spin frequency. In all cases, the change in the apparent geometric surface area for the range of observed spin frequencies is {approx}<5% and hence only a small source of error in the measurement of neutron-star radii.

  16. Pulse profiles from spinning neutron stars in the Hartle-Thorne approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal E-mail: fozel@email.arizone.edu

    2014-09-10

    We present a new numerical algorithm for the calculation of pulse profiles from spinning neutron stars in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. Our approach allows us to formally take into account the effects of Doppler shifts and aberration, of frame dragging, as well as of the oblateness of the stellar surface and of its quadrupole moment. We confirm an earlier result that neglecting the oblateness of the neutron-star surface leads to ≅ 5%-30% errors in the calculated profiles and further show that neglecting the quadrupole moment of its spacetime leads to ≅ 1%-5% errors at a spin frequency of ≅ 600 Hz. We discuss the implications of our results for the measurements of neutron-star masses and radii with upcoming X-ray missions, such as NASA's NICER and ESA's LOFT.

  17. New insights on the spin-up of a neutron star during core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Foglizzo, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    The spin of a neutron star at birth may be impacted by the asymmetric character of the explosion of its massive progenitor. During the first second after bounce, the spiral mode of the Standing Accretion Shock Instability (SASI) is able to redistribute angular momentum and spin up a neutron star born from a non-rotating progenitor. Our aim is to assess the robustness of this process. We perform 2D numerical simulations of a simplified setup in cylindrical geometry to investigate the timescale over which the dynamics is dominated by a spiral or a sloshing mode. We observe that the spiral mode prevails only if the ratio of the initial shock radius to the neutron star radius exceeds a critical value. In that regime, both the degree of asymmetry and the average expansion of the shock induced by the spiral mode increase monotonously with this ratio, exceeding the values obtained when a sloshing mode is artificially imposed. With a timescale of 2-3 SASI oscillations, the dynamics of SASI takes place fast enough to affect the spin of the neutron star before the explosion. The spin periods deduced from the simulations are compared favourably to analytical estimates evaluated from the measured saturation amplitude of the SASI wave. Despite the simplicity of our setup, numerical simulations revealed unexpected stochastic variations, including a reversal of the direction of rotation of the shock. Our results show that the spin-up of neutron stars by SASI spiral modes is a viable mechanism even though it is not systematic.

  18. Parameter Estimation on Gravitational Waves from Neutron-star Binaries with Spinning Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Ben; Berry, Christopher P. L.; Farr, Will M.; Haster, Carl-Johan; Middleton, Hannah; Cannon, Kipp; Graff, Philip B.; Hanna, Chad; Mandel, Ilya; Pankow, Chris; Price, Larry R.; Sidery, Trevor; Singer, Leo P.; Urban, Alex L.; Vecchio, Alberto; Veitch, John; Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    Inspiraling binary neutron stars (BNSs) are expected to be one of the most significant sources of gravitational-wave signals for the new generation of advanced ground-based detectors. We investigate how well we could hope to measure properties of these binaries using the Advanced LIGO detectors, which began operation in September 2015. We study an astrophysically motivated population of sources (binary components with masses 1.2\\quad {M}ȯ {--}1.6\\quad {M}ȯ and spins of less than 0.05) using the full LIGO analysis pipeline. While this simulated population covers the observed range of potential BNS sources, we do not exclude the possibility of sources with parameters outside these ranges; given the existing uncertainty in distributions of mass and spin, it is critical that analyses account for the full range of possible mass and spin configurations. We find that conservative prior assumptions on neutron-star mass and spin lead to average fractional uncertainties in component masses of ˜16%, with little constraint on spins (the median 90% upper limit on the spin of the more massive component is ˜0.7). Stronger prior constraints on neutron-star spins can further constrain mass estimates but only marginally. However, we find that the sky position and luminosity distance for these sources are not influenced by the inclusion of spin; therefore, if LIGO detects a low-spin population of BNS sources, less computationally expensive results calculated neglecting spin will be sufficient for guiding electromagnetic follow-up.

  19. Mergers of magnetized neutron stars with spinning black holes: disruption, accretion, and fallback.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sarvnipun; Anderson, Matthew; Besselman, Michael; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L; Motl, Patrick M; Neilsen, David

    2010-09-10

    We investigate the merger of a neutron star in orbit about a spinning black hole in full general relativity with a mass ratio of 5:1, allowing the star to have an initial magnetization of 10(12)  G. We present the resulting gravitational waveform and analyze the fallback accretion as the star is disrupted. We see no significant dynamical effects in the simulations or changes in the gravitational waveform resulting from the initial magnetization. We find that only a negligible amount of matter becomes unbound; 99% of the neutron star material has a fallback time of 10 seconds or shorter to reach the region of the central engine and that 99.99% of the star will interact with the central disk and black hole within 3 hours. PMID:20867561

  20. Modeling the Spin Equilibrium of Neutron Stars in LMXBs Without Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Haskell, B.; Watts, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the spin-equilibrium of accreting neutron stars in LMXBs. We demonstrate that, when combined with a naive spin-up torque, the observed data leads to inferred magnetic fields which are at variance with those of galactic millisecond radiopulsars. This indicates the need for either additional spin-down torques (eg. gravitational radiation) or an improved accretion model. We show that a simple consistent accretion model can be arrived at by accounting for radiation pressure in rapidly accreting systems (above a few percent of the Eddington accretion rate). In our model the inner disk region is thick and significantly sub-Keplerian, and the estimated equilibrium periods are such that the LMXB neutron stars have properties that accord well with the galactic millisecond radiopulsar sample. The implications for future gravitational-wave observations are also discussed briefly.

  1. Outflows from accretion discs formed in neutron star mergers: effect of black hole spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel; Metzger, Brian D.; Quataert, Eliot

    2015-01-01

    The accretion disc that forms after a neutron star merger is a source of neutron-rich ejecta. The ejected material contributes to a radioactively powered electromagnetic transient, with properties that depend sensitively on the composition of the outflow. Here, we investigate how the spin of the black hole (BH) remnant influences mass ejection on the thermal and viscous time-scales. We carry out two-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of merger remnant accretion discs including viscous angular momentum transport and approximate neutrino self-irradiation. The gravity of the spinning BH is included via a pseudo-Newtonian potential. We find that a disc around a spinning BH ejects more mass, up to a factor of several, relative to the non-spinning case. The enhanced mass-loss is due to energy release by accretion occurring deeper in the gravitational potential, raising the disc temperature and hence the rate of viscous heating in regions where neutrino cooling is ineffective. The mean electron fraction of the outflow increases moderately with BH spin due to a highly irradiated (though not neutrino-driven) wind component. While the bulk of the ejecta is still very neutron-rich, thus generating heavy r-process elements, the leading edge of the wind contains a small amount of Lanthanide-free material. This component can give rise to an ≲1 d blue optical `bump' in a kilonova light curve, even in the case of prompt BH formation, which may facilitate its detection.

  2. Spin-down Properties of Quark-Core Neutron Stars, Catastrophic Phase Transitions and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Feng; Luo, Shan

    1996-05-01

    We study properties of an isolated quark-core neutron star in its spin-down process. We find that the central density of the star increases with time, and more neutron matter is converted into quark matter via continuous quark-hadron phase transition. As a result, the whole star contracts while its quark core increases in size and mass. This has two observational signatures: first, the fractional moment of inertia of the neutral component of the star (I_n/I) decreases and results in a decrease of the proportional healing parameter (Q) of pulsar glitches; second, due to the contraction of the whole star, the total moment of inertia decreases and results in an increase in the braking index (n) of the pulsar spin-down process. This makes the spin-down behavior of a quark-core neutron star different from that of ``pure'' neutron stars. In comparison, most previous work about rotational properties of neutron and quark stars concentrated on rotation-induced mass ``increase'', which is related to star families and not directly observable. In the extreme case, catastrophic quark-hadron phase transition or pion condensation may happen to neutron stars at a rate of about 10(-6) yr(-1) per galaxy, with an energy release of about 10(52) ergs, and may be a good explanation of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at cosmological distances. If so, the detection of gravitational waves (GW) as counterparts of GRBs will be less likely than previously expected. We give an approximate light curve of GW for a catastrophic phase transition in a fast rotating star, and find it to be in sharp contrast to the predictions of neutron star merger models. We also discuss an extremely strong magnetic field that may be formed via the dynamo process during collapse; the effects of this field on electromagnetic and gravitational radiation; and an initial high energy neutrino burst due to the production of strange quarks.

  3. Spinning down newborn neutron stars: Nonlinear development of the r-mode instability

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Teukolsky, Saul A.; Wasserman, Ira

    2009-05-15

    We model the nonlinear saturation of the r-mode instability via three-mode couplings and the effects of the instability on the spin evolution of young neutron stars. We include one mode triplet consisting of the r-mode and two near-resonant inertial modes that couple to it. We find that the spectrum of evolutions is more diverse than previously thought. We start our evolutions with a star of temperature {approx}10{sup 10} K and a spin frequency close to the Kepler break-up frequency. We assume that hyperon bulk viscosity dominates at high temperatures (T{approx}10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} K) and boundary layer viscosity dominates at lower temperatures ({approx}a fewx10{sup 8} K). To explore possible nonlinear behavior, we vary properties of the star such as the hyperon superfluid transition temperature, the strength of the boundary layer viscosity, and the fraction of the star that cools via direct URCA reactions. The evolution of the star is dynamic and initially dominated by fast neutrino cooling. Nonlinear effects become important when the r-mode amplitude grows above its first parametric instability threshold. The balance between neutrino cooling and viscous heating plays an important role in the evolution. Depending on the initial r-mode amplitude, and on the strength of the viscosity and of the cooling this balance can occur at different temperatures. If thermal equilibrium occurs on the r-mode stability curve, where gravitational driving equals viscous damping, the evolution may be adequately described by a one-mode model. Otherwise, nonlinear effects are important and lead to various more complicated scenarios. Once thermal balance occurs, the star spins down oscillating between thermal equilibrium states until the instability is no longer active. The average evolution of the mode amplitudes can be approximated by quasistationary states that are determined algebraically. For lower viscosity we observe runaway behavior in which the r-mode amplitude passes several

  4. Erratum: Binary neutron stars with arbitrary spins in numerical relativity [Phys. Rev. D 92, 124012 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacik, Nick; Foucart, Francois; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Haas, Roland; Ossokine, Serguei; Kaplan, Jeff; Muhlberger, Curran; Duez, Matt D.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2016-08-01

    The code used in [Phys. Rev. D 92, 124012 (2015)] erroneously computed the enthalpy at the center of the neutron stars. Upon correcting this error, density oscillations in evolutions of rotating neutron stars are significantly reduced (from ˜20 % to ˜0.5 % ). Furthermore, it is possible to construct neutron stars with faster rotation rates.

  5. Spin-Down Mechanisms in Neutron Stars with ``Anomalous'' Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Energy losses from isolated neutron stars are attributed to a number of factors, the most common assumption being the emission of electromagnetic radiation from a rotating point-like magnetic dipole in vacuum. This energy loss mechanism predicts a braking index n = 3, which is not observed in highly magnetized neutron stars. Despite this fact, the assumptions of a dipole field and rapid early rotation are often assumed a priori. This typically causes a discrepancy in the characteristic age of these objects and the age of their associated Supernova Remnants (SNRs). In this work we consider neutron stars with ``anomalous'' magnetic fields - namely magnetars, high-B radio pulsars, and the Central Compact Objects (proposed to be `anti-magnetars’) that are securely associated with SNRs. Without making any assumptions about the initial spin periods of these objects and by constraining the SNR ages to match their associated pulsar ages, we compare the predictions of distinct energy loss mechanisms, such as field decay and the emission of relativistic winds using all observed data on the braking indices. This study has important implications on the proposed emission models for these exotic objects and helps in resolving the PSR-SNR age discrepancy.

  6. Initial Data for Binary Neutron Stars with Arbitrary Spin and Orbital Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsatsin, Petr; Marronetti, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    The starting point of any general relativistic numerical simulation is a solution of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraint. One characteristic of the Binary Neutron Star (BNS) initial data problem is that, unlike the case of binary black holes, there are no formalisms that permit the construction of initial data for stars with arbitrary spins. For many years, the only options available have been systems either with irrotational or corotating fluid. Ten years ago, Marronetti & Shapiro (2003) introduced an approximation that would produce such arbitrarily spinning systems. More recently, Tichy (2012) presented a new formulation to do the same. However, all these data sets are bound to have a non-zero eccentricity that results from the fact the stars' velocity have initial null radial components. We present here a new approximation for BNS initial data for systems that possess arbitrary spins and arbitrary radial and tangential velocity components. The latter allows for the construction of data sets with arbitrary orbital eccentricity. Through the fine-tuning of the radial component, we were able to reduce the eccentricity by a factor of several compared to that of standard helical symmetry data sets such as those currently used in the scientific community.

  7. Spin evolution of accreting neutron stars: Nonlinear development of the r-mode instability

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Teukolsky, Saul A.; Wasserman, Ira

    2007-09-15

    The nonlinear saturation of the r-mode instability and its effects on the spin evolution of low mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) are modeled using the triplet of modes at the lowest parametric instability threshold. We solve numerically the coupled equations for the three modes in conjunction with the spin and temperature evolution equations. We observe that very quickly the mode amplitudes settle into quasistationary states that change slowly as the temperature and spin of the star evolve. Once these states are reached, the mode amplitudes can be found algebraically and the system of equations is reduced from eight to two equations: spin and temperature evolution. The evolution of the neutron star angular velocity and temperature follow easily calculated trajectories along these sequences of quasistationary states. The outcome depends on whether or not the star will reach thermal equilibrium, where the viscous heating by the three modes is equal to the neutrino cooling (H=C curve). If, when the r-mode becomes unstable, the star spins at a frequency below the maximum of the H=C curve, then it will reach a state of thermal equilibrium. It can then either (1) undergo a cyclic evolution with a small cycle size with a frequency change of at most 10% (2) evolve toward a full equilibrium state in which the accretion torque balances the gravitational radiation emission, or (3) enter a thermogravitational runaway on a very long time scale of {approx_equal}10{sup 6} years. If the star does not reach a state of thermal equilibrium, then a faster thermal runaway (time scale of {approx_equal}100 years) occurs and the r-mode amplitude increases above the second parametric instability threshold. Following this evolution requires more inertial modes to be included. The sources of damping considered are shear viscosity, hyperon bulk viscosity, and viscosity within the core-crust boundary layer. We vary proprieties of the star such as the hyperon superfluid transition temperature T

  8. Hidden Markov model tracking of continuous gravitational waves from a neutron star with wandering spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, S.; Sun, L.; Melatos, A.; Moran, W.; Evans, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Gravitational wave searches for continuous-wave signals from neutron stars are especially challenging when the star's spin frequency is unknown a priori from electromagnetic observations and wanders stochastically under the action of internal (e.g., superfluid or magnetospheric) or external (e.g., accretion) torques. It is shown that frequency tracking by hidden Markov model (HMM) methods can be combined with existing maximum likelihood coherent matched filters like the F -statistic to surmount some of the challenges raised by spin wandering. Specifically, it is found that, for an isolated, biaxial rotor whose spin frequency walks randomly, HMM tracking of the F -statistic output from coherent segments with duration Tdrift=10 d over a total observation time of Tobs=1 yr can detect signals with wave strains h0>2 ×10-26 at a noise level characteristic of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO). For a biaxial rotor with randomly walking spin in a binary orbit, whose orbital period and semimajor axis are known approximately from electromagnetic observations, HMM tracking of the Bessel-weighted F -statistic output can detect signals with h0>8 ×10-26. An efficient, recursive, HMM solver based on the Viterbi algorithm is demonstrated, which requires ˜103 CPU hours for a typical, broadband (0.5-kHz) search for the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1, including generation of the relevant F -statistic input. In a "realistic" observational scenario, Viterbi tracking successfully detects 41 out of 50 synthetic signals without spin wandering in stage I of the Scorpius X-1 Mock Data Challenge convened by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration down to a wave strain of h0=1.1 ×10-25, recovering the frequency with a root-mean-square accuracy of ≤4.3 ×10-3 Hz .

  9. Long-term evolution of the neutron-star spin period of SXP 1062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, R.; Haberl, F.; Oskinova, L. M.; Schurch, M. P. E.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Gallagher, J. S.; Udalski, A.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The Be/X-ray binary SXP 1062 is of especial interest owing to the large spin period of the neutron star, its large spin-down rate, and the association with a supernova remnant constraining its age. This makes the source an important probe for accretion physics. Aims: To investigate the long-term evolution of the spin period and associated spectral variations, we performed an XMM-Newton target-of-opportunity observation of SXP 1062 during X-ray outburst. Methods: Spectral and timing analysis of the XMM-Newton data was compared with previous studies, as well as complementary Swift/XRT monitoring and optical spectroscopy with the SALT telescope were obtained. Results: The spin period was measured to be Ps = (1071.01 ± 0.16) s on 2012 Oct. 14. The X-ray spectrum is similar to that of previous observations. No convincing cyclotron absorption features, which could be indicative for a high magnetic field strength, are found. The high-resolution RGS spectra indicate the presence of emission lines, which may not completely be accounted for by the SNR emission. The comparison of multi-epoch optical spectra suggest an increasing size or density of the decretion disc around the Be star. Conclusions: SXP 1062 showed a net spin-down with an average of Ṗs = (2.27 ± 0.44) s yr-1 over a baseline of 915 days. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA and on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).The reduced SALT spectra is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/556/A139

  10. Neutron Star Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1998-01-01

    Various phenomena involving neutron stars are addressed. Electron-positron production in the near magnetosphere of gamma-ray pulsars is discussed along with magnetic field evolution in spun-up and spinning-down pulsars. Glitches and gamma-ray central engines are also discussed.

  11. SXP 1062, a young Be X-ray binary pulsar with long spin period. Implications for the neutron star birth spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Sturm, R.; Filipović, M. D.; Pietsch, W.; Crawford, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is ideally suited to investigating the recent star formation history from X-ray source population studies. It harbours a large number of Be/X-ray binaries (Be stars with an accreting neutron star as companion), and the supernova remnants can be easily resolved with imaging X-ray instruments. Aims: We search for new supernova remnants in the SMC and in particular for composite remnants with a central X-ray source. Methods: We study the morphology of newly found candidate supernova remnants using radio, optical and X-ray images and investigate their X-ray spectra. Results: Here we report on the discovery of the new supernova remnant around the recently discovered Be/X-ray binary pulsar CXO J012745.97-733256.5 = SXP 1062 in radio and X-ray images. The Be/X-ray binary system is found near the centre of the supernova remnant, which is located at the outer edge of the eastern wing of the SMC. The remnant is oxygen-rich, indicating that it developed from a type Ib event. From XMM-Newton observations we find that the neutron star with a spin period of 1062 s (the second longest known in the SMC) shows a very high average spin-down rate of 0.26 s per day over the observing period of 18 days. Conclusions: From the currently accepted models, our estimated age of around 10 000-25 000 years for the supernova remnant is not long enough to spin down the neutron star from a few 10 ms to its current value. Assuming an upper limit of 25 000 years for the age of the neutron star and the extreme case that the neutron star was spun down by the accretion torque that we have measured during the XMM-Newton observations since its birth, a lower limit of 0.5 s for the birth spin period is inferred. For more realistic, smaller long-term average accretion torques our results suggest that the neutron star was born with a correspondingly longer spin period. This implies that neutron stars in Be/X-ray binaries with long spin periods can be much younger

  12. Banks of templates for directed searches of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarski, Andrzej; Jaranowski, Piotr; Pietka, Maciej

    2011-02-15

    We construct efficient banks of templates suitable for directed searches of almost monochromatic gravitational waves originating from spinning neutron stars in our Galaxy in data being collected by currently operating interferometric detectors. We thus assume that the position of the gravitational-wave source in the sky is known, but we do not assume that the wave's frequency and its derivatives are a priori known. In the construction we employ a simplified model of the signal with constant amplitude and phase which is a polynomial function of time. All our template banks enable usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithm in the computation of the maximum-likelihood F-statistic for nodes of the grids defining the bank. We study and employ the dependence of the grid's construction on the choice of the position of the observational interval with respect to the origin of time axis. We also study the usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithms with nonstandard frequency resolutions achieved by zero padding or folding the data. In the case of the gravitational-wave signal with one spin-down parameter included we have found grids with covering thicknesses which are only 0.1-16% larger than the thickness of the optimal 2-dimensional hexagonal covering.

  13. Planets Around Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolszczan, Alexander; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Anderson, Stuart B.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to continue investigations of neutron star planetary systems in an effort to describe and understand their origin, orbital dynamics, basic physical properties and their relationship to planets around normal stars. This research represents an important element of the process of constraining the physics of planet formation around various types of stars. The research goals of this project included long-term timing measurements of the planets pulsar, PSR B1257+12, to search for more planets around it and to study the dynamics of the whole system, and sensitive searches for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of old, rapidly spinning neutron stars with planetary systems. The instrumentation used in our project included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM), the 100-m Green Bank Telescope with the Berkeley- Caltech Pulsar Machine (BCPM), and the 100-m Effelsberg and 64-m Parkes telescopes equipped with the observatory supplied backend hardware.

  14. ORIGIN OF INTERMITTENT ACCRETION-POWERED X-RAY OSCILLATIONS IN NEUTRON STARS WITH MILLISECOND SPIN PERIODS

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Frederick K.; Boutloukos, Stratos; Van Wassenhove, Sandor; Chamberlain, Robert T.; Lo, Ka Ho; Coleman Miller, M.

    2009-11-01

    We have shown previously that many of the properties of persistent accretion-powered millisecond pulsars can be understood if their X-ray emitting areas are near their spin axes and move as the accretion rate and structure of the inner disk vary. Here, we show that this 'nearly aligned moving spot model' may also explain the intermittent accretion-powered pulsations that have been detected in three weakly magnetic accreting neutron stars. We show that movement of the emitting area from very close to the spin axis to approx10 deg. away can increase the fractional rms amplitude from approx<0.5%, which is usually undetectable with current instruments, to a few percent, which is easily detectable. The second harmonic of the spin frequency usually would not be detected, in agreement with observations. The model produces intermittently detectable oscillations for a range of emitting area sizes and beaming patterns, stellar masses and radii, and viewing directions. Intermittent oscillations are more likely in stars that are more compact. In addition to explaining the sudden appearance of accretion-powered millisecond oscillations in some neutron stars with millisecond spin periods, the model explains why accretion-powered millisecond oscillations are relatively rare and predicts that the persistent accretion-powered millisecond oscillations of other stars may become undetectable for brief intervals. It suggests why millisecond oscillations are frequently detected during the X-ray bursts of some neutron stars but not others and suggests mechanisms that could explain the occasional temporal association of intermittent accretion-powered oscillations with thermonuclear X-ray bursts.

  15. Probing the neutron star spin evolution in the young Small Magellanic Cloud Be/X-ray binary SXP 1062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.; Turolla, R.

    2012-03-01

    The newly discovered Be/X-ray binary in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 1062, provides the first example of a robust association with a supernova remnant (SNR). The short age estimated for the SNR qualifies SXP 1062 as the youngest known source in its class, ?. As such, it allows us to test current models of magnetorotational evolution of neutron stars in a still unexplored regime. Here we discuss possible evolutionary scenarios for SXP 1062 in an attempt to reconcile its long spin period, ?, and short age. Although several options can be considered, like an anomalously long initial period or the presence of a fossil disc, our results indicate that SXP 1062 may host a neutron star born with a large initial magnetic field, typically in excess of ˜ 1014 G, which then decayed to ˜ 1013 G.

  16. Binary neutron stars with generic spin, eccentricity, mass ratio, and compactness: Quasi-equilibrium sequences and first evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Moldenhauer, Niclas; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K.; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Markakis, Charalampos M.; Brügmann, Bernd; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Information about the last stages of a binary neutron star inspiral and the final merger can be extracted from quasiequilibrium configurations and dynamical evolutions. In this article, we construct quasiequilibrium configurations for different spins, eccentricities, mass ratios, compactnesses, and equations of state. For this purpose we employ the sgrid code, which allows us to construct such data in previously inaccessible regions of the parameter space. In particular, we consider spinning neutron stars in isolation and in binary systems; we incorporate new methods to produce highly eccentric and eccentricity-reduced data; we present the possibility of computing data for significantly unequal-mass binaries with mass ratios q ≃2 ; and we create equal-mass binaries with individual compactness up to C ≃0.23 . As a proof of principle, we explore the dynamical evolution of three new configurations. First, we simulate a q =2.06 mass ratio which is the highest mass ratio for a binary neutron star evolved in numerical relativity to date. We find that mass transfer from the companion star sets in a few revolutions before merger and a rest mass of ˜10-2M⊙ is transferred between the two stars. This amount of mass accretion corresponds to ˜1051 ergs of accretion energy. This configuration also ejects a large amount of material during merger (˜7.6 ×1 0-2M⊙), imparting a substantial kick to the remnant neutron star. Second, we simulate the first merger of a precessing binary neutron star. We present the dominant modes of the gravitational waves for the precessing simulation, where a clear imprint of the precession is visible in the (2,1) mode. Finally, we quantify the effect of an eccentricity-reduction procedure on the gravitational waveform. The procedure improves the waveform quality and should be employed in future precision studies. However, one also needs to reduce other errors in the waveforms, notably truncation errors, in order for the improvement due to

  17. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  18. Hadron star models. [neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Boerner, G.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of fully relativistic rotating hadron star models are discussed using models based on recently developed equations of state. All of these stable neutron star models are bound with binding energies as high as about 25%. During hadron star formation, much of this energy will be released. The consequences, resulting from the release of this energy, are examined.

  19. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkotas, Konstantinos

    2016-03-01

    Neutron stars are the densest objects in the present Universe, attaining physical conditions of matter that cannot be replicated on Earth. These unique and irreproducible laboratories allow us to study physics in some of its most extreme regimes. More importantly, however, neutron stars allow us to formulate a number of fundamental questions that explore, in an intricate manner, the boundaries of our understanding of physics and of the Universe. The multifaceted nature of neutron stars involves a delicate interplay among astrophysics, gravitational physics, and nuclear physics. The research in the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars is expected to flourish and thrive in the next decade. The imminent direct detection of gravitational waves will turn gravitational physics into an observational science, and will provide us with a unique opportunity to make major breakthroughs in gravitational physics, in particle and high-energy astrophysics. These waves, which represent a basic prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity but have yet to be detected directly, are produced in copious amounts, for instance, by tight binary neutron star and black hole systems, supernovae explosions, non-axisymmetric or unstable spinning neutron stars. The focus of the talk will be on the neutron star instabilities induced by rotation and the magnetic field. The conditions for the onset of these instabilities and their efficiency in gravitational waves will be presented. Finally, the dependence of the results and their impact on astrophysics and especially nuclear physics will be discussed.

  20. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Supid

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes neutron stars and thermonuclear x ray bursts. The contents include: 1) Neutron Stars: why do we care?; 2) Thermonuclear Bursts: why do we care?; 3) Neutron Stars: Mass, Radius and Spin: a. Continuum Spectroscopy of Bursts b. Spectral Lines from Bursts c. Timing Properties of Bursts; 4) Neutron Star Atmosphere: Thermonuclear Flame Spreading; and 5) Future Prospects and Conclusions.

  1. Old and new neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M.

    1984-09-01

    The youngest known radiopulsar in the rapidly spinning magnetized neutron star which powers the Crab Nebula, the remnant of the historical supernova explosion of 1054 AD. Similar neutron stars are probably born at least every few hundred years, but are less frequent than Galactic supernova explosions. They are initially sources of extreme relativistic electron and/or positron winds (approx.10/sup 38/s/sup -1/ of 10/sup 12/ eV leptons) which greatly decrease as the neutron stars spin down to become mature pulsars. After several million years these neutron stars are no longer observed as radiopulsars, perhaps because of large magnetic field decay. However, a substantial fraction of the 10/sup 8/ old dead pulsars in the Galaxy are the most probable source for the isotropically distributed ..gamma..-ray burst detected several times per week at the earth. Some old neutron stars are spun-up by accretion from companions to be resurrected as rapidly spinning low magnetic field radiopulsars. 52 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  2. The Guitar nebula - A bow shock from a slow-spin, high-velocity neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, James M.; Romani, Roger W.; Lundgren, Scott C.

    1993-01-01

    The discovery is reported of a prominent nebula produced by the motion of a high-velocity pulsar, PSR 2224 + 65, through partially neutral gas. The pulsar's transverse speed of over about 800 km/s makes it arguably the fastest known star in the Galaxy and guarantees that it will ultimately escape the Galactic potential well. A deep H-alpha image reveals a bright head and a giant limb-brightened 'body' whose variable width suggests that the ambient interstellar gas has density variations on length scales less than 0.1 pc. Thermalization of shock energy occurs at a rate of about 0.01 times the pulsar's spindown loss rate. These observations provide some insights into the likelihood of finding shocks around other pulsars and the use of nebulae to find high-velocity neutron stars either not acting as pulsars or with their radiation beamed away from the earth.

  3. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  4. Thermally driven neutron star glitches

    SciTech Connect

    Link, B. |; Epstein, R.I.

    1996-02-01

    We examine the thermal and dynamical response of a neutron star to a sudden perturbation of the inner crust temperature. During the star{close_quote}s evolution, starquakes and other processes may deposit {approx_gt}10{sup 42} ergs, causing significant internal heating and increased frictional coupling between the crust and the more rapidly rotating neutron superfluid the star is expected to contain. Through numerical simulation we study the propagation of the thermal wave created by the energy deposition, the induced motion of the interior superfluid, and the resulting spin evolution of the crust. We find that energy depositions of {approximately}10{sup 40} ergs produce gradual spin-ups above the timing noise level, while larger energy depositions produce sudden spin jumps resembling pulsar glitches. For a star with a temperature in the observed range of the Vela pulsar, an energy deposition of {approximately}10{sup 42} ergs produces a large spin-up taking place over minutes, similar to the Vela {open_quote}{open_quote}Christmas{close_quote}{close_quote} glitch. Comparable energy deposition in a younger and hotter {open_quote}{open_quote}Crab-like{close_quote}{close_quote} star produces a smaller spin-up taking place over {approximately}1{sup d}, similar to that seen during the partially time-resolved Crab glitch of 1989. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Astronomical Society.}

  5. Neutron Stars are Follicly Challenged

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunes, Nicolas; Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo; Pappas, George; Apostolatos, Theocharis; Kyutoku, Koutarou

    2015-04-01

    Black holes satisfy certain no-hair relations through which all multipole moments of the spacetime can be specified in terms of just a few quantities, like their mass and spin angular momentum. I will describe how neutron stars and quark stars also satisfy similar no-hair relations that are approximately independent of their equation of state. I will show how these results hold for both slowly- and rapidly-rotating stars in full General Relativity, provided the stars are uniformly rotating and uncharged. I will then explain why such relations may be relevant to observations of the pulse profile of hot spots on rotating neutron stars with NICER, as well as how they could be used to test General Relativity with binary pulsar and gravitational wave observations. I acknowledge support from the NSF CAREER Award PHY-1250636.

  6. Search of S3 LIGO data for gravitational wave signals from spinning black hole and neutron star binary inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.

    2008-08-01

    We report on the methods and results of the first dedicated search for gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral of compact binaries with spinning component bodies. We analyze 788 hours of data collected during the third science run (S3) of the LIGO detectors. We searched for binary systems using a detection template family specially designed to capture the effects of the spin-induced precession of the orbital plane. We present details of the techniques developed to enable this search for spin-modulated gravitational waves, highlighting the differences between this and other recent searches for binaries with nonspinning components. The template bank we employed was found to yield high matches with our spin-modulated target waveform for binaries with masses in the asymmetric range 1.0M⊙spin of the binary’s components to have a significant effect. We find that our search of S3 LIGO data has good sensitivity to binaries in the Milky Way and to a small fraction of binaries in M31 and M33 with masses in the range 1.0M⊙spinning components and Gaussian distribution of masses representing a prototypical neutron star black hole system with m1≃1.35M⊙ and m2≃5M⊙, we calculate the 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of coalescence of these systems to be 15.9yr-1L10-1, where L10 is 1010 times the blue light luminosity of the Sun.

  7. Asymmetric Neutrino Emissions in Relativistic Mean-Field Approach and Observables: Pulsar Kick and Rapid Spin-Deceleration of Magnetized Proto-Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, T.; Kajino, T.; Yasutake, N.; Hidaka, J.; Kuroda, T.; Cheoun, M. K.; Ryu, C. Y.; Mathews, G. J.

    2015-11-01

    We calculate absorption cross-sections of neutrino in proto-neutron stars with strong magnetic field in the relativistic mean-field theory. Then, we apply this result to the neutrino transfer in the matter, and study the pulsar kick and the rapid spin down of magnetars.

  8. Rapidly rotating neutron star progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K. A.; Kuranov, A. G.; Kolesnikov, D. A.; Popov, S. B.; Porayko, N. K.

    2016-08-01

    Rotating proto-neutron stars can be important sources of gravitational waves to be searched for by present-day and future interferometric detectors. It was demonstrated by Imshennik that in extreme cases the rapid rotation of a collapsing stellar core may lead to fission and formation of a binary proto-neutron star which subsequently merges due to gravitational wave emission. In the present paper, we show that such dynamically unstable collapsing stellar cores may be the product of a former merger process of two stellar cores in a common envelope. We applied population synthesis calculations to assess the expected fraction of such rapidly rotating stellar cores which may lead to fission and formation of a pair of proto-neutron stars. We have used the BSE population synthesis code supplemented with a new treatment of stellar core rotation during the evolution via effective core-envelope coupling, characterized by the coupling time, τc. The validity of this approach is checked by direct MESA calculations of the evolution of a rotating 15 M⊙ star. From comparison of the calculated spin distribution of young neutron stars with the observed one, reported by Popov and Turolla, we infer the value τc ≃ 5 × 105 years. We show that merging of stellar cores in common envelopes can lead to collapses with dynamically unstable proto-neutron stars, with their formation rate being ˜0.1 - 1% of the total core collapses, depending on the common envelope efficiency.

  9. Exploration of spin-down rate of neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lang; Liu, Xi-Wei; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-04-01

    We use the evolutionary population synthesis method to investigate the statistical properties of the wind-fed neutron-star (NS) compact (Porb < 10 d) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in our Galaxy, based on different spin-down models. Model 1 assumes that the surrounding material is treated as forming a quasi-static atmosphere. Model 2 assumes that the characteristic velocity of matter and the typical Alfvén velocity of material in the magnetospheric boundary layer are comparable to the sound speed in the external medium. We find that the spin-down rate in the supersonic propeller phase in either model 1 or model 2 is too low to produce the observed number of compact HMXBs. Model 3 assumes that the infalling material is ejected with the corotation velocity at the magnetospheric radius when the magnetospheric radius is larger than the corotation radius. Model 4 uses simple integration of the magnetic torque over the magnetosphere. Both models 3 and 4 have a larger spin down rate than that given by model 1 or 2. We also find that models 3 and 4 can predict a reasonable number of observed wind-fed NS compact HMXBs. By comparing our calculated results with the observed particular distributions of wind-fed NS compact HMXBs in a Ps versus Porb diagram, we find that the subsonic propeller phase may not exist at all. However, the spin-down rates in models 3 and 4 both seem reasonable to produce the observed distribution of wind-fed NS compact HMXBs in the Ps versus Porb diagram. We cannot find which spin-down rate seems more reasonable from our calculations.

  10. Superfluid Turbulence in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Bennett

    Project Summary: Superfluid Turbulence in Neutron Stars The purpose of this proposal is to use recent progress in condensed matter physics and nuclear physics to advance our understanding of the inner workings of neutron stars and the associated observable phenomena. We will focus on determination of the observable consequences of superfluid turbulence in neutron stars. In particular, we will address these questions: 1) What is the signature of superfluid turbulence in the spin glitches seen in magnetars and pulsars? Observed post-glitch recovery in magnetars occurs more quickly than current theory predicts. We will explore if glitch recovery observed in magnetars can be explained by turbulent flow of the superfluid. 2) Are observed stochastic spin variations related to turbulence? Superfluid turbulence will exert a stochastic torque on the neutron star crust. We will calculate the response of the crust to compare with the observed power spectra of spin fluctuations. 3) Can superfluid turbulence produce observed spin glitches? We will study if transient effects arising from non-linearities in turbulent flow can produce observed glitches. We will predict the spin-up timescale to compare with existing and future data, and investigate if the basic features of the observed glitch distribution can be explained. Significant progress on these issues is now possible with modern models of the neutron star interior, in conjunction with laboratory observations of superfluid turbulence and the development of powerful new techniques for modeling superfluid turbulence. This project will be a synthesis of theoretical study of fundamental physical processes and testable predictions that will constrain the physics. Our goal is to develop theoretical background and realistic physical models with which to explain and interpret existing and future data of spin glitches in magnetars from RXTE, Fermi, Swift, Chandra, Suzaku, and XMM-Newton. This work addresses the ATP goal to explain

  11. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  12. TESTING MODELS OF MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION OF NEUTRON STARS WITH THE STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THEIR SPIN EVOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shuangnan; Xie Yi

    2012-10-01

    We test models for the evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields (B). Our model for the evolution of the NS spin is taken from an analysis of pulsar timing noise presented by Hobbs et al.. We first test the standard model of a pulsar's magnetosphere in which B does not change with time and magnetic dipole radiation is assumed to dominate the pulsar's spin-down. We find that this model fails to predict both the magnitudes and signs of the second derivatives of the spin frequencies ({nu}-double dot). We then construct a phenomenological model of the evolution of B, which contains a long-term decay (LTD) modulated by short-term oscillations; a pulsar's spin is thus modified by its B-evolution. We find that an exponential LTD is not favored by the observed statistical properties of {nu}-double dot for young pulsars and fails to explain the fact that {nu}-double dot is negative for roughly half of the old pulsars. A simple power-law LTD can explain all the observed statistical properties of {nu}-double dot. Finally, we discuss some physical implications of our results to models of the B-decay of NSs and suggest reliable determination of the true ages of many young NSs is needed, in order to constrain further the physical mechanisms of their B-decay. Our model can be further tested with the measured evolutions of {nu}-dot and {nu}-double dot for an individual pulsar; the decay index, oscillation amplitude, and period can also be determined this way for the pulsar.

  13. The Neutron Star Zoo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission. XXX Neutron stars are found in a wide variety of sources, displaying an amazing array of behavior. They can be isolated or in binary systems, accreting, heating, cooling, spinning down, spinning up, pulsing, flaring and bursting. The one property that seems to determine their behavior most strongly is their magnetic field strength, structure and evolution. The hot polar caps, bursts and flares of magnetars are likely due to the rapid decay and twisting of their superstrong magnetic fields, whose very existence requires some kind of early dynamo activity. The intermediate-strength magnetic fields of RPPs determines their spin-down behavior and radiation properties. However, the overlap of the magnetar and RPP populations is not understood at present. Why don't high-field RPPs burst or flare? Why don't lower-field magnetars sometimes behave more like RPPs? INS may be old magnetars whose high fields have decayed, but they do not account for the existence of younger RPPs with magnetar-strength fields. Not only the strength of the magnetic field but also its configuration may be important in making a NS a magnetar or a RPP. Magnetic field decay is a critical link between other NS populations as well. "Decay" of the magnetic field is necessary for normal RPPs to evolve into MSPs through accretion and spin up in LMXBs. Some kind of accretion-driven field reduction is the most likely mechanism, but it is controversial since it is not

  14. Neutron Star Compared to Manhattan

    NASA Video Gallery

    A pulsar is a neutron star, the crushed core of a star that has exploded. Neutron stars crush half a million times more mass than Earth into a sphere no larger than Manhattan, as animated in this s...

  15. Temperature of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Sachiko

    2016-07-01

    We start with a brief introduction to the historical background in the early pioneering days when the first neutron star thermal evolution calculations predicted the presence of neutron stars hot enough to be observable. We then report on the first detection of neutron star temperatures by ROSAT X-ray satellite, which vindicated the earlier prediction of hot neutron stars. We proceed to present subsequent developments, both in theory and observation, up to today. We then discuss the current status and the future prospect, which will offer useful insight to the understanding of basic properties of ultra-high density matter beyond the nuclear density, such as the possible presence of such exotic particles as pion condensates.

  16. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  17. Discovery of a Neutron Star with Spin Frequency 530 Hz in A1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Swank, Jean H.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2005-01-01

    We report the detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) of 530 Hz burst oscillations in a thermonuclear (Type I) burst from the transient X-ray source A1744-361. This is only the second burst ever observed from this source, and the first to be seen in any detail. Our results confirm that A1744-361 is a low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system harboring a rapidly rotating neutron star. The oscillations are first detected along the rising edge of the burst, and show evidence for frequency evolution of a magnitude similar to that seen in other burst sources. The modulation amplitude and its increase with photon energy are also typical of burst oscillations. The lack of any strong indication of photospheric radius expansion during the burst suggests a 9 kpc upper limit of the source distance. We also find energy dependent dips, establishing A1744-361 as a high inclination, dipping LMXB. The timescale between the two episodes of observed dips suggests an orbital period of approx. 97 min. We have also detected a 2 - 4 Hz quasi-periodic-oscillation (QPO) for the first time from this source. This QPO appears consistent with approx. 1 Hz QPOs seen from other high inclination systems. We searched for kilohertz QPOs, and found a suggestive 2.3 sigma feature at 800 Hz in one observation. The frequency, strength and quality factor are consistent with that of a lower frequency kilohertz QPO, but the relatively low significance argues for caution, so we consider this a tentative detection requiring confirmation.

  18. High energy radiation from neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M.

    1985-04-01

    Topics covered include young rapidly spinning pulsars; static gaps in outer magnetospheres; dynamic gaps in pulsar outer magnetospheres; pulse structure of energetic radiation sustained by outer gap pair production; outer gap radiation, Crab pulsar; outer gap radiation, the Vela pulsar; radioemission; and high energy radiation during the accretion spin-up of older neutron stars. 26 refs., 10 figs. (GHT)

  19. Origin of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    1999-12-01

    The origin of the concept of neutron stars can be traced to two brief, incredibly insightful publications. Work on the earlier paper by Lev Landau (Phys. Z. Sowjetunion, 1, 285, 1932) actually predated the discovery of neutrons. Nonetheless, Landau arrived at the notion of a collapsed star with the density of a nucleus (really a "nucleus star") and demonstrated (at about the same time as, and independent of, Chandrasekhar) that there is an upper mass limit for dense stellar objects of about 1.5 solar masses. Perhaps even more remarkable is the abstract of a talk presented at the December 1933 meeting of the American Physical Society published by Walter Baade and Fritz Zwicky in 1934 (Phys. Rev. 45, 138). It followed the discovery of the neutron by just over a year. Their report, which was about the same length as the present abstract: (1) invented the concept and word supernova; (2) suggested that cosmic rays are produced by supernovae; and (3) in the authors own words, proposed "with all reserve ... the view that supernovae represent the transitions from ordinary stars to neutron stars (italics), which in their final stages consist of extremely closely packed neutrons." The abstract by Baade and Zwicky probably contains the highest density of new, important (and correct) ideas in high energy astrophysics ever published in a single paper. In this talk, we will discuss some of the facts and myths surrounding these two publications.

  20. Neutron star crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, C. P.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    We calculate properties of neutron star matter at subnuclear densities using an improved nuclear Hamiltonian. Nuclei disappear and the matter becomes uniform at a density of about 0.6n(s), where n(s) of about 0.16/cu fm is the saturation density of nuclear matter. As a consequence, the mass of matter in the crusts of neutron stars is only about half as large as previously estimated. In about half of that crustal mass, nuclear matter occurs in shapes very different from the roughly spherical nuclei familiar at lower densities. The thinner crust and the unusual nuclear shape have important consequences for theories of the rotational and thermal evolution of neutron stars, especialy theories of glitches.

  1. Atmospheres around Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Benz, Willy

    1994-12-01

    Interest in the behavior of atmospheres around neutron stars has grown astronomically in the past few years. Some of this interest arrived in the wake of the explosion of Supernova 1987A and its elusive remnant; spawning renewed interest in a method to insure material ``fall-back'' onto the adolescent neutron star in an effort to transform it into a silent black hole. However, the bulk of the activity with atmospheres around neutron stars is concentrated in stellar models with neutron star, rather than white dwarf, cores; otherwise known as Thorne-Zytkow objects. First a mere seed in the imagination of theorists, Thorne-Zytkow objects have grown into an observational reality with an ever-increasing list of formation scenarios and observational prospects. Unfortunately, the analytic work of Chevalier on supernova fall-back implies that, except for a few cases, the stellar simulations of Thorne-Zytkow objects are missing an important aspect of physics: neutrinos. Neutrino cooling removes the pressure support of these atmospheres, allowing accretion beyond the canonical Eddington rate for these objects. We present here the results of detailed hydrodynamical simulations in one and two dimensions with the additional physical effects of neutrinos, advanced equations of state, and relativity over a range of parameters for our atmosphere including entropy and chemical composition as well as a range in the neutron star size. In agreement with Chevalier, we find, under the current list of formation scenarios, that the creature envisioned by Thorne and Zytkow will not survive the enormous appetite of a neutron star. However, neutrino heating (a physical effect not considered in Chevalier's analysis) can play an important role in creating instabilities in some formation schemes, leading to an expulsion of matter rather than rapid accretion. By placing scrutiny upon the formation methods, we can determine the observational prospects for each.

  2. Neutrinos from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    A calculation of the flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars is presented. The calculation is used to determine the number of point sources detectable at the sensitivity threshold of a proposed deep underwater muon and neutrino detector array. The detector array would have a point source detection threshold of about 100 eV/sq cm-sec. Analysis of neutrino luminosities and the number of detectable sources suggests that the deep underwater detector may make a few discoveries. In particular, a suspected neutron star in the Cyg X-3 source seems a promising target for the deep underwater array.

  3. The neutron star zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2013-12-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission.

  4. The breaking strain of neutron star crust

    SciTech Connect

    Kadau, Kai; Horowitz, C J

    2009-01-01

    Mountains on rapidly rotating neutron stars efficiently radiate gravitational waves. The maximum possible size of these mountains depends on the breaking strain of neutron star crust. With multimillion ion molecular dynamics simulations of Coulomb solids representing the crust, we show that the breaking strain of pure single crystals is very large and that impurities, defects, and grain boundaries only modestly reduce the breaking strain to around 0.1. Due to the collective behavior of the ions during failure found in our simulations, the neutron star crust is likely very strong and can support mountains large enough so that their gTavitational wave radiation could limit the spin periods of some stars and might be detectable in large scale interferometers. Furthermore, our microscopic modeling of neutron star crust material can help analyze mechanisms relevant in Magnetar Giant and Micro Flares.

  5. Initial data for black hole–neutron star binaries, with rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacik, Nick; Foucart, Francois; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Muhlberger, Curran; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2016-11-01

    The coalescence of a neutron star with a black hole is a primary science target of ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Constraining or measuring the neutron star spin directly from gravitational wave observations requires knowledge of the dependence of the emission properties of these systems on the neutron star spin. This paper lays foundations for this task, by developing a numerical method to construct initial data for black hole–neutron star binaries with arbitrary spin on the neutron star. We demonstrate the robustness of the code by constructing initial-data sets in large regions of the parameter space. In addition to varying the neutron star spin-magnitude and spin-direction, we also explore neutron star compactness, mass-ratio, black hole spin, and black hole spin-direction. Specifically, we are able to construct initial data sets with neutron stars spinning near centrifugal break-up, and with black hole spins as large as {S}{BH}/{M}{BH}2=0.99.

  6. Neutron Star Mysteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, G. J.; Fragile, P. C.; Suh, I.; Wilson, J. R.

    2003-04-01

    Neutron stars provide a unique laboratory in which to explore the nuclear equation of state at high densities. Nevertheless, their interior structure and equation of state have remained a mystery. Recently, a number of advances have been made toward unraveling this mystery. The first direct optical images of a nearby neutron star have been obtained from HST. High quality data for X-ray emission from low-mass X-ray binaries, including observations of nearly coherent oscillations (NCO's) and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) now exist. The existence of a possible absorption feature as well as pulsar light curves and glitches, and studies of soft-gamma repeaters, have all led to significant new constraints on the mass-radius relation and maximum mass of neutron stars. We also discuss how models of supernova explosion dynamics and the associated r-process nucleosynthesis also constrain the nuclear equation of state, along with heavy-ion and monopole resonance data. Recent work on the search for the Friedman-Chandrasekhar-Schutz instability and the effects of internal magnetic fields are also discussed. The overall constraints on the neutron star equation of state are summarized.

  7. Hyperons and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Vidaña, Isaac

    2015-02-24

    In this lecture I will briefly review some of the effects of hyperons on the properties of neutron and proto-neutron stars. In particular, I will revise the problem of the strong softening of the EoS, and the consequent reduction of the maximum mass, induced by the presence of hyperons, a puzzle which has become more intringuing and difficult to solve due the recent measurements of the unusually high masses of the millisecond pulsars PSR J1903+0327 (1.667±0.021M{sub ⊙}), PSR J1614–2230 (1.97±0.04M{sub ⊙}), and PSR J0348+0432 (2.01±0.04M{sub ⊙}). Finally, I will also examine the role of hyperons on the cooling properties of newly born neutron stars and on the so-called r-mode instability.

  8. Hyperons in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaña, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    In this work I briefly review some of the effects of hyperons on the properties of neutron and proto-neutron stars. In particular, I revise the problem of the strong softening of the EoS, and the consequent reduction of the maximum mass, induced by the presence of hyperons, a puzzle which has become more intringuing and difficult to solve because of the recent measurements of the unusually high masses of the millisecond pulsars PSR J1903+0327 (1.667 ± 0.021M⊙), PSR J1614-2230 (1.97 ± 0.04M⊙), and PSR J0348+0432 (2.01 ± 0.04M⊙). Some of the solutions proposed to tackle this problem are discussed. Finally, I re-examine also the role of hyperons on the cooling properties of newly born neutron stars and on the so-called r-mode instability.

  9. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, Gandolfi; Steiner, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  10. Can neutron stars have auroras ? : electromagnetic coupling process between neutron star and magnetized accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.; Iwakiri, W. B.; Enoto, T.; Wada, T.; Tao, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the binary neutron star system, angular momentum transfer from accretion disk to a star is essential process for spin-up/down of stars. The angular momentum transfer has been well formulated for the accretion disk strongly magnetized by the neutron star [e.g., Ghosh and Lamb, 1978, 1979a, b]. However, the electromagnetic (EM) coupling between the neutron star and accretion disk has not been self-consistently solved in the previous studies although the magnetic field lines from the star are strongly tied with the accretion disk. In this study, we applied the planet-magnetosphere coupling process established for Jupiter [Hill, 1979] to the binary neutron star system. Angular momentum distribution is solved based on the torque balance between the neutron star's surface and accretion disk coupled by the magnetic field tensions. We found the EM coupling can transfer significantly larger fraction of the angular momentum from the magnetized accretion disk to the star than the unmagnetized case. The resultant spin-up rate is estimated to ~10^-14 [sec/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters, which is comparable with or larger than the other common spin-down/up processes: e.g., the magnetic dipole radiation spin-down. The Joule heating energy dissipated in the EM coupling is estimated to be up to ~10^36 [erg/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters. The release is comparable to that of gravitation energy directly caused by the matters accreting onto the neutron star. This suggests the EM coupling at the neutron star can accompany the observable radiation as auroras with a similar manner to those at the rotating planetary magnetospheres like Jupiter, Saturn, and other gas giants.

  11. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  12. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, J.; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    Adopting the hypothesis of accretion-induced magnetic field decay in neutron stars, the consequent evolution of a neutron star's spin and magnetic field are calculated. The results are consistent with observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Thermomagnetic effects could provide a possible physical mechanism for such accretion-induced field decay.

  13. ASTROPHYSICS: Neutron Stars Imply Relativity's a Drag.

    PubMed

    Schilling, G

    2000-09-01

    A new finding, based on x-rays from distant neutron stars, could be the first clear evidence of a weird relativistic effect called frame dragging, in which a heavy chunk of spinning matter wrenches the space-time around it like an eggbeater. Using data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, three astronomers in Amsterdam found circumstantial evidence for frame dragging in the flickering of three neutron stars in binary systems. They announced their results in the 1 September issue of The Astrophysical Journal. PMID:17839511

  14. Neutron spin-reorientation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    Neutron spin-reorientation experiments which give fundamental physics information are described. The magnetic moment of the neutron has been measured to be 1.91304275(45) nuclear magnetons by separated oscillatory fields resonant reorientation's of the spins of neutrons in a beam passing through a magnetic field. In similar resonance experiments with ultracold neutrons trapped in a bottle, the neutron electric dipole moment has been shown to be less than 9 × 10 -26e cm. Neutrons “dressed” with many radio frequency quanta have been studied. The Berry phases of neutrons that have passed through a helical magnetic field or an oscillatory magnetic field have been observed. In neutron interactions experiments with condensed matter, small changes in neutron velocities have been measured by changes in the neutron precessions in magnetic fields before and after the interaction. Parity non-conserving spin rotations of neutrons passing through various materials have been observed and measured and new experiments with H 2 and He are in progress.

  15. Modeling Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Conner; Read, Jocelyn; Flynn, Eric; Lockett-Ruiz, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein's Theory of Relativity, are a new frontier in astronomical observation we can use to observe phenomena in the universe. Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) is currently searching for gravitational wave signals, and requires accurate predictions in order to best extract astronomical signals from all other sources of fluctuations. The focus of my research is in increasing the accuracy of Post-Newtonian models of binary neutron star coalescence to match the computationally expensive Numerical models. Numerical simulations can take months to compute a couple of milliseconds of signal whereas the Post-Newtonian can generate similar signals in seconds. However the Post-Newtonian model is an approximation, e.g. the Taylor T4 Post-Newtonian model assumes that the two bodies in the binary neutron star system are point charges. To increase the effectiveness of the approximation, I added in tidal effects, resonance frequencies, and a windowing function. Using these observed effects from simulations significantly increases the Post-Newtonian model's similarity to the Numerical signal.

  16. Grand unification of neutron stars

    PubMed Central

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has shown us that the observational properties of neutron stars are remarkably diverse. From magnetars to rotating radio transients, from radio pulsars to isolated neutron stars, from central compact objects to millisecond pulsars, observational manifestations of neutron stars are surprisingly varied, with most properties totally unpredicted. The challenge is to establish an overarching physical theory of neutron stars and their birth properties that can explain this great diversity. Here I survey the disparate neutron stars classes, describe their properties, and highlight results made possible by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, in celebration of its 10th anniversary. Finally, I describe the current status of efforts at physical “grand unification” of this wealth of observational phenomena, and comment on possibilities for Chandra’s next decade in this field. PMID:20404205

  17. QPO Constraints on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. Coleman

    2005-01-01

    The kilohertz frequencies of QPOs from accreting neutron star systems imply that they are generated in regions of strong gravity, close to the star. This suggests that observations of the QPOs can be used to constrain the properties of neutron stars themselves, and in particular to inform us about the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear densities. Here we discuss some relatively model-insensitive constraints that emerge from the kilohertz QPOs, as well as recent developments that may hint at phenomena related to unstable circular orbits outside neutron stars.

  18. Quark-novae in neutron star - white dwarf binaries: a model for luminous (spin-down powered) sub-Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia supernovae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Staff, Jan

    2013-04-01

    We show that, by appealing to a Quark-Nova (QN) in a tight binary system containing a massive neutron star and a CO white dwarf (WD), a Type Ia explosion could occur. The QN ejecta collides with the WD, driving a shock that triggers carbon burning under degenerate conditions (the QN-Ia). The conditions in the compressed low-mass WD (MWD < 0.9 Msolar) in our model mimic those of a Chandrasekhar mass WD. The spin-down luminosity from the QN compact remnant (the quark star) provides additional power that makes the QN-Ia light-curve brighter and broader than a standard SN-Ia with similar 56Ni yield. In QNe-Ia, photometry and spectroscopy are not necessarily linked since the kinetic energy of the ejecta has a contribution from spin-down power and nuclear decay. Although QNe-Ia may not obey the Phillips relationship, their brightness and their relatively “normal looking" light-curves mean they could be included in the cosmological sample. Light-curve fitters would be confused by the discrepancy between spectroscopy at peak and photometry and would correct for it by effectively brightening or dimming the QNe-Ia apparent magnitudes, thus over- or under-estimating the true magnitude of these spin-down powered SNe-Ia. Contamination of QNe-Ia in samples of SNe-Ia used for cosmological analyses could systematically bias measurements of cosmological parameters if QNe-Ia are numerous enough at high-redshift. The strong mixing induced by spin-down wind combined with the low 56Ni yields in QNe-Ia means that these would lack a secondary maximum in the i-band despite their luminous nature. We discuss possible QNe-Ia progenitors.

  19. Understanding Neutron Stars using Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star = EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts = modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  20. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star approaching EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. +k Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts - modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. +k Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  1. I-Love-Q: unexpected universal relations for neutron stars and quark stars.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2013-07-26

    Neutron stars and quark stars are not only characterized by their mass and radius but also by how fast they spin, through their moment of inertia, and how much they can be deformed, through their Love number and quadrupole moment. These depend sensitively on the star's internal structure and thus on unknown nuclear physics. We find universal relations between the moment of inertia, the Love number, and the quadrupole moment that are independent of the neutron and quark star's internal structure. These can be used to learn about neutron star deformability through observations of the moment of inertia, break degeneracies in gravitational wave detection to measure spin in binary inspirals, distinguish neutron stars from quark stars, and test general relativity in a nuclear structure-independent fashion.

  2. I-Love-Q: unexpected universal relations for neutron stars and quark stars.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2013-07-26

    Neutron stars and quark stars are not only characterized by their mass and radius but also by how fast they spin, through their moment of inertia, and how much they can be deformed, through their Love number and quadrupole moment. These depend sensitively on the star's internal structure and thus on unknown nuclear physics. We find universal relations between the moment of inertia, the Love number, and the quadrupole moment that are independent of the neutron and quark star's internal structure. These can be used to learn about neutron star deformability through observations of the moment of inertia, break degeneracies in gravitational wave detection to measure spin in binary inspirals, distinguish neutron stars from quark stars, and test general relativity in a nuclear structure-independent fashion. PMID:23888033

  3. Chandra Captures Neutron Star Action

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows a fast moving jet of particles produced by a rapidly rotating neutron star, and may provide new insight into the nature of some of the densest...

  4. Children's Literature on Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, James

    Children's literature is simple discussion of complicated issues. Neutron stars are discussed in several children's books. Using libraries in Chicago, I will review children's books on neutron stars and compare the literature to literature from scientific discussions of neutron stars on sites like the Chandra site, Hubble Space Telescope site and NASA site. The result will be a discussion of problems and issues involved in discussion of neutron stars. Do children's books leave material out? Do children's books discuss recent observations? Do children's books discuss anything discredited or wrong? How many children's books are in resources like World Cat, the Library of Congress catalog, and the Chicago Public Library catalog? Could children's books be useful to present some of your findings or observations or projects? Children's books are useful for both children and scientist as they present simplified discussion of topics, although sometimes issues are simplified too much.

  5. Neutron stars and strange matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1986-01-01

    The likelihood is investigated that quark matter with strangeness of order unity resides in neutron stars. In the strong coupling regime near rho/sub 0/ this is found to be unlikely. Considering higher densities where perturbative expansions are used, we find a lower bound to be at 7rho/sub 0/ for the transition density. This is higher than the inferred density of observed neutron stars, and thus the transition to quark matter is precluded. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Spin-orbit splitting in neutron drops

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S.C.; Pandharipande, V.R.; Ravenhall, D.G.

    1995-08-01

    Hartree-Fock calculations of very neutron-rich nuclei are an essential source of input for calculations of the properties of neutron-star crusts. The Hartree-Fock calculations often use Skyrme models whose parameters are determined by fits to known (hence not neutron-rich) nuclei and extrapolations to the N >> Z case. The Vautherin and Brink (VB) prescription for the isospin dependence of the spin-orbit potential, V{sub so}, is usually used; this is based on the assumption that most of V{sub so} comes from a short-range L{center_dot}S nucleon-nucleon interaction. In 1993 we showed that more than half of the spin-orbit splitting in {sup 15}N comes from long-range three-nucleon potentials and correlations, which violate the VB assumption. To investigate the isospin dependence of the spin-orbit splitting, we made calculations of the type described in Sec. B.d for systems of 7 (p-wave splitting) and 19 (d-wave) neutrons. The neutrons were confined in external potentials that were adjusted to give physically reasonable densities. We find that the spin-orbit splitting of these drops is less than half the {sup 15}N value. These values can be used to determine an isospin dependence of V{sub so} that is very different from that of VB. Hartree-Fock calculations of known spin-orbit splittings in nuclei with N significantly different from Z are now being made with this new prescription.

  7. Dynamics of microemulsions bridged with hydrophobically end-capped star polymers studied by neutron spin-echo

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, I.; Malo de Molina, Paula; Gradzielski, M.; Farago, B.; Falus, P.; Herfurth, Christoph; Laschewsky, André

    2014-01-21

    The mesoscopic dynamical properties of oil-in-water microemulsions (MEs) bridged with telechelic polymers of different number of arms and with different lengths of hydrophobic stickers were studied with neutron spin-echo (NSE) probing the dynamics in the size range of individual ME droplets. These results then were compared to those of dynamicic light scattering (DLS) which allow to investigate the dynamics on a much larger length scale. Studies were performed as a function of the polymer concentration, number of polymer arms, and length of the hydrophobic end-group. In general it is observed that the polymer bridging has a rather small influence on the local dynamics, despite the fact that the polymer addition leads to an increase of viscosity by several orders of magnitude. In contrast to results from rheology and DLS, where the dynamics on much larger length and time scales are observed, NSE shows that the linear polymer is more efficient in arresting the motion of individual ME droplets. This finding can be explained by a simple simulation, merely by the fact that the interconnection of droplets becomes more efficient with a decreasing number of arms. This means that the dynamics observed on the short and on the longer length scale depend in an opposite way on the number of arms and hydrophobic stickers.

  8. Dynamics of microemulsions bridged with hydrophobically end-capped star polymers studied by neutron spin-echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, I.; de Molina, Paula Malo; Farago, B.; Falus, P.; Herfurth, Christoph; Laschewsky, André; Gradzielski, M.

    2014-01-01

    The mesoscopic dynamical properties of oil-in-water microemulsions (MEs) bridged with telechelic polymers of different number of arms and with different lengths of hydrophobic stickers were studied with neutron spin-echo (NSE) probing the dynamics in the size range of individual ME droplets. These results then were compared to those of dynamicic light scattering (DLS) which allow to investigate the dynamics on a much larger length scale. Studies were performed as a function of the polymer concentration, number of polymer arms, and length of the hydrophobic end-group. In general it is observed that the polymer bridging has a rather small influence on the local dynamics, despite the fact that the polymer addition leads to an increase of viscosity by several orders of magnitude. In contrast to results from rheology and DLS, where the dynamics on much larger length and time scales are observed, NSE shows that the linear polymer is more efficient in arresting the motion of individual ME droplets. This finding can be explained by a simple simulation, merely by the fact that the interconnection of droplets becomes more efficient with a decreasing number of arms. This means that the dynamics observed on the short and on the longer length scale depend in an opposite way on the number of arms and hydrophobic stickers.

  9. Neutron star moments of inertia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravenhall, D. G.; Pethick, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    An approximation for the moment of inertia of a neutron star in terms of only its mass and radius is presented, and insight into it is obtained by examining the behavior of the relativistic structural equations. The approximation is accurate to approximately 10% for a variety of nuclear equations of state, for all except very low mass stars. It is combined with information about the neutron-star crust to obtain a simple expression (again in terms only of mass and radius) for the fractional moment of inertia of the crust.

  10. Quantum crystals in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Chitre, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    Using the many-body techniques appropriate for quantum crystals it is shown that the deep interior of a neutron star is most likely an orderly arrangement of neutrons, protons and hyperons forming a solid. It is shown that a liquid or gas arrangement would produce higher energy. If so, a neutron star can be viewed as two solids (crust and core) permeated by a layer of ordinary or (perhaps) superfluid liquid. Astronomical evidence is in favor of such a structure: the sudden jumps in the periods of the Crab and Vela pulsars that differ by a factor of about 100 can be easily explained by the star-quake model. If the Crab is less massive than Vela (i.e., if it is not dense enough to have a solid core), the star-quakes take place in the crust whereas for Vela they occur in the core.

  11. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D. E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu

    2013-10-10

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ☉} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ☉} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ☉} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ☉} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ∼ 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ν} ∼ 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  12. The nuclear physics of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2014-05-09

    We explore the unique and fascinating structure of neutron stars. Although neutron stars are of interest in many areas of Physics, our aim is to provide an intellectual bridge between Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. We argue against the naive perception of a neutron star as a uniform assembly of neutrons packed to enormous densities. Rather, by focusing on the many exotic phases that are speculated to exist in a neutron star, we show how the reality is different and far more interesting.

  13. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, Jacob; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    The recent discovery of cyclotron lines from gamma-ray bursts indicates that the strong magnetic fields of isolated neutron stars might not decay. The possible inverse correlation between the strength of the magnetic field and the mass accreted by the neutron star suggests that mass accretion itself may lead to the decay of the magnetic field. The spin and magnetic field evolution of the neutron star was calculated under the hypothesis of the accretion-induced field decay. It is shown that the calculated results are consistent with the observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars.

  14. Instability windows and evolution of rapidly rotating neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Gusakov, Mikhail E; Chugunov, Andrey I; Kantor, Elena M

    2014-04-18

    We consider an instability of rapidly rotating neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) with respect to excitation of r modes (which are analogous to Earth's Rossby waves controlled by the Coriolis force). We argue that finite temperature effects in the superfluid core of a neutron star lead to a resonance coupling and enhanced damping (and hence stability) of oscillation modes at certain stellar temperatures. Using a simple phenomenological model we demonstrate that neutron stars with high spin frequency may spend a substantial amount of time at these "resonance" temperatures. This finding allows us to explain puzzling observations of hot rapidly rotating neutron stars in LMXBs and to predict a new class of hot, nonaccreting, rapidly rotating neutron stars, some of which may have already been observed and tentatively identified as quiescent LMXB candidates. We also impose a new theoretical limit on the neutron star spin frequency, which can explain the cutoff spin frequency ∼730  Hz, following from the statistical analysis of accreting millisecond x-ray pulsars. In addition to explaining the observations, our model provides a new tool to constrain superdense matter properties by comparing measured and theoretically predicted resonance temperatures. PMID:24785021

  15. Instability windows and evolution of rapidly rotating neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Gusakov, Mikhail E; Chugunov, Andrey I; Kantor, Elena M

    2014-04-18

    We consider an instability of rapidly rotating neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) with respect to excitation of r modes (which are analogous to Earth's Rossby waves controlled by the Coriolis force). We argue that finite temperature effects in the superfluid core of a neutron star lead to a resonance coupling and enhanced damping (and hence stability) of oscillation modes at certain stellar temperatures. Using a simple phenomenological model we demonstrate that neutron stars with high spin frequency may spend a substantial amount of time at these "resonance" temperatures. This finding allows us to explain puzzling observations of hot rapidly rotating neutron stars in LMXBs and to predict a new class of hot, nonaccreting, rapidly rotating neutron stars, some of which may have already been observed and tentatively identified as quiescent LMXB candidates. We also impose a new theoretical limit on the neutron star spin frequency, which can explain the cutoff spin frequency ∼730  Hz, following from the statistical analysis of accreting millisecond x-ray pulsars. In addition to explaining the observations, our model provides a new tool to constrain superdense matter properties by comparing measured and theoretically predicted resonance temperatures.

  16. Anomalous hydrodynamics kicks neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Matthias; Uhlemann, Christoph F.; Bleicher, Marcus; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    Observations show that, at the beginning of their existence, neutron stars are accelerated briskly to velocities of up to a thousand kilometers per second. We argue that this remarkable effect can be explained as a manifestation of quantum anomalies on astrophysical scales. To theoretically describe the early stage in the life of neutron stars we use hydrodynamics as a systematic effective-field-theory framework. Within this framework, anomalies of the Standard Model of particle physics as underlying microscopic theory imply the presence of a particular set of transport terms, whose form is completely fixed by theoretical consistency. The resulting chiral transport effects in proto-neutron stars enhance neutrino emission along the internal magnetic field, and the recoil can explain the order of magnitude of the observed kick velocities.

  17. Neutron stars and black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation of neutron stars is powered by accretion, rotation, or internal heat; accreting black holes are thought to be the central engines of AGNs and of a handful of binary X-ray sources in the Galaxy. The evolution of a neutron star depends on the coupling between the rotating neutron and proton fluids in the interior, and between these fluids and the crust; it also depends on the magnetic and thermal properties of the star. Significant progress has been made in recent years in the understanding of radial and disk accretion by black holes. Radiation from pair plasmas may make an important contribution to the X- and gamma-ray spectra of AGNs and black holes in binary systems.

  18. Nuclear Physics of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarewicz, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    One of the overarching questions posed by the recent community report entitled ``Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter'' asks How Does Subatomic Matter Organize Itself and What Phenomena Emerge? With their enormous dynamic range in both density and neutron-proton asymmetry, neutron stars provide ideal laboratories to answer this critical challenge. Indeed, a neutron star is a gold mine for the study of physical phenomena that cut across a variety of disciplines, from particle physics to general relativity. In this presentation--targeted at non-experts--I will focus on the essential role that nuclear physics plays in constraining the dynamics, structure, and composition of neutron stars. In particular, I will discuss some of the many exotic states of matter that are speculated to exist in a neutron star and the impact of nuclear-physics experiments on elucidating their fascinating nature. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FD05-92ER40750.

  19. On neutron star structure and the millisecond pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The millisecond pulsar is the first observed example of a neutron star spinning rapidly enough to approach the Jacobi bifurcation point and thus affords the possibility of constraining neutron star physics. The pulsar must be rotating below the critical frequency at which its equilibrium configuration would become nonaxisymmetric, since the lifetime of this configuration against decay by gravitational radiation is very short. This critical frequency may be used to set a lower limit of 2 x 10 to the 14th g/cu cm on the density of the star. If the mass is 0.5-1.5 solar mass, several of the stiffer neutron star equations of state may be ruled out, and the radius should be less than 16 km. The condition for axisymmetry also imposes an upper limit on the rotation rate to which neutron stars may be spun up by accretion disks in binary systems.

  20. Breaking strain of neutron star crust and gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C J; Kadau, Kai

    2009-05-15

    Mountains on rapidly rotating neutron stars efficiently radiate gravitational waves. The maximum possible size of these mountains depends on the breaking strain of the neutron star crust. With multimillion ion molecular dynamics simulations of Coulomb solids representing the crust, we show that the breaking strain of pure single crystals is very large and that impurities, defects, and grain boundaries only modestly reduce the breaking strain to around 0.1. Because of the collective behavior of the ions during failure found in our simulations, the neutron star crust is likely very strong and can support mountains large enough so that their gravitational wave radiation could limit the spin periods of some stars and might be detectable in large-scale interferometers. Furthermore, our microscopic modeling of neutron star crust material can help analyze mechanisms relevant in magnetar giant flares and microflares.

  1. Accuracy and precision of gravitational-wave models of inspiraling neutron star-black hole binaries with spin: Comparison with matter-free numerical relativity in the low-frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Barkett, Kevin; Bhagwat, Swetha; Afshari, Nousha; Brown, Duncan A.; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2015-11-01

    Coalescing binaries of neutron stars and black holes are one of the most important sources of gravitational waves for the upcoming network of ground-based detectors. Detection and extraction of astrophysical information from gravitational-wave signals requires accurate waveform models. The effective-one-body and other phenomenological models interpolate between analytic results and numerical relativity simulations, that typically span O (10 ) orbits before coalescence. In this paper we study the faithfulness of these models for neutron star-black hole binaries. We investigate their accuracy using new numerical relativity (NR) simulations that span 36-88 orbits, with mass ratios q and black hole spins χBH of (q ,χBH)=(7 ,±0.4 ),(7 ,±0.6 ) , and (5 ,-0.9 ). These simulations were performed treating the neutron star as a low-mass black hole, ignoring its matter effects. We find that (i) the recently published SEOBNRv1 and SEOBNRv2 models of the effective-one-body family disagree with each other (mismatches of a few percent) for black hole spins χBH≥0.5 or χBH≤-0.3 , with waveform mismatch accumulating during early inspiral; (ii) comparison with numerical waveforms indicates that this disagreement is due to phasing errors of SEOBNRv1, with SEOBNRv2 in good agreement with all of our simulations; (iii) phenomenological waveforms agree with SEOBNRv2 only for comparable-mass low-spin binaries, with overlaps below 0.7 elsewhere in the neutron star-black hole binary parameter space; (iv) comparison with numerical waveforms shows that most of this model's dephasing accumulates near the frequency interval where it switches to a phenomenological phasing prescription; and finally (v) both SEOBNR and post-Newtonian models are effectual for neutron star-black hole systems, but post-Newtonian waveforms will give a significant bias in parameter recovery. Our results suggest that future gravitational-wave detection searches and parameter estimation efforts would benefit

  2. Theory of cooling neutron stars versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Gnedin, O. Y.; Kaminker, A. D.; Potekhin, A. Y.

    2008-02-27

    We review current state of neutron star cooling theory and discuss the prospects to constrain the equation of state, neutrino emission and superfluid properties of neutron star cores by comparing the cooling theory with observations of thermal radiation from isolated neutron stars.

  3. Neutrino Processes in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of these lectures is to introduce basic processes responsible for cooling of neutron stars and to show how to calculate the neutrino production rate in dense strongly interacting nuclear medium. The formalism is presented that treats on equal footing one-nucleon and multiple-nucleon processes and reactions with virtual bosonic modes and condensates. We demonstrate that neutrino emission from dense hadronic component in neutron stars is subject of strong modifications due to collective effects in the nuclear matter. With the most important in-medium processes incorporated in the cooling code an overall agreement with available soft X ray data can be easily achieved. With these findings the so-called “standard” and “non-standard” cooling scenarios are replaced by one general “nuclear medium cooling scenario” which relates slow and rapid neutron star coolings to the star masses (interior densities). The lectures are split in four parts. Part I: After short introduction to the neutron star cooling problem we show how to calculate neutrino reaction rates of the most efficient one-nucleon and two-nucleon processes. No medium effects are taken into account in this instance. The effects of a possible nucleon pairing are discussed. We demonstrate that the data on neutron star cooling cannot be described without inclusion of medium effects. It motivates an assumption that masses of the neutron stars are different and that neutrino reaction rates should be strongly density dependent. Part II: We introduce the Green’s function diagram technique for systems in and out of equilibrium and the optical theorem formalism. The latter allows to perform calculations of production rates with full Green’s functions including all off-mass-shell effects. We demonstrate how this formalism works within the quasiparticle approximation. Part III: The basic concepts of the nuclear Fermi liquid approach are introduced. We show how strong interaction effects can be

  4. Jets from Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes, its especially important to understand the electromagnetic signals resulting from mergers of compact objects. New simulations successfully follow a merger of two neutron stars that produces a short burst of energy via a jet consistent with short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) detections.Still from the authors simulation showing the two neutron stars, and their magnetic fields, before merger. [Adapted from Ruiz et al. 2016]Challenging SystemWe have long suspected that sGRBs are produced by the mergers of compact objects, but this model has been difficult to prove. One major hitch is that modeling the process of merger and sGRB launch is very difficult, due to the fact that these extreme systems involve magnetic fields, fluids and full general relativity.Traditionally, simulations are only able to track such mergers over short periods of time. But in a recent study, Milton Ruiz (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Industrial University of Santander, Colombia) and coauthors Ryan Lang, Vasileios Paschalidis and Stuart Shapiro have modeled a binary neutron star system all the way through the process of inspiral, merger, and the launch of a jet.A Merger TimelineHow does this happen? Lets walk through one of the teams simulations, in which dipole magnetic field lines thread through the interior of each neutron star and extend beyond its surface(like magnetic fields found in pulsars). In this example, the two neutron stars each have a mass of 1.625 solar masses.Simulation start (0 ms)Loss of energy via gravitational waves cause the neutron stars to inspiral.Merger (3.5 ms)The neutron stars are stretched by tidal effects and make contact. Their merger produces a hypermassive neutron star that is supported against collapse by its differential (nonuniform) rotation.Delayed collapse into a black hole (21.5 ms)Once the differential rotation is redistributed by magnetic fields and partially

  5. Jets from Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes, its especially important to understand the electromagnetic signals resulting from mergers of compact objects. New simulations successfully follow a merger of two neutron stars that produces a short burst of energy via a jet consistent with short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) detections.Still from the authors simulation showing the two neutron stars, and their magnetic fields, before merger. [Adapted from Ruiz et al. 2016]Challenging SystemWe have long suspected that sGRBs are produced by the mergers of compact objects, but this model has been difficult to prove. One major hitch is that modeling the process of merger and sGRB launch is very difficult, due to the fact that these extreme systems involve magnetic fields, fluids and full general relativity.Traditionally, simulations are only able to track such mergers over short periods of time. But in a recent study, Milton Ruiz (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Industrial University of Santander, Colombia) and coauthors Ryan Lang, Vasileios Paschalidis and Stuart Shapiro have modeled a binary neutron star system all the way through the process of inspiral, merger, and the launch of a jet.A Merger TimelineHow does this happen? Lets walk through one of the teams simulations, in which dipole magnetic field lines thread through the interior of each neutron star and extend beyond its surface(like magnetic fields found in pulsars). In this example, the two neutron stars each have a mass of 1.625 solar masses.Simulation start (0 ms)Loss of energy via gravitational waves cause the neutron stars to inspiral.Merger (3.5 ms)The neutron stars are stretched by tidal effects and make contact. Their merger produces a hypermassive neutron star that is supported against collapse by its differential (nonuniform) rotation.Delayed collapse into a black hole (21.5 ms)Once the differential rotation is redistributed by magnetic fields and partially

  6. NSCool: Neutron star cooling code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Dany

    2016-09-01

    NSCool is a 1D (i.e., spherically symmetric) neutron star cooling code written in Fortran 77. The package also contains a series of EOSs (equation of state) to build stars, a series of pre-built stars, and a TOV (Tolman- Oppenheimer-Volkoff) integrator to build stars from an EOS. It can also handle “strange stars” that have a huge density discontinuity between the quark matter and the covering thin baryonic crust. NSCool solves the heat transport and energy balance equations in whole GR, resulting in a time sequence of temperature profiles (and, in particular, a Teff - age curve). Several heating processes are included, and more can easily be incorporated. In particular it can evolve a star undergoing accretion with the resulting deep crustal heating, under a steady or time-variable accretion rate. NSCool is robust, very fast, and highly modular, making it easy to add new subroutines for new processes.

  7. The neutron star mass distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kiziltan, Bülent; Kottas, Athanasios; De Yoreo, Maria; Thorsett, Stephen E.

    2013-11-20

    In recent years, the number of pulsars with secure mass measurements has increased to a level that allows us to probe the underlying neutron star (NS) mass distribution in detail. We critically review the radio pulsar mass measurements. For the first time, we are able to analyze a sizable population of NSs with a flexible modeling approach that can effectively accommodate a skewed underlying distribution and asymmetric measurement errors. We find that NSs that have evolved through different evolutionary paths reflect distinctive signatures through dissimilar distribution peak and mass cutoff values. NSs in double NS and NS-white dwarf (WD) systems show consistent respective peaks at 1.33 M {sub ☉} and 1.55 M {sub ☉}, suggesting significant mass accretion (Δm ≈ 0.22 M {sub ☉}) has occurred during the spin-up phase. The width of the mass distribution implied by double NS systems is indicative of a tight initial mass function while the inferred mass range is significantly wider for NSs that have gone through recycling. We find a mass cutoff at ∼2.1 M {sub ☉} for NSs with WD companions, which establishes a firm lower bound for the maximum NS mass. This rules out the majority of strange quark and soft equation of state models as viable configurations for NS matter. The lack of truncation close to the maximum mass cutoff along with the skewed nature of the inferred mass distribution both enforce the suggestion that the 2.1 M {sub ☉} limit is set by evolutionary constraints rather than nuclear physics or general relativity, and the existence of rare supermassive NSs is possible.

  8. The Art of Neutron Spin Flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieffers, Justin; Holley, Adam; Snow, W. M.

    2014-09-01

    Low energy precision measurements complement high energy collider results in the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Neutron spin rotation is a sensitive technique to search for possible exotic velocity and spin-dependent interactions involving the neutron from the exchange of light (~ meV) spin 1 bosons. We plan to conduct such searches using beams of cold neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). To change the spin state of the neutrons in the apparatus we have developed an Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) neutron spin flipper. I will present the mechanical design, static and RF magnetic field modeling and measurements, and spin flip efficiency optimization of the constructed device. I would like to acknowledge the NSF REU program (NSF-REU grant PHY-1156540) and the Indiana University nuclear physics group (NSF grant PHY-1306942) for this opportunity.

  9. Measuring the neutron star tidal Love number with inspiral waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Marc

    2014-03-01

    The tidal Love number parameterizes how easily a binary companion deforms a neutron star. This deformation modifies the gravitational field near the neutron star and imprints itself on the binary orbit and gravitational waveform. Measuring the Love number with LIGO or other detectors will help constrain the neutron star equation of state (which is uncertain at high densities). I will discuss an improved parameterization of the waveform's Love-number dependence. I will also discuss how systematic errors will make this number difficult to measure. These systematic errors could arise from unknown post-Newtonian terms that enter at lower orders than tidal effects, or from neglecting small neutron star spins or binary eccentricity.

  10. Accreting neutron stars by QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    layer with thickness of 1 km then q = 1 (N1S1), the gravity from N1S1 inside and exterior will be completely shielded. Because of net nuν _{0} flux is the medium to produce and transmit gravity, q obstructed by the shielding layer lie on the density of layer matter and the section of single nucleon to electronic neutrino obtained by nuclear physics experiments is about 1.1*10 ({-) 43} cm (2) . The mass inside N1S1 for exterior has not gravity interaction, it equivalent to has not inertia as the mass vanish. The neutron star is as a empty shell thereby may rapidly rotating and has not upper limit of mass and radii by the gravity accretion of N1S1, which will influence the mechanisms of pulsars, quasars and X-rays generated. At N1S1 interior the mass for exterior has not gravity which is just we searching dark matter. The mass each part will each other shielding and gravity decrease to less than the pressure of the degenerate neutron gas. The neutron star cannot collapse into a singular point with infinite density, i.e., the black hole with infinite gravity cannot be formed or the neutron star is jest the black hole in observational meaning. By the gravity accrete of N1S1 the neutron star may enlarge its shell radii but thickness keep. Only a shell gravity may be not less than any a observed value which to be deemed as black hole. The neutron star has powerful gravity certainly accompany with great surface negative charge and it may rapidly to rotate, so that there is a powerful magnetic field surround it. The accreting neutron star is as a slowly expand empty shell with fixed thickness of 1 km, its spin period depend on its radii or total accretion mass.

  11. Journey to the Center of a Neutron Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A neutron star is not a place most would want to visit. This dense remnant of a collapsed star has a magnetic field billions of times stronger than Earth's, enough to shuffle your body's molecules long before you even land. The featureless surface is no fun either. Crushing gravity ensures that the star is a near perfect sphere, compressing all matter so that a sand-grain-sized scoop of neutron star material would weigh as much as a battleship on Earth. At least black holes offer the promise of funky singularity, time warps, and the Odyssean temptation to venture beyond a point of no return. What s a journey to a neutron star good for, one might ask? Well, for starters, it offers the possibility of confirming a theorized state of matter called quark-gluon plasma, which likely existed for a moment after the Big Bang and now might only exist in the superdense interiors of neutron stars. Beneath the neutron star crust, a kilometer-thick plate of crystalline matter, lies the great unknown. The popular theory is that the neutron star interior is made up of a neutron superfluid - a fluid without friction. With the help of two NASA satellites - the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory - scientists are journeying to the center of a neutron star. Matter might be so compressed there that it breaks down into quarks, the building blocks of protons and neutrons, and gluons, the carrier of the strong nuclear force. To dig inside a neutron star, no simple drill bit will do. Scientists gain insight into the interior through events called glitches, a sudden change in the neutron star s precise spin rate. 'Glitches are one of the few ways we have to study the neutron star interior,' says Frank Marshall of NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center, who has used the Rossi Explorer to follow the escapades of the glitchiest of all neutron stars, dubbed the Big Glitcher and known scientifically as PSR J0537-6910.

  12. Birth accelerations of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heras, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    We suggest that neutron stars experienced at birth three related physical changes, which may originate in magneto-rotational instabilities: (i) an increase in period from the initial value P 0 to the current value Ps , implying a change of rotational energy Δ E rot; (ii) an exponential decay of its magnetic field from the initial value B 0 to the current surface value Bs , implying a change of radiative energy Δ E rad; and (iii) an increase of space velocity from the initial value v 0 to the current value v, implying a change of kinetic energy Δ E kin. These changes are assumed to be connected by Δ E rad + Δ E kin = Δ E rot. This means that the radiation loss and increase of kinetic energy are both at the expense of a rotational energy loss. It is shown that this energy conversion occurs during times of order of 10-4 s if the neutron stars are born with magnetic fields in the range of 1015-1016 G and initial periods in range 1-20 ms. It is shown that the birth accelerations of neutron stars are of the order of 108g.

  13. Heating and Cooling in Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries accrete enough mass over their lifetimes to replace their entire crust. The accreted matter undergoes a series of nuclear reactions in the crust as it is compressed by continued accretion to higher density. These reactions, which include electron captures, neutron emissions, and pycnonuclear reactions, heat the crust and core of the neutron star. In this talk I will discuss what we can learn from observations of transiently accreting neutron stars in quiescence, when accretion has turned off and we can see emission from the neutron star directly. The quiescent luminosity of these neutron stars constrains the neutrino emissivity in the neutron star core. In systems with long accretion outbursts, observations of thermal relaxation of the crust in quiescence enable, for the first time, constraints on the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the crust. In this way, low mass X-ray binary neutron stars offer a remarkable chance to constrain the properties of dense neutron-rich matter, such as neutron superfluidity and pasta phases in the inner crust of neutron stars.

  14. Data analysis of gravitational-wave signals from spinning neutron stars. V. A narrow-band all-sky search

    SciTech Connect

    Astone, Pia; Borkowski, Kazimierz M.; Jaranowski, Piotr; Pietka, Maciej; Krolak, Andrzej

    2010-07-15

    We present theory and algorithms to perform an all-sky coherent search for periodic signals of gravitational waves in narrow-band data of a detector. Our search is based on a statistic, commonly called the F-statistic, derived from the maximum-likelihood principle in Paper I of this series. We briefly review the response of a ground-based detector to the gravitational-wave signal from a rotating neuron star and the derivation of the F-statistic. We present several algorithms to calculate efficiently this statistic. In particular our algorithms are such that one can take advantage of the speed of fast Fourier transform in calculation of the F-statistic. We construct a grid in the parameter space such that the nodes of the grid coincide with the Fourier frequencies. We present interpolation methods that approximately convert the two integrals in the F-statistic into Fourier transforms so that the fast Fourier transform algorithm can be applied in their evaluation. We have implemented our methods and algorithms into computer codes and we present results of the Monte Carlo simulations performed to test these codes.

  15. Optical Transients and Nucleosynthesis from Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The production and ejection of radioactive isotopes during, or immediately following, the merger of two neutron stars (or a neutron star and a black hole) can give rise to optical/infrared emission similar to, but dimmer and briefer than that of an ordinary supernova. These transients are promising electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave sources, and may be diagnostic of the sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. I will describe the physics of compact object mergers and their aftermath, and present calculations that demonstrate how the nucleosynthetic yields depend on the mechanism of ejection, the degree of neutron-richness and neutrino irradiation, and the survival lifetime of a remnant hyper-massive neutron star or the spin of a remnant black hole. We find that the color and luminosity of the transients depend sensitively on the mass and composition of the outflow, and therefore can provide a direct and informative probe of r-process nucleosynthesis at the production site.

  16. Neutron stars as cosmic hadron physics laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, D.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive observations of Her-1 with the Exosat satellite have led to a new understanding of both the dynamics of neutron-star superfluids and the free precession of neutron stars. Detailed microscopic calculations on neutron matter and the properties of the pinned crustal superfluid are provided to serve as a basis for comparing theory with observation on neutron stars. Topics discussed include the Hadron matter equation of state, neutron star structure, Hadron superfluids, the vortex creep theory, Vela pulsar glitches, astrophysical constraints on neutron matter energy gaps, the 35 day periodicity of Her-1, and the neutron matter equation of state. It is concluded that since the post-glitch fits and the identification of the 35th periodicity in Her X-1 as stellar wobble require a rigid neutron matter equation of state, the astrophysical evidence for such an equation seems strong, as well as that for an intermediate Delta(rho) curve.

  17. SPINDOWN OF ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS: GRAVITATIONAL WAVES OR MAGNETIC BRAKING?

    SciTech Connect

    Staff, Jan E.; Jaikumar, Prashanth; Chan, Vincent; Ouyed, Rachid

    2012-05-20

    We study the spindown of isolated neutron stars from initially rapid rotation rates, driven by two factors: (1) gravitational wave emission due to r-modes and (2) magnetic braking. In the context of isolated neutron stars, we present the first study including self-consistently the magnetic damping of r-modes in the spin evolution. We track the spin evolution employing the RNS code, which accounts for the rotating structure of neutron stars for various equations of state. We find that, despite the strong damping due to the magnetic field, r-modes alter the braking rate from pure magnetic braking for B {<=} 10{sup 13} G. For realistic values of the saturation amplitude {alpha}{sub sat}, the r-mode can also decrease the time to reach the threshold central density for quark deconfinement. Within a phenomenological model, we assess the gravitational waveform that would result from r-mode-driven spindown of a magnetized neutron star. To contrast with the persistent signal during the spindown phase, we also present a preliminary estimate of the transient gravitational wave signal from an explosive quark-hadron phase transition, which can be a signal for the deconfinement of quarks inside neutron stars.

  18. Post-Newtonian diagnosis of quasiequilibrium configurations of neutron star-neutron star and neutron star-black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Emanuele; Iyer, Sai; Will, Clifford M.

    2008-01-15

    We use a post-Newtonian diagnostic tool to examine numerically generated quasiequilibrium initial data sets for nonspinning double neutron star and neutron star-black hole binary systems. The post-Newtonian equations include the effects of tidal interactions, parametrized by the compactness of the neutron stars and by suitable values of 'apsidal' constants, which measure the degree of distortion of stars subjected to tidal forces. We find that the post-Newtonian diagnostic agrees well with the double neutron star initial data, typically to better than half a percent except where tidal distortions are becoming extreme. We show that the differences could be interpreted as representing small residual eccentricity in the initial orbits. In comparing the diagnostic with preliminary numerical data on neutron star-black hole binaries, we find less agreement.

  19. White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, P.

    1977-01-01

    The three possible fates of burned-out stars: white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, are described in elementary terms. Characteristics of these celestial bodies, as provided by Einstein's work, are described. (CP)

  20. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, D.; Pons, J. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Rea, N.

    2015-05-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  1. A white beam neutron spin splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Krist, T.; Klose, F.; Felcher, G.P.

    1997-07-23

    The polarization of a narrow, highly collimated polychromatic neutron beam is tested by a neutron spin splitter that permits the simultaneous measurement of both spin states. The device consists of a Si-Co{sub 0.11} Fe{sub 0.89} supermirror, which totally reflects one spin state up to a momentum transfer q=0.04 {angstrom}{sup -1}, whilst transmits neutrons of the opposite spin state. The supermirror is sandwitched between two thick silicon wafers and is magnetically saturated by a magnetic field of 400 Oe parallel to its surface. The neutron beam enters through the edge of one of the two silicon wavers, its spin components are split by the supermirror and exit from the opposite edges of the two silicon wafers and are recorded at different channels of a position-sensitive detector. The device is shown to have excellent efficiency over a broad range of wavelengths.

  2. Solitary neutron stars as gamma-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, M.

    Very high energy particle accelerators exist in the outer magnetospheres of some rapidly spinning solitary radiopulsars. The production of e± pairs and γ-rays associated with these accelerators evolves as the pulsar spins down. Expected evolution proceeds from a weak γ-ray source to a stronger Crab-like pulsar, then to a Vela-like pulsar, to a much stronger Cos B source, and, after several 104years, to an extinct aligned Vela-like neutron star whose further spin-down is quenched. The latter can be reignited to be a transient Gamma Ray Burst source by various "match-like" phenomena. Reasons are given for the different evolution of canonical radiopulsars. Outer magnetosphere accelerators in millisecond pulsars and around magnetized neutron stars with accretion disks are also considered.

  3. Systematic Parameter Errors in Inspiraling Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Marc

    2014-03-01

    The coalescence of two neutron stars is an important gravitational wave source for LIGO and other detectors. Numerous studies have considered the precision with which binary parameters (masses, spins, Love numbers) can be measured. Here I consider the accuracy with which these parameters can be determined in the presence of systematic errors due to waveform approximations. These approximations include truncation of the post-Newtonian (PN) series and neglect of neutron star (NS) spin, tidal deformation, or orbital eccentricity. All of these effects can yield systematic errors that exceed statistical errors for plausible parameter values. In particular, neglecting spin, eccentricity, or high-order PN terms causes a significant bias in the NS Love number. Tidal effects will not be measurable with PN inspiral waveforms if these systematic errors are not controlled.

  4. How loud are neutron star mergers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Radice, David; Ott, Christian D.; Roberts, Luke F.; Mösta, Philipp; Galeazzi, Filippo

    2016-07-01

    We present results from the first large parameter study of neutron star mergers using fully general relativistic simulations with finite-temperature microphysical equations of state and neutrino cooling. We consider equal and unequal-mass binaries drawn from the galactic population and simulate each binary with three different equations of state. Our focus is on the emission of energy and angular momentum in gravitational waves in the postmerger phase. We find that the emitted gravitational-wave energy in the first ˜10 ms of the life of the resulting hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) is about twice the energy emitted over the entire inspiral history of the binary. The total radiated energy per binary mass is comparable to or larger than that of nonspinning black hole inspiral-mergers. About 0.8-2.5% of the binary mass-energy is emitted at kHz frequencies in the early HMNS evolution. We find a clear dependence of the postmerger gravitational wave emission on binary configuration and equation of state and show that it can be encoded as a broad function of the binary tidal coupling constant κ2T. Our results also demonstrate that the dimensionless spin of black holes resulting from subsequent HMNS collapse are limited to ≲0.7 - 0.8 . This may significantly impact the neutrino pair annihilation mechanism for powering short gamma-ray bursts (sGRB).

  5. On the conversion of neutron stars into quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliara, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The possible existence of two families of compact stars, neutron stars and quark stars, naturally leads to a scenario in which a conversion process between the two stellar objects occurs with a consequent release of energy of the order of 1053 erg. We discuss recent hydrodynamical simulations of the burning process and neutrino diffusion simulations of cooling of a newly formed strange star. We also briefly discuss this scenario in connection with recent measurements of masses and radii of compact stars.

  6. Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith C.; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation contains an overview of the mission of the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICE), a proposed International Space Station (ISS) payload dedicated ot the study of neutron stars. There are also reviews of the Science Objectives of the payload,the science measurements, the design and the expected performance for the instruments for NICE,

  7. EUV/soft x-ray spectra for low B neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Rajagopal, Mohan; Rogers, Forrest J.; Iglesias, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent ROSAT and EUVE detections of spin-powered neutron stars suggest that many emit 'thermal' radiation, peaking in the EUV/soft X-ray band. These data constrain the neutron stars' thermal history, but interpretation requires comparison with model atmosphere computations, since emergent spectra depend strongly on the surface composition and magnetic field. As recent opacity computations show substantial change to absorption cross sections at neutron star photospheric conditions, we report here on new model atmosphere computations employing such data. The results are compared with magnetic atmosphere models and applied to PSR J0437-4715, a low field neutron star.

  8. ROTATIONAL CORRECTIONS TO NEUTRON-STAR RADIUS MEASUREMENTS FROM THERMAL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bauböck, Michi; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2015-01-20

    We calculate the rotational broadening in the observed thermal spectra of neutron stars spinning at moderate rates in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. These calculations accurately account for the effects of the second-order Doppler boosts as well as for the oblate shapes and the quadrupole moments of the neutron stars. We find that fitting the spectra and inferring the bolometric fluxes under the assumption that a star is not rotating causes an underestimate of the inferred fluxes and, thus, radii. The correction depends on the stellar spin, mass, radius, and the observer's inclination. For a 10 km, 1.4 M {sub ☉} neutron star spinning at 600 Hz, the rotational correction to the flux is ∼1%-4%, while for a 15 km neutron star with the same spin period, the correction ranges from 2% for pole-on sources to 12% for edge-on sources. We calculate the inclination-averaged corrections to inferred radii as a function of the neutron-star radius and mass and provide an empirical formula for the corrections. For realistic neutron-star parameters (1.4 M {sub ☉}, 12 km, 600 Hz), the stellar radius is on the order of 4% larger than the radius inferred under the assumption that the star is not spinning.

  9. Experiments dependent on neutron spin transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    2000-05-01

    Experiments dependent on neutron spin orientation transitions which give fundamental physics information are described. The magnetic moment of the neutron has been measured to be 1.91304275(45) nuclear magnetons by separated oscillatory fields resonant reorientations of the spins of neutrons in a beam passing through a magnetic field. In similar resonance experiments with ultracold neutrons trapped in a bottle, the neutron electric dipole moment has been shown to be less than 9×10 -26 e cm. Neutrons `dressed' with many radiofrequency quanta have been studied. The Berry phases of neutrons that have passed through a helical magnetic field or an oscillatory magnetic field have been observed. In neutron interactions, experiments with condensed matter, small changes in neutron velocities have been measured by changes in the neutron precessions in magnetic fields before and after the interaction. Parity non-conserving spin rotations of neutrons passing through various materials have been observed and measured and new experiments with H 2 and He are in progress.

  10. Where a Neutron Star's Accretion Disk Ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    In X-ray binaries that consist of a neutron star and a companion star, gas funnels from the companion into an accretion disk surrounding the neutron star, spiraling around until it is eventually accreted. How do the powerful magnetic fields threading through the neutron star affect this accretion disk? Recent observations provide evidence that they may push the accretion disk away from the neutron stars surface.Truncated DisksTheoretical models have indicated that neutron star accretion disks may not extend all the way in to the surface of a neutron star, but may instead be truncated at a distance. This prediction has been difficult to test observationally, however, due to the challenge of measuring the location of the inner disk edge in neutron-star X-ray binaries.In a new study, however, a team of scientists led by Ashley King (Einstein Fellow at Stanford University) has managed to measure the location of the inner edge of the disk in Aquila X-1, a neutron-star X-ray binary located 17,000 light-years away.Iron line feature detected by Swift (red) and NuSTAR (black). The symmetry of the line is one of the indicators that the disk is located far from the neutron star; if the inner regions of the disk were close to the neutron star, severe relativistic effects would skew the line to be asymmetric. [King et al. 2016]Measurements from ReflectionsKing and collaborators used observations made by NuSTAR and Swift/XRT both X-ray space observatories of Aquila X-1 during the peak of an X-ray outburst. By observing the reflection of Aquila X-1s emission off of the inner regions of the accretion disk, the authors were able to estimate the location of the inner edge of the disk.The authors find that this inner edge sits at ~15 gravitational radii. Since the neutron stars surface is at ~5 gravitational radii, this means that the accretion disk is truncated far from the stars surface. In spite of this truncation, material still manages to cross the gap and accrete onto the

  11. Transient phenomena from accreting magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, Dmitry

    In this contribution, I will review the recent progress in the research of accreting magnetized neutron stars (observed as X-ray pulsars) based on the study of their variability on different time scales. Specifically, I will focus on the properties of the X-ray emitting region. In recent years, the high-quality observational data accumulated with the new generation of X-ray observatories have triggered a renewed interest in these systems. The new studies are primarily focused on the detailed structure of the two physical regions of the objects: (i) the emitting area above the polar caps of the neutron star and (ii) the magnetospheric boundary, where the infalling matter couples to the accretoŕs magnetic field. The modulation of the matter supply from the binary companion as well as the instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the transient character of the majority of X-ray pulsars. The observations show that the "persistent" pulsars also exhibit numerous types of variabilities over a broad range of time scales (off-states, pulse-to-pulse variability, switches of spectral states, alternation of the pulsar's spin-up/spin-down episodes etc.). Of particular importance are the observed variations of the cyclotron absorption features (cyclotron lines), whose centroid energies are directly proportional to the magnetic field strength at the site of the line formation. The detailed studies of these variabilities have lead to the development of new theoretical models describing the physics in the emitting region and at the magnetospheric boundary. It has been proposed that the configuration and geometry of the two areas may change abruptly when the mass accretion rate reaches certain critical values. Such changes cause transitions between different accretion modes. A particular mode is expected to be characterized by certain variability patterns and can thus be inferred from the observations. I will describe these recent observations and the models which are aimed at

  12. Physics in strong magnetic fields near neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena occurring in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars are currently of great interest in high-energy astrophysics. Observations of rotation rate changes and cyclotron lines in pulsars and gamma-ray bursts indicate that surface magnetic fields of neutron stars often exceed a trillion gauss. In fields this strong, where electrons behave much as if they were in bound atomic states, familiar processes undergo profound changes, and exotic processes become important. Strong magnetic fields affect the physics in several fundamental ways: energies perpendicular to the field are quantized, transverse momentum is not conserved, and electron-positron spin is important. Neutron stars therefore provide a unique laboratory for the study of physics in extremely high fields that cannot be generated on earth.

  13. Axion cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    Cooling simulations of neutron stars and their comparison with the data from thermally emitting x-ray sources put constraints on the properties of axions, and by extension, of any light pseudoscalar dark matter particles, whose existence has been postulated to solve the strong-C P problem of QCD. We incorporate the axion emission by pair-breaking and formation processes by S - and P -wave nucleonic condensates in a benchmark code for cooling simulations, as well as provide fit formulas for the rates of these processes. Axion cooling of neutron stars has been simulated for 24 models covering the mass range 1 to 1.8 solar masses, featuring nonaccreted iron and accreted light-element envelopes, and a range of nucleon-axion couplings. The models are based on an equation state predicting conservative physics of superdense nuclear matter that does not allow for the onset of fast cooling processes induced by phase transitions to non-nucleonic forms of matter or high proton concentration. The cooling tracks in the temperature vs age plane were confronted with the (time-averaged) measured surface temperature of the central compact object in the Cas A supernova remnant as well as surface temperatures of three nearby middle-aged thermally emitting pulsars. We find that the axion coupling is limited to fa/107 GeV ≥(5 - 10 ) , which translates into an upper bound on axion mass ma≤(0.06 - 0.12 ) eV for Peccei-Quinn charges of the neutron |Cn|˜0.04 and proton |Cp|˜0.4 characteristic for hadronic models of axions.

  14. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  15. A debris disk around an isolated young neutron star.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Kaplan, David L

    2006-04-01

    Pulsars are rotating, magnetized neutron stars that are born in supernova explosions following the collapse of the cores of massive stars. If some of the explosion ejecta fails to escape, it may fall back onto the neutron star or it may possess sufficient angular momentum to form a disk. Such 'fallback' is both a general prediction of current supernova models and, if the material pushes the neutron star over its stability limit, a possible mode of black hole formation. Fallback disks could dramatically affect the early evolution of pulsars, yet there are few observational constraints on whether significant fallback occurs or even the actual existence of such disks. Here we report the discovery of mid-infrared emission from a cool disk around an isolated young X-ray pulsar. The disk does not power the pulsar's X-ray emission but is passively illuminated by these X-rays. The estimated mass of the disk is of the order of 10 Earth masses, and its lifetime (> or = 10(6) years) significantly exceeds the spin-down age of the pulsar, supporting a supernova fallback origin. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks seen around ordinary young stars, suggesting the possibility of planet formation around young neutron stars.

  16. A debris disk around an isolated young neutron star.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Kaplan, David L

    2006-04-01

    Pulsars are rotating, magnetized neutron stars that are born in supernova explosions following the collapse of the cores of massive stars. If some of the explosion ejecta fails to escape, it may fall back onto the neutron star or it may possess sufficient angular momentum to form a disk. Such 'fallback' is both a general prediction of current supernova models and, if the material pushes the neutron star over its stability limit, a possible mode of black hole formation. Fallback disks could dramatically affect the early evolution of pulsars, yet there are few observational constraints on whether significant fallback occurs or even the actual existence of such disks. Here we report the discovery of mid-infrared emission from a cool disk around an isolated young X-ray pulsar. The disk does not power the pulsar's X-ray emission but is passively illuminated by these X-rays. The estimated mass of the disk is of the order of 10 Earth masses, and its lifetime (> or = 10(6) years) significantly exceeds the spin-down age of the pulsar, supporting a supernova fallback origin. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks seen around ordinary young stars, suggesting the possibility of planet formation around young neutron stars. PMID:16598251

  17. Neutron Stars Join The Black Hole Jet Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    centers of galaxies," said Heinz. "What's unusual here is that this pocket-sized version, relatively speaking, is being powered by a neutron star, not a black hole." The main evidence for the newly found jet comes in two extended features in the Chandra data. These two fingers of X-ray emission are separated by about 30 degrees and may represent the outer walls of a wide jet. When overlapped with radio images, these X-ray features, which are at least five light years from the neutron star, closely trace the outline of the radio jet. Another interpretation is that these two features represent two separate, highly collimated jets produced at different times by a precessing neutron star. That is, the neutron star wobbles like a top as it spins and the jet fires at different angles at different times. Jet precession is also consistent with radio observations taken at different times, which show varying orientation angles of the jet. If the precession scenario is correct, Circinus X-1 would possess one of the longest, narrowest jets found in X-ray binary systems to date, representing yet another way in which neutron stars can rival and even outdo their larger black hole relatives. These results will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass.

  18. The influence of spin-down on thermal evolution of hybrid stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Dong

    2014-11-01

    As neutron stars spin-down, quark matter may appear in the core forming so-called hybrid stars. We investigate the evolution behavior of rotating hybrid stars which have tortuous thermal evolution curves because of a change of chemical composition and the appearance of different powerful neutrino reactions in the process of spin-down. The emergence of the nucleon direct Urca processes can lead to an abrupt rise of the rate of neutrino emission. Quark deconfinement heating can both delay the cooling dramatically and raise the temperature of the stars over a period of time. Comparing the thermal evolution curves with observations, our investigation shows that the thermal evolution curves of rotating hybrid stars are consistent with the most of pulsar’s data despite the onset of fast cooling. Massive rotating hybrid stars model could be a good choice for some “cooler” stars. The Cas A supernova remnant contains a young neutron star (≈330 yr old) which is one of the most important isolated neutron stars in testing the thermal evolution theory of neutron star. We find the onset of the nucleon direct Urca process of the rotating hybrid star with heating model also could be an alternative explanation for the rapid cooling of Cas A neutron star.

  19. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2014-05-09

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ρ0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ρ0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ρ0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  20. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ρ0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ρ0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ρ0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  1. Neutron Star Science with the NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J. K.

    2015-10-16

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), launched in June 2012, helped scientists obtain for the first time a sensitive high-­energy X-­ray map of the sky with extraordinary resolution. This pioneering telescope has aided in the understanding of how stars explode and neutron stars are born. LLNL is a founding member of the NuSTAR project, with key personnel on its optics and science team. We used NuSTAR to observe and analyze the observations of different neutron star classes identified in the last decade that are still poorly understood. These studies not only help to comprehend newly discovered astrophysical phenomena and emission processes for members of the neutron star family, but also expand the utility of such observations for addressing broader questions in astrophysics and other physics disciplines. For example, neutron stars provide an excellent laboratory to study exotic and extreme phenomena, such as the equation of state of the densest matter known, the behavior of matter in extreme magnetic fields, and the effects of general relativity. At the same time, knowing their accurate populations has profound implications for understanding the life cycle of massive stars, star collapse, and overall galactic evolution.

  2. Radio Detection of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Brandon; Cardena, Brett; Dispoto, Dana; Papadopoulos, Joanna; Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John

    2011-10-01

    Neutron star binary systems lose energy through gravitational radiation, and eventually merge. The gravitational radiation from the merger can be detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). It is expected that a transient radio pulse will also be produced during the merger event. Detection of such radio transients would allow for LIGO to search for signals within constrained time periods. We calculate the LWA-1 detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers. We calculate the detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers for the Long Wavelength Array and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array.

  3. Observations of Neutron Stars with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an approved NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity that will be deployed as an attached payload on the International Space Station in August of 2016. By virtue of its unprecedented combination of throughput and fast timing capabilities, NICER will enable an empirical determination of the neutron star equation of state via realistic modeling of the pulsed X-ray radiation from millisecond pulsars. In this talk, I will describe the NICER instrument and measurement techniques it will employ, as well as the expected constraints on neutron star structure, and by extension the behavior of matter at supra-nuclear densities.

  4. DISCOVERY OF A NEUTRON STAR OSCILLATION MODE DURING A SUPERBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmayer, Tod; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2014-10-01

    Neutron stars are among the most compact objects in the universe and provide a unique laboratory for the study of cold ultra-dense matter. While asteroseismology can provide a powerful probe of the interiors of stars, for example, helioseismology has provided unprecedented insights about the interior of the Sun, comparable capabilities for neutron star seismology have not yet been achieved. Here, we report the discovery of a coherent X-ray modulation from the neutron star 4U 1636–536 during the 2001 February 22 thermonuclear superburst seen with NASA's Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) that is very likely produced by a global oscillation mode. The observed frequency is 835.6440 ± 0.0002 Hz (1.43546 times the stellar spin frequency of 582.14323 Hz) and the modulation is well described by a sinusoid (A + Bsin (φ – φ{sub 0})) with a fractional half-amplitude of B/A = 0.19 ± 0.04% (4-15 keV). The observed frequency is consistent with the expected inertial frame frequency of a rotationally modified surface g-mode, an interfacial mode in the ocean-crust interface, or perhaps an r-mode. Observing an inertial frame frequency—as opposed to a co-rotating frame frequency—appears consistent with the superburst's thermal emission arising from the entire surface of the neutron star, and the mode may become visible by perturbing the local surface temperature. We briefly discuss the implications of the mode detection for the neutron star's projected velocity and mass. Our results provide further strong evidence that global oscillation modes can produce observable modulations in the X-ray flux from neutron stars.

  5. NASA'S Chandra Finds Superfluid in Neutron Star's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    superconducting material," said Peter Shternin of the Ioffe Institute in St Petersburg, Russia, leader of a team with a paper accepted in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Both teams show that this rapid cooling is explained by the formation of a neutron superfluid in the core of the neutron star within about the last 100 years as seen from Earth. The rapid cooling is expected to continue for a few decades and then it should slow down. "It turns out that Cas A may be a gift from the Universe because we would have to catch a very young neutron star at just the right point in time," said Page's co-author Madappa Prakash, from Ohio University. "Sometimes a little good fortune can go a long way in science." The onset of superfluidity in materials on Earth occurs at extremely low temperatures near absolute zero, but in neutron stars, it can occur at temperatures near a billion degrees Celsius. Until now there was a very large uncertainty in estimates of this critical temperature. This new research constrains the critical temperature to between one half a billion to just under a billion degrees. Cas A will allow researchers to test models of how the strong nuclear force, which binds subatomic particles, behaves in ultradense matter. These results are also important for understanding a range of behavior in neutron stars, including "glitches," neutron star precession and pulsation, magnetar outbursts and the evolution of neutron star magnetic fields. Small sudden changes in the spin rate of rotating neutron stars, called glitches, have previously given evidence for superfluid neutrons in the crust of a neutron star, where densities are much lower than seen in the core of the star. This latest news from Cas A unveils new information about the ultra-dense inner region of the neutron star. "Previously we had no idea how extended superconductivity of protons was in a neutron star," said Shternin's co-author Dmitry Yakovlev, also from the Ioffe Institute. The

  6. Gravitational wave damping of neutron star wobble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Curt; Jones, David Ian

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the effect of gravitational wave (GW) back reaction on realistic neutron stars (NS's) undergoing torque-free precession. By ``realistic'' we mean that the NS is treated as a mostly fluid body with an elastic crust, as opposed to a rigid body. We find that GW's damp NS wobble on a time scale τθ~2×105 yr [10- 7/(ΔId/I0)]2(kHz/ νs)4, where νs is the spin frequency and ΔId is the piece of the NS's inertia tensor that ``follows'' the crust's principal axis (as opposed to its spin axis). We give two different derivations of this result: one based solely on energy and angular momentum balance, and another obtained by adding the Burke-Thorne radiation reaction force to the Newtonian equations of motion. This problem was treated long ago by Bertotti and Anile, but their claimed result is wrong. When we convert from their notation to ours, we find that their τθ is too short by a factor of ~105 for the typical cases of interest and even has the wrong sign for ΔId negative. We show where their calculation went astray.

  7. Young Neutron Stars in Extragalactic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Nathan; Lorimer, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars are compact remnants of stellar cores left behind by supernova explosions. They spin rapidly and emit electromagnetic radiation from their magnetic poles, and gradually lose rotational energy. This project tests and expands upon a previous prediction by Perna et al. for the initial spin rates of neutron stars by attempting to model the x-ray emission from extragalactic supernovae. A computer simulation generated a set of pulsars of known initial rotational periods, magnetic field strengths, and ages, and will calculate the expected x-ray luminosities from the known relationship between magnetic field strengths, slow-down rates, and radio luminosities. This experiment expanded upon the original research by incorporating variability in the angle between the magnetic and rotational axes of each pulsar as well as the braking index value, which in the original publication were kept constant. This examines the effect of the angle on pulsars’ x-ray luminosities. The simulated x-ray luminosities were compared to the known x-ray luminosities of known supernova explosions, which served as an upper limit to determine the highest possible initial rotation speeds. Funding was provided through the WVU Summer Undergraduate Research Program.

  8. Neutron-star matter within the energy-density functional theory and neutron-star structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fantina, A. F.; Chamel, N.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    2015-02-24

    In this lecture, we will present some nucleonic equations of state of neutron-star matter calculated within the nuclear energy-density functional theory using generalized Skyrme functionals developed by the Brussels-Montreal collaboration. These equations of state provide a consistent description of all regions of a neutron star. The global structure of neutron stars predicted by these equations of state will be discussed in connection with recent astrophysical observations.

  9. Gravitational waves from neutron-star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Jocelyn; Cullen, Torrey; Flynn, Eric; Lockett-Ruiz, Veronica; Park, Conner; Vong, Susan

    2016-03-01

    The inspiral and merger of binary neutron stars is expected to provide many signals for Advanced LIGO at design sensitivity. The waveform models currently used to search for and parameterize these signals ignore effects near the merger: as the stars coalesce, the gravitational waves depend additionally on the properties of matter in the core of the stars. In this talk, I will discuss potential systematic error from neglecting these features and present phenomenological waveform models currently being developed to capture the dynamics of merging neutron stars.

  10. The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith C.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICE) will be a Mission of Opportunity dedicated to the study of neutron stars, the only places in the universe where all four fundamental forces of nature are simultaneously in play. NICE will explore the exotic states of matter within neutron stars, revealing their interior and surface compositions through rotation resolved X-ray spectroscopy. Absolute time-referenced data will allow NICE to probe the extreme physical environments associated with neutron stars, leveraging observations across the electromagnetic spectrum to answer decades-old questions about one of the most powerful cosmic accelerators known. Finally, NICE will definitively measure stabilities of pulsars as clocks, with implications for navigation, a pulsar-based timescale, and gravitational-wave detection. NICE will fly on the International Space Station, while GLAST is on orbit and post-RXTE, and will allow for the discovery of new high-energy pulsars and provide continuity in X-ray timing astrophysics.

  11. Electromagnetic damping of neutron star oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. N.; Savedoff, M. P.; Van Horn, H. M.; Zweibel, E. G.; Hansen, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A simple model of magnetic field perturbations driven by neutron star oscillations is used to estimate the electromagnetic power radiated by g-modes and torsional oscillations. The calculation assumes that the neutron star has a frozen-in magnetic field which is perturbed by the oscillatory motions of the surface. The disturbances propagate into the vacuum as outgoing electromagnetic waves. The relative effectiveness of Joule heating of the neutron star crust by pulsation-induced electric currents is estimated. It is concluded that electromagnetic damping is the dominant energy dissipation mechanism for quadrupole g-mode oscillations of neutron stars. For dipole spheroidal modes, both electromagnetic radiation and Joule heating are important, and there is no gravitational radiation emitted by these modes.

  12. Astronomers Discover Most Massive Neutron Star Yet Known

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have discovered the most massive neutron star yet found, a discovery with strong and wide-ranging impacts across several fields of physics and astrophysics. "This neutron star is twice as massive as our Sun. This is surprising, and that much mass means that several theoretical models for the internal composition of neutron stars now are ruled out," said Paul Demorest, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This mass measurement also has implications for our understanding of all matter at extremely high densities and many details of nuclear physics," he added. Neutron stars are the superdense "corpses" of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae. With all their mass packed into a sphere the size of a small city, their protons and electrons are crushed together into neutrons. A neutron star can be several times more dense than an atomic nucleus, and a thimbleful of neutron-star material would weigh more than 500 million tons. This tremendous density makes neutron stars an ideal natural "laboratory" for studying the most dense and exotic states of matter known to physics. The scientists used an effect of Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity to measure the mass of the neutron star and its orbiting companion, a white dwarf star. The neutron star is a pulsar, emitting lighthouse-like beams of radio waves that sweep through space as it rotates. This pulsar, called PSR J1614-2230, spins 317 times per second, and the companion completes an orbit in just under nine days. The pair, some 3,000 light-years distant, are in an orbit seen almost exactly edge-on from Earth. That orientation was the key to making the mass measurement. As the orbit carries the white dwarf directly in front of the pulsar, the radio waves from the pulsar that reach Earth must travel very close to the white dwarf. This close passage causes them to be delayed in their arrival by the distortion of

  13. Direct URCA process in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattimer, James M.; Prakash, Madappa; Pethick, C. J.; Haensel, Pawel

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the direct URCA process can occur in neutron stars if the proton concentration exceeds some critical value in the range 11-15 percent. The proton concentration, which is determined by the poorly known symmetry energy of matter above nuclear density, exceeds the critical value in many current calculations. If it occurs, the direct URCA process enhances neutrino emission and neutron star cooling rates by a large factor compared to any process considered previously.

  14. Relativistic tidal properties of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Nagar, Alessandro

    2009-10-15

    We study the various linear responses of neutron stars to external relativistic tidal fields. We focus on three different tidal responses, associated to three different tidal coefficients: (i) a gravito-electric-type coefficient G{mu}{sub l}=[length]{sup 2l+1} measuring the lth-order mass multipolar moment GM{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}} induced in a star by an external lth-order gravito-electric tidal field G{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}}; (ii) a gravito-magnetic-type coefficient G{sigma}{sub l}=[length]{sup 2l+1} measuring the lth spin multipole moment GS{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}} induced in a star by an external lth-order gravito-magnetic tidal field H{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}}; and (iii) a dimensionless 'shape' Love number h{sub l} measuring the distortion of the shape of the surface of a star by an external lth-order gravito-electric tidal field. All the dimensionless tidal coefficients G{mu}{sub l}/R{sup 2l+1}, G{sigma}{sub l}/R{sup 2l+1}, and h{sub l} (where R is the radius of the star) are found to have a strong sensitivity to the value of the star's 'compactness'c{identical_to}GM/(c{sub 0}{sup 2}R) (where we indicate by c{sub 0} the speed of light). In particular, G{mu}{sub l}/R{sup 2l+1}{approx}k{sub l} is found to strongly decrease, as c increases, down to a zero value as c is formally extended to the 'black hole (BH) limit'c{sup BH}=1/2. The shape Love number h{sub l} is also found to significantly decrease as c increases, though it does not vanish in the formal limit c{yields}c{sup BH}, but is rather found to agree with the recently determined shape Love numbers of black holes. The formal vanishing of {mu}{sub l} and {sigma}{sub l} as c{yields}c{sup BH} is a consequence of the no-hair properties of black holes. This vanishing suggests, but in no way proves, that the effective action describing the gravitational interactions of black holes may not need to be augmented by nonminimal worldline couplings.

  15. Neutron star cooling: effects of envelope physics

    SciTech Connect

    Van Riper, K.A.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron star cooling calculations are reported which employ improved physics in the calculation of the temperature drop through the atmosphere. The atmosphere microphysics is discussed briefly. The predicted neutron star surface temperatures, in the interesting interval 200 less than or equal to t (yr) less than or equal to 10/sup 5/, do not differ appreciably from the earlier results of Van Riper and Lamb (1981) for a non-magnetic star; for a magnetic star, the surface temperature is lower than in the previous work. Comparison with observational limits show that an exotic cooling mechanism, such as neutrino emission from a pion condensate or in the presence of percolating quarks, is not required unless the existence of a neutron star in the Tycho or SN1006 SNRs is established.

  16. ULXs: Neutron stars versus black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Andrew; Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We consider ultraluminous X-ray systems (ULXs) where the accretor is a neutron star rather than a black hole. We show that the recently discovered example (M82 X-2) fits naturally into the simple picture of ULXs as beamed X-ray sources fed at super-Eddington rates, provided that its magnetic field is weaker (≃1011G) than a new-born X-ray pulsar, as expected if there has been mass gain. Continuing accretion is likely to weaken the field to the point that pulsing stops, and make the system indistinguishable from a ULX containing a black hole. Accordingly we suggest that a significant fraction of all ULXs may actually contain neutron star accretors rather than black holes, reflecting the neutron-star fraction among their X-ray binary progenitors. We emphasize that neutron-star ULXs are likely to have higher apparent luminosities than black hole ULXs for a given mass transfer rate, as their tighter beaming outweighs their lower Eddington luminosities. This further increases the likely proportion of neutron-star accretors among all ULXs. Cygnus X-2 is probably a typical descendant of neutron-star ULXs, which may therefore ultimately end as millisecond pulsar binaries with massive white dwarf companions.

  17. Neutron stars as laboratories for gravity physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deliduman, Cemsinan

    2014-01-01

    We study the structure of neutron stars in R+αR² gravity model with perturbative method. We obtain mass-radius relations for four representative equations of state (EoS). We find that, for |α|~10⁹ cm², the results differ substantially from the results of general relativity. The effects of modified gravity are seen as mimicking a stiff or soft EoS for neutron stars depending upon whether α is negative or positive, respectively. Some of the soft EoS that are excluded within the framework of general relativity can be reconciled for certain values of α of this order with the 2 solar mass neutron star recently observed. Indeed, if the EoS is ever established to be soft, modified gravity of the sort studied here may be required to explain neutron star masses as large as 2 M{sub ⊙}. The associated length scale √(α)~10⁵ cm is of the order of the the typical radius of neutron stars implying that this is the smallest value we could find by using neutron stars as a probe. We thus conclude that the true value of α is most likely much smaller than 10⁹ cm².

  18. Carbon Atmosphere Discovered On Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Evidence for a thin veil of carbon has been found on the neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, resolves a ten-year mystery surrounding this object. "The compact star at the center of this famous supernova remnant has been an enigma since its discovery," said Wynn Ho of the University of Southampton and lead author of a paper that appears in the latest issue of Nature. "Now we finally understand that it can be produced by a hot neutron star with a carbon atmosphere." By analyzing Chandra's X-ray spectrum - akin to a fingerprint of energy - and applying it to theoretical models, Ho and his colleague Craig Heinke, from the University of Alberta, determined that the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, has an ultra-thin coating of carbon. This is the first time the composition of an atmosphere of an isolated neutron star has been confirmed. The Chandra "First Light" image of Cas A in 1999 revealed a previously undetected point-like source of X-rays at the center. This object was presumed to be a neutron star, the typical remnant of an exploded star, but researchers were unable to understand its properties. Defying astronomers' expectations, this object did not show any X-ray or radio pulsations or any signs of radio pulsar activity. By applying a model of a neutron star with a carbon atmosphere to this object, Ho and Heinke found that the region emitting X-rays would uniformly cover a typical neutron star. This would explain the lack of X-ray pulsations because -- like a lightbulb that shines consistently in all directions -- this neutron star would be unlikely to display any changes in its intensity as it rotates. Scientists previously have used a neutron star model with a hydrogen atmosphere giving a much smaller emission area, corresponding to a hot spot on a typical neutron star, which should produce X-ray pulsations as it rotates. Interpreting the hydrogen atmosphere model

  19. MAGNETIC INTERACTIONS IN COALESCING NEUTRON STAR BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2012-08-10

    It is expected on both evolutionary and empirical grounds that many merging neutron star (NS) binaries are composed of a highly magnetized NS in orbit with a relatively low magnetic field NS. I study the magnetic interactions of these binaries using the framework of a unipolar inductor model. The electromotive force generated across the non-magnetic NS as it moves through the magnetosphere sets up a circuit connecting the two stars. The exact features of this circuit depend on the uncertain resistance in the space between the stars R{sub space}. Nevertheless, I show that there are interesting observational and/or dynamical effects irrespective of its exact value. When R{sub space} is large, electric dissipation as great as {approx}10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1} (for magnetar-strength fields) occurs in the magnetosphere, which would exhibit itself as a hard X-ray precursor in the seconds leading up to merger. With less certainty, there may also be an associated radio transient. When R{sub space} is small, electric dissipation largely occurs in the surface layers of the magnetic NS. This can reach {approx}10{sup 49} erg s{sup -1} during the final {approx}1 s before merger, similar to the energetics and timescales of short gamma-ray bursts. In addition, for dipole fields greater than Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 12} G and a small R{sub space}, magnetic torques spin up the magnetized NS. This drains angular momentum from the binary and accelerates the inspiral. A faster coalescence results in less orbits occurring before merger, which would impact matched-filtering gravitational-wave searches by ground-based laser interferometers and could create difficulties for studying alternative theories of gravity with compact inspirals.

  20. NASA'S Chandra Finds Superfluid in Neutron Star's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    superconducting material," said Peter Shternin of the Ioffe Institute in St Petersburg, Russia, leader of a team with a paper accepted in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Both teams show that this rapid cooling is explained by the formation of a neutron superfluid in the core of the neutron star within about the last 100 years as seen from Earth. The rapid cooling is expected to continue for a few decades and then it should slow down. "It turns out that Cas A may be a gift from the Universe because we would have to catch a very young neutron star at just the right point in time," said Page's co-author Madappa Prakash, from Ohio University. "Sometimes a little good fortune can go a long way in science." The onset of superfluidity in materials on Earth occurs at extremely low temperatures near absolute zero, but in neutron stars, it can occur at temperatures near a billion degrees Celsius. Until now there was a very large uncertainty in estimates of this critical temperature. This new research constrains the critical temperature to between one half a billion to just under a billion degrees. Cas A will allow researchers to test models of how the strong nuclear force, which binds subatomic particles, behaves in ultradense matter. These results are also important for understanding a range of behavior in neutron stars, including "glitches," neutron star precession and pulsation, magnetar outbursts and the evolution of neutron star magnetic fields. Small sudden changes in the spin rate of rotating neutron stars, called glitches, have previously given evidence for superfluid neutrons in the crust of a neutron star, where densities are much lower than seen in the core of the star. This latest news from Cas A unveils new information about the ultra-dense inner region of the neutron star. "Previously we had no idea how extended superconductivity of protons was in a neutron star," said Shternin's co-author Dmitry Yakovlev, also from the Ioffe Institute. The

  1. Neutron Stars and the Discovery of Pulsars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, George

    1985-01-01

    Part one recounted the story of the discovery of pulsars and examined the Crab Nebula, supernovae, and neutron stars. This part (experts from the book "Frozen Star") shows how an understanding of the nature of pulsars allowed astronomers to tie these together. (JN)

  2. Local distribution of old neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frei, Szolt; Huang, Xiaolan; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1992-01-01

    The local distribution of old disk neutron stars is approximated with a 1D model, in which the steady state distribution in the direction perpendicular to the Galactic plane is calculated, assuming a variety of the initial radio pulsar positions and velocities, and various Galactic potentials. It is found that the local distribution of old neutron stars is dominated by those that were born with very low velocities. The high-velocity neutron stars spend most of their lifetime far in the Galactic halo and do not contribute much to the local density. Therefore, the rms velocity at birth is not a good indicator of the scale height of the old population. The most likely half-density scale height for the old disk neutron stars is approximately 350 pc, the same as for the old disk G, K, and M stars. If gamma-ray bursts originate on old disk neutron stars, then 350 pc should also be the scale height for the bursters.

  3. Spin distribution in neutron induced preequilibrium reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Kawano, T; Chadwick, M; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Macri, R; Younes, W

    2005-10-04

    The preequilibrium reaction mechanism makes an important contribution to neutron-induced reactions above E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. The preequilibrium process has been studied exclusively via the characteristic high energy neutrons produced at bombarding energies greater than 10 MeV. They are expanding the study of the preequilibrium reaction mechanism through {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Cross-section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 250 MeV) on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Residual state population was predicted using the GNASH reaction code, enhanced for preequilibrium. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshback, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without preequilibrium effects is significant.

  4. Population Synthesis of Double Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenney, Craig; Lorimer, D.; Bagchi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Globular clusters in our galaxy provide a fertile ground for stars to undergo supernova which leads to the creation of neutron stars. A population synthesis was created to study the population of double neutron stars (DNS) in our Galaxy that originated in globular clusters. The rate of DNS formation is proportional to the cluster's luminosity and the resulting kick from the supernova at birth ejects the DNS from the cluster. Initial conditions are given to the DNS after being ejected and allowed to evolve throughout the galaxy to the present time. With a simulated population of DNS we test to see how many of them are detectable from Earth with radio telescopes. DNS are being used as a way to detect gravitation waves when the two neutron stars spiral into each other. A better constraint on their formation and existence will lead to more accurate predictions for gravitational wave detectors.

  5. HYPERACCRETING NEUTRON STAR DISKS AND NEUTRINO ANNIHILATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dong; Dai, Z. G. E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.c

    2009-09-20

    Newborn neutron stars surrounded by hyperaccreting and neutrino-cooled disks may exist in some gamma-ray bursts and/or supernovae. In this paper, we further study the structure of such a neutron star disk based on the two-region (i.e., inner and outer) disk scenario following our previous work, and calculate the neutrino annihilation luminosity from the disk in various cases. We investigate the effects of the viscosity parameter {alpha}, energy parameter {epsilon} (measuring the neutrino cooling efficiency of the inner disk), and outflow strength on the structure of the entire disk as well as the effect of emission from the neutron star surface boundary emission on the total neutrino annihilation rate. The inner disk satisfies the entropy-conservation self-similar structure for the energy parameter {epsilon} {approx_equal} 1 and the advection-dominated structure for {epsilon} < 1. An outflow from the disk decreases the density and pressure but increases the thickness of the disk. Moreover, compared with the black hole disk, the neutrino annihilation luminosity above the neutron star disk is higher, and the neutrino emission from the boundary layer could increase the neutrino annihilation luminosity by about one order of magnitude higher than the disk without boundary emission. The neutron star disk with the advection-dominated inner disk could produce the highest neutrino luminosity while the disk with an outflow has the lowest. Although a heavily mass-loaded outflow from the neutron star surface at early times of neutron star formation prevents the outflow material from being accelerated to a high bulk Lorentz factor, an energetic ultrarelativistic jet via neutrino annihilation can be produced above the stellar polar region at late times if the disk accretion rate and the neutrino emission luminosity from the surface boundary layer are sufficiently high.

  6. Limiting rotational period of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K. )

    1992-11-15

    We seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties in which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a {ital M}=1.442{ital M}{sub {circle dot}} neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). A still lower curve, based only on the structure of Einstein's equations, limits any star whatsoever to lie in the plane above it. Hypothetical stars such as strange stars, if the matter of which they are made is self-bound in bulk at a sufficiently large equilibrium energy density, can lie in the region above the general-relativistic forbidden region, and in the region forbidden to neutron stars.

  7. Limiting rotational period of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    1992-11-01

    We seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties in which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M=1.442Msolar neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). A still lower curve, based only on the structure of Einstein's equations, limits any star whatsoever to lie in the plane above it. Hypothetical stars such as strange stars, if the matter of which they are made is self-bound in bulk at a sufficiently large equilibrium energy density, can lie in the region above the general-relativistic forbidden region, and in the region forbidden to neutron stars.

  8. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüster, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  9. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruester, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen

    2006-03-15

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  10. Encounters between binaries and neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    We simulated encounters between a neutron star and primordial and tidal-capture binaries. In the case of encounters involving a tidal-capture binary, comprising a white dwarf and a main-sequence star, we find that most exchange encounters will produce a single merged object with the white dwarf and neutron star engulfed in a common envelope of gas donated by the main-sequence primary of the original binary. A small fraction of exchanges induce a merger of the white dwarf and main-sequence star, with this object being unbound to the neutron star, and the two objects having a large relative speed at infinity. For encounters involving a primordial binary, fewer encounters require the inclusion of hydrodynamical effects. Those involving collisions or close encounters tend to produce a binary comprised of the two merged stars (now forming one star) and the third star. The binaries produced typically have large enough separations to prevent the formation of a single merged object until subsequent stellar evolution of one of the components causes it to fill its Roche lobe. Clean exchanges produce binaries with large eccentricities; they are typically sufficiently wide to avoid circularization.

  11. Improved microphysics in neutron star merger simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois

    2014-09-01

    Neutron star mergers are expected to be among the main sources of gravitational waves detectable by the Advance LIGO/VIRGO/KAGRA detector network. In many cases, these mergers are also likely to power bright electromagnetic transients, including short gamma-ray bursts and ``kilonovae,'' the optical/infrared emission due to the radioactive decay of neutron rich elements in material unbound by the merger. These EM counterparts can provide important information on the environment in which the merger takes place and the nature of the binary, and their detection could shed a light on the origin of short gamma-ray bursts and of r-process elements. Numerical simulations of neutron star mergers using general relativistic codes are required to understand the merger dynamics, the impact of the equation of state of the neutron star on the gravitational wave signal, and the potential of a given binary to power electromagnetic counterparts to that signal. Until recently, however, general relativistic codes used very simple models for the neutron star - often a simple gamma-law equation of state without any additional microphysics. Although sufficient to model the gravitational wave signal before merger, this cannot be used to follow the post-merger evolution of the system, or even some aspects of the disruption of the neutron star. To do so, nuclear-theory based equations of state with temperature and composition dependence have to be used, and the effects of neutrinos and magnetic fields should be taken into account. In this talk, I will discuss current efforts to include more advanced microphysics in general relativistic simulations, what we can do so far, and what the remaining computational challenges are. I will also show how existing numerical simulations have helped us constrain the outcome of neutron star mergers, and what remains to be done in order to extract as much information as possible from upcoming gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations. Neutron

  12. From ultracold Fermi Gases to Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Ultracold dilute atomic gases can be considered as model systems to address some pending problem in Many-Body physics that occur in condensed matter systems, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. We have developed a general method to probe with high precision the thermodynamics of locally homogeneous ultracold Bose and Fermi gases [1,2,3]. This method allows stringent tests of recent many-body theories. For attractive spin 1/2 fermions with tunable interaction (^6Li), we will show that the gas thermodynamic properties can continuously change from those of weakly interacting Cooper pairs described by Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory to those of strongly bound molecules undergoing Bose-Einstein condensation. First, we focus on the finite-temperature Equation of State (EoS) of the unpolarized unitary gas. Surprisingly, the low-temperature properties of the strongly interacting normal phase are well described by Fermi liquid theory [3] and we localize the superfluid phase transition. A detailed comparison with theories including recent Monte-Carlo calculations will be presented. Moving away from the unitary gas, the Lee-Huang-Yang and Lee-Yang beyond-mean-field corrections for low density bosonic and fermionic superfluids are quantitatively measured for the first time. Despite orders of magnitude difference in density and temperature, our equation of state can be used to describe low density neutron matter such as the outer shell of neutron stars. [4pt] [1] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, K. Jiang, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Nature 463, 1057 (2010) [0pt] [2] N. Navon, S. Nascimbène, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Science 328, 729 (2010) [0pt] [3] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, S. Pilati, F. Chevy, S. Giorgini, A. Georges, and C. Salomon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 215303 (2011)

  13. Testing General Relativity with Bursting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2008-03-01

    Neutron stars offer the possibility of testing General Relativity in the highest possible curvature limit attainable by an astrophysical object. Such tests, however, are hampered by the lack of a theoretical framework with which potential deviations from the GR predictions can be quantified. I show that several observable properties of bursting neutron stars in metric theories of gravity can be calculated using only conservation laws, symmetries, and the Einstein equivalence principle, without requiring the validity of the general relativistic field equations. I discuss, in particular, the gravitational redshift of a surface atomic line, the touchdown luminosity of a radius-expansion burst, which is believed to be equal to the Eddington critical luminosity, and the apparent surface area of a neutron star as measured during the cooling tails of bursts. I show that, for a general metric theory of gravity, the apparent surface area of a neutron star depends on the coordinate radius of the stellar surface and on its gravitational redshift in the exact same way as in general relativity. On the other hand, the Eddington critical luminosity depends also on an additional parameter that measures the degree to which the general relativistic field equations are satisfied. These results can be used in conjunction with current and future high-energy observations of bursting neutron stars to test general relativity in the strong-field regime.

  14. Dissipative processes in superfluid neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Colucci, Giuseppe; Manuel, Cristina

    2011-05-23

    We present some results about a novel damping mechanism of r-mode oscillations in neutron stars due to processes that change the number of protons, neutrons and electrons. Deviations from equilibrium of the number densities of the various species lead to the appearance in the Euler equations of the system of a dissipative mechanism, the so-called rocket effect. The evolution of the r-mode oscillations of a rotating neutron star are influenced by the rocket effect and we present estimates of the corresponding damping timescales. In the description of the system we employ a two-fluid model, with one fluid consisting of all the charged components locked together by the electromagnetic interaction, while the second fluid consists of superfluid neutrons. Both components can oscillate however the rocket effect can only efficiently damp the countermoving r-mode oscillations, with the two fluids oscillating out of phase. In our analysis we include the mutual friction dissipative process between the neutron superfluid and the charged component. We neglect the interaction between the two r-mode oscillations as well as effects related with the crust of the star. Moreover, we use a simplified model of neutron star assuming a uniform mass distribution.

  15. Improved Universal No-Hair Relations for Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Barun; Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    The exterior gravitational field of an astrophysical body can be characterized by its multipole moments. No-hair theorems for black holes state that the exterior gravitational field can be completely described in terms of their mass and spin angular momentum. Similar no-hair like relations have been recently found for neutron stars which are approximately independent of the internal structure of the star. Missions like NICER and LOFT will observe the pulse profiles of millisecond pulsars and thermonuclear bursters. The equation-of-state (EoS) independent relations may break degeneracies among the relevant observables in the modeling of X-ray pulse and atomic line profiles. The amount of EoS independence of these approximately universal relations depends on how one adimensionalizes the multipole moments of the star with stellar mass, spin and radius. We show that for slowly-rotating neutron stars in both non-relativistic limit and full General Relativity, the optimal normalization of the multipole moments exist that minimizes the EoS dependence in the universal relations. The relations among the moment of inertia and higher order moments can be improved from the original ones approximately by a factor of two. Nicolas Yunes acknowledges support from NSF CAREER Award PHY-1250636. Barun Majumder is supported by the Fulbright-Nehru Postdoctoral Research Fellowship.

  16. Prospects for measuring neutron-star masses and radii with X-ray pulse profile modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Chakrabarty, Deepto E-mail: fozel@email.arizona.edu

    2014-06-01

    Modeling the amplitudes and shapes of the X-ray pulsations observed from hot, rotating neutron stars provides a direct method for measuring neutron-star properties. This technique constitutes an important part of the science case for the forthcoming NICER and proposed LOFT X-ray missions. In this paper, we determine the number of distinct observables that can be derived from pulse profile modeling and show that using only bolometric pulse profiles is insufficient for breaking the degeneracy between inferred neutron-star radius and mass. However, we also show that for moderately spinning (300-800 Hz) neutron stars, analysis of pulse profiles in two different energy bands provides additional constraints that allow a unique determination of the neutron-star properties. Using the fractional amplitudes of the fundamental and the second harmonic of the pulse profile in addition to the amplitude and phase difference of the spectral color oscillations, we quantify the signal-to-noise ratio necessary to achieve a specified measurement precision for neutron star radius. We find that accumulating 10{sup 6} counts in a pulse profile is sufficient to achieve a ≲ 5% uncertainty in the neutron star radius, which is the level of accuracy required to determine the equation of state of neutron-star matter. Finally, we formally derive the background limits that can be tolerated in the measurements of the various pulsation amplitudes as a function of the system parameters.

  17. WHEN CAN GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE OBSERVATIONS DISTINGUISH BETWEEN BLACK HOLES AND NEUTRON STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Hannam, Mark; Fairhurst, Stephen; Brown, Duncan A.; Fryer, Chris L.; Harry, Ian W.

    2013-03-20

    Gravitational-wave observations of compact binaries have the potential to uncover the distribution of masses and spins of black holes and neutron stars in the universe. The binary components' physical parameters can be inferred from their effect on the phasing of the gravitational-wave signal, but a partial degeneracy between the components' mass ratio and their spins limits our ability to measure the individual component masses. At the typical signal amplitudes expected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (signal-to-noise ratios between 10 and 20), we show that it will in many cases be difficult to distinguish whether the components are neutron stars or black holes. We identify when the masses of the binary components could be unambiguously measured outside the range of current observations: a system with a chirp mass M {<=} 0.871 M{sub Sun} would unambiguously contain the smallest-mass neutron star observed, and a system with M {>=} 2.786 M{sub Sun} must contain a black hole. However, additional information would be needed to distinguish between a binary containing two 1.35 M{sub Sun} neutron stars and an exotic neutron-star-black-hole binary. We also identify those configurations that could be unambiguously identified as black hole binaries, and show how the observation of an electromagnetic counterpart to a neutron-star-black-hole binary could be used to constrain the black hole spin.

  18. Accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Pines, D

    1980-02-01

    During the past 8 years, extended temporal and broadband spectroscopic studies carried out by x-ray astronomical satellites have led to the identification of specific compact x-ray sources as accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars in close binary systems. Such sources provide a unique opportunity to study matter under extreme conditions not accessible in the terrestrial laboratory. Quantitative theoretical models have been developed which demonstrate that detailed studies of these sources will lead to a greatly increased understanding of dense and superdense hadron matter, hadron superfluidity, high-temperature plasma in superstrong magnetic fields, and physical processes in strong gravitational fields. Through a combination of theory and observation such studies will make possible the determination of the mass, radius, magnetic field, and structure of neutron stars and degenerate dwarf stars and the identification of further candidate black holes, and will contribute appreciably to our understanding of the physics of accretion by compact astronomical objects. PMID:17749313

  19. Ultrahigh energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the production rate of ultrahigh energy (UHE) neutrinos from galactic neutron stars. The statistics of various stellar populations are reviewed as well as an evolutionary scheme linking several neutron star environments. An observational test for predicting stellar evolution is made using two mass ratio intervals of less than 0.3 and greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, which is supported by kinematical evidence. Attention is given to the problem of the target material that is required by UHE protons accelerated from the pulsar's surface to their rotational kinetic energy, and to the detectability of neutron stars in the UHE neutrinos by employing the deep underwater muon and neutrino detector (DUMAND) array.

  20. The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Gendreau, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an approved NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity dedicated to the study of the extraordinary gravitational, electromagnetic, and nuclear-physics environments embodied by neutron stars. Scheduled to be launched in 2016 as an International Space Station payload, NICER will explore the exotic states of matter, using rotation-resolved spectroscopy of the thermal and non-thermal emissions of neutron stars in the soft (0.2-12 keV) X-ray band. Grazing-incidence "concentrator" optics coupled with silicon drift detectors, actively pointed for a full hemisphere of sky coverage, will provide photon-counting spectroscopy and timing registered to GPS time and position, with high throughput and relatively low background. The NICER project plans to implement a Guest Observer Program, which includes competitively selected user targets after the first year of flight operations. I will describe NICER and discuss ideas for potential Be/X-ray binary science.

  1. Instability of superfluid flow in the neutron star core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, B.

    2012-04-01

    Pinning of superfluid vortices to magnetic flux tubes in the outer core of a neutron star supports a velocity difference of ˜105 cm s-1 between the neutron superfluid and the proton-electron fluid as the star spins down. Under the Magnus force that arises on the vortex array, vortices undergo vortex creep through thermal activation or quantum tunnelling. We examine the hydrodynamic stability of this situation. Vortex creep introduces two low-frequency modes, one of which is unstable above a critical wavenumber for any non-zero flow velocity of the neutron superfluid with respect to the charged fluid. For typical pinning parameters of the outer core, the superfluid flow is unstable over wavelengths λ≲ 10 m and over time-scales of ˜(λ/1 m)1/2 yr down to ˜1 d. The vortex lattice could degenerate into a tangle, and the superfluid flow would become turbulent. We suggest that superfluid turbulence could be responsible for the red timing noise seen in many neutron stars, and find a predicted spectrum that is generally consistent with observations.

  2. Towards a metallurgy of neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Kobyakov, D; Pethick, C J

    2014-03-21

    In the standard picture of the crust of a neutron star, matter there is simple: a body-centered-cubic lattice of nuclei immersed in an essentially uniform electron gas. We show that, at densities above that for neutron drip (∼ 4 × 1 0(11)  g cm(-3) or roughly one-thousandth of nuclear matter density), the interstitial neutrons give rise to an attractive interaction between nuclei that renders the lattice unstable. We argue that the likely equilibrium structure is similar to that in displacive ferroelectric materials such as BaTiO3. As a consequence, the properties of matter in the inner crust are expected to be much richer than previously appreciated, and we mention possible consequences for observable neutron star properties.

  3. Magnetic field evolution in superconducting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, Vanessa; Andersson, Nils; Glampedakis, Kostas; Lander, Samuel K.

    2015-10-01

    The presence of superconducting and superfluid components in the core of mature neutron stars calls for the rethinking of a number of key magnetohydrodynamical notions like resistivity, the induction equation, magnetic energy and flux-freezing. Using a multifluid magnetohydrodynamics formalism, we investigate how the magnetic field evolution is modified when neutron star matter is composed of superfluid neutrons, type-II superconducting protons and relativistic electrons. As an application of this framework, we derive an induction equation where the resistive coupling originates from the mutual friction between the electrons and the vortex/fluxtube arrays of the neutron and proton condensates. The resulting induction equation allows the identification of two time-scales that are significantly different from those of standard magnetohydrodynamics. The astrophysical implications of these results are briefly discussed.

  4. HOW CAN NEWLY BORN RAPIDLY ROTATING NEUTRON STARS BECOME MAGNETARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Quan; Yu, Yun-Wei

    2014-05-10

    In a newly born (high-temperature and Keplerian rotating) neutron star, r-mode instability can lead to stellar differential rotation, which winds the seed poloidal magnetic field (∼10{sup 11} G) to generate an ultra-high (∼10{sup 17} G) toroidal field component. Subsequently, by succumbing to the Tayler instability, the toroidal field could be partially transformed into a new poloidal field. Through such dynamo processes, the newly born neutron star with sufficiently rapid rotation could become a magnetar on a timescale of ∼10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} s, with a surface dipolar magnetic field of ∼10{sup 15} G. Accompanying the field amplification, the star could spin down to a period of ∼5 ms through gravitational wave radiation due to the r-mode instability and, in particular, the non-axisymmetric stellar deformation caused by the toroidal field. This scenario provides a possible explanation for why the remnant neutron stars formed in gamma-ray bursts and superluminous supernovae could be millisecond magnetars.

  5. Physics in Strong Magnetic Fields Near Neutron Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the behaviors of particles and energies in the magnetic fields of neutron stars. Different types of possible research using neutron stars as a laboratory for the study of strong magnetic fields are proposed. (CW)

  6. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-15

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars.

  7. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-15

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars. PMID:27472110

  8. An instability in neutron stars at birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Adam; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supernova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this 'convective' instability is pivotal to the supernova mechanism, pulsar nagnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  9. Neutron star kicks and their relationship to supernovae ejecta mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, J. C.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a simple model to explain the velocity of young neutron stars. We attempt to confirm a relationship between the amount of mass ejected in the formation of the neutron star and the `kick' velocity imparted to the compact remnant resulting from the process. We assume that the velocity is given by vkick = α (Mejecta/Mremnant) + β . To test this simple relationship, we use the BPASS (Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis) code to create stellar population models from both single and binary star evolutionary pathways. We then use our Remnant Ejecta and Progenitor Explosion Relationship (REAPER) code to apply different α and β values, and three different `kick' orientations then record the resulting velocity probability distributions. We find that while a single star population provides a poor fit to the observational data, the binary population provides an excellent fit. Values of α = 70 km s-1 and β = 110 km s-1 reproduce the Hobbs et al. observed two-dimensional velocities, and α = 70 km s-1 and β = 120 km s-1 reproduce their inferred three-dimensional velocity distribution for nearby single neutron stars with ages less than 3 Myr. After testing isotropic, spin-axis aligned and orthogonal to spin-axis `kick' orientations, we find no statistical preference for a `kick' orientation. While ejecta mass cannot be the only factor that determines the velocity of supernova compact remnants, we suggest that it is a significant contributor and that the ejecta-based `kick' should replace the Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution currently used in many population synthesis codes.

  10. Neutron Star Kicks and their Relationship to Supernovae Ejecta Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, J. C.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a simple model to explain the velocity of young neutron stars. We attempt to confirm a relationship between the amount of mass ejected in the formation of the neutron star and the `kick' velocity imparted to the compact remnant resulting from the process. We assume the velocity is given by vkick = α (Mejecta/Mremnant) + β . To test this simple relationship we use the BPASS (Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis) code to create stellar population models from both single and binary star evolutionary pathways. We then use our Remnant Ejecta and Progenitor Explosion Relationship (REAPER) code to apply different α and β values and three different `kick' orientations then record the resulting velocity probability distributions. We find that while a single star population provides a poor fit to the observational data, the binary population provides an excellent fit. Values of α = 70 km s-1 and β = 110 km s-1 reproduce the Hobbs et al. (2005) observed 2-dimensional velocities and α = 70 km s-1 and β = 120 km s-1 reproduce their inferred 3-dimensional velocity distribution for nearby single neutron stars with ages less than 3 Myrs. After testing isotropic, spin-axis aligned and orthogonal to spin-axis `kick' orientations, we find no statistical preference for a `kick' orientation. While ejecta mass cannot be the only factor that determines the velocity of supernovae compact remnants, we suggest it is a significant contributor and that the ejecta based `kick' should replace the Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution currently used in many population synthesis codes.

  11. Merger of Magnetized Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Hirschmann, Eric; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We present simulations of the merger of binary neutron star systems calculated with full general relativity and incorporating the global magnetic field structure for the stars evolved with resistive magnetohydrodynamics. We also incorporate the effects of neutrino transport and tabular equations of state to describe the degenerate matter. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA through the Astrophysics Theory Program grant NNX13AH01G.

  12. PULSE PROFILES FROM THERMALLY EMITTING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Turolla, R.; Nobili, L.

    2013-05-10

    The problem of computing the pulse profiles from thermally emitting spots on the surface of a neutron star in general relativity is reconsidered. We show that it is possible to extend Beloborodov's approach to include (multiple) spots of finite size in different positions on the star surface. The results for the pulse profiles are expressed by comparatively simple analytical formulae which involve only elementary functions.

  13. Neutron stars: A cosmic hadron physics laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, David

    1989-01-01

    A progress report is given on neutron stars as a cosmic hadron physics laboratory. Particular attention is paid to the crustal neutron superfluid, and to the information concerning its properties which may be deduced from observations of pulsar glitches and postglitch behavior. Current observational evidence concerning the softness or stiffness of the high density neutron matter equation of state is reviewed briefly, and the (revolutionary) implications of a confirmation of the existence of a 0.5 ms pulsar at the core of (Supernova) SN1987A are discussed.

  14. Neutron stars - A cosmic hadron physics laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, David

    1989-01-01

    A progress report is given on neutron stars as a cosmic hadron physics laboratory. Particular attention is paid to the crustal neutron superfluid, and to the information concerning its properties which may be deduced from observations of pulsar glitches and postglitch behavior. Current observational evidence concerning the softness or stiffness of the high density neutron matter equation of state is reviewed briefly, and the (revolutionary) implications of a confirmation of the existence of a 0.5 ms pulsar at the core of (Supernova) SN1987A are discussed.

  15. High Time Resolution Studies of X-Ray Bursts: Neutron Star Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, William

    1998-04-01

    Galactic low mass X-ray binaries distinguish themselves from the X-Ray pulsars by two characteristics: (1) they emit X-ray bursts due to unstable nuclear burning of accreted matter on the neutron star surface, and (2) they do not appear to emit coherent pulsations, even though they are believed to harbor fast-spinning neutron stars. One of the ``holy grails'' of X-ray astronomy in the 1980's was to measure the spin rates of these neutron stars so as to establish these neutron stars as progenitors of milli-second radio pulsars. Since the launch of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer in 1995, highly coherent flux oscillations, with a Q-value of several hundred, have been observed during the X-ray bursts of several low mass X-ray binaries. All aspects of these oscillations, i.e., coherence, frequency stability from one burst to another for a given binary, their absence and presence at different phases of the bursts, strongly indicate that these oscillations are due to rotation of the neutron star. A very promising interpretation is that they are due to a combination of the neutron star rotation and surface temperature variations during the unstable nuclear burning. Therefore it is quite appropriate to call these neutron stars nuclear powered pulsars. These oscillations offer a unique opportunity to probe the neutron star structure. In this talk I will review the observational status of these oscillations and show how we could use them to study the intrinsic properties of the neutron star (mass, radius, and magnetic field).

  16. The Mystery of the Lonely Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-09-01

    The VLT Reveals Bowshock Nebula around RX J1856.5-3754 Deep inside the Milky Way, an old and lonely neutron star plows its way through interstellar space. Known as RX J1856.5-3754 , it measures only ~ 20 km across. Although it is unusually hot for its age, about 700,000 °C, earlier observations did not reveal any activity at all, contrary to all other neutron stars known so far. In order to better understand this extreme type of object, a detailed study of RX J1856.5-3754 was undertaken by Marten van Kerkwijk (Institute of Astronomy of the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands) and Shri Kulkarni (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA). To the astronomers' delight and surprise, images and spectra obtained with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) now show a small nearby cone-shaped ("bowshock") nebula. It shines in the light from hydrogen atoms and is obviously a product of some kind of interaction with this strange star. Neutron stars - remnants of supernova explosions Neutron stars are among the most extreme objects in the Universe. They are formed when a massive star dies in a "supernova explosion" . During this dramatic event, the core of the star suddenly collapses under its own weight and the outer parts are violently ejected into surrounding space. One of the best known examples is the Crab Nebula in the constellation Taurus (The Bull). It is the gaseous remnant of a star that exploded in the year 1054 and also left behind a pulsar , i.e., a rotating neutron star [1]. A supernova explosion is a very complex event that is still not well understood. Nor is the structure of a neutron star known in any detail. It depends on the extreme properties of matter that has been compressed to incredibly high densities, far beyond the reach of physics experiments on Earth [2]. The ultimate fate of a neutron star is also unclear. From the observed rates of supernova explosions in other galaxies, it appears that several hundred million neutron stars

  17. Spin-orbit states of neutron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsofini, Joachim; Sarenac, Dusan; Wood, Christopher J.; Cory, David G.; Arif, Muhammad; Clark, Charles W.; Huber, Michael G.; Pushin, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a method to prepare an entangled spin-orbit state between the spin and the orbital angular momenta of a neutron wave packet. This spin-orbit state is created by passing neutrons through the center of a quadrupole magnetic field, which provides a coupling between the spin and orbital degrees of freedom. A Ramsey-fringe-type measurement is suggested as a means of verifying the spin-orbit correlations.

  18. Measurement of the Radius of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    A physical understanding of the behavior of cold ultra-dense matter -- at and above nuclear density -- can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars. The recent 1.97+/-0.04 Msun measurement for PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of state (EoSs) are disfavored, in favor of hadronic EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, the latter EoSs produce lines of nearly constant radii (within about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. Our (preliminary) results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, in the range 7.5-10 km (90% confidence). The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to unmodelled spectrally hard components.

  19. Measurement of the Radius of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, R. E.; Servillat, M.; Webb, N.

    2013-01-01

    A physical understanding of the behavior of cold ultra dense matter - at and above nuclear density - can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars. The recent 1.97 ± 0.04 M⊙ measurement for PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of state (EoSs) are disfavored, in favor of hadronic EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, the latter EoSs produce lines of nearly constant radii (within about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. Our (preliminary) results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, in the range 7.5-10 km (90% confidence). The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to unmodeled spectrally hard components.

  20. Properties of ultracompact neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Becker, Peter A.; Wood, Kent S.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the effects extreme gravity would have on the propagation of particles inside and around constant density ultracompact stars are examined. The possible observational characteristics due to the gravitational lensing of surface hot spots are examined. The change that would be seen in the Eddington luminosity near such an object is computed. It is shown that such stars would exhibit a 'neutrino' sphere inside the surface and a 'neutrino cloud' partially exterior to the surface.

  1. Tidal Love Numbers of Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderer, Tanja

    2008-04-20

    For a variety of fully relativistic polytropic neutron star models we calculate the star's tidal Love number k{sub 2}. Most realistic equations of state for neutron stars can be approximated as a polytrope with an effective index n {approx} 0.5-1.0. The equilibrium stellar model is obtained by numerical integration of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhov equations. We calculate the linear l = 2 static perturbations to the Schwarzschild spacetime following the method of Thorne and Campolattaro. Combining the perturbed Einstein equations into a single second-order differential equation for the perturbation to the metric coefficient g{sub tt} and matching the exterior solution to the asymptotic expansion of the metric in the star's local asymptotic rest frame gives the Love number. Our results agree well with the Newtonian results in the weak field limit. The fully relativistic values differ from the Newtonian values by up to {approx}24%. The Love number is potentially measurable in gravitational wave signals from inspiralling binary neutron stars.

  2. Nonlinear radial oscillations of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gabler, Michael; Sperhake, Ulrich; Andersson, Nils

    2009-09-15

    The effects of nonlinear oscillations in compact stars are attracting considerable current interest. In order to study such phenomena in the framework of fully nonlinear general relativity, highly accurate numerical studies are required. A numerical scheme specifically tailored for such a study is based on formulating the time evolution in terms of deviations from a stationary equilibrium configuration. Using this technique, we investigate over a wide range of amplitudes nonlinear effects in the evolution of radial oscillations of neutron stars. In particular, we discuss mode coupling due to nonlinear interaction, the occurrence of resonance phenomena, shock formation near the stellar surface as well as the capacity of nonlinearities to stabilize perturbatively unstable neutron star models.

  3. One-arm Spiral Instability in Hypermassive Neutron Stars Formed by Dynamical-Capture Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; East, William E.; Pretorius, Frans; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2016-03-01

    Using general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations, we show that merging binary neutron stars can form hypermassive neutrons stars that undergo the one-arm spiral instability. We study the particular case of a dynamical capture merger where the stars have a small spin, as may arise in globular clusters, and focus on an equal-mass scenario where the spins are aligned with the orbital angular momentum. We find that this instability develops when post-merger fluid vortices lead to the generation of a toroidal remnant - a configuration whose maximum density occurs in a ring around the center-of-mass - with high vorticity along its rotation axis. The instability quickly saturates on a timescale of ~ 10 ms, with the m = 1 azimuthal density multipole mode dominating over higher modes. The instability also leaves a characteristic imprint on the post-merger gravitational wave signal that could be detectable if the instability persists in long-lived remnants. This work was supported by the Simons Foundation and NSF Grants PHY-1305682, PHY-1300903, and NASA Grant NNX13AH44G. Computational resources were provided by XSEDE/TACC under Grants TG-PHY100053, TG-MCA99S008, and the Orbital cluster at Princeton Univers.

  4. Non-identical neutron star twins

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.; Kettner, Christiane

    1998-07-01

    The work of J. A. Wheeler in the mid 1960's showed that forsmooth equations of state no stable stellar configurations with centraldensities above that corresponding to the limiting mass of 'neutronstars' (in the generic sense) were stable against acoustical vibrationalmodes. A perturbation would cause any such star to collapse to a blackhole or explode. Accordingly, there has been no reason to expect that astable degenerate family of stars with higher density than the knownwhite dwarfs and neutron stars might exist. We have found a class ofexceptions corresponding to certain equations of state that describe afirst order phase transition. We discuss how such a higher density familyof stars could be formed in nature, and how the promising new explorationof oscillations in the X-ray brightness of accreting neutron stars mightprovide a means of identifying them. Our proof of the possible existenceof a third family of degenerate stars is one of principle and rests ongeneral principles like causality, microstability of matter and GeneralRelativity.

  5. Confirming a substellar companion candidate around a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, Bettina; Luhman, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    In a search for substellar companions around young neutron stars, we found an indication for a very faint near-infrared source at the position of the isolated neutron star RXJ0806.4-4123. The suspected near-IR source cannot be the neutron star itself because the latter is much too faint to be detected. Recent Herschel 160 microm observations of the field point to an additional dusty belt around the neutron star. The outer location of the dusty belt could be explained by the presence of a substellar companion around the neutron star. We propose deeper near-infrared observations with FLAMINGOS-2 to confirm that the near-infrared source is real. The observation could provide the first direct detection of a substellar companion around a neutron star. However, even a non-detection would be interesting to constrain evolution models of the dusty belt around the neutron star.

  6. Self-similar Hot Accretion Flow onto a Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2001-06-01

    We consider hot, two-temperature, viscous accretion onto a rotating, unmagnetized neutron star. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, as well as free-free cooling from the electrons. We show that the accretion flow has an extended settling region that can be described by means of two analytical self-similar solutions: a two-temperature solution that is valid in an inner zone, r<~102.5, where r is the radius in Schwarzschild units; and a one-temperature solution that is valid in an outer zone, r>~102.5. In both zones the density varies as ρ~r-2 and the angular velocity as Ω~r-3/2. We solve the flow equations numerically and confirm that the analytical solutions are accurate. Except for the radial velocity, all gas properties in the self-similar settling zone, such as density, angular velocity, temperature, luminosity, and angular momentum flux, are independent of the mass accretion rate; these quantities do depend sensitively on the spin of the neutron star. The angular momentum flux is outward under most conditions; therefore, the central star is nearly always spun down. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy that is released as the star is braked by viscosity, and the contribution from gravity is small; hence, the radiative efficiency, η=Lacc/Mc2, is arbitrarily large at low M. For reasonable values of the gas adiabatic index γ, the Bernoulli parameter is negative; therefore, in the absence of dynamically important magnetic fields, a strong outflow or wind is not expected. The flow is also convectively stable but may be thermally unstable. The described solution is not advection dominated; however, when the spin of the star is small enough, the flow transforms smoothly to an advection-dominated branch of solution.

  7. Self-similar hot accretion flow onto a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2001-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical solutions which describe a hot, viscous, two-temperature accretion flow onto a neutron star or any other compact star with a surface. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, and free-free cooling from the electrons. Outside a thin boundary layer, where the accretion flow meets the star, we show that there is an extended settling region which is well-described by two self-similar solutions: (1) a two-temperature solution which is valid in an inner zone r<=102.5 (r is in Schwarzchild units), and (2) a one-temperature solution at larger radii. In both zones, ρ~r-2, Ω~r-3/2, v~r0, Tp~r-1 in the two-temperature zone, Te~r-1/2. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy of the star as the star is braked by viscosity; hence the luminosity is independent of Ṁ. The settling solution is convectively and viscously stable and is unlikely to have strong winds or outflows. The flow is thermally unstable, but the instability may be stabilized by thermal conduction. The settling solution described here is not advection-dominated, and is thus different from the self-similar ADAF found around black holes. When the spin of the star is small enough, however, the present solution transforms smoothly to a (settling) ADAF. .

  8. R-mode Instability of Neutron Star with Non-Newtonian Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Wen, De-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar—Friedmann—Schutz (CFS) instabilities of r-modes for canonical neutron stars (1.4 Msolar) with rigid crusts are investigated by using an equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter with super-soft symmetry energy, where the non-Newtonian gravity proposed in the grand unification theories is also considered. Constrained by the observations of the masses and the spin frequencies for neutron stars, the boundary of the r-mode instability window for a canonical neutron star is obtained, and the results show that the observed neutron stars are all outside the instability window, which is consistent with the theoretical expectation. In addition, an upper limit of the non-Newtonian gravity parameters is also given.

  9. THE ANGULAR MOMENTA OF NEUTRON STARS AND BLACK HOLES AS A WINDOW ON SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Miller, M. C.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2011-04-10

    It is now clear that a subset of supernovae displays evidence for jets and is observed as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The angular momentum distribution of massive stellar endpoints provides a rare means of constraining the nature of the central engine in core-collapse explosions. Unlike supermassive black holes, the spin of stellar-mass black holes in X-ray binary systems is little affected by accretion and accurately reflects the spin set at birth. A modest number of stellar-mass black hole angular momenta have now been measured using two independent X-ray spectroscopic techniques. In contrast, rotation-powered pulsars spin down over time, via magnetic braking, but a modest number of natal spin periods have now been estimated. For both canonical and extreme neutron star parameters, statistical tests strongly suggest that the angular momentum distributions of black holes and neutron stars are markedly different. Within the context of prevalent models for core-collapse supernovae, the angular momentum distributions are consistent with black holes typically being produced in GRB-like supernovae with jets and with neutron stars typically being produced in supernovae with too little angular momentum to produce jets via magnetohydrodynamic processes. It is possible that neutron stars are with high spin initially and rapidly spun down shortly after the supernova event, but the available mechanisms may be inconsistent with some observed pulsar properties.

  10. Cooling of neutron stars with diffusive envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznogov, M. V.; Fortin, M.; Haensel, P.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Zdunik, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars on their cooling. To this aim, we perform cooling simulations using newly constructed models of the envelopes composed of binary ion mixtures (H-He, He-C, C-Fe) varying the mass of lighter ions (H, He or C) in the envelope. The results are compared with those calculated using the standard models of the envelopes which contain the layers of lighter (accreted) elements (H, He and C) on top of the Fe layer, varying the mass of accreted elements. The main effect is that the chemical composition of the envelopes influences their thermal conductivity and, hence, thermal insulation of the star. For illustration, we apply these results to estimate the internal temperature of the Vela pulsar and to study the cooling of neutron stars of ages of 105 - 106 yr at the photon cooling stage. The uncertainties of the cooling models associated with our poor knowledge of chemical composition of the heat insulating envelopes strongly complicate theoretical reconstruction of the internal structure of cooling neutron stars from observations of their thermal surface emission.

  11. Magnetorotational instability in proto-neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urpin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Magneto-rotational instability (MRI) has been suggested to lead to a rapid growth of the magnetic field in core collapse supernovae and produce departures from spherical symmetry that are important in determining the explosion mechanism. Aims: We address the problem of stability in differentially rotating magnetized proto-neutron stars at the beginning of their evolution. Methods: To do this, we consider a linear stability taking into account non-linear effects of the magnetic field and strong gravity. Results: Criteria for MRI are derived without simplifying assumptions about a weak magnetic field. In proto-neutron stars, these criteria differ qualitatively from the standard condition dΩ/d s <0 where Ω is the angular velocity and s the cylindrical radius. If the magnetic field is strong, the MRI can occur only in the neighbourhood of the regions where the spherical radial component of the magnetic field vanishes. The growth rate of the MRI is relatively low except for perturbations with very small scales which usually are not detected in numerical simulations. We find that MRI in proto-neutron stars grows more slowly than the double diffusive instability analogous the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in ordinary stars.

  12. Stars Can't Spin Out of Control (Artist's Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for QuickTime Movie of Stars Can't Spin Out of Control

    This artist's animation demonstrates how a dusty planet-forming disk can slow down a whirling young star, essentially saving the star from spinning itself to death. Evidence for this phenomenon comes from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The movie begins by showing a developing star (red ball). The star is basically a giant ball of gas that is collapsing onto itself. As it shrinks, it spins faster and faster, like a skater folding in his or her arms. The green lines represent magnetic fields.

    As gravity continues to pull matter inward, the star spins so fast, it starts to flatten out. The same principle applies to the planet Saturn, whose spin has caused it to be slightly squashed or oblate.

    A forming star can theoretically whip around fast enough to overcome gravity and flatten itself into a state where it can no longer become a full-fledged star. But stars don't spin out of control, possibly because swirling disks of dust slow them down. Such disks can be found orbiting young stars, and are filled with dust that might ultimately stick together to form planets.

    The second half of the animation demonstrates how a disk is thought to keep its star's speed in check. A developing star is shown twirling inside its disk. As it turns, its magnetic fields pass through the disk and get bogged down like a spoon in molasses. This locks the star's rotation to the slower-turning disk, so the star, while continuing to shrink, does not spin faster.

    Spitzer found evidence for star-slowing disks in a survey of nearly 500 forming stars in the Orion nebula. It observed that slowly spinning stars are five times more likely to host disks than rapidly spinning stars.

  13. Effects of the quark-hadron phase transition on highly magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzon, B.; Gomes, R. O.; Schramm, S.

    2016-08-01

    The presence of quark-hadron phase transitions in neutron stars can be related to several interesting phenomena. In particular, previous calculations have shown that fast rotating neutron stars, when subjected to a quark-hadron phase transition in their interiors, could give rise to the backbending phenomenon characterized by a spin-up era. In this work, we use an equation of state composed of two phases, containing nucleons (and leptons) and quarks. The hadronic phase is described in a relativistic mean field formalism that takes many-body forces into account, and the quark phase is described by the MIT bag model with a vector interaction. Stationary and axi-symmetric stellar models are obtained in a self-consistent way by solving numerically the Einstein-Maxwell equations by means of a pseudo-spectral method. As a result, we obtain the interesting backbending phenomenon for fast spinning neutron stars. More importantly, we show that a magnetic field, which is assumed to be axi-symmetric and poloidal, can also be enhanced due to the phase transition from normal hadronic matter to quark matter on highly magnetized neutron stars. Therefore, in parallel to the spin-up era, classes of neutron stars endowed with strong magnetic fields may go through a "magnetic-up era" in their lives.

  14. Effects of the quark-hadron phase transition on highly magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzon, B.; Gomes, R. O.; Schramm, S.

    2016-11-01

    The presence of quark-hadron phase transitions in neutron stars can be related to several interesting phenomena. In particular, previous calculations have shown that fast rotating neutron stars, when subjected to a quark-hadron phase transition in their interiors, could give rise to the backbending phenomenon characterized by a spin-up era. In this work, we use an equation of state composed of two phases, containing nucleons (and leptons) and quarks. The hadronic phase is described in a relativistic mean field formalism that takes many-body forces into account, and the quark phase is described by the MIT bag model with a vector interaction. Stationary and axisymmetric stellar models are obtained in a self-consistent way by solving numerically the Einstein-Maxwell equations by means of a pseudo-spectral method. As a result, we obtain the interesting backbending phenomenon for fast spinning neutron stars. More importantly, we show that a magnetic field, which is assumed to be axisymmetric and poloidal, can also be enhanced due to the phase transition from normal hadronic matter to quark matter on highly magnetized neutron stars. Therefore, in parallel to the spin-up era, classes of neutron stars endowed with strong magnetic fields may go through a `magnetic-up era' in their lives.

  15. On the neutron stars in supergiant fast x-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangdong

    Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) are a new class of high-mass X-ray binaries com-posed by a massive OB supergiant star as companion donor and a compact object, possibly a neutron star. SFXTs display short X-ray outbursts characterized by fast flares on brief timescales of hours and large flux variability typically in the range 103 - 105 . Based on the most recent observational features of SFXTs we discuss the evolution of the neutron stars in SFXTs, and suggest that they may be born with relatively long spin periods.

  16. Colloquium: Measuring the neutron star equation of state using x-ray timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Anna L.; Andersson, Nils; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco; Hebeler, Kai; Israel, Gianluca; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Morsink, Sharon; Özel, Feryal; Patruno, Alessandro; Poutanen, Juri; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Schwenk, Achim; Steiner, Andrew W.; Stella, Luigi; Tolos, Laura; van der Klis, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    One of the primary science goals of the next generation of hard x-ray timing instruments is to determine the equation of state of matter at supranuclear densities inside neutron stars by measuring the radius of neutron stars with different masses to accuracies of a few percent. Three main techniques can be used to achieve this goal. The first involves waveform modeling. The flux observed from a hotspot on the neutron star surface offset from the rotational pole will be modulated by the star's rotation, and this periodic modulation at the spin frequency is called a pulsation. As the photons propagate through the curved spacetime of the star, information about mass and radius is encoded into the shape of the waveform (pulse profile) via special and general-relativistic effects. Using pulsations from known sources (which have hotspots that develop either during thermonuclear bursts or due to channeled accretion) it is possible to obtain tight constraints on mass and radius. The second technique involves characterizing the spin distribution of accreting neutron stars. A large collecting area enables highly sensitive searches for weak or intermittent pulsations (which yield spin) from the many accreting neutron stars whose spin rates are not yet known. The most rapidly rotating stars provide a clean constraint, since the limiting spin rate where the equatorial surface velocity is comparable to the local orbital velocity, at which mass shedding occurs, is a function of mass and radius. However, the overall spin distribution also provides a guide to the torque mechanisms in operation and the moment of inertia, both of which can depend sensitively on dense matter physics. The third technique is to search for quasiperiodic oscillations in x-ray flux associated with global seismic vibrations of magnetars (the most highly magnetized neutron stars), triggered by magnetic explosions. The vibrational frequencies depend on stellar parameters including the dense matter equation of

  17. Neutron stars in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Silva, Hector O.; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-06-01

    Horndeski's theory of gravity is the most general scalar-tensor theory with a single scalar whose equations of motion contain at most second-order derivatives. A subsector of Horndeski's theory known as "Fab Four" gravity allows for dynamical self-tuning of the quantum vacuum energy, and therefore it has received particular attention in cosmology as a possible alternative to the Λ CDM model. Here we study compact stars in Fab Four gravity, which includes as special cases general relativity ("George"), Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity ("Ringo"), theories with a nonminimal coupling with the Einstein tensor ("John"), and theories involving the double-dual of the Riemann tensor ("Paul"). We generalize and extend previous results in theories of the John class and were not able to find realistic compact stars in theories involving the Paul class.

  18. Why neutron stars have three hairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Leo; Yagi, Kent; Pappas, George; Yunes, Nicolas; Apostolatos, Theocharis

    2015-04-01

    Neutron stars have recently been found to enjoy a certain `baldness' in their multipolar structure which is independent of the equation of state (EoS) of dense nuclear matter. This is reminiscent of the black hole no-hair relations, and in stark contrast to regular stars. Why is this? Is it because realistic EoSs are sufficiently similar, or because GR effects are especially important, or because the nuclear matter is `cold'? We explore the physics behind these and more hypotheses, and give a convincing explanation for the true origin of the three-hair relations.

  19. FAST FOSSIL ROTATION OF NEUTRON STAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-10

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed {approx}10{sup 3} yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  20. Cosmic ray acceleration by binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, W.

    Young binary neutron stars, the elder brothers of pulsars, are proposed as the boosters of the ionic component of cosmic rays. Their rotational energy can be converted into beams of cosmic rays if there is enough coupling between the corotating magnetosphere and the impinging plasma, in a manner similar to the sparking of a grindstone. Power-law spectra in energy are obtained from a power-law dependence of the accelerating fields. The upper cutoff energy should not greatly exceed 10 to the 20th eV. The observed ionic cosmic-ray spectrum would result from a superposition of the injection by no more than about one million young binary neutron stars.

  1. 'Tertiary' nuclear burning - Neutron star deflagration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    A motivation is presented for the idea that dense nuclear matter can burn to a new class of stable particles. One of several possibilities is an 'octet' particle which is the 16 baryon extension of alpha particle, but now composed of a pair of each of the two nucleons, (3Sigma, Delta, and 2Xi). Such 'tertiary' nuclear burning (here 'primary' is H-He and 'secondary' is He-Fe) may lead to neutron star explosions rather than collapse to a black hole, analogous to some Type I supernovae models wherein accreting white dwarfs are pushed over the Chandrasekhar mass limit but explode rather than collapse to form neutron stars. Such explosions could possibly give gamma-ray bursts and power quasars, with efficient particle acceleration in the resultant relativistic shocks. The new stable particles themselves could possibly be the sought-after weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) or 'dark' matter.

  2. The Fascinating World of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2009-07-01

    Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of cold nuclear matter, namely, the relation between pressure and energy density, is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova, all depend critically on the equation of state of hadronic matter. In this contribution I will concentrate on the EOS of cold baryonic matter with special emphasis on its impact on the structure and dynamics of neutron stars. In particular, I will discuss the many fascinating phases that one encounters in the journey from the low-density crust to the high-density core.

  3. The Fascinating World of Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2009-07-06

    Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of cold nuclear matter, namely, the relation between pressure and energy density, is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova, all depend critically on the equation of state of hadronic matter. In this contribution I will concentrate on the EOS of cold baryonic matter with special emphasis on its impact on the structure and dynamics of neutron stars. In particular, I will discuss the many fascinating phases that one encounters in the journey from the low-density crust to the high-density core.

  4. Particle acceleration in axisymmetric, magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1977-01-01

    The potential drop in the polar cap region of a rotating, magnetized neutron star is found assuming that the magnetic field is dipolar, with the field aligned (or anti-aligned) with the rotation axis. The curvature of the field lines is of critical importance. Charge flow is assumed to be along magnetic field lines. The electric field has a maximum at radius 1.5 R and the magnitude and functional form of the current is determined.

  5. Mergers of Binary Neutron Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We present results from fully relativistic simulations of binary neutron star mergers varying the tabular equation of state used to approximate the degenerate material and the mass ratio. The simulations incorporate both magnetic fields and the effects of neutrino cooling. In particular, we examine the amount and properties of material ejected from the merger. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA through the Astrophysics Theory Program grant NNX13AH01G.

  6. Physics of systems containing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1989-01-01

    The following is a summary of work done during the period of Mar. to Oct. 1989. Three major topics were extensively looked into during this time: the reported 2,000 Hz optical signal from the direction of SNR1987A, the possibility that neutron stellar surface magnetic fields do not decay except when the star is accreting, and the 6 Hz QPOs of LMXBs.

  7. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  8. Spin Duality on the Neutron ($^3$He)

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Solvignon

    2006-02-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility experiment E01-012 measured the ^3He spin structure functions and virtual photon asymmetries in the resonance region in the range 1.0neutron. Preliminary results for A_1^3He are presented as well as an overview of the experimental and theoretical developments.

  9. Spin Duality on the Neutron (^3He)

    SciTech Connect

    Solvignon, Patricia

    2007-02-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility experiment E01-012 measured the 3He spin structure functions and virtual photon asymmetries in the resonance region in the momentum transfer range 1.0 < Q2 < 4.0 (GeV/c)2. Our date, when compared with existing deep inelastic scattering data, can be used to test quark-hadron duality in g1 and A1 for 3He and the neutron. Preliminary results for A{sub 1}{sup {sup 3}He} are presented, as well as some details about the experiment.

  10. From neutron stars to quark stars in mimetic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2016-09-01

    Realistic models of neutron and quark stars in the framework of mimetic gravity with a Lagrange multiplier constraint are presented. We discuss the effect of a mimetic scalar aiming to describe dark matter on the mass-radius relation and the moment of inertia for slowly rotating relativistic stars. The mass-radius relation and moment of inertia depend on the value of the mimetic scalar in the center of the star. This fact leads to the ambiguity in the mass-radius relation for a given equation of state. Such ambiguity allows us to explain some observational facts better than in standard general relativity. The case of mimetic potential V (ϕ )˜A eC ϕ2 is considered in detail. The relative deviation of the maximal moment of inertia is approximately twice as large as the relative deviation of the maximal stellar mass. We also briefly discuss the mimetic f (R ) gravity. In the case of f (R )=R +a R2 mimetic gravity, it is expected that the increase of maximal mass and maximal moment of inertia due to the mimetic scalar becomes much stronger with bigger parameter a . The influence of the scalar field in mimetic gravity can lead to the possible existence of extreme neutron stars with large masses.

  11. Searching for gravitational waves from neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrisy, Ashikuzzaman

    In this dissertation we discuss gravitational waves (GWs) and their neutron star (NS) sources. We begin with a general discussion of the motivation for searching for GWs and the indirect experimental evidence of their existence. Then we discuss the various mechanisms through which NS can emit GWs, paying special attention the r-mode oscillations. Finally we end with discussion of GW detection. In Chapter 2 we describe research into the frequencies of r-mode oscillations. Knowing these frequencies can be useful for guiding and interpreting gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations. The frequencies of slowly rotating, barotropic, and non-magnetic Newtonian stars are well known, but subject to various corrections. After making simple estimates of the relative strengths of these corrections we conclude that relativistic corrections are the most important. For this reason we extend the formalism of K. H. Lockitch, J. L. Friedman, and N. Andersson [Phys. Rev. D 68, 124010 (2003)], who consider relativistic polytropes, to the case of realistic equations of state. This formulation results in perturbation equations which are solved using a spectral method. We find that for realistic equations of state the r-mode frequency ranges from 1.39--1.57 times the spin frequency of the star when the relativistic compactness parameter (M/R) is varied over the astrophysically motivated interval 0.110--0.310. Following a successful r-mode detection our results can help constrain the high density equation of state. In Chapter 3 we present a technical introduction to the data analysis tools used in GW searches. Starting from the plane-wave solutions derived in Chapter 1 we develop the F-statistic used in the matched filtering technique. This technique relies on coherently integrating the GW detector's data stream with a theoretically modeled wave signal. The statistic is used to test the null hypothesis that the data contains no signal. In this chapter we also discuss how to

  12. Neutron stars interiors: Theory and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    There are many fascinating processes in the universe which we observe in more detail thanks to increasingly sophisticated technology. One of the most interesting phenomena is the life cycle of stars, their birth, evolution and death. If the stars are massive enough, they end their lives in a core-collapse supernova explosion, one of the most violent events in the universe. As a result, the densest objects in the universe, neutron stars and/or black holes, are created. The physical basis of these events should be understood in line with observation. Unfortunately, available data do not provide adequate constraints for many theoretical models of dense matter. One of the most open areas of research is the composition of matter in the cores of neutron stars. Unambiguous fingerprints for the appearance and evolution of particular components, such as strange baryons and mesons, with increasing density, have not been identified. In particular, the hadron-quark phase transition remains a subject of intensive research. In this contribution we briefly survey the most promising observational and theoretical directions leading to progress in understanding high density matter in neutron stars. A possible way forward in modeling high-density matter is outlined, exemplified by the quark-meson-coupling model (QMC). This model makes connection between hadronic structure and the underlying quark make-up. It offers a natural explanation for the saturation of nuclear force and treats high-density matter, containing the full baryon octet, in terms of four uniquely defined parameters adjusted to properties of symmetric nuclear matter at saturation.

  13. Accuracy in measuring the neutron star mass in the gravitational wave parameter estimation for black hole-neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hee-Suk

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two gravitational wave (GW) signals, named as GW150914 and GW151226, have been detected by the two LIGO detectors. Although both signals were identified as originating from merging black hole (BH) binaries, GWs from systems containing neutron stars (NSs) are also expected to be detected in the near future by the advanced detector network. In this work, we assess the accuracy in measuring the NS mass ( M NS) for the GWs from BH-NS binaries adopting the Advanced LIGO sensitivity with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10. By using the Fisher matrix method, we calculate the measurement errors ( σ) in M NS assuming a NS mass of 1 ≤ M NS/ M ⊙ ≤ 2 and low-mass BHs with masses in the range of 4 ≤ M BH/ M ⊙ ≤ 10. We use the TaylorF2 waveform model in which the spins are aligned with the orbital angular momentum, but here we only consider the BH spins. We find that the fractional errors ( σ/ M NS × 100) are in the range of 10% - 50% in our mass region for a given dimensionless BH spin χBH = 0. The errors tend to increase as the BH spin increases, and this tendency is stronger for higher NS masses (or higher total masses). In particular, for the highest mass NSs ( M NS = 2 M ⊙), the errors σ can be larger than the true value of M NS if the dimensionless BH spin exceeds ~ 0.6.

  14. Relativistic density functional theory for finite nuclei and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarewicz, Jorge

    In 1939 Oppenheimer and Volkoff demonstrated using Einstein's theory of general relativity that a neutron star supported exclusively by neutron degeneracy pressure will collapse into a black hole if its mass exceeds seven tenths of a solar mass. Seventy five years after such a pioneering prediction the existence of neutron stars with masses as large as two solar masses has been firmly established. This fact alone highlights the critical role that nuclear interactions play in explaining the structure of neutron stars. Indeed, a neutron star is a gold mine for the study of nuclear phenomena that span an enormous range of densities and neutron-proton asymmetries. Physical phenomena over such diverse scales are best described by a formalism based on Relativistic Density Functional Theory. In this contribution I focus on the synergy between theory, experiment, and observation that is needed to elucidate the myriad of exotic states of matter that are believed to exist in a neutron star.

  15. Isolated neutron stars in the galaxy: from magnetars to antimagnetars

    SciTech Connect

    Boldin, P. A.; Popov, S. B.

    2012-07-15

    Using the model with decaying magnetic fields it is possible to describe with one smooth (log-Gaussian) initial magnetic field distribution three types of isolated neutron stars: radiopulsar, magnetars, and cooling close-by compact objects. The same model is used here to make predictions for old accreting isolated neutron stars. It is shown that using the updated field distribution we predict a significant fraction of isolated neutron stars at the stage of accretion despite long subsonic propeller stage.

  16. Three-Hair Relations, Orbital Motion and Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunes, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Neutron stars are one of the most relativistic objects in the Universe. The gravitational waves they emit when two of them spiral into each other and merge are one of the primary targets of ground-based gravitational wave observatories, such as LIGO and Virgo. In this talk, I will describe a new set of three-hair relations (analogous to the no-hair relations of black holes) that prescribe all multipole moments of the external gravitational field of neutron stars in terms of only the mass, the spin angular momentum and the quadrupole moment. I will then describe how these relations allow us to construct more accurate gravitational waveform for neutron star inspirals. Such waveforms may allow us to better measure certain combinations of the neutron star's individual spins, as well as the tidal Love number, from which one may be able to infer the neutron star equation of state. We acknowledge support from NSF PHY-1114374, PHY-1250636 and NASA NNX11AI49G.

  17. On the properties of matter in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, G.

    1973-01-01

    A qualitative description of the interior of a neutron star is presented, giving attention also to the validity of the 'isotropic fluid' approximation. The atmosphere and surface of a neutron star are considered together with aspects concerning nuclear and solid state physics in the crust, the liquid interior, the hyperon core, neutron star models, and pulsar observations. Accretion processes are also investigated, taking into account such topics as the Eddington limit, accretion rates, the death of pulsars, changes of the surface composition of neutron stars by accretion, questions of X-ray emission, and aspects of gamma radiation emission.

  18. Future Probes of the Neutron Star Equation of State Using X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    Observations with NASA s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have resulted in the discovery of fast (200 - 600 Hz), coherent X-ray intensity oscillations (hereafter, %urstoscillations ) during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from 12 low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Although many of their detailed properties remain to be fully understood, it is now beyond doubt that these oscillations result from spin modulation of the thermonuclear burst flux from the neutron star surface. Among the new timing phenomena revealed by RXTE the burst oscillations are perhaps the best understood, in the sense that many of their properties can be explained in the framework of this relatively simple model. Because of this, detailed modelling of burst oscillations can be an extremely powerful probe of neutron star structure, and thus the equation of state (EOS) of supra-nuclear density matter. Both the compactness parameter beta = GM/c(sup 2)R, and the surface velocity, nu(sub rot) = Omega(sub spin)R, are encoded in the energy-dependent amplitude and shape of the modulation pulses. The new discoveries have spurred much new theoretical work on thermonuclear burning and propagation on neutron stars, so that in the near future it is not unreasonable to think that detailed physical models of the time dependent flux from burning neutron stars will be available for comparison with the observed pulse profiles from a future, large collecting area X-ray timing observatory. In addition, recent high resolution burst spectroscopy with XMM/Newton suggests the presence of redshifted absorption lines from the neutron star surface during bursts. This leads to the possibility of using large area, high spectral resolution measurements of X-ray bursts as a precise probe of neutron star structure. In this work I will explore the precision with which constraints on neutron star structure, and hence the dense matter EOS, can be made with the implementation of such programs.

  19. Nonequilibrium Dynamics and the Evolution of Superfluid Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauls, Jame

    2016-07-01

    The interior crust and the liquid core of neutron stars are predicted to be a mixture of neutron and proton superfluids and a liquid of relativistic electrons and muons. Quantized vortices in the neutron superfluid and quantized flux lines in the proton superconductor are topological defects of these hadronic condensates. I discuss the roles of nucleation, interaction and evolution of topological defects under non-equilibrium conditions in the context of our current understanding and models of the rotational dynamics of pulsars, as well as thermal and magnetic field evolution of neutron stars. I include some speculative ideas on possibile turbulent vortex states in neutron star interiors.

  20. Dynamics of dissipative multifluid neutron star cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, B.; Andersson, N.; Comer, G. L.

    2012-09-01

    We present a Newtonian multifluid formalism for superfluid neutron star cores, focusing on the additional dissipative terms which arise when one takes into account the individual dynamical degrees of freedom associated with the coupled “fluids.” The problem is of direct astrophysical interest as the nature of the dissipative terms can have significant impact on the damping of the various oscillation modes of the star and the associated gravitational-wave signatures. A particularly interesting application concerns the gravitational-wave driven instability of f- and r-modes. We apply the developed formalism to two specific three-fluid systems: (i) a hyperon core in which both Λ and Σ- hyperons are present and (ii) a core of deconfined quarks in the color-flavor-locked phase in which a population of neutral K0 kaons is present. The formalism is, however, general and can be applied to other problems in neutron-star dynamics (such as the effect of thermal excitations close to the superfluid transition temperature) as well as laboratory multifluid systems.

  1. Nonlinear Tides in Coalescing Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Nevin

    2016-03-01

    Coalescing binary neutron stars are among the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO. Tidal interactions in such systems extract energy from the orbit and, at some level, modify the gravitational wave signal. Previous studies found that tidal effects are probably too small to be detected from individual systems with LIGO. However, these studies typically assumed that the tide can be treated as a linear perturbation to the star. I will show that the linear approximation is invalid even during the early stages of inspiral and that nonlinear fluid effects in the form of tide-internal wave interactions become important around the time the binary first enters LIGO's bandpass (at gravitational wave frequencies around 30 Hz). Although the precise influence of nonlinear fluid effects is not yet well constrained, I will show that they may significantly modify the gravitational wave signal and electromagnetic emission from coalescing binary neutron stars. This research was supported by NASA Grant NNX14AB40G.

  2. Rapidly rotating neutron stars in general relativity: Realistic equations of state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Gregory B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1994-01-01

    We construct equilibrium sequences of rotating neutron stars in general relativity. We compare results for 14 nuclear matter equations of state. We determine a number of important physical parameters for such stars, including the maximum mass and maximum spin rate. The stability of the configurations to quasi-radial perturbations is assessed. We employ a numerical scheme particularly well suited to handle rapid rotation and large departures from spherical symmetry. We provide an extensive tabulation of models for future reference. Two classes of evolutionary sequences of fixed baryon rest mass and entropy are explored: normal sequences, which behave very much like Newtonian sequences, and supramassive sequences, which exist for neutron stars solely because of general relativistic effects. Adiabatic dissipation of energy and angular momentum causes a star to evolve in quasi-stationary fashion along an evolutionary sequence. Supramassive sequences have masses exceeding the maximum mass of a nonrotating neutron star. A supramassive star evolves toward eventual catastrophic collapse to a black hole. Prior to collapse, the star actually spins up as it loses angular momentum, an effect that may provide an observable precursor to gravitational collapse to a black hole.

  3. EQUATION OF STATE FOR MASSIVE NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuya; Saito, Koichi; Miyatsu, Tsuyoshi

    2012-12-15

    Using the relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation, we investigate the properties of neutron-star matter in detail. In the present calculation, we consider not only the tensor coupling of vector mesons to octet baryons and the form factors at interaction vertices but also the change in the internal (quark) structure of baryons in dense matter. The relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations are performed in two ways: one with coupling constants determined by SU(6) (quark model) symmetry and the other with coupling constants based on SU(3) (flavor) symmetry. For the latter case, we use the latest Nijmegen (ESC08) model. Then, it is very remarkable that the particle composition of the core matter in SU(3) symmetry is completely different from that in SU(6) symmetry. In SU(6) symmetry, all octet baryons appear in the density region below {approx}1.2 fm{sup -3}, while in the ESC08 model only the {Xi}{sup -} hyperon is produced. Furthermore, the medium modification of the internal baryon structure hardens the equation of state for the core matter. Taking all these effects into account, we can obtain the maximum neutron-star mass which is consistent with the recently observed mass, 1.97 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun} (PSR J1614-2230). We therefore conclude that the extension from SU(6) symmetry to SU(3) symmetry in meson-baryon couplings and the internal baryon structure variation in matter considerably enhance the mass of neutron stars. Furthermore, the effects of the form factor at the vertex and the Fock contribution, including the tensor coupling due to vector mesons, are indispensable for describing the core matter.

  4. Numerical Relativity Simulations of Magnetized Black Hole-Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah B.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    We present new numerical techniques we developed for launching the first parameter study of magnetized black hole-neutron star (BHNS) mergers, varying the magnetic fields seeded in the initial neutron star. We found that magnetic fields have a negligible impact on the gravitational waveforms and bulk dynamics of the system during merger, regardless of magnetic field strength or BH spin. In a recent simulation, we seeded the remnant disk from an unmagnetized BHNS merger simulation with large-scale, purely poloidal magnetic fields, which are otherwise absent in the full simulation. The outcome appears to be a viable sGRB central engine.

  5. Quark matter droplets in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.; Staubo, E. F.

    1993-01-01

    We show that, for physically reasonable bulk and surface properties, the lowest energy state of dense matter consists of quark matter coexisting with nuclear matter in the presence of an essentially uniform background of electrons. We estimate the size and nature of spatial structure in this phase, and show that at the lowest densities the quark matter forms droplets embedded in nuclear matter, whereas at higher densities it can exhibit a variety of different topologies. A finite fraction of the interior of neutron stars could consist of matter in this new phase, which would provide new mechanisms for glitches and cooling.

  6. Supernovae, neutron stars and biomolecular chirality.

    PubMed

    Bonner, W A; Rubenstein, E

    1987-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of the origin of biomolecular chirality are reviewed briefly. Biotic and abiotic theories are evaluated critically with the conclusion that asymmetric photochemical processes with circulary polarized light (CPL), particularly asymmetric photolyses, constitute the most viable mechanisms. Solar CPL sources appear too weak and random to be effective. We suggest an alternative CPL source, namely, the synchrotron radiation from the neutron star remnants of supernova explosions. This could asymmetrically process racemic compounds in the organic mantles of the dust grains in interstellar clouds, and the resulting chiral molecules could be transferred to Earth by cold accretion as the solar system periodically traverses these interstellar clouds.

  7. Neutron star cooling and pion condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tsuruta, Sachiko; Muto, Takumi; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    1994-01-01

    The nonstandard cooling of a neutron star with the central pion core is explored. By adopting the latest results from the pion condensation theory, neutrino emissivity is calulated for both pure charged pions and a mixture of charged and neutral pions, and the equations of state are constructed for the pion condensate. The effect of superfluidity on cooling is investigated, adopting methods more realistic than in previous studies. Our theoretical models are compared with the currently updated observational data, and possible implications are explored.

  8. Neutron star binaries, pulsars and burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.

    1981-01-01

    Unresolved issues involving neutron star binaries, pulsars, and burst sources are described. Attention is drawn to the types of observations most likely to resolve them. Many of these observations are likely to be carried out during the next decade by one or more missions that have been approved or proposed. Flux measurements with an imaging detector and broad-band spectroscopic studies in the energy range 30-150 keV are discussed. The need for soft X-ray and X-ray observations with an instrument which has arcminute angular resolution and an effective area substantially greater than of ROSAT or EXOSAT is also discussed.

  9. Coalescence of Magnetized Binary Neutron Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Ponce, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    We present simulations of the merger of binary neutron star systems calculated with full general relativity and incorporating the global magnetic field structure for the stars evolved with resistive magnetohydrodynamics. Our simulation tools have recently been improved to incorporate the effects of neutrino cooling and have been generalized to allow for tabular equations of state to describe the degenerate matter. Of particular interest are possible electromagnetic counterparts to the gravitational radiation that emerges from these systems. We focus on magnetospheric interactions that ultimately tap into the gravitational potential energy of the binary to power a Poynting flux and deposition of energy through Joule heating and magnetic reconnection. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA through the Astrophysics Theory Program grant NNX13AH01G.

  10. A SECOND NEUTRON STAR IN M4?

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J.; Rozanska, A.; Rozyczka, M.; Krzeminski, W.; Thompson, Ian B.

    2012-05-01

    We show that the optical counterpart of the X-ray source CX 1 in M4 is a {approx}20th magnitude star, located in the color-magnitude diagram on (or very close to) the main sequence of the cluster, and exhibiting sinusoidal variations of the flux. We find the X-ray flux to be also periodically variable, with X-ray and optical minima coinciding. Stability of the optical light curve, lack of UV-excess, and unrealistic mean density resulting from period-density relation for semidetached systems speak against the original identification of CX 1 as a cataclysmic variable. We argue that the X-ray active component of this system is a neutron star (probably a millisecond pulsar).

  11. Theory of Radiation Transfer in Neutron Star Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav

    2006-01-01

    The possibility for direct investigation of thermal emission from isolated neutron stars opened about a quarter of century ago with the launch of the first X-ray observatories Einstein and EXOSAT stimulated developing models of the neutron star surface radiation which began at the end of 80's. Confronting observational data with theoretical models of thermal emission allows one to infer the surface temperatures, magnetic fields, chemical composition, and neutron star masses and radii. This information, supplemented with the model equations of state and neutron star cooling models, provides an opportunity to understand the fundamental properties of the superdense matter in the stars' interiors. Almost all available models are based on the assumption that thermal radiation emitted by a neutron star is formed in the superficial star's layers--atmosphere. The neutron star atmospheres are very different from those of usual stars due to the immense gravity and huge magnetic fields. In this presentation we review the current status of the neutron star atmosphere modeling, present most important results, discuss problems and possible future developments.

  12. Spectral Models of Neutron Star Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    1997-01-01

    We revisit the association of unidentified Galactic plane EGRET sources with tracers of recent massive star formation and death. Up-to-date catalogs of OB associations, SNR's, young pulsars, H2 regions and young open clusters were used in finding counterparts for a recent list of EGRET sources. It has been argued for some time that EGRET source positions are correlated with SNR's and OB associations as a class; we extend such analyses by finding additional counterparts and assessing the probability of individual source identifications. Among the several scenarios relating EGRET sources to massive stars, we focus on young neutron stars as the origin of the gamma-ray emission. The characteristics of the candidate identifications are compared to the known gamma-ray pulsar sample and to detailed Galactic population syntheses using our outer gap pulsar model of gamma-ray emission. Both the spatial distribution and luminosity function of the candidates are in good agreement with the model predictions; we infer that young pulsars can account for the bulk of the excess low latitude EGRET sources. We show that with this identification, the gamma-ray point sources provide an important new window into the history of recent massive star death in the solar neighborhood.

  13. Neutron Resonance Spin Determination Using Multi-Segmented Detector DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2011-06-01

    A sensitive method to determine the spin of neutron resonances is introduced based on the statistical pattern recognition technique. The new method was used to assign the spins of s-wave resonances in {sup 155}Gd. The experimental neutron capture data for these nuclei were measured with the DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiment) calorimeter at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The highly segmented calorimeter provided detailed multiplicity distributions of the capture {gamma}-rays. Using this information, the spins of the neutron capture resonances were determined. With these new spin assignments, level spacings are determined separately for s-wave resonances with J{sup {pi}} = 1{sup -} and 2{sup -}.

  14. RELATIONS BETWEEN NEUTRON-STAR PARAMETERS IN THE HARTLE-THORNE APPROXIMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bauböck, Michi; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Berti, Emanuele E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu E-mail: berti@phy.olemiss.edu

    2013-11-01

    Using stellar structure calculations in the Hartle-Thorne approximation, we derive analytic expressions connecting the ellipticity of the stellar surface to the compactness, the spin angular momentum, and the quadrupole moment of the spacetime. We also obtain empirical relations between the compactness, the spin angular momentum, and the spacetime quadrupole. Our formulae reproduce the results of numerical calculations to within a few percent and help reduce the number of parameters necessary to model the observational appearance of moderately spinning neutron stars. This is sufficient for comparing theoretical spectroscopic and timing models to observations that aim to measure the masses and radii of neutron stars and to determine the equation of state prevailing in their interiors.

  15. Spin measurement and neutron resonance spectroscopy for ^155Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Mitchell, G. E.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wouters, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Viera, D. J.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.

    2009-05-01

    The ^155Gd(n,γ) reaction has been measured with the DANCE calorimeter at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The highly segmented calorimeter provided detailed multiplicity distributions of the capture γ - rays. With this information the spins of the neutron capture resonances have been determined. The improved sensitivity of this method allowed the determination of the spins of even weak and unresolved resonances. With these new spin assignments as well as previously determined resonance parameters, level spacings and neutron strength functions are determined separately for s-wave resonances with J = 1 and 2.

  16. Shear modulus of neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiko, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    The shear modulus of solid neutron star crust is calculated by the thermodynamic perturbation theory, taking into account ion motion. At a given density, the crust is modelled as a body-centred cubic Coulomb crystal of fully ionized atomic nuclei of one type with a uniform charge-compensating electron background. Classic and quantum regimes of ion motion are considered. The calculations in the classic temperature range agree well with previous Monte Carlo simulations. At these temperatures, the shear modulus is given by the sum of a positive contribution due to the static lattice and a negative ∝ T contribution due to the ion motion. The quantum calculations are performed for the first time. The main result is that at low temperatures the contribution to the shear modulus due to the ion motion saturates at a constant value, associated with zero-point ion vibrations. Such behaviour is qualitatively similar to the zero-point ion motion contribution to the crystal energy. The quantum effects may be important for lighter elements at higher densities, where the ion plasma temperature is not entirely negligible compared to the typical Coulomb ion interaction energy. The results of numerical calculations are approximated by convenient fitting formulae. They should be used for precise neutron star oscillation modelling, a rapidly developing branch of stellar seismology.

  17. Physics of systems containing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1996-01-01

    This grant dealt with several topics related to the dynamics of systems containing a compact object. Most of the research dealt with systems containing Neutron Stars (NS's), but a Black Hole (BH) or a White Dwarf (WD) in situations relevant to NS systems were also addressed. Among the systems were isolated regular pulsars, Millisecond Pulsars (MSP's) that are either Single (SMP's) or in a binary (BMP's), Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXB's) and Cataclysmic Variables (CV's). Also dealt with was one aspect of NS structure, namely NS superfluidity. A large fraction of the research dealt with irradiation-driven winds from companions which turned out to be of importance in the evolution of LMXB's and MSP's, be they SMP's or BMP's. While their role during LMXB evolution (i.e. during the accretion phase) is not yet clear, they may play an important role in turning BMP's into SMP's and also in bringing about the formation of planets around MSP's. Work was concentrated on the following four problems: The Windy Pulsar B197+20 and its Evolution; Wind 'Echoes' in Tight Binaries; Post Nova X-ray Emission in CV's; and Dynamics of Pinned Superfluids in Neutron Stars.

  18. Neutron star accretion and the neutrino fireball

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Herant, M.E.; Benz, W.

    1991-11-26

    The mixing necessary to explain the ``Fe`` line widths and possibly the observed red shifts of 1987A is explained in terms of large scale, entropy conserving, up and down flows (calculated with a smooth particle 2-D code) taking place between the neutron star and the explosion shock wave due to the gravity and neutrino deposition. Depending upon conditions of entropy and mass flux further accretion takes place in single events, similar to relaxation oscillator, fed by the downward flows of low entropy matter. The shock, in turn, is driven by the upflow of the buoyant high entropy bubbles. Some accretion events will reach a temperature high enough to create a neutrino ``fireball,`` a region hot enough, 11 Mev, so as to be partially opaque to its own (neutrino) radiation. The continuing neutrino deposition drives the explosion shock until the entropy of matter flowing downwards onto the neutron star is high enough to prevent further accretion. This process should result in a robust supernova explosion.

  19. Constraining decaying dark matter with neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The amount of decaying dark matter, accumulated in the central regions in neutron stars together with the energy deposition rate from decays, may set a limit on the neutron star survival rate against transitions to more compact objects provided nuclear matter is not the ultimate stable state of matter and that dark matter indeed is unstable. More generally, this limit sets constraints on the dark matter particle decay time, τχ. We find that in the range of uncertainties intrinsic to such a scenario, masses (mχ /TeV) ≳ 9 ×10-4 or (mχ /TeV) ≳ 5 ×10-2 and lifetimes τχ ≲1055 s and τχ ≲1053 s can be excluded in the bosonic or fermionic decay cases, respectively, in an optimistic estimate, while more conservatively, it decreases τχ by a factor ≳1020. We discuss the validity under which these results may improve with other current constraints.

  20. Diffusive heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznogov, M. V.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2016-06-01

    We construct new models of outer heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars composed of binary ion mixtures (H-He, He-C, C-Fe) in and out of diffusive equilibrium. To this aim, we generalize our previous work on diffusion of ions in isothermal gaseous or Coulomb liquid plasmas to handle non-isothermal systems. We calculate the relations between the effective surface temperature Ts and the temperature Tb at the bottom of heat blanketing envelopes (at a density ρb ˜ 108 - 1010 g cm-3) for diffusively equilibrated and non-equilibrated distributions of ion species at different masses ΔM of lighter ions in the envelope. Our principal result is that the Ts-Tb relations are fairly insensitive to detailed distribution of ion fractions over the envelope (diffusively equilibrated or not) and depend almost solely on ΔM. The obtained relations are approximated by analytic expressions which are convenient for modelling the evolution of neutron stars.

  1. Long-term evolution of crustal neutron star magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urpin, V. A.; Chanmugam, G.; Sang, Yeming

    1994-01-01

    We have derived an analytic solution to the asymptotic behavior of dipolar magnetic fields that are generated in the crusts of neutron stars. We show that if the conductivity is due to impurity scattering, as expected for late stages of evolution, the surface field strength at the magnetic pole declines with the power law B(sub p) approximately = (t/t(sub 0))(exp -2/3). The results are shown to be qualitatively consistent with detailed numerical calculations. These latter results are consistent with some recent analyses of pulsar statistics and the magnetic fields of several binary pulsars with white dwarf companions whose ages have been determined. The dependence of the surface magnetic field on spin period of the pulsar is derived.

  2. Microscopic vortex velocity and implications for neutron star dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gügercinoǧlu, Erbil; Alpar, Mehmet Ali

    2016-07-01

    Rotational dynamics of a neutron star is governed by the distribution and motion of vortex lines within the neutron superfluid. Interaction of the vortex lines with the ambient matter plays an important role in the glitches, thermal evolution and magnetic field evolution of pulsars. Thus, correctly treating the vortex motion both in the inner crust and in the outer core of neutron stars is a key ingredient in modeling a great variety of observational phenomena of pulsars. In this work we outline the first principles to calculate the microscopic vortex velocity in the inner crust as well as in the outer core. Then we discuss some implications for neutron star's dynamics.

  3. The EOS of neutron matter, and the effect of Lambda hyperons to neutron star structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gandolfi, Stefano

    2015-01-13

    The following topics are addressed: the model and the method; equation of state of neutron matter, role of three-neutron force; symmetry energy; Λ-hypernuclei; Λ-neutron matter; and neutron star structure. In summary, quantum Monte Carlo methods are useful to study nuclear systems in a coherent framework; the three-neutron force is the bridge between Esym and neutron star structure; and neutron star observations are becoming competitive with experiments. Λ-nucleon data are very limited, but ΛNN is very important. The role of Λ in neutron stars is far from understood; more ΛN data are needed. The author's conclusion: We cannot conclude anything with present models.

  4. Geminga: A cooling superfluid neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Dany

    1994-01-01

    We compare the recent temperature estimate for Geminga with neutron star cooling models. Because of its age (approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 5) yr), Geminga is in the photon cooling era. We show that its surface temperature (approximately 5.2 x 10(exp 5) K) can be understood by both types of neutrino cooling scenarios, i.e., slow neutrino cooling by the modified Urca process or fast neutrino cooling by the direct Urca process or by some exotic matter, and thus does not allow us to discriminate between these two competing schemes. However, for both types of scenarios, agreement with the observed temperature can only be obtained if baryon pairing is present in most, if not all, of the core of the star. Within the slow neutrino cooling scenario, early neutrino cooling is not sufficient to explain the observed low temperature, and extensive pairing in the core is necessary to reduce the specific heat and increase the cooling rate in the present photon cooling era. Within all the fast neutrino cooling scenarios, pairing is necessary throughout the whole core to control the enormous early neutrino emission which, without pairing suppression, would result in a surface temperature at the present time much lower than observed. We also comment on the recent temperature estimates for PSR 0656+14 and PSR 1055-52, which pertain to the same photon cooling era. If one assumes that all neutron stars undergo fast neutrino cooling, then these two objects also provide evidence for extensive baryon pairing in their core; but observational uncertainties also permit a more conservative interpretation, with slow neutrino emission and no pairing at all. We argue though that observational evidence for the slow neutrino cooling model (the 'standard' model) is in fact very dim and that the interpretation of the surface temperature of all neutron stars could be done with a reasonable theoretical a priori within the fast neutrino cooling scenarios only. In this case, Geminga, PSR 0656+14, and PSR

  5. A Coincident Search for Radio and Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardena, Brett

    2011-05-01

    The merger of neutron star-neutron star binary pairs may be accompanied by the prompt emission of a coherent low-frequency radio pulse. This radio transient is produced as synchrotron radiation caused by the spin and rotation of the surface charge density of a pulsar through the magnetosphere of a larger neutron star, usually referred to as a Magnetar . This type of merger event would also result in the release of a gravitational coalescence wave-form. We will discuss a coincident radio transient and gravitational wave search. This search is being conducted by two radio telescope arrays: The Long Wave Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) in coordination with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We will outline this ongoing coincident search and discuss some preliminary results.

  6. Supermagnetic Neutron Star Surprises Scientists, Forces Revision of Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    Astronomers using radio telescopes from around the world have discovered a spinning neutron star with a superpowerful magnetic field -- called a magnetar -- doing things no magnetar has been seen to do before. The strange behavior has forced them to scrap previous theories about radio pulsars and promises to give new insights on the physics behind these extreme objects. Magnetar Artist's Conception of Magnetar With Radio Beams ALL IMAGES AND ANIMATIONS CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Image and Animation Files Magnetar Graphic (above image, JPEG, 32K) Animation With Sound From GBT Detection of XTE J1810-197 (8.6M) Animation With Sound From GBT Detection of XTE J1810-197 (Full Size, 29M) The magnetar, approximately 10,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius, is emitting powerful, regularly-timed pulses of radio waves just like radio pulsars, which are neutron stars with far less intense magnetic fields. Usually, magnetars are visible only in X-rays and sometimes very weakly in optical and infrared light. "No one has ever found radio pulses coming from a magnetar before. We thought that magnetars didn't do this," said Fernando Camilo of Columbia University. "This object is going to teach us new things about magnetar physics that we would never have learned otherwise," Camilo added. Neutron stars are the remnants of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae. Containing more mass than the Sun, they are compressed to a diameter of only about 15 miles, making them as dense as atomic nuclei. Ordinary pulsars are neutron stars that emit "lighthouse beams" of radio waves along the poles of their magnetic fields. As the star spins, the beam of radio waves is flung around, and when it passes the direction of Earth, astronomers can detect it with radio telescopes. Scientists have found about 1700 pulsars since their first discovery in 1967. While pulsars have strong magnetic fields, about a dozen neutron stars have been dubbed

  7. Gravitational Waves from Fallback Accretion onto Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Thrane, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Massive stars generally end their lives as neutron stars (NSs) or black holes (BHs), with NS formation typically occurring at the low-mass end and collapse to a BH more likely at the high-mass end. In an intermediate regime, with a mass range that depends on the uncertain details of rotation and mass loss during the star's life, an NS is initially formed, which then experiences fallback accretion and collapse to a BH. The electromagnetic consequence of such an event is not clear. Depending on the progenitor's structure, possibilities range from a long gamma-ray burst to a Type II supernova (which may or may not be jet powered) to a collapse with a weak electromagnetic signature. Gravitational waves (GWs) provide the exciting opportunity to peer through the envelope of a dying massive star and directly probe what is occurring inside. We explore whether fallback onto young NSs can be detected by ground-based interferometers. When the incoming material has sufficient angular momentum to form a disk, the accretion spins up the NS sufficiently to produce non-axisymmetric instabilities and gravitational radiation at frequencies of ~700-2400 Hz for ~30-3000 s until collapse to a BH occurs. Using a realistic excess cross-power search algorithm, we show that such events are detectable by Advanced LIGO out to ≈17 Mpc. From the rate of nearby core-collapse supernovae in the past five years, we estimate that there will be ~1-2 events each year that are worth checking for fallback GWs. The observation of these unique GW signatures coincident with electromagnetic detections would identify the transient events that are associated with this channel of BH formation, while providing information about the protoneutron star progenitor.

  8. Optimised adiabatic fast passage spin flipping for 3He neutron spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKetterick, T. J.; Boag, S.; Stewart, J. R.; Frost, C. D.; Skoda, M. W. A.; Parnell, S. R.; Babcock, E.

    2011-06-01

    We describe here a method of performing adiabatic fast passage (AFP) spin flipping of polarized 3He used as a neutron spin filter (NSF) to polarize neutron beams. By reversing the spin states of the 3He nuclei the polarization of a neutron beam can be efficiently reversed allowing for the transmission of a neutron beam polarized in either spin state. Using an amplitude modulated frequency sweep lasting 500 ms we can spin flip a polarized 3He neutron spin filter with only 1.8×10-5 loss in 3He polarization. The small magnetic fields (10-15 G) used to house neutron spin filters mean the 3He resonant frequencies are low enough to be generated using a computer with a digital I/O card. The versatility of this systems allows AFP to be performed on any beamline or in any laboratory using 3He neutron spin filters and polarization losses can be minimised by adjusting sweep parameters.

  9. Gravitomagnetic resonant excitation of Rossby modes in coalescing neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Éanna É.; Racine, Étienne

    2007-02-01

    In coalescing neutron star binaries, r-modes in one of the stars can be resonantly excited by the gravitomagnetic tidal field of its companion. This post-Newtonian gravitomagnetic driving of these modes dominates over the Newtonian tidal driving previously computed by Ho and Lai. To leading order in the tidal expansion parameter R/r (where R is the radius of the neutron star and r is the orbital separation), only the l=2, |m|=1, and |m|=2 r-modes are excited. The tidal work done on the star through this driving has an effect on the evolution of the inspiral and on the phasing of the emitted gravitational wave signal. For a neutron star of mass M, radius R, spin frequency fspin, modeled as a Γ=2 polytrope, with a companion also of mass M, the gravitational wave phase shift for the m=2 mode is ˜0.1radians(R/10km)4(M/1.4M⊙)-10/3(fspin/100Hz)2/3 for optimal spin orientation. For canonical neutron star parameters this phase shift will likely not be detectable by gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO, but if the neutron star radius is larger it may be detectable if the signal-to-noise ratio is moderately large. The energy transfer is large enough to drive the mode into the nonlinear regime if fspin≳100Hz. For neutron star—black hole binaries, the effect is smaller; the phase shift scales as companion mass to the -4/3 power for large companion masses. The net energy transfer from the orbit into the star is negative corresponding to a slowing down of the inspiral. This occurs because the interaction reduces the spin of the star, and occurs only for modes which satisfy the Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz instability criterion. A large portion of the paper is devoted to developing a general formalism to treat mode driving in rotating stars to post-Newtonian order, which may be useful for other applications. We also correct some conceptual errors in the literature on the use of energy conservation to deduce the effect of the mode driving on the gravitational wave

  10. Evidence for a Broad Relativistic Iron Line from the Neutron Star LMXB Ser X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2007-01-01

    We report on an analysis of XMM-Newton data from the neutron star low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Serpens X-1 (Ser X-1). Spectral analysis of EPIC PN data indicates that the previously known broad iron Ka emission line in this source has a significantly skewed structure with a moderately extended red wing. The asymmetric shape of the line is well described with the laor and diskline models in XSPEC, which strongly supports an inner accretion disk origin of the line. To our knowledge this is the first strong evidence for a relativistic line in a neutron star LMXB. This finding suggests that the broad lines seen in other neutron star LMXBs likely originate from the inner disk as well. Detailed study of such lines opens up a new way to probe neutron star parameters and their strong gravitational fields. The laor model describes the line from Ser X-1 somewhat better than diskline, and suggests that the inner accretion disk radius is less than 6GM/c(exp 2). This is consistent with the weak magnetic fields of LMXBs, and may point towards a high compactness and rapid spin of the neutron star. Finally, the inferred source inclination angle in the approximate range 50-60 deg is consistent with the lack of dipping from Ser X-1.

  11. Spin echo small angle neutron scattering using a continuously pumped {sup 3}He neutron polarisation analyser

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, S. R.; Li, K.; Yan, H.; Stonaha, P.; Li, F.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V.; Snow, W. M.; Washington, A. L.; Walsh, A.; Chen, W. C.; Parnell, A. J.; Fairclough, J. P. A.; Pynn, R.

    2015-02-15

    We present a new instrument for spin echo small angle neutron scattering (SESANS) developed at the Low Energy Neutron Source at Indiana University. A description of the various instrument components is given along with the performance of these components. At the heart of the instrument are a series of resistive coils to encode the neutron trajectory into the neutron polarisation. These are shown to work well over a broad range of neutron wavelengths. Neutron polarisation analysis is accomplished using a continuously operating neutron spin filter polarised by Rb spin-exchange optical pumping of {sup 3}He. We describe the performance of the analyser along with a study of the {sup 3}He polarisation stability and its implications for SESANS measurements. Scattering from silica Stöber particles is investigated and agrees with samples run on similar instruments.

  12. Universality of the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    AlGendy, Mohammad; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2014-08-20

    On the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star, the effective centrifugal force decreases the effective acceleration due to gravity (as measured in the rotating frame) at the equator while increasing the acceleration at the poles due to the centrifugal flattening of the star into an oblate spheroid. We compute the effective gravitational acceleration for relativistic rapidly rotating neutron stars and show that for a star with mass M, equatorial radius R{sub e} , and angular velocity Ω, the deviations of the effective acceleration due to gravity from the nonrotating case take on a universal form that depends only on the compactness ratio M/R{sub e} , the dimensionless square of the angular velocity Ω{sup 2}R{sub e}{sup 3}/GM, and the latitude on the star's surface. This dependence is universal, in that it has very little dependence on the neutron star's equation of state. The effective gravity is expanded in the slow-rotation limit to show the dependence on the effective centrifugal force, oblate shape of the star, and the quadrupole moment of the gravitational field. In addition, an empirical fit and simple formula for the effective gravity is found. We find that the increase in the acceleration due to gravity at the poles is of the same order of magnitude as the decrease in the effective acceleration due to gravity at the equator for all realistic value of mass, radius, and spin. For neutron stars that spin with frequencies near 600 Hz, the difference between the effective gravity at the poles and the equator is about 20%.

  13. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F. Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V.; Hamilton, W. A.; Maranville, B. B.; Semerad, R.; Cremer, J. T.; Pynn, R.

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ∼30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ∼98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm × 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 μm. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed.

  14. Probing thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars using burst rise oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2016-07-01

    Intense X-ray bursts (type-I bursts), originated from runaway thermonuclear processes, are observed from the surfaces of many accreting neutron star Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) systems and they provide an important tool to constrain the neutron star equation of state. Periodic intensity variations during these bursts, termed burst oscillations, are observed in about 10% of thermonuclear bursts. Oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear bursts are hypothesized to originate from an expanding hot-spot on the surface of the neutron star. We studied the evolution of oscillations during the rising phase of a large sample of thermonuclear bursts from 10 bursting neutron stars in order to probe the process of burning front propagation during an X-ray burst. Our results show observational evidences of expanding hot-spot with spin modulated flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force present as a result of the high stellar spin (270-620 Hz). This implies that the flame propagation is latitude-dependent and we address the factors affecting the detection and non-detection of burst rise oscillations in the light of this Coriolis force modulated flame spreading scenario.

  15. Rotational and magnetic field instabilities in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2014-01-14

    In this short review we present recent results on the dynamics of neutron stars and their magnetic fields. We discuss the progress that has been made, during the last 5 years, in understanding the rotational instabilities with emphasis to the one due to the f-mode, the possibility of using gravitational wave detection in constraining the parameters of neutron stars and revealing the equation of state as well as the detectability of gravitational waves produced during the unstable phase of a neutron star’s life. In addition we discuss the dynamics of extremely strong magnetic fields observed in a class of neutron stars (magnetars). Magnetic fields of that strength are responsible for highly energetic phenomena (giant flares) and we demonstrate that the analysis of the emitted electromagnetic radiation can lead in constraining the parameters of neutron stars. Furthermore, we present our results from the study of such violent phenomena in association with the emission of gravitational radiation.

  16. Proton acceleration in neutron star magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.; Katz, J. I.; Diamond, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    To explain the emission of TeV and PeV gamma rays from accreting X-ray binary sources, protons must be accelerated to several times the gamma-ray energy. It is shown here that at certain times, the plasma in the accretion column of the neutron star may form a deep enough pool that the top portion becomes unstable to convective motions in spite of the strong magnetic field. The resulting turbulence produces fluctuations in the strength of the magnetic field that travel up the accretion column, taking energy out to the region of the energetic protons. The protons resonantly absorb this energy and are accelerated to high energies. Including the synchrotron radiation losses of the protons, it is shown that they can be accelerated to energies that are high enough to explain the gamma-ray observations.

  17. Chandra Spectroscopy of a Remarkable Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jon

    2013-09-01

    IGR J17062-6143 is one of only 5 sources that have displayed a super-expansion burst. This requires a special mode of continuous low-level accretion that allows material to accumulate on the stellar surface, without triggering smaller bursts. Swift spectroscopy of a super-expansion burst in IGR J17062-6143 revealed the only strong detections of atomic emission and absorption lines in a burst observed at CCD or gratings resolution. Whereas atomic features from the stellar surface have not been detected in other neutron stars, the accretion mode in IGR J17062-6143 may provide the right conditions. To search for lines from the surface, and to better understand the nature of low-level accretion, we request a 100 ksec HETGS observation of IGR J17062-6143.

  18. Implementing a New Ion Chamber Design for Neutron Spin Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah; Anderson, Eamon; Fry, Jason; Holley, Adam; Snow, Mike

    2012-10-01

    The quark-quark weak interaction is difficult to measure due to the presence of the strong force. However, low energy neutrons passing through liquid Helium-4 can be used to probe the nucleon-nucleon weak interaction, which is induced by the quark-quark weak interaction. The neutron spin rotation experiment seeks to measure the spin rotation angle of neutrons due to their weak interaction with Helium-4 nuclei. This rotation angle is translated into a neutron flux asymmetry with a neutron polarizer/analyzer pair. A segmented Helium-3 gas ionization chamber was developed to measure the resultant neutron flux. We report on the design and initial tests of that ionization chamber. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation REU program and NSF grant #PHY-0969490.

  19. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, V. F.; Poutanen, J.; Klochkov, D.; Werner, K.

    2016-02-01

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutron star radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1-4MK) and ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed.

  20. NEUTRON STAR STRUCTURE IN THE PRESENCE OF SCALAR FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, James P.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2009-08-20

    Motivated by the possible presence of scalar fields on cosmological scales, suggested by the recent measurement of the deceleration parameter by supernovae surveys, we present models of neutron star structure under the assumption that a scalar field makes a significant contribution to the stress energy momentum tensor, in addition to that made by the normal matter. To that end we solve the coupled Einstein-scalar field-hydrostatic balance equations to compute the effect of the presence of the scalar field on the neutron star structure. We find that the presence of the scalar field does change the structure of the neutron star, especially in cases of strong coupling between the scalar field and the matter density. We present the neutron star radius as a function of the matter-scalar field coupling constant for different values of the neutron star central density. The presence of the scalar field does affect both the maximum neutron star mass and its radius, the latter increasing with the value of the above coupling constant. Our results can provide limits to the scalar field-matter coupling through spectro-temporal observations of accreting or isolated neutron stars.

  1. The commensurate spin excitation in chromium: A polarised neutron investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R. ); Stirling, W.G. . Dept. of Physics); Severing, A. )

    1991-01-01

    A polarised neutron experiment with neutron energy analysis has been performed with a single-Q sample of chromium in a large magnetic field. The 4-meV commensurate'' mode is found to involve spin fluctuations parallel to the ordered chromium moments. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Neutron star dynamos and the origins of pulsar magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Christopher; Duncan, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron star convection is a transient phenomenon and has an extremely high magnetic Reynolds number. In this sense, a neutron star dynamo is the quintessential fast dynamo. The convective motions are only mildly turbulent on scales larger than the approximately 100 cm neutrino mean free path, but the turbulence is well developed on smaller scales. Several fundamental issues in the theory of fast dynamos are raised in the study of a neutron star dynamo, in particular the possibility of dynamo action in mirror-symmetric turbulence. It is argued that in any high magnetic Reynolds number dynamo, most of the magnetic energy becomes concentrated in thin flux ropes when the field pressure exceeds the turbulent pressure at the smallest scale of turbulence. In addition, the possibilities for dynamo action during the various (pre-collapse) stages of convective motion that occur in the evolution of a massive star are examined, and the properties of white dwarf and neutron star progenitors are contrasted.

  3. Lev Landau and the concept of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Dmitrii G.; Haensel, Pawel; Baym, Gordon; Pethick, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    We review Lev Landau's role in the history of neutron star physics in the 1930s. According to the recollections of Rosenfeld (Proc. 16th Solvay Conference on Physics, 1974, p. 174), Landau improvised the concept of neutron stars in a discussion with Bohr and Rosenfeld just after the news of the discovery of the neutron reached Copenhagen in February 1932. We present arguments that the discussion must have taken place in March 1931, before the discovery of the neutron, and that they, in fact, discussed the paper written by Landau in Zurich in February 1931 but not published until February 1932 (Phys. Z. Sowjetunion 1, 285). In this paper, Landau mentioned the possible existence of dense stars that look like one giant nucleus; this could be regarded as an early theoretical prediction or anticipation of neutron stars, albeit prior to the discovery of the neutron. The coincidence of the dates of the neutron discovery and the publication of the paper has led to an erroneous association of Landau's paper with the discovery of the neutron. In passing, we outline Landau's contribution to the theory of white dwarfs and to the hypothesis of stars with neutron cores.

  4. Relativistic effective interaction for nuclei, giant resonances, and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Fattoyev, F. J.; Piekarewicz, J.; Horowitz, C. J.; Shen, G.

    2010-11-15

    Nuclear effective interactions are useful tools in astrophysical applications especially if one can guide the extrapolations to the extremes regions of isospin and density that are required to simulate dense, neutron-rich systems. Isospin extrapolations may be constrained in the laboratory by measuring the neutron skin thickness of a heavy nucleus, such as {sup 208}Pb. Similarly, future observations of massive neutron stars will constrain the extrapolations to the high-density domain. In this contribution we introduce a new relativistic effective interaction that is simultaneously constrained by the properties of finite nuclei, their collective excitations, and neutron-star properties. By adjusting two of the empirical parameters of the theory, one can efficiently tune the neutron skin thickness of {sup 208}Pb and the maximum neutron-star mass. We illustrate this procedure in response to the recent interpretation of x-ray observations by Steiner, Lattimer, and Brown that suggests that the FSUGold effective interaction predicts neutron-star radii that are too large and a maximum stellar mass that is too small. The new effective interaction is fitted to a neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb of only R{sub n}-R{sub p}=0.16 fm and yields a moderately large maximum neutron-star mass of 1.94 M{sub {center_dot}}.

  5. Measurement of the spin-rotation coupling in neutron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Bülent; Sponar, Stephan; Hasegawa, Yuji

    2015-02-01

    The effect of spin-rotation coupling is measured for the first time with neutrons. The coupling of spin with the angular velocity of a rotating spin turner can be observed as a phase shift in a neutron polarimeter set-up. After the neutron’s spin is rotated by 2π through a rotating magnetic field, different phase shifts are induced for ‘up’ and ‘down’ spin eigenstates. This phase difference results in the rotation of the neutron’s spin-vector, which turns out to depend solely on the frequency of the rotation of the magnetic field. The experimental results agree well with the solutions acquired by the Pauli-Schrödinger equation.

  6. Resonant Shattering of Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David; Read, Jocelyn; Piro, Anthony; Hinderer, Tanja

    2014-08-01

    The resonant excitation of neutron star (NS) modes by tides is investigated as a source of short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) precursors. We find that the driving of a crust-core interface mode can lead to shattering of the NS crust, liberating ~10^46-10^47 erg of energy secondsbefore the merger of a NS-NS or NS-black hole binary. Such properties are consistent with Swift/BAT detections of sGRB precursors, and we use the timing of the observed precursors to place weak constraints on the crust equation of state. We describe how a larger sample of precursor detections could be used alongside coincident gravitational wave detections of the inspiral by Advanced LIGO class detectors to probe the NS structure. These two types of observations nicely complement one another, since the former constrains the equation of state and structure near the crust-core boundary, while the latter is more sensitive to the core equation of state. I will also discuss shattering flares as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave bursts during parabolic and elliptic encounters in dense star clusters.

  7. Resonant Shattering of Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David; Read, J.; Hinderer, T.; Piro, A.

    2013-01-01

    The resonant excitation of neutron star (NS) modes by tides is investigated as a source of short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) precursors. We find that the driving of a crust-core interface mode can lead to shattering of the NS crust, liberating ~10^46-10^47 erg of energy seconds before the merger of a NS-NS or NS-black hole binary. Such properties are consistent with Swift/BAT detections of sGRB precursors, and we use the timing of the observed precursors to place weak constraints on the crust equation of state. We describe how a larger sample of precursor detections could be used alongside coincident gravitational wave detections of the inspiral by Advanced LIGO class detectors to probe the NS structure. These two types of observations nicely complement one another, since the former constrains the equation of state and structure near the crust-core boundary, while the latter is more sensitive to the core equation of state. We also discuss the application of such shattering flares as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave bursts from elliptic and parabolic encounters in dense star clusters.

  8. The neutron star born in the Antlia supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, N.; Torres, G.; Neuhäuser, R.; Hohle, M. M.

    2013-10-01

    Among all known young nearby neutron stars, we search for the neutron star that was born in the same supernova event that formed the Antlia supernova remnant (SNR). We also look for a runaway star that could have been the former companion to the neutron star (if it exists) and then got ejected due to the same supernova. We find the pulsar PSR J0630-2834 to be the best candidate for a common origin with the Antlia SNR. In that scenario, the SNR is ≈1.2 Myr old and is presently located at a distance of ≈138 pc. We consider the runaway star HIP 47155 a former companion candidate to PSR J0630-2834. The encounter time and place is consistent with both stars being ejected from the Antlia SNR. We measured the radial velocity of HIP 47155 as 32.42 ± 0.70 km s-1.

  9. Neutron-capture nucleosynthesis in the first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Sneden, Christopher

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that metal-poor stars enhanced in carbon but containing low levels of neutron-capture elements may have been among the first to incorporate the nucleosynthesis products of the first generation of stars. We have observed 16 stars with enhanced carbon or nitrogen using the MIKE Spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory and the Tull Spectrograph on the Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We present radial velocities, stellar parameters, and detailed abundance patterns for these stars. Strontium, yttrium, zirconium, barium, europium, ytterbium, and other heavy elements are detected. In four stars, these heavy elements appear to have originated in some form of r-process nucleosynthesis. In one star, a partial s-process origin is possible. The origin of the heavy elements in the rest of the sample cannot be determined unambiguously. The presence of elements heavier than the iron group offers further evidence that zero-metallicity rapidly rotating massive stars and pair instability supernovae did not contribute substantial amounts of neutron-capture elements to the regions where the stars in our sample formed. If the carbon- or nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor stars with low levels of neutron-capture elements were enriched by products of zero-metallicity supernovae only, then the presence of these heavy elements indicates that at least one form of neutron-capture reaction operated in some of the first stars.

  10. CCO Pulsars as Anti-Magnetars: Evidence of Neutron Stars Weakly Magnetized at Birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.

    2008-02-01

    Our new study of the two central compact object pulsars, PSR J1210-5226 (P = 424 ms) and PSR J1852+0040 (P = 105 ms), leads us to conclude that a weak natal magnetic field shaped their unique observational properties. In the dipole spin-down formalism, the 2-sigma upper limits on their period derivatives, <2×10-16 for both pulsars, implies surface magnetic field strengths of Bs<3×1011 G and spin periods at birth equal to their present periods to three significant digits. Their X-ray luminosities exceed their respective spin-down luminosities, implying that their thermal spectra are derived from residual cooling and perhaps partly from accretion of supernova debris. For sufficiently weak magnetic fields an accretion disk can penetrate the light cylinder and interact with the magnetosphere while resulting torques on the neutron star remain within the observed limits. We propose the following as the origin of radio-quiet CCOs: the magnetic field, derived from a turbulent dynamo, is weaker if the NS is formed spinning slowly, which enables it to accrete SN debris. Accretion excludes neutron stars born with both Bs<1011 G and P>0.1 s from radio pulsar surveys, where such weak fields are not encountered except among very old (>40 Myr) or recycled pulsars. We predict that these birth properties are common, and may be attributes of the youngest detected neutron star, the CCO in Cassiopeia A, as well as an undetected infant neutron star in the SN 1987A remnant. In view of the far-infrared light echo discovered around Cas A and attributed to an SGR-like outburst, it is especially important to determine via timing whether Cas A hosts a magnetar or not. If not a magnetar, the Cas A NS may instead have undergone a one-time phase transition (corequake) that powered the light echo.

  11. Larmor labeling of neutron spin using superconducting Wollaston prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fankang

    Neutron spin Larmor labeling using magnetic Wollaston prisms (WP) provides a way to overcome some of the limitations arising from the nature of neutron beams: low flux and divergence. Using superconducting films and tapes, a series of strong, well-defined shaped magnetic fields can be produced due to both the zero-resistance and Meissner effect in superconductors. Using finite element simulations, the criterion to build a superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism with high encoding efficiency and low Larmor phase aberrations are presented. To achieve a high magnetic field and simplify the maintenance, we optimize the design using careful thermal analysis. The measured neutron spin flipping efficiency is measured to be independent of both the neutron wavelength and energizing current, which is a significant improvement over other devices with similar functions. A highly linear variation of the Larmor phase is measured across the device, which ensures a highly uniform encoding of scattering angles into the neutron spin Larmor phase. Using two WPs, the correlation function for a colloidal silica sample was measured by spin echo modulated small angle neutron scattering (SEMSANS) and agrees well with other techniques. Using Monte Carlo code (McStas), we further investigated the SEMSANS setup and showed the requirements to improve its performance. We have proposed a new technique to implement neutron spin echo on a triple axis neutron spectrometer to achieve high resolution measurements of the lifetime of dispersive phonon excitations. The spin echo is tuned by appropriate choice of magnetic fields instead of physically tilting the coils used in traditional methods. This new approach allows a higher energy resolution and a larger effective tilting angle and hence larger group velocity to be measured.

  12. Channel capacities of an exactly solvable spin-star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshed, Nigum; Toor, A. H.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    We calculate the entanglement-assisted and -unassisted channel capacities of an exactly solvable spin star system, which models the quantum dephasing channel. The capacities for this non-Markovian model exhibit a strong dependence on the coupling strengths of the bath spins with the system, the bath temperature, and the number of bath spins. For equal couplings and bath frequencies, the channel becomes periodically noiseless.

  13. Channel capacities of an exactly solvable spin-star system

    SciTech Connect

    Arshed, Nigum; Toor, A. H.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-06-15

    We calculate the entanglement-assisted and -unassisted channel capacities of an exactly solvable spin star system, which models the quantum dephasing channel. The capacities for this non-Markovian model exhibit a strong dependence on the coupling strengths of the bath spins with the system, the bath temperature, and the number of bath spins. For equal couplings and bath frequencies, the channel becomes periodically noiseless.

  14. X-ray radiation from accreting, magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of recent developments in the theory of emission from a magnetized plasma for accreting neutron star conditions. Some observational data on X-ray pulsars are discussed, and present problems are indicated. 26 references.

  15. Galactic neutron stars and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter; Woosley, S. E.; Epstein, Richard I.

    1990-01-01

    The association of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon with Galactic neutron stars is investigated statistically, and the distance to presently observable gamma-ray bursts is constrained. This is done by calculating the spatial distribution and kinematic properties of a sample of Population I neutron stars and comparing their properties to those of observed gamma-ray bursts. Both brightness distribution and angular distribution on the celestial sphere are employed. Current observations suggest negligible correlation on small angular scales, large-scale isotropy, and a radial distribution that is approximately uniform to the distances currently observed. It is concluded that the distribution of Population I neutron stars is consistent with current observations if gamma-ray bursts occur continuously throughout the neutron star lifetime and if the current sampling depth is at least about 150 pc but not more than roughly 2 kpc.

  16. Gravitational and Electromagnetic Emission from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Palenzuela, C.; Lehner, L.; Ponce, M.; Liebling, S. L.; Anderson, M.; Neilsen, D.

    2013-06-01

    The inspiral of a neutron star - neutron star binary is a leading candidate for strong emission of gravitational waves. The interaction between the stellar magnetospheres may also give rise to electromagnetic emissions accompanying the gravity waves as the neutron stars inspiral and merge. We present results from a set of resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of mergers computed with full general relativity. We vary the initial magnetic field of the neutron stars including cases where the fields are initially aligned, anit-aligned and where one star’s field dominates over its companion. This presentation is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant No. NNX13AH01G through the astrophysics theory program.

  17. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    MAKISHIMA, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1–7) × 108 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states. PMID:27169348

  18. Highlights of JLab Neutron (3He) Spin Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-ping Chen

    2009-07-01

    Nucleon spin structure has been an active, exciting and intriguing subject of interest for the last three decades. Recent precision spin-structure data from Jefferson Lab have significantly advanced our knowledge of nucleon structure at low Q2. In particular, it has improved our understanding of spin sum rules and higher-twist effects. First, results of neutron spin sum rules and polarizabilities in the low to intermediate Q2 region are presented. Comparison with theoretical calculations, in particular with Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) calculations, are discussed. Surprising disagreements of ChPT calculations with experimental results on the generalized spin polarizability, deltaLTn, were found. Results of precision measurements of the g2 structure function to study higher-twist effects are presented. The data indicate a significant higher-twist (twist-3 or higher) effect. The second moment of the spin structure functions and the twist-3 matrix element d2 results were extracted. The high Q2 result was compared with a Lattice QCD calculation. Finally, other neutron spin structure results, such as the resonance data for quark-hadron duality study and a precision measurement of the neutron spin asymmetry in the valence quark (high-x) region are briefly discussed.

  19. On the Maximum Mass of Differentially Rotating Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Baumgarte; Shapiro; Shibata

    2000-01-01

    We construct relativistic equilibrium models of differentially rotating neutron stars and show that they can support significantly more mass than their nonrotating or uniformly rotating counterparts. We dynamically evolve such "hypermassive" models in full general relativity and show that there do exist configurations that are dynamically stable against radial collapse and bar formation. Our results suggest that the remnant of binary neutron star coalescence may be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation, leading to delayed collapse and a delayed gravitational wave burst. PMID:10587488

  20. Thermal neutron flux measurements in the STAR experimental hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisyak, Yuri; Tsai, Oleg; Videbæk, Flemming; Xu, Zhangbu

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of thermal neutron fluxes at different locations in the STAR experimental hall during RHIC Run 13 with proton-proton collisions at √{s}=510 GeV. We compare these measurements to calculations based on PYTHIA as a minimum bias event generator, detailed GEANT3 simulation of the STAR detector and experimental hall, and with GCALOR as the neutron transport code. A fairly good agreement was found between simulation and measurements.

  1. Crust-core coupling in rotating neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Andersson, Nils

    2006-08-15

    Motivated by their gravitational wave driven instability, we investigate the influence of the crust on r-mode oscillations in a neutron star. Using a simplistic model of an elastic neutron star crust with constant shear modulus, we carry out an analytic calculation with the main objective of deriving an expression for the slippage between the core and the crust. Our analytic estimates support previous numerical results and provide useful insights into the details of the problem.

  2. ON THE MASS DISTRIBUTION AND BIRTH MASSES OF NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Santos Villarreal, Antonio; Narayan, Ramesh

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the distribution of neutron star masses in different populations of binaries, employing Bayesian statistical techniques. In particular, we explore the differences in neutron star masses between sources that have experienced distinct evolutionary paths and accretion episodes. We find that the distribution of neutron star masses in non-recycled eclipsing high-mass binaries as well as of slow pulsars, which are all believed to be near their birth masses, has a mean of 1.28 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.24 M{sub Sun }. These values are consistent with expectations for neutron star formation in core-collapse supernovae. On the other hand, double neutron stars, which are also believed to be near their birth masses, have a much narrower mass distribution, peaking at 1.33 M{sub Sun }, but with a dispersion of only 0.05 M{sub Sun }. Such a small dispersion cannot easily be understood and perhaps points to a particular and rare formation channel. The mass distribution of neutron stars that have been recycled has a mean of 1.48 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.2 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the expectation that they have experienced extended mass accretion episodes. The fact that only a very small fraction of recycled neutron stars in the inferred distribution have masses that exceed {approx}2 M{sub Sun} suggests that only a few of these neutron stars cross the mass threshold to form low-mass black holes.

  3. Neutron star formation in theoretical supernovae. Low mass stars and white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    The presupernova evolution of stars that form semi-degenerate or strongly degenerate O + Ne + Mg cores is discussed. For the 10 to 13 Msub solar stars, behavior of off-center neon flashes is crucial. The 8 to 10 m/sub solar stars do not ignite neon and eventually collapse due to electron captures. Properties of supernova explosions and neutron stars expected from these low mass progenitors are compared with the Crab nebula. The conditions for which neutron stars form from accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs in clsoe binary systems is also examined.

  4. Binary Neutron Star Mergers: A Jet Engine for Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Milton; Lang, Ryan N.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2016-06-01

    We perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations in full general relativity (GRMHD) of quasi-circular, equal-mass, binary neutron stars that undergo merger. The initial stars are irrotational, n = 1 polytropes and are magnetized. We explore two types of magnetic-field geometries: one where each star is endowed with a dipole magnetic field extending from the interior into the exterior, as in a pulsar, and the other where the dipole field is initially confined to the interior. In both cases the adopted magnetic fields are initially dynamically unimportant. The merger outcome is a hypermassive neutron star that undergoes delayed collapse to a black hole (spin parameter a/M BH ˜ 0.74) immersed in a magnetized accretion disk. About 4000M ˜ 60(M NS/1.625 M ⊙) ms following merger, the region above the black hole poles becomes strongly magnetized, and a collimated, mildly relativistic outflow—an incipient jet—is launched. The lifetime of the accretion disk, which likely equals the lifetime of the jet, is Δ t ˜ 0.1 (M NS/1.625 M ⊙) s. In contrast to black hole-neutron star mergers, we find that incipient jets are launched even when the initial magnetic field is confined to the interior of the stars.

  5. Measuring neutron-star properties via gravitational waves from neutron-star mergers.

    PubMed

    Bauswein, A; Janka, H-T

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate by a large set of merger simulations for symmetric binary neutron stars (NSs) that there is a tight correlation between the frequency peak of the postmerger gravitational-wave (GW) emission and the physical properties of the nuclear equation of state (EoS), e.g., expressed by the radius of the maximum-mass Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhoff configuration. Therefore, a single measurement of the peak frequency of the postmerger GW signal will constrain the NS EoS significantly. For optimistic merger-rate estimates a corresponding detection with Advanced LIGO is expected to happen within an operation time of roughly a year.

  6. Resonant shattering of neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Tsang, David; Read, Jocelyn S; Hinderer, Tanja; Piro, Anthony L; Bondarescu, Ruxandra

    2012-01-01

    The resonant excitation of neutron star (NS) modes by tides is investigated as a source of short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) precursors. We find that the driving of a crust-core interface mode can lead to shattering of the NS crust, liberating ∼10{46}-10{47}  erg of energy seconds before the merger of a NS-NS or NS-black-hole binary. Such properties are consistent with Swift/BAT detections of SGRB precursors, and we use the timing of the observed precursors to place weak constraints on the crust equation of state. We describe how a larger sample of precursor detections could be used alongside coincident gravitational wave detections of the inspiral by Advanced LIGO class detectors to probe the NS structure. These two types of observations nicely complement one another, since the former constrains the equation of state and structure near the crust-core boundary, while the latter is more sensitive to the core equation of state. PMID:22304251

  7. Pair fireball precursors of neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Zivancev, Charles

    2016-10-01

    If at least one neutron star (NS) is magnetized in a binary NS merger, then the orbital motion of the conducting companion during the final inspiral induces a strong voltage and current along the magnetic field lines connecting the NSs. If a modest fraction η of the extracted electromagnetic power extracted accelerates relativistic particles, the resulting gamma-ray emission a compact volume will result in the formation of an electron-positron pair fireball. Applying a steady-state pair wind model, we quantify the detectability of the precursor fireball with gamma-ray satellites. For η ˜ 1 the gamma-ray detection horizon of Dmax ≈ 10(Bd/1014 G)3/4 Mpc is much closer than the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo horizon of 200 Mpc, unless the NS surface magnetic field strength is very large, B_d ≲ 10^{15} G. Given the quasi-isotropic nature of the emission, mergers with weaker NS fields could contribute a nearby population of short gamma-ray bursts. Power not dissipated close to the binary is carried to infinity along the open field lines by a large-scale Poynting flux. Reconnection within this outflow, well outside of the pair photosphere, provides a potential site for non-thermal emission, such as a coherent millisecond radio burst.

  8. Physics of systems containing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1995-01-01

    This grant deals with several topics related to the dynamics of systems containing a compact object. Most of our research in 1994 dealt with systems containing Neutron Stars (NS's), but we also addressed systems containing a Black Hole (BH) or a White Dwarf (WD) in situations relevant to NS systems. Among the systems were isolated regular pulsars, Millisecond Pulsars (MSP's) that are either Single (SMP's) or in a binary (BMP's) Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMX's) and Cataclysmic Variables (CV's). We also dealt with one aspect of NS structure, namely NS superfluidity. A large fraction of our research dealt with irradiation-driven winds from companions. These winds turned out to be of some importance in the evolution of LMXB's and MSP's, be they SMP's or BMP's. While their role during LMXB evolution (i.e. during the accretion phase) is not yet clear, they may play an important role in turning BMP's into SMP's and also in bringing about the formation of planets around MSP's.

  9. RESPECT: Neutron resonance spin-echo spectrometer for extreme studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgii, R.; Kindervater, J.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2016-11-01

    We propose the design of a REsonance SPin-echo spECtrometer for exTreme studies, RESPECT, that is ideally suited for the exploration of non-dispersive processes such as diffusion, crystallization, slow dynamics, tunneling processes, crystal electric field excitations, and spin fluctuations. It is a variant of the conventional neutron spin-echo technique (NSE) by (i) replacing the long precession coils by pairs of longitudinal neutron spin-echo coils combined with RF-spin flippers and (ii) by stabilizing the neutron polarization with small longitudinal guide fields that can in addition be used as field subtraction coils thus allowing to adjust the field integrals over a range of 8 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the dynamic range of RESPECT can in principle be varied over 8 orders of magnitude in time, if neutrons with the required energy are made available. Similarly as for existing NSE-spectrometers, spin echo times of up to approximately 1 μs can be reached if the divergence and the correction elements are properly adjusted. Thanks to the optional use of neutron guides and the fact that the currents for the correction coils are much smaller than in standard NSE, intensity gains of at least one order of magnitude are expected, making the concept of RESPECT also competitive for operation at medium flux neutron sources. RESPECT can also be operated in a MIEZE configuration allowing the investigation of relaxation processes in depolarizing environments as they occur when magnetic fields are applied at the sample position, i.e. for the investigation of the dynamics of flux lines in superconductors, magnetic fluctuations in ferromagnetic materials, and samples containing hydrogen.

  10. Resonant tidal excitation of superfluid neutron stars in coalescing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang; Weinberg, Nevin N.

    2016-10-01

    We study the resonant tidal excitation of g-modes in coalescing superfluid neutron star binaries and investigate how such tidal driving impacts the gravitational-wave signal of the inspiral. Previous studies of this type treated the neutron star core as a normal fluid and thus did not account for its expected superfluidity. The source of buoyancy that supports the g-modes is fundamentally different in the two cases: in a normal fluid core the buoyancy is due to gradients in the proton-to-neutron fraction whereas in a superfluid core it is due to gradients in the muon-to-electron fraction. The latter yields a stronger stratification and a superfluid neutron star therefore has a denser spectrum of g-modes with frequencies above 10Hz. As a result, many more g-modes undergo resonant tidal excitation as the binary sweeps through the bandwidth of gravitational-wave detectors such as LIGO. We find that ≃ 10 times more orbital energy is transferred into g-mode oscillations if the neutron star has a superfluid core rather than a normal fluid core. However, because this energy is transferred later in the inspiral when the orbital decay is faster, the accumulated phase error in the gravitational waveform is comparable for a superfluid and normal fluid neutron star (˜10-3 - 10-2radians). A phase error of this magnitude is too small to be measured from a single event with the current generation of gravitational wave detectors.

  11. Unequal mass binary neutron star mergers and multimessenger signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos; Caballero, O. L.; O'Connor, Evan; Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David

    2016-09-01

    We study the merger of binary neutron stars with different mass ratios adopting three different realistic, microphysical nuclear equations of state, as well as incorporating neutrino cooling effects. In particular, we concentrate on the influence of the equation of state on the gravitational wave signature and also on its role, in combination with neutrino cooling, in determining the properties of the resulting hypermassive neutron star, of the neutrinos produced, and of the ejected material. The ejecta we find are consistent with other recent studies that find that small mass ratios produce more ejecta than equal mass cases (up to some limit) and this ejecta is more neutron rich. This trend indicates the importance with future kilonovae observations of measuring the individual masses of an associated binary neutron star system, presumably from concurrent gravitational wave observations, in order to be able to extract information about the nuclear equation of state.

  12. Constraints on binary neutron star merger product from short GRB observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing; Lü, Hou-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are strong gravitational-wave (GW) sources and the leading candidates to interpret short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Under the assumptions that SGRBs are produced by double neutron star mergers and that the x-ray plateau followed by a steep decay as observed in SGRB x-ray light curves marks the collapse of a supramassive neutron star to a black hole (BH), we use the statistical observational properties of Swift SGRBs and the mass distribution of Galactic double neutron star systems to place constraints on the neutron star equation of state (EoS) and the properties of the post-merger product. We show that current observations already impose the following interesting constraints. (1) A neutron star EoS with a maximum mass close to a parametrization of Mmax=2.37 M⊙(1 +1.58 ×10-10P-2.84) is favored. (2) The fractions for the several outcomes of NS-NS mergers are as follows: ˜40 % prompt BHs, ˜30 % supramassive NSs that collapse to BHs in a range of delay time scales, and ˜30 % stable NSs that never collapse. (3) The initial spin of the newly born supramassive NSs should be near the breakup limit (Pi˜1 ms ), which is consistent with the merger scenario. (4) The surface magnetic field of the merger products is typically ˜1015 G . (5) The ellipticity of the supramassive NSs is ɛ ˜(0.004 -0.007 ), so that strong GW radiation is released after the merger. (6) Even though the initial spin energy of the merger product is similar, the final energy output of the merger product that goes into the electromagnetic channel varies in a wide range from several 1049 to several 1052 erg , since a good fraction of the spin energy is either released in the form of GWs or falls into the black hole as the supramassive NS collapses.

  13. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  14. Spin-dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Andreas

    1988-07-01

    We present a phenomenological model for the spin-dependent structure functions g1(x) of the proton and neutron. The model is an extension of the one proposed by Carlitz and Kaur. We use improved unpolarized structure functions and include effects due to the mass difference between up and down quark and due to the mass difference between spin 1/2 and 3/2 baryons. Our results for the proton agree with the data.

  15. Double core evolution. 7: The infall of a neutron star through the envelope of its massive star companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terman, James L.; Taam, Ronald E.; Hernquist, Lars

    1995-01-01

    Binary systems with properties similar to those of high-mass X-ray binaries are evolved through the common envelope phase. Three-dimensional simulations show that the timescale of the infall phase of the neutron star depends upon the evolutionary state of its massive companion. We find that tidal torques more effectively accelerate common envelope evolution for companions in their late core helium-burning stage and that the infall phase is rapid (approximately several initial orbital periods). For less evolved companions the decay of the orbit is longer; however, once the neutron star is deeply embedded within the companion's envelope the timescale for orbital decay decreases rapidly. As the neutron star encounters the high-density region surrounding the helium core of its massive companion, the rate of energy loss from the orbit increases dramatically leading to either partial or nearly total envelope ejection. The outcome of the common envelope phase depends upon the structure of the evolved companion. In particular, it is found that the entire common envelope can be ejected by the interaction of the neutron star with a red supergiant companion in binaries with orbital periods similar to those of long-period Be X-ray binaries. For orbital periods greater than or approximately equal to 0.8-2 yr (for companions of mass 12-24 solar mass) it is likely that a binary will survive the common envelope phase. For these systems, the structure of the progenitor star is characterized by a steep density gradient above the helium core, and the common envelope phase ends with a spin up of the envelope to within 50%-60% of corotation and with a slow mass outflow. The efficiency of mass ejection is found to be approximately 30%-40%. For less evolved companions, there is insufficient energy in the orbit to unbind the common envelope and only a fraction of it is ejected. Since the timescale for orbital decay is always shorter than the mass-loss timescale from the common envelope

  16. Supergiant pulses from extragalactic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Wasserman, Ira

    2016-03-01

    We consider radio bursts that originate from extragalactic neutron stars (NSs) by addressing three questions about source distances. What are the physical limitations on coherent radiation at GHz frequencies? Do they permit detection at cosmological distances? How many bursts per NS are needed to produce the inferred burst rate ˜103-104sky-1 d-1? The burst rate is comparable to the NS formation rate in a Hubble volume, requiring only one per NS if they are bright enough. Radiation physics suggests a closer population, requiring more bursts per NS and increasing the chances for repeats. Bursts comprise sub-ns, coherent shot pulses superposed incoherently to produce ms-duration ˜1 Jy amplitudes; each shot pulse can be much weaker than 1 Jy, placing less restrictive requirements on the emission process. None the less, single shot pulses are similar to the extreme, unresolved (<0.4 ns) MJy shot pulse seen from the Crab pulsar, consistent with coherent curvature radiation emitted near the light cylinder by an almost neutral clump with net charge ˜± 1021e and total energy ≳ 1023 erg. Bursts from Gpc distances require incoherent superposition of {˜ } 10^{12}d_Gpc^2 shot pulses or a total energy ≳ 10^{35} d_Gpc^2 erg. The energy reservoir near the light cylinder limits the detection distance to ≲ few × 100 Mpc for a fluence ˜1 Jy ms unless conditions are more extreme than for the Crab pulsar, such as in magnetars. We discuss contributions to dispersion measures from galaxy clusters and we propose tests for the overall picture presented.

  17. Axisymmetric oscillations of magnetic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Umin

    2007-01-01

    We calculate axisymmetric oscillations of rotating neutron stars composed of the surface fluid ocean, solid crust and fluid core, taking account of a dipole magnetic field as strong as BS ~ 1015 G at the surface. The adiabatic oscillation equations for the solid crust threaded by a dipole magnetic field are derived in Newtonian dynamics, on the assumption that the axis of rotation is aligned with the magnetic axis so that perturbations on the equilibrium can be represented by series expansions in terms of spherical harmonic functions Yml(θ, φ) with different degrees l for a given azimuthal wave number m around the magnetic axis. Although the three component models can support a rich variety of oscillation modes, axisymmetric (m = 0) toroidal ltn and spheroidal lsn shear waves propagating in the solid crust are our main concerns, where l and n denote the harmonic degree and the radial order of the modes, respectively. In the absence of rotation, axisymmetric spheroidal and toroidal modes are completely decoupled, and we consider the effects of rotation on the oscillation modes only in the limit of slow rotation. We find that the oscillation frequencies of the fundamental toroidal torsional modes ltn in the crust are hardly affected by the magnetic field as strong as BS ~ 1015 G at the surface. As the radial order n of the shear modes in the crust becomes higher, however, both spheroidal and toroidal modes become susceptible to the magnetic field, and their frequencies in general get higher with increasing BS. We also find that the surface g modes and the crust/ocean interfacial modes are suppressed by a strong magnetic field, and that there appear magnetic modes in the presence of a strong magnetic field.

  18. Electrodynamics of disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Lamb, Frederick K.; Hamilton, Russell J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the electrodynamics of magnetic neutron stars accreting from Keplerian disks and the implications for particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission by such systems. We argue that the particle density in the magnetospheres of such stars is larger by orders of magnitude than the Goldreich-Julian density, so that the formation of vacuum gaps is unlikely. We show that even if the star rotates slowly, electromotive forces (EMFs) of order 10(exp 15) V are produced by the interaction of plasma in the accretion disk with the magnetic field of the neutron star. The resistance of the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit is small, and hence these EMFs drive very large conduction currents. Such large currents are likely to produce magnetospheric instabilities, such as relativistic double layers and reconnection events, that can accelerate electrons or ions to very high energies.

  19. The Case of the Neutron Star With a Wayward Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    A long observation with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed important new details of a neutron star that is spewing out a wake of high-energy particles as it races through space. The deduced location of the neutron star on the edge of a supernova remnant, and the peculiar orientation of the neutron star wake, pose mysteries that remain unresolved. "Like a kite flying in the wind, the behavior of this neutron star and its wake tell us what sort of gas it must be plowing through," said Bryan Gaensler of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass., and lead author of a paper accepted to The Astrophysical Journal. "Yet we're still not sure how the neutron star got to its present location." Animation: Sequence of images of J0617 in IC 443 Animation: Sequence of images of J0617 in IC 443 The neutron star, known as CXOU J061705.3+222127, or J0617 for short, appears to lie near the outer edge of an expanding bubble of hot gas associated with the supernova remnant IC 443. Presumably, J0617 was created at the time of the supernova -- approximately 30,000 years ago -- and propelled away from the site of the explosion at about 500,000 miles per hour. However, the neutron star's wake is oriented almost perpendicularly to the direction expected if the neutron star were moving away from the center of the supernova remnant. This apparent misalignment had previously raised doubts about the association of the speeding neutron star with the supernova remnant. Gaensler and his colleagues provide strong evidence that J0617 was indeed born in the same explosion that created the supernova remnant. First, the shape of the neutron star's wake indicates it is moving a little faster than the speed of sound in Composite Images of SNR IC 443 Composite Images of SNR IC 443 the remnant's multimillion-degree gas. The velocity that one can then calculate from this conclusion closely matches the predicted pace of the neutron star. In contrast, if the neutron

  20. THE DOUBLE PULSAR: EVIDENCE FOR NEUTRON STAR FORMATION WITHOUT AN IRON CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdman, R. D.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Breton, R. P.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Possenti, A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    2013-04-10

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is a double neutron star binary, with a 2.4 hr orbital period, which has allowed measurement of relativistic orbital perturbations to high precision. The low mass of the second-formed neutron star, as well as the low system eccentricity and proper motion, point to a different evolutionary scenario compared to most other known double neutron star systems. We describe analysis of the pulse profile shape over 6 years of observations and present the resulting constraints on the system geometry. We find the recycled pulsar in this system, PSR J0737-3039A, to be a near-orthogonal rotator with an average separation between its spin and magnetic axes of 90 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign {+-} 5 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, we find a mean 95% upper limit on the misalignment between its spin and orbital angular momentum axes of 3. Degree-Sign 2, assuming that the observed emission comes from both magnetic poles. This tight constraint lends credence to the idea that the supernova that formed the second pulsar was relatively symmetric, possibly involving electron capture onto an O-Ne-Mg core.

  1. Possible ambiguities in the equation of state for neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Miyatsu, Tsuyoshi; Ryu, C. Y.; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Güngör, Can; Keleş, Vildan; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    We addressed possible ambiguities on the properties of neutron stars (NSs) estimated in theoretical sides. First, roles of hyperons inside the NS are discussed through various relativistic mean field (RMF) theories. In particular, the extension of SU(6) spin-flavor symmetry to SU(3) flavor symmetry is shown to give rise to the increase of hyperon threshold density, similarly to the Fock term effects in RMF theories. As a result, about 2.0 solar mass is obtained with the hyperons. Second, the effect by the modified f(R) gravity, which leaves a room for the dark energy in the Einstein equation to be taken into account, is discussed for the NS in a strong magnetic field (MF). Our results show that the modified gravity with the Kaluza-Klein electro-magnetism theory expanded in terms of a length scale parameter may reasonably describe the NS in strong MF, so called magnetar. Even the super-soft equation of state is shown to be revived by the modified f(R) gravity.

  2. Magnetar Formation from the Merger of Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the results of recent fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers performed with the Whisky code. I will describe in particular the role of magnetic fields in the post-merger dynamics, their impact on gravitational waves (GWs), and the possible formation of magnetars. The formation of a rapidly spinning magnetar after the merger could in particular generate electromagnetic signals that, if measured together with GWs emitted during the inspiral, could help to constrain the equation of state of NSs. Moreover BNSs are also thought to be behind the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and the formation of a magnetar could explain some of the observed SGRBs. While global GRMHD simulations of BNS mergers are currently unable to produce strong magnetic field amplifications during merger, local high-resolution simulations showed that small-scale turbulence can play a very important role in amplifying the magnetic fields. I will show how such small-scale dynamics can be included in global GRMHD BNS simulations via the implementation of a subgrid-scale model and its effect on the formation of magnetars.

  3. The Fate of the Compact Remnant in Neutron Star Mergers

    DOE PAGES

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztoff; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rosswog, Stephan; Shen, Gang; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-10-06

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star - black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts. They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the coresmore » of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3-2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing gamma-ray bursts, LIGO observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.« less

  4. Atmosphere composition of quiescent accreting neutron stars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servillat, M.

    2012-12-01

    Through the study of the quiescent X-ray emission of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries it is possible to constrain the equation of state of dense matter. However, the chemical composition of the neutron star atmosphere is still uncertain. Using deep Chandra observations, we report the detailed spectral analysis of a neutron star in the globular cluster M28. For the first time for this kind of object, different atmosphere models composed of hydrogen, helium or carbon are used. The carbon model can be ruled out, and the derived mass and radius are clearly distinct depending on the composition of the atmosphere, leading to different constraints on the equation of state. We compare those results with the other similar neutron stars studied with a hydrogen atmosphere model only and show that a helium model could be relevant in many cases. Measurements of neutron star masses/radii by spectral fitting should consider the possibility of heavier element atmospheres, which produce larger masses/radii for the same data, unless the composition of the accretor is known independently.

  5. The Fate of the Compact Remnant in Neutron Star Mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztoff; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rosswog, Stephan; Shen, Gang; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-10-06

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star - black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts. They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the cores of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3-2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing gamma-ray bursts, LIGO observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.

  6. The formation of double neutron stars and double black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelemans, Gijs

    2016-07-01

    The evolution from two massive stars in a binary to a compact binary with neutron stars or black holes passes through many stages in which the two stars interact. The outcome of many of these is highly uncertain. I will present a study into some of the most important uncertainties and some initial suggestions on how use of Gaia data for the early phases and LIGO/Virgo data on the final systems may constrain the outcome of these uncertain phases. In turn, this knowledge will guide further studies into the detailed physics of the interaction between stars in a massive binary.

  7. Formation of the Double Neutron Star System PSR J1930-1852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The spin period (185 ms) and period derivative (1.8× {10}-17 {{s}} {{{s}}}-1) of the recently discovered double neutron star (DNS) system PSR J1930-1852 indicate that the pulsar was mildly recycled through the process of Roche-lobe overflow. This system has the longest orbital period (45 days) of the known DNS systems, and can be formed from a helium star-NS binary if the initial mass of the helium star was ≲ 4.0{M}⊙ ; otherwise, the helium star would never fill its Roche-lobe. At the moment of the supernova explosion, the mass of the helium star was ≲ 3.0{M}⊙ . We find that the probability distribution of the velocity kick imparted to the new-born neutron star has a maximum at about 30 {km} {{{s}}}-1 (and a tail up to 260 {km} {{{s}}}-1), indicating that this NS probably received a low kick velocity at birth.

  8. Microscopic calculations of nuclear and neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    DOE PAGES

    Gandolfi, S.

    2015-02-01

    We present Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the equation of state of neutron matter. The equation of state is directly related to the symmetry energy and determines the mass and radius of neutron stars, providing then a connection between terrestrial experiments and astronomical observations. As a result, we also show preliminary results of the equation of state of nuclear matter.

  9. Burst Oscillation Probes of Neutron Stars and Nuclear Burning with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2012-01-01

    X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts--burst oscillations--have provided a new probe of neutron star spins as well as of the dependent nuclear burning processes. The frequency drift and amplitude evolution of the oscillations observed during bursts can in principle place constraints on the physics of thermonuclear flame spreading and the dynamics of the burning atmosphere. I use simulations appropriate to LOFT to explore the precision with which the time dependence of the oscillation frequency can be inferred. This can test, for example, different models for the frequency drift, such as up-lift versus geostrophic drift. I also explore the precision with which asymptotic frequencies can be constrained in order to estimate the capability for LOFT to detect the Doppler shifts induced by orbital motion of the neutron star from a sample of bursts at different orbital phases.

  10. Cas A and friends: directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    We present the status of searches for continuous gravitational waves from the central compact object in supernova remnant Cassiopeia A and eight other young suspected neutron stars whose positions are known well enough to use a single barycentric correction per object. All objects have age estimates less than a few thousand years, young enough that r-modes could still be active. The searches coherently integrate from five to twenty-five days of the LIGO S6 data run and cover gravitational wave frequency bands of varying widths from 140 Hz to 2 kHz so that each requires a similar computational cost, which is about 1/3 that of the published LIGO search for Cassiopeia A due to the use of SSE2 floating point extensions. The objects are chosen so that each search can detect a neutron star in the band if its (unknown) spin-down has been dominated by gravitational-wave emission since birth.

  11. Test of Lorentz Invariance with Spin Precession of Ultracold Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Baker, C. A.; Iaydjiev, P.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ban, G.; Lefort, T.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Quemener, G.; Bodek, K.; Kistryn, S.; Zejma, J.; Daum, M.; Henneck, R.; Kirch, K.; Knecht, A.; Lauss, B.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Petzoldt, G.

    2009-08-21

    A clock comparison experiment, analyzing the ratio of spin precession frequencies of stored ultracold neutrons and {sup 199}Hg atoms, is reported. No daily variation of this ratio could be found, from which is set an upper limit on the Lorentz invariance violating cosmic anisotropy field b{sub perpendicular}<2x10{sup -20} eV (95% C.L.). This is the first limit for the free neutron. This result is also interpreted as a direct limit on the gravitational dipole moment of the neutron |g{sub n}|<0.3 eV/c{sup 2} m from a spin-dependent interaction with the Sun. Analyzing the gravitational interaction with the Earth, based on previous data, yields a more stringent limit |g{sub n}|<3x10{sup -4} eV/c{sup 2} m.

  12. Binary pulsars as probes of neutron star birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van Paradijs, J.; van den Heuvel, E. P. J.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss two issues in the physics of neutron stars and their progenitors. The first is whether a neutron star receives a velocity kick when it is formed in the supernova-explosion of a massive star, and if it does, what is the characteristic magnitude, v(0), thereof? The second concerns the fate of close massive binaries that consist of a helium star and a companion with a mass of order a solar mass. Whether the helium star explodes as a supernova, leaving a neutron star, or alternatively becomes a white dwarf, depends on its mass. The issue is which mass, m, of the helium star divides the two cases. We conclude that even though there are only four known 1913+16-type binary pulsars, the kick's magnitude can be constrained to some extent: v(0) is less than 400 km/. m alone cannot be constrained well, but a line can be drawn in the (m, v(0))-plane that separates the acceptable pairs of values from the unacceptable ones. We also suggest how more stringent, but also more model-dependent, constraints may be found by combining our method with results of other studies.

  13. Thermonuclear Burning as a Probe of Neutron Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2008-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a fundamental process taking place in the matter transferred onto neutron stars in accreting binary systems. The heat deposited by nuclear reactions becomes readily visible in the X-ray band when the burning is either unstable or marginally stable, and results in the rich phenomenology of X-ray bursts, superbursts, and mHz quasiperiodic oscillations. Fast X-ray timing observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) over the past decade have revealed a wealth of new phenomena associated with thermonuclear burning on neutron stars, including the discovery of nuclear powered pulsations during X-ray bursts and superbursts. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these new phenomena, with an emphasis on recent findings, and discuss what they are telling us about the structure of neutron stars.

  14. Effects of Gravitational Correction on Neutron Stars with Antikaon Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wen-Bo; Hou, Jia-Wei; Qi, Zhan-Qiang; E, Shan-Shan; Bao, Tmurbagan; Liu, Guang-Zhou; Yu, Zi; Zhao, En-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Effects of gravitational correction through the introduction of U bosons on neutron stars with antikaon condensation are studied in the relativistic mean held theory. How the global properties of neutron stars, redshift and the momentum of inertia are modified by gravitational correction and antikaon condensation are discussed here. Results show that antikaon condensation can occur at the core of pulsar PSR J1614-2230. Gravitational correction and antikaon condensation influence each other, and when coupling constant of U bosons and baryons becomes very high, effects of antikaon condensation almost vanish. Moreover, both the redshift and the momentum of inertia of neutron stars are sensitive to the constant of U bosons. Combining with observation data, we can provide a further constraint on coupling constant of U bosons. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11265009, 11271055, and 11175077, and General Project of Liaoning Provincial Department of Education under Grant No. L2015005

  15. Gravitational Waves from Magnetized Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2010-02-01

    Binary neutron stars are among the most important sources of gravitational waves which are expected to be detected by the current or next generation of gravitational wave detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo, and they are also thought to be at the origin of very important astrophysical phenomena, such as short gamma-ray bursts. In order to describe the dynamics of these events one needs to solve the full set of general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics equations through the use of parallel numerical codes. I will report on some recent results obtained with the use of the fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code Whisky in simulating binary neutron stars which inspiral and merge forming an hypermassive neutron star which eventually collapses to form a black hole surrounded by a torus. I will in particular describe how the magnetic fields can affect the dynamics and consequently the gravitational waves emitted by these systems and discuss about their detectability by current and future gravitational-wave detectors. )

  16. General Relativistic Simulations of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca; Link, David; Font, José A.

    2011-08-01

    Binary neutron star mergers are one of the possible candidates for the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and they are also powerful sources of gravitational waves. We have used our fully general relativistic hydrodynamical code Whisky to investigate the merger of binary neutron star systems and we have in particular studied the properties of the tori that can be formed by these systems, their possible connection with the engine of short GRBs and the gravitational wave signals that detectors such as advanced LIGO will be able to detect. We have also shown how the mass of the torus varies as a function of the total mass of the neutron stars composing the binary and of their mass ratio and we have found that tori sufficiently massive to power short GRBs can indeed be formed.

  17. Neutron star natal kicks and the long-term survival of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contenta, Filippo; Varri, Anna Lisa; Heggie, Douglas C.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the dynamical evolution of a star cluster in an external tidal field by using N-body simulations, with focus on the effects of the presence or absence of neutron star natal velocity kicks. We show that, even if neutron stars typically represent less than 2 per cent of the total bound mass of a star cluster, their primordial kinematic properties may affect the lifetime of the system by up to almost a factor of 4. We interpret this result in the light of two known modes of star cluster dissolution, dominated by either early stellar evolution mass-loss or two-body relaxation. The competition between these effects shapes the mass-loss profile of star clusters, which may either dissolve abruptly (`jumping'), in the pre-core-collapse phase, or gradually (`skiing'), after having reached core collapse.

  18. Magnetized neutron stars with superconducting cores: effect of entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palapanidis, K.; Stergioulas, N.; Lander, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    We construct equilibrium configurations of magnetized, two-fluid neutron stars using an iterative numerical method. Working in Newtonian framework we assume that the neutron star has two regions: the core, which is modelled as a two-component fluid consisting of type-II superconducting protons and superfluid neutrons, and the crust, a region composed of normal matter. Taking a new step towards more complete equilibrium models, we include the effect of entrainment, which implies that a magnetic force acts on neutrons, too. We consider purely poloidal field cases and present improvements to an earlier numerical scheme for solving equilibrium equations, by introducing new convergence criteria. We find that entrainment results in qualitative differences in the structure of field lines along the magnetic axis.

  19. Pairing gap in the inner crust of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.; Broglia, R.A.; Vigezzi, E.; Barranco, F.

    1995-08-01

    The pairing gap in the inner crust of a neutron star can be strongly affected by the presence of heavy nuclei. The effect is commonly estimated in a semiclassical description, using the local density approximation. It was found that the nuclear specific heat can become comparable to the electronic specific heat at certain densities and temperatures. The quantitative result depends critically upon the magnitude of the pairing gap. We therefore decided to assess the validity of the semiclassical approach. This is done by solving the quantal BCS pairing gap equation for neutrons that are confined to the Wigner-Seitz cell that surrounds a heavy nucleus. We performed calculations that are based on the Gogny pairing force. They are feasible for realistic densities of neutrons and heavy nuclei that are expected to be found in the inner crust of neutron stars. The results will be compared to the semiclassical predictions. This work is in progress.

  20. THE FATE OF THE COMPACT REMNANT IN NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztoff; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rosswog, Stephan; Shen, Gang; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-10-10

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star–black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and advanced VIRGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of Newtonian merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the cores of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3–2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing GRBs, LIGO/Virgo observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.

  1. Tables of model atmospheres of bursting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madej, Jerzy

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents tables of plane-parallel neutron star model atmospheres in radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium, with effective temperatures of 8 x 10 exp 6, 1.257 x 10 exp 7, 2 x 10 exp 7, and 3 x 10 exp 7 K, and surface gravities of 15.0 and less (cgs units). The equations of model atmospheres on which the tables are based fully account for nonisotropies of the radiation field and effects of noncoherent Compton scattering of thermal X-rays by free electrons. Both the effective temperatures and gravities listed above are measured on the neutron star surface.

  2. X-ray spectra from convective photospheres of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zavlin, V.E.; Pavlov, G.G. |; Shibanov, Yu.A.; Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1996-01-17

    We present first results of modeling convective photospheres of neutron stars. We show that in photospheres composed of the light elements convection arises only at relatively low effective temperatures ({le}3 - 5 x 10{sup 4} K), whereas in the case of iron composition it arises at T{sub eff}{le} 3 x 10{sup 5}K. Convection changes the depth dependence of the photosphere temperature and the shapes of the emergent spectra. Thus, it should be taken into account for the proper interpretation of EUV/soft-X-ray observations of the thermal radiation from neutron stars.

  3. Producing ultrastrong magnetic fields in neutron star mergers.

    PubMed

    Price, D J; Rosswog, S

    2006-05-01

    We report an extremely rapid mechanism for magnetic field amplification during the merger of a binary neutron star system. This has implications for the production of the short class of gamma-ray bursts, which recent observations suggest may originate in such mergers. In detailed magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the merger process, the fields are amplified by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities beyond magnetar field strength and may therefore represent the strongest magnetic fields in the universe. The amplification occurs in the shear layer that forms between the neutron stars and on a time scale of only 1 millisecond, that is, long before the remnant can collapse into a black hole.

  4. Observing quantum vacuum lensing in a neutron star binary system.

    PubMed

    Dupays, Arnaud; Robilliard, Cécile; Rizzo, Carlo; Bignami, Giovanni F

    2005-04-29

    In this Letter we study the propagation of light in the neighborhood of magnetized neutron stars. Because of the optical properties of quantum vacuum in the presence of a magnetic field, the light emitted by background astronomical objects is deviated, giving rise to a phenomenon of the same kind as the gravitational one. We give a quantitative estimation of this effect, and we discuss the possibility of its observation. We show that this effect could be detected by monitoring the evolution of the recently discovered double neutron star system J0737-3039.

  5. Observing quantum vacuum lensing in a neutron star binary system.

    PubMed

    Dupays, Arnaud; Robilliard, Cécile; Rizzo, Carlo; Bignami, Giovanni F

    2005-04-29

    In this Letter we study the propagation of light in the neighborhood of magnetized neutron stars. Because of the optical properties of quantum vacuum in the presence of a magnetic field, the light emitted by background astronomical objects is deviated, giving rise to a phenomenon of the same kind as the gravitational one. We give a quantitative estimation of this effect, and we discuss the possibility of its observation. We show that this effect could be detected by monitoring the evolution of the recently discovered double neutron star system J0737-3039. PMID:15904205

  6. The Many Faces - and Phases - of Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2007-10-26

    Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova, all depend critically on the equation of state of hadronic matter. In this contribution I will concentrate on the EOS of cold baryonic matter with special emphasis on its impact on the structure and dynamics of neutron stars. In particular, I will discuss the many fascinating phases that one encounters as one travels from the low-density crust to the high-density core.

  7. Black Hole - Neutron Star Binary Simulations at Georgia Tech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Roland

    2009-05-01

    Mixed compact object binaries consisting of a black hole and a neutron star are expected to be not only one of the primary sources of gravitational radiation to be observed by interferometric detectors but also the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts. We report on the status of our effort at Georgia Tech to model these mixed binary systems using the moving puncture method. The results are obtained with an enhanced version our vacuum MayaKranc code coupled to the hydrodynamics Whisky code. We present preliminary results of gravitational waveforms and the disruption of the neutron star for simple polytropic equations of state.

  8. Spin-down Dynamics of Magnetized Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Garaud, P.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their main-sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough & McIntyre, that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, which are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor & Brenner, with a coupling timescale proportional to the local Eddington-Sweet timescale across the tachocline. This timescale depends both on the rotation rate of the star and on the thickness of the tachocline, and it can vary from a few hundred thousand years to a few Gyr, depending on stellar properties. Qualitative predictions of the model appear to be consistent with observations, although they depend sensitively on the assumed functional dependence of the tachocline thickness on the stellar rotation rate.

  9. Spin-down dynamics of magnetized solar-type stars

    SciTech Connect

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Garaud, P.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their main-sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough and McIntyre, that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, which are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor and Brenner, with a coupling timescale proportional to the local Eddington-Sweet timescale across the tachocline. This timescale depends both on the rotation rate of the star and on the thickness of the tachocline, and it can vary from a few hundred thousand years to a few Gyr, depending on stellar properties. Qualitative predictions of the model appear to be consistent with observations, although they depend sensitively on the assumed functional dependence of the tachocline thickness on the stellar rotation rate.

  10. Strangeness in nuclei and neutron stars: A challenging puzzle

    DOE PAGES

    Lonardoni, Diego; Lovato, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco

    2016-03-25

    The prediction of neutron stars properties is strictly connected to the employed nuclear interactions. The appearance of hyperons in the inner core of the star is strongly dependent on the details of the underlying hypernuclear force. Here, we summarize our recent quantum Monte Carlo results on the development of realistic two- and threebody hyperon-nucleon interactions based on the available experimental data for light- and medium-heavy hypernuclei.

  11. Superfluid phases of triplet pairing and neutrino emission from neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leinson, L. B.

    2010-12-15

    Neutrino energy losses through neutral weak currents in the triplet-spin superfluid neutron liquid are studied for the case of condensate involving several magnetic quantum numbers. Low-energy excitations of the multicomponent condensate in the timelike domain of the energy and momentum are analyzed. Along with the well-known excitations in the form of broken Cooper pairs, the theoretical analysis predicts the existence of collective waves of spin density in the one-component condensate at very low energy. Because of a rather small excitation energy of spin waves, their decay leads to a substantial neutrino emission at the lowest temperatures when all other mechanisms of neutrino energy loss are killed by a superfluidity. Neutrino energy losses caused by the pair recombination and spin-wave decays are examined in all of the multicomponent phases that might represent the ground state of the condensate, according to modern theories, and for the case when a phase transition occurs in the condensate at some temperature. Our estimate predicts a sharp increase in the neutrino energy losses followed by a decrease, along with a decrease in the temperature that takes place more rapidly than it would without the phase transition. We demonstrate the important role of the neutrino radiation caused by the decay of spin waves in the cooling of neutron stars.

  12. Colliding Neutron Stars as the Source of Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Where do the heavy elements the chemical elements beyond iron in our universe come from? One of the primary candidate sources is the merger of two neutron stars, but recent observations have cast doubt on this model. Can neutron-star mergers really be responsible?Elements from Collisions?Periodic table showing the origin of each chemical element. Those produced by the r-process are shaded orange and attributed to supernovae in this image; though supernovae are one proposed source of r-process elements, an alternative source is the merger of two neutron stars. [Cmglee]When a binary-neutron-star system inspirals and the two neutron stars smash into each other, a shower of neutrons are released. These neutrons are thought to bombard the surrounding atoms, rapidly producing heavy elements in what is known as r-process nucleosynthesis.So could these mergers be responsible for producing the majority of the universes heavy r-process elements? Proponents of this model argue that its supported by observations. The overall amount of heavy r-process material in the Milky Way, for instance, is consistent with the expected ejection amounts from mergers, based both on predicted merger rates for neutron stars in the galaxy, and on the observed rates of soft gamma-ray bursts (which are thought to accompany double-neutron-star mergers).Challenges from Ultra-Faint DwarfsRecently, however, r-process elements have been observed in ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies. This discovery raises two major challenges to the merger model for heavy-element production:When neutron stars are born during a core-collapse supernova, mass is ejected, providing the stars with asymmetric natal kicks. During the second collapse in a double-neutron-star binary, wouldnt the kick exceed the low escape velocity of an ultra-faint dwarf, ejecting the binary before it could merge and enrich the galaxy?Ultra-faint dwarfs have very old stellar populations and the observation of r-process elements in these stars

  13. Measurement of the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B neutron decay using ultracold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, Wesley S

    2009-01-01

    We present a new approach to measuring the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B in neutron decay. The approach combines the technology of large-area ion-implanted silicon detectors being developed for the abBA experiment, with an ultracold neutron source to provide more precise neutron polarimetry. The technique detects both proton and electron from the neutron decay in coincidence. B is determined from an electron-energy-dependent measurement of the proton spin asymmetry. This approach will provide a statistical precision of 1 x 10-4 . The systematic precision is still being evaluated, but is expected to be below 1 x 10-3 , and could approach 1 x 10-4 . A measurement of B with this precision would place constraints on supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model.

  14. Extreme neutron stars from Extended Theories of Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Capozziello, Salvatore; Odintsov, Sergei D. E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it

    2015-01-01

    We discuss neutron stars with strong magnetic mean fields in the framework of Extended Theories of Gravity. In particular, we take into account models derived from f(R) and f(G) extensions of General Relativity where functions of the Ricci curvature invariant R and the Gauss-Bonnet invariant G are respectively considered. Dense matter in magnetic mean field, generated by magnetic properties of particles, is described by assuming a model with three meson fields and baryons octet. As result, the considerable increasing of maximal mass of neutron stars can be achieved by cubic corrections in f(R) gravity. In principle, massive stars with M > 4M{sub ☉} can be obtained. On the other hand, stable stars with high strangeness fraction (with central densities ρ{sub c} ∼ 1.5–2.0 GeV/fm{sup 3}) are possible considering quadratic corrections of f(G) gravity. The magnetic field strength in the star center is of order 6–8 × 10{sup 18} G. In general, we can say that other branches of massive neutron stars are possible considering the extra pressure contributions coming from gravity extensions. Such a feature can constitute both a probe for alternative theories and a way out to address anomalous self-gravitating compact systems.

  15. Collective modes in the superfluid inner crust of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Michael; Oertel, Micaela

    2015-08-01

    The neutron star inner crust is assumed to be superfluid at relevant temperatures. The contribution of neutron quasiparticles to thermodynamic and transport properties of the crust is therefore strongly suppressed by the pairing gap. Nevertheless, the neutron gas still has low-energy excitations, namely long-wavelength collective modes. We summarize different approaches to describe the collective modes in the crystalline phases of the inner crust and present an improved model for the description of the collective modes in the pasta phases within superfluid hydrodynamics.

  16. Role of Nucleonic Fermi Surface Depletion in Neutron Star Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. M.; Lombardo, U.; Zhang, H. F.; Zuo, W.

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi surface depletion of beta-stable nuclear matter is calculated to study its effects on several physical properties that determine the neutron star (NS) thermal evolution. The neutron and proton Z factors measuring the corresponding Fermi surface depletions are calculated within the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach, employing the AV18 two-body force supplemented by a microscopic three-body force. Neutrino emissivity, heat capacity, and in particular neutron 3PF2 superfluidity, turn out to be reduced, especially at high baryonic density, to such an extent that the cooling rates of young NSs are significantly slowed.

  17. Observations of neutron-capture elements in the first stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    A considerable number of observational constraints on the nature of neutron-capture element production in the early Universe have been assembled over the past decade. For example, the neutron-capture element Sr has been detected in one of the lowest metallicity stars known, HE 1327-2326, with [Fe/H] = -5.7. While only upper limits on Sr and Ba are available for the handful of other stars known with [Fe/H] <-4.5, the presence of Sr in HE 1327-2326 indicates that at least one channel exists for the production of elements beyond the iron peak in the most metal-poor stars. Dedicated searches for highly r-process-enhanced stars (r-II stars; [r-element/Fe] > +1.0) have revealed a total of some 18 such objects, roughly one-third of which exhibit the so-called ``actinide boost'' phenomenon, with Th (and sometimes U) observed at levels that are significantly higher than expected for radioactive species that have existed for >12 Gyrs. The r-II stars occupy a relatively narrow range in metallicity, -3.3 <[Fe/H] <-2.8, which may be related to their astrophysical origin. Dedicated radial-velocity monitoring of a subset of the r-II stars has shown no preference for such stars to form as binary systems, indicating that the enhancement of their r-process elements most likely occurred due to pollution of their natal clouds. In order to better clarify the nature of the astrophysical site(s) of early neutron-capture production, and its relationship (if any) to the characteristic light-element pattern (e.g., of CNO) that is found for >40% of all stars with [Fe/H] <-3.5, new dedicated surveys are now being undertaken, which will be summarized in this talk.

  18. Neutron star-black hole mergers with a nuclear equation of state and neutrino cooling: Dependence in the binary parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Haas, Roland; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela

    2014-07-01

    We present a first exploration of the results of neutron star-black hole mergers using black hole masses in the most likely range of 7M⊙-10M⊙, a neutrino leakage scheme, and a modeling of the neutron star material through a finite-temperature nuclear-theory based equation of state. In the range of black hole spins in which the neutron star is tidally disrupted (χBH≳0.7), we show that the merger consistently produces large amounts of cool (T ≲1 MeV), unbound, neutron-rich material (Mej˜0.05M⊙-0.20M⊙). A comparable amount of bound matter is initially divided between a hot disk (Tmax˜15 MeV) with typical neutrino luminosity of Lν˜1053 erg /s, and a cooler tidal tail. After a short period of rapid protonization of the disk lasting ˜10 ms, the accretion disk cools down under the combined effects of the fall-back of cool material from the tail, continued accretion of the hottest material onto the black hole, and neutrino emission. As the temperature decreases, the disk progressively becomes more neutron rich, with dimmer neutrino emission. This cooling process should stop once the viscous heating in the disk (not included in our simulations) balances the cooling. These mergers of neutron star-black hole binaries with black hole masses of MBH˜7M⊙-10M⊙, and black hole spins high enough for the neutron star to disrupt provide promising candidates for the production of short gamma-ray bursts, of bright infrared postmerger signals due to the radioactive decay of unbound material, and of large amounts of r-process nuclei.

  19. Many-particle theory of nuclear systems with application to neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakkalakal, D. A.; Yang, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    The energy-density relation was calculated for pure neutron matter in the density range relevant for neutron stars, using four different hard-core potentials. Calculations are also presented of the properties of the superfluid state of the neutron component, along with the superconducting state of the proton component and the effects of polarization in neutron star matter.

  20. Dark matter, neutron stars, and strange quark matter.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, M Angeles; Silk, Joseph; Stone, Jirina R

    2010-10-01

    We show that self-annihilating weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter accreted onto neutron stars may provide a mechanism to seed compact objects with long-lived lumps of strange quark matter, or strangelets, for WIMP masses above a few GeV. This effect may trigger a conversion of most of the star into a strange star. We use an energy estimate for the long-lived strangelet based on the Fermi-gas model combined with the MIT bag model to set a new limit on the possible values of the WIMP mass that can be especially relevant for subdominant species of massive neutralinos.

  1. Evolution of proto-neutron stars with quarks.

    PubMed

    Pons, J A; Steiner, A W; Prakash, M; Lattimer, J M

    2001-06-01

    Neutrino fluxes from proto-neutron stars with and without quarks are studied. Observable differences become apparent after 10-20 s of evolution. Sufficiently massive stars containing negatively charged, strongly interacting, particles collapse to black holes during the first minute of evolution. Since the neutrino flux vanishes when a black hole forms, this is the most obvious signal that quarks (or other types of strange matter) have appeared. The metastability time scales for stars with quarks are intermediate between those containing hyperons and kaon condensates.

  2. Gamma-burst emission from neutron-star accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.; Petschek, A. G.; Sarracino, R.

    1983-01-01

    A model for emission of the hard photons of gamma bursts is presented. The model assumes accretion at nearly the Eddington limited rate onto a neutron star without a magnetic field. Initially soft photons are heated as they are compressed between the accreting matter and the star. A large electric field due to relatively small charge separation is required to drag electrons into the star with the nuclei against the flux of photons leaking out through the accreting matter. The photon number is not increased substantially by Bremsstrahlung or any other process. It is suggested that instability in an accretion disc might provide the infalling matter required.

  3. Spin observables in neutron-proton elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmidouch, A.; Arnold, J.; van den Brandt, B.; Daum, M.; Demierre, P.; Drevenak, R.; Finger, M. |; Finger, M. Jr.; Franz, J.; Goujon, N.; Hautle, P.; Janout, Z. Jr.; Hajdas, W.; Heer, E.; Hess, R.; Koger, R.; Konter, J.A.; Lacker, H.; Lechanoine-LeLuc, C.; Lehar, F.; Mango, S.; Mascarini, C.; Rapin, D.; Roessle, E.; Schmelzbach, P.A.; Schmitt, H.; Sereni, P.; Slunecka, M.

    1995-07-15

    We describe here two experiments presently running at PSI using the NA2 polarized neutron beam. They are devoted to the measurement of 2- and 3-spin observables in {ital np} elastic scattering for kinetic energies from 230 to 590 MeV with a center of mass angular range from 60 to 180 degrees. The goal is to determine the five {ital NN} scattering amplitudes for isospin 0 in a model independent way. Preliminary results for {ital K}{sub {ital OSKO}} and {ital K}{sub {ital OSSO}} spin-transfers are presented.

  4. Superfluid instability of r-modes in ``differentially rotating'' neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Hogg, M.

    2013-03-01

    Superfluid hydrodynamics affects the spin evolution of mature neutron stars and may be key to explaining timing irregularities such as pulsar glitches. However, most models for this phenomenon exclude the global instability required to trigger the event. In this paper we discuss a mechanism that may fill this gap. We establish that small scale inertial r-modes become unstable in a superfluid neutron star that exhibits a rotational lag expected to build up due to vortex pinning as the star spins down. Somewhat counterintuitively, this instability arises due to the (under normal circumstances dissipative) vortex-mediated mutual friction. We explore the nature of the superfluid instability for a simple incompressible model allowing for entrainment coupling between the two fluid components. Our results recover a previously discussed dynamical instability in systems where the two components are strongly coupled. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that the system is secularly unstable (with a growth time that scales with the mutual friction) throughout much of parameter space. Interestingly, large scale r-modes are also affected by this new aspect of the instability. We analyze the damping effect of shear viscosity, which should be particularly efficient at small scales, arguing that it will not be sufficient to completely suppress the instability in astrophysical systems.

  5. Further stable neutron star models from f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Capozziello, Salvatore; Odintsov, Sergei D. E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it

    2013-12-01

    Neutron star models in perturbative f(R) gravity are considered with realistic equations of state. In particular, we consider the FPS, SLy and other equations of state and a case of piecewise equation of state for stars with quark cores. The mass-radius relations for f(R) = R+R(e{sup −R/R{sub 0}}−1) model and for R{sup 2} models with logarithmic and cubic corrections are obtained. In the case of R{sup 2} gravity with cubic corrections, we obtain that at high central densities (ρ > 10ρ{sub ns}, where ρ{sub ns} = 2.7 × 10{sup 14} g/cm{sup 3} is the nuclear saturation density), stable star configurations exist. The minimal radius of such stars is close to 9 km with maximal mass ∼ 1.9M{sub ⊙} (SLy equation). A similar situation takes place for AP4 and BSK20 EoS. Such an effect can give rise to more compact stars than in General Relativity. If observationally identified, such objects could constitute a formidable signature for modified gravity at astrophysical level. Another interesting result can be achieved in modified gravity with only a cubic correction. For some EoS, the upper limit of neutron star mass increases and therefore these EoS can describe realistic star configurations (although, in General Relativity, these EoS are excluded by observational constraints)

  6. Testing general metric theories of gravity with bursting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2008-03-01

    I show that several observable properties of bursting neutron stars in metric theories of gravity can be calculated using only conservation laws, Killing symmetries, and the Einstein equivalence principle, without requiring the validity of the general relativistic field equations. I calculate, in particular, the gravitational redshift of a surface atomic line, the touchdown luminosity of a radius-expansion burst, which is believed to be equal to the Eddington critical luminosity, and the apparent surface area of a neutron star as measured during the cooling tails of bursts. I show that, for a general metric theory of gravity, the apparent surface area of a neutron star depends on the coordinate radius of the stellar surface and on its gravitational redshift in the exact same way as in general relativity. On the other hand, the Eddington critical luminosity depends also on an additional parameter that measures the degree to which the general relativistic field equations are satisfied. These results can be used in conjunction with current and future high-energy observations of bursting neutron stars to test general relativity in the strong-field regime.

  7. Very massive neutron stars in Ni's theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that in Ni's theory of gravity, which is identical to general relativity in the post-Newtonian limit, neutron stars of arbitrarily large mass are possible. This result is independent, within reasonable bounds, of the equation of state of matter at supernuclear densities.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Non-Accreting Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Kelsey L.; Heyl, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of a neutron star crust, such as breaking strain and shear modulus, have implications for the detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star as well as bursts from Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs). These properties are calculated here for three different crustal compositions for a non-accreting neutron star that results from three different cooling histories, as well as for a pure iron crust. A simple shear is simulated using molecular dynamics to the crustal compositions by deforming the simulation box. The breaking strain and shear modulus are found to be similar in the four cases, with a breaking strain of ˜0.1 and a shear modulus of ˜1030 dyne cm-2 at a density of ρ = 1014g cm-3 for simulations with an initially perfect BCC lattice. With these crustal properties and the observed properties of PSR J2124-3358 the predicted strain amplitude of gravitational waves for a maximally deformed crust is found to be greater than the observational upper limits from LIGO. This suggests that the neutron star crust in this case may not be maximally deformed or it may not have a perfect BCC lattice structure. The implications of the calculated crustal properties of bursts from SGRs are also explored. The mechanical properties found for a perfect BCC lattice structure find that crustal events alone can not be ruled out for triggering the energy in SGR bursts.

  9. Mechanical properties of non-accreting neutron star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Kelsey; Heyl, Jeremy

    2012-11-01

    The mechanical properties of a neutron star crust, such as breaking strain and shear modulus, have implications for the detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star as well as bursts from soft Gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs). These properties are calculated here for three different crustal compositions for a non-accreting neutron star that results from three different cooling histories, as well as for a pure iron crust. A simple shear is simulated using molecular dynamics to the crustal compositions by deforming the simulation box. The breaking strain and shear modulus are found to be similar in the four cases, with a breaking strain of ˜0.1 and a shear modulus of ˜1030 dyne cm-2 at a density of ρ = 1014 g cm-3 for simulations with an initially perfect body-centred cubic (BCC) lattice. With these crustal properties and the observed properties of PSR J2124-3358, the predicted strain amplitude of gravitational waves for a maximally deformed crust is found to be greater than the observational upper limits from LIGO. This suggests that the neutron star crust in this case may not be maximally deformed or it may not have a perfect BCC lattice structure. The implications of the calculated crustal properties of bursts from SGRs are also explored. The mechanical properties found for a perfect BCC lattice structure find that crustal events alone cannot be ruled out for triggering the energy in SGR bursts.

  10. Isolated neutron stars and studies of their interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.

    2012-12-01

    In these lectures presented at Baikal summer school on physics of elementary particles and astrophysics 2011, I present a wide view of neutron star astrophysics with special attention paid to young isolated compact objects and studies of the properties of their interiors using astronomical methods.

  11. Testing general metric theories of gravity with bursting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2008-03-15

    I show that several observable properties of bursting neutron stars in metric theories of gravity can be calculated using only conservation laws, Killing symmetries, and the Einstein equivalence principle, without requiring the validity of the general relativistic field equations. I calculate, in particular, the gravitational redshift of a surface atomic line, the touchdown luminosity of a radius-expansion burst, which is believed to be equal to the Eddington critical luminosity, and the apparent surface area of a neutron star as measured during the cooling tails of bursts. I show that, for a general metric theory of gravity, the apparent surface area of a neutron star depends on the coordinate radius of the stellar surface and on its gravitational redshift in the exact same way as in general relativity. On the other hand, the Eddington critical luminosity depends also on an additional parameter that measures the degree to which the general relativistic field equations are satisfied. These results can be used in conjunction with current and future high-energy observations of bursting neutron stars to test general relativity in the strong-field regime.

  12. Post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds and neutron-capture processes in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, M.; Campbell, S. W.; Van Winckel, H.; De Smedt, K.; Karakas, A. I.; Käppeler, F.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: We explore modifications to the current scenario for the slow neutron-capture process (the s-process) in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to account for the Pb deficiency observed in post-AGB stars of low metallicity ([Fe/H] ≃-1.2) and low initial mass (≃ 1-1.5 M⊙) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Methods: We calculated the stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis for a 1.3 M⊙ star with [Fe/H] = -1.3 and tested different amounts and distributions of protons leading to the production of the main neutron source within the 13C-pocket and proton ingestion scenarios. Results: No s-process models can fully reproduce the abundance patterns observed in the post-AGB stars. When the Pb production is lowered, the abundances of the elements between Eu and Pb, such as Er, Yb, W, and Hf, are also lowered to below those observed. Conclusions: Neutron-capture processes with neutron densities intermediate between the s and the rapid neutron-capture processes may provide a solution to this problem and be a common occurrence in low-mass, low-metallicity AGB stars.

  13. Measuring surface temperature of isolated neutron stars and related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teter, Marcus Alton

    New and exciting results for measuring neutron star surface temperatures began with the successful launch of the Chandra X-ray observatory. Among these results are new detections of neutron star surface temperatures which have made it possible to seriously test neutron star thermal evolution theories. The important new temperature determination of the Vela pulsar (Pavlov, et al., 2001a) requires a non-standard cooling scenario to explain it. Apart from this result, we have measured PSR B1055-52's surface temperature in this thesis, determining that it can be explained by standard cooling with heating. Our spectral fit of the combined data from ROSAT and Chandra have shown that a three component model, two thermal blackbodies and an non-thermal power-law, is required to explain the data. Furthermore, our phase resolved spectroscopy has begun to shed light on the geometry of the hot spot on PSR B1055-52's surface as well as the structure of the magnetospheric radiation. Also, there is strong evidence for a thermal distribution over its surface. Most importantly, the fact that PSR B1055-52 does not have a hydrogen atmosphere has been firmly established. To reconcile these two key observations, on the Vela pulsar and PSR B1055-52, we tested neutron star cooling with neutrino processes including the Cooper pair neutrino emission process. Overall, it has been found that a phase change associated with pions being present in the cores of more massive neutron stars explains all current of the data. A transition from neutron matter to pion condensates in the central stellar core explains the difference between standard and non-standard cooling scenarios, because the superfluid suppression of pion cooling will reduce the emissivity of the pion direct URCA process substantially. A neutron star with a mass of [Special characters omitted.] with a medium stiffness equation of state and a T72 type neutron superfluid models the standard cooling case well. A neutron star of [Special

  14. Entrainment parameters in a cold superfluid neutron star core

    SciTech Connect

    Chamel, Nicolas; Haensel, Pawel

    2006-04-15

    Hydrodynamic simulations of neutron star cores that are based on a two-fluid description in terms of a neutron-proton superfluid mixture require the knowledge of the Andreev-Bashkin entrainment matrix which relates the momentum of one constituent to the currents of both constituents. This matrix is derived for arbitrary nuclear asymmetry at zero temperature and in the limits of small relative currents in the framework of the energy density functional theory. The Skyrme energy density functional is considered as a particular case. General analytic formulas for the entrainment parameters and various corresponding effective masses are obtained. These formulas are applied to the liquid core of a neutron star composed of homogeneous plasma of nucleons, electrons, and possibly muons in {beta} equilibrium.

  15. Outflows from neutron star merger remnant disks: nucleosynthesis and kilonovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Foucart, Francois; Metzger, Brian; Kasen, Daniel; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-03-01

    The accretion disk formed in a neutron star merger can drive powerful winds on timescales of 100ms to seconds after coalescence. The wind material is more strongly irradiated by neutrinos than the dynamical ejecta, and hence has a less neutron-rich composition, with implications for r-process element synthesis and the radioactively-powered kilonova transient. This talk will present preliminary results from projects aimed at quantifying (1) the nucleosynthesis yield from disks around hypermassive neutron stars, (2) the effect of MHD turbulence on mass ejection when a black hole sits at the center, and (3) the interaction between disk wind and dynamical ejecta when the relative masses of these components vary.

  16. Spin Currents Carried by Spinons in XXZ Spin Chains: Signatures in Polarized Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Leonard Patrick; Braun, Hans-Benjamin; Kulda, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Quantum spin chains serve as a paradigm for exploring truly quantum phenomena, with spinons being the elementary excitations. Motivated by compounds such as CsCoBr3 and CsCoCl3, we focus on the Ising-like antiferromagnetic Heisenberg XXZ model (spin-1/2). Here we present theoretical results for the total inelastic scattering cross section of spin-polarized neutrons in the presence of an external magnetic field, which is applied transverse to the Ising direction. In particular, we identify the spin current associated with spinons and their corresponding signatures in the neutron scattering cross section. The presence of a transverse magnetic field no longer allows for reliance on Stotz as a conserved quantity, which has traditionally been assumed in this context. As a striking consequence, we find that the spinons carry a non-vanishing spin current, even in the limit of infinitesimal fields. Our results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental neutron scattering data on CsCoBr3.

  17. Neutron Stars with Delta-Resonances in the Walecka and Zimanyi-Moszkowski Models

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, C. T.; Oliveira, J. C. T.; Duarte, S. B.

    2010-11-12

    In the present work we have obtained the equation of state of the highly asymmetric dense stellar matter focusing on the delta resonance formation. We extended the nonlinear Walecka (NLW) and Zimanyi-Moszkowski (ZM) models to accommodate in the context of the relativistic mean field approximation the Rarita-Schwinger field for the spin 3/2 resonances. With the constructed stellar matter equations of state we solve numerically the TOV equation (Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff) in order to determine the internal structure of neutron stars, and discuss the obtained masses versus radii diagram.

  18. General-relativistic simulations of binary black hole-neutron stars: Precursor electromagnetic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2013-07-01

    We perform the first general relativistic force-free simulations of neutron star magnetospheres in orbit about spinning and nonspinning black holes. We find promising precursor electromagnetic emission: typical Poynting luminosities at, e.g., an orbital separation of r=6.6RNS are LEM˜6×1042(BNS,p/1013G)2(MNS/1.4M⊙)2erg/s. The Poynting flux peaks within a broad beam of ˜40° in the azimuthal direction and within ˜60° from the orbital plane, establishing a possible lighthouse effect. Our calculations, though preliminary, preview more detailed simulations of these systems that we plan to perform in the future.

  19. Gravitational waves from relativistic neutron-star mergers with microphysical equations of state.

    PubMed

    Oechslin, R; Janka, H-T

    2007-09-21

    The gravitational wave (GW) emission from a set of relativistic neutron-star (NS) merger simulations is analyzed and characteristic signal features are identified. The distinct peak in the GW energy spectrum that is associated with the formation of a hypermassive merger remnant has a frequency that depends strongly on the properties of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) and on the total mass of the binary system, whereas the mass ratio and the NS spins have a weak influence. If the total mass can be determined from the inspiral chirp signal, the peak frequency of the post-merger signal is a sensitive indicator of the EOS.

  20. Ancient Guest Stars as harbingers of neutron star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Ru

    The well-known AD 1006, 1054, 1572, and 1604 were described as "Guest Stars" by Chinese, Japanese and Korean. In most cases, it might thus be possible to expect a Guest Star to be a term for supernova or nova. There are a lot of records concerning ancient Guest Stars in Chinese historical books. Two catalogues were compiled by Xi (1955) and Xi and Bo (1965, 1966) that listed 90 probable novae or supernovae observed between 1400 BC and AD 1700. Clark and Stephenson (1977), Ho (1962) and Kanda (1935) collected more or less similar records. Among all the historical records more than 80% are from China. The discussion presented in this paper is based on them.

  1. Hyperon puzzle, hadron-quark crossover and massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars are studied on the basis of the hadron-quark crossover picture where a smooth transition from the hadronic phase to the quark phase takes place at finite baryon density. By using a phenomenological equation of state (EOS) "CRover", which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0, it is found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M_{odot} can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition. The radii of the cold NSs with the CRover EOS are in the narrow range (12.5 ± 0.5) km which is insensitive to the NS masses. Due to the stiffening of the EOS induced by the hadron-quark crossover, the central density of the NSs is at most 4 ρ0 and the hyperon-mixing barely occurs inside the NS core. This constitutes a solution of the long-standing hyperon puzzle. The effect of color superconductivity (CSC) on the NS structures is also examined with the hadron-quark crossover. For the typical strength of the diquark attraction, a slight softening of the EOS due to two-flavor CSC (2SC) takes place and the maximum mass is reduced by about 0.2M_{odot}. The CRover EOS is generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition. The gravitational energy release and the spin-up rate during the contraction from the hot NS to the cold NS are also estimated.

  2. Light dark matter scattering in outer neutron star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermeño, Marina; Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We calculate for the first time the phonon excitation rate in the outer crust of a neutron star due to scattering from light dark matter (LDM) particles gravitationally boosted into the star. We consider dark matter particles in the sub-GeV mass range scattering off a periodic array of nuclei through an effective scalar-vector interaction with nucleons. We find that LDM effects cause a modification of the net number of phonons in the lattice as compared to the standard thermal result. In addition, we estimate the contribution of LDM to the ion-ion thermal conductivity in the outer crust and find that it can be significantly enhanced at large densities. Our results imply that for magnetized neutron stars the LDM-enhanced global conductivity in the outer crust will tend to reduce the anisotropic heat conduction between perpendicular and parallel directions to the magnetic field.

  3. Prompt merger collapse and the maximum mass of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Bauswein, A; Baumgarte, T W; Janka, H-T

    2013-09-27

    We perform hydrodynamical simulations of neutron-star mergers for a large sample of temperature-dependent nuclear equations of state and determine the threshold mass above which the merger remnant promptly collapses to form a black hole. We find that, depending on the equation of state, the threshold mass is larger than the maximum mass of a nonrotating star in isolation by between 30 and 70 percent. Our simulations also show that the ratio between the threshold mass and maximum mass is tightly correlated with the compactness of the nonrotating maximum-mass configuration. We speculate on how this relation can be used to derive constraints on neutron-star properties from future observations.

  4. A Theoretical Analysis of Thermal Radiation from Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, James H.

    1993-01-01

    As soon as it was realized that the direct URCA process is allowed by many modern nuclear equation of state, an analysis of its effect on the cooling of neutron stars was undertaken. A primary study showed that the occurrence of the direct URCA process makes the surface temperature of a neutron star suddenly drop by almost an order of magnitude when the cold wave from the core reaches the surface when the star is a few years old. The results of this study are published in Page and Applegate. As a work in progress, we are presently extending the above work. Improved expressions for the effect of nucleon pairing on the neutrino emissivity and specific heat are now available, and we have incorporated them in a recalculation of rate of the direct URCA process.

  5. QPO observations related to neutron star equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlik, Zdenek; Urbanec, Martin; Török, Gabriel; Bakala, Pavel; Cermak, Petr

    We apply a genetic algorithm method for selection of neutron star models relating them to the resonant models of the twin peak quasiperiodic oscillations observed in the X-ray neutron star binary systems. It was suggested that pairs of kilo-hertz peaks in the X-ray Fourier power density spectra of some neutron stars reflect a non-linear resonance between two modes of accretion disk oscillations. We investigate this concept for a specific neutron star source. Each neutron star model is characterized by the equation of state (EOS), rotation frequency Ω and central energy density ρc . These determine the spacetime structure governing geodesic motion and position dependent radial and vertical epicyclic oscillations related to the stable circular geodesics. Particular kinds of resonances (KR) between the oscillations with epicyclic frequencies, or the frequencies derived from them, can take place at special positions assigned ambiguously to the spacetime structure. The pairs of resonant eigenfrequencies relevant to those positions are therefore fully given by KR,ρc , Ω, EOS and can be compared to the observationally determined pairs of eigenfrequencies in order to eliminate the unsatisfactory sets (KR,ρc , Ω, EOS). For the elimination we use the advanced genetic algorithm. Genetic algorithm comes out from the method of natural selection when subjects with the best adaptation to assigned conditions have most chances to survive. The chosen genetic algorithm with sexual reproduction contains one chromosome with restricted lifetime, uniform crossing and genes of type 3/3/5. For encryption of physical description (KR,ρ, Ω, EOS) into chromosome we used Gray code. As a fitness function we use correspondence between the observed and calculated pairs of eigenfrequencies.

  6. Neutron star equation of state and QPO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanec, Martin; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Török, Gabriel; Bakala, Pavel; Čermák, Petr

    2007-12-01

    Assuming a resonant origin of the twin peak quasiperiodic oscillations observed in the X-ray neutron star binary systems, we apply a genetic algorithm method for selection of neutron star models. It was suggested that pairs of kilohertz peaks in the X-ray Fourier power density spectra of some neutron stars reflect a non-linear resonance between two modes of accretion disk oscillations. We investigate this concept for a specific neutron star source. Each neutron star model is characterized by the equation of state (EOS), rotation frequency Ω and central energy density rho_{c}. These determine the spacetime structure governing geodesic motion and position dependent radial and vertical epicyclic oscillations related to the stable circular geodesics. Particular kinds of resonances (KR) between the oscillations with epicyclic frequencies, or the frequencies derived from them, can take place at special positions assigned ambiguously to the spacetime structure. The pairs of resonant eigenfrequencies relevant to those positions are therefore fully given by KR, rho_{c}, Ω, EOS and can be compared to the observationally determined pairs of eigenfrequencies in order to eliminate the unsatisfactory sets (KR, rho_{c}, Ω, EOS). For the elimination we use the advanced genetic algorithm. Genetic algorithm comes out from the method of natural selection when subjects with the best adaptation to assigned conditions have most chances to survive. The chosen genetic algorithm with sexual reproduction contains one chromosome with restricted lifetime, uniform crossing and genes of type 3/3/5. For encryption of physical description (KR, rho_{c}, Ω, EOS) into the chromosome we use the Gray code. As a fitness function we use correspondence between the observed and calculated pairs of eigenfrequencies.

  7. First Search for Gravitational Waves from the Youngest Known Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Atkinson, D. E.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Behnke, B.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Boyle, M.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Costa, C. A.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Daudert, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, M.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J.-C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Finn, L. S.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Garofoli, J. A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Graef, C.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Li, J.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mak, C.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Miller, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mossavi, K.; MowLowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Pareja, M.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Pickenpack, M.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Radke, T.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Röver, C.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vallisneri, M.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P. P.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    We present a search for periodic gravitational waves from the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. The search coherently analyzes data in a 12 day interval taken from the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory. It searches gravitational-wave frequencies from 100 to 300 Hz and covers a wide range of first and second frequency derivatives appropriate for the age of the remnant and for different spin-down mechanisms. No gravitational-wave signal was detected. Within the range of search frequencies, we set 95% confidence upper limits of (0.7-1.2) × 10-24 on the intrinsic gravitational-wave strain, (0.4-4) × 10-4 on the equatorial ellipticity of the neutron star, and 0.005-0.14 on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations of the neutron star. These direct upper limits beat indirect limits derived from energy conservation and enter the range of theoretical predictions involving crystalline exotic matter or runaway r-modes. This paper is also the first gravitational-wave search to present upper limits on the r-mode amplitude.

  8. The shear modulus of the neutron star crust and nonradial oscillations of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.; Van Horn, H. M.; Ogata, S.; Iyetomi, H.; Ichimaru, S.

    1991-01-01

    Shear moduli are calculated for bcc crystalline and rapidly quenched Coulomb solids produced by the Monte Carlo simulation method. The shear moduli are calculated up to the transition temperature and include the effects of thermal fluctuations. An effective shear modulus appropriate to an approximate 'isotropic' body is introduced. It is found that the values of the 'average shear modulus' for the quenched solids remain about the same as those for the corresponding bcc crystals, although the individual shear moduli of the former, disordered solids deviate considerably from the cubic symmetry of the latter. These results are applied to analyses of neutron star oscillations. It is found that the periods of the two interfacial modes are increased by about 10 percent compared to previous results, and that s-mode periods are increased by about 30 percent. The periods of the f and p modes are hardly affected at all. The surface g-mode periods are not greatly affected, while the t-mode periods are increased by 20-25 percent.

  9. Stochastic Background from Coalescences of Neutron Star-Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regimbau, T.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.

    2006-05-01

    In this work, numerical simulations were used to investigate the gravitational stochastic background produced by coalescences of double neutron star systems occurring up to z~5. The cosmic coalescence rate was derived from Monte Carlo methods using the probability distributions for massive binaries to form and for a coalescence to occur in a given redshift. A truly continuous background is produced by events located only beyond the critical redshift z*=0.23. Events occurring in the redshift interval 0.027

  10. Quark matter nucleation in neutron stars and astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, Ignazio; Logoteta, Domenico; Vidaña, Isaac; Providência, Constança

    2016-03-01

    A phase of strong interacting matter with deconfined quarks is expected in the core of massive neutron stars. We investigate the quark deconfinement phase transition in cold (T=0 and hot β -stable hadronic matter. Assuming a first order phase transition, we calculate and compare the nucleation rate and the nucleation time due to quantum and thermal nucleation mechanisms. We show that above a threshold value of the central pressure a pure hadronic star (HS) (i.e. a compact star with no fraction of deconfined quark matter) is metastable to the conversion to a quark star (QS) (i.e. a hybrid star or a strange star). This process liberates an enormous amount of energy, of the order of 1053erg, which causes a powerful neutrino burst, likely accompanied by intense gravitational waves emission, and possibly by a second delayed (with respect to the supernova explosion forming the HS) explosion which could be the energy source of a powerful gamma-ray burst (GRB). This stellar conversion process populates the QS branch of compact stars, thus one has in the Universe two coexisting families of compact stars: pure hadronic stars and quark stars. We introduce the concept of critical mass M_{cr} for cold HSs and proto-hadronic stars (PHSs), and the concept of limiting conversion temperature for PHSs. We show that PHSs with a mass M < M_{cr} could survive the early stages of their evolution without decaying to QSs. Finally, we discuss the possible evolutionary paths of proto-hadronic stars.

  11. Swift J045106.8-694803: A Highly Magnetised Neutron Star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klus, H.; Bartlett, E. S.; Bird, A. J.; Coe, M.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Udalski, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the analysis of a highly magnetised neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The high mass X-ray binary pulsar Swift J045106.8-694803 has been observed with Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) in 2008, The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 2011 and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission - Newton (XMM-Newton) in 2012. The change in spin period over these four years indicates a spin-up rate of 5.010.06 s/yr, amongst the highest observed for an accreting pulsar. This spin-up rate can be accounted for using Ghosh and Lambs (1979) accretion theory assuming it has a magnetic field of (1.2 +/= 0.20/0.7) x 10(exp 14) Gauss. This is over the quantum critical field value. There are very few accreting pulsars with such high surface magnetic fields and this is the first of which to be discovered in the LMC. The large spin-up rate is consistent with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations which show that Swift J045106.8-694803 has had a consistently high X-ray luminosity for at least five years. Optical spectra have been used to classify the optical counterpart of Swift J045106.8-694803 as a B0-1 III-V star and a possible orbital period of 21.631 +/- 0.005 days has been found from MACHO optical photometry.

  12. Measuring neutron star masses and radii using NICER observations of X-ray oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-04-01

    Precise and reliable simultaneous measurements of the mass and radius of several neutron stars with different masses would provide valuable guidance for improving models of the properties of cold dense matter. The prime scientific goal of the Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is to make such measurements by fitting energy-dependent waveform models to the thermal X-ray oscillations observed from rotation-powered millisecond pulsars. These oscillations are thought to be produced as hotter regions of the stellar surface near one or both of the star’s magnetic poles rotate around the star at the star's spin frequency. We first discuss the phenomenology and modeling of these oscillations. We then present the results of parameter estimation studies using synthetic waveform data and Bayesian statistical methods. The synthetic and model waveforms used in this study were computed using the X-ray spectra and radiation beaming patterns given by models of the cool hydrogen atmospheres that NICER is expected to observe. Finally, we discuss the causes and expected sizes of the uncertainties in radius and mass estimates that will be made by NICER using this method.

  13. Chandra Reveals a Compact Nebula Created by a Shooting Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    In one of its most bizarre images yet, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the details of a compact nebula that resembles a gigantic cosmic crossbow. The nebula, located in the Vela supernova remnant, is created as a rapidly rotating neutron star, or pulsar, spins out rings and jets of high-energy particles while shooting through space. "What is fascinating is that the jets from the pulsar are directed exactly along the direction of the pulsar's motion," said Dr. George Pavlov of Penn State University, University Park today at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, New York. "The southern jet looks like a rocket exhaust!" The X-ray jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and an inner ring is seen for the first time. This ring is thought to represent a shock wave due to matter rushing away from the neutron star. More focused flows at the neutron star's polar regions produce jets of particles that blast away at near the speed of light. Pavlov explained that shortly after the star exploded, jets with unequal thrust along the poles of the neutron star could have accelerated it like a rocket. The neutron star is enveloped in a cloud of high-energy particles emitting X rays as they spiral around magnetic field lines. This cloud, or nebula, is embedded in a much larger cloud produced by the supernova and has a swept-back, cometary shape because of its motion through the larger cloud. The dramatic bow-like structure at the leading edge of the nebula is perpendicular to the jets and has the appearance of a cosmic crossbow with the jets as the arrows. This bow and the smaller one inside it, are thought to be the near edges of tilted rings of X-ray emission from high-energy particles produced by the central neutron star. The neutron star-ring-jet system, which resulted from an explosion in the constellation Vela ten thousand or more years ago, is similar to the remarkable structure observed by Chandra in the Crab Nebula

  14. A new class of g-modes in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisenegger, Andreas; Goldreich, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Because a neutron star is born hot, its internal composition is close to chemical equilibrium. In the fluid core, this implies that the ratio of the number densities of charged particles (protons and electrons) to neutrons is an increasing function of the mass density. This composition gradient stably stratifies the matter giving rise to a Brunt-Vaisala frequency N of about 500/s. Consequently, a neutron star core provides a cavity that supports gravity modes (g-modes). These g-modes are distinct from those previously identified with the thermal stratification of the surface layers and the chemical stratification of the crust. We compute the lowest-order, quadrupolar, g-modes for cold, Newtonian, neutron star models with M/solar M = 0.581 and M/solar M = 1.405, and show that the crustal and core g-modes have similar periods. We also discuss damping mechanisms and estimate damping rates for the core g-modes. Particular attention is paid to damping due to the emission of gravitational radiation.

  15. INVESTIGATING SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN NEUTRON STAR INTERIORS WITH GLITCH MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, B.; Pizzochero, P. M.; Seveso, S.

    2013-02-20

    The high-density interior of a neutron star is expected to contain superconducting protons and superfluid neutrons. Theoretical estimates suggest that the protons will form a type II superconductor in which the stellar magnetic field is carried by flux tubes. The strong interaction between the flux tubes and the neutron rotational vortices could lead to strong ''pinning'', i.e., vortex motion could be impeded. This has important implications especially for pulsar glitch models as it would lead to a large part of the vorticity of the star being decoupled from the ''normal'' component to which the electromagnetic emission is locked. In this Letter, we explore the consequences of strong pinning in the core on the ''snowplow'' model for pulsar glitches, making use of realistic equations of state and relativistic background models for the neutron star. We find that, in general, a large fraction of the pinned vorticity in the core is not compatible with observations of giant glitches in the Vela pulsar. Thus, the conclusion is that either most of the core is in a type I superconducting state or the interaction between vortices and flux tubes is weaker than previously assumed.

  16. Molecular Dynamics of Nuclear Pasta in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Christian; da Silva Schneider, Andre

    2014-09-01

    During a core collapse supernova, a massive star undergoes rapid contraction followed by a massive explosion on the order of a hundred trillion trillion nuclear bombs in less than a second. While most matter is expelled at high speeds, what remains can form a neutron star. The bulk of a neutron star does not contain separate nuclei but is itself a single nucleus of radius ~10 km. In the crust of a neutron star, density is low enough that some matter exists as distinct nuclei arranged into crystalline lattice dominated by electromagnetic forces. Between the crust and core lies an interesting interface where matter is neither a single nucleus nor separate nuclei. It exists in a frustrated phase; competition between electromagnetic and strong nuclear forces causes exotic shapes to emerge, referred to as nuclear pasta. We use Molecular Dynamics (MD) to simulate nuclear pasta, with densities between nuclear saturation density and approximately one-tenth saturation density. Using MD particle trajectories, we compute the static structure factor S(q) and dynamical response function to describe both electron-pasta and neutrino-pasta scattering. We relate the structure and properties of nuclear pasta phases to features in S(q). Finally, one can integrate over S(q) to determine transport properties such as the electrical and thermal conductivity. This may help provide a better understanding of X-ray observations of neutron stars. During a core collapse supernova, a massive star undergoes rapid contraction followed by a massive explosion on the order of a hundred trillion trillion nuclear bombs in less than a second. While most matter is expelled at high speeds, what remains can form a neutron star. The bulk of a neutron star does not contain separate nuclei but is itself a single nucleus of radius ~10 km. In the crust of a neutron star, density is low enough that some matter exists as distinct nuclei arranged into crystalline lattice dominated by electromagnetic forces

  17. On neutron star structure and the millisecond pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The recently discovered millisecond pulsar (PSR1937-214) is observed to be rotating close to the limit of dynamical instability for a neutron star. Despite its extremely rapid rotation, measurements of the period derivative put a stringent upper limit on the energy loss from gravitational radiation, thus requiring that the quadrupole moment be quite small. The pulsar must also be rotating below the critical frequency at which its equilibrium configuration would become non-axisymmetric, since the lifetime of this configuration against decay by gravitational radiation is very short. This critical frequency, given by the theory of rotating ellipsoids, imposes a restriction on the rotation rate more severe than the break-up frequency and may be used to set a lower limit, rho 2 x 10 to the 14th power g/cu cm, on the density of the star. If the mass is 0.5 - 1.5 solar mass, several of the stiffer neutron star equations of state may be ruled out, and the radius should be less than 16 km. The condition for axisymmetry also imposes an upper limit on the rotation rate to which neutron stars may be spun up by accretion disks in binary systems, a model recently proposed for the evolution of the millisecond pulsar.

  18. Supernova Explosions and the Birth of Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Janka, H.-Thomas; Marek, Andreas; Mueller, Bernhard; Scheck, Leonhard

    2008-02-27

    We report here on recent progress in understanding the birth conditions of neutron stars and the way how supernovae explode. More sophisticated numerical models have led to the discovery of new phenomena in the supernova core, for example a generic hydrodynamic instability of the stagnant supernova shock against low-mode nonradial deformation and the excitation of gravity-wave activity in the surface and core of the nascent neutron star. Both can have supportive or decisive influence on the inauguration of the explosion, the former by improving the conditions for energy deposition by neutrino heating in the postshock gas, the latter by supplying the developing blast with a flux of acoustic power that adds to the energy transfer by neutrinos. While recent two-dimensional models suggest that the neutrino-driven mechanism may be viable for stars from {approx}8M{sub {center_dot}} to at least 15M{sub {center_dot}}, acoustic energy input has been advocated as an alternative if neutrino heating fails. Magnetohydrodynamic effects constitute another way to trigger explosions in connection with the collapse of sufficiently rapidly rotating stellar cores, perhaps linked to the birth of magnetars. The global explosion asymmetries seen in the recent simulations offer an explanation of even the highest measured kick velocities of young neutron stars.

  19. X-ray Polarisation in highly-magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turolla, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Radiation emitted in the vicinity of an isolated neutron star is expected to be intrinsically polarized because the high magnetic field (B˜10^{12}-10^{15} G) strongly affects the plasma opacity. The polarization fraction and polarization angle measured by an instrument, however, do not necessary coincide with the intrinsic ones, due to the effects of both quantum electrodynamics in the highly magnetized vacuum around the star (the vacuum polarization) and rotation of the Stokes parameters in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight induced by the non-uniform magnetic field. I'll review theoretical estimates for the polarization observables in the case of thermal surface emission from neutron stars and of the (soft) X-ray emission from magnetars, where magnetospheric reprocessing of radiation by resonant cyclotron scattering is important. The potentials of X-ray polarimetry to probe the physical conditions in neutron star sources and to test, for the first time, vacuum polarization are discussed in connection with the recently proposed polarimetric missions, like XIPE.

  20. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, Exploding Stars, Neutron Stars, and Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Since August, 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been scanning the sky, producing a full-sky image every three hours. These cosmic gamma-rays come from extreme astrophysical phenomena, many related to exploding stars (supernovae) or what these explosions leave behind: supernova remnants, neutron stars, and black holes. This talk uses sample Fermi results, plus simple demonstrations, to illustrate the exotic properties of these endpoints of stellar evolution.

  1. Single neutron star systems evolving with fallback discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertan, Unal; Caliskan, Sirin; Alpar, Mehmet Ali; Benli, Onur; Trümper, Joachim E.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the long-term evolution of the young neutron star systems, namely anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs), soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), dim isolated neutron stars (XDINs), and the so-called "high-B radio pulsars" in the frame of the fallback disk disc model. We have shown that the X-ray luminosities and the rotational properties of individual sources in these different populations can be achieved by neutron stars evolving with fallback disks and with conventional dipole magnetic fields of young neutron stars. Presence of small-scale magnetar fields in the higher multi-poles which are likely to be responsible for soft gamma bursts observed from these systems is compatible with the fallback disk model, since the rotational evolution of the star is governed by the interaction between the large-scale dipole field and the disc. The results of our model is self-consistent in that (1) the X-ray luminosity, period and period derivative of individual sources are produced simultaneously, and (2) these results are obtained with very similar set of main disk parameters for all these systems with rather different properties. Our results indicate that all known AXPs, except two sources, are in the accretion phase at present. The 6 XDINs with confirmed period and period derivatives reached their long periods in the accretion epochs in the past. At present, XDINs are evolving in the propeller phase without accretion, but they are still slowing down under effect of the disk torques. For the "high-B radio pulsars", the source properties are obtained in the phases when accretion is not allowed, which is consistent with the radio pulsar property of these sources.

  2. Hot News from NuSTAR about black hole spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Dominic

    2014-03-01

    Measurement of black hole spin has the potential to enhance our understanding in a wide variety of key astrophysical topics, including galaxy formation and the growth of supermassive black holes, supernova/GRB explosions, and relativistic jets. The best methods for measuring black hole spin currently available are anchored in X-ray spectroscopy, and ultimately rely on constraining the radius of the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO), which relates directly to spin. Although such measurements are in their relative infancy, substantial progress has been made over the last few years. NuSTAR has undertaken a major program, coordinated with XMM, Swift and Suzaku, to obtain the highest-quality broad band X-ray spectra from AGN and BH binaries to date, with the aim of obtaining spin constraints. The quality of the data not only allows us to make robust constraints, but also challenge the physical assumptions inherent in the relativistic reflection models primarily utilized for these measurements. We review the current status of this program, highlighting in particular some of the early observational results obtained. On behalf of the NuSTAR team.

  3. Conceptual design of a polarized 3He neutron spin filter for polarized neutron spectrometer POLANO at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ino, T.; Ohoyama, K.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Ohkawara, M.; Kira, H.; Hayashida, H.; Sakai, K.; Hiroi, K.; Oku, T.; Kakurai, K.; Chang, L. J.

    2016-04-01

    A 3He neutron spin filter (NSF) has been designed for a new polarized neutron chopper spectrometer called the Polarization Analysis Neutron Spectrometer with Correlation Method (POLANO) at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. It is designed to fit in a limited space on the spectrometer as an initial neutron beam polarizer and is polarized in situ by spin exchange optical pumping. This will be the first generation 3He NSF on POLANO, and a polarized neutron beam up to 100 meV with a diameter of 50 mm will be available for research on magnetism, hydrogen materials, and strongly correlated electron systems.

  4. Relativistic mean field models for finite nuclei and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Chia

    In this dissertation we have created theoretical models for finite nuclei, nuclear matter, and neutron stars within the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, and we have used these models to investigate the elusive isovector sector and related physics, in particular, the neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei, the nuclear symmetry energy, and the properties of neutron stars. To build RMF models that incorporate collective excitations in finite nuclei in addition to their ground-state properties, we have extended the non-relativistic sum rule approach to the relativistic domain. This allows an efficient estimate of giant monopole energies. Moreover, we have combined an exact shell-model-like approach with the mean-field calculation to describe pairing correlations in open-shell nuclei. All the ingredients were then put together to establish the calibration scheme. We have also extended the transformation between model parameters and pseudo data of nuclear matter within the RMF context. Performing calibration in this pseudo data space can not only facilitate the searching algorithm but also make the pseudo data genuine model predictions. This calibration scheme is also supplemented by a covariance analysis enabling us to extract the information content of a model, including theoretical uncertainties and correlation coefficients. A series of RMF models subject to the same isoscalar constraints but one differing isovector assumption were then created using this calibration scheme. By comparing their predictions of the nuclear matter equation of state to both experimental and theoretical constraints, we found that a small neutron skin of about 0.16 fm in Pb208 is favored, indicating that the symmetry energy should be soft. To obtain stronger evidence, we proceeded to examine the evolution of the isotopic chains in both oxygen and calcium. Again, it was found that the model with such small neutron skin and soft symmetry energy can best describe both isotopic

  5. Radiation of Neutron Stars Produced by Superfluid Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.

    2003-06-01

    We find a new mechanism of neutron star radiation wherein radiation is produced by the stellar interior. The main finding is that the neutron star interior is transparent for collisionless electron sound, the same way as it is transparent for neutrinos. In the presence of the magnetic field the electron sound is coupled with electromagnetic radiation; such collective excitation is known as a fast magnetosonic wave. At high densities such waves reduce to the zero sound in electron liquid, while near the stellar surface they are similar to electromagnetic waves in a medium. We find that zero sound is generated by superfluid vortices in the stellar core. Thermally excited helical vortex waves produce fast magnetosonic waves in the stellar crust that propagate toward the surface and transform into outgoing electromagnetic radiation. The magnetosonic waves are partially absorbed in a thin layer below the surface. The absorption is highly anisotropic; it is smaller for waves that in the absorbing layer propagate closer to the magnetic field direction. As a result, the vortex radiation is pulsed with the period of star rotation. The vortex radiation has the spectral index α~-0.45 and can explain nonthermal radiation of middle-aged pulsars observed in the infrared, optical, and hard X-ray bands. The radiation is produced in the star interior, rather than in the magnetosphere, which allows direct determination of the core temperature. Comparing the theory with available spectra observations, we find that the core temperature of the Vela pulsar is T~8×108 K, while the core temperature of PSR B0656+14 and Geminga exceeds 2×108 K. This is the first measurement of the temperature of a neutron star core. The temperature estimate rules out equations of state incorporating Bose condensations of pions or kaons and quark matter in these objects. The estimate also allows us to determine the critical temperature of triplet neutron superfluidity in the Vela core, Tc=(7.5+/-1.5)×109

  6. Stellar encounters involving neutron stars in globular cluster cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Encounters between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star and a 0.8 solar mass red giant (RG) and between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star (NS) and an 0.8 solar mass main-sequence (MS) star have been successfully simulated. In the case of encounters involving an RG, bound systems are produced when the separation at periastron passage R(MIN) is less than about 2.5 R(RG). At least 70 percent of these bound systems are composed of the RG core and NS forming a binary engulfed in a common envelope of what remains of the former RG envelope. Once the envelope is ejected, a tight white dwarf-NS binary remains. For MS stars, encounters with NSs will produce bound systems when R(MIN) is less than about 3.5 R(MS). Some 50 percent of these systems will be single objects with the NS engulfed in a thick disk of gas almost as massive as the original MS star. The ultimate fate of such systems is unclear.

  7. Buoyancy and g-modes in young superfluid neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passamonti, A.; Andersson, N.; Ho, W. C. G.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the local dynamics of a realistic neutron-star core, including composition gradients, superfluidity and thermal effects. The main focus is on the gravity g-modes, which are supported by composition stratification and thermal gradients. We derive the equations that govern this problem in full detail, paying particular attention to the input that needs to be provided through the equation of state and distinguishing between normal and superfluid regions. The analysis highlights a number of key issues that should be kept in mind whenever equation of state data is compiled from nuclear physics for use in neutron-star calculations. We provide explicit results for a particular stellar model and a specific nucleonic equation of state, making use of cooling simulations to show how the local wave spectrum evolves as the star ages. Our results show that the composition gradient is effectively dominated by the muons whenever they are present. When the star cools below the superfluid transition, the support for g-modes at lower densities (where there are no muons) is entirely thermal. We confirm the recent suggestion that the g-modes in this region may be unstable, but our results indicate that this instability will be weak and would only be present for a brief period of the star's life. Our analysis accounts for the presence of thermal excitations encoded in entrainment between the entropy and the superfluid component. Finally, we discuss the complete spectrum, including the normal sound waves and, in superfluid regions, the second sound.

  8. General relativistic hydrodynamics with viscosity: Contraction, catastrophic collapse, and disk formation in hypermassive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duez, Matthew D.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Stephens, Branson C.

    2004-05-01

    Viscosity and magnetic fields drive differentially rotating stars toward uniform rotation, and this process has important consequences in many astrophysical contexts. For example, merging binary neutron stars can form a “hypermassive” remnant, i.e., a differentially rotating star with a mass greater than would be possible for a uniformly rotating star. The removal of the centrifugal support provided by differential rotation can lead to delayed collapse of the remnant to a black hole, accompanied by a delayed burst of gravitational radiation. Both magnetic fields and viscosity alter the structure of differentially rotating stars on secular time scales, and tracking this evolution presents a strenuous challenge to numerical hydrodynamic codes. Here, we present the first evolutions of rapidly rotating stars with shear viscosity in full general relativity. We self-consistently include viscosity in our relativistic hydrodynamic code by solving the fully relativistic Navier-Stokes equations. We perform these calculations both in axisymmetry and in full 3+1 dimensions. In axisymmetry, the resulting reduction in computational costs allows us to follow secular evolution with high resolution over dozens of rotation periods (thousands of M). We find that viscosity operating in a hypermassive star generically leads to the formation of a compact, uniformly rotating core surrounded by a low-density disk. These uniformly rotating cores are often unstable to gravitational collapse. We follow the collapse in such cases and determine the mass and the spin of the final black hole and ambient disk. However, viscous braking of differential rotation in hypermassive neutron stars does not always lead to catastrophic collapse, especially when viscous heating is substantial. The stabilizing influences of viscous heating, which generates enhanced thermal pressure, and centrifugal support prevent collapse in some cases, at least until the star cools. In all cases studied, the rest mass

  9. Modeling the Complete Gravitational Wave Spectrum of Neutron Star Mergers.

    PubMed

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim; Nagar, Alessandro

    2015-08-28

    In the context of neutron star mergers, we study the gravitational wave spectrum of the merger remnant using numerical relativity simulations. Postmerger spectra are characterized by a main peak frequency f2 related to the particular structure and dynamics of the remnant hot hypermassive neutron star. We show that f(2) is correlated with the tidal coupling constant κ(2)^T that characterizes the binary tidal interactions during the late-inspiral merger. The relation f(2)(κ(2)^T) depends very weakly on the binary total mass, mass ratio, equation of state, and thermal effects. This observation opens up the possibility of developing a model of the gravitational spectrum of every merger unifying the late-inspiral and postmerger descriptions. PMID:26371635

  10. Electromagnetic and gravitational outputs from binary-neutron-star coalescence.

    PubMed

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Ponce, Marcelo; Liebling, Steven L; Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Motl, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    The late stage of an inspiraling neutron-star binary gives rise to strong gravitational wave emission due to its highly dynamic, strong gravity. Moreover, interactions between the stellar magnetospheres can produce considerable electromagnetic radiation. We study this scenario using fully general relativistic, resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We show that these interactions extract kinetic energy from the system, dissipate heat, and power radiative Poynting flux, as well as develop current sheets. Our results indicate that this power can (i) outshine pulsars in binaries, (ii) display a distinctive angular- and time-dependent pattern, and (iii) radiate within large opening angles. These properties suggest that some binary neutron-star mergers are ideal candidates for multimessenger astronomy.

  11. The freedom to choose neutron star magnetic field equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Lasky, Paul D.

    2016-08-01

    Our ability to interpret and glean useful information from the large body of observations of strongly magnetised neutron stars rests largely on our theoretical understanding of magnetic field equilibria. We answer the following question: is one free to arbitrarily prescribe magnetic equilibria such that fluid degrees of freedom can balance the equilibrium equations? We examine this question for various models for neutron star matter; from the simplest single-fluid barotrope to more realistic non-barotropic multifluid models with superfluid/superconducting components, muons and entropy. We do this for both axi- and non-axisymmetric equilibria, and in Newtonian gravity and general relativity. We show that, in axisymmetry, the most realistic model allows complete freedom in choosing a magnetic field equilibrium whereas non-axisymmetric equilibria are never completely arbitrary.

  12. Does SN 1987A contain a rapidly vibrating neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Q.; Chen, K.; Hamilton, T. T.; Ruderman, M.; Shaham, Jacob

    1989-01-01

    If the recently reported 0.5 ms-period pulsed optical signal from the direction of Supernova 1987A originated in a young neutron star, its interpretation as a rotational period has difficulties. The surface magnetic field would have to be much lower than expected, and the high rotation rate may rule out preferred nuclear equations of state. It is pointed out here that a remnant radial vibration of a neutron star, excited in the supernova event, may survive for several years with about the observed (gravitationally redshifted) period. Heavy ions at the low-density stellar surface, periodically shocked by the vibration, may efficiently produce narrow pulses of optical cyclotron radiation in a surface field of about a trillion gauss.

  13. Optimising gravitational wave searches for unknown isolated neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Sinead; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    All-sky searches for gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars must be highly sensitive over a large parameter space. This requirement presents a significant computational challenge. Computing power is amassed with the support of the public via the Einstein@Home project. Semi-coherent search methods seek to maximise sensitivity to signals of unknown frequency over the whole sky. Parameter space coverage in each dimension, and coherent integration time at each point in parameter space, impact the search sensitivity and the computing requirements. The optimal search design is a trade-off among these elements, with the best choice depending on the amount of LIGO data and the area in parameter space to be covered. Here I present efforts to address the multi-dimensional challenge of optimising all-sky searches for isolated neutron stars with Einstein@Home.

  14. Polarized X-rays from accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    Accreting neutron stars span a wide range in X-ray luminosity and magnetic field strength. Accretion may be wind-fed or disk-fed, and the dominant X-ray flux may originate in the disk or a magnetically confined accretion column. In all such systems X-ray polarization may arise due to Compton or Magneto-Compton scattering, and on some occasions polarization of non-thermal emission from jet-like ejection may also be detectable. Spectral and temporal behaviour of the polarized X-rays would carry information regarding the radiation process, as well as of the matter dynamics - and can assist the detection of effects such as the Lense-Thirring precession. This talk will review our current knowledge of the expected X-ray polarization from accreting neutron stars and explore the prospects of detection with upcoming polarimetry missions.

  15. Modeling the Complete Gravitational Wave Spectrum of Neutron Star Mergers.

    PubMed

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim; Nagar, Alessandro

    2015-08-28

    In the context of neutron star mergers, we study the gravitational wave spectrum of the merger remnant using numerical relativity simulations. Postmerger spectra are characterized by a main peak frequency f2 related to the particular structure and dynamics of the remnant hot hypermassive neutron star. We show that f(2) is correlated with the tidal coupling constant κ(2)^T that characterizes the binary tidal interactions during the late-inspiral merger. The relation f(2)(κ(2)^T) depends very weakly on the binary total mass, mass ratio, equation of state, and thermal effects. This observation opens up the possibility of developing a model of the gravitational spectrum of every merger unifying the late-inspiral and postmerger descriptions.

  16. X-ray spectra from convective photospheres of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavlin, V. E.; Pavlov, G. G.; Shibanov, Yu. A.; Rogers, F. J.; Iglesias, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    The preliminary results from the simulation of convective photospheres of neutron stars are presented. It is shown that in photospheres composed of light elements, convection arises at relatively low effective temperatures of between 3 x 10(exp 4) and 5 x 10(exp 4) K, whereas, in the case of iron composition, it arises at temperatures of less than or equal to 3 x 10(exp 5) K. Convection changes the depth dependence of the photosphere temperature and the shapes of the emergent spectra. It is concluded that depth should be taken into account for the correct interpretation of extreme ultraviolet/soft X-ray observations of the thermal radiation from neutron stars.

  17. General Relativistic Simulations of Magnetized Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno

    2011-04-01

    Binary neutron stars are among the most important sources of gravitational waves which are expected to be detected by the current or next generation of gravitational wave detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo, and they are also thought to be at the origin of very important astrophysical phenomena, such as short gamma-ray bursts. I will report on some recent results obtained using the fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code Whisky in simulating equal-mass binary neutron star systems during the last phases of inspiral, merger and collapse to black hole surrounded by a torus. I will in particular describe how magnetic fields can affect the gravitational wave signal emitted by these sources and their possible role in powering short gamma-ray bursts.

  18. Collapse of magnetized hypermassive neutron stars in general relativity.

    PubMed

    Duez, Matthew D; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shibata, Masaru; Stephens, Branson C

    2006-01-27

    Hypermassive neutron stars (HMNSs)--equilibrium configurations supported against collapse by rapid differential rotation--are possible transient remnants of binary neutron-star mergers. Using newly developed codes for magnetohydrodynamic simulations in dynamical spacetimes, we are able to track the evolution of a magnetized HMNS in full general relativity for the first time. We find that secular angular momentum transport due to magnetic braking and the magnetorotational instability results in the collapse of an HMNS to a rotating black hole, accompanied by a gravitational wave burst. The nascent black hole is surrounded by a hot, massive torus undergoing quasistationary accretion and a collimated magnetic field. This scenario suggests that HMNS collapse is a possible candidate for the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts.

  19. Singlet pairing gaps of neutrons and protons in hyperonic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Liu, Cheng-Zhi; Fan, Cun-Bo; Han, Xing-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Zhu, Ming-Feng; Wang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Guang-Zhou

    2015-05-01

    The 1S0 nucleonic superfluids are investigated within the relativistic mean-field model and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory in hyperonic neutron stars. The 1S0 pairing gaps of neutrons and protons are calculated based on the Reid soft-core interaction as the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we have studied the influence of degrees of freedom for hyperons on the 1S0 nucleonic pairing gap in neutron star matter. It is found that the appearance of hyperons has little impact on the baryonic density range and the size of the 1S0 neutronic pairing gap; the 1S0 protonic pairing gap also decreases slightly in this region where ρB = 0.0-0.393 fm-3. However, if baryonic density becomes greater than 0.393 fm-3, the 1S0 protonic pairing gap obviously increases. In addition, the possible range for a protonic superfluid is obviously enlarged due to the presence of hyperons. In our results, the hyperons change the 1S0 protonic pairing gap, which must change the cooling properties of neutron stars. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  20. Diversity of neutron star properties at the fixed neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Sulaksono, A.; Agrawal, B. K.

    2015-07-01

    We study the diversities in the properties of the neutron stars arising due to the different choices for the cross coupling between various mesons, which governs the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy in the extended relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. For this purpose, we obtain two different families of the extended RMF model corresponding to different nonlinear cross-coupling terms in the isovector part of the effective Lagrangian density. The lowest-order contributions for the δ mesons are also included. The different models within the same family yield wide variation in the value of neutron-skin thickness in the 208Pb nucleus. These models are employed to compute the neutron-star properties such as core-crust transition density, radius and red shift at canonical mass ( 1.4 M⊙) , tidal polarizability parameter, and threshold mass required for the enhanced cooling through the direct Urca process. Most of the neutron-star properties considered are significantly different(10-40%) for the different families of models at a smaller neutron-skin thickness (˜0.15 fm ) in the 208Pb nucleus.

  1. Electric and thermal conductivities of quenched neutron star crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogata, Shuji; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1990-01-01

    The electric and thermal conductivities in the outer crustal matter of a neutron star quenched into a solid state by cooling are estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of freezing transition for dense plasmas. The conductivities are calculated by the precise evaluation of the scattering integrals, using the procedure of Ichimaru et al. (1983) and Iyetomi and Ichimaru (1983). The results predict the conductivities lower, by a factor of about 3, than those with the single-phonon approximation.

  2. Uncovering the Properties of Young Neutron Stars and Their Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Slane, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The subject grant provides funding through the NASA LTSA program. This five-year grant involves the study of young neutron stars, particularly those in supernova remnants. In the fifth year of this program, the following studies have been undertaken in support of this effort and are discussed in this report. 1) 3C 58; 2) Chandra Survey for Compact Objects in Supernova Remnants; 3) G327.1-1.1; 4) Infrared Emission from Pulsar Wind Nebulae; and Cas A.

  3. Neutron Star Science with the X-ray Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, Feryal

    2015-10-01

    Probing the interiors and magnetic fields of neutron stars and characterizing their populations in the Galaxy is an important science goal for the next generation X-ray telescopes. I will discuss how the capabilities of the X-ray Surveyor Mission are crucial for making significant advances in these fields and how we can address the open questions with a dataset that will become available with such a mission.

  4. Impacts of Nuclear Symmetry Energy on Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, S. S.; Shen, H.

    2015-11-01

    Using the relativistic mean-field theory, we adopt two different methods, namely, the coexisting phase method and the self-consistent Thomas-Fermi approximation, to study the impacts of nuclear symmetry energy on the properties of neutron star crusts within a wide range of densities. It is found that the nuclear symmetry energy and its density slope play an important role in determining the pasta phases and the crust-core transition.

  5. On the capture of dark matter by neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Güver, Tolga; Erkoca, Arif Emre; Sarcevic, Ina; Reno, Mary Hall E-mail: aeerkoca@gmail.com E-mail: ina@physics.arizona.edu

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the number of dark matter particles that a neutron star accumulates over its lifetime as it rotates around the center of a galaxy, when the dark matter particle is a self-interacting boson but does not self-annihilate. We take into account dark matter interactions with baryonic matter and the time evolution of the dark matter sphere as it collapses within the neutron star. We show that dark matter self-interactions play an important role in the rapid accumulation of dark matter in the core of the neutron star. We consider the possibility of determining an exclusion region of the parameter space for dark matter mass and dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons as well as dark matter self-interaction cross section, based on the observation of old neutron stars. We show that for a dark matter density of 10{sup 3} GeV/cm{sup 3}and dark matter mass m{sub χ} ∼< 10 GeV, there is a potential exclusion region for dark matter interactions with nucleons that is three orders of magnitude more stringent than without self-interactions. The potential exclusion region for dark matter self-interaction cross sections is many orders of magnitude stronger than the current Bullet Cluster limit. For example, for high dark matter density regions, we find that for m{sub χ} ∼ 10 GeV when the dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons ranges from σ{sub χn} ∼ 10{sup −52} cm{sup 2} to σ{sub χn} ∼ 10{sup −57} cm{sup 2}, the dark matter self-interaction cross section limit is σ{sub χχ} ∼< 10{sup −33} cm{sup 2}, which is about ten orders of magnitude stronger than the Bullet Cluster limit.

  6. SHATTERING FLARES DURING CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, David

    2013-11-10

    We demonstrate that resonant shattering flares can occur during close passages of neutron stars in eccentric or hyperbolic encounters. We provide updated estimates for the rate of close encounters of compact objects in dense stellar environments, which we find are substantially lower than given in previous works. While such occurrences are rare, we show that shattering flares can provide a strong electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational wave bursts expected from such encounters, allowing triggered searches for these events to occur.

  7. Evolutionary Channels for the Formation of Double Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Jeff J.; Farr, W. M.; Kalogera, V.; Willems, B.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze binary population models of double-neutron stars and compare results to the accurately measured orbital periods and eccentricities of the eight known such systems in our Galaxy. In contrast to past similar studies, we especially focus on the dominant evolutionary channels (we identify three); for the first time, we use a detailed understanding of the evolutionary history of three double neutron stars as actual constraints on the population models. We find that the evolutionary constraints derived from the double pulsar are particularly tight, and less than half of the examined models survive the full set of constraints. The top-likelihood surviving models yield constraints on the key binary evolution parameters, but most interestingly reveal (1) the need for electron-capture supernovae from relatively low-mass degenerate, progenitor cores, and (2) the most likely evolutionary paths for the rest of the known double neutron stars. In particular, we find that J1913+16 likely went through a phase of Case BB mass transfer, and J1906+0746 and J1756-2251 are consistent with having been formed in electron-capture supernovae.

  8. The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer Mission of Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendreau, Keith

    2014-08-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is an X-ray astrophysics mission of opportunity (MoO) that will reveal the inner workings of neutron stars, cosmic lighthouses that embody unique gravitational, electromagnetic, and nuclear-physics environments. NICER achieves this objective by deploying a high-heritage instrument as an attached payload on a zenith-side ExPRESS Logistics Carrier (ELC) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). NICER offers order-of-magnitude improvements in time-coherent sensitivity and timing resolution beyond the capabilities of any X-ray observatory flown to date.Through a cost-sharing opportunity between the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) NICER will also demonstrate how neutron stars can serve as deep-space navigation beacons to guide humankind out of Earth orbit, to destinations throughout the Solar System and beyond.I will overview the NICER mission, discuss our experience working with the ISS, and describe the process of forging a partnership between SMD and STMD.

  9. MAGNETIC ENERGY PRODUCTION BY TURBULENCE IN BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zrake, Jonathan; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2013-06-01

    The simultaneous detection of electromagnetic and gravitational wave emission from merging neutron star binaries would greatly aid in their discovery and interpretation. By studying turbulent amplification of magnetic fields in local high-resolution simulations of neutron star merger conditions, we demonstrate that magnetar-level ({approx}> 10{sup 16} G) fields are present throughout the merger duration. We find that the small-scale turbulent dynamo converts 60% of the randomized kinetic energy into magnetic fields on a merger timescale. Since turbulent magnetic energy dissipates through reconnection events that accelerate relativistic electrons, turbulence may facilitate the conversion of orbital kinetic energy into radiation. If 10{sup -4} of the {approx}10{sup 53} erg of orbital kinetic available gets processed through reconnection and creates radiation in the 15-150 keV band, then the fluence at 200 Mpc would be 10{sup -7} erg cm{sup -2}, potentially rendering most merging neutron stars in the advanced LIGO and Virgo detection volumes detectable by Swift BAT.

  10. Dragging of inertial frames inside the rotating neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Chandrachur; Modak, Kamakshya Prasad; Bandyopadhyay, Debades E-mail: kamakshya.modak@saha.ac.in

    2014-07-20

    We derive the exact frame-dragging rate inside rotating neutron stars. This formula is applied to show that the frame-dragging rate monotonically decreases from the center to the surface of the neutron star along the pole. In the case of the frame-dragging rate along the equatorial distance, it decreases initially away from the center, becomes negligibly small well before the surface of the neutron star, rises again, and finally approaches to a small value at the surface. The appearance of a local maximum and minimum in this case is the result of the dependence of frame-dragging frequency on the distance and angle. Moving from the equator to the pole, it is observed that this local maximum and minimum in the frame-dragging rate along the equator disappear after crossing a critical angle. It is also noted that the positions of the local maximum and minimum of the frame-dragging rate along the equator depend on the rotation frequency and central energy density of a particular pulsar.

  11. Masses, Radii, and the Equation of State of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Freire, Paulo

    2016-09-01

    We summarize our current knowledge of neutron-star masses and radii. Recent instrumentation and computational advances have resulted in a rapid increase in the discovery rate and precise timing of radio pulsars in binaries in the past few years, leading to a large number of mass measurements. These discoveries show that the neutron-star mass distribution is much wider than previously thought, with three known pulsars now firmly in the 1.9–2.0-M⊙ mass range. For radii, large, high-quality data sets from X-ray satellites as well as significant progress in theoretical modeling led to considerable progress in the measurements, placing them in the 10–11.5-km range and shrinking their uncertainties, owing to a better understanding of the sources of systematic errors. The combination of the massive-neutron-star discoveries, the tighter radius measurements, and improved laboratory constraints of the properties of dense matter has already made a substantial impact on our understanding of the composition and bulk properties of cold nuclear matter at densities higher than that of the atomic nucleus, a major unsolved problem in modern physics.

  12. Masses, Radii, and the Equation of State of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Freire, Paulo

    2016-09-01

    We summarize our current knowledge of neutron-star masses and radii. Recent instrumentation and computational advances have resulted in a rapid increase in the discovery rate and precise timing of radio pulsars in binaries in the past few years, leading to a large number of mass measurements. These discoveries show that the neutron-star mass distribution is much wider than previously thought, with three known pulsars now firmly in the 1.9–2.0-M⊙ mass range. For radii, large, high-quality data sets from X-ray satellites as well as significant progress in theoretical modeling led to considerable progress in the measurements, placing them in the 10–11.5-km range and shrinking their uncertainties, owing to a better understanding of the sources of systematic errors. The combination of the massive-neutron-star discoveries, the tighter radius measurements, and improved laboratory constraints of the properties of dense matter has already made a substantial impact on our understanding of the composition and bulk properties of cold nuclear matter at densities higher than that of the atomic nucleus, a major unsolved problem in modern physics.

  13. UNIVERSALITY IN OSCILLATION MODES OF SUPERFLUID NEUTRON STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K. S.; Lin, L. M.; Leung, P. T.

    2009-07-10

    It has been well established that the f-mode of relativistic ordinary fluid neutron stars displays a universal scaling behavior. Here, we study whether the 'ordinary' f{sub o}- and 'superfluid' f{sub s}-modes of superfluid neutron stars also show similar universal behavior. We first consider a simple case where the neutron superfluid and normal fluid are decoupled, and with each fluid modeled by a polytropic equation of state. We find that the f{sub o}-mode obeys the same scaling laws as established for the f-mode of ordinary fluid stars. However, the oscillation frequency of the f{sub s}-mode obeys a different scaling law, which can be derived analytically from a homogenous two-fluid stellar model in Newtonian gravity. Next the coupling effect between the two fluids is studied via a parameterized model of entrainment. We find that the coupling in general breaks the universal behavior seen in the case of decoupled fluids. Based on a relativistic variational principle, an approximated expression is derived for the first-order shift of the f{sub s}-mode squared frequency due to the entrainment.

  14. Oscillations of red dwarfs in evolved low-mass binaries with neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarna, Marek J.; Lee, Umin; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate a novel aspect of a problem related to the properties of low-mass binaries (LMBs) with millisecond pulsars: the pulsations of the red dwarf (donor) companion of the neutron star (NS). The illumination of the donor star by the pulsar's high-energy nonthermal radiation and relativistic wind may substantially affect its structure. We present a quantitative analysis of the oscillation spectrum of a red dwarf which has evolved in an LMB and has undergone the stage of evaporation. We calculate the p- and g-modes for red dwarfs with masses in the interval (0.2-0.6) stellar mass. For comparison, similar calculations are presented for zero age main-sequence (ZAMS) stars of the same masses. For less massive donor stars (approximately 0.2 stellar mass) the oscillation spectrum becomes quantitatively different from that of their ZAMS counterparts. The differnce is due to the fact that a ZAMS star of 0.2 stellar mass is fully convective, while the donor star in an LMB is expected to be far from thermal equilibrium and not fully convective. As a result, in contrast to a low-mass ZAMS star, a red dwarf of the same mass in an LMB allows the existence of g-modes. We also consider tidally forced g-modes, and perform a linear analysis of these oscillations for different degrees of nonsynchronism between the orbital and spin rotation of the red dwarf component. We demonstrate the existence of a series of reasonances for the low-order g-modes which may occur in LMBs at a late stage of their evolution. We discuss the possibility that these oscillations may trigger Roche lobe overflow and sudden mass loss by the donor star. Further implications of this effect for gamma- and X-ray burst phenomena are outlined.

  15. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1-7) × 10(8) T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states. PMID:27169348

  16. Online SEOP polarization of Large Area Neutron Spin Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, Earl; Salhi, Zahir; Ioffe, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The Juelich Center for neutron Science has a program to use SEOP polarized 3He Neutron Spin Filters (3He NSF) on many neutron scattering instruments. The main applications are for polarization analysis of the scattered beam. As such, the devices must operate in close proximity to the neutron sample and sample environment which can include complicated cryostats, humidity and pressure cells, and high field magnets. Thus we have developed novel magnetic cavities to house the 3He NSF cells which allow for simultaneous optical pumping on the instruments. Further we continually develop and redevelop the laser sources which must be relatively narrow band and have long term (i.e. months) stability and robust operation. The first fully operational polarizer has been used continuously for over 2, 60-day reactor cycles at the FRM2. This device uses a 12.5 cm I.D. 3He cell, and has a 3He storage lifetime, including the cells lifetime, in excess of 200 hours with the cell about 60 cm from the sample position inside a 1.2 T electromagnet, and has achieved over 75% 3He polarisation when fully optimized. This talk will describe the magnetic cavities, and laser sources as well as provide a description of the completed 3He polarizer devices.

  17. Quark-Hadron Duality in Neutron (3He) Spin Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Solvignon, Patricia; Liyanage, Nilanga; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Aniol, Konrad; Averett, Todd; Boeglin, Werner; Camsonne, Alexandre; Cates, Gordon; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chudakov, Eugene; Craver, Brandon; Cusanno, Francesco; Deur, Alexandre; Dutta, Dipangkar; Ent, Rolf; Feuerbach, Robert; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Glashausser, Charles; Gorbenko, Viktor; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Ibrahim, Hassan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Aidan; Kelly, J.; Keppel, Cynthia; Kim, Wooyoung; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kramer, Kevin; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Ma, Bin; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; McCormick, Kathy; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Monaghan, Peter; Munoz-Camacho, Carlos; Paschke, Kent; Reitz, Bodo; Saha, Arunava; Sheyor, Ran; Singh, Jaideep; Slifer, Karl; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Wang, Kebin; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Woo, Seungtae; Yang, Jae-Choon; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-10-01

    We present experimental results of the first high-precision test of quark-hadron duality in the spin-structure function g_1 of the neutron and $^3$He using a polarized 3He target in the four-momentum-transfer-squared range from 0.7 to 4.0 (GeV/c)^2. Global duality is observed for the spin-structure function g_1 down to at least Q^2 = 1.8 (GeV/c)^2 in both targets. We have also formed the photon-nucleon asymmetry A_1 in the resonance region for 3He and found no strong Q^2-dependence above 2.2 (GeV/c)^2.

  18. Measurement of the generalized forward spin polarizabilities of the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Moskov Amarian; Leonard Auerbach; Todd Averett; J. Berthot; Pierre Bertin; William Bertozzi; Tim Black; Edward Brash; David Brown; Etienne Burtin; John Calarco; Gordon Cates; Zhengwei Chai; Jian-Ping Chen; Seonho Choi; Eugene Chudakov; Evaristo Cisbani; Cornelis de Jager; Alexandre Deur; Rachele Di Salvo; Sonja Dieterich; Pibero Djawotho; John Finn; Kevin Fissum

    2004-05-01

    The generalized forward spin polarizabilities {gamma}{sub 0} and {delta}{sub LT} of the neutron have been extracted for the first time in a Q{sup 2} range from 0.1 to 0.9 GeV{sup 2}. Since {gamma}{sub 0} is sensitive to nucleon resonances and {delta}{sub LT} is insensitive to the {Delta} resonance, it is expected that the pair of forward spin polarizabilities should provide benchmark tests of the current understanding of the chiral dynamics of QCD. The new results on {delta}{sub LT} show significant disagreement with Chiral Perturbation Theory calculations, while the data for {gamma}{sub 0} at low Q{sup 2} are in good agreement with a next-to-lead order Relativistic Baryon Chiral Perturbation theory calculation. The data show good agreement with the phenomenological MAID model.

  19. SLAC measurements of the neutron spin-structure function

    SciTech Connect

    Petratos, G.G.; E142 Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    Results from a measurement of the neutron spin-dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) over a range in x from 0.03 to 0.6 and with Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} are presented. The experiment consisted of scattering a longitudinally polarized electron beam from the Stanford Linear Accelerator off a polarized {sup 3}He target and detecting scattered electrons in two magnetic spectrometers. The results are interpreted in the quark-parton model and used to test the Bjorken sum rule.

  20. Relativistic structure, stability, and gravitational collapse of charged neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, Cristian R.

    2005-11-15

    Charged stars have the potential of becoming charged black holes or even naked singularities. We present a set of numerical solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations that represents spherical charged compact stars in hydrostatic equilibrium. The stellar models obtained are evolved forward in time integrating the Einstein-Maxwell field equations. We assume an equation of state of a neutron gas at zero temperature. The charge distribution is taken as being proportional to the rest mass density distribution. The set of solutions present an unstable branch, even with charge-to-mass ratios arbitrarily close to the extremum case. We perform a direct check of the stability of the solutions under strong perturbations and for different values of the charge-to-mass ratio. The stars that are in the stable branch oscillate and do not collapse, while models in the unstable branch collapse directly to form black holes. Stars with a charge greater than or equal to the extreme value explode. When a charged star is suddenly discharged, it does not necessarily collapse to form a black hole. A nonlinear effect that gives rise to the formation of a shell of matter (in supermassive stars), is negligible in the present simulations. The results are in agreement with the third law of black hole thermodynamics and with the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  1. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  2. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  3. Spin down of rotating compact magnetized strange stars in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    We find that in general relativity slow down of the pulsar rotation due to the magnetodipolar radiation is more faster for the strange star with comparison to that for the ordinary neutron star of the same mass. Comparison with astrophysical observations on pulsars spindown data may provide an evidence for the strange star existence and, thus, serve as a test for distinguishing it from the neutron star.

  4. Levitating atmospheres of Eddington-luminosity neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgus, Maciek; Sądowski, Aleksander; Kluźniak, Włodek; Abramowicz, Marek; Narayan, Ramesh

    2016-06-01

    We construct models of static, spherically symmetric shells supported by the radiation flux of a luminous neutron star in the Schwarzschild metric. The atmospheres are disconnected from the star and levitate above its surface. Gas pressure and density inversion appear in the inner region of these atmospheres, which is a purely relativistic phenomenon. We account for the scattering opacity dependence on temperature green by using the Klein-Nishina formula. The relativistic M1 closure scheme for the radiation tensor provides a general relativity-consistent treatment of the photon flux and radiation tensor anisotropy. In this way, we are able to address atmospheres of both large and moderate/low optical depths with the same set of equations. We discuss properties of the levitating atmospheres and find that they may indeed be optically thick, with the distance between star surface and the photosphere expanding as luminosity increases. These results may be relevant for the photosphereric radius expansion X-ray bursts.

  5. Spin-density correlations in the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory: Comparison with polarized neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, N. B.; Reser, B. I.; Paradezhenko, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    To study the spin-density correlations in the ferromagnetic metals above the Curie temperature, we relate the spin correlator and neutron scattering cross-section. In the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory, we obtain explicit expressions for the effective and local magnetic moments and spatial spin-density correlator. Our theoretical results are demonstrated by the example of bcc Fe. The effective and local moments are found in good agreement with results of polarized neutron scattering experiment over a wide temperature range. The calculated short-range order is small (up to 4 Å) and slowly decreases with temperature.

  6. HERSCHEL AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF SLOWLY ROTATING, NEARBY ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Posselt, B.; Pavlov, G. G.; Popov, S.; Wachter, S.

    2014-11-01

    Supernova fallback disks around neutron stars have been suspected to influence the evolution of the diverse neutron star populations. Slowly rotating neutron stars are the most promising places to find such disks. Searching for the cold and warm debris of old fallback disks, we carried out Herschel PACS (70 μm, 160 mu m) and Spitzer IRAC (3.6 μm, 4.5 μm) observations of eight slowly rotating (P ≈ 3-11 s) nearby (<1 kpc) isolated neutron stars. Herschel detected 160 μm emission (>5σ) at locations consistent with the positions of the neutron stars RX J0806.4-4123 and RX J2143.0+0654. No other significant infrared emission was detected from the eight neutron stars. We estimate probabilities of 63%, 33%, and 3% that, respectively, none, one, or both Herschel PACS 160 μm detections are unrelated excess sources due to background source confusion or an interstellar cirrus. If the 160 μm emission is indeed related to cold (10-22 K) dust around the neutron stars, this dust is absorbing and re-emitting ∼10% to ∼20% of the neutron stars' X-rays. Such high efficiencies would be at least three orders of magnitude larger than the efficiencies of debris disks around nondegenerate stars. While thin dusty disks around the neutron stars can be excluded as counterparts of the 160 μm emission, dusty asteroid belts constitute a viable option.

  7. A Christmas comet falling onto a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.

    The Sun and the planets are the main, but not the only, bodies of the Solar System. There are thousands of asteroids and several tens of comets, many of which are still unknown. They are the remnants of the planetesimals that formed at the origin of our Solar System, and they are rocky objects of different dimensions and irregular shape. Sometimes these minor bodies fall onto the Sun or onto planets, like Jupiter. Less dramatic events occur when the infalling bodies do not directly impact onto the target but are tidally disrupted. The tidal disruption of solar mass stars around supermassive black holes has been extensively studied analytically and numerically. In these events the star, as it approaches the black hole, develops into an elongated banana-shaped structure, the most tightly bound debris being at the closer end to the compact object. After completing an (few) eccentric orbit(s), these bound debris fall onto the black hole, emitting energy. Orbital precession may lead to the crossing of the debris orbits producing an accretion disk. Observationally, these events will give rise to luminous events with different temporal decays in different energy bands. Tidal break-up events occur also in planetary systems around normal stars but these events are too faint to be detected. Things change when the star is a compact object. Indeed planets have been discovered around radio pulsars, making likely the existence also of orbiting minor bodies. The direct impact of minor bodies onto neutron stars has been studied in the past and it has been envisaged as a possible (local) explanation for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), producing short-duration (˜ seconds) events. To explain the peculiarities of GRB 101225A (Christmas burst) we propose that it resulted from the tidal disruption event of a minor body around a neutron star in our Galaxy.

  8. Fluctuating neutron star magnetosphere: braking indices of eight pulsars, frequency second derivatives of 222 pulsars and 15 magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Z. W.; Tong, H.; Kou, F. F.; Ding, G. Q.

    2016-04-01

    Eight pulsars have low braking indices, which challenge the magnetic dipole braking of pulsars. 222 pulsars and 15 magnetars have abnormal distribution of frequency second derivatives, which also make contradiction with classical understanding. How neutron star magnetospheric activities affect these two phenomena are investigated by using the wind braking model of pulsars. It is based on the observational evidence that pulsar timing is correlated with emission and both aspects reflect the magnetospheric activities. Fluctuations are unavoidable for a physical neutron star magnetosphere. Young pulsars have meaningful braking indices, while old pulsars' and magnetars' fluctuation item dominates their frequency second derivatives. It can explain both the braking index and frequency second derivative of pulsars uniformly. The braking indices of eight pulsars are the combined effect of magnetic dipole radiation and particle wind. During the lifetime of a pulsar, its braking index will evolve from three to one. Pulsars with low braking index may put strong constraint on the particle acceleration process in the neutron star magnetosphere. The effect of pulsar death should be considered during the long term rotational evolution of pulsars. An equation like the Langevin equation for Brownian motion was derived for pulsar spin-down. The fluctuation in the neutron star magnetosphere can be either periodic or random, which result in anomalous frequency second derivative and they have similar results. The magnetospheric activities of magnetars are always stronger than those of normal pulsars.

  9. Bulk viscosity coefficients due to phonons in superfluid neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, Cristina; Tolos, Laura; Tarrús, Jaume E-mail: tarrus@ecm.ub.edu

    2013-07-01

    We calculate the three bulk viscosity coefficients as arising from the collisions among phonons in superfluid neutron stars. We use effective field theory techniques to extract the allowed phonon collisional processes, written as a function of the equation of state of the system. The solution of the dynamical evolution of the phonon number density allows us to calculate the bulk viscosity coefficients as function of the phonon collisional rate and the phonon dispersion law, which depends on the neutron pairing gap. Our method of computation is rather general, and could be used for different superfluid systems, provided they share the same underlying symmetries. We find that the behavior with temperature of the bulk viscosity coefficients is dominated by the contributions coming from the collinear regime of the 2↔3 phonon processes. For typical star radial pulsation frequencies of ω ∼ 10{sup 4}s{sup −1}, we obtain that the bulk viscosity coefficients at densities n∼>4n{sub 0} are within 10% from its static value for T∼<10{sup 9} K and for the case of strong neutron superfluidity in the core with a maximum value of the {sup 3}P{sub 2} gap above 1 MeV, while, otherwise, the static solution is not a valid approximation to the bulk viscosity coefficients. Compared to previous results from Urca and modified Urca reactions, we conclude that at T ∼ 10{sup 9}K phonon collisions give the leading contribution to the bulk viscosities in the core of the neutron stars, except for n ∼ 2n{sub 0} when the opening of the Urca processes takes place.

  10. Spin Modes, Neutrino-Induced Reactions and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio; Higashiyama, Koji

    2008-11-11

    Recent advances in shell model calculations of spin modes in nuclei with the use of new shell model Hamiltonians are discussed. Important roles of tensor interaction in shell evolutions toward drip-lines are pointed out. Electromagnetic transitions in exotic carbon isotopes are investigated. Anomalous supressions of transition strengths in the isotopes are found to be rather well explained. Neutrino-induced reactions on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni are studied, and implications on production yields of heavy elements in stars are discussed.

  11. Many-particle theory of nuclear systems with application to neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakkalakal, D. A.; Yang, C.

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported concerning energy-density relation for the normal state of neutron star matter, and the effects of superfluidity and polarization on neutron star matter. Considering constraints on variation, and the theory of quantum fluids, three methods for calculating the energy-density range are presented. The effects of polarization on neutron star structure, and polarization effects on condensation and superfluid-state energy are discussed.

  12. Constraints on neutron star models of gamma-burst sources from the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzichini, G.; Gottardi, M.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Laros, J. G.; Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1986-01-01

    Six Einstein observations of five gamma-ray burst sources are presented and discussed. With one possible exception, no point source was detected in any of the observations. The data are interpreted in the framework of neutron star models for gamma bursters. Upper limits are derived for the surface temperatures of the neutron stars assumed to be responsible for the bursts. It is shown that the lack of soft X-ray emission may impose stringent constraints on accretion rates onto neutron stars.

  13. Short-range nucleon correlations and neutrino emission by neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, Leonid; Strikman, Mark

    2008-10-13

    We argue that significant probability of protons with momenta above their Fermi surface leads for proton concentrations p/n{>=}1/8 to the enhancement of termally excited direct and modified URCA processes within a cold neutron star, and to a nonzero probability of direct URCA processes for small proton concentrations (p/n{<=}1/8). We evaluate high momentum tails of neutron, proton and electrons distributions within a neutron star. We expect also significantly faster neutrino cooling of hyperon stars.

  14. Determining the nuclear equation of state from neutron-star masses and radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindblom, Lee

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed for determining the nuclear equation of state directly from a knowledge of the masses and radii of neutron stars. This analysis assumes only that equilibrium neutron-star matter has the stress-energy tensor of an isotropic fluid with a barotropic equation of state, and that general relativity describes a neutron star's internal gravitational field. We present numerical examples which illustrate how well this method will determine the equation of state when the appropriate observational data become available.

  15. Spin-up of a rapidly rotating star by angular momentum loss - Effects of general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Gregory B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1992-01-01

    It has recently been shown that a rapidly rotating Newtonian star can spin up by radiating angular momentum. Extremely fast pulsars losing energy and angular momentum by magnetic dipole radiation or gravitational radiation may exhibit this behavior. Here, we show that this phenomenon is more widespread for rapidly rotating stars in general relativity. We construct and tabulate polytropic sequences of fully relativistic rotating stars of constant rest mass and entropy. We find that the range of adiabatic indices allowing spin-up extends somewhat above 4/3 because of the nonlinear effects of relativistic gravity. In addition, there is a new class of 'supramassive' stars which will inevitably spin up by losing angular momentum regardless of their equation of state. A supramassive star, spinning up via angular momentum loss, will ultimately evolve until it becomes unstable to catastrophic collapse to a black hole. Spin-up in a rapidly rotating star may thus be an observational precursor to such collapse.

  16. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  17. Models of Kilonova/Macronova Emission from Black Hole–Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kyohei; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Tanaka, Masaomi

    2016-07-01

    Black hole–neutron star (BH–NS) mergers are among the most promising gravitational-wave sources for ground-based detectors, and gravitational waves from BH–NS mergers are expected to be detected in the next few years. The simultaneous detection of electromagnetic counterparts with gravitational waves would provide rich information about merger events. Among the possible electromagnetic counterparts from BH–NS mergers is the so-called kilonova/macronova, emission powered by the decay of radioactive r-process nuclei, which is one of the best targets for follow-up observations. We derive fitting formulas for the mass and the velocity of ejecta from a generic BH–NS merger based on recently performed numerical-relativity simulations. We combine these fitting formulas with a new semi-analytic model for a BH–NS kilonova/macronova lightcurve, which reproduces the results of radiation-transfer simulations. Specifically, the semi-analytic model reproduces the results of each band magnitude obtained by the previous radiation-transfer simulations within ˜1 mag. By using this semi-analytic model we found that, at 400 Mpc, the kilonova/macronova is as bright as 22–24 mag for cases with a small chirp mass and a high black hole spin, and >28 mag for a large chirp mass and a low black hole spin. We also apply our model to GRB 130603B as an illustration, and show that a BH–NS merger with a rapidly spinning black hole and a large neutron star radius is favored.

  18. Models of Kilonova/Macronova Emission from Black Hole-Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kyohei; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Tanaka, Masaomi

    2016-07-01

    Black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) mergers are among the most promising gravitational-wave sources for ground-based detectors, and gravitational waves from BH-NS mergers are expected to be detected in the next few years. The simultaneous detection of electromagnetic counterparts with gravitational waves would provide rich information about merger events. Among the possible electromagnetic counterparts from BH-NS mergers is the so-called kilonova/macronova, emission powered by the decay of radioactive r-process nuclei, which is one of the best targets for follow-up observations. We derive fitting formulas for the mass and the velocity of ejecta from a generic BH-NS merger based on recently performed numerical-relativity simulations. We combine these fitting formulas with a new semi-analytic model for a BH-NS kilonova/macronova lightcurve, which reproduces the results of radiation-transfer simulations. Specifically, the semi-analytic model reproduces the results of each band magnitude obtained by the previous radiation-transfer simulations within ˜1 mag. By using this semi-analytic model we found that, at 400 Mpc, the kilonova/macronova is as bright as 22-24 mag for cases with a small chirp mass and a high black hole spin, and >28 mag for a large chirp mass and a low black hole spin. We also apply our model to GRB 130603B as an illustration, and show that a BH-NS merger with a rapidly spinning black hole and a large neutron star radius is favored.

  19. Advection of magnetic flux by accretion disks around neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Tulian, S.; Reisenegger, A.

    The aim of our research is to address why millisecond pulsars have relatively weak surface magnetic fields, of about 10^8 G, with a narrow spread. We propose that the accretion of plasma from the companion star fully screens the original neutron star field, but the accretion disk carries additional magnetic flux from the companion star, or itself can generate field by means of dynamo processes. For a strongly magnetized star, the field prevents the disk from approaching the star. The accretion is along the field lines and deposits the matter on the polar cap. Then, the accreted plasma flows, dragging with itself the magnetic field lines, from the pole to the equator (Payne & Melatos 2004). In a following stage, when the star becomes non-magnetic, because the field has been buried, the disk touches the star. We suggest that some effective mechanism of magnetic flux transport such as that proposed by Spruit & Uzdensky 2005 (or Bisnovatyi-Kogan & Lovelace 2007), operates and necessarily leads to a "strongly magnetized disk''. It becomes laminar because the magneto-rotational instability saturates (it is considered to be responsible for turbulence in the disk), and the magnetic difussivity is negligible. Then, the loss of angular momentum allowing the accretion is only caused by the magneto-centrifugal disk-wind (Blandford & Payne 1982). Meanwhile, the wind-driven transport of the magnetic flux by the disk re-magnetizes the star. This process continues until the Lorentz force due to the star's magnetic field forbids any further accretion of matter and magnetic flux, in the Ideal Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics approach. Additional of material can fall onto the star (but at lower rate) if some instability process sets in, allowing the diffusion of mass through the magnetic field lines (e.g the Interchange Instability, Spruit & Taam 1990). All these processes might lead to an asymptotic magnetic field of 10^8 G,as is inferred from observations. We are developing a self

  20. New XMM-Newton observation of the thermally emitting isolated neutron star 2XMM J104608.7-594306

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, A. M.; Motch, C.; Turolla, R.; Popov, S. B.; Schwope, A. D.; Treves, A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The isolated neutron star (INS) 2XMM J104608.7-594306 is one of the only two to be discovered through their thermal emission since the ROSAT era. Possibly a remnant of a former generation of massive stars in the Carina nebula, the exact nature of the source is unclear, and it might be unique amongst the several classes of Galactic INSs. Aims: In a first dedicated XMM-Newton observation of the source, we found intriguing evidence of a very fast spin period of P ~ 18.6 ms at the 4σ confidence level. Moreover, spectral features in absorption have also been identified. We re-observed 2XMM J104608.7-594306 with XMM-Newton to better characterise the spectral energy distribution of the source, confirm the candidate spin period, and possibly constrain the pulsar spin-down. Methods: We used the two XMM-Newton observations of 2XMM J104608.7-594306 to perform detailed timing and spectral X-ray analysis. Both the spin-down rate and the energy of the spectral features provide estimates on the neutron star magnetic field, which are crucial for investigating the evolutionary state of the neutron star. Results: Statistically acceptable spectral fits and meaningful physical parameters for the source are only obtained when the residuals at energies 0.55 keV and 1.35 keV are taken into account by the spectral modelling. While the former can result from the inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the surface of the neutron star or can be related to a local overabundance of oxygen in the Carina nebula, the one at 1.35 keV is only satisfactorily accounted for by invoking a line in absorption. In this case, the best-fit neutron star atmosphere models constrain the hydrogen column density, the effective temperature, and the luminosity of the source within NH = (2.5-3.3) × 1021 cm-2, Teff = (6-10) × 105 K, and LX = (1.1-7.4) × 1032 erg s-1. The implied distance is consistent with a location in (or in front of) the Carina nebula, and radiation radii are compatible with

  1. Dynamic neutron scattering on incoherent systems using efficient resonance spin flip techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Häussler, Wolfgang; Kredler, Lukas

    2014-05-15

    We have performed numerical ray-tracing Monte-Carlo-simulations of incoherent dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We intend to optimize the efficiency of incoherent measurements depending on the fraction of neutrons scattered without and with spin flip at the sample. In addition to conventional spin echo, we have numerically and experimentally studied oscillating intensity techniques. The results point out the advantages of these different spin echo variants and are an important prerequisite for neutron resonance spin echo instruments like RESEDA (FRM II, Munich), to choose the most efficient technique depending on the scattering vector range and the properties of the sample system under study.

  2. Development of neutron resonance spin flipper for high resolution NRSE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hino, Masahiro; Kawabata, Yuji; Hayashida, Hirotoshi; Tasaki, Seiji; Maruyama, Ryuji; Yamazaki, Dai; Ebisawa, Toru; Torikai, Naoya

    2006-11-01

    Neutron spin echo (NSE) is one of the techniques with the highest energy resolution for measurement of quasi-elastic scattering. In neutron resonance spin echo (NRSE), two separated neutron resonance spin flippers (RSFs) replace a homogeneous static magnetic field for spin precession in a conventional NSE. We have made a new type of RSF with pure aluminum wires in order to reduce the scattering from the surface. Test experiments have been performed at cold neutron beam line MINE1 at JRR-3M reactor in JAERI and the beam line CN3 at KUR The spin-flip probability was higher than 0.95 at a neutron wavelength of 0.81 nm and a RSF frequency of 100 kHz.

  3. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n} (x, Q{sup 2}) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized {sup 3}He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 {le} x {le} 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 GeV{sup 2}. The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be {integral}{sub 0.014}{sup 0.7} dx g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, 5 GeV{sup 2}) = {minus}0.036 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x {r_arrow} 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n} paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}, determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule.

  4. The Wrapping of Magnetic Field Lines due to Frame Dragging around a Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Rhameez S.; Qadir, Asghar; Momoniat, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    In this short paper we report on the results found in modeling of a relativistically rotating neutron star. The star is modeled as a rotating magnetic dipole in a static spherical mass. It is found that the radiation for these relativistically rotating stars is severely reduced due to general relativistic effects. It is also found that in the limit, as the mass of the neutron star approaches 3.2M⊙, no radiation is emitted; this essentially signifies a black hole.

  5. Prediction of Black Hole and Neutron Star Mesolensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alex; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Urama, Johnson; Pham, Dang

    2016-01-01

    Black holes and neutron stars are ideal gravitational lenses because they have large masses and dim optical magnitudes. Lensing induced by nearby stellar objects, typically within a few kpc, is known as mesolensing. We report on our study of the spatial paths of more than 200 compact objects with measured proper motions. We predict their close approaches on the sky to background stars whose positions and magnitudes have been drawn from the Hubble Source Catalog, and from the 2MASS and USNO-A catalogs. By plotting the paths of the stellar remnants many years into the future we make predictions on when detectable events will occur. The observations provide a way of measuring the masses of the neutron star/black hole lenses. We also investigate possible future lensing events that would be caused if the compact object is orbited by dark companions, including exoplanets. Mesolensing events may be caused by exoplanets even if the compact object is unlikely to produce its own event. Constraints can be derived for planet masses and orbits both in cases with event detections and in cases in which no detection is achieved.

  6. A dichotomy between the hard state spectral properties of black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. J.; Gilfanov, M.; Sunyaev, R.

    2016-10-01

    We analyse the spectra of black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) X-ray binaries (XBs) in the hard state using archival RXTE observations. We find that there is a clear dichotomy in the strength of Comptonisation between NS and BH sources, as measured by both the Compton y -parameter and amplification factor A, with distinct groups of BH and NS XBs separated at y ˜ 0.9 and A ˜ 3. The electron temperature kTe can occupy a broad range in BH systems, from kTe ˜ 30 - 200 keV, whereas for NSs kTe is peaked at ˜15 - 25 keV, but can extend to higher values. The difference between BHs and NSs in y implies that kTe is higher at a given optical depth for BH XBs. Our results also imply that for NS systems the accreting material loses ˜1/2 - 2/3 of its energy through Comptonisation in the corona. The remaining energy is released on the surface of the neutron star, making it a powerful source of soft radiation, which alters the properties of the Comptonizing corona. Finally, we find evidence at the ˜2.4σ confidence level that Comptonisation parameters may be correlated with the neutron star spin, whereas no correlation with the BH spin is found. Our results highlight a further observational distinction between BH and NS XBs that is a consequence of NSs possessing a physical surface.

  7. Lense-Thirring precession in neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Jeroen

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with low frequencies (0.01-70 Hz) have been observed in the X-ray light curves of most neutron-star and black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. Despite having been discovered more than 25 years ago, their origin is still not well understood. Similarities between the low-frequency QPOs in the two types of systems suggest that they have a common origin in the accretion flows around black holes and neutron stars. Some of the proposed models that attempt to explain low- frequency QPOs invoke a General Relativistic effect known as Lense-Thirring precession (or "frame dragging"). However, for Lense-Thirring precession to produce substantial modulations of the X-ray flux through relativistic beaming and gravitational lensing, the rotation axis of the inner part of the accretion disk needs to have a substantial tilt (10-20 degrees) with respect to the spin axis of the compact object. We argue that observational evidence for such titled inner accretion disks can be found in the variability of neutron- star low-mass X-ray binaries that are viewed at inclination angles of 60-80 degrees. In these systems low-frequency QPOs at ~0.1-15 Hz are observed that modulate the emission from the neutron star by quasi-periodic obscuration, presumably by a titled inner disc. The goal of our proposed program is to test whether the frequency evolution and spectral state dependence of these QPOs is similar to what is observed for the low-frequency QPOs that are observed in lower-inclination neutron-star X-ray binaries. To make such a comparison, we need to better characterize the properties and behavior of these QPOs. Our study will make use of almost 1300 RXTE observations of 11 sources, totaling 5.7 Ms of data. Signatures of strong gravity have long been sought after in accreting compact objects. While strong evidence from spectral features has emerged in the last decade (e.g. gravitationally broadened iron emission lines), there have only been hints of such

  8. Internal composition of proto-neutron stars under strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzon, B.; Dexheimer, V.; Schramm, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study the effects of magnetic fields and rotation on the structure and composition of proto-neutron stars. A hadronic chiral SU(3) model is applied to cold neutron stars and proto-neutron stars with trapped neutrinos and at fixed entropy per baryon. We obtain general relativistic solutions for neutron and proto-neutron stars endowed with a poloidal magnetic field by solving Einstein-Maxwell field equations in a self-consistent way. As the neutrino chemical potential decreases in value over time, this alters the chemical equilibrium and the composition inside the star, leading to a change in the structure and in the particle population of these objects. We find that the magnetic field deforms the star and significantly alters the number of trapped neutrinos in the stellar interior, together with strangeness content and temperature in each evolution stage.

  9. Thermally activated post-glitch response of the neutron star inner crust and core. I. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Bennett

    2014-07-10

    Pinning of superfluid vortices is predicted to prevail throughout much of a neutron star. Based on the idea of Alpar et al., I develop a description of the coupling between the solid and liquid components of a neutron star through thermally activated vortex slippage, and calculate the response to a spin glitch. The treatment begins with a derivation of the vortex velocity from the vorticity equations of motion. The activation energy for vortex slippage is obtained from a detailed study of the mechanics and energetics of vortex motion. I show that the 'linear creep' regime introduced by Alpar et al. and invoked in fits to post-glitch response is not realized for physically reasonable parameters, a conclusion that strongly constrains the physics of a post-glitch response through thermal activation. Moreover, a regime of 'superweak pinning', crucial to the theory of Alpar et al. and its extensions, is probably precluded by thermal fluctuations. The theory given here has a robust conclusion that can be tested by observations: for a glitch in the spin rate of magnitude Δν, pinning introduces a delay in the post-glitch response time. The delay time is t{sub d} = 7(t{sub sd}/10{sup 4} yr)((Δν/ν)/10{sup –6}) d, where t{sub sd} is the spin-down age; t{sub d} is typically weeks for the Vela pulsar and months in older pulsars, and is independent of the details of vortex pinning. Post-glitch response through thermal activation cannot occur more quickly than this timescale. Quicker components of post-glitch response, as have been observed in some pulsars, notably, the Vela pulsar, cannot be due to thermally activated vortex motion but must represent a different process, such as drag on vortices in regions where there is no pinning. I also derive the mutual friction force for a pinned superfluid at finite temperature for use in other studies of neutron star hydrodynamics.

  10. Giant pulsar glitches and the inertia of neutron star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsate, T.; Chamel, N.; Gürlebeck, N.; Fantina, A. F.; Pearson, J. M.; Ducoin, C.

    2016-07-01

    Giant pulsar frequency glitches as detected in the emblematic Vela pulsar have long been thought to be the manifestation of a neutron superfluid permeating the inner crust of a neutron star. However, this superfluid has been recently found to be entrained by the crust, and as a consequence it does not carry enough angular momentum to explain giant glitches. The extent to which pulsar-timing observations can be reconciled with the standard vortex-mediated glitch theory is studied considering the current uncertainties on dense-matter properties. To this end, the crustal moment of inertia of glitching pulsars is calculated employing a series of different unified dense-matter equations of state.

  11. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  12. A theoretical analysis of the X-ray cyclotron absorption lines of the isolated neutron star 1E1207.4-5209

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ai-fang; Liu, Dang-bo; Chen, Lei; Ding, Li; You, Jun-hang

    2006-07-01

    As revealed by recent observations, in the X-ray continuum of the radio quiet isolated neutron star 1E1207.4-5209 there exist several equidistant absorption lines, and their energies are, respectively, 0.7, 1.4 and 2.1 keV. According to the theory of quantum cyclotron radiation under the quadrupolar approximation developed in recent years, we have clarified some existing doubts and affirmed that these lines are electron cyclotron absorption lines instead of proton cyclotron lines. Besides, the spatial orientation of the spin axis of this neutron star has been theoretically determined.

  13. Relativistic outflow from two thermonuclear shell flashes on neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in't Zand, J. J. M.; Keek, L.; Cavecchi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    We study the exceptionally short (32-43 ms) precursors of two intermediate-duration thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from the neutron stars in 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549. They exhibit photon fluxes that surpass those at the Eddington limit later in the burst by factors of 2.6 to 3.1. We are able to explain both the short duration and the super-Eddington flux by mildly relativistic outflow velocities of 0.1c to 0.3c subsequent to the thermonuclear shell flashes on the neutron stars. These are the highest velocities ever measured from any thermonuclear flash. The precursor rise times are also exceptionally short: about 1 ms. This is inconsistent with predictions for nuclear flames spreading laterally as deflagrations and suggests detonations instead. This is the first time that a detonation is suggested for such a shallow ignition column depth (yign ≈ 1010 g cm-2). The detonation would possibly require a faster nuclear reaction chain, such as bypassing the α-capture on 12C with the much faster 12C(p,γ)13N(α,p)16O process previously proposed. We confirm the possibility of a detonation, albeit only in the radial direction, through the simulation of the nuclear burning with a large nuclear network and at the appropriate ignition depth, although it remains to be seen whether the Zel'dovich criterion is met. A detonation would also provide the fast flame spreading over the surface of the neutron star to allow for the short rise times. This needs to be supported by future two-dimensional calculations of flame spreading at the relevant column depth. As an alternative to the detonation scenario, we speculate on the possibility that the whole neutron star surface burns almost instantly in the auto-ignition regime. This is motivated by the presence of 150 ms precursors with 30 ms rise times in some superexpansion bursts from 4U 1820-30 at low ignition column depths of ~108 g cm-2.

  14. CONSTRAINTS ON NATAL KICKS IN GALACTIC DOUBLE NEUTRON STAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Tsing-Wai; Willems, Bart; Kalogera, Vassiliki E-mail: b-willems@northwestern.ed

    2010-10-01

    Since the discovery of the first double neutron star (DNS) system in 1975 by Hulse and Taylor, there are currently eight confirmed DNS in our galaxy. For every system, the masses of both neutron stars, the orbital semimajor axis, and eccentricity are measured, and proper motion is known for half of the systems. Using the orbital parameters and kinematic information, if available, as constraints for all systems, we investigate the immediate progenitor mass of the second-born neutron star (NS2) and the magnitude of the supernova kick it received at birth, with the primary goal to understand the core-collapse mechanism leading to neutron star formation. Compared to earlier studies, we use a novel method to address the uncertainty related to the unknown radial velocity of the observed systems. For PSR B1534+12 and PSR B1913+16, the kick magnitudes are 150-270 km s{sup -1} and 190-450 km s{sup -1} (with 95% confidence), respectively, and the progenitor masses of the NS2 are 1.3-3.4 M{sub sun} and 1.4-5.0 M{sub sun} (95%), respectively. These suggest that the NS2 was formed by an iron core-collapse supernova in both systems. For PSR J0737 - 3039, on the other hand, the kick magnitude is only 5-120 km s{sup -1} (95%), and the progenitor mass of the NS2 is 1.3-1.9 M{sub sun} (95%). Because of the relatively low progenitor mass and kick magnitude, the formation of the NS2 in PSR J0737 - 3039 is potentially connected to an electron capture supernova of a massive O-Ne-Mg white dwarf. For the remaining five Galactic DNS, the kick magnitude ranges from several tens to several hundreds of km s{sup -1}, and the progenitor mass of the NS2 can be as low as {approx}1.5 M{sub sun} or as high as {approx}8 M{sub sun}. Therefore, in these systems it is not clear which type of supernova is more likely to form the NS2.

  15. Atmospheres of Quiescent Low-Mass Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Platon; Medin, Zachary; Calder, Alan; Lattimer, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the neutron stars in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries are important for determining their masses and radii which can lead to powerful constraints on the dense matter nuclear equation of state. The interpretation of these sources is complex and their spectra differ appreciably from blackbodies. Further progress hinges on reducing the uncertainties stemming from models of neutron star atmospheres. We present a suite of low-temperature neutron star atmospheres of different chemical compositions (pure H and He). Our models are constructed over a range of temperatures [log(T/1 K)=5.3, 5.6, 5.9, 6.2, 6.5] and surface gravities [log(g/1 cm/s2)=14.0, 14.2, 14.4, 14.6]. We generated model atmospheres using zcode - a radiation transfer code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In order to facilitate analytic studies, we developed three-parameter fits to our models, and also compared them to diluted blackbodies in the energy range of 0.4-5 keV (CXO/MGE). From the latter, we extract color-correction factors (fc), which represent the shift of the spectra as compared to a blackbody with the same effective temperature. These diluted blackbodies are also useful for studies of photspheric expansion X-ray bursts. We provide a comparison of our models to previous calculations using the McGill Planar Hydrogen Atmosphere Code (McPHAC). These results enhance our ability to interpret thermal emission from neutron stars and to constrain the mass-radius relationship of these exotic objects.This research was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-87ER40317 and by resources at the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at Stony Brook University. This research was carried out in part under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy at Los Alamos National Laboratory and supported by Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  16. Electron transport through nuclear pasta in magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple model for electron transport in a possible layer of exotic nuclear clusters (in the so-called nuclear pasta layer) between the crust and liquid core of a strongly magnetized neutron star. The electron transport there can be strongly anisotropic and gyrotropic. The anisotropy is produced by different electron effective collision frequencies along and across local symmetry axis in domains of exotic ordered nuclear clusters and by complicated effects of the magnetic field. We also calculate averaged kinetic coefficients in case local domains are freely oriented. Possible applications of the obtained results and open problems are outlined.

  17. Soft gamma rays from black holes versus neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.

    1992-01-01

    The recent launches of GRANAT and GRO provide unprecedented opportunities to study compact collapsed objects from their hard x ray and gamma ray emissions. The spectral range above 100 keV can now be explored with much higher sensitivity and time resolution than before. The soft gamma ray spectral data is reviewed of black holes and neutron stars, radiation, and particle energization mechanisms and potentially distinguishing gamma ray signatures. These may include soft x ray excesses versus deficiencies, thermal versus nonthermal processes, transient gamma ray bumps versus power law tails, lines, and periodicities. Some of the highest priority future observations are outlines which will shed much light on such systems.

  18. Photoneutrino reactions in a superstrong magnetoactive plasma. [neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, C. K.; Fassio-Canuto, L.; Canuto, V.

    1979-01-01

    The neutrino luminosity due to the photoneutrino process in the presence of a superstrong magnetoactive electron plasma appropriate for neutron stars is computed. The results indicate that for relatively low temperatures, between 100 million and 500 million K, the energy loss rate is significantly reduced both in the low-density regime below about 10 million g/cu cm (by the magnetic field) and in the high-density regime above that value (by plasmon excitations). These effects are temperature dependent, and they are less pronounced when the temperature is in the range from 500 million to 1 billion K.

  19. Hybridizing Gravitationl Waveforms of Inspiralling Binary Neutron Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, Torrey; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves are ripples in space and time and were predicted to be produced by astrophysical systems such as binary neutron stars by Albert Einstein. These are key targets for Laser Interferometer and Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), which uses template waveforms to find weak signals. The simplified template models are known to break down at high frequency, so I wrote code that constructs hybrid waveforms from numerical simulations to accurately cover a large range of frequencies. These hybrid waveforms use Post Newtonian template models at low frequencies and numerical data from simulations at high frequencies. They are constructed by reading in existing Post Newtonian models with the same masses as simulated stars, reading in the numerical data from simulations, and finding the ideal frequency and alignment to ``stitch'' these waveforms together.

  20. Polarization of neutron star surface emission: a systematic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taverna, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    New-generation X-ray polarimeters currently under development promise to open a new window in the study of high-energy astrophysical sources. Among them, neutron stars (NSs) appear particularly suited for polarization measurements. Radiation from the (cooling) surface of an NS is expected to exhibit a large intrinsic polarization degree due to the star strong magnetic field (≈ 10 ^{12}-10 ^{15} G). We present an efficient method for computing the observed polarization fraction and polarization angle in the case of radiation coming from the entire surface of an NS, accounting for both vacuum polarization and geometrical effects due to the extended emitting region. Our approach is fairly general and is illustrated in the case of blackbody emission from an NS with either a dipolar or a (globally) twisted magnetic field.

  1. Gravitational wave asteroseismology with fast rotating neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate damping and growth times of the quadrupolar f mode for rapidly rotating stars and a variety of different polytropic equations of state in the Cowling approximation. This is the first study of the damping/growth time of these types of oscillations for fast-rotating neutron stars in a relativistic treatment where the spacetime degrees of freedom of the perturbations are neglected. We use these frequencies and damping/growth times to create robust empirical formulae which can be used for gravitational-wave asteroseismology. The estimation of the damping/growth time is based on the quadrupole formula and our results agree very well with Newtonian ones in the appropriate limit.

  2. Self-similar hot accretion flow onto a rotating neutron star: Structure and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2001-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical solutions which describe a hot, viscous, two-temperature accretion flow onto a rotating neutron star or any other rotating compact star with a surface. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, and free-free cooling from the electrons. Outside a thin boundary layer, where the accretion flow meets the star, we show that there is an extended settling region which is well-described by two self-similar solutions: (i) a two-temperature solution which is valid in an inner zone r<=102.5 (r is in Schwarzchild units), and (ii) a one-temperature solution at larger radii. In both zones, ρ~r-2, Ω~r-3/2, v~r0, Tp~r-1 in the two-temperature zone, Te~r-1/2. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy of the star as the star is braked by viscosity. Hence the luminosity and the flow parameters (density, temperature, angular velocity) are independent of M. The settling solution described here is not advection-dominated, and is thus different from the self-similar ADAF found around black holes. When the spin of the star is small enough, however, the present solution transforms smoothly to a (settling) ADAF. We carried out a stability analysis of the settling flow. The flow is convectively and viscously stable and is unlikely to have strong winds or outflows. Unlike another cooling-dominated system-the SLE disk,-the settling flow is thermally stable provided that thermal conduction is taken into account. This strong saturated-like thermoconduction does not change the structure of the flow. .

  3. Explaining observations of rapidly rotating neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakov, Mikhail E.; Chugunov, Andrey I.; Kantor, Elena M.

    2014-09-01

    In a previous paper [M. E. Gusakov, A. I. Chugunov, and E. M. Kantor, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 151101 (2014)], we introduced a new scenario that explains the existence of rapidly rotating warm neutron stars (NSs) observed in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs). Here it is described in more detail. The scenario takes into account the interaction between superfluid inertial modes and the normal (quadrupole) m=2 r mode, which can be driven unstable by the Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz (CFS) mechanism. This interaction can only occur at some fixed "resonance" stellar temperatures; it leads to formation of the "stability peaks" which stabilize a star in the vicinity of these temperatures. We demonstrate that a NS in LMXB spends a substantial fraction of time on the stability peak, that is, in the region of stellar temperatures and spin frequencies that has been previously thought to be CFS unstable with respect to excitation of r modes. We also find that the spin frequencies of NSs are limited by the CFS instability of normal (octupole) m=3 r mode rather than by m=2 r mode. This result agrees with the predicted value of the cutoff spin frequency ˜730 Hz in the spin distribution of accreting millisecond x-ray pulsars. In addition, we analyze evolution of a NS after the end of the accretion phase and demonstrate that millisecond pulsars can be born in LMXBs within our scenario. Besides millisecond pulsars, our scenario also predicts a new class of LMXB descendants—hot and rapidly rotating nonaccreting NSs ("hot widows"/HOFNARs). Further comparison of the proposed theory with observations of rotating NSs can impose new important constraints on the properties of superdense matter.

  4. Neutron star models in frames of f (R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Astashenok, Artyom V.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron star models in perturbative f (R) gravity are considered with realistic equations of state. In particular, we consider the FPS and SLy equations of state. The mass-radius relations for f(R)=R+βR(e{sup -R/R₀}₋1) model and for R² models with cubic corrections are obtained. In the case of R2 gravity with cubic corrections, we obtain that at high central densities (ρ > 10 ρ{sub ns} = 2.7 × 10¹⁴ g/cm³ is the nuclear saturation density), stable star configurations exist. The minimal radius of such stars is close to 9 km with maximal mass ~ 1.9M{sub ⊙}(SLy equation) or to 8.5 km with mass ~ 1.7M{sub ⊙} (FPS equation). This effect can give rise to more compact stars than in GR. If observationally identified, such objects could constitute a formidable signature for modified gravity at astrophysical level.

  5. Constraining parity violation in gravity with measurements of neutron-star moments of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Yunes, Nicolas; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal; Loeb, Abraham

    2010-03-15

    Neutron stars are sensitive laboratories for testing general relativity, especially when considering deviations where velocities are relativistic and gravitational fields are strong. One such deviation is described by dynamical, Chern-Simons modified gravity, where the Einstein-Hilbert action is modified through the addition of the gravitational parity-violating Pontryagin density coupled to a field. This four-dimensional effective theory arises naturally both in perturbative and nonperturbative string theory, loop quantum gravity, and generic effective field theory expansions. We calculate here Chern-Simons modifications to the properties and gravitational fields of slowly spinning neutron stars. We find that the Chern-Simons correction affects only the gravitomagnetic sector of the metric to leading order, thus introducing modifications to the moment-of-inertia but not to the mass-radius relation. We show that an observational determination of the moment-of-inertia to an accuracy of 10%, as is expected from near-future observations of the double pulsar, will place a constraint on the Chern-Simons coupling constant of {xi}{sup 1/4} < or approx. 5 km, which is at least three-orders of magnitude stronger than the previous strongest bound.

  6. Search method for long-duration gravitational-wave transients from neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prix, R.; Giampanis, S.; Messenger, C.

    2011-07-01

    We introduce a search method for a new class of gravitational-wave signals, namely, long-duration O(hours-weeks) transients from spinning neutron stars. We discuss the astrophysical motivation from glitch relaxation models and we derive a rough estimate for the maximal expected signal strength based on the superfluid excess rotational energy. The transient signal model considered here extends the traditional class of infinite-duration continuous-wave signals by a finite start-time and duration. We derive a multidetector Bayes factor for these signals in Gaussian noise using F-statistic amplitude priors, which simplifies the detection statistic and allows for an efficient implementation. We consider both a fully coherent statistic, which is computationally limited to directed searches for known pulsars, and a cheaper semicoherent variant, suitable for wide parameter-space searches for transients from unknown neutron stars. We have tested our method by Monte-Carlo simulation, and we find that it outperforms orthodox maximum-likelihood approaches both in sensitivity and in parameter-estimation quality.

  7. Stellar neutron sources and s-process in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Rashi

    The s-process or the slow neutron capture process is a nucleosynthesis process taking place at relatively low neutron densities in stars. It runs along the valley of beta stability since the neutron capture rate is much slower compared to the beta decay rate. The s-process occurs mainly during core helium burning and shell carbon burning phase in massive stars and during thermally pulsing helium burning phase in asymptotic giant-branch stars. The potential stellar neutron source for the s-process is associated with alpha-capture reactions on light nuclei. The capture-reaction rates provide the reaction flow for the build-up of22Ne neutron source during the heliumburning phase in these stars. The low energy 26Mg resonances at stellar energies below 800 keV are predicted to have a critical influence on the alpha-capture rates on 22Ne. Some of these resonances may also correspond to pronounced alpha cluster structure near the alpha-threshold. However, these resonances have remained elusive during direct alpha capture measurements owing to the high Coulomb barrier and background from cosmic rays and beam induced reactions. Hence, in the present work, alpha-inelastic scattering and alpha- transfer measurements have been performed to probe the level structure of 26Mg nucleus in order to determine the 22Ne+alpha-capture rates. Both experiments have been performed using the high-resolution Grand Raiden Spectrometer at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka, Japan. For the alpha-inelastic scattering measurement, a self-supporting solid 26Mg target was used and for the alpha-transfer study via the (6Li,d) reaction, 22Ne gas enclosed in a gas cell with Aramid windows was used. The reaction products were momentum analysed by the spectrometer and detected at the focal plane equipped with two multi-wire drift chambers and two plastic-scintillation detectors. The focal plane detection system provided information on the position, the angle, the time of flight and

  8. Gamma ray bursts from comet neutron star magnetosphere interaction, field twisting and E sub parallel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Consider the problem of a comet in a collision trajectory with a magnetized neutron star. The question addressed in this paper is whether the comet interacts strongly enough with a magnetic field such as to capture at a large radius or whether in general the comet will escape a magnetized neutron star. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Neutrinos from SN 1987A and cooling of the nascent neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Melia, Fulvio

    1988-01-01

    The implications of the detection of neutrinos from SN 1987A for the cooling of the nascent neutron star are considered. The nu-bar(e) number N, the apparent temperature, the cooling time scale measured by the Kamioka and IMB detectors, and the inferred neutron star apparent radius and binding energy are all found to provide striking verification of current supernova theory.

  10. Neutron stars in Einstein-Λ gravity: the cosmological constant effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordbar, G. H.; Hendi, S. H.; Eslam Panah, B.

    2016-09-01

    Regarding a d-dimensional spherically symmetric line element in the context of Einstein- Λ gravity, the hydrostatic equilibrium equation of stars is obtained. Then, by using the lowest-order constrained variational (LOCV) method with the AV18 potential and employing microscopic many-body calculations in the modern equation of state, the structure properties of neutron stars are investigated. Regardless of the cosmological point of view and considering arbitrary positive and negative values of the cosmological constant, the maximum mass of the neutron stars and their corresponding radius in 4 dimensions are computed. The results show that there is an upper limit for the maximum mass of a neutron star for a positive cosmological constant ( M_{max} ≤ 1.68M_{⊙}). On the other hand, it is shown that the Einstein gravity cannot explain the structure of neutron star with negative Λ. Other properties of neutron stars such as the Schwarzschild radius, average density, compactness and Buchdahl-Bondi bound are studied. In addition, by using the Buchdahl-Bondi bound for neutron stars, stability of these stars is investigated. Finally, the dynamical stability is investigated and it is shown that the neutron stars follow the dynamical stability in this gravity.

  11. The neutron star interior composition explorer (NICER): mission definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Gendreau, K. C.; Baker, C. L.; Cazeau, T.; Hestnes, P.; Kellogg, J. W.; Kenyon, S. J.; Kozon, R. P.; Liu, K.-C.; Manthripragada, S. S.; Markwardt, C. B.; Mitchell, A. L.; Mitchell, J. W.; Monroe, C. A.; Okajima, T.; Pollard, S. E.; Powers, D. F.; Savadkin, B. J.; Winternitz, L. B.; Chen, P. T.; Wright, M. R.; Foster, R.; Prigozhin, G.; Remillard, R.; Doty, J.

    2014-07-01

    Over a 10-month period during 2013 and early 2014, development of the Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission [1] proceeded through Phase B, Mission Definition. An external attached payload on the International Space Station (ISS), NICER is scheduled to launch in 2016 for an 18-month baseline mission. Its prime scientific focus is an in-depth investigation of neutron stars—objects that compress up to two Solar masses into a volume the size of a city—accomplished through observations in 0.2-12 keV X-rays, the electromagnetic band into which the stars radiate significant fractions of their thermal, magnetic, and rotational energy stores. Additionally, NICER enables the Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) demonstration of spacecraft navigation using pulsars as beacons. During Phase B, substantive refinements were made to the mission-level requirements, concept of operations, and payload and instrument design. Fabrication and testing of engineering-model components improved the fidelity of the anticipated scientific performance of NICER's X-ray Timing Instrument (XTI), as well as of the payload's pointing system, which enables tracking of science targets from the ISS platform. We briefly summarize advances in the mission's formulation that, together with strong programmatic performance in project management, culminated in NICER's confirmation by NASA into Phase C, Design and Development, in March 2014.

  12. Probing double neutron star evolution with pulsar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdman, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Pulsars in double neutron star (DNS) binary systems represent a distinct population among pulsar binaries. Within this class of system, the formation channel through which the second neutron star (NS) is formed can differ in ways that can leave distinct observable signatures. In particular, measured DNS properties provide clues about prior interactions and the progenitor supernova event that has left behind the second-formed NS. In this talk I will present results from long-term timing analysis and profile studies of several pulsars in DNS systems, including highly relativistic binaries such as PSR J0737-3039A from the double pulsar system and the recently discovered PSR J1913+1102. I will place them in the larger context of the DNS population, and demonstrate our attempt to distinguishing the different evolutionary channels that are possible for these systems. Doing so will also provide crucial complimentary information to current and future observations by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and VIRGO, which are particularly sensitive to merging DNS systems.

  13. Gravitational waves from color-magnetic "mountains" in neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Glampedakis, K; Jones, D I; Samuelsson, L

    2012-08-24

    Neutron stars may harbor the true ground state of matter in the form of strange quark matter. If present, this type of matter is expected to be a color superconductor, a consequence of quark pairing with respect to the color and flavor degrees of freedom. The stellar magnetic field threading the quark core becomes a color-magnetic admixture and, in the event that superconductivity is of type II, leads to the formation of color-magnetic vortices. In this Letter, we show that the volume-averaged color-magnetic vortex tension force should naturally lead to a significant degree of nonaxisymmetry in systems such as radio pulsars. We show that gravitational radiation from such color-magnetic "mountains" in young pulsars, such as the Crab and Vela, could be observable by the future Einstein Telescope, thus, becoming a probe of paired quark matter in neutron stars. The detectability threshold can be pushed up toward the sensitivity level of Advanced LIGO if we invoke an interior magnetic field about a factor ten stronger than the surface polar field.

  14. Finite size effects in neutron star and nuclear matter simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez Molinelli, P. A.; Dorso, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study molecular dynamics simulations of symmetric nuclear and neutron star matter using a semi-classical nucleon interaction model. Our aim is to gain insight on the nature of the so-called "finite size effects", unavoidable in this kind of simulations, and to understand what they actually affect. To do so, we explore different geometries for the periodic boundary conditions imposed on the simulation cell: cube, hexagonal prism and truncated octahedron. For nuclear matter simulations we show that, at sub-saturation densities and low temperatures, the solutions are non-homogeneous structures reminiscent of the "nuclear pasta" phases expected in neutron star matter simulations, but only one structure per cell and shaped by specific artificial aspects of the simulations-for the same physical conditions (i.e. number density and temperature) different cells yield different solutions. The particular shape of the solution at low enough temperature and a given density can be predicted analytically by surface minimization. We also show that even if this behavior is due to the imposition of periodic boundary conditions on finite systems, this does not mean that it vanishes for very large systems, and it is actually independent of the system size. We conclude that, for nuclear matter simulations, the cells' size sets the only characteristic length scale for the inhomogeneities, and the geometry of the periodic cell determines the shape of those inhomogeneities.

  15. Nuclear fusion and carbon flashes on neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, R. E.; Picklum, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports on detailed calculations of the thermal evolution of the carbon-burning shells in the envelopes of accreting neutron stars for mass-accretion rates of 1 hundred-billionth to 2 billionths of a solar mass per yr and neutron-star masses of 0.56 and 1.41 solar masses. The work of Hansen and Van Horn (1975) is extended to higher densities, and a more detailed treatment of nuclear processing in the hydrogen- and helium-burning regions is included. Results of steady-state calculations are presented, and results of time-dependent computations are examined for accretion rates of 3 ten-billionths and 1 billionth of solar mass per yr. It is found that two evolutionary sequences lead to carbon flashes and that the carbon abundance at the base of the helium shell is a strong function of accretion rate. Upper limits are placed on the accretion rates at which carbon flashes will be important.

  16. Unexpected Windy Weather Around a Highly Magnetized Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, George A.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Gill, Ramandeep; Granot, Jonathan; Watts, Anna; Gelfand, Joseph; Baring, Matthew G.; Kust Harding, Alice; Pavlov, George G.; van der Horst, Alexander; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Gögüs, Ersin; Lin, Lin; Roberts, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars (RPPs) historically represented two distinct subclasses of neutron stars. Magnetars are slowly-rotating (~2-12 s), isolated neutron stars (NSs) with super-strong magnetic fields, B~10^13-10^15 G. RPPs, on the other hand, are rapidly-rotating (~0.01-0.3~s), isolated NSs with surface dipole magnetic field in the range ~10^11-10^13 G. Most pulsars possess a large rotational energy loss rate that powers a relativistic magnetized particle wind, often seen as a pulsar wind nebula (PWN; the Crab PWN being the most famous). There has not yet been convincing evidence for a wind nebula around magnetars, most likely due to their low rotational energy loss rate. Here, we report the study of new deep X-ray observations of the peculiar extended emission around the magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846. Our new results strongly support a wind nebula as the nature of the extended emission, thus, establishing Swift J1834.9-0846 as the first magnetar to possess a surrounding nebula. This implies that wind nebulae are no longer exclusive to RPPs and, along with recent discoveries in the field, further narrow the gaps between these two sub-populations of isolated NSs. The physical properties of this wind nebula, however, show peculiarities, especially its high radiative efficiency of about 10%, only shared with two other known very young RPPs, the Crab and its twin.

  17. COMPOSITIONALLY DRIVEN CONVECTION IN THE OCEANS OF ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the effect of chemical separation as matter freezes at the base of the ocean of an accreting neutron star, and argue that the retention of light elements in the liquid acts as a source of buoyancy that drives a slow but continual mixing of the ocean, enriching it substantially in light elements, and leading to a relatively uniform composition with depth. We first consider the timescales associated with different processes that can redistribute elements in the ocean, including convection, sedimentation, crystallization, and diffusion. We then calculate the steady-state structure of the ocean of a neutron star for an illustrative model in which the accreted hydrogen and helium burn to produce a mixture of O and Se. Even though the H/He burning produces only 2% oxygen by mass, the steady-state ocean has an oxygen abundance more than 10 times larger, almost 40% by mass. Furthermore, we show that the convective motions transport heat inward, with a flux of {approx}0.2 MeV nucleon{sup -1} for an O-Se ocean, heating the ocean and steepening the outward temperature gradient. The enrichment of light elements and heating of the ocean due to compositionally driven convection likely have important implications for carbon ignition models of superbursts.

  18. Simulations of the Inspiral and Merger of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, M.; Hirschman, E. W.; Lehner, L.; Liebling, S. L.; Neilsen, D.; Palenzuela, C.; Tohline, J. E.

    2008-05-01

    We present simulations of the inspiral, merger and eventual collapse of neutron star binaries calculated in full general relativity. The Einstein equations are solved in a first order reduction of the general harmonic formulation while the matter is evolved in the MHD approximation. Each binary component initially has a dipole magnetic field perpendicular to the orbital plane. We use the adaptive mesh refinement package HAD to resolve the disparate length scales in the problem ranging from the radiation zone down to the internal dynamics of the neutron stars. For aligned fields and our chosen field strength, we find that magnetic effects delay the merger somewhat - thus boosting the gravitational wave signal from the binary. As we will discuss, the magnetic field significantly impacts the distribution of matter and angular momentum in the super-massive, merged object after merger. This work has been supported in part by NSF grants AST 04-07070 and PHY 03-26311, and in part through NASA's ATP program grants NAG5-8497, NAG5-13430 and NNX07AG84G. The computations were performed on computer facilities provided through the Teragrid, LONI, LSU and BYU.

  19. Universal three-body repulsion suggested by neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsuka, T.; Nishizaki, S.; Tamagaki, R.

    2008-04-29

    Because of a serious inconsistency between theory and observation for the mass of hyperon-mixed neutron stars, it is suggested that some 'extra repulsion' is needed in hypernuclear systems. A 3-body force repulsion is tested for two cases, a 2{pi}-exchange via {delta}-excitation type (2{pi}{delta}) and a string-junction model (SJM) for the quark structure of baryons. It is found that the 2{pi}{delta} model generates an increasing repulsion with increasing density but cannot produce the 'extra repulsion' in hyperon-mixed neutron stars because it does not work on a {lambda} due to the lack of {lambda}{lambda}{pi} direct coupling. It is pointed out that the 'extra repulsion' should act universally, i.e., independent of baryon species. The SJM 3-body repulsion can satisfy the condition of universality because of the flavor-independence and the {l_brace}2{pi}{delta}+SJM{r_brace} scheme is shown to be a promising candidate for the 'extra repulsion', maintaining consistency with the empirical saturation property of nuclear matter.

  20. Gravitational waves from color-magnetic "mountains" in neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Glampedakis, K; Jones, D I; Samuelsson, L

    2012-08-24

    Neutron stars may harbor the true ground state of matter in the form of strange quark matter. If present, this type of matter is expected to be a color superconductor, a consequence of quark pairing with respect to the color and flavor degrees of freedom. The stellar magnetic field threading the quark core becomes a color-magnetic admixture and, in the event that superconductivity is of type II, leads to the formation of color-magnetic vortices. In this Letter, we show that the volume-averaged color-magnetic vortex tension force should naturally lead to a significant degree of nonaxisymmetry in systems such as radio pulsars. We show that gravitational radiation from such color-magnetic "mountains" in young pulsars, such as the Crab and Vela, could be observable by the future Einstein Telescope, thus, becoming a probe of paired quark matter in neutron stars. The detectability threshold can be pushed up toward the sensitivity level of Advanced LIGO if we invoke an interior magnetic field about a factor ten stronger than the surface polar field. PMID:23002735