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Sample records for neutron studies support

  1. Neutron reflectivity studies of single lipid bilayers supported on planar substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, S.; Orts, W.J.; Berk, N.F.; Majkrzak, C.F.; Koenig, B.W.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron reflectivity was used to probe the structure of single phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers adsorbed onto a planar silicon surface in an aqueous environment. Fluctuations in the neutron scattering length density profiles perpendicular to the silicon/water interface were determined for different lipids as a function of the hydrocarbon chain length. The lipids were studied in both the gel and liquid crystalline phases by monitoring changes in the specularly-reflected neutron intensity as a function of temperature. Contrast variation of the neutron scattering length density was applied to both the lipid and the solvent. Scattering length density profiles were determined using both model-independent and model-dependent fitting methods. During the reflectivity measurements, a novel experimental set-up was implemented to decrease the incoherent background scattering due to the solvent. Thus, the reflectivity was measured to Q {approx} 0.3{Angstrom}{sup -1}, covering up to seven orders of magnitude in reflected intensity, for PC bilayers in D{sub 2}O and silicon-matched (38% D{sub 2}O/62% H{sub 2}O) water. The kinetics of lipid adsorption at the silicon/water interface were also explored by observing changes in the reflectivity at low Q values under silicon-matched water conditions.

  2. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. X.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2012-02-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ˜38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ˜1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  3. Ordering and lyotropic behavior of a silicon-supported cationic and neutral lipid system studied by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domenici, F.; Castellano, C.; Congiu, A.; Pompeo, G.; Felici, R.

    2008-05-01

    Self-assembling of amphipathic lipid films on solid support allows the structural investigation of important biological model systems, such as the vectorlike lipid membranes, in order to improve DNA transfection in nonviral gene therapy. We present a neutron reflectivity study of a binary lipid system composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB) deposited on [100] silicon support by means of spin coating technique. We underline their lyotropic behavior under saturated deuterium oxide (D2O) vapor thus pointing out that the lipid mixture is organized in ordered domains composed of plane lamellar bilayers of noninteractive DOPC and DDAB.

  4. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (1120) sapphire.

    SciTech Connect

    Oleson, Timothy A.; Sahai, Nita; Wesolowski, David J; Dura, Joseph A; Majkrzak, Charles F; Giuffre, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetric membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacjed SPBs retain properties (e.,g. fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined face coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (1120) face of sapphire (a-Al2O3). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (l=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I>210mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca2+. The latter two effects are additive, suggesting that Ca2+ mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on a-Al2O3 particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (1010) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques.

  5. X-ray and neutron reflectivity study of solid-supported lipid membranes prepared by spin coating

    SciTech Connect

    Generosi, Johanna; Castellano, Carlo; Pozzi, Daniela; Castellano, Agostina Congiu; Felici, Roberto; Natali, Francesca; Fragneto, Giovanna

    2004-12-01

    We present a study of x-ray synchrotron radiation and neutron reflectivity on solid-supported lipid membranes prepared by spin coating. This technique has the advantage of allowing the control of the number of lipid layers by varying the deposition parameters. The experiments were performed on the cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane chloride salt (DOTAP), the neutral lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), the lipid mixture (DOTAP-DOPC), and the complex (DOTAP-DOPC/DNA) deposited on wafers. Only single neutral lipids or lipid-peptide mixtures were deposited on solid substrate using the spin coating technique and characterized. Results on the structure of the deposited lipid layers indicate that DNA contributes to the order in the lipoplexes.

  6. Aminopolymer Mobility and Support Interactions in Silica-PEI Composites for CO 2 Capture Applications: A Quasielastic Neutron Scattering Study

    DOE PAGES

    Holewinski, Adam; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; ...

    2017-05-30

    Composite gas sorbents, formed from an active polymer phase and a porous support, are promising materials for the separation of acid gases from a variety of gas streams. Significant changes in sorption performance (capacity, rate, stability etc.) can be achieved by tuning the properties of the polymer and the nature of interactions between polymer and support. We utilize quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize the dynamic behavior of the most commonly reported polymer in such materials, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), both in bulk form and when supported in a mesoporous silica framework. The polymer chain dynamicsmore » (rotational and translational diffusion) are characterized using two neutron backscattering spectrometers that have overlapping time scales, ranging from picoseconds to a few nanoseconds. Two modes of motion are detected for the PEI molecule in QENS. At low energy transfers, a “slow process” on the time scale of ~200 ps is found and attributed to jump-mediated, center-of-mass diffusion. Second, a “fast process” at ~20 ps scale is also found and is attributed to a locally confined, jump-diffusion. Characteristic data (time scale and spectral weight) of these processes are compared to those characterized by MD, and reasonable agreement is found. For the nanopore-confined PEI, we observe a significant reduction in the time scale of polymer motion as compared to the bulk. The impacts of silica surface functionalization and of polymer fill fraction in the silica pores (controlling the portion of polymer molecules in contact with the pore walls), are both studied in detail. Hydrophobic functionalization of the silica leads to an increase of the PEI mobility above that in native silanol-terminated silica, but the dynamics are still slower than those in bulk PEI. Sorbents with faster PEI dynamics are also found to be more efficient for CO2 capture, possibly because sorption sites are

  7. Aminopolymer Mobility and Support Interactions in Silica-PEI Composites for CO2 Capture Applications: A Quasielastic Neutron Scattering Study.

    PubMed

    Holewinski, Adam; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y; Potter, Matthew E; Ellebracht, Nathan; Rother, Gernot; Sumpter, Bobby G; Jones, Christopher W

    2017-07-13

    Composite gas sorbents, formed from an active polymer phase and a porous support, are promising materials for the separation of acid gases from a variety of gas streams. Significant changes in sorption performance (capacity, rate, stability etc.) can be achieved by tuning the properties of the polymer and the nature of interactions between polymer and support. Here we utilize quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize the dynamic behavior of the most commonly reported polymer in such materials, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), both in bulk form and when supported in a mesoporous silica framework. The polymer chain dynamics (rotational and translational diffusion) are characterized using two neutron backscattering spectrometers that have overlapping time scales, ranging from picoseconds to a few nanoseconds. Two modes of motion are detected for the PEI molecule in QENS. At low energy transfers, a "slow process" on the time scale of ∼200 ps is found and attributed to jump-mediated, center-of-mass diffusion. A second, "fast process" at ∼20 ps scale is also found and is attributed to a locally confined, jump-diffusion. Characteristic data (time scale and spectral weight) of these processes are compared to those characterized by MD, and reasonable agreement is found. For the nanopore-confined PEI, we observe a significant reduction in the time scale of polymer motion as compared to the bulk. The impacts of silica surface functionalization and of polymer fill fraction in the silica pores (controlling the portion of polymer molecules in contact with the pore walls), are both studied in detail. Hydrophobic functionalization of the silica leads to an increase of the PEI mobility above that in native silanol-terminated silica, but the dynamics are still slower than those in bulk PEI. Sorbents with faster PEI dynamics are also found to be more efficient for CO2 capture, possibly because sorption sites are more

  8. Neutronics analyses in support of rotating target developments at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, Franz X.

    2010-03-08

    A second target station (STS) for Spallation Neutron Souce (SNS) very likely being operated in long-pulse mode is in the early design phase, will complement the ORNL neutron sources, which presently consist of a short-pulse spallation source and the HFIR research reactor. As an alternative to the stationary liquid metal target, a rotating target is being considered. Neutronics studies in support of a 3MW power 20 Hz repetition rate rotating target feasibility study funded through the laboratory LDRD program, was extended towards a 1.5 MW STS design. The scope of work included in-operation heat deposition rates in target structures for thermal and structural analyses, target radionuclide inventory for decay heat and safety analyses, lifetime estimations due to radiation-driven material damage of target and moderator components, moderator neutron performance and moderator cryogenic heatloads.

  9. Neutron based evaluation in support of NEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven C.; Bourke, Mark Andrew; Losko, Adrian Simon

    2016-06-07

    The primary objective of the Advanced Non-Destructive fuel Examination (ANDE) work package is to develop capability that has the potential to accelerate insight and development of ceramic and metallic fuels. Establishing unique validation opportunities for new models is a key component of this effort. To explore opportunities a series of interactions were held with NEAMS modelers at LANL. The focus was to identify experiments that draw on the unique capabilities of neutron scattering and imaging for studies of nuclear fuel particularly in areas where experimental data can be valuable for of models validation. The neutron characterization techniques applied in the ANDE program span length scales from millimeter to micrometer to angstroms. Spatial heterogeneities of interest include cracks, pores and inclusions, crystal structure, phase composition, stoichiometry texture, chemistry and atomic thermal motion. Neutrons offer characterization opportunities that are distinct from other probes such as X-rays, electrons or protons. This report describes a variety of opportunities whereby neutron data can be related to models and lists some opportunities.

  10. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (11 ̅20) sapphire.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Timothy A; Sahai, Nita; Wesolowski, David J; Dura, Joseph A; Majkrzak, Charles F; Giuffre, Anthony J

    2012-03-15

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetic membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacked SPBs retain properties (e.g., fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined the role of oxide surface charge (by varying pH and ionic strength) and of divalent Ca(2+) in controlling surface coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (11 ̅20) face of sapphire (α-Al(2)O(3)). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (I=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I≥210 mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca(2+). The latter two effects are not additive, suggesting that Ca(2+) mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on α-Al(2)O(3) particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (10 ̅10) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Calculations to support JET neutron yield calibration: Modelling of neutron emission from a compact DT neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čufar, Aljaž; Batistoni, Paola; Conroy, Sean; Ghani, Zamir; Lengar, Igor; Milocco, Alberto; Packer, Lee; Pillon, Mario; Popovichev, Sergey; Snoj, Luka

    2017-03-01

    At the Joint European Torus (JET) the ex-vessel fission chambers and in-vessel activation detectors are used as the neutron production rate and neutron yield monitors respectively. In order to ensure that these detectors produce accurate measurements they need to be experimentally calibrated. A new calibration of neutron detectors to 14 MeV neutrons, resulting from deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas, is planned at JET using a compact accelerator based neutron generator (NG) in which a D/T beam impinges on a solid target containing T/D, producing neutrons by DT fusion reactions. This paper presents the analysis that was performed to model the neutron source characteristics in terms of energy spectrum, angle-energy distribution and the effect of the neutron generator geometry. Different codes capable of simulating the accelerator based DT neutron sources are compared and sensitivities to uncertainties in the generator's internal structure analysed. The analysis was performed to support preparation to the experimental measurements performed to characterize the NG as a calibration source. Further extensive neutronics analyses, performed with this model of the NG, will be needed to support the neutron calibration experiments and take into account various differences between the calibration experiment and experiments using the plasma as a source of neutrons.

  12. Neutron diffraction studies of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Popot, J.L.; Engelman, D.M.; Zaccai, G.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of bacteriorhodopsin have utilized the entire range of deuterium labeling techniques that are commonly used in biological neutron scattering experiments. We will review the work published in this area and report on current projects. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  13. ATW neutronics design studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, D. C.; Yang, W. S.; Khalil, H.

    2000-11-10

    The Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept has been proposed as a transuranics (TRU) (and long-lived fission product) incinerator for processing the 87,000 metric tonnes of Light Water Reactor used fuel which will have been generated by the time the currently deployed fleet of commercial reactors in the US reach the end of their licensed lifetime. The ATW is proposed to separate the uranium from the transuranics and fission products in the LWR used fuel, to fission the transuranics, to send the LWR and ATW generated fission products to the geologic repository and to send the uranium to either a low level waste disposal site or to save it for future use. The heat liberated in fissioning the transuranics would be converted to electricity and sold to partially offset the cost of ATW construction and operations. Options for incineration of long-lived fission products are under evaluation. A six-year science-based program of ATW trade and system studies was initiated in the US FY 2000 to achieve two main purposes: (1) ''to evaluate ATW within the framework of nonproliferation, waste management, and economic considerations,'' and (2) ''to evaluate the efficacy of the numerous technical options for ATW system configuration.'' This paper summarizes the results from neutronics and thermal/hydraulics trade studies which were completed at Argonne National Laboratory during the first year of the program. Core designs were developed for Pb-Bi cooled and Na cooled 840 MW{sub th} fast spectrum transmuter designs employing recycle. Additionally, neutronics analyses were performed at Argonne for a He cooled 600 MW{sub th} hybrid thermal and fast core design proposed by General Atomics Co. which runs critical for 3/4 and subcritical for 1/4 of its four year once-thin burn cycle. The mass flows and the ultimate loss of transuranic isotopes to the waste stream per unit of heat generated during transmutation have been calculated on a consistent basis and are compared. (Long

  14. Performance study of the neutron-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Meng; Li, Yulan; Niu, Libo; Deng, Zhi; Cheng, Xiaolei; He, Li; Zhang, Hongyan; Fu, Jianqiang; Yan, Yangyang; Cai, Yiming; Li, Yuanjing

    2017-02-01

    Fast neutron spectrometers will play an important role in the future of the nuclear industry and nuclear physics experiments, in tasks such as fast neutron reactor monitoring, thermo-nuclear fusion plasma diagnostics, nuclear reaction cross-section measurement, and special nuclear material detection. Recently, a new fast neutron spectrometer based on a GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier amplification)-TPC (Time Projection Chamber), named the neutron-TPC, has been under development at Tsinghua University. It is designed to have a high energy resolution, high detection efficiency, easy access to the medium material, an outstanding n/γ suppression ratio, and a wide range of applications. This paper presents the design, test, and experimental study of the neutron-TPC. Based on the experimental results, the energy resolution (FWHM) of the neutron-TPC can reach 15.7%, 10.3% and 7.0% with detection efficiency higher than 10-5 for 1.2 MeV, 1.81 MeV and 2.5 MeV neutrons respectively. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275109)

  15. Magnetic Excitations in Polyoxotungstate-Supported Lanthanoid Single-Molecule Magnets: An Inelastic Neutron Scattering and ab Initio Study.

    PubMed

    Vonci, Michele; Giansiracusa, Marcus J; Van den Heuvel, Willem; Gable, Robert W; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Yu, Dehong; Mole, Richard A; Soncini, Alessandro; Boskovic, Colette

    2017-01-03

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been used to investigate the crystal field (CF) magnetic excitations of the analogs of the most representative lanthanoid-polyoxometalate single-molecule magnet family: Na9[Ln(W5O18)2] (Ln = Nd, Tb, Ho, Er). Ab initio complete active space self-consistent field/restricted active space state interaction calculations, extended also to the Dy analog, show good agreement with the experimentally determined low-lying CF levels, with accuracy better in most cases than that reported for approaches based only on simultaneous fitting to CF models of magnetic or spectroscopic data for isostructural Ln families. In this work we demonstrate the power of a combined spectroscopic and computational approach. Inelastic neutron scattering has provided direct access to CF levels, which together with the magnetometry data, were employed to benchmark the ab initio results. The ab initio determined wave functions corresponding to the CF levels were in turn employed to assign the INS transitions allowed by selection rules and interpret the observed relative intensities of the INS peaks. Ultimately, we have been able to establish the relationship between the wave function composition of the CF split Ln(III) ground multiplets and the experimentally measured magnetic and spectroscopic properties for the various analogs of the Na9[Ln(W5O18)2] family.

  16. Neutron reflectometry of supported hybrid bilayers with inserted peptide

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew B.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Genzer, Jan; Lösche, Mathias; Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    The insertion of a synthetic amphiphilic, α-helical peptide into a supported hybrid bilayer membrane (HBM) was studied by neutron reflectometry to elucidate the resulting nanostructure. The HBM consisted of a self-assembled monolayer of perdeuterated octadecanethiol on gold and an overlying leaflet of acyl-deuterated phosphatidylcholine (d-DMPC). Using contrast variation, several reflectivity spectra were recorded for each step of film fabrication, and simultaneously modeled. This analysis indicated that peptide insertion into the DMPC lipid leaflet is the likeliest mode of incorporation. PMID:21274414

  17. Study of a spherical torus based volumetric neutron source for nuclear technology testing and development. Final report of a scientific research supported by the USDOE/SBIR program

    SciTech Connect

    E.T. Cheng, et al.

    1999-06-01

    A plasma based, deuterium and tritium (DT) fueled, volumetric 14 MeV neutron source (VNS) has been considered as a possible facility to support the development of the demonstration fusion power reactor (DEMO). It can be used to test and develop necessary fusion blanket and divertor components and provide sufficient database, particularly on the reliability of nuclear components necessary for DEMO. The VNS device complement to ITER by reducing the cost and risk in the development of DEMO. A low cost, scientifically attractive, and technologically feasible volumetric neutron source based on the spherical torus (ST) concept has been conceived. The ST-VNS, which has a major radius of 1.07 m, aspect ratio 1.4, and plasma elongation 3, can produce a neutron wall loading from 0.5 to 5 MW/m{sup 2} at the outboard test section with a modest fusion power level from 38 to 380 MW. It can be used to test necessary nuclear technologies for fusion power reactor and develop fusion core components include divertor, first wall, and power blanket. Using staged operation leading to high neutron wall loading and optimistic availability, a neutron fluence of more than 30 MW-y/m{sup 2} is obtainable within 20 years of operation. This will permit the assessments of lifetime and reliability of promising fusion core components in a reactor relevant environment. A full scale demonstration of power reactor fusion core components is also made possible because of the high neutron wall loading capability. Tritium breeding in such a full scale demonstration can be very useful to ensure the self-sufficiency of fuel cycle for a candidate power blanket concept.

  18. Neutron Scattering Studies of Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Despite more than a century of research, basic questions remain regarding both the internal structure and the role of water in Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete, the world's most widely used manufactured material. Most such questions concern the primary hydration product and strength-building phase of OPC paste, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. When cement and water are mixed, this phase precipitates as clusters of nanoscale (nearly amorphous) colloidal particles with an associated water-filled inter-particle pore system. Most attempts to characterize the C-S-H gel and the behavior of the associated water involve drying or other processes that, themselves, change the bound water content within and around the gel. Neutron scattering methods do not suffer from this disadvantage. Furthermore, the neutron isotope effect and the neutron's sensitivity to molecular motion have enabled considerable progress to be made in recent years by: (i) determining the C-S-H composition, density and gel structure in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) H/D contrast variation studies; (ii) elucidating the changing state of water within cement as hydration progresses using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS); and (iii) measuring the production and consumption of nanoscale calcium hydroxide (CH), a by-product of cement hydration that co-exists with the C-S-H gel, using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These experiments have provided new insights into the physics and chemistry of cement hydration, and have implications for the design of new concretes with pozzolanic cement additions that are intended to address environmental concerns and sustainability issues.

  19. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  20. Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% {sup 235}U) or medium enriched uranium (35% {sup 235}U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology.

  1. Neutron scattering studies of multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Ivelisse M.

    Magnetoelectric multiferroics are systems that exhibit magnetic and ferroelectric order. In strongly coupled multiferroics, competing magnetic interactions can break spatial inversion symmetry and yield ferroelectricity through a magnetic phase transition. In this dissertation, I present original work on the multiferroic properties of Ni3V2O8 and critical phenomena in TbMnO3 and RbFe(MoO4)2. Ni3V2O8 is an insulating magnet where Ni-spins order in a longitudinal amplitude modulated pattern along the a axis in the high-temperature incommensurate (HTI) phase. Upon cooling to the low-temperature incommensurate phase, an additional spine site spin component along b results in a cycloidal structure that breaks spatial inversion symmetry, yielding ferroelectricity. Electric control of multiferroic domains is demonstrated quantitatively and qualitatively using polarized magnetic neutron diffraction. We show that magnetic and ferroelectric domains are strongly coupled in this system and that definite cycloid handedness is achieved by antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Ni3 V2O8 displays a memory effect where the system reverts to the previous polarization state upon exiting and re-entering the multiferroic phase through a first order phase transition. Our results suggest that small multiferroic domains in the paraelectric, commensurate phase retain the polarization history and reestablish it upon re-entering the multiferroic phase. TbMnO3 is a frustrated magnet similar to Ni3V 2O8 which undergoes two magnetic phase transitions before becoming multiferroic. A temperature-dependent magnetic diffraction study near TN reveals that this system orders through a continuous phase transition. Further studies in the HTI phase are needed to clarify whether a novel, weak transition exists at around 39 K. Our results support the single irreducible representation model as the system enters the HTI phase. RbFe(MoO4)2 is a nearly 2D antiferromagnet that enters the

  2. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  3. Neutron radiation embrittlement studies in support of continued operation, and validation by sampling of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels and components

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.; Bolton, C.J.

    1997-02-01

    Magnox steel reactor pressure vessels differ significantly from US LWR vessels in terms of the type of steel used, as well as their operating environment (dose level, exposure temperature range, and neutron spectra). The large diameter ferritic steel vessels are constructed from C-Mn steel plates and forgings joined together with manual metal and submerged-arc welds which are stress-relieved. All Magnox vessels are now at least thirty years old and their continued operation is being vigorously pursued. Vessel surveillance and other programmes are summarized which support this objective. The current understanding of the roles of matrix irradiation damage, irradiation-enhanced copper impurity precipitation and intergranular embrittlement effects is described in so far as these influence the form of the embrittlement and hardening trend curves for each material. An update is given on the influence of high temperature exposure, and on the role of differing neutron spectra. Finally, the validation offered by the results of an initial vessel sampling exercise is summarized together with the objectives of a more extensive future sampling programme.

  4. Intercomparisons of neutron dosimeters in support of dosimetry measurements in containment

    SciTech Connect

    Auman, L.E.; Miller, W.H. ); Graham, C.C.; Stretch, C.D. ); Welty, T.J.; West, L. )

    1991-01-01

    In support of neutron dosimetry needs at Union Electric's Callaway nuclear plant, an intercomparison of a variety of neutron detection systems was performed. Eight different neutron detection systems were tested in four different neutron fields, utilizing facilities at the Missouri University research reactor (MURR) and the Southwest Radiation Calibration Center at the University of Arkansas. In general, all results agreed within a factor of 2 in predicting the neutron dose equivalent.

  5. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1993-01-28

    The purpose of this three year study is to develop a neutron focusing system to be used with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of neutrons. A prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility will also be designed, setup, and tested under this DOE grant. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which the authors wrote to trace neutrons through the existing curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, they obtained gains of 4 to 5 for the neutron flux averaged over an area of 1 x 1 cm. Two graduate students were supported by the first year of the DOE grant. Both have passed the Nuclear Engineering qualifying examination and have been admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree at The University of Texas at Austin. Their programs of study and dissertation projects have been approved by the appropriate committees.

  6. Nuclear and neutron matter studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R.B.; Akmal, A.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1995-08-01

    We are studying nuclear and neutron matter with the new Argonne v{sub 18} NN and Urbana 3N potentials. We use variational wave functions and a diagrammatic cluster expansion with Fermi hypernetted and single-operator chain (FHNC/SOC) integral equations to evaluate the energy expectation value. Initial results show some interesting differences with our previous calculations with the older Argonne v{sub 14} potential. In particular, there are a number of diagrams involving L{center_dot}S and L{sup 2} terms which were small with the older model and were rather crudely estimated or even neglected. It appears that these terms are more important with the new potential and will have to be evaluated more accurately. Work on this subject is in progress. A simple line of attack is to just add additional diagrams at the three-body cluster level. A longer term approach may be to adapt some of the methods for evaluating nucleon clusters used in the few-body and closed shell nuclei described above.

  7. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  8. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  9. Neutron generator (HIRRAC) and dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Hoshi, M; Takada, J; Tauchi, H; Matsuura, S; Takeoka, S; Kitagawa, K; Suga, S; Komatsu, K

    1999-12-01

    Dosimetry studies have been made for neutrons from a neutron generator at Hiroshima University (HIRRAC) which is designed for radiobiological research. Neutrons in an energy range from 0.07 to 2.7 MeV are available for biological irradiations. The produced neutron energies were measured and evaluated by a 3He-gas proportional counter. Energy spread was made certain to be small enough for radiobiological studies. Dose evaluations were performed by two different methods, namely use of tissue equivalent paired ionization chambers and activation of method with indium foils. Moreover, energy deposition spectra in small targets of tissue equivalent materials, so-called lineal energy spectrum, were also measured and are discussed. Specifications for biological irradiation are presented in terms of monoenergetic beam conditions, dose rates and deposited energy spectra.

  10. Neutronic data in support of space nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.; Schmidt, E.; Ludewig, H.

    1997-07-01

    The thermophysical properties of lithium hydride ({sup 7}LiH), particularly small density (0.775 gm/cc), high melting point (688 C) and relatively high hydrogen atomic number density makes it an attractive material for use as a neutron moderator and shield (for LiH) in space nuclear thermal propulsion. However, the unavailability of neutronic cross section data in the thermal energy range for {sup 7}LiH in the ENDF/B library necessitated the generation of the relevant data which is required in criticality studies and for the determination of temperature-dependent feedback coefficients in the moderator and fuel regions. Here, the scattering kernel data for {sup 7}LiH have been generated for the first time in the temperature range 50--1,000 K. This is based on a phonon distribution function derived from both experimental data and theoretical calculations. A detailed study of the variation of the moderator temperature coefficient {alpha}{sub m}(T) with temperature, T, is carried out for a typical space nuclear reactor of the particle bed type. It is established that the moderator temperature coefficient is proportional to T{sup {minus}1.65} where T is the moderator temperature in Kelvin units.

  11. Proton Transfer Reactions Studied Using the VANDLE Neutron Detector Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornsberry, C. R.; Burcher, S.; Gryzwacz, R.; Jones, K. L.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Smith, K.; Vostinar, M.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blankstein, D.; Deboer, J.; Hall, M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Reingold, C.; Tan, W.; Cizewski, J. A.; Lepailleur, A.; Walter, D.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Marley, S. T.

    2016-09-01

    Proton transfer reactions, such as (d,n), are powerful tools for the study of single particle proton states of exotic nuclei. Measuring the outgoing neutron allows for the extraction of spectroscopic information from the recoil nucleus. With the development of new radioactive ion beam facilities, such as FRIB in the U.S., comes the need for new tools for the study of reactions involving radioactive nuclei. Neutron detectors, such as VANDLE, are sensitive to gamma rays in addition to neutrons. This results in high background rates for measurements with high external trigger rates. The use of discriminating recoil particle detectors, such as phoswich detectors, allow for the selection of a clean recoil tag by separating the recoil nucleus of interest from unreacted RIB components. Developments of low energy proton transfer measurements in inverse kinematics and recent (d,n) results will be presented. This work supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  12. A fundamental study on hyper-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K

    1994-12-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum with a Maxwellian distribution at a higher temperature than room temperature (300 K), was studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution at depth in a living body for neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were carried out using a Monte Carlo code 'MCNP-V3' in order to investigate the characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons, i.e. (i) depth dependence of the neutron energy spectrum, and (ii) depth distribution of the reaction rate in a water phantom for materials with 1/v neutron absorption. It is confirmed that hyper-thermal neutron irradiation can improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in the deeper areas in a living body compared with thermal neutron irradiation. When hyper-thermal neutrons with a 3000 K Maxwellian distribution are incident on a body, the reaction rates of 1/v materials such as 14N, 10B etc are about twice that observed for incident thermal neutrons at 300 K, at a depth of 5 cm. The limit of the treatable depth for tumours having 30 ppm 10B is expected to be about 1.5 cm greater by utilizing hyper-thermal neutrons at 3000 K compared with the incidence of thermal neutrons at 300 K.

  13. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, S.

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions were obtained that are not only interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up opportunities for further discoveries.

  14. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions have been obtained that are not ony interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up new opportunities for further discoveries.

  15. Theoretical Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    2003-01-01

    Among the newly discovered classes of X-ray sources which have attracted wide attention are close binary systems in which mass is transferred via Roche lobe overflow from a low mass donor star to its neutron star companion. Many of these sources exhibit intense bursts of X-ray radiation as well as periodic and quasi-periodic phenomena. Intensive analysis of these sources as a class has provided insight into the accretion process in binary star systems and into the magnetic field, rotational, and nuclear evolution of the underlying neutron star. In this proposal we have focused on theoretical studies of the hydrodynamical and nuclear processes that take place on the surface of accreting neutron stars in these systems. The investigation of these processes is critical for providing an understanding of a number of outstanding problems related to their transient behavior and evolution.

  16. Neutron scattering studies of glassy Li+ superionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, Tom; Zella, Leo; Zaidi, Ali; Rathore, Munesh; Dalvi, Anshuman; Mitra, Saibal

    2013-03-01

    Two distinct neutron scattering techniques were implemented in the study of glassy superionic materials composed of a complex network of their interconnected sub-units: Li2O, NH4H2PO2, and Li2SO4. The use of disordered materials underlies an effort to promote Li+ mobility, while suppressing e- conductivity, which makes them good candidates for use as electrolytes in lithium ion batteries. We present triple-axis spectrometer results of energy resolved vs. energy integrated neutron scattering that indicate the presence of a broad range of dynamic processes in the materials, rather than well-defined excitations. Additionally, we report on neutron diffraction data that demonstrates the formation of crystallites within the material upon annealing up to 450 °C. Such crystallites hinder the performance of the materials as electrolytes, which is evident in thin film devices where heating is unavoidable during fabrication.

  17. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1996-12-19

    The goals of this three-year study were: (1) design a neutron focusing system for use with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of cold neutrons appropriate for prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA); (2) orchestrate the construction of the focusing system, integrate it into the TCNS neutron guide complex, and measure its performance; and (3) design, setup, and test a cold-neutron PGAA system which utilizes the guided focused cold neutron beam. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which the authors wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, the authors obtained gains of 3 to 5 for 4 different converging guide geometries. During the second year of the DOE grant, the subject of this final report, Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company was contracted to build a converging neutron guide focusing system to the specifications. Considerable time and effort were spent working with Ovonics on selecting the materials for the converging neutron guide system. The major portion of the research on the design of a cold-neutron PGAA system was also completed during the second year. At the beginning of the third year of the grant, a converging neutron guide focusing system had been ordered, and a cold-neutron PGAA system had been designed. Since DOE did not fund the third year, there was no money to purchase the required equipment for the cold-neutron PGAA system and no money to perform tests of either the converging neutron guide or the cold-neutron PGAA system. The research already accomplished would have little value without testing the systems which had been designed. Thus the project was continued at a pace that could be sustained with internal funding.

  18. Neutron transport study of a beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaial, Anas M.

    Neutron radiography has the ability to differentiate between gas and liquid in two-phase flow due both to the density difference and the high neutron scattering probability of hydrogen. Previous studies have used dynamic neutron radiography -- in both real-time and high-speed -- for air-water, steam-water and gas-liquid metal two-phase flow measurements. Radiography with thermal neutrons is straightforward and efficient as thermal neutrons are easier to detect with relatively higher efficiency and can be easily extracted from nuclear reactor beam ports. The quality of images obtained using neutron radiography and the imaging speed depend on the neutron beam intensity at the imaging plane. A high quality neutron beam, with thermal neutron intensity greater than 3.0x 10 6 n/cm2-s and a collimation ratio greater than 100 at the imaging plane, is required for effective dynamic neutron radiography up to 2000 frames per second. The primary objectives of this work are: (1) to optimize a neutron radiography facility for dynamic neutron radiography applications and (2) to investigate a new technique for three-dimensional neutron radiography using information obtained from neutron scattering. In this work, neutron transport analysis and experimental validation of a dynamic neutron radiography facility is studied with consideration of real-time and high-speed neutron radiography requirements. A beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility, for a target thermal neutron flux of 1.0x107 n/cm2-s, has been analyzed, constructed and experimentally verified at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. The neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance is evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes using copper activation flux-mapping technique. The development of different facility components, such as beam tube liner, gamma ray filter, beam shutter and biological shield, is achieved analytically using neutron attenuation and divergence theories. Monte

  19. Ames collaborative study of cosmic ray neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, J. E.; Hughes, L.; Mccaslin, J. B.; Stephens, L. D.; Rindi, A.; Smith, A. R.; Thomas, R. H.; Griffith, R. V.; Welles, C. G.; Baum, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a collaborative study to define both the neutron flux and the spectrum more precisely and to develop a dosimetry package that can be flown quickly to altitude for solar flare events are described. Instrumentation and analysis techniques were used which were developed to measure accelerator-produced radiation. The instruments were flown in the Ames Research Center high altitude aircraft. Neutron instrumentation consisted of Bonner spheres with both active and passive detector elements, threshold detectors of both prompt-counter and activation-element types, a liquid scintillation spectrometer based on pulse-shape discrimination, and a moderated BF3 counter neutron monitor. In addition, charged particles were measured with a Reuter-Stokes ionization chamber system and dose equivalent with another instrument. Preliminary results from the first series of flights at 12.5 km (41,000 ft) are presented, including estimates of total neutron flux intensity and spectral shape and of the variation of intensity with altitude and geomagnetic latitude.

  20. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Susana C. M.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Leal, Ricardo M. F.; Mitchell, Edward P.; Forsyth, V. Trevor

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  1. Reactivity studies on the advanced neutron source. [Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Redmond, E.L. II; Fletcher, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) with a peak thermal neutron flux of about 8.5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} is being designed for condensed matter physics, materials science, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. The ANS is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady-state source of neutrons. The design effort is currently in the conceptual phase. A reference reactor design has been selected in order to examine the safety, performance, and costs associated with this one design. The ANS Project has an established, documented safety philosophy, and safety-related design criteria are currently being established. The purpose of this paper is to present analyses of safety aspects of the reference reactor design that are related to core reactivity events. These analyses include control rod worth, shutdown rod worth, heavy water voiding, neutron beam tube flooding, light water ingress, and single fuel element criticality. Understanding these safety aspects will allow us to make design modifications that improve the reactor safety and achieve the safety related design criteria. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Studies of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission using Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegl, Kevin; Aprahamian, A.; Scielzo, N. D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Burkey, M.; Caldwell, S.; Czeszumska, A.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Kolos, K.; Marley, S. T.; Morgan, G. E.; Norman, E. B.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Pérez Galván, A.; Sh, K. S.; Strauss, S. Y.; Wang, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Using a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap to confine radioactive ions allows indirect measurements of beta-delayed neutron (BDN) emission. By determining the recoil energy of the beta-decay daughter ions it is possible to study BDN emission, as the neutron emission can impart a significantly larger nuclear recoil than from beta-decay alone. This method avoids most of the systematic uncertainties associated with direct neutron detection but introduces dependencies on the specifics of the decay and interactions of the ion with the RF fields. The decays of seven BDN precursors were studied using the Beta-decay Paul Trap (BPT) to confine fission fragments from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The analysis of these measurements and results for the branching ratios and neutron energy spectra will be presented. Supported by the NSF under grant PHY-1419765, and the U.S. DOE under the NEUP project 13-5485, contracts DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL) and DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and award DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  3. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  4. Neutron reflectivity studies of ionomer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrys, B. J.; Bhutto, A. A.; Bucknall, D. G.; Braiewa, R.; Vesely, D.; Weiss, R. A.

    Preliminary results are presented of a neutron reflectivity study of the interfacial width between lithium- and zinc-sulphonated deuterated polystyrene with polycarbonate (PC). Both systems are partially miscible and exhibit an upper critical solution temperature behaviour. The interdiffusion in these systems was measured by annealing at a temperature above the glass-transition temperature of both polymers. The interfacial profiles obtained for these systems were described by symmetric Gaussian interfaces. No significant diffusion was observed.

  5. Neutron scattering study of dilute supercritical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, H.D.; Wignall, G.D.; Shah, V.M.; Londono, J.D.; Bienkowski, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    Dilute solutions in supercritical solvents exhibit interesting microstructures that are related to their dramatic macroscopic behavior. In typical attractive solutions, solutes are believed to be surrounded by clusters of solvent molecules, and solute molecules are believed to congregate in the vicinity of one another. Repulsive solutions, on the other hand, exhibit a local region of reduced solvent density around the solute with solute-solute congregation. Such microstructures influence solubility, partial molar volume, reaction kinetics, and many other properties. We have undertaken to observe these interesting microstructures directly by neutron scattering experiments on dilute noble gas systems including Ar. The three partial structure factors for such systems and the corresponding pair correlation functions can be determined by using the isotope substitution technique. The systems studied are uniquely suited for our objectives because of the large coherent neutron scattering length of the isotope {sup 36}Ar and because of the accurate potential energy functions that are available for use in molecular simulations and theoretical calculations to be compared with the scattering results. We will describe our experiment, the unique apparatus we have built for it, and the neutron scattering results from our initial allocations of beam time. We will also describe planned scattering experiments to follow those with noble gases, including study of long-chain molecules in supercritical solvents. Such studies will involve hydrocarbon mixtures with and without deuteration to provide contrast.

  6. Air bearing center cross gap of neutron stress spectrometer sample table support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Wu, Yunxin; Gong, Hai; Feng, Xiaolei

    2016-12-01

    A support system is the main load-bearing component of sample table for neutron stress spectrometer, and air bearing is an important element of a support system. The neutron stress spectrometer sample table was introduced, and the scheme for air bearing combination was selected. To study the performance of air bearing center cross gap, finite element models (FEMs) were established based on air motion and Reynolds equations, effects of air supply pressure, and gap parameters on the overturning moment and bearing capacity of air bearing center cross gap were analyzed. Results indicate that the width, depth, and height differences of the marble floor gap played important roles in the performance of the air bearing. When gap width is lesser than 1 mm and gap depth is lower than 0.4 mm, bearing capacity and overturning moment would vary rapidly with the variation of the width and depth. A gap height difference results in the bearing capacity dropping rapidly. The FEM results agree well with experimental results. Further, findings of the study could guide the design of the support system and marble floor.

  7. Exchange bias studied with polarized neutron reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    te Velthuis, S. G. E.

    2000-01-05

    The role of Polarized Neutron Reflectivity (PNR) for studying natural and synthetic exchange biased systems is illustrated. For a partially oxidized thin film of Co, cycling of the magnetic field causes a considerable reduction of the bias, which the onset of diffuse neutron scattering shows to be due to the loosening of the ferromagnetic domains. On the other hand, PNR measurements of a model exchange bias junction consisting of an n-layered Fe/Cr antiferromagnetic (AF) superlattice coupled with an m-layered Fe/Cr ferromagnetic (F) superlattice confirm the predicted collinear magnetization in the two superlattices. The two magnetized states of the F (along or opposite to the bias field) differ only in the relative orientation of the F and adjacent AF layer. The possibility of reading clearly the magnetic state at the interface pinpoints the commanding role that PNR is having in solving this intriguing problem.

  8. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Susana C M; Blakeley, Matthew P; Leal, Ricardo M F; Mitchell, Edward P; Forsyth, V Trevor

    2008-05-01

    A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 A on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin-receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  9. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Susana C. M.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Leal, Ricardo M. F.; Mitchell, Edward P.; Forsyth, V. Trevor

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste. PMID:18453706

  10. Neutron scattering studies of premartensitic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Elastic neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering are ideal techniques for studying premartensitic behavior in metallic alloys. By necessity, real, bulk samples are probed replete with their intrinsic defects. Also, because of the properties of the neutron it is straightforward to probe the behavior of the phonon modes away from the zone center which is probed in the normal ultrasonic techniques. A wide variety of alloys exhibiting martensitic transformations have been studied. It will be shown that most systems undergoing diffusionless transformations exhibit premartensitic behavior in that precursor effects are seen at temperatures well above the martensitic transformation temperature, T{sub M}. This behavior manifests itself in an anomalous temperature dependence of the energy of a particular phonon mode as the temperature approaches T{sub M}. The wavevector of this mode is frequently away from the zone center (i.e., q {ne} O). This softening is nearly always accompanied by elastic diffuse scattering at the same wavevector. Particular examples to be discussed are the alkali metals, {omega}-phase materials and Ni-based alloys. 34 refs., 9 figs.

  11. A Deuterated Neutron Detector Array For Nuclear (Astro)Physics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaraz-Calderon, Sergio; Asher, B. W.; Barber, P.; Hanselman, K.; Perello, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    The properties of neutron-rich nuclei are at the forefront of research in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics. The advent of intense rare isotope beams (RIBs) has opened a new door for studies of systems with very short half-lives and possible fascinating properties. Neutron spectroscopic techniques become increasingly relevant when these neutron rich nuclei are used in a variety of experiments. At Florida State University, we are developing a neutron detector array that will allow us to perform high-resolution neutron spectroscopic studies with stable and radioactive beams. The neutron detection system consists of 16 deuterated organic liquid scintillation detectors with fast response and pulse-shape discrimination capabilities. In addition to these properties, there is the potential to use the structure in the pulse-height spectra to extract the energy of the neutrons and thus produce directly excitation spectra. This type of detector uses deuterated benzene (C6D6) as the liquid scintillation medium. The asymmetric nature of the scattering between a neutron and a deuterium in the center of mass produces a pulse-height spectrum from the deuterated scintillator which contains useful information on the initial energy of the neutron. Work supported in part by the State of Florida and NSF Grant No. 1401574.

  12. Non-destructive studies of fuel pellets by neutron resonance absorption radiography and thermal neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Vogel, S. C.; Mocko, M.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Yuan, V.; Nelson, R. O.; Brown, D. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2013-09-01

    Many isotopes in nuclear materials exhibit strong peaks in neutron absorption cross sections in the epithermal energy range (1-1000 eV). These peaks (often referred to as resonances) occur at energies specific to particular isotopes, providing a means of isotope identification and concentration measurements. The high penetration of epithermal neutrons through most materials is very useful for studies where samples consist of heavy-Z elements opaque to X-rays and sometimes to thermal neutrons as well. The characterization of nuclear fuel elements in their cladding can benefit from the development of high resolution neutron resonance absorption imaging (NRAI), enabled by recently developed spatially-resolved neutron time-of-flight detectors. In this technique the neutron transmission of the sample is measured as a function of spatial location and of neutron energy. In the region of the spectra that borders the resonance energy for a particular isotope, the reduction in transmission can be used to acquire an image revealing the 2-dimensional distribution of that isotope within the sample. Provided that the energy of each transmitted neutron is measured by the neutron detector used and the irradiated sample possesses neutron absorption resonances, then isotope-specific location maps can be acquired simultaneously for several isotopes. This can be done even in the case where samples are opaque or have very similar transmission for thermal neutrons and X-rays or where only low concentrations of particular isotopes are present (<0.1 atom% in some cases). Ultimately, such radiographs of isotope location can be utilized to measure isotope concentration, and can even be combined to produce three-dimensional distributions using tomographic methods. In this paper we present the proof-of-principle of NRAI and transmission Bragg edge imaging performed at Flight Path 5 (FP5) at the LANSCE pulsed, moderated neutron source of Los Alamos National Laboratory. A set of urania mockup

  13. Neutron diffraction studies of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.C.; Erwin Desa, J.A.; Weeks, R.A.; Sinclair, R.N.; Bailey, D.K.

    1983-08-01

    A neutron diffraction investigation has been carried out of the structures of several naturally occurring glasses, viz. Libyan Desert glass, a Fulgurite, Wabar glass, Lechatelierite from Canon Diablo, a Tektite, Obsidian (3 samples), and Macusani glass. Libyan Desert sand has also been examined, together with crystalline ..cap alpha..-quartz and ..cap alpha..-cristobalite. A comparison of data for the natural glasses and synthetic vitreous silica (Spectrosil B) in both reciprocal and real space allows a categorisation into Silicas, which closely resemble synthetic vitreous silica, and Silicates, for which the resemblance to silica is consistently less striking. The data support the view that Libyan Desert glass and sand have a common origin, while the Tektite has a structure similar to that of volcanic glasses.

  14. Neutron scattering studies of amorphous Invar alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews recent inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed to study the spin dynamics of two amorphous Invar systems: Fe/sub 100-x/B/sub x/ and Fe/sub 90-x/Ni/sub x/Zr/sub 10/. As in crystalline Invar Fe/sub 65/Ni/sub 35/ and Fe/sub 3/Pt, the excitation of conventional long-wavelength spin waves in these amorphous systems cannot account for the relatively rapid change of their magnetization with temperature. These results are discussed in terms of additional low-lying excitations which apparently have a density of states similar to the spin waves.

  15. NEUTRONIC ANALYSES TO SUPPORT WASTE MANAGEMENT FOR SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina I; Gallmeier, Franz X; Trotter, Steven M; Dayton, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    According to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) operations plan the facility components are replaced, when they reach their end-of-life. These components must be safely removed, placed in a container for storage, and transported from the site. In order to classify components and suggest appropriate shipping container an accurate estimate of the radionuclide inventory is performed. After choice for the container is made, it is being modelled with the facility component, placed inside, in order to perform transport calculations to ensure that the container is compliant with the waste management regulations

  16. Neutron structure and mechanistic studies of diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Julian C.-H.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Schoenborn, Benno P.; Langan, Paul; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2010-11-01

    The structure and mechanism of diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) have been studied using a variety of methods, including isotopic labelling, X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography. The neutron structure of DFPase, mechanistic studies and subsequent rational design efforts are described. Diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) is a calcium-dependent phosphotriesterase that acts on a variety of highly toxic organophosphorus compounds that act as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase. The mechanism of DFPase has been probed using a variety of methods, including isotopic labelling, which demonstrated the presence of a phosphoenzyme intermediate in the reaction mechanism. In order to further elucidate the mechanism of DFPase and to ascertain the protonation states of the residues and solvent molecules in the active site, the neutron structure of DFPase was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. The proposed nucleophile Asp229 is deprotonated, while the active-site solvent molecule W33 was identified as water and not hydroxide. These data support a mechanism involving direct nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on the substrate and rule out a mechanism involving metal-assisted water activation. These data also allowed for the re-engineering of DFPase through rational design to bind and productively orient the more toxic S{sub P} stereoisomers of the nerve agents sarin and cyclosarin, creating a modified enzyme with enhanced overall activity and significantly increased detoxification properties.

  17. Development of Neutron Absorbers to Support Disposal of DOE SNF

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, William Lon; Mizia, Ronald Eugene; T. E. Lister; P. J. Pinhero; Robino, C. V.; J. N. Dupont

    2003-03-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, coordinates and integrates national efforts in management and disposal of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)- owned . These management functions include using the DOE standardized canister for packaging, storage, treatment, transport, and long-term disposal. Nuclear criticality control measures are needed in these canisters because of the enrichment and total quantity of fissile material in some types of the DOE spent nuclear fuel. This paper will report the test results of one alloy heat from a metallurgical development program that is developing nickelchromium- molybdenum-gadolinium alloys for nuclear criticality control in the DOE standardized canister. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. The microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance of various alloys will be presented. These corrosion resistant, structural alloys can be used to fabricate components of spent nuclear fuel storage racks, storage canisters and internal structural baskets, and transportation cask internals. The focus of this work is to qualify these materials for American Society of Mechanical Engineers code qualification and acceptance in the Yucca Mountain Repository.

  18. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  19. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  20. Theoretical study on neutron distribution of 208Pb by parity-violating electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Cun; Ren, Zhong-Zhou; Xu, Chang

    2016-03-01

    The precise determination of neutron distribution has important implications for both nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The purpose of this paper is to study the characteristics of neutron distribution of 208Pb by parity-violating electron scattering (PVS). Parity-violating asymmetries of 208Pb with different types of neutron skins are systematically calculated and compared with the experimental data of PREx. The results indicate that the PVS experiments are very sensitive to the nuclear neutron distributions. From further PVS measurements, detailed information on nuclear neutron distributions can be extracted. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11505292, 11175085, 11235001, 11447226), by the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (BS2014SF007), by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (15CX02072A, 15CX02070A, 15CX05026A, 13CX10022A, 14CX02157A).

  1. Neutron scattering studies of 54,56Fe with monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B. M.; Henderson, S. L.; Sidwell, L. C.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Garza, E.; Steves, J.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Prados-Estevez, F. M.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-10-01

    Neutron scattering data for Fe are important for the development of next generation fission reactors, since Fe is an important structural material in all proposed reactor designs, as well as in existing reactors. How neutrons interact with Fe has an important impact on fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of fission reactors. While differential scattering cross sections have been previously measured at several incident neutron energies in the fast neutron region, questions remain regarding the uncertainties for existing cross sections and for neutron inelastic scattering. Elastic and inelastic differential scattering cross sections have been measured on 54,56Fe at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory in the fast neutron energy region between 1.7 and 4 MeV. Results from our measurements and comparisons to model calculations will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the Department of Energy under grant NEUP: NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and by the Cowan Physics Fund at the Univ. of Dallas.

  2. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1995-03-06

    Funds were received for the first year of a three year DOE Nuclear Engineering Research Grant, ``Study of Neutron Focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source`` (FGO2-92ER75711). The purpose of this three year study was to develop a neutron focusing system to be used with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of neutrons. A prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility was also to be designed, setup, and tested under the three year project. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which we wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, we obtained gains of 3 to 5 for the neutron flux averaged over an area of 1 {times} 1 cm.

  3. Neutrons scattering studies in the actinide region

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1992-09-01

    During the report period were investigated the following areas: prompt fission neutron energy spectra measurements; neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from [sup 239]Pu; neutron scattering in [sup 181]Ta and [sup 197]Au; response of a [sup 235]U fission chamber near reaction thresholds; two-parameter data acquisition system; black'' neutron detector; investigation of neutron-induced defects in silicon dioxide; and multiple scattering corrections. Four Ph.D. dissertations and one M.S. thesis were completed during the report period. Publications consisted of three journal articles, four conference papers in proceedings, and eleven abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. There are currently four Ph.D. and one M.S. candidates working on dissertations directly associated with the project. In addition, three other Ph.D. candidates are working on dissertations involving other aspects of neutron physics in this laboratory.

  4. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region. Progress report, August 1, 1991--July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    During the period August 1, 1991 to July 31, 1994 the authors report progress on the following: (a) prompt fission neutron energy spectra for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu; (b) two-parameter measurement of nuclear lifetimes; (c) `black` neutron detector; (d) data reduction techniques for neutron scattering experiments; (e) elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in {sup 197}Au; (f) elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in {sup 239}Pu; (g) neutron induced defects in silicon dioxide MOS structures; (h) response of a {sup 235}U fission chamber near reaction thresholds; (i) efficiency calibration of a liquid scintillation detector using the WNR facility at LAMPF; (j) prompt fission neutron energy spectrum measurements below the incident neutron energy; (k) multi-parameter data acquisition system; (l) accelerator improvements; (m) non-DOE supported research. Eight Ph.D. dissertations and two M.S. theses were completed during the report period. Publications consisted of 6 journal articles, 10 conference proceedings, and 19 abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. One invited talk was given.

  5. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  6. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  7. Neutron diffraction studies of thin film multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Majkrzak, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    The application of neutron diffraction methods to the study of the microscopic chemical and magnetic structures of thin film multilayers is reviewed. Multilayer diffraction phenomena are described in general and in particular for the case in which one of the materials of a bilayer is ferromagnetic and the neutron beam polarized. Recent neutron diffraction measurements performed on some interesting multilayer systems are discussed. 70 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Use of ultracold neutrons for condensed-matter studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michaudon, A.

    1997-05-01

    Ultracold neutrons have such low velocities that they are reflected by most materials at all incident angles and can be stored in material bottles for long periods of time during which their intrinsic properties can be studied in great detail. These features have been mainly used for fundamental-physics studies including the detection of a possible neutron electric dipole moment and the precise determination of neutron-decay properties. Ultracold neutrons can also play a role in condensed-matter studies with the help of high-resolution spectrometers that use gravity as a strongly dispersive medium for low-velocity neutrons. Such studies have so far been limited by the low intensity of existing ultracold-neutron sources but could be reconsidered with more intense sources, which are now envisaged. This report provides a broad survey of the properties of ultracold neutrons (including their reflectivity by different types of samples), of ultracold-neutron spectrometers that are compared with other high-resolution instruments, of results obtained in the field of condensed matter with these instruments, and of neutron microscopes. All these subjects are illustrated by numerous examples.

  9. Support effects studied on model supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gorte, R.J.

    1993-02-01

    Composition and structure of oxide support materials can change the catalytic behavior of metal and oxide catalysts. Model catalysts are being studied in which the active phase is deposited on flat oxide substrates, with emphasis on metals catalysis for automotive emissions control and acidity in supported oxides. Research is reported in the following areas: particle-size effects, support effects on ZnO and zirconia, support effects on ceria, supported oxides, and low energy ion scattering (no results in the latter).

  10. Study of a Loop Heat Pipe Using Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    C. Thomas Conroy; A. A. El-Ganayni; David R. Riley; John M. Cimbala; Jack S. Brenizer, Jr.; Abel Po-Ya Chuang; Shane Hanna

    2001-08-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, has been identified with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design.

  11. Neutron damage studies of organic materials with NQR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.E.; Jamil, K. )

    1992-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques for the evaluation of radiation damage to materials exposed to neutrons provide valuable methods for monitoring neutron-induced radiation damage. Radiation damage to many organic materials is difficult to monitor without destructive testing. The authors present a new technique for the evaluation of neutron-induced radiation damage based on nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) techniques. This demonstrates the NQR response to neutron damage in two organic materials and provides quantitative estimates of microdosimetry and damage sites associated with neutron-induced damage in these materials. They have used {sup 14}N as a probe nucleus to detect molecular bonding changes induced by neutron irradiation. For these studies, two simple, nitrogen containing, organic materials known to provide strong NQR signals were chosen: urea (CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}) and thiourea (CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}).

  12. Study of a loop heat pipe using neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Cimbala, John M; Brenizer, Jack S; Chuang, Abel Po-Ya; Hanna, Shane; Thomas Conroy, C; El-Ganayni, A A; Riley, David R

    2004-10-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, is potentially identifiable with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design.

  13. TEM study of neutron-irradiated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, L.L.; Bentley, J.; Farrell, K.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a transmission electron microscopy study of the defect structure in iron neutron-irradiated to low fluences (less than or equal to 1 dpa) at temperatures of 455 to 1013/sup 0/K are presented. The dislocation microstructures coarsen with increasing irradiation temperature from decorated dislocations, through clusters of dislocation loops, to near-edge, interstitial dislocation loops with b = a<100>, and network segments. Significant cavity formation occurred only at 548 to 723/sup 0/K, with homogeneous distributions found only at 623 and 673/sup 0/K. The maximum swelling of 0.07% occurred at 673/sup 0/K. Large cavities had a truncated octahedral shape with (111) facets and (100) truncations. Damage halos were observed around boron-containing precipitates. The effects of interstitial impurities on microstructural development and the differences in the observed microstructures compared to those in refractory bcc metals are discussed. 8 figures, 6 tables.

  14. Neutron shielding of the GDT (Novosibirsk) neutron generator project -- A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Robouch, B.V.; Ingrosso, L.; Brzosko, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents results of extensive neutronic studies of the neutron source test facility based on the Novosibirsk Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT). The facility is to provide 10{sup 18} SDT-neutrons/s (over a continuous 10-year period) for material-test studies. The paper examines the protective-shield capacity to ensure survival of GDT vital parts and suggests design modifications when survival is in jeopardy. The numerical studies used the 3D-AMC-VINIA Monte Carlo code with a precise computer representation of the sensitive parts of the facility. Intensity maps were plotted for neutron fluences, displacements, heat deposition, etc. Shielding feasibility has been ascertained, and the lifetime of consumable components ensured beyond the recommended values. A modification is suggested to extend the irradiation space at HARD neutron energy spectra to increase the volume to 1 m{sup 3} with damage gradients <5%/cm. The design achieves neutron fluences close to 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s (3.10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} end-of-life) in a >100 {ell} test space.

  15. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region. Progress report, August 1, 1992--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Prompt fission neutron energy spectra for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu; Two-parameter measurement of nuclear lifetimes; ``Black`` neutron detector; Data reduction techniques for neutron scattering experiments; Inelastic neutron scattering studies in {sup 197}Au; Elastic and inelastic scattering studies in {sup 239}Pu; and neutron induced defects in silicon dioxide MOS structures.

  16. Applying an analytical method to study neutron behavior for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, S. A. Mousavi

    2016-12-01

    In this investigation, a new dosimetry process is studied by applying an analytical method. This novel process is associated with a human liver tissue. The human liver tissue has compositions including water, glycogen and etc. In this study, organic compound materials of liver are decomposed into their constituent elements based upon mass percentage and density of every element. The absorbed doses are computed by analytical method in all constituent elements of liver tissue. This analytical method is introduced applying mathematical equations based on neutron behavior and neutron collision rules. The results show that the absorbed doses are converged for neutron energy below 15MeV. This method can be applied to study the interaction of neutrons in other tissues and estimating the absorbed dose for a wide range of neutron energy.

  17. Studies of D-Li neutron source: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-06-01

    The construction of a neutron source facility able to reproduce the radiation environment predicted for a fusion reactor can be considered a very important milestone for the fusion program. Such a neutron source should allow materials testing over a wide range of neutron flux and neutron fluence. To date, none of the existing facilities reproduce the neutron flux with the energy spectrum of a fusion reactor. As a result, the major part of the required material database is obtained by extrapolations which may not be as reliable as needed to predict the real performance of those materials under fusion reactor conditions. As an example, the effect of the gas production, transmutation, atomic displacement, and other nuclear responses on the ductility and swelling and perhaps other properties as well, must be analyzed in samples which have undergone reactor conditions environment. This study is focused on the neutronics analysis of a D-Li neutron source. Neutron induced nuclear responses and neutron transport are calculated with the aim at defining the expected performance of a D-Li neutron source. The first section describes the differences in the magnitude of the neutron flux when material is present or not inside the test cell The second section deals with nuclear responses such as DPA, helium production, and nuclear heating. In the third section, calculations of the available volume above a threshold DPA value are presented. Section four presents results for the gamma-ray flux distribution. A brief discussion about tritium generation in the lithium jet is given in section live, and the conclusions are summarized in section six.

  18. Neutron beta decay studies with Nab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeßler, S.; Alarcon, R.; Alonzi, L. P.; Balascuta, S.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Bowman, J. D.; Bychkov, M. A.; Byrne, J.; Calarco, J. R.; Chupp, T.; Cianciolo, T. V.; Crawford, C.; Frlež, E.; Gericke, M. T.; Glück, F.; Greene, G. L.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Gudkov, V.; Harrison, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Ito, T.; Makela, M.; Martin, J.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGovern, S.; Page, S.; Penttilä, S. I.; Počanić, D.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Tompkins, Z.; Wagner, D.; Wilburn, W. S.; Young, A. R.

    2013-10-01

    Precision measurements in neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay and allow for several stringent tests of the standard model. This paper discusses the design and the expected performance of the Nab spectrometer.

  19. Neutron Activation Analysis, A Titanium Material Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresser, Charles

    2011-04-01

    In order to obtain faster and more accurate measurements of radioactive contaminates within a sample of titanium we expose it to a neutron flux. This flux will activate the stable and quasi stable (those with extremely long half lives) isotopes into resultant daughter cells that are unstable which will result in shorter half lives on the order of minutes to days. We measured the resulting decays in the Germanium Crystal Detector and obtained a complex gamma spectrum. A mathematical model was used to recreate the production of the measured isotopes in the neutron flux and the resultant decays. Using this model we calculated the mass percent of the contaminate isotopes inside our titanium sample. Our mathematical model accounted for two types of neutron activation, fast or thermal activation, since this would determine which contaminate was the source of our signals. By looking at the percent abundances, neutron absorption cross-sections and the resulting mass percents of each contaminate we are able to determine the exact source of our measured signals. Additionally we implemented a unique ratio method to cross check the mathematical model. Our results have verified that for fast neutron activation and thermal neutron activation the method is accurate.

  20. Phase I measurements for the HTGR bottom reflector and Core Support Block Neutron-Streaming Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Holland, L.B.; Hull, J.L.; Manning, J.J.

    1984-07-01

    This report presents the Phase I measurements of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Bottom Reflector and Core Support Neutron Streaming Experiment conducted at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility during FY-1983. In this phase the first four of eight segments that comprise the full experimental mockup were utilized. These were: (1) an upper boron pin layer (graphite matrix) followed by a boral shroud; (2) a graphite reflector layer; (3) a graphite coolant crossover layer; and (4) a graphite follow-on layer, all containing coolant holes. A collimated beam from the Tower Shielding Reactor II was used as the neutron source. In order to obtain a spectrum of neutrons more nearly like the spectrum expected from the HTGR, an iron and graphite spectrum modifier was inserted in the TSR-II beam ahead of the experimental mockup. The various experimental configurations tested resulted from the successive addition of the four graphite layers to the mockup. Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the spectrum modifier and the boron pin layer and integral neutron fluxes were measured behind the spectrum modifier and behind each of the four layers. The measurements were divided into two Parts, the two parts differing in the composition of the boron pin layer. During part I, a reference pin pattern was used which consisted of a combination of graphite and boronated graphite pins. During part II, a full pattern of boronated graphite pins was used. The experimental data are presented in both tabular and graphical form.

  1. Advanced life support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Summary reports on each of the eight tasks undertaken by this contract are given. Discussed here is an evaluation of a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS), including modeling and analysis of Physical/Chemical Closed Loop Life Support (P/C CLLS); the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) evolution - Intermodule Ventilation study; advanced technologies interface requirements relative to ECLSS; an ECLSS resupply analysis; the ECLSS module addition relocation systems engineering analysis; an ECLSS cost/benefit analysis to identify rack-level interface requirements of the alternate technologies evaluated in the ventilation study, with a comparison of these with the rack level interface requirements for the baseline technologies; advanced instrumentation - technology database enhancement; and a clean room survey and assessment of various ECLSS evaluation options for different growth scenarios.

  2. MCNPX Simulation Study of STRAW Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Stephen Mitchell

    2010-01-08

    A novel prototype fission meter is being designed at National Security Technologies, LLC, using a thin uniform coating (only 1 micron thick) of {sup 10}B as a neutron converter inside a large array of thin (4 mm diameter) copper tubes. The copper tubes are only 2 mils thick, and each holds the stretched anode wire under tension and high voltage. The tubes are filled with proportional counter gas (a mixture of 90%/10% of Ar/CO{sub 2}). The tubes operate in proportional counter mode and attract mobile charged particles ({alpha}'s) created in the nuclear interaction {sup 10}B(n, {sup 4}He){sup 7}Li. However, a single tube has about 1/7th the sensitivity of a {sup 3}He tube. Modeling is required to determine if enough such tubes could be placed in a neutron detection assembly of the current size to give comparable sensitivity to {sup 3}He. Detectors lined with {sup 10}B lie between {sup 3}He and {sup 10}BF{sub 3} proportional counters and fission chambers in terms of neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray insensitivity. The mean free path of thermal neutrons in {sup 10}B is about 18 {micro}m. It takes about 60 {micro}m of {sup 10}B layer to completely stop thermal neutrons, but the energetic {alpha}-particles generated in the reaction have a range of only 3.3 {micro}m in {sup 10}B environment - hence the thin layer of boron coating on the copper tube. The prototype design is shown in Figure 1. It consists of two panels of three staggered rows of 500-mm-long, 4-mm-diameter straws, with 20 in each row, embedded in 30-mm-thick high density polyethylene (HDPE). The project demonstrates a new application of thin neutron and gamma converter technique (1 micron thin {sup 10}B coated copper tube). It exploits fast timing from multiple straw detectors to count multiplicity of both gamma and neutrons from fissioning materials. The objective is to find a near-term replacement of {sup 3}He gas in neutron detection and measurement (with a very large neutron detection area). All

  3. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  4. Study of SMM flares in gamma-rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research supported by NASA grant NAGW-2755 and lists the papers and publications produced through the grant. The objective of the work was to study solar flares that produced observable signals from high-energy (greater than 10 MeV) gamma-rays and neutrons in the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS). In 3 of 4 flares that had been studied previously, most of the neutrons and neutral pions appear to have been produced after the 'main' impulsive phase as determined from hard x-rays and gamma-rays. We, therefore, proposed to analyze the timing of the high-energy radiation, and its implications for the acceleration, trapping, and transport of flare particles. It was equally important to characterize the spectral shapes of the interacting energetic electrons and protons - another key factor in constraining possible particle acceleration mechanisms. In section 2.0, we discuss the goals of the research. In section 3.0, we summarize the results of the research. In section 4.0, we list the papers and publications produced under the grant. Preprints or reprints of the publications are attached as appendices.

  5. In-Plane Correlations in a Polymer-Supported Lipid Membrane Measured by Off-Specular Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablin, Michael S.; Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Toperverg, Boris P.; Dubey, Manish; Smith, Hillary L.; Vidyasagar, Ajay; Toomey, Ryan; Hurd, Alan J.; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2011-04-01

    Polymer-supported single lipid bilayers are models to study configurations of cell membranes. We used off-specular neutron scattering to quantify in-plane height-height correlations of interfacial fluctuations of such a lipid bilayer. As temperature decreased from 37°C to 25°C, the polymer swells and the polymer-supported lipid membrane deviates from its initially nearly planar structure. A correlation length characteristic of capillary waves changes from 30μm at 37°C to 11μm at 25°C, while the membrane bending rigidity remains roughly constant in this temperature range.

  6. Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries (ANSL-V): ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E. III; Arwood, J.W.; Greene, N.M.; Moses, D.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Slater, C.O.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1990-09-01

    Pseudo-problem-independent, multigroup cross-section libraries were generated to support Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor design studies. The ANS is a proposed reactor which would be fueled with highly enriched uranium and cooled with heavy water. The libraries, designated ANSL-V (Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries based on ENDF/B-V), are data bases in AMPX master format for subsequent generation of problem-dependent cross-sections for use with codes such as KENO, ANISN, XSDRNPM, VENTURE, DOT, DORT, TORT, and MORSE. Included in ANSL-V are 99-group and 39-group neutron, 39-neutron-group 44-gamma-ray-group secondary gamma-ray production (SGRP), 44-group gamma-ray interaction (GRI), and coupled, 39-neutron group 44-gamma-ray group (CNG) cross-section libraries. The neutron and SGRP libraries were generated primarily from ENDF/B-V data; the GRI library was generated from DLC-99/HUGO data, which is recognized as the ENDF/B-V photon interaction data. Modules from the AMPX and NJOY systems were used to process the multigroup data. Validity of selected data from the fine- and broad-group neutron libraries was satisfactorily tested in performance parameter calculations.

  7. Neutron spectrum studies in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.; Putnam, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been and currently is used to provide irradiation fields to study the effects of intense radiation on samples of reactor materials. These samples include fuel, cladding, control and structural materials. The ATR is also used to irradiate target materials for the production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications as well as for scientific research. Routine monitoring of the thermal'' and fast'' neutron levels have been conducted during every operational cycle since its startup in 1970. The routine neutron dosimetry has been primarily accomplished using the {sup 59}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 60}Co reaction for thermal'' neutrons and the {sup 58}Ni(n,p) {sup 58}Co reaction for fast'' neutrons as described in ASTM standard methods E261, E262, and E264. Neutron spectrum studies have now been conducted in the epithermal and fast neutron energy ranges for the various capsule irradiation test facilities and the routine neutron monitoring locations. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Trojan Horse Method for neutrons-induced reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulino, M.; Asfin Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced reactions play an important role in nuclear astrophysics in several scenario, such as primordial Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Inhomogeneous Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, heavy-element production during the weak component of the s-process, explosive stellar nucleosynthesis. To overcome the experimental problems arising from the production of a neutron beam, the possibility to use the Trojan Horse Method to study neutron-induced reactions has been investigated. The application is of particular interest for reactions involving radioactive nuclei having short lifetime.

  9. Mass Study of the Neutron Deficient Nulceus ^68Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, T.; Davids, C.; Penttila, H.; Blumenthal, D.; Lister, C.; Busse, B.; Batchelder, J.; Walters, W.; Conticchio, L.; Mustillo, D.; Ramayya, A. V.

    1998-10-01

    For the last few decades, many groups have made innovative attempts to study the properties of the neutron deficient nucleus ^68Se. Due to the small production cross section and the inability to quickly and definitely separate ^68Se from other reaction products, the search has thus far been incomplete. With the Fragment Mass Analyzer at Argonne National Lab, the halflife and β+ decay scheme were measured and found to agree with that of a previous work (P. Baumann et al., Phys. Rev. C50 R1180(1994)). A mass measurement was also performed. The latter piece of information is critical for nuclear synthesis models in regard to the rp process. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Nuclear Physics Division, under contract W-31-109-ENG-38 and by the NSF.

  10. Neutron capture autoradiographic study of the biodistribution of 10B in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ogura, K; Yanagie, H; Eriguchi, M; Lehmann, E H; Kühne, G; Bayon, G; Kobayashi, H

    2004-10-01

    For the study on boron neutron capture therapy, the whole-body sections of tumor-bearing mice infused with 10B attached to CR-39 plastic track detectors were exposed to thermal and cold neutron beams. Neutron capture autoradiographic images obtained by the cold neutron irradiation were extremely superior in quality to those of the thermal neutron beams. From the autoradiographic images, the 10B reaction dose of the neutron-induced particles was estimated using the differential LET distribution.

  11. Neutron scattering study on U-dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metoki, N.; Kaneko, K.; Ikeda, S.; Sakai, H.; Yamamoto, E.; Haga, Y.; Homma, Y.; Shiokawa, Y.

    2010-03-01

    We will report the results of our recent inelastic neutron scattering study on β-US2. This compound shows a semi-metallic or narrow gap semi-conducting behaviour at room temperature. A clear exponential up-turn of the resistivity in the order of ~106 Ωcm has been observed below 100 K. We found a sharp inelastic peak at the excitation energy of about 7 meV at 8 K. The Q-dependence of the peak intensity is in good agreement with the magnetic form factor of U4+ ion and no clear dispersion relation has been observed. Therefore we concluded that this is a crystalline electric field (CEF) excitation peak. The excitation energy is in good agreement with the CEF level scheme obtained from the susceptibility data. The CEF peak intensity decreases with increasing temperature and becomes much weaker than the calculated temperature factor expected from the CEF level scheme. Furthermore a quasi-elastic response appears, and coexists with a broadened CEF peak at higher temperatures. The quasi-elastic component is not due to phonon, because the temperature dependence of the intensity is inconsistent with calculation. We concluded that this quasi-elastic response is a hybridization effect of U-5f electrons with, most likely, p-electrons of sulfur. It is highly interesting that the energy scale of the CEF peak (~7 meV) is very close to the conduction gap (90K), and the quasi-elastic component appears above the characteristic temperature of about 100 K. Our data strongly suggest that the crossover of 5f character plays an import role for the metal-insulating transition in β-US2.

  12. Beta-delayed neutron emission studies with a C7LYC array at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Gemma; Chowdhury, Partha; Lister, Christopher; Brown, Tristan; Carpenter, Michael; Chillery, Thomas; Copp, Patrick; Doucet, Emery; Mitchell, Alan; Savard, Guy; Zhu, Shaofei

    2016-09-01

    This work is a study of β-delayed neutron and γ emission from 94Rb at CARIBU. Beta-delayed neutron emission studies are important in the astrophysical r-process, nuclear structure and for nuclear reactor safety and design. Approximately 150 γ rays are known in the daughter 94Sr, many of which are unplaced. An estimated 26% of γ rays are thought to be missing. The probability of β-delayed neutron emission in 94Sr is 10.2(2)%. Recently, substantial γ-decay from above the neutron separation energy in 94Rb has been reported. This research is aimed at understanding this high-lying γ-strength. The experiment employed the X-Array (a high efficiency HPGe clover array), SCANS (Small CLYC Array for Neutron Scattering) and the SATURN decay station (Scintillator And Tape Using Radioactive Nuclei) for γ, fast neutron and β-particle detection, respectively. Data were collected in a triggerless digital data acquisition system, with detected β , n , and γ events correlated offline. Techniques, analysis and first results will be discussed. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance Program under Grant DE-NA00013008, and by US DoE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  13. Thermal-hydraulic studies of the Advanced Neutron Source cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was to be a user-oriented neutron research facility producing the most intense steady-state flux of thermal and cold neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the production of cold neutrons was a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410-mm-diam sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design were performed with heat conduction simulations of the vessel walls and multidimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This report presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that were planned to verify the final design.

  14. A study on the optimum fast neutron flux for boron neutron capture therapy of deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-02-01

    High-energy neutrons, named fast neutrons which have a number of undesirable biological effects on tissue, are a challenging problem in beam designing for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. In spite of this fact, there is not a widely accepted criterion to guide the beam designer to determine the appropriate contribution of fast neutrons in the spectrum. Although a number of researchers have proposed a target value for the ratio of fast neutron flux to epithermal neutron flux, it can be shown that this criterion may not provide the optimum treatment condition. This simulation study deals with the determination of the optimum contribution of fast neutron flux in the beam for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. Since the dose due to these high-energy neutrons damages shallow tissues, delivered dose to skin is considered as a measure for determining the acceptability of the designed beam. To serve this purpose, various beam shaping assemblies that result in different contribution of fast neutron flux are designed. The performances of the neutron beams corresponding to such configurations are assessed in a simulated head phantom. It is shown that the previously used criterion, which suggests a limit value for the contribution of fast neutrons in beam, does not necessarily provide the optimum condition. Accordingly, it is important to specify other complementary limits considering the energy of fast neutrons. By analyzing various neutron spectra, two limits on fast neutron flux are proposed and their validity is investigated. The results show that considering these limits together with the widely accepted IAEA criteria makes it possible to have a more realistic assessment of sufficiency of the designed beam. Satisfying these criteria not only leads to reduction of delivered dose to skin, but also increases the advantage depth in tissue and delivered dose to tumor during the treatment time. The Monte Carlo Code, MCNP-X, is used to perform these simulations.

  15. Neutron Imaging Studies of In Situ Growth of Neutron and Gamma Detector Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strange, Nicholas; Crain, Christopher; Wahida, Fatema; Stroupe, Zach; Larese, J. Z.

    The studies described here are aimed at addressing the critical need to develop dependable crystal growth techniques of solid-state materials used as radiation detectors for both national security and medical applications. We present our activities using pulsed neutron, radiographic imaging and simultaneous diffraction techniques to examine the synthesis of both CZT and CLYC with the goal of identifying the conditions that favor the production of defect free materials. Using a pulsed neutron beam and time of flight detection methods, we exploit the penetrating power and wavelength dependence of neutron absorption to perform measurements during crystal growth. Furthermore, solid boules can be examined either inside the furnace or free standing. The objective of these studies include the validation/improvement of the modeling studies of CLYC and CZT growth behavior, the development of new/improved furnace design, and the identification of optimum growth techniques that enable the production of large boules of defect free, single crystalline materials in a timely/cost effective manner. We provide our preliminary results that include the experiential setup at LANSCE and sample neutron radiographic and synchrotron based IR images of CZT flat solid plates.

  16. Slow Neutron Velocity Spectrometer Transmission Studies Of Pu

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Havens, W. W. Jr.; Melkonian, E.; Rainwater, L. J.; Levin, M.

    1951-05-28

    The slow neutron transmission of several samples of Pu has been investigated with the Columbia Neutron Velocity Spectrometer. Data are presented in two groups, those covering the energy region from 0 to 6 ev, and those covering the region above 6 ev. Below 6 ev the resolution was relatively good, and a detailed study of the cross section variation was made. Work above 6 ev consisted of merely locating levels and obtaining a rough idea of their strengths.

  17. Time Resolved Neutron Reflectivity During Supported Membrane Formation by Vesicle Fusion.

    PubMed

    Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Lairez, Didier

    2017-09-05

    The formation of supported lipid bilayers (SLB) on hydrophilic substrates through the method of unilamelar vesicle fusion is used routinely in a wide range of biophysical studies. In an effort to control and better understand the fusion process on the substrate, many experimental studies employing different techniques have been devoted to the elucidation of the fusion mechanism. In the present work we follow the kinetics of membrane formation using time-resolved (TR) neutron reflectivity, focussing at the structural changes near the solid/liquid interface. A clear indication of stacked bilayer structure is observed during the intermediate phase of SLB formation. Adsorbed lipid mass decrease is also measured at the final stage of the process. We have found that it is essential for the analysis of the experimental results to treat theoretically the shape of adsorbed lipid vesicles on an attractive substrate. The overall findings are discussed in relation to proposed fusion mechanisms from previous literature, while we argue that our observations favour a model involving enhanced adhesion of incoming vesicles on the edges of already formed bilayer patches.

  18. Neutron diffraction study of the zeolite edingtonite

    SciTech Connect

    Kvick, A.; Smith, J.V.

    1983-09-01

    A neutron diffraction study at 294 K of a single crystal of edingtonite (Ba/sub 2/Al/sub 4/Si/sub 6/O/sub 20/ x 7H/sub 2/O; a 9.537(3) b 9.651(2) c 6.509(2) A; P2/sub 1/2/sub 1/2) utilized 1876 diffraction intensities from the Brookhaven National Laboratory high-flux beam reactor. The agreement factor R(F/sup 2/) = 0.055 for conventional anisotropic refinement was reduced to 0.045 for a Gram--Charlier expansion up to fourth order for the thermal factors of the water atoms. The Si--O and Al--O distances correlate inversely with the Si--O--Al angle as in scolecite. There is no indication of substitutional disorder. The barium atom is coordinated to three pairs of framework oxygens (2.89, 2.96, and 3.04 A) and two pairs of water oxygens (2.79 and 2.79 A). Two framework oxygens have weak hydrogen bonds to both water molecules (O(4)--OW(1) 2.87, -OW(2) 2.96; O(5) -OW(1) 3.02, -OW(2) 3.02 A) and the other three framework oxygens are each bonded to a Ba atom. The OW--H xxx O angles (163.5/sup 0/, 165.1/sup 0/, 173.9/sup 0/, and 178.0/sup 0/) are fairly close to 180/sup 0/, the H xxx O distances are long (1.91, 2.02, 2.09, and 2.10 A) and the observed uncorrected OW--H distances range from 0.928(6) to 0.959(4) A. Only seven out of the eight water positions are occupied (W(1) 84% occupancy; W(2) 91%). The average rms displacement of each hydrogen (0.32, 0.29, 0.27, and 0.24 A) correlates approximately with the hydrogen bond length (2.09, 2.10, 2.02, and 1.91 A). Third- and fourth-order tensor components in the displacements of the water molecules may result from anharmonic or curvilinear vibrations; however, the effect of the static displacements of the center-of-motion from interaction with unoccupied water sites may also be important.

  19. Neutron scattering study of unconventional superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seunghun

    2014-06-30

    My group’s primary activity at the University of Virginia supported by DOE is to study novel electronic, magnetic, and structural phenomena that emerge out of strong interactions between electrons. Some of these phenomena are unconventional superconductivity, exotic states in frustrated magnets, quantum spin liquid states, and magneto-electricity. The outcome of our research funded by the grant advanced microscopic understanding of the emergence of the collective states in the systems.

  20. Using Neutrons to Study Fluid-Rock Interactions in Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiStefano, V. H.; McFarlane, J.; Anovitz, L. M.; Gordon, A.; Hale, R. E.; Hunt, R. D.; Lewis, S. A., Sr.; Littrell, K. C.; Stack, A. G.; Chipera, S.; Perfect, E.; Bilheux, H.; Kolbus, L. M.; Bingham, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Recovery of hydrocarbons by hydraulic fracturing depends on complex fluid-rock interactions that we are beginning to understand using neutron imaging and scattering techniques. Organic matter is often thought to comprise the majority of porosity in a shale. In this study, correlations between the type of organic matter embedded in a shale and porosity were investigated experimentally. Selected shale cores from the Eagle Ford and Marcellus formations were subjected to pyrolysis-gas chromatography, Differential Thermal Analysis/Thermogravimetric analysis, and organic solvent extraction with the resulting affluent analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The pore size distribution of the microporosity (~1 nm to 2 µm) in the Eagle Ford shales was measured before and after solvent extraction using small angle neutron scattering. Organics representing mass fractions of between 0.1 to 1 wt.% were removed from the shales and porosity generally increased across the examined microporosity range, particularly at larger pore sizes, approximately 50 nm to 2 μm. This range reflects extraction of accessible organic material, including remaining gas molecules, bitumen, and kerogen derivatives, indicating where the larger amount of organic matter in shale is stored. An increase in porosity at smaller pore sizes, ~1-3 nm, was also present and could be indicative of extraction of organic material stored in the inter-particle spaces of clays. Additionally, a decrease in porosity after extraction for a sample was attributed to swelling of pores with solvent uptake. This occurred in a shale with high clay content and low thermal maturity. The extracted hydrocarbons were primarily paraffinic, although some breakdown of larger aromatic compounds was observed in toluene extractions. The amount of hydrocarbon extracted and an overall increase in porosity appeared to be primarily correlated with the clay percentage in the shale. This study complements fluid transport neutron

  1. Study of the neutron beam line shield design for JSNS.

    PubMed

    Kawai, M; Saito, K; Sanami, T; Nakao, N; Maekawa, F

    2005-01-01

    The JSNS, a spallation neutron source of J-PARC (JAERI-KEK Joint Project of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator) has 23 neutron beam lines. In the present study, a database was formulated for an optimum shielding design using the MCNP-X code. The calculations involved two steps. In the first step, the neutron distributions were created in the typical neutron beam line with a model that included the spallation neutron source target. The neutron currents evaluated flowed from the duct into the duct wall which was the boundary source for the bulk shield surrounding the beam line. In the second step, bulk-shield calculations were performed for the various shielding materials (iron, concrete, heavy concrete and so on) used and their composites up to thicknesses of 3 m. The results were compared with each other. Composite material shields of iron and such hydrogeneous materials as polyethylene or concrete were more effective. A typical design was prepared for a beam line within 25 m distance from a moderator, as a sample.

  2. STUDY MAGNETIC EXCITATIONS IN DOPED TRANSITION METAL OXIDES USING INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Pengcheng

    2014-02-18

    Understanding the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity continues to be a “hot” topic in modern condensed matter physics. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in iron-based materials in 2008 provided an unique opportunity to compare and contrast these materials with traditional high-Tc copper oxide superconductors. Neutron scattering plays an important role in determining the dynamical spin properties in these materials. This proposal is a continuation of previous DOE supported proposal. This report summarizes the final progress we have made over from May 2005 till Aug. 2013. Overall, we continue to carry out extensive neutron scattering experiments on Fe-based materials, focusing on understanding their magnetic properties. In addition, we have established a materials laboratory at UT that has allowed us to grow these superconductors. Because neutron scattering typically demands a large amount of samples, by growing these materials in our own laboratory, we can now pursuit neutron scattering experiments over the entire electronic phase diagram, focusing on regions of interests. The material synthesis laboratory at UT was established entirely with the support of DOE funding. This not only allowed us to carry out neutron scattering experiments, but also permit us to provide samples to other US/International collaborators for studying these materials.

  3. Experimental Transport Benchmarks for Physical Dosimetry to Support Development of Fast-Neutron Therapy with Neutron Capture Augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg; J. K. Hartwell; J. R. Venhuizen; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; G. E. Laramore; W. Sauerwein; G. Hudepohl; A. Lennox

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Washington (UW) Neutron Therapy Center, the University of Essen (Germany) Neutron Therapy Clinic, and the Northern Illinois University(NIU) Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab have been collaborating in the development of fast-neutron therapy (FNT) with concurrent neutron capture (NCT) augmentation [1,2]. As part of this effort, we have conducted measurements to produce suitable benchmark data as an aid in validation of advanced three-dimensional treatment planning methodologies required for successful administration of FNT/NCT. Free-beam spectral measurements as well as phantom measurements with Lucite{trademark} cylinders using thermal, resonance, and threshold activation foil techniques have now been completed at all three clinical accelerator facilities. The same protocol was used for all measurements to facilitate intercomparison of data. The results will be useful for further detailed characterization of the neutron beams of interest as well as for validation of various charged particle and neutron transport codes and methodologies for FNT/NCT computational dosimetry, such as MCNP [3], LAHET [4], and MINERVA [5].

  4. Neutron Diffraction Study of Silicate Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. K.; van Orman, J.; Fei, Y.; Hemley, R. J.; Loveday, J.; Nelmes, R.; Smith, R. I.

    2002-12-01

    The oxygen deficiency and cation-site distribution of silicate perovskite control its physical and chemical properties, including density, bulk modulus, defect mobility, ionic transport, flow behavior, oxidation states, hydration, and minor-element solubility. These properties of perovskite, in turn control the geophysical and geochemical processes of the Earth. The possibility of oxygen deficiency was first recognized in perovskite with minor amounts of Al replacing Mg and Si [1, 2], and its significance is compared to the analogous defect perovskite in ceramics [3]. Basic crystallographic characteristics of the silicate perovskite, including the lattice parameters of the orthorhombic unit cell, the Pbmn space group, and atomic positions, were previously determined by x-ray diffraction [4]. The defect crystallography of silicate perovskite, however, cannot be measured by x-rays because the relevant ions (Mg2+, Al3+, Si4+ and O2-) are isoelectronic. These ions have very different neutron cross-section and can be readily resolved by neutron diffraction. Using multianvil apparatus, we synthesized perovskite samples at 1700°C and 25-28 GPa. We perform multiple runs to accumulate 3 mm3 sample each for the MgSiO3 end member and MgSiO3 plus 5 weight %\\ Al2O3 in perovskite structure. Excellent powder diffraction data were collected at the POLARIS Beamline of ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Lab, and were subjected to Rietveld analysis. Neutron derived information sheds light on the unusual effects found for Al3+ substitution on the compressibility of the silicate perovskite [1]. 1. J. Zhang and D. J. Weidner, Science 284, 782 (1999). 2. J. P. Brodholt, Nature 407, 620 (2000). 3. A. Navrotsky, Science 284, 1788 (1999). 4. N. L. Ross and R. M. Hazen, Phys. Chem. Minerals 17, 228 (1990).

  5. Computational Analysis Supporting the Design of a New Beamline for the Mines Neutron Radiography Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; King, J.

    The Colorado School of Mines installed a neutron radiography system at the United States Geological Survey TRIGA reactor in 2012. An upgraded beamline could dramatically improve the imaging capabilities of this system. This project performed computational analyses to support the design of a new beamline, with the major goals of minimizing beam divergence and maximizing beam intensity. The new beamline will consist of a square aluminum tube with an 11.43 cm (4.5 in) inner side length and 0.635 cm (0.25 in) thick walls. It is the same length as the original beam tube (8.53 m) and is composed of 1.22 m (4 ft) and 1.52 m (5 ft) flanged sections which bolt together. The bottom 1.22 m of the beamline is a cylindrical aluminum pre-collimator which is 0.635 cm (0.25 in) thick, with an inner diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in). Based on Monte Carlo model results, when a pre-collimator is present, the use of a neutron absorbing liner on the inside surface of the beam tube has almost no effect on the angular distribution of the neutron current at the collimator exit. The use of a pre-collimator may result in a non-uniform flux profile at the image plane; however, as long as the collimator is at least three times longer than the pre-collimator, the flux distortion is acceptably low.

  6. Neutron generator at Hiroshima University for use in radiobiology study.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Hoshi, M; Tauchi, H; Takeoka, S; Kitagawa, K; Suga, S; Maeda, N; Komatsu, K; Sawada, S; Iwamoto, E

    1995-06-01

    A neutron generator (HIRRAC) for use in radiobiology study has been constructed at the Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University (RIRBM). Monoenergetic neutrons of which energy is less than 1.3 MeV are generated by the 7Li(p,n)7 Be reaction at proton energies up to 3 MeV. The protons are accelerated by a Schenkel-type-accelerator and are bombared onto the 7Li-target. An apparatus for the irradiation of biological material such as mice, cultured cells and so on, was designed and will be manufactured. Neutron and gamma-ray dose rates were measured by paired (TE-TE and C-CO2) ionization chambers. Contamination of the gamma ray was less than about 6% when using 10-microns-thick 7Li as a target. Maximum dose rates for the tissue equivalent materials was 40 cGy/min at a distance of 10 cm from the target. Energy distributions of the obtained neutrons have been measured by a 3He-gas proportional counter. The monoenergetic neutrons within an energy region from 0.1 to 1.3 MeV produced by thin 7Li or 7LiF targets had a small energy spread of about 50 keV (1 sigma width of gaussian). The energy spread of neutrons was about 10% or less at an incident proton energy of 2.3 MeV. We found that HIRRAC produces small energy spread neutrons and at sufficient dose rates for use in radiobiology studies.

  7. UA/ORNL Collaboration: Neutron Scattering Studies of Antiferromagnetic Films, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mankey, Gary J.

    2006-07-26

    The work reported here was a collaborative project between the research groups of Dr. J.L. Robertson at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Dr. G.J. Mankey at the University of Alabama. The main thrust is developing neutron optical devices and materials for the study of magnetic thin films and interfaces. The project is particularly timely, since facility upgrades are currently underway at the High Flux Isotope Reactor. A new neutron optical device, a multicrystal analyzer, was designed and built to take maximum advantage of the increased flux that the upgraded beamlines at HFIR will provide. This will make possible detailed studies of the magnetic structure of thin films, multilayers, and interfaces that are not feasible at present. We performed studies of the antiferromagnetic order in thin films and crystals using neutron scattering, determined magnetic structures at interfaces with neutron reflectometry and measured order in magnetic dispersions using small angle neutron scattering. The collaboration has proved fruitful: generating eleven publications, contributing to the training of a postdoc who is now on staff at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and providing the primary support for two recent Ph.D. recipients. The collaboration is still vibrant, with anticipated implementation of the multicrystal analyzer on one of the new cold source beamlines at the High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  8. 1982 US-CEC neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.; Schraube, H.; Burger, G.

    1983-11-01

    A neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison study was conducted during April 19-23, 1982, as a joint effort between the United States and the Commission of European Communities. Dosimeters from 48 participating agencies were mounted on cylindrical phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (0.48-13.91 mSv neutron and 0.02-1.32 mSv gamma) in nine different radiation fields. Exposure conditions considered in this study included four mixed-field spectra produced using the Health Physics Research Reactor, four monoenergetic neutron fields generated by accelerators, and one 15-cm D/sub 2/O-moderated californium source spectrum. In general, neutron results reported by the participating agencies were consistent with expected dosimeter performance based on energy response characteristics of the detection systems. Albedo dosimeters, which were the most popular neutron monitoring systems used in this study, provided the best overall accuracy for all exposure conditions. Film, Cr-39 recoil track, and Th-232 fission track systems generally underestimated dose equivalents relative to reference values. Associated gamma measurements showed that TLD monitors produced more accurate results than film dosimeters although both systems overestimated gamma dose equivalents in mixed radiation fields. 24 references, 10 figures, 19 tables.

  9. Neutron-induced reaction studies using stored ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, Jan; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2015-11-01

    Storage rings provide unique possibilities for investigations of nuclear reactions. Radioactive ions can be stored if the ring is connected to an appropriate facility and reaction studies are feasible at low beam intensities because of the recycling of beam particles. Using gas jet or droplet targets, charged particle-induced reactions on short-lived isotopes can be studied in inverse kinematics. In such a system a high-flux reactor could serve as a neutron target extending the experimental spectrum to neutron-induced reactions. Those could be studied over a wide energy range covering the research fields of nuclear astrophysics and reactor safety, transmutation of nuclear waste and fusion.

  10. Support effects studied on model supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gorte, R.G.

    1991-11-01

    We are studying model catalysts in which the active phase is deposited onto flat oxide substrates in order to understand how a catalyst is affected by its support. We have examined the following growth and stability of titania overlayers which had been vapor deposited onto a Rh foil; the growth of Pt films on ZnO(0001)Zn and O(0001)O and compared the results to those obtained for Pt on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001). Samples were prepared by vapor deposition of Pt onto flat substrates in ultra high vacuum, and metal coverages were measured using a quartz-crystal, film thickness monitor; the structure and CO adsorption properties of Pt films vapor deposited onto a ZrO{sub 2}(100) crystal; the deposition of Rh on a ZrO{sub 2}(100) crystal; The absorption of NO on Pt particles supported on CeO{sub 2}, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), and the Zn- and O-polar surfaces of ZnO(0001). We have investigated supported oxides in order to understand the acidic properties that have been reported for monolayer oxides. Our first studies were of amorphous, silicalumina catalysts. Finally, we have also begun to prepare model supported oxides in order to be able to used spectroscopic methods to characterize the sites formed on these materials. Our first studies were of niobia deposition on oxidized Al films and on an {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) crystal.

  11. Development of new methods for studying nanostructures using neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, Roger

    2016-03-18

    The goal of this project was to develop improved instrumentation for studying the microscopic structures of materials using neutron scattering. Neutron scattering has a number of advantages for studying material structure but suffers from the well-known disadvantage that neutrons’ ability to resolve structural details is usually limited by the strength of available neutron sources. We aimed to overcome this disadvantage using a new experimental technique, called Spin Echo Scattering Angle Encoding (SESAME) that makes use of the neutron’s magnetism. Our goal was to show that this innovation will allow the country to make better use of the significant investment it has recently made in a new neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and will lead to increases in scientific knowledge that contribute to the Nation’s technological infrastructure and ability to develop advanced materials and technologies. We were successful in demonstrating the technical effectiveness of the new method and established a baseline of knowledge that has allowed ORNL to start a project to implement the method on one of its neutron beam lines.

  12. Monte Carlo studies on neutron interactions in radiobiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Hau, Tak Cheong; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to study the characteristics of neutron interactions with cells underneath a water medium layer with varying thickness. The following results were obtained. (1) The fractions of neutron interaction with 1H, 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei in the cell layer were studied. The fraction with 1H increased with increasing medium thickness, while decreased for 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei. The bulges in the interaction fractions with 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei were explained by the resonance spikes in the interaction cross-section data. The interaction fraction decreased in the order: 1H > 16O > 12C > 14N. (2) In general, as the medium thickness increased, the number of "interacting neutrons" which exited the medium and then further interacted with the cell layer increased. (3) The area under the angular distributions for "interacting neutrons" decreased with increasing incident neutron energy. Such results would be useful for deciphering the reasons behind discrepancies among existing results in the literature.

  13. Halo Nucleus 11Be: A Spectroscopic Study via Neutron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Kyle; Jones, K. L.; Bey, A.; Ahn, S.H.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeffery C; Brown, S.; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Matei, Catalin; Matos, M.; Moazen, Brian H; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Nunes, F. M.; O'Malley, Patrick; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Wilson, G.

    2012-01-01

    The best examples of halo nuclei, exotic systems with a diffuse nuclear cloud surrounding a tightly bound core, are found in the light, neutron-rich region, where the halo neutrons experience only weak binding and a weak, or no, potential barrier. Modern direct-reaction measurement techniques provide powerful probes of the structure of exotic nuclei. Despite more than four decades of these studies on the benchmark one-neutron halo nucleus 11Be, the spectroscopic factors for the two bound states remain poorly constrained. In the present work, the 10Be d;p reaction has been used in inverse kinematics at four beam energies to study the structure of 11Be. The spectroscopic factors extracted using the adiabatic model were found to be consistent across the four measurements and were largely insensitive to the optical potential used. The extracted spectroscopic factor for a neutron in an n j 2s1=2 state coupled to the ground state of 10Be is 0.71(5). For the first excited state at 0.32 MeV, a spectroscopic factor of 0.62(4) is found for the halo neutron in a 1p1=2 state.

  14. Application of Neutron Reflectivity for Studies of Biomolecular Structures and Functions at Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Ankner, John Francis; Wang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Structures and functions of cell membranes are of central importance in understanding processes such as cell signaling, chemotaxis, redox transformation, biofilm formation, and mineralization occurring at interfaces. This chapter provides an overview of the application of neutron reflectivity (NR) as a unique tool for probing biomolecular structures and mechanisms as a first step toward understanding protein protein, protein lipid, and protein mineral interactions at the membrane substrate interfaces. Emphasis is given to the review of existing literature on the assembly of biomimetic membrane systems, such as supported membranes for NR studies, and demonstration of model calculations showing the potential of NR to elucidate molecular fundamentals of microbial cell mineral interactions and structure functional relationships of electron transport pathways. The increased neutron flux afforded by current and upcoming neutron sources holds promise for elucidating detailed processes such as phase separation, formation of microdomains, and membrane interactions with proteins and peptides in biological systems.

  15. Thermal neutron imaging support with other laboratories BL06-IM-TNI

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.

    2008-06-17

    The goals of this project are: (1) detect and locate a source of thermal neutrons; (2) distinguish a localized source from uniform background; (3) show shape and size of thermalizing material; (4) test thermal neutron imager in active interrogation environment; and (5) distinguish delayed neutrons from prompt neutrons.

  16. Neutron crystallographic studies of T4 lysozyme at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Shukla, Shantanu; Meilleur, Flora; Standaert, Robert F; Pierce, Josh; Myles, Dean A A; Cuneo, Matthew J

    2017-07-13

    Bacteriophage T4 lysozyme (T4L) has been used as a paradigm for seminal biophysical studies on protein structure, dynamics, and stability. Approximately 700 mutants of this protein and their respective complexes have been characterized by X-ray crystallography; however, despite the high resolution diffraction limits attained in several studies, no hydrogen atoms were reported being visualized in the electron density maps. To address this, a 2.2 Å-resolution neutron data set was collected at 80 K from a crystal of perdeuterated T4L pseudo-wild type. We describe a near complete atomic structure of T4L, which includes the positions of 1737 hydrogen atoms determined by neutron crystallography. The cryogenic neutron model reveals explicit detail of the hydrogen bonding interactions in the protein, in addition to the protonation states of several important residues. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  17. Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Karim, Julia Abdul

    2011-03-30

    Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

  18. Study of nuclear recoils in liquid argon with monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenfus, C.; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Creus, W.; Ferella, A.; Rochet, J.; Walter, M.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of developments for liquid argon dark matter detectors we assembled a laboratory setup to scatter neutrons on a small liquid argon target. The neutrons are produced mono-energetically (Ekin = 2.45 MeV) by nuclear fusion in a deuterium plasma and are collimated onto a 3" liquid argon cell operating in single-phase mode (zero electric field). Organic liquid scintillators are used to tag scattered neutrons and to provide a time-of-flight measurement. The setup is designed to study light pulse shapes and scintillation yields from nuclear and electronic recoils as well as from alpha particles at working points relevant for dark matter searches. Liquid argon offers the possibility to scrutinise scintillation yields in noble liquids with respect to the population strength of the two fundamental excimer states. Here we present experimental methods and first results from recent data towards such studies.

  19. LANL sunnyside experiment: Study of neutron production in accelerator-driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G.; Butler, G.; Cappiello, M.

    1995-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the neutron production in prototypic targets for accelerator driven systems. Studies were conducted on four target assemblies containing lead, lithium, tungsten, and a thorium-salt mixture. Integral data on total neutron production were obtained as well as more differential data on neutron leakage and neutron flux profiles in the blanket/moderator region. Data analysis on total neutron production is complete and shows excellent agreement with calculations using the LAHET/MCNP code system.

  20. LANL sunnyside experiment: Study of neutron production in accelerator-driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, G.; Butler, G.; Cappiello, M.; Carius, S.; Daemen, L.; DeVolder, B.; Frehaut, J.; Goulding, C.; Grace, R.; Green, R.; Lisowski, P.; Littleton, P.; King, J.; King, N.; Prael, R.; Stratton, T.; Turner, S.; Ullmann, J.; Venneri, F.; Yates, M.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the neutron production in prototypic targets for accelerator driven systems. Studies were conducted on four target assemblies containing lead, lithium, tungsten, and a thorium-salt mixture. Integral data on total neutron production were obtained as well as more differential data on neutron leakage and neutron flux profiles in the blanket/moderator region. Data analysis on total neutron production is complete and shows excellent agreement with calculations using the LAHET/MCNP code system.

  1. Digital acquisition development for neutron induced fission studies at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Debra; O'Donnell, John; Couture, Aaron; Mosby, Shea; Wender, Steve

    2013-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a neutron time of flight facility with a diverse group of experiments dedicated to the study of neutron induced reactions. A powerful proton LINAC is used to produce multiple pulsed neutron beams for which monitoring is required to track the neutron flux and energy distribution for each pulse. Digital DAQ techniques lend themselves well to beam monitoring and many of the experiments. Significant effort is being put into transitioning several traditional analog DAQ systems to state of the art digital systems. The Irradiation of Chips and Electronics (ICE House) and the Total Kinetic Energy of Fission (TKE) experiments are both transitioning to digital for the fall 2013 LANSCE run cycle. These new DAQ systems were built using the CAEN VME digitizer family, and both systems will benefit from reduced module count and zero deadtime. The TKE experiment utilizes FPGA firmware to streamline the acquisition system, as well as provide additional data for further analysis. Details of the implementation process along with preliminary data from both experiments will be presented.

  2. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  3. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  4. Neutron irradiation study of silicon photomultipliers from different vendors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushpil, V.; Mikhaylov, V.; Kugler, A.; Kushpil, S.; Ladygin, V. P.; Reznikov, S. G.; Svoboda, O.; Tlustý, P.

    2017-02-01

    We present recent results on the investigation of the KETEK, ZECOTEK, HAMAMATSU and SENSL SiPM properties after irradiation by the 6-35 MeV neutrons. The typical neutron fluence was about 1012 n /cm2. The changing of the internal structure of the irradiated SiPMs was studied by the measuring of the C-V and C-f characteristics. We have observed the strong influence of the SiPM manufacturing technology on their radiation hardness. The application of the obtained results to the development of the readout electronics is discussed.

  5. Temperature-dependent neutron diffraction measurements from D2O hydrating single-supported lipid bilayers of DMPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Z. N.; Torres, J.; Mazza, A.; Kaiser, H.; Taub, H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Miskowiec, A.; Tyagi, M.

    The freezing point depression of water associated with biological membranes, studied principally by NMR, has been of interest for decades. Here we have used neutron diffraction measurements at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) to investigate the freezing behavior of water associated with single-supported zwitterionic lipid bilayers composed of DMPC. Diffraction patterns obtained as a function of temperature reveal that water freezes abruptly into its hexagonal phase at 270 K with no evidence of amorphous ice. Following the initial crystallization of the membrane-associated water there is a region of continuous hexagonal crystal growth, which is believed to occur in the interfacial water closest to the membrane. The temperature-dependent intensity of the observed Bragg peaks have been compared with that of incoherently elastically-scattered neutrons collected on the High-Flux Backscattering Spectrometer at NIST from an identical sample hydrated with H2O [2]. We find excellent agreement between the two data sets, suggesting the absence of amorphous solid water and that all the water hydrating a DMPC membrane eventually freezes into the hexagonal crystalline phase. 2 M. Bai et al., Europhys. Lett. 98, 48006 (2012). Supported by NSF Grant Nos. DMR-0944772 and DGE-1069091.

  6. Coupling neutron reflectivity with cell-free protein synthesis to probe membrane protein structure in supported bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Soranzo, Thomas; Martin, Donald K.; Lenormand, Jean -Luc; ...

    2017-06-13

    Here, the structure of the p7 viroporin, an oligomeric membrane protein ion channel involved in the assembly and release of the hepatitis C virus, was determined from proteins expressed and inserted directly into supported model lipid membranes using cell-free protein expression. Cell-free protein expression allowed (i) high protein concentration in the membrane, (ii) control of the protein’s isotopic constitution, and (iii) control over the lipid environment available to the protein. Here, we used cell-free protein synthesis to directly incorporate the hepatitis C virus (HCV) p7 protein into supported lipid bilayers formed from physiologically relevant lipids (POPC or asolectin) for bothmore » direct structural measurements using neutron reflectivity (NR) and conductance measurements using electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). We report that HCV p7 from genotype 1a strain H77 adopts a conical shape within lipid bilayers and forms a viroporin upon oligomerization, confirmed by EIS conductance measurements. This combination of techniques represents a novel approach to the study of membrane proteins and, through the use of selective deuteration of particular amino acids to enhance neutron scattering contrast, has the promise to become a powerful tool for characterizing the protein conformation in physiologically relevant environments and for the development of biosensor applications.« less

  7. Neutronics analyses in support of the conceptual design of the MAPS NTP reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Raepsaet, X.; Lenain, R.

    1996-03-01

    Within the framework of the French nuclear thermal propulsion program called MAPS (Lenain 1996), several neutronics studies and analyses were performed. The aim was to determine the basic design features of a reactor based on the Pebble Bed Reactor concept (Powell 1985) and needing minimum technological developments. In the concern to further enhance the reactor safety posture and to maintain a minimum engine mass breakdown, a beryllium moderated/reflected reactor using highly enriched UO{sub 2} or UC{sub 2} as fuel has been designed with a mean hydrogen core outlet temperature of 2200 K (theoretical ISP of 859 s). The objective of this paper is to give a detailed neutronics analysis of the MAPS reactor. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. TREAT Neutronics Analysis and Design Support, Part II: Multi-SERTTA-CAL

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E.; Hill, Connie M.; Snow, Spencer D.; Jensen, Colby B.

    2016-08-01

    Experiment vehicle design is necessary in preparation for Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility restart and the resumption of transient testing to support Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) characterization and other future fuels testing requirements. Currently the most mature vehicle design is the Multi-SERTTA (Static Environments Rodlet Transient Test Apparatuses), which can accommodate up to four concurrent rodlet-sized specimens under separate environmental conditions. Robust test vehicle design requires neutronics analyses to support design development, optimization of the power coupling factor (PCF) to efficiently maximize energy generation in the test fuel rodlets, and experiment safety analyses. In integral aspect of prior TREAT transient testing was the incorporation of calibration experiments to experimentally evaluate and validate test conditions in preparation of the actual fuel testing. The calibration experiment package established the test parameter conditions to support fine-tuning of the computational models to deliver the required energy deposition to the fuel samples. The calibration vehicle was designed to be as near neutronically equivalent to the experiment vehicle as possible to minimize errors between the calibration and final tests. The Multi-SERTTA-CAL vehicle was designed to serve as the calibration vehicle supporting Multi-SERTTA experimentation. Models of the Multi-SERTTA-CAL vehicle containing typical PWR-fuel rodlets were prepared and neutronics calculations were performed using MCNP6.1 with ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data libraries; these results were then compared against those performed for Multi-SERTTA to determine the similarity and possible design modification necessary prior to construction of these experiment vehicles. The estimated reactivity insertion worth into the TREAT core is very similar between the two vehicle designs, with the primary physical difference being a hollow Inconel tube running down the length of the calibration

  9. RESPECT: Neutron resonance spin-echo spectrometer for extreme studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgii, R.; Kindervater, J.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2016-11-01

    We propose the design of a REsonance SPin-echo spECtrometer for exTreme studies, RESPECT, that is ideally suited for the exploration of non-dispersive processes such as diffusion, crystallization, slow dynamics, tunneling processes, crystal electric field excitations, and spin fluctuations. It is a variant of the conventional neutron spin-echo technique (NSE) by (i) replacing the long precession coils by pairs of longitudinal neutron spin-echo coils combined with RF-spin flippers and (ii) by stabilizing the neutron polarization with small longitudinal guide fields that can in addition be used as field subtraction coils thus allowing to adjust the field integrals over a range of 8 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the dynamic range of RESPECT can in principle be varied over 8 orders of magnitude in time, if neutrons with the required energy are made available. Similarly as for existing NSE-spectrometers, spin echo times of up to approximately 1 μs can be reached if the divergence and the correction elements are properly adjusted. Thanks to the optional use of neutron guides and the fact that the currents for the correction coils are much smaller than in standard NSE, intensity gains of at least one order of magnitude are expected, making the concept of RESPECT also competitive for operation at medium flux neutron sources. RESPECT can also be operated in a MIEZE configuration allowing the investigation of relaxation processes in depolarizing environments as they occur when magnetic fields are applied at the sample position, i.e. for the investigation of the dynamics of flux lines in superconductors, magnetic fluctuations in ferromagnetic materials, and samples containing hydrogen.

  10. A Study on Inhomogeneous Neutron Intensity Distribution Origin from Neutron Guide Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wei, Guohai; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Yuntao; He, Linfeng; Sun, Kai; Han, Songbai; Chen, Dongfeng

    The uniformity of the neutron intensity spatial distribution at the sample position will directly affect the neutron imaging quality. But the unexpected inhomogeneous spatial distribution phenomenon always appears in the neutron radiography facilities installed at the end of neutron guide. In this paper, the source of this phenomenon has been analyzed through geometrical optics and confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations, and several optimization solutions are also proposed.

  11. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies in neutron-irradiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, James W.; Kleinhenz, Richard L.; En, Wu; Zhi-pu, You

    1982-08-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of neutron-irradiated silicon are surveyed, both as being of interest per se and as related to transmutation doping. The emerging panorama progressing from vacancy- and interstitial-related point defects to agglomerates visible in the electron microscope is described. Intrinsic and impurity-driven partial dissociation of defect complexes is discussed.

  12. TREAT Neutronics Analysis and Design Support, Part I: Multi-SERTTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E.; Hill, Connie M.; Jensen, Colby B.; Snow, Spencer D.

    2016-08-01

    Experiment vehicle design is necessary in preparation for Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility restart and the resumption of transient testing to support Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) characterization and other future fuels testing requirements. Currently the most mature vehicle design is the Multi-SERTTA (Static Environments Rodlet Transient Test Apparatuses), which can accommodate up to four concurrent rodlet-sized specimens under separate environmental conditions. Robust test vehicle design requires neutronics analyses to support design development, optimization of the power coupling factor (PCF) to efficiently maximize energy generation in the test fuel rodlets, and experiment safety analyses. Calculations were performed to support analysis of a near-final design of the Multi-SERTTA vehicle, the design process for future TREAT test vehicles, and establish analytical practices for upcoming transient test experiments. Models of the Multi-SERTTA vehicle containing typical PWR-fuel rodlets were prepared and neutronics calculations were performed using MCNP6.1 with ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data libraries. Calculation of the PCF for reference conditions of a PWR fuel rodlet in clean water at operational temperature and pressure provided results between 1.10 and 1.74 W/g-MW depending on the location of the four Multi-SERTTA units with the stack. Basic changes to the Multi-SERTTA secondary vessel containment and support have minimal impact on PCF; using materials with less neutron absorption can improve expected PCF values, especially in the primary containment. An optimized balance is needed between structural integrity, experiment safety, and energy deposition in the experiment. Type of medium and environmental conditions within the primary vessel surrounding the fuel rodlet can also have a significant impact on resultant PCF values. The estimated reactivity insertion worth into the TREAT core is impacted more by the primary and secondary Multi-SERTTA vehicle structure

  13. Study of Scattered Background Neutron in NIF and Time-of Flight (TOF) to Measure Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Moran, M; Phillips, T; Lerche, R; Koch, J; Eder, D

    2005-08-31

    Some of the planned core diagnostics for National Ignition Facility (NIF) will use neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy techniques to gather information for primary neutron yield measurement or neutron imaging. This technique has been widely and routinely used at other laser facilities including Nova and Omega. TOF methods will also be used to observe target fuel areal density <{rho}R> (radial integral of density) via measuring the number of primary 14.1 MeV neutrons that are down-scattered to lower energies by nuclear collisions inside the compressed target core. The substantially larger target chamber size and higher neutron yield for NIF raises issues related to the large number of scattered neutrons produced by high yield deuterium-tritium (D-T) shots at NIF. The effect of primary neutrons scattered by the walls of the massive target chamber and structures both inside and outside the chamber will contribute a significant scattered background signal when trying to determine the number of neutrons down-scattered from the target core. The optimum detector locations outside the target chamber or target bay wall will be proposed. Appropriate collimators at the chamber port and the bay wall (between the neutron source at target chamber center (TCC) and detector) that maximize detection of signal neutrons while minimizing the background from scattered neutrons and neutron induced gamma rays will also be presented.

  14. Beta Decay Study of Neutron-rich Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, John; Rajabali, Mustafa; Griffin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Within the ``island of inversion'' around the N = 20 shell gap, isotopes of magnesium, and aluminum deviate from the expected closed-shell structure. Particles promoted across the N = 20 shell gap result in a lower energy deformed ground state configuration rather than the expected spherical configuration. An experiment was conducted at TRIUMF laboratory in the summer of 2015 to study the decay of ``island of inversion'' isotopes 33 , 34 , 35Mg and the structure of the respective daughter nuclei. The isotopes of interest were produced by a proton beam from TRIUMF's 500 MeV cyclotron impacting on a UCx target. The magnesium decays populated states along the decay chain in Al, Si, P, and S isotopes. The new GRIFFIN spectrometer in the ISAC-I facility was used to detect the gamma rays. Two sets of scintillators, one for detecting the beta particles (SCEPTAR) and the other for detecting beta-delayed neutrons (DESCANT), were also used in conjunction with GRIFFIN. The GRIFFIN data were energy calibrated and partially analyzed for this project. New algorithms were developed for the analysis. Preliminary results for new transitions detected in 34Mg as well as the half lives obtained will be presented in their current form. This research was supported by the Tennessee Tech research office.

  15. Inelastic and elastic neutron scattering studies of the vibrational and reorientational dynamics, crystal structure and solid-solid phase transition in [Mn(OS(CH3)2)6](ClO4)2 supported by theoretical (DFT) calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, Elżbieta; Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The vibrational and reorientational dynamics of CH3 groups from (CH3)2SO ligands in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Mn(OS(CH3)2)6](ClO4)2 were investigated by quasielastic and inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (QENS and IINS) methods. The results show that above the phase transition temperature (detected earlier by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at TC5c = 222.9 K on cooling and at TC5h = 225.4 K on heating) the CH3 groups perform fast (τR ≈ 10-12-10-13 s) reorientational motions. These motions start to slow down below TC5c Neutron powder diffraction (NPD) measurements, performed simultaneously with QENS and IINS, indicated that this phase transition is associated with a change of the crystal structure, too. Theoretical infrared absorption, Raman and inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectra were calculated using DFT method (B3LYP functional, LANL2DZ ECP basis set (on Mn atom) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set (on C, H, S, O atoms) for the isolated equilibrium model (isolated [Mn(DMSO)6]2+ cation and ClO4- anion). Calculated spectra show a good agreement with the experimental spectra (FT-IR, RS and IINS). The comparison of the results obtained by these complementary methods was made.

  16. ANALYTICAL NEUTRONIC STUDIES CORRELATING FAST NEUTRON FLUENCE TO MATERIAL DAMAGE IN CARBON, SILICON, AND SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Sterbentz

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluates how fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV correlates to material damage (i.e., the total fluence spectrum folded with the respective material’s displacements-per- atom [dpa] damage response function) for the specific material fluence spectra encountered in Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) service and the irradiation tests conducted in material test reactors (MTRs) for the fuel materials addressed in the white paper. It also reports how the evaluated correlations of >0.1 MeV fluence to material damage vary between the different spectral conditions encountered in material service versus testing.

  17. The Early Stage of Neutron Tomography for Cultural Heritage Study in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaweerat, S.; Ratanatongchai, W.; S. Wonglee; Schillinger, B.

    In parallel to the upgrade of neutron imaging facility at TRR-1/M1 since 2015, the practice on image processing software has led to implementation of neutron tomography (NT). The current setup provides a thermal neutron flux of 1.08×106 cm-2sec-1 at the exposure position. In general, the sample was fixed on a plate at the top of rotary stage controlled by Labview 2009 Version 9.0.1. The incremental step can be adjusted from 0.45 to 7.2 degree. A 16 bit CCD camera assembled with a Nikkor 50 mm f/1.2 lens was used to record light from 6LiF/ZnS (green) neutron converter screen. The exposure time for each shot was 60 seconds, resulting in the acquisition time of approximately three hours for completely turning the sample around. Afterwards, the batch of two dimensional neutron images of the sample was read into the reconstruction and visualization software Octopus reconstruction 8.8 and Octopus visualization 2.0, respectively. The results revealed that the system alignment is important. Maintaining the stability of heavy sample at every particular angle of rotation is important. Previous alignment showed instability of the supporting plane while tilting the sample. This study showed that the sample stage should be replaced. Even though the NT is a lengthy process and involves large data processing, it offers an opportunity to better understand features of an object in more details than with neutron radiography. The digital NT also allows us to separate inner features that appear superpositioned in radiography by cross-sectioning the 3D data set of an object without destruction. As a result, NT is a significant tool for revealing hidden information included in the inner structure of cultural heritage objects, providing great benefits in archaeological study, conservation process and authenticity investigating.

  18. Study of DD Neutrons and their Transmission in Iron Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sushil

    The Deuterium-Deuteron (DD) reaction has been used as a neutron source to study the transport of neutrons in natural iron. The scattering targets are used in the form of spheres and the neutron transmission measurement has been done at 7-MeV incident deuteron beam energy. The purpose of this study is to test the elastic and non-elastic neutron scattering cross sections for iron in the ENDF/B-VII data library, as some indications about the inaccuracy of those cross sections have been found from previous studies. The experiment has been carried out using the 4.5-MV tandem accelerator at Edwards Accelerator Laboratory at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. The DD source reaction has been measured at 5- and 7-MeV deuteron beam energy. The D(d,n)3He monoenergetic reaction cross section has been measured from 0° to 135° at both 5- and 7-MeV beam energy and the D(d,np)D breakup reaction cross section has been measured up to 60° laboratory angles at 7-MeV beam energy. The target used is a deuterium gas cell of 3-cm length at approximately 2 atmosphere absolute pressure. The neutron energy is determined using the time of flight method. A NE213 liquid scintillation detector is used for neutron detection and the thick-target 27Al(d,n) reaction is used for the determination of neutron detector efficiency. The monoenergetic reaction cross section has been found to be in reasonable agreement with previous evaluations. The neutron transmission studies through iron spheres is done using two natural iron spheres with thicknesses of 3 and 8 cm. The DD source measurement (sphere-off) were repeated for the transmission studies and the neutron source was covered with the spheres for the transmission measurements. The experimental transmitted neutron spectrum is compared with the calculation done using Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP6.1 developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. MCNP uses ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluated iron cross section for the simulation. The calculated and experimental

  19. Neutron star mass limit at 2M⊙ supports the existence of a CEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Castillo, D.; Benic, S.; Blaschke, D.; Han, Sophia; Typel, S.

    2016-08-01

    We point out that the very existence of a "horizontal branch" in the mass-radius characteristics for neutron stars indicates a strong first-order phase transition and thus supports the existence of a critical endpoint (CEP) of first-order phase transitions in the QCD phase diagram. This branch would sample a sequence of hybrid stars with quark matter core, leading to the endpoint of stable compact star configurations with the highest possible baryon densities. Since we know of the existence of compact stars with 2 M_{⊙}, this hypothetical branch has to lie in the vicinity of this mass value, if it exists. We report here a correlation between the maximal radius of the horizontal branch and the pressure at the onset of hadron-to-quark matter phase transition, which is likely to be a universal quantity of utmost relevance to the upcoming experiments with heavy-ion collisions at NICA and FAIR.

  20. Neutron-Rich Nuclei and Neutron Stars: A New Accurately Calibrated Interaction for the Study of Neutron-Rich Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Todd-Rutel, B.G.; Piekarewicz, J.

    2005-09-16

    An accurately calibrated relativistic parametrization is introduced to compute the ground state properties of finite nuclei, their linear response, and the structure of neutron stars. While similar in spirit to the successful NL3 parameter set, it produces an equation of state that is considerably softer--both for symmetric nuclear matter and for the symmetry energy. This softening appears to be required for an accurate description of several collective modes having different neutron-to-proton ratios. Among the predictions of this model are a symmetric nuclear-matter incompressibility of K=230 MeV and a neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb of R{sub n}-R{sub p}=0.21 fm. The impact of such a softening on various neutron-star properties is also examined.

  1. Neutron-rich nuclei and neutron stars: a new accurately calibrated interaction for the study of neutron-rich matter.

    PubMed

    Todd-Rutel, B G; Piekarewicz, J

    2005-09-16

    An accurately calibrated relativistic parametrization is introduced to compute the ground state properties of finite nuclei, their linear response, and the structure of neutron stars. While similar in spirit to the successful NL3 parameter set, it produces an equation of state that is considerably softer--both for symmetric nuclear matter and for the symmetry energy. This softening appears to be required for an accurate description of several collective modes having different neutron-to-proton ratios. Among the predictions of this model are a symmetric nuclear-matter incompressibility of K=230 MeV and a neutron skin thickness in 208 Pb of Rn-Rp=0.21 fm. The impact of such a softening on various neutron-star properties is also examined.

  2. Study on a focusing, low-background neutron delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahn, J.; Panzner, T.; Filges, U.; Marcelot, C.; Böni, P.

    2011-04-01

    In various fields of neutron scattering there is a tendency to use smaller and smaller samples. There are various reasons for this, e.g. the limited size in high pressure cells, the restrictions given by growth methods of thin films, or the impossibility to grow larger single crystals. With conventional guides this leads to the situation that a white beam with some 50 cm2 cross-section and a broad divergence is to illuminate a sample of some mm2 area. Thus more than 99% of the neutrons leaving the guide are not needed and cause background and radiation problems.It is suggested to change the order of the optical elements and the design of the guide section to filter neutrons not intended to hit the sample as early as possible. As an example a set-up for specular reflectivity on small samples is presented. A double monochromator some meters behind the source cuts away all neutrons of the wrong wavelength even before they enter the guide. The guide itself is one branch of an ellipse. It maps the divergent beam from the monochromator to a convergent beam at the sample position. An entry aperture at the first focal point, a bit larger than the sample, guarantees that just enough neutrons enter the guide to bath the sample. There is no direct line of sight to the source and the guide ends far away from the sample position, so that there are only few spacial restrictions.Detailed McStas calculations and a design study for a down-scaled test device, both for reflectometry and diffraction, are presented.

  3. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Jr., Thomas Dean

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 108 n/cm2 • s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10-11cGy•cm2/nepi and 20 x 10-11 cGy•cm2/nepi , respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  4. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  5. The study of neutron burst shape of a neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishnyaev, Evgeny; Polosatkin, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    A slim-shaped portable DD-neutron generator is developed at Budker institute of Nuclear Physics. The generator is a combination of Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier and a sealed gas-filled neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode. Neutron burst shape in pulsed mode of neutron tube operation is measured with stroboscopic time spectrometry, implemented on scintillation detector, and modeled with Comsol Script 1.3 and Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. Modeling appears to be in good agreement with experimental results. Measured pulse rise and fall times are 110 ns and 100 ns respectively.

  6. Neutron irradiated uranium silicides studied by neutron diffraction and Rietveld analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Mueller, M.H.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The irradiation behavior of high-density uranium silicides has been a matter of interest to the nuclear industry for use in high power or low enrichment applications. Transmission electron microscopy studies have found that heavy ion bombardment renders U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} amorphous at temperatures below about 250 C and that U{sub 3}Si becomes mechanically unstable suffering rapid growth by plastic flow. In this present work, crystallographic changes preceding amorphization by fission fragment damage have been studied by high-resolution neutron diffraction as a function of damage produced by uranium fission at room temperature. Initially, both silicides had tetragonal crystal structures. Crystallographic and amorphous phases were studied simultaneously by combining conventional Rietveld refinement of the crystallographic phases with Fourier-filtering analysis of the non-crystalline scattering component. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Study of pipe thickness loss using a neutron radiography method

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Wahab, Aliff Amiru Bin; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Md; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2014-02-12

    The purpose of this preliminary work is to study for thickness changes in objects using neutron radiography. In doing the project, the technique for the radiography was studied. The experiment was done at NUR-2 facility at TRIGA research reactor in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Malaysia. Test samples of varying materials were used in this project. The samples were radiographed using direct technique. Radiographic images were recorded using Nitrocellulose film. The films obtained were digitized to processed and analyzed. Digital processing is done on the images using software Isee!. The images were processed to produce better image for analysis. The thickness changes in the image were measured to be compared with real thickness of the objects. From the data collected, percentages difference between measured and real thickness are below than 2%. This is considerably very low variation from original values. Therefore, verifying the neutron radiography technique used in this project.

  8. The neutron moderated detector and groundbased cosmic ray modulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, P. H.; Raubenheimer, B. C.

    1985-01-01

    Reports appear on modulation studies with the neutron monitor without lead. Some of these studies cast doubt on the reliability of this detector. The stability of the neutron moderated detector (NMD) at Sanae, Antarctic is discussed. The barometric coeficient of the 4NMD for epoch 1976 appears not to differ statistically from the 0.73%/mb of the 3NM64. The monthly averaged hourly counting rate of our 4NMD and 3NM64 correlates very well (correlation coefficient: 98%) over the years from 1974-1984, with the 4NMD showing a 8% larger long term modulation effect than the 3NM64, indicating a difference in sensitivities of the two detectors. From this difference in sensitivities spectra of ground level solar proton events and modulation functions of Forbush decreases are deduced.

  9. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to function

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In the Progress Report for last year (7-1-88 to 6-30-89) we proposed to complete the following experiments: (1) Structure of TFIIIA/DNA complex, (2) Effect of histone acetylation on nucleosome structure, and (3) Location of lysine rich histone H5 on the nucleosome. Our major source of neutrons is LANSCE, LANL. However, for the period of this report LANSCE has been down between cycles of operation. Continuing neutron scatter studies have been carried out at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France, on the trimmed nucleosome core particles. X-ray scatter studies have been carried out at DESY, Hamburg on the histone octamer and trimmed octamer. X-ray scatter studies have been performed also at LANL on proposed objectives. We have continued with the following of our research program; (i) assembly of fully characterized nucleosomes; (ii) effect of histone acetylation on nucleosomes; (iii) effect of full acetylation of H3 and H4 on nucleosome DNA linking number; (iv) assembly and characterization of defined minichromosomes; (v) neutron and X-ray scatter of the histone octamer and trimmed octamer; (vi) structural studies of human sperm chromatin, histones and protamines. 5 refs.

  10. Crystals for neutron scattering studies of quantum magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Yankova, Tantiana; Hüvonen, Dan; Mühlbauer, Sebastian; Schmidiger, David; Wulf, Erik; Hong, Tao; Garlea, Vasile O; Custelcean, Radu; Ehlers, Georg

    2012-01-01

    We review a strategy for targeted synthesis of large single crystal samples of prototype quantum magnets for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Four case studies of organic copper halogenide S = 1/2 systems are presented. They are meant to illustrate that exciting experimental results pertaining to the forefront of many-body quantum physics can be obtained on samples grown using very simple techniques, standard laboratory equipment, and almost no experience in advanced crystal growth techniques.

  11. Study of neutron irradiated structures of ammonothermal GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Deveikis, L.; Meskauskaite, D.; Miasojedovas, S.; Mickevicius, J.; Pavlov, J.; Pukas, K.; Vaitkus, J.; Velicka, M.; Zajac, M.; Kucharski, R.

    2017-04-01

    Study of the radiation damage in GaN-based materials becomes an important aspect for possible application of the GaN detectors in the harsh radiation environment at the Large Hadron Collider and at other particle acceleration facilities. Intentionally doped and semi-insulating bulk ammonothermal GaN materials were studied to reveal the dominant defects introduced by reactor neutron irradiations. These radiation defects have been identified by combining electron spin resonance and transmission spectroscopy techniques. Characteristics of carrier lifetime dependence on neutron irradiation fluence were examined. Variations of the response of the capacitor-type sensors with neutron irradiation fluence have been correlated with the carrier lifetime changes. The measurements of the photoconductivity and photoluminescence transients have been used to study the variation of the parameters of radiative and non-radiative recombination. The examined characteristics indicate that AT GaN as a particle sensing material is radiation hard up to high hadron fluences  ⩾1016 cm‑2.

  12. Protein Dynamics Studied by Quasi-elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Mamontov, Eugene; Lagi, Marco; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Gajapathy, Manavalan; Ng, Joseph; Weiss, Kevin; Coates, Leighton; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero

    2012-02-01

    The biological function and activities of proteins are intimately related to their structures and dynamics. Nowadays, neutron scattering is one of the most powerful tools to study the protein dynamics. In this study, we use quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) at the Spallation Neutron Source, ORNL, to study relaxational dynamics of two structurally different proteins --- hen egg white lysozyme and an inorganic pyrophosphatase from a hyperthermophile, in the time range of 10ps to 1ns. We experimentally prove that the slow dynamics of globular proteins can be described by the mode-coupling theory (MCT) that was originally developed for glass-forming molecular liquids. The MCT predicts the appearance of a logarithmic decay for a glass-forming liquid. Such dynamic behavior is also observed by recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on protein molecules. In addition, we compare the temperature dependence of the dynamics of the two proteins with completely different activity profiles. Our results greatly help understanding the relation between protein dynamics and their biological functions.

  13. Explosives detection studies using Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) is being investigated for detection of explosives in luggage or air cargo. We present here the principle results of a two-year study of a few-view tomographic FNTS system using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP to simulate neutron transmission through simple luggage phantoms and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves to determine system performance. Elemental distributions along projections through the interrogated object are obtained by analyzing MCNP generated neutron transmission data. Transmission data for few (3-5) angles and relatively coarse resolution ({approximately}2 cm) are used to create a tomographic reconstruction of elemental distributions within the object. The elemental unfolding and tomographic reconstruction algorithms and the concept of transmission-derived cross sections for use in elemental analysis have been validated by application to experimental data. Elemental distributions are combined in an explosives detection algorithm to provide an indication of the presence or absence of explosives. The algorithm in current use, termed the ``equivalent explosive`` algorithm, determines the quantity of explosive that can be formed using the measured amount of the constituent elements in each pixel. Reconstruction and explosives detection algorithms have been applied to a series of randomly packed suitcases to generated ROC that describe system performance in terms of the probability of detection and of false alarms. System studies have been performed to study the operational characteristics and limitations of a FNTS system, and to determine the system`s sensitivity to several important parameters such as neutron source reaction and incident particle energy, flight path length, and the position of the interrogated object.

  14. Neutron and Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Studies of Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tranquada,J.M.

    2008-09-01

    Superconductors hold the promise for a more stable and efficient electrical grid, but new isotropic, high-temperature superconductors are needed in order to reduce cable manufacturing costs. The effort to understand high-temperature superconductivity, especially in the layered cuprates, provides guidance to the search for new superconductors. Neutron scattering has long provided an important probe of the collective excitations that are involved in the pairing mechanism. For the cuprates, neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques also provide information on competing types of order, such as charge and spin stripes, that appear to be closely connected to the superconductivity. Recently, inelastic x-ray scattering has become competitive for studying phonons and may soon provide valuable information on electronic excitations. Examples of how these techniques contribute to our understanding of superconductivity are presented.

  15. Scissors Mode of 162 Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    DOE PAGES

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; ...

    2015-05-28

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions,more » (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ’) reactions.« less

  16. Neutron skin studies of medium and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, M.; Becker, D.; Ferretti, M.; Kumar, K.; Sfienti, C.

    2014-06-01

    The recent PREX experiment at JLab has demonstrated the sensitivity of parity violating electron scattering to the neutron density, meanwhile outlining its major experimental challenges. On the other side, intermediate energy photons are an ideal probe for studying the properties of strongly interacting matter from the nuclear scale down to the sub-nuclear components of the nucleus. Among others coherent pion photoproduction can provide information on the existence and nature of neutron skins in nuclei. The simultaneous combination of different techniques allows a systematic determination across the periodic table thus benchmarking modern calculation. Recently a systematic investigation of the latter method has been exploited at MAMI (Mainz). At MESA the same setup as in the measurement of the weak mixing angle can be used to determine the parity-violating asymmetry for polarized electrons scattered on heavy nuclei with a 1% resolution. Status and prospects of the projects are presented.

  17. Scissors Mode of 162Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions, (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ') reactions.

  18. Study of spherical torus based volume neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.T.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    1998-01-01

    With the worldwide development of fusion power focusing on the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), developmental strategies for the demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) are being discussed. A relatively prudent strategy is to construct and operate a small deuterium tritium fuelled volumetric neutron source (VNS) in parallel with ITER. The VNS is to provide, over a period less than 20 years, a relatively high fusion neutron fluence of 6 MW year m2 and wall loading of 1 MW m2 or more, over an accessible blanket test area of more than 10 m2. Such a VNS would complement ITER in testing, developing, and qualifying nuclear technology components, materials, and their combinations for DEMO and future commercial power plants. The effort of this study has established the potential of the spherical tokamak as a credible VNS concept that satisfies the above requirements.

  19. Reactor physics methods, models, and applications used to support the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Renier, J.P.; Wemple, C.A.; Jahshan, S.N.; Ryskammp, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the neutronics analysis performed during 1991 and 1992 in support of characterization of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The methods used in the analysis, parametric studies, and key results supporting the design and safety evaluations of the conceptual design are presented. The analysis approach used during the conceptual design phase followed the same approach used in early ANS evaluations: (1) a strong reliance on Monte Carlo theory for beginning-of-cycle reactor performance calculations and (2) a reliance on few-group diffusion theory for reactor fuel cycle analysis and for evaluation of reactor performance at specific time steps over the fuel cycle. The Monte Carlo analysis was carried out using the MCNP continuous-energy code, and the few- group diffusion theory calculations were performed using the VENTURE and PDQ code systems. The MCNP code was used primarily for its capability to model the reflector components in realistic geometries as well as the inherent circumvention of cross-section processing requirements and use of energy-collapsed cross sections. The MCNP code was used for evaluations of reflector component reactivity effects and of heat loads in these components. The code was also used as a benchmark comparison against the diffusion-theory estimates of key reactor parameters such as region fluxes, control rod worths, reactivity coefficients, and material worths. The VENTURE and PDQ codes were used to provide independent evaluations of burnup effects, power distributions, and small perturbation worths. The performance and safety calculations performed over the subject time period are summarized, and key results are provided. The key results include flux and power distributions over the fuel cycle, silicon production rates, fuel burnup rates, component reactivities, control rod worths, component heat loads, shutdown reactivity margins, reactivity coefficients, and isotope production rates.

  20. Monte Carlo studies on neutron interactions in radiobiological experiments

    PubMed Central

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Hau, Tak Cheong; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to study the characteristics of neutron interactions with cells underneath a water medium layer with varying thickness. The following results were obtained. (1) The fractions of neutron interaction with 1H, 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei in the cell layer were studied. The fraction with 1H increased with increasing medium thickness, while decreased for 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei. The bulges in the interaction fractions with 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei were explained by the resonance spikes in the interaction cross-section data. The interaction fraction decreased in the order: 1H > 16O > 12C > 14N. (2) In general, as the medium thickness increased, the number of “interacting neutrons” which exited the medium and then further interacted with the cell layer increased. (3) The area under the angular distributions for “interacting neutrons” decreased with increasing incident neutron energy. Such results would be useful for deciphering the reasons behind discrepancies among existing results in the literature. PMID:28704557

  1. Multitier Portal Architecture for Thin- and Thick-client Neutron Scattering Experiment Support

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Mark L; Miller, Stephen D

    2007-01-01

    Integration of emerging technologies and design patterns into the three-tier client-server architecture is required in order to provide a scalable and flexible architecture for novice to sophisticated portal user groups. The ability to provide user customizable portal interfaces is rapidly becoming commonplace and is driving the expectations of researchers and scientists in the scientific community. This paper describes an architectural design that maximizes information technology service reuse while providing a customizable user interface that scales with user sophistication and requirements. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides a state-of-the-art facility ideal for implementation of this infrastructure. The SNS Java-based Science Portal (Tier I) and Open Grid Computing Environment (Tier II) provide thin-client support whereas the GumTree Eclipse Rich Client Platform (Tier III) and Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (Tier IV) provide thickclient support within a multitier portal architecture. Each tier incorporates all of the features of the previous tiers while adding new capabilities based on the user requirements.

  2. Neutron Scattering Study of Low Energy Magnetic Excitation in FeTeSe System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Schneeloch, John; Matsuda, Masaaki; Christianson, A. D.; Gu, Genda; Zaliznyak, I. A.; Xu, Guangyong; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2014-03-01

    We have performed neutron scattering and magnetization/transport measurements on a series of FeTe1-xSex system single crystals to study the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity. Comparing to pure FeTe1-xSex compounds, extra Fe and Ni/Cu doping on Fe-site can change physics properties of these samples, including resistivity, magnetization and superconducting properties. Our neutron scattering studies also show the Fe-site doping change low energy magnetic spectrum, including the magnetic excitations intensity, position and magnetic correlation length in these samples. On the other hand, the temperature dependence of the low energy magnetic fluctuations are also found to be different depending on the composition. This work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE.

  3. Cosmic ray modulation studies with Lead-Free Gulmarg Neutron Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darzi, M. A.; Ishtiaq, P. M.; Mir, T. A.; Mufti, S.; Shah, G. N.

    2014-02-01

    A lead-free neutron monitor operating at High Altitude Research Laboratory (HARL), Gulmarg optimized for detecting 2.45 MeV neutron bursts produced during the atmospheric lightning discharges is also concurrently used for studying background neutron component present in the atmosphere. These background neutrons are produced due to the interaction of primary cosmic rays with the atmospheric constituents. In order to study and extract the information about the yield of the neutron production during transient atmospheric lightning discharges, the system is continuously operated to monitor and record the cosmic ray produced background secondary neutrons in the atmosphere. The data analysis of the background neutrons recorded by Lead-Free Gulmarg Neutron Monitor (LFGNM) has convincingly established that the modulation effects due to solar activity phenomena compare very well with those monitored by the worldwide IGY or NM64 type neutron monitors which have optimum energy response relatively towards the higher energy regime of the cosmic rays. The data has revealed various types of modulation phenomena like diurnal variation, Forbush decrease etc. during its entire operational period. However, a new kind of a periodic/seasonal variation pattern is also revealed in the data from September 2007 to September 2012, which is seen to be significantly consistent with the data recorded by Emilio Segre observatory, Israel (ESOI) Neutron Monitor. Interestingly, both these neutron monitors have comparable latitude and altitude. However, the same type of consistency is not observed in the data recorded by the other conventional neutron monitors operating across the globe.

  4. Preparation of radioactive rare earth targets for neutron capture study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G. G.; Rogers, P. S. Z.; Palmer, P. D.; Dry, D. E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    The understanding of thc details of nucleosynthesis in stars remains a great challenge. Though the basic mechanisms governing the processes have been known since the pioneering work of Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle (l), we are now evolving into a condition where we can ask more specific questions. Of particular interest are the dynamics of the s ('slow') process. In this process the general condition is one in which sequential neutron captures occur at time scales long compared with the beta decay half lives of the capturing nuclides. The nucleosynthesis period for C or Ne burning stellar shells is believed to be in the year to few year time frame (2). This means that radionuclides with similar half lives to this burning period serve as 'branch point' nuclides. That is, there will be a competition between a capture to the next heavier isotope and a beta decay to the element of nexl higher atomic number. By understanding the abundances of these competing reactions we can learn about the dynamics of the nucleosynthesis process in the stellar medium. Crucial to this understanding is that we have a knowledge of the underlying neutron reaction cross sections on these unstable nuclides in the relevant stellar energy regions (neutrons of 0.1-100 KeV). Tm (1.9 years) and ls'Sm (90 ycws) have decay properties that permit their handling in an open fume hood. These Iwo were therefore selected to be the first radionuclides for neutron capture study in what will be an ongoing effort.

  5. Neutron capture studies on /sup 189/Os

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, A.M.; Colvin, G.G.; Gelletly, W.; Warner, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive study of the level structure of /sup 189/Os has been carried out using the (n,..gamma..) and (n,e-) reactions. The use of the Average Resonance Capture technique ensures that the complete set of 1/2-, 3/2- states has been established up to 1500 keV in excitation energy and secondary ..gamma..-rays have been measured in singles and coincidence to build up the detailed level scheme. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Optimization study of normal conductor tokamak for commercial neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Sakai, R.; Okamoto, A.

    2017-05-01

    The optimum conceptual design of tokamak with normal conductor coils was studied for minimizing the cost for producing a given neutron flux by using a system code, PEC. It is assumed that the fusion neutrons are used for burning transuranics from the fission reactor spent fuel in the blanket and a fraction of the generated electric power is circulated to opearate the tokamak with moderate plasma fusion gain. The plasma performance was assumed to be moderate ones; {β\\text{N}}~∼ ~3{--}4 in the aspect ratio A~=~2{--}3 and {{H}98y2}~=~1 . The circulating power is an important factor affecting the cost. Though decreasing the aspect ratio is useful to raise the plasma beta and decrease the toroidal field, the maximum field in the coil starts to rise in the very low aspect ratio range and then the circulating power increases with decrease in the plasma aspect ratio A below A~∼ ~2 , while the construction cost increases with A . As a result, the cost per neutron has its minimum around A~∼ ~2.2 , namely, between ST and the conventional tokamak. The average circulating power fraction is expected to be ~51%.

  7. Density of states in solid deuterium: Inelastic neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Morkel, C.; Mueller, A. R.; Paul, S.; Urban, M.; Schober, H.; Rols, S.; Unruh, T.; Hoelzel, M.

    2009-08-01

    The dynamics of solid deuterium (sD{sub 2}) is studied by means of inelastic scattering (coherent and incoherent) of thermal and cold neutrons at different temperatures and para-ortho ratios. In this paper, the results for the generalized density of states (GDOS) are presented and discussed. The measurements were performed at the thermal neutron time-of-flight (TOF) instrument IN4 at ILL Grenoble and at the cold neutron TOF instrument TOFTOF at FRM II Garching. The GDOS comprises besides the hcp phonon excitations of the sD{sub 2} the rotational transitions J=0{yields}1 and J=1{yields}2. The intensities of these rotational excitations depend strongly on the ortho-D{sub 2} molecule concentration c{sub o} in sD{sub 2}. Above E=10 meV there are still strong excitations, which very likely may originate from higher-energy damped optical phonons and multiphonon contributions. A method for separating the one-phonon and multiphonon contributions to the density of states will be presented and discussed.

  8. Study of a new central compact object: The neutron star in the supernova remnant G15.9+0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D.; Suleimanov, V.; Sasaki, M.; Santangelo, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present our study of the central point source CXOU J181852.0-150213 in the young Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G15.9+0.2 based on the recent ~90 ks Chandra observations. The point source was discovered in 2005 in shorter Chandra observations and was hypothesized to be a neutron star associated with the SNR. Our X-ray spectral analysis strongly supports the hypothesis of a thermally emitting neutron star associated with G15.9+0.2. We conclude that the object belongs to the class of young cooling low-magnetized neutron stars referred to as central compact objects (CCOs). We modeled the spectrum of the neutron star with a blackbody spectral function and with our hydrogen and carbon neutron star atmosphere models, assuming that the radiation is uniformly emitted by the entire stellar surface. Under this assumption, only the carbon atmosphere models yield a distance that is compatible with a source located in the Galaxy. In this respect, CXOU J181852.0-150213 is similar to two other well-studied CCOs, the neutron stars in Cas A and in HESS J1731-347, for which carbon atmosphere models were used to reconcile their emission with the known or estimated distances.

  9. Ellipsometric and neutron diffraction study of pentane physisorbed on graphite.

    PubMed

    Kruchten, Frank; Knorr, Klaus; Volkmann, Ulrich G; Taub, Haskell; Hansen, Flemming Y; Matthies, Blake; Herwig, Kenneth W

    2005-08-02

    High-resolution ellipsometry and neutron diffraction measurements have been used to investigate the structure, growth, and wetting behavior of fluid pentane (n-C(5)H(12)) films adsorbed on graphite substrates. We present isotherms of the thickness of pentane films adsorbed on the basal-plane surfaces of a pyrolytic graphite substrate as a function of the vapor pressure. These isotherms are measured ellipsometrically for temperatures between 130 and 190 K. We also describe neutron diffraction measurements in the temperature range 11-140 K on a deuterated pentane (n-C(5)D(12)) monolayer adsorbed on an exfoliated graphite substrate. Below a temperature of 99 K, the diffraction patterns are consistent with a rectangular centered structure. Above the pentane triple point at 143.5 K, the ellipsometric measurements indicate layer-by-layer adsorption of at least seven fluid pentane layers, each having the same optical thickness. Analysis of the neutron diffraction pattern of a pentane monolayer at a temperature of 130 K is consistent with small clusters having a rectangular-centered structure and an area per molecule of approximately 37 A(2) in coexistence with a fluid monolayer phase. Assuming values of the polarizability tensor from the literature and that the monolayer fluid has the same areal density as that inferred for the coexisting clusters, we calculate an optical thickness of the fluid pentane layers in reasonable agreement with that measured by ellipsometry. We discuss how these results support the previously proposed "footprint reduction" mechanism of alkane monolayer melting. In the hypercritical regime, we show that the layering behavior is consistent with the two-dimensional Ising model and determine the critical temperatures for layers n = 2-5.

  10. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg).

  11. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (˜100 mg).

  12. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Kelton, K. F.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Goldman, A. I.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Egami, T.

    2016-01-15

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr{sub 64}Ni{sub 36} measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg)

  13. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGES

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  14. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).

  15. Neutron studies of liquid and solid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Glyde, H.R.

    1987-04-01

    The progress made during 5/1/86--4/31/87 under contract No. F902- 34ER45082 is reported. The validity of the Impulse Approximation (IA) to the dynamic form factor, S(Q,{omega}), has been investigated using realistic models of solid helium. The calculations suggest that the IA can be used to obtain the momentum distribution, n(p), within 1% at Q {approx} 30 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}, if S(Q,{omega}) is first symmetrized about the recoil frequency, {omega}{sub R}. For solid helium under pressure (e.g. 5 kbar) a Q {approx gt} 50 {Angstrom} {sup {minus}1} is required. The S(Q,{omega}) in liquid {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He in the wave vector transfer range 3 {le} Q {le} 10 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1} has been evaluated, beginning from the pair potential. The general shape and width of S(Q,{omega}) obtained agrees well with existing experiment. The width of S(Q,{omega}) is found to oscillate as a function of Q in {sup 4}He but not in {sup 3}He. The dynamics of atoms adsorbed in solid layers on surfaces has been studied using self-consistent methods.

  16. Study of Neutron Deficient 13O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarge, Joseph; Rogachev, G. V.; Blackmon, J.; Wiedenhover, I.; Baby, L.; Johnson, E. D.; Kuchera, A. N.; Koshchiy, E.; Lai, J.; Linhardt, L.; Macon, K.; Matos, M.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2013-10-01

    Development of theoretical framework that allows the combination of nuclear structure calculations with the continuum is an important objective of modern nuclear theory [A. Volya, PRC 79, 044308 (2009), S. Quaglioni and P. Navratil, PRL 101092501 (2008)]. Due to the low binding energy of exotic isotopes even the lowest excited states are unbound and therefore it is essential to take the continuum into account. We studied the structure of the lightest bound oxygen isotope, 13O, through 12N+p resonance scattering using the new active target detector ANASEN [M. Matos et al., Proc. Intern. Symp. on Nuclei in the Cosmos, July 19-23, Heidelberg, Germany, p. 226 (2010)]. The experiment was performed at the John D. Fox Superconducting Accelerator Laboratory at Florida State University. A rare isotope beam of 12N ions was produced using the radioactive nuclear beam facility RESOLUT. Methane gas was used as a target and also as an active medium for the gas proportional counters of the ANASEN detector. The analysis of the p+12N excitation functions was performed using the R-Matrix approach. The preliminary results of the experiment will be presented.

  17. Study of Neutron Deficient ^9C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarge, Joseph; Rogachev, G. V.; Blackmon, J.; Wiedenhover, I.; Baby, L.; Johnson, E. D.; Kuchera, A. N.; Koshchiy, E.; Lai, J.; Linhardt, L.; Macon, K.; Matos, M.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2012-10-01

    Development of theoretical framework that allows the combination of nuclear structure calculations with the continuum is an important objective of modern nuclear theory [1,2]. Due to the low binding energy of exotic isotopes even the lowest excited states are unbound and therefore it is essential to take the continuum into account. We studied the structure of the lightest bound carbon isotope, ^9C, through ^8B+p resonance scattering using the new active target detector ANASEN [3]. The experiment was performed at the John D. Fox Superconducting Accelerator Laboratory at FSU. A rare isotope beam of ^8B ions was produced using the radioactive nuclear beam facility RESOLUT. Pure hydrogen gas was used as a target and also as an active medium for the gas proportional counters of the ANASEN detector. The analysis of the p+^8B excitation functions was performed using the R-Matrix approach. The preliminary results will be presented.[4pt] [1] A. Volya, Phys. Rev. C 79, 044308 (2009).[0pt] [2] S. Quaglioni and P. Navr'atil, PRL 101, 092501 (2008).[0pt] [3] M. Matos, et al.,Proc. Intern. Symposium on Nuclei in the Cosmos XI, July 19-23 2010, Heidelberg, Germany, p.226(2010).

  18. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rorschach, H.E.

    1993-05-25

    Results that shed new light on the study of protein dynamics were obtained by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The triple axis instrument H-9 supplied by the cold source was used to perform a detailed study of the quasi-elastic spectrum and the Debye-Waller factor for trypsin in powder form, in solution, and in crystals. A preliminary study of myoglobin crystals was also done. A new way to view the results of quasi-elastic scattering experiments is sketched, and the data on trypsin are presented and analyze according to this new picture.

  19. Simulation study of accelerator based quasi-mono-energetic epithermal neutron beams for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Adib, M; Habib, N; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Mansy, M S

    2016-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-7.5 keV at the accelerator port using the generated neutron spectrum from a Li (p, n) Be reaction. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The feature of the filtered beams is detailed in terms of optimal thickness of the primary and additive components. A computer code named "QMNB-AS" was developed to carry out the required calculations. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity with low contamination from the accompanying thermal, fast neutrons and γ-rays.

  20. Dynamics of pseudo-partial wetting studied by neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esibov, Levon; Sarkisov, Dmitry; Jeng, U.-Ser; Crow, M. L.; Steyerl, Albert

    The structural changes occurring in oil layers during condensation of deuterated octane (C 8D 18) on the surface of a solid (single-crystal silicon) and a liquid (water solution with low (0.08 wt%) concentration of a non-ionic surfactant (C 10E 4) have been studied by neutron reflectometry. The results demonstrate the presence of pseudo-partial wetting during condensation. The van der Waals attractive potential stabilizes a thin oil film coexisting with the residual droplet. We report a study of the growth dynamics of the residual droplet.

  1. Passive and Active Fast-Neutron Imaging in Support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Safeguards Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Blackston, Matthew A; Hausladen, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Results from safeguards-related passive and active coded-aperture fast-neutron imaging measurements of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) material configurations performed at Idaho National Laboratory s Zero Power Physics Reactor facility are presented. The imaging measurements indicate that it is feasible to use fast neutron imaging in a variety of safeguards-related tasks, such as monitoring storage, evaluating holdup deposits in situ, or identifying individual leached hulls still containing fuel. The present work also presents the first demonstration of imaging of differential die away fast neutrons.

  2. STUDY OF A 10-MW CONTINUOUS SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.G.LUDEWIG,H.SHAPIRO,S.

    2003-05-12

    This paper reports on the feasibility study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac as the driver for an Accelerator-based Continuous Neutron Source (ACNS) [1] to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Linac is to be operated in the Continuous Wave (CW) mode to produce an average 10 MW of beam power. The Linac beam energy is taken to be 1.25 GeV. The required average proton beam intensity in exit is then 8 mA.

  3. Neutron depth profiling study of lithium niobate optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolářova, P.; Vacík, J.; Špirková-Hradilová, J.; Červená, J.

    1998-05-01

    The relation between optical properties and the structure of proton exchanged and annealed proton exchanged optical waveguides in lithium niobate was studied using the mode spectroscopy and neutron depth profiling methods. We have found a close correlation between the lithium depletion and the depth profile of the extraordinary refractive index. The form of the observed dependence between Li depletion and refractive index depends on the fabrication procedure by which the waveguide was prepared but it is highly reproducible for specimens prepared by the same procedure.

  4. Neutron Scattering Study of TbPtin Intermetallic Compound

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Vasile O; Morosan, E.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Zarestky, Jerel L; Canfield, P. C.; Stassis, C.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron diffraction techniques have been used to study the magnetic properties of a TbPtIn single-crystal as a function of temperature and magnetic field. In the absence of an externally applied magnetic field, the compound orders, below approximately 47 K, in an antiferromagnetic structure with propagation vector k=(1/2,0,1/2); the magnetic moments were found to be parallel to the [1 {ovr 2} 0] direction. Measurements at 4.2 K, with a magnetic field applied along the [1 {ovr 2} 0] direction, revealed metamagnetic transitions at approximately 20 kG and 40 kG.

  5. Solid phases of spatially nanoconfined oxygen: A neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Kojda, Danny; Wallacher, Dirk; Hofmann, Tommy; Baudoin, Simon; Hansen, Thomas; Huber, Patrick

    2014-01-14

    We present a comprehensive neutron scattering study on solid oxygen spatially confined in 12 nm wide alumina nanochannels. Elastic scattering experiments reveal a structural phase sequence known from bulk oxygen. With decreasing temperature cubic γ-, orthorhombic β- and monoclinic α-phases are unambiguously identified in confinement. Weak antiferromagnetic ordering is observed in the confined monoclinic α-phase. Rocking scans reveal that oxygen nanocrystals inside the tubular channels do not form an isotropic powder. Rather, they exhibit preferred orientations depending on thermal history and the very mechanisms, which guide the structural transitions.

  6. Functional renormalization group study of nuclear and neutron matter

    SciTech Connect

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-01-22

    A chiral model based on nucleons interacting via boson exchange is investigated. Fluctuation effects are included consistently beyond the mean-field approximation in the framework of the functional renormalization group. The liquid-gas phase transition of symmetric nuclear matter is studied in detail. No sign of a chiral restoration transition is found up to temperatures of about 100 MeV and densities of at least three times the density of normal nuclear matter. Moreover, the model is extended to asymmetric nuclear matter and the constraints from neutron star observations are discussed.

  7. Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.G.; Durkee, J.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in the design and demonstrations of a small, long-lived nuclear heat and electric power source for potential applications at remote sites where alternate fossil energy systems would not be cost effective. This paper describes the neutronic design analysis that was performed to arrive at two conceptual designs, one using thermoelectric conversion, the other using an organic Rankine cycle. To meet the design objectives and constraints a number of scoping and optimization studies were carried out. The results of calculations of control worths, temperature coefficients of reactivity and fuel depletion effects are reported.

  8. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structure related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron scatter studies have been performed at LANSCE, LANL and at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France. In the previous progress report (April 1, 1988--July 1, 1988) the following objectives were listed: shape of the histone octamer; location of the N-terminal domains of histone in the nucleosome core particle (specific aim 1 of original grant proposal); effect of acetylation on nucleosome structure (specific aim 2); location of the globular domain of histone H1 (specific aim 6); and complexes of the transcription factor 3A with its DNA binding site. Progress is briefly discussed.

  9. Infrared absorption study of neutron-transmutation-doped germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, I. S.; Haller, E. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using high-resolution far-infrared Fourier transform absorption spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements, the evolution of the shallow acceptor and donor impurity levels in germanium during and after the neutron transmutation doping process was studied. The results show unambiguously that the gallium acceptor level concentration equals the concentration of transmutated Ge-70 atoms during the whole process indicating that neither recoil during transmutation nor gallium-defect complex formation play significant roles. The arsenic donor levels appear at full concentration only after annealing for 1 h at 450 C. It is shown that this is due to donor-radiation-defect complex formation. Again, recoil does not play a significant role.

  10. Infrared absorption study of neutron-transmutation-doped germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, I. S.; Haller, E. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using high-resolution far-infrared Fourier transform absorption spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements, the evolution of the shallow acceptor and donor impurity levels in germanium during and after the neutron transmutation doping process was studied. The results show unambiguously that the gallium acceptor level concentration equals the concentration of transmutated Ge-70 atoms during the whole process indicating that neither recoil during transmutation nor gallium-defect complex formation play significant roles. The arsenic donor levels appear at full concentration only after annealing for 1 h at 450 C. It is shown that this is due to donor-radiation-defect complex formation. Again, recoil does not play a significant role.

  11. Precision Neutron Decay Studies with the Nab and UCNB Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprow, Aaron; Nab Collaboration; UCNB Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Precision neutron decay correlation experiments are a sensitive means to study the standard model and probe for beyond the standard model physics. Nab and UCNB are two such experiments that will measure the neutrino-electron correlation term, a, and the neutrino asymmetry, B, respectively. Thick, highly-segmented silicon detectors will be used to directly measure the proton and electron from each decay event in coincidence, leading to the extraction of these angular correlations. Preliminary work to understand the systematic uncertainties associated with these experiments, as well as the early analysis of data taken from the 2015-2016 beam time at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be presented.

  12. Decay studies of the highly neutron-deficient indium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    An extension of the experimentally known nuclidic mass surface to nuclei far from the region of beta-stability is of fundamental interest in providing a better determination of the input parameters for the various nuclear mass formulae, allowing a more accurate prediction of the ultimate limits of nuclear stability. In addition, a study of the shape of the mass surface in the vicinity of the doubly-closed nuclide /sup 100/Sn provides initial information on the behavior of the shell closure to be expected when Z = N = 50. Experiments measuring the decay energies of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In by ..beta..-endpoint measurements are described with special attention focused on the development of a plastic scintillator ..beta..-telescope coupled to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer). An attempt to measure the ..beta..-endpoint energy of /sup 102/In is also briefly described. The experimentally determined decay energies and derived masses for /sup 103/ /sup 105/In are compared with the predictions of different mass models to identify which models are more successful in this region. Furthermore, the inclusion in these comparisons of the available data on the neutron-rich indium nuclei permits a systematic study of their ground state mass behavior as a function of the neutron number between the shell closures at N = 50 and N = 82. These analyses indicate that the binding energy of /sup 103/In is 1 MeV larger than predicted by the majority of the mass models. An examination of the Q/sub EC/ surface and the single- and two-neutron separation energies in the vicinity of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In is also performed to investigate further the deviation and other possible systematic variations in the mass surface in a model-independent way.

  13. Materials compatibility studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R and D programs. In addition, corrosion studies also include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous spallation neutron systems as a window material. Two types of compatibility issues relative to 316 SS/mercury and Inconel 718/mercury are being examined: (1) liquid metal embrittlement (LME) and (2) temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275 C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercury or mercury-gallium. However, there was evidence that the fracture was less ductile. Preliminary evaluation of mass transfer of either type 316 SS or Inconel 718 in mercury or mercury-gallium at 350 C (maximum temperature) did not reveal significant effects. Two 5,000 h thermal convection loop tests of type 316 SS are in progress, with specimens in both hot and cold test regions, at 300 and 240 C, respectively.

  14. Neutron and X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Tiley, Jaimie; Wang, Yandong; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    The selection of articles in the special topic 'Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials' is based on the materials presented during the TMS 2009 annual meeting in San Francisco, CA, February 15-19, 2009. The development of ultrabrilliant third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, together with advances in X-ray optics, has created intense X-ray microbeams, which provide the best opportunities for in-depth understanding of mechanical behavior in a broad spectrum of materials. Important applications include ultrasensitive elemental detection by X-ray fluorescence/absorption and microdiffraction to identify phase and strain with submicrometer spatial resolution. X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly exciting application compared with alternative probes of crystalline structure, orientation, and strain. X-ray microdiffraction is nondestructive with good strain resolution, competitive or superior spatial resolution in thick samples, and with the ability to probe below the sample surface. Moreover, the high-energy X-ray diffraction technique provides an effective tool for characterizing the mechanical and functional behavior in various environments (temperature, stress, and magnetic field). At the same time, some neutron diffraction instruments constructed mainly for the purpose of engineering applications can be found at nearly all neutron facilities. The first generation-dedicated instruments designed for studying in-situ mechanical behavior have been commissioned and used, and industrial standards for reliable and repeatable measurements have been developed. Furthermore, higher penetration of neutron beams into most engineering materials provides direct measurements on the distribution of various stresses (i.e., types I, II, and III) beneath the surface up to several millimeters, even tens of millimeters for important industrial components. With X-ray and neutron measurements, it is possible to characterize material behavior at different length scales. It

  15. Polarized Neutron Studies on Antiferromagnetic Single Crystals: Technical Report No. 4

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nathans, R.; Riste, T.; Shirane, G.; Shull, C.G.

    1958-11-26

    The theory of neutron scattering by magnetic crystals as given by Halpern and Johnson predicts changes in the polarization state of the neutron beam upon scattering which depend upon the relative orientation of the neutron polarization vector and the crystal magnetic axis. This was investigated experimentally with a polarized beam spectrometer using single crystals of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and alpha - Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in which reside unique antiferromagnetic axes. Studies were made on several different reflections in both crystals for a number of different temperatures both below and above the Neel point. Results support the theoretical predictions and indicate directions for the moments in these crystals consistent with previous work. A more detailed study of the polarization changes in the (111) reflection in alpha - Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at room temperature on application of a magnetic field was carried out, The results indicate that the principal source of the parasitic ferromagnetism in hematite is essentially independent of the orientation of the antiferromagnetic domains within the crystal.

  16. Neutron scattering studies of a bond-disordered S = 1 quantum spin liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarov, Kirill; Wulf, Erik; Hüvonen, Dan; Gvasaliya, Severian; Ressouche, Eric; Ollivier, Jacques; Paduan-Filho, Armando; Zheludev, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of the neutron scattering studies of a bond-disordered modification of a well-known gapped S = 1 antiferromagnetic quantum system NiCl2 . 4SC(NH2)2 (commonly referred to as DTN). The focus of the study is a zero-field spin-liquid phase of a compound with 6% of Cl to Br substitution. Inelastic neutron time-of-flight measurements at a temperature of 60 mK were employed to map the magnetic excitation spectrum over the whole Brillouin zone with a high resolution. In addition, we have also investigated the critical properties of the field-induced phase transition in DTN specimen with various concentration of Br by means of neutron diffraction. We compare these experimental results to the bulk measurements on DTN with similar levels of Cl/Br substitution and recent theoretical predictions for disordered quantum magnets. This work was partially supported by the Swiss National Fund.

  17. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  18. Study of radioactive impurities in neutron transmutation doped germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathimalar, S.; Dokania, N.; Singh, V.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Shrivastava, A.; Jagadeesan, K. C.; Thakare, S. V.

    2015-02-01

    A program to develop low temperature (mK) sensors with neutron transmutation doped Ge for rare event studies with a cryogenic bolometer has been initiated. For this purpose, semiconductor grade Ge wafers are irradiated with thermal neutron flux from Dhruva reactor at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai. Spectroscopic studies of irradiated samples have revealed that the environment of the capsule used for irradiating the sample leads to significant levels of 65Zn, 110mAg and 182Ta impurities, which can be reduced by chemical etching of approximately 50 μm thick surface layer. From measurements of the etched samples in the low background counting setup, activity due to trace impurities of 123Sb in bulk Ge is estimated to be 1 Bq / g after irradiation. These estimates indicate that in order to use the NTD Ge sensors for rare event studies, a cooldown period of 2 years would be necessary to reduce the radioactive background to ≤ 1 mBq / g.

  19. (Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structure related to function)

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study is concerned with the application of neutron scatter techniques to the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin with the long term objective of understanding how the enormous lengths of DNA are folded into chromosomes. Micrococcal nuclease digestion kinetics have defined two subnucleosome particles; the chromatosome with 168 bp DNA, the histone octamer and one H1 and the nucleosome core particle with 146 bp DNA and the histone octamer. As will be discussed, the structure of the 146 bp DNA core particle is known in solution at low resolution from neutron scatter studies and in crystals. Based on this structure, the authors have a working model for the chromatosome and the mode of binding of H1. In order to define the structure of the nucleosome and also the different orders of chromatin structures they need to know the paths of DNA that link nucleosomes and the factors associated with chromosome functions that act on those DNA paths. The major region for this situation is the inherent variabilities in nucleosome DNA sequences, in the histone subtypes and their states of chemical modification and in the precise locations of nucleosomes. Such variabilities obscure the underlying principles that govern the packaging of DNA into the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin. The only way to elucidate these principles is to study the structures of nucleosomes and oligonucleosomes that are fully defined. They have largely achieved these objectives.

  20. Determining fragmentation dynamics through a study of neutron multiplicity at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Sharon; Christ, Peter; Mazza, Maria; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In nuclear fragmentation reactions the number of neutrons and the excitation energy of the final fragment are related to the excitation energies of prefragments, which are produced in the reaction target but not directly observed. The MoNA Collaboration designed and performed an experiment to measure the number of neutrons in coincidence with charged projectile fragments to determine the excitation mechanisms of specific prefragments. All prior MoNA experimental campaigns concentrated on neutrons emitted from discrete levels in near dripline nuclei and treated any evaporation neutrons as an underlying background. This experiment capitalizes on those evaporation neutrons, focusing on sodium, neon and fluorine reaction products. For the experiment a 32Mg secondary beam with energy 86 MeV/u was incident on a Be reaction target. This target is upstream from the Sweeper, a superconducting dipole steering magnet with a bending angle of 43° and a vertical gap that permits forward-focused neutrons to get to the MoNA, the Modular Neutron Array. The rigidity of the Sweeper was varied during this experiment to increase the detection range. Analysis of the neutron-neutron hit distribution in coincidence with each sodium, neon, or fluorine charged fragment will be presented. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation Award 1613429 and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Award 52007540.

  1. Study of the Neutron Detection Efficiency for the CLAS12 Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Keegan; Gilfoyle, Gerard; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    One of the central physics goals of Jefferson Lab is to understand how quarks and gluons form nuclei. The 12 GeV upgrade is nearing completion and a new detector, CLAS12, is being built in Hall B. One of the approved experiments will measure the magnetic form factor of the neutron. To make this measurement, we will extract the ratio of electron-neutron (e-n) to electron-proton (e-p) scattering events from deuterium in quasi-elastic kinematics. A major source of systematic uncertainty is the neutron detection efficiency (NDE) of CLAS12. To better understand the NDE we used the Monte Carlo code gemc to simulate quasi-elastic e-n events like those expected in the experiment. We then analyzed the simulated e-n events by using the measured, scattered electron information to predict the neutron's path. The neutron is detected in CLAS12's electromagnetic calorimeter (EC). If the predicted neutron path intersected the fiducial volume of the EC, then we searched for a hit near that point. The NDE is the ratio of the number of neutrons found in the EC to the number of neutrons predicted to hit the EC. The analysis was done using the newly released CLAS12 reconstruction tools. We observe a rapid rise in the NDE at low neutron momentum and a plateau above 60%. Work supported by the University of Richmond and the US Department of Energy.

  2. The physics experimental study for in-hospital neutron irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yiguo; Xia Pu; Zou Shuyun; Zhang Yongbao; Zheng Iv; Zheng Wuqing; Shi Yongqian; Gao Jijin; Zhou Yongmao

    2008-07-15

    MNSRs (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor) are low power research reactors designed and manufactured by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). MNSRs are mainly used for NAA, training and teaching, testing of nuclear instrumentation. The first MNSR, the prototype MNSR, was put into operation in 1984, later, eight other MNSRs had been built both at home and abroad. For MNSRs, highly enriched uranium (90%) is used as the fuel material. The In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator (IHNI) is designed for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) based on Miniature Neutron Source Reactor(MNSR). On both sides of the reactor core, there are two neutron beams, one is thermal neutron beam, and the other opposite to the thermal beam, is epithermal neutron beam. A small thermal neutron beam is specially designed for the measurement of blood boron concentration by the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA). In this paper, the experimental results of critical mass worth of the top Be reflectors worth of the control rod, neutron flux distribution and other components worth were measured, the experiment was done on the Zero Power Experiment equipment of MNSR. (author)

  3. Simulation study of a 'fission electron-collection' neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dong; Zhang Chuanfei

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a 'fission electron-collection' neutron detector was studied using the Monte Carlo method. The detector consists of two metal electrodes mounted in a vacuum, named coated and collection electrodes, respectively. The first electrode is coated with triuranium octoxide. The detector uses the 'fission electron-collection' technique, which does not need an intermediate material but directly collects electrons from the coating. Such a detector can realize a flat energy response and a fast time response, both of which are important in the fluence measurement of pulsed neutron sources. In this paper, the physical processes of detection are presented, as well as Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 toolkit. From the results, the sensitivity of the detector is approximately 1.5 x 10{sup -21} [C/(n/cm{sup 2})], and the FWHM of response function is 2.5 nanoseconds. Additionally, the characterization of escaping electrons is also presented, and the sensitivity of the detector is determined for various coating thicknesses. (authors)

  4. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  5. Structure of molten Al and eutectic Al-Si alloy studied by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlborg, U.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Besser, M.; Morris, J. R.; Calvo-Dahlborg, M.

    2012-11-24

    The structure of molten eutectic Al87.8Si12.2 alloy has been studied by neutron diffraction during a temperature cycle. For comparison measurements were performed on pure molten Al. The measurements show that the alloy after heating above the liquidus contains particles of two kinds, aluminum-rich and silicon-rich. The silicon-rich particles are partly dissolved after a further heating. Earlier published data obtained by the γ-ray absorption technique of the density of the molten eutectic Al–Si alloy had demonstrated the existence of two temperatures above the liquidus temperature: A dissolution temperature Td, at which the microstructure of the melt inherited from the ingot starts to dissolve and a branching temperature, Tb, at which the melt reaches a fully mixed state. The highest temperature that was possible to reach during the neutron experiments lies between Td and Tb. The obtained results support these conclusions that molten alloys after melting are inhomogeneous up to a temperature well above the liquidus. Moreover, the difference in shape between the static structure factors measured by neutron and X-ray diffraction on molten aluminum is observed and is found to be more accentuated and to extend to larger wavevectors than in earlier works.

  6. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed a study on the structure of trypsin trimmed histone octamers using small angle neutron and X-ray scattering studies and nuclear magnetic resonance. We have also completed studies on the structure of TFIIIA induced DNA bending by a circular permutation gel electrophoresis assay. Individual acetylated species of core histones from butyrate treated HeLa cells were isolated and reconstituted into nucleosomes using a 5S rDNA nucleosome positioning DNA sequence from sea urchin. These nucleosomes were characterized by sulfhydryl group probing, nucleoprotein particle gel electrophoresis and DNase I footprinting. Fully acetylated species of histones H3 and H4 were also reconstituted in closed circular minichromosomes and the effect of DNA topology changes caused by acetylation was studied. Finally, protamines isolated from human sperm were characterized and a full set of core histones were isolated and characterized. 7 refs.

  7. Neutron production from flattening filter free high energy medical linac: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, M. A.; Abolaban, F. A.; Podolyák, Z.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the problems arising from using a conventional linac at high energy (>8 MV) is the production of neutrons. One way to reduce neutron production is to remove the flattening filter (FF). The main purpose of this work was to study the effect of FF removal on neutron fluence and neutron dose equivalent inside the treatment room at different photon beam energies. Several simulations based on Monte Carlo techniques were carried out in order to calculate the neutron fluence at different locations in the treatment room from different linac energies with and without a FF. In addition, a step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) for prostate cancer was modelled using the 15 MV photon beam with and without a FF on a water phantom to calculate the neutron dose received in a full treatment. The results obtained show a significant drop-off in neutrons fluence and dose equivalent when the FF was removed. For example, the neutron fluence was decreased by 54%, 76% and 75% for 10, 15 and 18 MV, respectively. This can decrease the neutron dose to the patient as well as reduce the shielding cost of the treatment room. The neutron dose equivalent of the SnS IMRT for prostate cancer was reduced significantly by 71.3% when the FF was removed. It can be concluded that the flattening filter removal from the head of the linac could reduce the risk of causing secondary cancers and the shielding cost of radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  8. Time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering studies of native photosystems.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    The internal molecular dynamics of proteins plays an important role in a number of functional processes in native photosystems. Prominent examples include the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin and electron transfer in the reaction center of plant photosystem II. In this regard, the recently developed technique of time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering with laser excitation opens up new perspectives for the study of protein/membrane dynamics in specific functional states of even complex systems. The first direct observation of a functionally modulated protein dynamics has just recently been reported for the model system bacteriorhodopsin (Pieper et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 2008, 228103.), where a transient softening of the protein was observed on a timescale of approximately 1 ms along with the large-scale structural change in the M-intermediate of bacteriorhodopsin. In contrast, photosystem II membrane fragments with inhibited electron transfer show a suppression of protein dynamics approximately 160 mus after the actinic laser flash (Pieper and Renger, Biochemistry 48, 2009, 6111). This effect may reflect aggregation-like conformational changes capable of dissipation of excess excitation energy to prevent photodamage in the absence of Q(A)-->Q(B) electron transfer. These findings indicate that proteins exhibit a remarkable flexibility to accommodate different functional processes. This contribution will discuss methodical aspects, challenges, and recent applications of laser-excited, time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering.

  9. Neutron scattering studies of disordered carbon anode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanek, P.; Kamitakahara, W. A.; Zhou, P.; Fischer, J. E.

    2001-09-01

    Carbon-based anodes show many promising properties in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. So-called `disordered carbons' are characterized by a substantial amount of residual hydrogen, and exhibit large Li uptake capacities. We have employed a variety of neutron scattering techniques, coupled with computer simulations, to study the composition, local atomic structure, and vibrational dynamics of such materials. Radial distribution function analysis of neutron diffraction data, and incoherent inelastic scattering show that the structural motif is a planar graphene fragment, with edge carbons terminated by single hydrogen atoms, and random stacking between fragments. The vibrational spectra of the hydrogen-rich carbons are remarkably similar to the spectra of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon coronene in the medium-frequency region. At low frequencies, only a boson peak is observed, characteristic for glassy and disordered materials, and this feature shifts upon doping. The results are consistent with two proposed mechanisms for Li capacity, one analogous to conventional intercalation but with Li on both sides of graphene fragments, the other involving bonding of Li to H-terminated edge carbons.

  10. Neutron crystallography for the study of hydrogen bonds in macromolecules

    DOE PAGES

    Oksanen, Esko; Chen, Julian C.; Fisher, Zoe

    2017-04-07

    The hydrogen bond (H bond) is one of the most important interactions that form the foundation of secondary and tertiary protein structure. Beyond holding protein structures together, H bonds are also intimately involved in solvent coordination, ligand binding, and enzyme catalysis. The H bond by definition involves the light atom, H, and it is very difficult to study directly, especially with X-ray crystallographic techniques, due to the poor scattering power of H atoms. Neutron protein crystallography provides a powerful, complementary tool that can give unambiguous information to structural biologists on solvent organization and coordination, the electrostatics of ligand binding, themore » protonation states of amino acid side chains and catalytic water species. The method is complementary to X-ray crystallography and the dynamic data obtainable with NMR spectroscopy. Also, as it gives explicit H atom positions, it can be very valuable to computational chemistry where exact knowledge of protonation and solvent orientation can make a large difference in modeling. Finally, this article gives general information about neutron crystallography and shows specific examples of how the method has contributed to structural biology, structure-based drug design; and the understanding of fundamental questions of reaction mechanisms.« less

  11. Enzymes for carbon sequestration: neutron crystallographic studies of carbonic anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S. Z. Kovalevsky, A. Y.; Domsic, J.; Mustyakimov, M.; Silverman, D. N.; McKenna, R.; Langan, P.

    2010-11-01

    The first neutron crystal structure of carbonic anhydrase is presented. The structure reveals interesting and unexpected features of the active site that affect catalysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a ubiquitous metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO{sub 2} to form HCO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sup +} using a Zn–hydroxide mechanism. The first part of catalysis involves CO{sub 2} hydration, while the second part deals with removing the excess proton that is formed during the first step. Proton transfer (PT) is thought to occur through a well ordered hydrogen-bonded network of waters that stretches from the metal center of CA to an internal proton shuttle, His64. These waters are oriented and ordered through a series of hydrogen-bonding interactions to hydrophilic residues that line the active site of CA. Neutron studies were conducted on wild-type human CA isoform II (HCA II) in order to better understand the nature and the orientation of the Zn-bound solvent (ZS), the charged state and conformation of His64, the hydrogen-bonding patterns and orientations of the water molecules that mediate PT and the ionization of hydrophilic residues in the active site that interact with the water network. Several interesting and unexpected features in the active site were observed which have implications for how PT proceeds in CA.

  12. Neutron Crystallography for the Study of Hydrogen Bonds in Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Oksanen, Esko; Chen, Julian C-H; Fisher, Suzanne Zoë

    2017-04-07

    Abstract: The hydrogen bond (H bond) is one of the most important interactions that form the foundation of secondary and tertiary protein structure. Beyond holding protein structures together, H bonds are also intimately involved in solvent coordination, ligand binding, and enzyme catalysis. The H bond by definition involves the light atom, H, and it is very difficult to study directly, especially with X-ray crystallographic techniques, due to the poor scattering power of H atoms. Neutron protein crystallography provides a powerful, complementary tool that can give unambiguous information to structural biologists on solvent organization and coordination, the electrostatics of ligand binding, the protonation states of amino acid side chains and catalytic water species. The method is complementary to X-ray crystallography and the dynamic data obtainable with NMR spectroscopy. Also, as it gives explicit H atom positions, it can be very valuable to computational chemistry where exact knowledge of protonation and solvent orientation can make a large difference in modeling. This article gives general information about neutron crystallography and shows specific examples of how the method has contributed to structural biology, structure-based drug design; and the understanding of fundamental questions of reaction mechanisms.

  13. Study of pulse shape discrimination for a neutron phoswich detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica; Barzilov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    A portable phoswich detector capable of differentiating between fast neutrons and thermal neutrons, and photons was developed. The detector design is based on the use of two solid-state scintillators with dissimilar scintillation time properties coupled with a single optical sensor: a 6Li loaded glass and EJ-299-33A plastic. The on-the-fly digital pulse shape discrimination and the wavelet treatment of measured waveforms were employed in the data analysis. The instrument enabled neutron spectrum evaluation.

  14. Studying 10BE and 11BE Halo States Through The (P,D) Single-Neutron Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Keri; Sarazin, Fred; Tigress Collaboration; (Pcb)2 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    One-neutron transfer reactions are being used to study single-particle neutron states in nuclei. For one-neutron halo nuclei, such as 11Be, the (p,d) reaction enables the removal of the halo neutron or of one of the core neutrons. This way, it is possible to simultaneously study the halo wavefunction of the 11Be ground-state but also a possible excited halo state in 10Be. The 11Be(p, d)10Be transfer reaction at 10 MeV/nucleon is being investigated at the TRIUMF-ISAC II facility with the Printed Circuit Board Based Charged Particle ((PCB)2) array inside the TRIUMF ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS). The ground state and first excited state of 10Be can be directly identified using deuteron identification and kinematics from the charged particle array, while the four excited states in10Be around 6 MeV, including the suspected halo state (2- state), are identified using coincident gamma rays from TIGRESS with the identified deuterons. Angular distributions for the 10Be populated states will be shown along with their FRESCO fits. This work is partially supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant/Contract No. DE-FG03- 93ER40789.

  15. Studying 10Be and 11Be Halo States through the (p,d) Single-Neutron Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Keri; Sarazin, Fred; (Pcb)2 Collaboration; Tigress Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    One-neutron transfer reactions are being used to study single-particle neutron states in nuclei. For one-neutron halo nuclei, such as 11Be, the (p,d) reaction enables the removal of the halo neutron or of one of the core neutrons. This way, it is possible to simultaneously study the halo wavefunction of the 11Be ground-state but also a possible excited halo state in 10Be. The 11Be(p, d)10Be transfer reaction at 10 MeV/nucleon is being investigated at the TRIUMF-ISAC II facility with the Printed Circuit Board Based Charged Particle ((PCB)2) array inside the TRIUMF ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS). The ground state and first excited state of 10Be can be directly identified using deuteron identification and kinematics from the charged particle array, while the four excited states in10Be around 6 MeV, including the suspected halo state (2- state), are identified using coincident gamma rays from TIGRESS with the identified deuterons. Angular distributions for the 10Be populated states will be shown along with their FRESCO fits. This work is partially supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant/Contract No. DE-FG03-93ER40789 (Colorado School of Mines).

  16. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  17. Support effects studied on model supported catalysts. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gorte, R.J.

    1993-02-01

    Composition and structure of oxide support materials can change the catalytic behavior of metal and oxide catalysts. Model catalysts are being studied in which the active phase is deposited on flat oxide substrates, with emphasis on metals catalysis for automotive emissions control and acidity in supported oxides. Research is reported in the following areas: particle-size effects, support effects on ZnO and zirconia, support effects on ceria, supported oxides, and low energy ion scattering (no results in the latter).

  18. Exotic geophysical phenomena observed in an environmental neutron flux study using EAS PRISMA detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Victor; Bagrova, Anastasia; Cui, Shuwang; He, Yayun; Li, Bingbing; Ma, Xinhua; Pozdnyakov, Egor; Shchegolev, Oleg; Stenkin, Yuri; Stepanov, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    Some exotic geophysical events are observed by a global net of electron-neutron detectors (en-detectors) developed in the framework of the PRISMA EAS project. Our en-detectors running both on the Earth's surface and underground are continuously measuring the environmental thermal neutron flux. Thermal neutrons are in equilibrium with media and are therefore sensitive to many geophysical phenomena, which are exotic for people studying ultra high-energy cosmic rays or carrying out low background experiments deep underground.

  19. Recent neutronics developments for reactor safety studies with SIMMER code at KIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rineiski, A.; Marchetti, M.; Andriolo, L.; Gabrielli, F.

    2017-01-01

    The SIMMER family of codes is applied for safety studies of sodium fast reactors and reactors of other types. Both neutronics and fluid-dynamics parts of SIMMER are under development. In the paper new neutronics capabilities are presented. In particular developments for neutron transport solvers and a new technique for taking into account thermal expansion effects are described. These new capabilities facilitate 3D simulations and improve accuracy of modelling for the initiation transient phase during a hypothetical severe accident.

  20. Associated particle neutron elemental imaging in vivo: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Abel, Michael R; Koltick, David S; Nie, Linda H

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a Monte Carlo simulation model for in vivo associated particle neutron elemental imaging (APNEI) and to study the feasibility of using APNEI to determine the iron distribution in a human liver with the defined model. The model presented in this study was defined in mcnp by the basic geometry of the human body, the use of D + D source neutrons, iron as the element of interest, an iron-containing voxel in the liver as the target region, and 2 large germanium detectors anterior and posterior to the trunk of the body. The f8 pulse height tally was employed in mcnp to determine the signal acquired from iron inelastic scatter gamma rays at various iron concentrations in the target liver voxel. Correspondingly, the f4 average flux tally in mcnp was modified by a dose function such that the equivalent dose to the whole liver and the effective dose to the whole body could be estimated and used as the basis for a limiting number of neutron histories which could feasibly allow for the collection of a sufficient volume of data to construct a 2D image of iron distribution in the liver voxel. Assuming an allowable equivalent dose to the liver of 5 mSv, 143 inelastic scatter iron gamma ray counts (at ∼847 keV) would ideally be registered at the germanium detectors for a 1 cm(3) cube-shaped liver voxel with an iron concentration of 1000 ppm. According to the simulation model, an image of iron distribution in the liver can be constructed with a 1 cm resolution at the level of 1000 ppm iron. Collecting such an image would yield an estimated whole body dose of 0.82 mSv. The mathematical introduction of image uncertainty resulting from source spot diameter and detector timing resolution more closely approximates the result of real world application. APNEI of certain elements in vivo appears feasible given several timing, sensitivity, and resolution caveats. However, further study is required to determine what the detection limit of iron would

  1. Final report on Seed Money Project 3210-0346: Feasibility study for californium cold neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G.; Henderson, D.L.; Montgomery, B.H.

    1988-10-01

    A study has been completed of the feasibility and cost of building a cold neutron source that is not dependent on a reactor or accelerator. The neutron source is provided by up to ten /sup 252/Cf capsules, each containing 50 mg of the isotope produced in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor. The neutrons are moderated by heavy water and liquid deuterium to attain, in practice, a peak cold neutron flux of 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 13/ neutrons/(m/sup 2//center dot/s). The new facility would be located in the TURF Californium Facility. The estimated cost of the Californium Cold Neutron Source Facility is $6.5 million. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-08-26

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs.

  3. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  4. Neutron Reflectometry Studies Define Prion Protein N-terminal Peptide Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Le Brun, Anton P.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.; James, Michael; Boland, Martin P.; Collins, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP), widely recognized to misfold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the misfolding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various posttranslational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha- and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2, respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Our previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption. In the current study we aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, we used neutron reflectometry to define the structural details of this interaction in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with our previous studies, interaction was stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. This was most evident for the N1 peptide and suggests an induction of increased lipid order in the absence of phase transition. These observations stand in clear contrast to the findings of analogous studies of Ab and α-synuclein and thereby support the possibility of a functional role for such N-terminal fragment-membrane interactions. PMID:25418300

  5. Measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on the Godiva IV fast burst assembly for application to neutron dosimetry studies

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Hsu, H.H.; Paternoster, R.R.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1996-06-01

    In June, 1995, Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted the 23rd U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Study at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The participants tested their facilities accident dosimeters under a variety of neutrons fields produced by the Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) and the Godiva IV fast burst assembly. To provide useful information for the evaluation of the results, the neutron energy Spectrum was determined and the delivered absorbed dose to tissue. The measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on Godiva provides a unique problem in that the burst, which is nearly Gaussian in time, has a full width at half maximum of around 50 microseconds. The neutron spectrum was first determined at low-power while running at delayed critical using a standard set of Bonner spheres. At the same time, the response of a set of TLD dosimeters were measured. After that, measurements were conducted during a burst with another set of TLDs and with sulfur pellets.

  6. Fast neutron (14.5 MeV) radiography: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-07-01

    Fast neutron (14.5 MeV) radiography is a type of non-destructive analysis tool that offers its own benefits and drawbacks. Because cross-sections vary with energy, a different range of materials can be examined with fast neutrons than can be studied with thermal neutrons, epithermal neutrons, or x-rays. This paper details these differences through a comparative study of fast neutron radiography to the other types of radiography available. The most obvious difference among the different types of radiography is in the penetrability of the sources. Fast neutrons can probe much deeper and can therefore obtain details of the internals of thick objects. Good images have been obtained through as much as 15 cm of steel, 10 cm of water, and 15 cm of borated polyethylene. In addition, some objects were identifiable through as much as 25 cm of water or 30 cm of borated polyethylene. The most notable benefit of fast neutron radiography is in the types of materials that can be tested. Fast neutron radiography can view through materials that simply cannot be viewed by X rays, thermal neutrons, or epithermal neutrons due to the high cross-sections or linear attenuation coefficients involved. Cadmium was totally transparent to the fast neutron source. Fast neutron radiography is not without drawbacks. The most pronounced drawback has been in the quality of radiograph produced. The image resolution is only about 0.8 mm for a 1.25 cm thick object, whereas, other forms of radiography have much better resolution.

  7. The study of the thermal neutron flux in the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, V. V.; Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Dzhappuev, D. D.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the study of thermal neutron flux using monitors based on mixture of ZnS(Ag) and LiF enriched with a lithium-6 isotope at the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900 at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory. An annual modulation of thermal neutron flux in DULB-4900 is observed. Experimental evidences were obtained of correlation between the long-term thermal neutron flux variations and the absolute humidity of the air in laboratory. The amplitude of the modulation exceed 5% of total neutron flux.

  8. Spatially resolved in operando neutron scattering studies on Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyshyn, A.; Mühlbauer, M. J.; Dolotko, O.; Hofmann, M.; Pirling, T.; Ehrenberg, H.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially-resolved neutron diffraction has been applied to probe the lithium distribution in radial direction of a commercial Li-ion cell of 18650-type. The spatial evolution of selected Bragg reflections for LiCoO2 (positive electrode, "cathode") and graphite and lithium intercalated graphite (negative electrode, "anode") was observed and evaluated by taking beam attenuation and cell geometry effects into account. No evidences for lithium inhomogeneities have been found for the investigated set of cells. Computed neutron tomography using a monochromatic neutron beam confirmed the homogeneous lithium distribution. The relevance of the monochromatic beam to neutron imaging studies of Li-ion cells is discussed.

  9. Materials Compatibility Studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. The energy deposited in the target is transported by two separate mercury flow streams: one to transport heat in the interior target region and one to cool the stainless steel container. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations have been performed to predict temperature, velocity, and pressure distributions in the target. Results have generally shown that the power deposited in the bulk mercury can be effectively transported with reasonable flow rates and the bulk mercury temperature should not exceed 160{deg}C. Assuming good thermal contact, the maximum stainless steel wall temperature should be 130 {deg}C. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R&D programs. In addition, corrosion studies include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous water cooled spallation neutron systems as a window material. With type 316 SS selected to contain the mercury target of the SNS, two types of compatibility issues have been examined: LME and temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275{deg}C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 {deg}C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercwy or mercury-gallium. However, there

  10. The pilot experimental study of 14 MeV fast neutron digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Zhou, Changgen; Huo, Heyong; Wu, Yang; Liu, Bin; Lou, Benchao; Sun, Yong

    2009-09-01

    14 MeV Fast neutrons has good penetrability and the 14 MeV fast neutron radiography can meet the need of Non-Destructive Test of the structure and lacuna of heavy-massive sample, whose shell is made of heavy metal and in which there are some hydrogen materials, and the study of fast neutron digital radiography just begins in China. By the use of a D-T accelerator, a digital imaging system made up of a fast neutron scintillation screen made of ZnS(Ag) and polypropylene, lens and a scientific grade CCD, the experimental study of fast neutron radiography has been done between 4.3×1010-6.8×1010 n/s of neutron yield. Some 14 MeV fast neutron digital radiographs have been gotten. According to experimental radiographs and their data, the performance of the fast neutron scintillation screen and the basic characters of 14 MeV fast neutron radiography are analyzed, and it is helpful for the further research.

  11. Nanodiamond Foils for H- Stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and Related Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L; Harris, Gary; Piazza, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a single nanodiamond foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the entire operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control over film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development

  12. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Spectra of {gamma} rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of {sup 153,155-159}Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow}, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow} increases with A and for {sup 157,159}Gd it is significantly higher compared to {sup 156,158}Gd.

  13. Diffusion of water in bentonite clay: Neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V. K.; Prabhudesai, S. A.; Dessai, R. Raut; Erwin Desa, J. A.; Mitra, S.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2013-02-01

    Diffusion of water confined in natural bentonite clay is studied using the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. X-ray diffraction shows a well-defined crystalline structure of the clay with an interlayer spacing of 13 Å. The QENS experiment has been carried out on hydrated as well as dehydrated clay at 300 K. Significant quasi-elastic broadening was observed in case of hydrated bentonite clay whereas dehydrated clay did not show any broadening over the instrument resolution. Analysis of QENS data reveals that diffusion of water occurs through jump diffusion characterized by random distribution of jump lengths. Diffusion of water in clay is found to be hindered vis a vis bulk water.

  14. A neutron diffraction study of ancient Greek ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siouris, I. M.; Walter, J.

    2006-11-01

    Non-destructive neutron diffraction studies were performed on three 2nd-century BC archaeological pottery fragments from the excavation site of Neos Scopos, Serres, in North Greece. In all the 273 K diagrams quartz and feldspars phase fractions are dominant. Diopside and iron oxide phases were also identifiable. The diopside content is found to decrease with increasing quartz-feldspar compositions. Iron oxides containing minerals were found to be present and the phase compositions reflect upon the coloring of the samples. However, the different content compositions of the phases may suggest different regions of the original clay materials as well as different preparation techniques. The firing temperatures were determined to be in the range of 900-1000 °C.

  15. Neutron spin echo studies on the segmental dynamics of macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Bernd; Richter, Dieter

    The ultrahigh resolution neutron spin echo (NSE) technique provides the unique opportunity to investigate internal dynamic relaxation processes of polymer molecules simultaneously in spcae and time. In particular, information of the single chain behaviour is not restricted to dilute solutions but may also be obtained, if an appropriate mixture of protonated and deuterated polymers is used, from concentrated systems, the melt included. This paper gives a review on recent NSE studies on liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) systems. Single chain relaxation as well as collective fluctuations are considered in the whole range of concentrations. Thereby especially the cross over phenomena between different dynamic regimes are emphasized. The results are discussed in terms of microscopic models and compared with the theoretical predictions concerning universal and critical behaviour.

  16. Hanford personnel dosimeter supporting studies FY-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This report examined specific functional components of the routine external personnel dosimeter program at Hanford. Components studied included: dosimeter readout; dosimeter calibration; dosimeter field response; dose calibration algorithm; dosimeter design; and TLD chip acceptance procedures. Additional information is also presented regarding the dosimeter response to light- and medium-filtered x-rays, high energy photons and neutrons. This study was conducted to clarify certain data obtained during the FY-1980 studies.

  17. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Study on spatial resolution of micromegas as a neutron detector under condition of high neutron flux and γ ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Ji-Jin; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2009-02-01

    In this paper Micromegas has been designed to detect neutrons. The simulation of the spatial resolution of Micromegas as neutron detector is carried out by GEANT4 toolkit. The neutron track reconstruction method based on the time coincidence technology is employed in the present work. The influence of the flux of incident 14 MeV neutron and high gamma background on the spatial resolution is carefully studied. Our results show that the spatial resolution of the detector is sensitive to the neutron flux, but insensitive to the intensity of γ background if the neutron track reconstruction method proposed by our group is used. The γ insensitivity makes it possible for us to use the Micromegas detector under condition which has high γ-rays background.

  18. Neutron scattering studies of superconducting MgB2 tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellingeri, E.; Malagoli, A.; Modica, M.; Braccini, V.; Siri, A. S.; Grasso, G.

    2003-02-01

    The capability of manufacturing long superconducting MgB2 wires with already remarkable critical currents makes this material a very promising candidate for future applications. Tapes are prepared by the powder-in-tube technique. After the cold working procedure typically carried out by wire drawing and cold rolling, it has been found that a final sintering step carried out in argon atmosphere is a key process for further improving the superconducting properties of the conductors. To study the effect of the deformation and heat treatment processes, we performed neutron scattering experiment. Due to the high penetration depth of neutron inside matter, it was possible to analyse the MgB2 phase still wrapped in the Ni sheath. Our studies were carried out by a full spectra refinement by the Rietveld method. In the starting superconducting powder a large Mg deficiency was observed. In the tapes we found that the large forces applied during the cold working induced a large MgB2 lattice deformation, and that it is partly relaxed during the final sintering process. An important correlation of the residual stress with the critical temperature and the pinning properties was pointed out. We also observed the appearance of detrimental secondary phases during the sintering process. In particular, the MgB2 phase reacted with the nickel sheath and MgB2Ni2.5 was formed at temperatures higher than 850 °C. These results are of basic importance for a further optimization of the transport properties at moderate fields where applications of MgB2 tapes are already envisageable.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-11-22

    A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

  20. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Guiseppe, V.; Kidd, M.; Rundberg, B.; Tybo, J.

    2013-04-01

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of 195Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  1. Studies of neutron cross-sections important for spallation experiments using the activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Krása, A.; Majerle, M.; Suchopár, M.; Svoboda, O.; Wagner, V.

    2014-09-01

    A series of experiments devoted to studies of neutron cross-sections by activation method was carried out. The cross-sections of various threshold reactions were studied by means of different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources with energies from 14 MeV up to 100 MeV. Threshold reactions in various materials are among other used to measure fast neutron fields produced during accelerator driven system studies. For this reason our measurements of neutron cross-sections are crucial. At present, neither experimental nor evaluated data above 30 MeV are available for neutron threshold reactions in Au, I and In published in this proceedings. We studied materials in the form of thin foils and compared our data with the calculations preformed using the deterministic code TALYS 1.4.

  2. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  3. Studies of 54,56Fe Neutron Scattering Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.; French, A. J.; Henderson, S. L.; Howard, T. J.; Pecha, R. L.; Santonil, Z. C.; Crider, B. P.; Liu, S.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-05-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering differential cross sections and γ-ray production cross sections have been measured on 54,56Fe at several incident energies in the fast neutron region between 1.5 and 4.7 MeV. All measurements were completed at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (UKAL) using a 7-MV Model CN Van de Graaff accelerator, along with the neutron production and neutron and γ-ray detection systems located there. The facilities at UKAL allow the investigation of both elastic and inelastic scattering with nearly mono-energetic incident neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques were used to detect the scattered neutrons for the differential cross section measurements. The measured cross sections are important for fission reactor applications and also for testing global model calculations such as those found at ENDF, since describing both the elastic and inelastic scattering is important for determining the direct and compound components of the scattering mechanism. The γ-ray production cross sections are used to determine cross sections to unresolved levels in the neutron scattering experiments. Results from our measurements and comparisons to model calculations are presented.

  4. A pulsed neutron generator for in vivo body composition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinlein, J. H.; O'Neal, M. L.; Bacon, F. M.

    1991-05-01

    A neutron generator system utilizing two Zetatron neutron tubes has been designed and delivered to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University for use in clinical measurements of body carbon by neutron inelastic scattering. Each neutron tube is capable of delivering 10 3-10 4 14-MeV neutrons in a 7-μs pulse at repetition rates of 4 or 8 kHz, and can be operated independently as well as in a master-slave mode. The neutron tubes are gas filled with a mixture of deuterium and tritium; the target of the tube is operated at - 30 to - 60 kV dc and the ion source is operated with a 2.5-kV, 7-μs pulse. The tube gas pressure is monitored and controlled by measuring the total current in the high voltage circuit and feeding it back to the gas-reservoir drive circuit. Neutrons were measured with a plastic scintillator and photomultiplier tube.

  5. Ames collaborative study of cosmic-ray neutrons. 2: Low- and mid-latitude flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, L. D.; Mccaslin, J. B.; Smith, A. R.; Thomas, R. H.; Hewitt, J. E.; Hughes, L.

    1978-01-01

    Progress of the study of cosmic ray neutrons is described. Data obtained aboard flights from Hawaii at altitudes of 41,000 and 45,000 feet, and in the range of geomagnetic latitude 17 N less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 21 N are reported. Preliminary estimates of neutron spectra are made.

  6. Palladium deuteride formation in the cathode of an electrochemical cell: An in situ neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Rotella, F.J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Redey, L.; Felcher, G.P.; Hitterman, R.L.; Kleb, R.

    1991-12-31

    In this report, neutron diffraction of palladium cathodes is utilized to reveal palladium deuteride formation within the crystal structure of the metal. The experiment described in this report demonstrates the efficacy of neutron powder diffraction as a tool for structural studies of metal deuterides/hydrides and the feasibility of in situ diffraction measurements from a working electrochemical cell. (JL)

  7. Palladium deuteride formation in the cathode of an electrochemical cell: An in situ neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Rotella, F.J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Redey, L.; Felcher, G.P.; Hitterman, R.L.; Kleb, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this report, neutron diffraction of palladium cathodes is utilized to reveal palladium deuteride formation within the crystal structure of the metal. The experiment described in this report demonstrates the efficacy of neutron powder diffraction as a tool for structural studies of metal deuterides/hydrides and the feasibility of in situ diffraction measurements from a working electrochemical cell. (JL)

  8. Study of {beta}-Decay in the Proton-Neutron Interacting Boson-Fermion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuffi, L.; Brant, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2006-04-26

    We study {beta}-decay in odd-A nuclei together with the energy levels and other properties in the proton-neutron interacting-boson-fermion model. We also report on the preliminary results in the odd-odd nuclei in the proton-neutron interacting boson-fermion-fermion model.

  9. Study of neutron-induced background and its effect on the search of 0νββ decay in 124Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokania, N.; Singh, V.; Mathimalar, S.; Ghosh, C.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Pal, S.; Bhushan, K. G.; Shrivastava, A.

    2014-11-01

    Neutron-induced background has been studied in various components of the TIN.TIN detector, which is under development for the search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in 124Sn. Fast neutron flux ~106 n cm-2s-1 covering a broad energy range ~0.1 to ( ~18 MeV) was generated using 9Be(p,n)9B reaction. In addition, reactions with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were also studied using 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. Among the different cryogenic support structures studied, Teflon is found to be preferable compared to Torlon as there is no high energy gamma background Eγ > 1 MeV) . Contribution of neutron-induced reactions in nat, 124Sn from other Sn isotopes (A = 112-122) in the energy region of interest, namely, around the Qββ of 124Sn (E ~ 2.293 MeV), is also investigated.

  10. Using FLUKA to Study Concrete Square Shield Performance in Attenuation of Neutron Radiation Produced by APF Plasma Focus Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, M. J.; Habibi, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    In 2010, representatives from the Nuclear Engineering and physics Department of Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT) requested development of a project with the objective of determining the performance of a concrete shield for their Plasma Focus as neutron source. The project team in Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering and physics department of Amirkabir University of Technology choose some shape of shield to study on their performance with Monte Carlo code. In the present work, the capability of Monte Carlo code FLUKA will be explored to model the APF Plasma Focus, and investigating the neutron fluence on the square concrete shield in each region of problem. The physical models embedded in FLUKA are mentioned, as well as examples of benchmarking against future experimental data. As a result of this study suitable thickness of concrete for shielding APF will be considered.

  11. Study of low energy neutron beam formation based on GEANT4 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagyan, R.; Avetisyan, R.; Ivanyan, V.; Kerobyan, I.

    2017-07-01

    The possibility of obtaining thermal/epithermal energy neutron beams using external protons from cyclotron C18/18 is studied based on GEANT4 simulations. This study will be the basis of the Beam Shaped Assembly (BSA) development for future Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Proton induced reactions on 9Be target are considered as a neutron source, and dependence of neutron yield on target thickness is investigated. The problem of reducing the ratio of gamma to neutron yields by inserting a lead sheet after the beryllium target is studied as well. By GEANT4 modeling the optimal thicknesses of 9Be target and lead absorber are determined and the design characteristics of beam shaping assembly, including the materials and thicknesses of reflector and moderator are considered.

  12. Neutron Transport Simulations for NIST Neutron Lifetime Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangchen; BL2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrons in stable nuclei can exist forever; a free neutron lasts for about 15 minutes on average before it beta decays to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino. Precision measurements of the neutron lifetime test the validity of weak interaction theory and provide input into the theory of the evolution of light elements in the early universe. There are two predominant ways of measuring the neutron lifetime: the bottle method and the beam method. The bottle method measures decays of ultracold neutrons that are stored in a bottle. The beam method measures decay protons in a beam of cold neutrons of known flux. An improved beam experiment is being prepared at the National Institute of Science and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD) with the goal of reducing statistical and systematic uncertainties to the level of 1 s. The purpose of my studies was to develop computer simulations of neutron transport to determine the beam collimation and study the neutron distribution's effect on systematic effects for the experiment, such as the solid angle of the neutron flux monitor. The motivation for the experiment and the results of this work will be presented. This work was supported, in part, by a Grant to Gettysburg College from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program.

  13. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  14. First Lunar Outpost support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartz, Christopher; Cook, John; Rusingizandekwe, Jean-Luc

    1993-01-01

    The First Lunar Outpost (FLO) is the first manned step in the accomplishment of the Space Exploration Initiative, the Vice President's directive to NASA on the 20th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing. FLO's broad objectives are the establishment of a permanent human presence on the moon, supporting the utilization of extraterrestrial resources in a long-term, sustained program. The primary objective is to emplace and validate the first elements of a man tended outpost on the lunar surface to provide the basis for: (1) establishing, maintaining and expanding human activities and influence across the surface; (2) establishing, maintaining and enhancing human safety and productivity; (3) accommodating space transportation operations to and from the surface; (4) accommodating production of scientific information; (5) exploiting in-situ resources. Secondary objectives are: (1) to conduct local, small scale science (including life science); (2) In-situ resource utilization (ISRU) demonstrations; (3) engineering and operations tests; (4) to characterize the local environment; and (5) to explore locally. The current work is part of ongoing research at the Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture supporting NASA's First Lunar Outpost initiative. Research at SICSA supporting the First Lunar Outpost initiative has been funded through the Space Exploration Initiatives office at Johnson Space Center. The objectives of the current study are to further develop a module concept from an evaluation of volumetric and programmatic requirements, and pursue a high fidelity design of this concept, with the intention of providing a high fidelity design mockup to research planetary design issues and evaluate future design concepts.

  15. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  16. Study of calculated and measured time dependent delayed neutron yields. [TX, for calculating delayed neutron yields; MATINV, for matrix inversion; in FORTRAN for LSI-II minicomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Time-dependent delayed neutron emission is of interest in reactor design, reactor dynamics, and nuclear physics studies. The delayed neutrons from neutron-induced fission of /sup 232/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 242m/Am, /sup 245/Cm, and /sup 249/Cf were studied for the first time. The delayed neutron emission from /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Pu, and /sup 242/Pu were measured as well. The data were used to develop an empirical expression for the total delayed neutron yield. The expression gives accurate results for a large variety of nuclides from /sup 232/Th to /sup 252/Cf. The data measuring the decay of delayed neutrons with time were used to derive another empirical expression predicting the delayed neutron emission with time. It was found that nuclides with similar mass-to-charge ratios have similar decay patterns. Thus the relative decay pattern of one nuclide can be established by any measured nuclide with a similar mass-to-charge ratio. A simple fission product yield model was developed and applied to delayed neutron precursors. It accurately predicts observed yield and decay characteristics. In conclusion, it is possible to not only estimate the total delayed neutron yield for a given nuclide but the time-dependent nature of the delayed neutrons as well. Reactors utilizing recycled fuel or burning actinides are likely to have inventories of fissioning nuclides that have not been studied until now. The delayed neutrons from these nuclides can now be incorporated so that their influence on the stability and control of reactors can be delineated. 8 figures, 39 tables.

  17. Progress on the Europium Neutron-Capture Study using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Macri, R A; Parker, W; Wilk, P; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T A; Esch, E; Haight, R C; O'Donnell, J M; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wouters, J M; Mitchell, G E; Sheets, S A; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2006-09-05

    The accurate measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of the Eu isotopes is important for many reasons including nuclear astrophysics and nuclear diagnostics. Neutron capture excitation functions of {sup 151,153}Eu targets were measured recently using a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter array DANCE located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for E{sub n} = 0.1-100 keV. The progress on the data analysis efforts is given in the present paper. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distributions for the Eu targets and Be backing are significantly different. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution is found to be the same for different neutron energies for both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu. The statistical simulation to model the {gamma}-ray decay cascade is summarized.

  18. Neutron activation studies and the effect of exercise on osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is described to measure calcium content by in vivo neutron activation analysis of the trunk and upper thighs. In postmenopausal women, estrogen and calcium or fluoride reversed osteoporosis.

  19. In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Kargl, F; Engelhardt, M; Yang, F; Weis, H; Schmakat, P; Schillinger, B; Griesche, A; Meyer, A

    2011-06-29

    When in situ techniques became available in recent years this led to a breakthrough in accurately determining diffusion coefficients for liquid alloys. Here we discuss how neutron radiography can be used to measure chemical diffusion in a ternary AlCuAg alloy. Neutron radiography hereby gives complementary information to x-ray radiography used for measuring chemical diffusion and to quasielastic neutron scattering used mainly for determining self-diffusion. A novel Al(2)O(3) based furnace that enables one to study diffusion processes by means of neutron radiography is discussed. A chemical diffusion coefficient of Ag against Al around the eutectic composition Al(68.6)Cu(13.8)Ag(17.6) at.% was obtained. It is demonstrated that the in situ technique of neutron radiography is a powerful means to study mass transport properties in situ in binary and ternary alloys that show poor x-ray contrast.

  20. High-temperature high pressure cell for neutron-scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qianli; Holdsworth, Stuart; Embs, Jan; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Frick, Bernhard; Braun, Artur

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a simple high-temperature high pressure cell concept has been developed to enable neutron diffraction and quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron-scattering studies to be conducted on large-volume powder samples of ceramic proton conductors at pressures of up to 1 GPa and at temperatures of up to 770 K. Details of the cell are provided, along with the first experimental neutron diffractograms (at 0.62 GPa and 300 K), quasi-elastic neutron-scattering spectra (at 0.58 GPa and 770 K) and inelastic neutron spectra (at 0.75 GPa and 530 K) determined for samples of BaCe0.8Y0.2O3.

  1. A possible approach to 14MeV neutron moderation: A preliminary study case.

    PubMed

    Flammini, D; Pilotti, R; Pietropaolo, A

    2017-07-01

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) interactions produce almost monochromatic neutrons with about 14MeV energy. These neutrons are used in benchmark experiments as well as for neutron cross sections assessment in fusion reactors technology. The possibility to moderate 14MeV neutrons for purposes beyond fusion is worth to be studied in relation to projects of intense D-T sources. In this preliminary study, carried out using the MCNP Monte Carlo code, the moderation of 14MeV neutrons is approached foreseeing the use of combination of metallic materials as pre-moderator and reflectors coupled to standard water moderators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Surface properties of neutron-rich exotic nuclei: A source for studying the nuclear symmetry energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidarov, M. K.; Antonov, A. N.; Sarriguren, P.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2011-09-15

    We study the correlation between the thickness of the neutron skin in finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy for isotopic chains of even-even Ni, Sn, and Pb nuclei in the framework of the deformed self-consistent mean-field Skyrme HF + BCS method. The symmetry energy, the neutron pressure, and the asymmetric compressibility in finite nuclei are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model using the symmetry energy as a function of density within the Brueckner energy density functional. The mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and the neutron-skin thickness are also studied together with the role of the neutron-proton asymmetry. A correlation between the parameters of the equation of state (symmetry energy and its density slope) and the neutron skin is suggested in the isotopic chains of Ni, Sn, and Pb nuclei.

  3. Study of concrete activation with IFMIF-like neutron irradiation: Status of EAF and TENDL neutron activation cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Mauricio; Sauvan, Patrick; García, Raquel; Ogando, Francisco; Sanz, Javier

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to check the performance of last versions of EAF and TENDL libraries (EAF2007, EAF2010, and TENDL2014) in the prediction of concrete activation under the neutron irradiation environment expected in IFMIF, an accelerator-based neutron source conceived for fusion materials testing. For this purpose Activity and dose rate responses of three types of concrete (ITER-Bioshield kind, barite and magnetite concretes) have been studied. For these quantities, dominant nuclides and production pathways have been determined and, then, a qualitative analysis of the relevant activation cross-sections involved has been performed by comparing data from mentioned libraries with experimental data from EXFOR database. Concrete activation studies have been carried out with IFMIF-like neutron irradiation conditions using the ACAB code and EAF and TENDL libraries. The cooling times assessed are related to safety and maintenance operations, specifically 1 hour, 1 day and 12 days. Final conclusions are focused on the recommendations for the activation library to be used among those analyzed and cross-section data to be improved.

  4. Background Neutron Studies for Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering Measurements at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane; Coherent Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The COHERENT collaboration has proposed to measure coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE νNS) cross sections on several nuclear targets using neutrinos produced at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The largest background of concern arises from beam-induced, fast neutrons that can mimic a nuclear recoil signal event in the detector. Multiple technologies of neutron detection have been employed at prospective experiment sites at the SNS. Analysis of these data have produced a consistent picture of the backgrounds expected for a CE νNS measurement. These background studies show that at suitable locations, the fast neutrons of concern arrive mainly in the prompt 1.3 μs window and the neutrons in the delayed window are primarily of lower energies that are relatively easier to shield.

  5. A Feasibility Study on Reactor Based Fission Neutron Radiography of 200-l Waste Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bücherl, T.; Kalthoff, O.; von Gostomski, Ch. Lierse

    This feasibility study investigates the applicability of fission neutrons for the non-destructive characterization of radioactive waste packages by means of neutron radiography. Based on a number of mock-up drums of different non-radioactive matrices, but being typical for radioactive waste generated in Europe, radiography measurements at the NECTAR and the ITS facility using fission neutrons and 60Co-gamma-rays, respectively, are performed. The resulting radiographs are compared and qualitatively assessed. In addition, a first approach for the stitching of the fission neutron radiographs to visualize the complete area of 200-l waste drums is performed. While the feasibility of fission neutrons is demonstrated successfully, fields for further improvements are identified.

  6. Neutron detection in nuclear astrophysics experiments: study of organic liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giovanni Francesco

    2016-02-01

    In order to study the nuclear reaction 13 C(α,n)16 O, crucial for the nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei (A>58), the LUNA collaboration at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, is looking for the best neutron detector to use in the set up. One of the possibilities is to use detectors based on cell filled with Organic Liquid Scintillator BC501A. These detectors are sensible to fast neutron, but also to gamma rays. A Pulse Shape Discrimination process using the Zero Crossing method has been performed to select only signals from neutrons. Comparing the neutron spectra after the Pulse Shape Discrimination and the spectrum from a GEANT4 simulations, the efficiency of the BC501A, in function of the neutron energy and varying the light threshold, has been evaluated.

  7. Focused neutron beam dose deposition profiles in tissue equivalent materials: a pilot study for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Welsh, James; Chen-Mayer, Huaiyu H.

    1997-02-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been limited by the inability to direct neutrons toward the therapeutic target and away from sensitive normal tissues. The recently developed Kumakhov lens has focused a broad incident low energy neutron beam in air to a sub-mm spot. This study examines the radiation does distribution of a converging beam passing through tissue equivalent materials. A neutron beam exiting a focusing lens is directed toward a stack of thin radiochromic media sandwiched between plastic sheets. The depth dose and beam profile within the tissue equivalent materials are determined by optical scanning and image processing of the individual radiochromic media sheets, a polymer based dosimetry medium which darkens upon exposure to ionizing radiation. The alpha particle emission from boron is examined by substituting a plastic sheet with a 6Li enriched lithium carbonate sheet positioned at the focal plane. The information will help determine the feasibility of applying the focused neutron beam to BNCT for therapy.

  8. Study of muon-induced neutron production using accelerator muon beam at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; Lin, C. J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Draeger, E.; White, C. G.; Luk, K. B.; Steiner, H.

    2015-08-17

    Cosmogenic muon-induced neutrons are one of the most problematic backgrounds for various underground experiments for rare event searches. In order to accurately understand such backgrounds, experimental data with high-statistics and well-controlled systematics is essential. We performed a test experiment to measure muon-induced neutron production yield and energy spectrum using a high-energy accelerator muon beam at CERN. We successfully observed neutrons from 160 GeV/c muon interaction on lead, and measured kinetic energy distributions for various production angles. Works towards evaluation of absolute neutron production yield is underway. This work also demonstrates that the setup is feasible for a future large-scale experiment for more comprehensive study of muon-induced neutron production.

  9. Dose evaluation of boron neutron capture synovectomy using the THOR epithermal neutron beam: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Chang, Shu-Jun; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Hsueh, Yen-Wan; Yeh, Kuan-Chuan; Wang, Jeng-Ning; Tsai, Wen-Pin

    2007-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common epidemic diseases in the world. For some patients, the treatment with steroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not effective, thus necessitating physical removal of the inflamed synovium. Alternative approaches other than surgery will provide appropriate disease control and improve the patient's quality of life. In this research, we evaluated the feasibility of conducting boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) with the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) as a neutron source. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with arthritic joint models and uncertainties were within 5%. The collimator, reflector and boron concentration were optimized to reduce the treatment time and normal tissue doses. For the knee joint, polyethylene with 40%-enriched Li2CO3 was used as the collimator material, and a rear reflector of 15 cm thick graphite and side reflector of 10 cm thick graphite were chosen. The optimized treatment time was 5.4 min for the parallel-opposed irradiation. For the finger joint, polymethyl methacrylate was used as the reflector material. The treatment time can be reduced to 3.1 min, while skin and bone doses can be effectively reduced by approximately 9% compared with treatment using the graphite reflector. We conclude that using THOR as a treatment modality for BNCS could be a feasible alternative in clinical practice.

  10. Neutron, X-ray, and optical studies of multiferroic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearmon, Alexander J.

    Developing a greater understanding of multiferroic materials, particularly those in which a strong coupling is exhibited between magnetic and electrical orderings, is of great importance if potential applications are to be realised. This thesis reports new experimental findings on several multiferroics using the techniques of X-ray and neutron diffraction together with nonlinear optical experiments. Spherical neutron polarimetry measurements on RbFe(MoOstudy. In zero field the system is helimagnetic, and with small applied fields peaks corresponding to a new phase appear. Energy calculations are used to suggest a suitable magnetic structure for the new phase and to show how this relates to the known commensurate phases that are present in low fields. Finally, an experimental setup designed to measure second harmonic generation from non-centrosymmetric crystals is presented, along with static measurements on the multiferroic system MnWO4. An optical

  11. A Study of the Spin Structure on the Neutron in Deep Inelastic Scattering of Polarized Electrons on Polarized Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Spengos, M

    2004-01-06

    The internal spin structure of the neutron, was studied in deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target in the End Station A of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The spin asymmetry of the neutron was measured at energies between 19 and 26 GeV in the range 0.03 {le} x {le} 0.06 at an average Q{sup 2} of 2 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The results are in agreement with a new measurement of the asymmetry by SMC within their six times larger uncertainties. The spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}(x) for the neutron was determined from the asymmetry measurement and, its integral over x is found to be {integral}g{sub 1}{sup n}(x)dx = -0.038 {+-} 0.009. This result is 2.7 standard deviations from the Ellis-Jaffe Sum Rule and combined with the EMC results from the proton in very good agreement with the Bjorken Sum Rule. In the Quark Parton Model (QPM), in conjunction with the weak coupling constants F and D, from baryon decay, the result implies that the quarks contribute approximately 32% of the nucleon helicity. Finally, different ways of evolving the data, based on various theoretical models, is attempted and future aspects for spin physics, with emphasis at spin physics at SLAC, are discussed.

  12. Study of boron neutron capture therapy used neutron source with protons bombarding a thick 9Be target.

    PubMed

    Yue, G; Chen, J; Song, R

    1997-06-01

    Neutron sources created by 4-, 3.5-, and 3-MeV protons striking a thick beryllium target were studied via the time-of-flight technique. Protons were accelerated by the Peking University 4.5 MV electrostatic accelerator. Two disk-shaped 9Be targets with thickness 1.5 and 3 mm were used in the measurements. The time-of-flight spectra were observed at zero degrees with respect to the incident proton beam. The analysis to these time-of-flight spectra is given. The time-of-flight spectra were converted to the energy spectra and compared to a neutron spectrum of 7Li(p, n)7 Be reaction with incident energy 2.5 MeV, which was also measured in this work. Restricted by the spectrometer itself, the threshold of the measurements is 400 keV. The results show that by using several MeV protons bombarding a thick beryllium target, reactions other than 9Be(p, n)9B produce significant contributions to the neutron yield with energy less than 1 MeV.

  13. The Fate of Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    A rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron star is one possible outcome when two smaller neutron stars merge. [Casey Reed/Penn State University]When two neutron stars collide, the new object that they make can reveal information about the interior physics of neutron stars. New theoretical work explores what we should be seeing, and what it can teach us.Neutron Star or Black Hole?So far, the only systems from which weve detected gravitational waves are merging black holes. But other compact-object binaries exist and are expected to merge on observable timescales in particular, binary neutron stars. When two neutron stars merge, the resulting object falls into one of three categories:a stable neutron star,a black hole, ora supramassive neutron star, a large neutron star thats supported by its rotation but will eventually collapse to a black hole after it loses angular momentum.Histograms of the initial (left) and final (right) distributions of objects in the authors simulations, for five different equations of state. Most cases resulted primarily in the formation of neutron stars (NSs) or supramassive neutron stars (sNSs), not black holes (BHs). [Piro et al. 2017]Whether a binary-neutron-star merger results in another neutron star, a black hole, or a supramassive neutron star depends on the final mass of the remnant and what the correct equation of state is that describes the interiors of neutron stars a longstanding astrophysical puzzle.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Anthony Piro (Carnegie Observatories) estimated which of these outcomes we should expect for mergers of binary neutron stars. The teams results along with future observations of binary neutron stars may help us to eventually pin down the equation of state for neutron stars.Merger OutcomesPiro and collaborators used relativistic calculations of spinning and non-spinning neutron stars to estimate the mass range that neutron stars would have for several different realistic equations of

  14. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  15. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  16. A neutron study of the feline leukaemia virus fusion peptide: Implications for biological fusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah M. A.; Darkes, Malcolm J. M.; Bradshaw, Jeremy P.

    Neutron diffraction studies were performed on stacked phospholipid bilayers to determine the effects of the feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) fusion peptide on membrane structure. Bilayers were composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with 50% (mol) dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol. Neutron scattering profiles with peptide present showed an increase in scattering density in the lipid-tails region, whilst scattering by the lipid headgroup region was decreased. This is interpreted as a lowering of the packing density of the lipid headgroups and an increase in the packing density of the lipid tails. Modelling studies and experimental evidence have suggested that fusion peptides catalyse fusion by increasing the negative curvature of the target membrane's outer monolayer. Our results presented here add support to this hypothesis for the fusion mechanism. The 2H 2O scattering profile was also slightly perturbed in the lipid headgroup region with 1% (mol)FeLV fusion peptide present. The FeLV peptide had no significant effect on the organisation of bilayers containing only dioleoylphosphatidylcholine.

  17. Study of 11Be on 9Be one neutron transfer reactions at TRIUMF ISAC-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braid, Ryan; (Pcb)2 Collaboration; Tigress Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The structure of neutron-rich Beryllium isotopes displays interesting properties arising from the interplay of alpha clustering and valence neutrons, leading in some cases to halo nuclei. In this presentation, preliminary results of the 11Be on 9Be reaction at 55 MeV and 30.14 MeV leading to two interesting exit channels will be shown, the first one enabling the study of 12Be and the second the study of 10Be. This reaction has advantages over the traditional (d,p) or (d,t) methods, since the reactants are equal in mass they both scatter in a detectable angular range. Additionally, TIGRESS allows precise γ-tagging for the excited states. Some challenges in analysis include the 10Be degeneracy, a large n breakup signature, and multiple particle excitation. The data and ongoing analysis will be presented. This work is partially supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant/Contract No. DE-FG03- 93ER40789 (Colorado School of Mines).

  18. Neutron and X-ray Scattering From Single Supported Lipid Bilayers: Reflectometry, Grazing Incidence In-Plane Diffraction and Off-Specular Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2010-03-01

    Biological membranes mediate transport and communication between the cell and its surroundings. They defend the cell against invasive agents, and most present day drugs interact with membrane components. Complexity of the cell membranes renders many of their characteristics impenetrable to fundamental physical studies. As a result, a significant emphasis has been placed on developing model lipid membranes that facilitate the physical and chemical characterization of particular membrane features. X-ray (XR) and neutron reflectivity (NR) and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) techniques can be utilized to measure the structure of single, supported lipid bilayers in bulk water. GIXD studies demonstrated that bilayers formed by vesicle fusion have more disorder in the inner leaflet compared to structures prepared using the Langmuir-Blodgett/Schaeffer (LB/S) technique. In both cases, only a modest water cushion was detected between the bilayer and substrate. Diffraction from in-plane ordered domains was observed from bilayers prepared by either technique. In the case of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers, the ordered domains were coupled across both leaflets, scattering as one entity. Contrastingly, the ordered domains were uncoupled in 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine (DPPE) bilayers. NR can be effectively used to study polymer-supported single lipid bilayers in bulk water. Using NR and fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrated that a hydrated, surface-tethered polymer network capable of five-fold change in thickness over a 25-37 C temperature range can be a novel support for single DPPC bilayers in a liquid environment. Moderate temperature change swells the polymer, lifting the membrane from the substrate, creating a nearly aqueous cushion. Additionally, as the polymer swells, it promotes both in- and out-of-plane undulations in the supported membrane. Off-specular neutron scattering was used to deduce the in

  19. Studies of Long Period Variability in Neutron Star HMXB Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heindl, William A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to investigate the long term, quasi-periodic variability of the X-ray emission from the accreting X-ray pulsars LMC X-4 and SMC X-1. These high mass X-ray binary (HMXB) sources are known to vary in a nearly periodic fashion with cycle lengths of about 30 and 60 days respectively. The prevailing model for such behavior is that it is due to the precession of a tilted accretion disk around the neutron star which is the source of the X-ray emission. As the disk precesses, it periodically obscures the emitting region, resulting in reduced flux as observed at the Earth. The obscuration is not strictly periodic, as the disk precession period changes as the total mass and size of the disk change through variable accretion processes. This model is well established for the long-period variability in the X-ray pulsar Her X-1. With this work, my collaborators and I sought to test whether this model works for LMC X-4 and SMC X-1. Observations with the pointed instruments on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) were carried out in order to observe changes in the X-ray spectrum and total flux which were correlated with the long period cycles in these objects. One of the main predictions of the precessing disk model is that the periods of low emission are caused not by changes in the central source, but by increased absorption of that flux as seen at the Earth. Such behavior would be observed in the X-ray spectrum as a relative lack of low energy X-rays (which are more easily absorbed) as compared to high energy X-rays. This is what was observed for SMC X-1, landing strong support to the precessing disk model for this system. For LMC X-1, however, the absorption was consistent with zero at the time of minimum flux. The entire spectrum appeared to be equally reduced. This is not supporting evidence for the model. However, it also does not rule out a precessing disk. If at the time of minimum flux, the intervening disk is so thick that no flux, even

  20. A critical assembly designed to measure neutronic benchmarks in support of the space nuclear thermal propulsion program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parma, Edward J.; Ball, Russell M.; Hoovler, Gary S.; Selcow, Elizabeth C.; Cerbone, Ralph J.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor designed to perform criticality experiments in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program is currently in operation at the Sandia National Laboratories' reactor facility. The reactor is a small, water-moderated system that uses highly enriched uranium particle fuel in a 19-element configuration. Its purpose is to obtain neutronic measurements under a variety of experimental conditions that are subsequently used to benchmark rector-design computer codes. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Babcock & Wilcox, and Sandia National Laboratories participated in determining the reactor's performance requirements, design, follow-on experimentation, and in obtaining the licensing approvals. Brookhaven National Laboratory is primarily responsible for the analytical support, Babcock & Wilcox the hardware design, and Sandia National Laboratories the operational safety. All of the team members participate in determining the experimentation requirements, performance, and data reduction. Initial criticality was achieved in October 1989. An overall description of the reactor is presented along with key design features and safety-related aspects.

  1. A critical assembly designed to measure neutronic benchmarks in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parma, E. J.; Ball, R. M.; Hoovler, G. S.; Selcow, E. C.; Cerbone, R. J.

    1992-10-01

    A reactor designed to perform criticality experiments in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program is currently in operation at the Sandia National Laboratories' reactor facility. The reactor is a small, water-moderated system that uses highly enriched uranium particle fuel in a 19-element configuration. Its purpose is to obtain neutronic measurements under a variety of experimental conditions that are subsequently used to benchmark reactor-design computer codes. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Babcock & Wilcox, and Sandia National Laboratories participated in determining the reactor's performance requirements, design, follow on experimentation, and in obtaining the licensing approvals. Brookhaven National Laboratory is primarily responsible for the analytical support, Babcock & Wilcox the hardware design, and Sandia National Laboratories the operational safety. All of the team members participate in determining the experimentation requirements, performance, and data reduction. Initial criticality was achieved in October 1989. An over-all description of the reactor is presented along with key design features and safety-related aspects.

  2. Functional renormalization group studies of nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) methods applied to calculations of isospin-symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter as well as neutron matter are reviewed. The approach is based on a chiral Lagrangian expressed in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom as appropriate for the hadronic phase of QCD with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated solving Wetterich's FRG flow equations. Nuclear thermodynamics and the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition are investigated in detail, both in symmetric matter and as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with advanced ab-initio many-body computations. Contacts with perturbative many-body approaches (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) are discussed. As an interesting test case, the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium is investigated. The question of chiral symmetry restoration in nuclear and neutron matter is addressed. A stabilization of the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry is found to persist up to high baryon densities once fluctuations beyond mean-field are included. Neutron star matter including beta equilibrium is discussed under the aspect of the constraints imposed by the existence of two-solar-mass neutron stars.

  3. Neutron scattering studies of ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D.; Ritz, R.; Pfleiderer, C.; Keller, T.

    2010-03-01

    Observation of an unconventional superconductivity in ferromagnetic UGe2 when ferromagnetism is suppressed by pressure indicates a dramatic modification of its electronic structure near the Quantum Critical Point [1]. We present high resolution measurements of the lattice constants of ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2 under pressure probed by a novel technique, which utilizes Larmor precession of polarized neutrons and surpasses the resolution of conventional scattering methods by an order of magnitude. We have observed sharp anomalies at the Curie temperature, TC and at TX, which marks the crossover regime. Our studies under pressure of 10, and 12 kbar indicate that the sharp anomaly corresponding to TC shifted to lower temperature in agreement with a phase diagram. At the pressure corresponding to an onset of superconductivity, 10kbar, the lattice expansion corresponding to ferromagnetic transition undergoes a first order transition and increases by a factor of 3. The results indicate a complex response of the electronic structure of UGe2 to external pressure and suggest a strong magnetoelastic coupling as one of multiple energy scales that stabilize superconductivity in UGe2. [1] S. S. Saxena, et al., Nature 406, 587 (2000)

  4. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Iles, Gail N. Reinhart, Guillaume; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F. Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3} and NiAl{sub 3} continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  5. Neutron-scattering studies of Yb-bearing silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Loong, C.K.; Wagner, J.

    1993-09-01

    The static and dynamic magnetic response of the Yb{sup 3+} ions in 2Na{sub 2}O{center_dot}Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}6SiO{sub 2} glass and the isochemical crystalline silicate Na{sub 3}YbSi{sub 3}O{sub 9} has been studied by neutron diffraction, inelastic magnetic-scattering, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The rare earth sites in the glass have an average coordination number of 5.6 {plus_minus} 0.5 and give a mean rare earth-oxygen bond length of 2.23 {Angstrom}; average Si-O and O-O coordination numbers and bond distances are comparable to those in vitreous SiO{sub 2}. The magnetic excitation spectrum of the Na{sub 3}YbSi{sub 3}O{sub 9} material was analyzed by a crystal-field model using a method of descending symmetry. The magnetic susceptibility and the excitation spectrum of the Yb glasses can be described by a distribution of ligand-field effects on the Yb{sup 3+} ions that are similar to the nominal crystal field in crystalline Na{sub 3}YbSi{sub 3}O{sub 9}.

  6. Neutron scattering studies of the hydration structure of Li+.

    PubMed

    Mason, P E; Ansell, S; Neilson, G W; Rempe, S B

    2015-02-05

    New results derived from the experimental method of neutron diffraction and isotopic substitution (NDIS) are presented for the hydration structure of the lithium cation (Li(+)) in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride in heavy water (D2O) at concentrations of 6, 3, and 1 m and at 1.5 m lithium sulfate. By introducing new and more-accurate data reduction procedures than in our earlier studies (I. Howell and G. W. Neilson, J. Phys: Condens. Matter, 1996, 8, 4455-4463), we find, in the first hydration shell of Li(+), ∼4.3(2) water molecules at 6 m, 4.9(3) at 3 m, 4.8(3) at 1 m in the LiCl solutions, and 5.0(3) water molecules in the case of Li2SO4 solution. The general form of the first hydration shell is similar in all four solutions, with the correlations for Li-O and Li-D sited at 1.96 (0.02) Å and 2.58 (0.02) Å, respectively. The results resemble those presented in 1996, in terms of ion-water distances and local coordination, but the hydration number is significantly lower for the case at 1 m than the 6.5 (1.0) given at that time. Thus, experimental and theoretical results now agree that lithium is hydrated by a small number of water molecules (4-5) in the nearest coordination shell.

  7. Neutron diffraction study of metal-matrix composite with fullerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, P. A.; Blanter, M. S.; Brazhkin, VV; Somenkov, VA; Filonenko, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Interaction of amorphous fullerite C60 with austenitic Fe-33.2 wt. % Ni alloy at pressures 0-8 GPa and temperatures 600-1100 °C was studied by neutron diffraction. The amorphous fullerite was obtained by ball milling and mixed with the powder of the crystalline alloy. The interaction at sintering led to the dissolution of carbon in fcc Fe-Ni solid solution and the formation of carbide (Fe, Ni)3C, but the Fe-Ni-C alloy did not undergo phase transformations and preserved the original fcc structure. As a result, the alloy hardened, we could also witness a clear barometric effect: at the pressure of 2 GPa the amount of the dissolved carbon and the microhardness turned out to be significantly higher than those at 8 GPa. During sintering amorphous fullerite is undergoing phase transitions and its microhardness is higher than the microhardness of the metal component. At high temperatures of interaction graphite appears. The presence of Fe-Ni alloy in the composite reduces the temperature of graphite formation in comparison with transformations in the pure amorphous fullerene.

  8. Study of essential elements in cattle tissues from a tropical country using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Artur Canella; Menezes, Maria Angela de B C; Veado, Julio Cesar C

    2002-09-01

    There has been increasing interest in the elemental composition of animal tissues to support health and nutritional studies. Determining the elemental concentration in cattle tissues is especially important because these materials are used for multipurpose objectives such as the assessment of animal health, the quality of human foods consumed, and as a potential environmental biomonitor. Chromium, copper, sodium, potassium, iron, and zinc levels were determined in bovine tissues--kidney, liver and muscle--from cattle bred and raised in a potentially metal contaminated region because of mineral activities. The Brazilian data were obtained using k0-instrumental neutron activation analysis, performed at the Nuclear Development Technology Centre/Nuclear Energy National Commission (CDTN/CNEN) in Minas Gerais State. The values of international organizations and the Brazilian analytical data are compatible. This study indicates that the nuclear technique is an efficient tool to determine elemental concentration in animal biological samples.

  9. Estimating mixed field effects: an application supporting the lack of a non-linear component for chromosome aberration induction by neutrons.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Biaggi, M; Edwards, A; Ferrari, A; Ottolenghi, A; Pelliccioni, M; Scannicchio, D

    2003-01-01

    The action of neutron fields on biological structures was investigated on the basis of chromosome aberration induction in human cells. Available experimental data on aberration induction by neutrons and their interaction products were reviewed. Present criteria adopted in neutron radiation protection were discussed. The linear coefficient alpha and the quadratic coefficient beta describing dose-response curves for dicentric chromosomes induced by neutrons of different energies were calculated via integration of experimental data on dicentric induction by photons and charged particles into the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA. The predicted values of the linear coefficients for neutron beams of different energies showed good agreement with the corresponding experimental values, whereas the data themselves indicated that the neutron quadratic coefficient cannot be obtained by 'averaging' the beta values of recoil ions and other nuclear reaction products. This supports the hypothesis that neutron induced aberrations increase substantially linearly with dose, a question that has been object of debate for a long time and is still open.

  10. Shielding design studies for a neutron irradiator system based on a 252Cf source.

    PubMed

    da Silva, A X; Crispim, V R

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a shielding design against neutrons and gamma rays from a source of 252Cf, using Monte Carlo simulation. The shielding materials studied were borated polyethylene, borated-lead polyethylene and stainless steel. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4B was used to design shielding for 252Cf based neutron irradiator systems. By normalising the dose equivalent rate values presented to the neutron production rate of the source, the resulting calculations are independent of the intensity of the actual 252Cf source. The results show that the total dose equivalent rates were reduced significantly by the shielding system optimisation.

  11. RECENT RESULTS OF FUSION INDUCED BY NEUTRON-RICH RADIOACTIVE BEAMS STUDIED AT HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J Felix

    2013-01-01

    The reaccelerated fission-fragment beams at HRIBF provide a unique opportunity for studying the mechanisms of fusion involving nuclei with large neutron excess. The fusion excitation functions for neutron-rich ra- dioactive 132Sn incident on 40Ca and 58Ni targets have been measured to explore the role of transfer couplings in sub-barrier fusion enhancement. Evaporation residue cross sections for 124,126,127,128Sn+64Ni were measured to study the dependence of fusion probability on neutron excess.

  12. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering study of the NIST mAb reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Liu, Yun; Krueger, Susan; Curtis, Joseph

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of great interest to the biopharmaceutical industry because they can be engineered to target specific antigens. Due to their importance, the biomanufacturing initiative at NIST is developing an IgG1 mAb reference material `NIST mAb', which can be used by industry, academia, and regulatory authorities. As part of this collaborative effort, we aim at characterizing the reference material using neutron scattering techniques. We have studied the small-angle scattering profile of the NIST mAb in a histidine buffer at 0 and 150 mM NaCl. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate an ensemble of structures and calculate their theoretical scattering profile, which can be directly compared with experimental data. Moreover, we analyze the structure factor to understand the effect of solution conditions on the protein-protein interactions. Finally, we have measured the solution scattering of the NIST mAb, while simultaneously performing freeze/thaw cycles, in order to investigate if the solution structure was affected upon freezing. The results from neutron scattering not only support the development of the reference material, but also provide insights on its stability and guide efforts for its development under different formulations.

  13. Production of bacterial cellulose with controlled deuterium-hydrogen substitution for neutron scattering studies.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Hugh; Shah, Riddhi; Evans, Barbara R; He, Junhong; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Jones, A Daniel; Langan, Paul; Davison, Brian H; Urban, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic enrichment of biomacromolecules is a widely used technique that enables the investigation of the structural and dynamic properties to provide information not accessible with natural abundance isotopic composition. This study reports an approach for deuterium incorporation into bacterial cellulose. A media formulation for growth of Acetobacter xylinus subsp. sucrofermentans and Gluconacetobacter hansenii was formulated that supports cellulose production in deuterium (D) oxide. The level of D incorporation can be varied by altering the ratio of deuterated and protiated glycerol used during cell growth in the D2O-based growth medium. Spectroscopic analysis and mass spectrometry show that the level of deuterium incorporation is high (>90%) for the perdeuterated form of bacterial cellulose. The small-angle neutron scattering profiles of the cellulose with different amounts of D incorporation are all similar indicating that there are no structural changes in the cellulose due to substitution of deuterium for hydrogen. In addition, by varying the amount of deuterated glycerol in the media it was possible to vary the scattering length density of the deuterated cellulose. The ability to control deuterium content of cellulose extends the range of experiments using techniques such as neutron scattering to reveal information about the structure and dynamics of cellulose, and its interactions with other biomacromolecules as well as synthetic polymers used for development of composite materials. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. and UT-Battelle, LLC, Contract no. DE-AC05-00OR22725. All rights reserved.

  14. A Study of Neutron Leakage in Finite Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for simple shielded objects. Monte Carlo (MC) benchmarks were used to verify the 3DHZETRN methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with MC codes to the degree that various MC codes agree among themselves. One limitation in the verification process is that all of the codes (3DHZETRN and three MC codes) utilize different nuclear models/databases. In the present report, the new algorithm, with well-defined convergence criteria, is used to quantify the neutron leakage from simple geometries to provide means of verifying 3D effects and to provide guidance for further code development.

  15. Neutron scattering study of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernavanois, N.; Grenier, B.; Huxley, A.; Ressouche, E.; Sanchez, J. P.; Flouquet, J.

    2001-11-01

    Unpolarized and polarized neutron scattering experiments have been performed at ambient pressure on a single crystal of the itinerant electron superconductor UGe2 in both the ferromagnetic and the paramagnetic phases. Unpolarized neutrons have confirmed the ZrGa2-type orthorhombic crystal structure of UGe2 and a ferromagnetic ordering below TC=53 K with the moments aligned along the a axis. No evidence of any modulated component for the magnetic structure has been found. Polarized neutron data have shown a large and almost spherical magnetization distribution at the U sites and no induced moment at the Ge sites. Refinements of the magnetic structure factors within the dipolar approximation allow the magnitude of the orbital and spin uranium moments to be quantified, and a comparison to the measured static magnetization reveals that there is no diffuse contribution.

  16. Scoping studies - photon and low energy neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.; Harker, Y.; Jones, J.; Harmon, F.

    1997-11-01

    High energy photon interrogation of waste containers, with the aim of producing photo nuclear reactions, in specific materials, holds the potential of good penetration and rapid analysis. Compact high energy ({le} 10 MeV) photon sources in the form of electron linacs producing bremstrahlung radiation are readily available. Work with the Varitron variable energy accelerator at ISU will be described. Advantages and limitations of the technique will be discussed. Using positive ion induced neutron producing reactions, it is possible to generate neutrons in a specific energy range. By this means, variable penetration and specific reactions can be excited in the assayed material. Examples using the {sup 3}H(p,n) and {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions as neutron sources will be discussed. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Material flow in metal foams studied by neutron radioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanzick, H.; Klenke, J.; Danilkin, S.; Banhart, J.

    Two kinds of experiments are presented in this paper: In the first lead alloy foams were generated in a furnace by expanding a foamable precursor material containing metal and a blowing agent. Vertical columns of liquid metal foam were scanned with a beam of neutrons while recording the time-dependent local neutron transmission. The resulting transmission profiles reflect the kinetics of material redistribution in liquid metallic foams under the influence of gravity (drainage). In the second experiment pre-fabricated solid lead foams were re-melted in a furnace. Neutron transmission profiles were also obtained in these experiments. Results of each type of experiment are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the density profile of aqueous foams.

  18. Interfacial assembly of proteins and peptides: recent examples studied by neutron reflection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, XiuBo; Pan, Fang; Lu, Jian R.

    2009-01-01

    Through reviewing a number of recent neutron reflection studies of interfacial adsorption of peptides and proteins, this paper aims to demonstrate the significance of this technique in studying interfacial biomolecular processes by illustrating the typical structural details that can be derived. The review will start with the introduction of relevant theoretical background, followed by an outline of representative biomolecular systems that have recently been studied to indicate the technical strengths of neutron reflection. PMID:19656822

  19. Review of Livermore-Led Neutron Capture Studies Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Sheets, S; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T; Clement, R; Couture, A; Esch, E; Haight, R; Jandel, M; Krticka, M; Mitchell, G; Macri, R; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R; Schwantes, J; Ullmann, J; Vieira, D; Wouters, J; Wilk, P

    2007-05-11

    We have made neutron capture cross-section measurements using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Science Center, the DANCE detector array (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for basic science and stockpile stewardship. In this paper, we review results from (n,{gamma}) reactions on {sup 94,95}Mo, {sup 152,154,157,160,nat}Gd, {sup 151,153}Eu and {sup 242m}Am for neutron energies from < 1eV up to {approx} 20 keV. We measured details of the {gamma}-ray cascade following neutron capture, for comparison with results of statistical model simulations. We determined the neutron energy dependent (n,{gamma}) cross section and gained information about statistical decay properties, including the nuclear level density and the photon strength function. Because of the high granularity of the detector array, it is possible to look at gamma cascades with a specified number of transitions (a specific multiplicity). We simulated {gamma}-ray cascades using a combination of the DICEBOX/GEANT computer codes. In the case of the deformed nuclei, we found evidence of a scissors-mode resonance. For the Eu, we also determined the (n,{gamma}) cross sections. For the {sup 94,95}Mo, we focused on the spin and parity assignments of the resonances and the determination of the photon strength functions for the compound nuclei {sup 95,96}Mo. Future plans include measurements on actinide targets; our immediate interest is in {sup 242m}Am.

  20. Low-level gamma and neutron monitoring based on use of proportional counter filled with 3He in polythene moderator: study of the responses to gamma and neutrons.

    PubMed

    Pszona, S; Bantsar, A; Tulik, P; Wincel, K; Zaręba, B

    2014-10-01

    It has been shown that a proportional counter filled with (3)He placed centrally inside a polythene sphere opens a new possibility for measuring gamma photons and neutrons in the separate pulse-height windows. The responses to gamma and neutrons (in terms of ambient dose equivalent) of the detector assembly consisting of 203-mm polythene sphere with centrally positioned 40-mm diameter (3)He proportional counter have been studied. The response to secondary gammas from capture process in hydrogen has also been studied. The rather preliminary studies indicate that the proposed measuring system has very promising features as an ambient dose equivalent device for mixed gamma-neutron fields.

  1. Sustaining knowledge in the neutron generator community and benchmarking study.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrentine, Tameka C.; Kennedy, Bryan C.; Saba, Anthony W.; Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Schneider, Julia Teresa; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Baldonado, Esther

    2008-03-01

    In 2004, the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment department embarked upon a partnership with the Systems Engineering and Analysis knowledge management (KM) team to develop knowledge management systems for the neutron generator (NG) community. This partnership continues today. The most recent challenge was to improve the current KM system (KMS) development approach by identifying a process that will allow staff members to capture knowledge as they learn it. This 'as-you-go' approach will lead to a sustainable KM process for the NG community. This paper presents a historical overview of NG KMSs, as well as research conducted to move toward sustainable KM.

  2. A study on optical aberrations in parabolic neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Yuntao; Zu, Yong; He, Linfeng; Wei, Guohai; Sun, Kai; Han, Songbai; Chen, Dongfeng

    2015-06-01

    It is widely believed that a neutron beam can be focused to a small spot using a parabolic guide, which will significantly improve the flux. However, researchers have also noted challenges for the neutron inhomogeneous phase space distribution in parabolic focusing guide systems. In this paper, the sources of most prominent optical aberrations, such as an inhomogeneous phase space distribution and irregular divergence distribution, are discussed, and an optimization solution is also proposed. We indicate that optimizing the parabolic guide geometrical configuration removes almost all of the aberrations and yields a considerable intensity gain factor.

  3. Neutron scattering and diffraction instrument for structural study on biology in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering and diffraction instruments in Japan which can be used for structural studies in biology are briefly introduced. Main specifications and general layouts of the instruments are shown.

  4. Cross-section studies of important neutron and relativistic deuteron reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, V.; Suchopár, M.; Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Herman, T.; Svoboda, O.; Geier, B.; Krása, A.; Majerle, M.; Kugler, A.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A.; Furman, W.; Kadykov, M.; Khushvaktov, J.; Solnyshkin, A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunikov, S.; Zavorka, L.; Vladimirova, N.; Bielewicz, M.; Kilim, S.; Szuta, M.; Strugalska-Gola, E.

    2014-09-01

    The cross-sections of relativistic deuteron reactions on natural copper were studied by the means of activation method. The deuteron beams produced by JINR Nuclotron (Russia) with energies from 1 GeV up to 8 GeV were used. Lack of such cross-sections prevents the usage of copper foils for beam integral monitoring. The copper monitors will help us to improve the beam integral determination during ADS studies. The yttrium samples are very suitable activation detectors for monitoring of neutron fields not only in the ADS studies. But experimental cross-section data for higher energy threshold neutron reactions are still missing. This situation is the reason why we have started to study neutron reactions on yttrium by the means of quasi mono-energetic neutron source based on NPI Řež cyclotron (Czech Republic).

  5. Study on Destructuring effect of trehalose on water by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branca, C.; Magazu', V.; Maisano, G.; Migliardo, F.; Soper, A. K.

    In this work results on trehalose/water solutions by neutron diffraction are reported. The study of the partial structure factors and spatial distribution functions gives evidence of a decreasing tetrahedrality degree of water and justifies its cryoprotectant effectiveness.

  6. Temperature-controlled neutron reflectometry sample cell suitable for study of photoactive thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, Kevin G.; Tanchak, Oleh M.; Barrett, Christopher J.; Watson, Mike J.; Fritzsche, Helmut

    2006-04-15

    We describe a novel cell design intended for the study of photoactive materials using neutron reflectometry. The cell can maintain sample temperature and control of ambient atmospheric environment. Critically, the cell is built with an optical port, enabling light irradiation or light probing of the sample, simultaneous with neutron reflectivity measurements. The ability to measure neutron reflectivity with simultaneous temperature ramping and/or light illumination presents unique opportunities for measuring photoactive materials. To validate the cell design, we present preliminary results measuring the photoexpansion of thin films of azobenzene polymer.

  7. Structure of Sn107 studied through single-neutron knockout reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Cerizza, G.; Ayres, A.; Jones, K. L.; ...

    2016-02-04

    The neutron-deficient nucleus Sn-107 has been studied by using the one-neutron knockout reaction. By measuring the decay gamma rays and momentum distributions of reaction residues, the spins of the ground, 5/2+, and first-excited, 7/2+, states of Sn-107 have been assigned by comparisons to eikonal-model reaction calculations. We also observed limits on the inclusive and exclusive cross sections and transitions due to neutron removals from below the N = 50 closed shell have been observed. New excited states up to 5.5 MeV in Sn-107 have been identified.

  8. Optical absorption and luminescence studies of fast neutron-irradiated complex oxides for jewellery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Skvortsova, V.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We studied the optical absorption and luminescence of agate (SiO2), topaz (Al2[SiO4](F,OH)2), beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18), and prehnite (Ca2Al(AlSi3O10)(OH)2) doped with different concentrations of transition metal ions and exposed to fast neutron irradiation. The exchange interaction between the impurity ions and the defects arising under neutron irradiation causes additional absorption as well as bands' broadening in the crystals. These experimental results allow us to suggest the method for obtaining new radiation-defect induced jewellery colors of minerals due to neutron irradiation.

  9. Experimental study of neutron induced background noise on gated x-ray framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N.; Hagmann, C.; Stone, G.; Hey, D.; Glenn, S.; Conder, A.; Teruya, A.; Sorce, C.; Tommasini, R.; Stoeffl, W.; Springer, P.; Landen, O. L.; Eckart, M.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Koch, J. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bahukutumbi, R.; and others

    2010-10-15

    A temporally gated x-ray framing camera based on a proximity focus microchannel plate is one of the most important diagnostic tools of inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, fusion neutrons produced in imploded capsules interact with structures surrounding the camera and produce background to x-ray signals. To understand the mechanisms of this neutron induced background, we tested several gated x-ray cameras in the presence of 14 MeV neutrons produced at the Omega laser facility. Differences between background levels observed with photographic film readout and charge-coupled-device readout have been studied.

  10. An accelerator-based neutron microbeam system for studies of radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A; Bigelow, Alan W; Akselrod, Mark S; Sykora, Jeff G; Brenner, David J

    2011-06-01

    A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The RARAF microbeam facility has been used for studies of radiation bystander effects in mammalian cells for many years. Now a prototype neutron microbeam is being developed that can be used for bystander effect studies. The neutron microbeam design here is based on the existing charged particle microbeam technology at the RARAF. The principle of the neutron microbeam is to use the proton beam with a micrometre-sized diameter impinging on a very thin lithium fluoride target system. From the kinematics of the ⁷Li(p,n)⁷Be reaction near the threshold of 1.881 MeV, the neutron beam is confined within a narrow, forward solid angle. Calculations show that the neutron spot using a target with a 17-µm thick gold backing foil will be <20 µm in diameter for cells attached to a 3.8-µm thick propylene-bottomed cell dish in contact with the target backing. The neutron flux will roughly be 2000 per second based on the current beam setup at the RARAF singleton accelerator. The dose rate will be about 200 mGy min⁻¹. The principle of this neutron microbeam system has been preliminarily tested at the RARAF using a collimated proton beam. The imaging of the neutron beam was performed using novel fluorescent nuclear track detector technology based on Mg-doped luminescent aluminum oxide single crystals and confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy.

  11. An accelerator-based neutron microbeam system for studies of radiation effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Bigelow, Alan W.; Akselrod, Mark S.; Sykora, Jeff G.; Brenner, David J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The RARAF microbeam facility has been used for studies of radiation bystander effects in mammalian cells for many years. Now a prototype neutron microbeam is being developed that can be used for bystander effect studies. The neutron microbeam design here is based on the existing charged particle microbeam technology at the RARAF. The principle of the neutron microbeam is to use the proton beam with a micrometre-sized diameter impinging on a very thin lithium fluoride target system. From the kinematics of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction near the threshold of 1.881 MeV, the neutron beam is confined within a narrow, forward solid angle. Calculations show that the neutron spot using a target with a 17-µm thick gold backing foil will be <20 µm in diameter for cells attached to a 3.8-µm thick propylene-bottomed cell dish in contact with the target backing. The neutron flux will roughly be 2000 per second based on the current beam setup at the RARAF singleton accelerator. The dose rate will be about 200 mGy min−1. The principle of this neutron microbeam system has been preliminarily tested at the RARAF using a collimated proton beam. The imaging of the neutron beam was performed using novel fluorescent nuclear track detector technology based on Mg-doped luminescent aluminum oxide single crystals and confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy. PMID:21131327

  12. High energy neutron treatment for pelvic cancers: study stopped because of increased mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Errington, R D; Ashby, D; Gore, S M; Abrams, K R; Myint, S; Bonnett, D E; Blake, S W; Saxton, T E

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare high energy fast neutron treatment with conventional megavoltage x ray treatment in the management of locally advanced pelvic carcinomas (of the cervix, bladder, prostate, and rectum). DESIGN--Randomised study from February 1986; randomisation to neutron treatment or photon treatment was unstratified and in the ratio of 3 to 1 until January 1988, when randomisation was in the ratio 1 to 1 and stratified by site of tumour. SETTING--Mersey regional radiotherapy centre at Clatterbridge Hospital, Wirral. PATIENTS--151 patients with locally advanced, non-metastatic pelvic cancer (27 cervical, 69 of the bladder, seven prostatic, and 48 of the rectum). INTERVENTION--Randomisation to neutron treatment was stopped in February 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patient survival and causes of death in relation to the development of metastatic disease and treatment related morbidity. RESULTS--In the first phase of the trial 42 patients were randomised to neutron treatment and 14 to photon treatment, and in the second phase 48 to neutron treatment and 47 to photon treatment. The relative risk of mortality for photons compared with neutrons was 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.40 to 1.10) after adjustment for site of tumour and other important prognostic factors. Short term and long term complications were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS--The trial was stopped because of the increased mortality in patients with cancer of the cervix, bladder, or rectum treated with neutrons. PMID:1903663

  13. Neutron Dosimetry on the Full-Core First Generation VVER-440 Aimed at Reactor Support Structure Load Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, P.; Borodkin, G.; Khrennikov, N.; Konheiser, J.; Noack, K.

    2009-08-01

    Reactor support structures (RSS), especially the ferritic steel wall of the water tank, of first-generation VVER-440 are non-restorable reactor equipment, and their lifetime may restrict plant-life. All operated Russian first generation VVER-440 have a reduced core with dummy assemblies except Unit 4 of Novovoronezh nuclear power plant (NPP). In comparison with other reactors, the full-core loading scheme of this reactor provides the highest neutron fluence on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RSS accumulated over design service-life and its prolongation. The radiation load parameters on the RPV and RSS that have resulted from this core loading scheme should be evaluated by means of precise calculations and validated by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry to provide the reliable assessment of embrittlement parameters of these reactor components. The results of different types of calculations and their comparison with measured data have been analyzed in this paper. The calculational analysis of RSS fluence rate variation in dependence on the core loading scheme, including the standard and low leakage core as well as the introduction of dummy assemblies, is presented in this paper.

  14. SU-E-T-21: A D-D Based Neutron Generator System for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, M; Liu, Y; Nie, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator for application in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain cancer Methods: MCNP simulations were performed using a head phantom and a monoenergetic neutron source, which resembles the point source in a DD generator that emits 2.45-MeV neutrons. Source energies ranging from 5eV to 2.45MeV were simulated to determine the optimal treatment energy. The phantom consisted of soft tissue, brain tissue, skull, skin layer, and a brain tumor of 5 cm in diameter. Tumor depth was varied from 5–10 cm. Boron-10 concentrations of 10 ppm, 15 ppm, and 30 ppm were used in the soft/brain tissues, skin, and tumor, respectively. The neutron flux required to deliver 60 Gy to the tumor as well as the normal tissue doses were determined. Results: Beam energies between 5eV and 10keV obtained doses with the highest dose ratios (3.3–25.9) between the tumor and the brain at various depths. The dose ratio with 2.45-MeV neutrons ranged from 0.8–6.6. To achieve the desired tumor dose in 40 minutes, the required neutron flux for a DD generator was between 8.8E10 and 5.2E11 n/s and the resulting brain dose was between 2.3 and 18 Gy, depending on the tumor depth. The skin and soft tissue doses were within acceptable tolerances. The boron-neutron interaction accounted for 54–58% of the total dose. Conclusion: This study shows that the DD neutron generator can be a feasible neutron source for BNCT. The required neutron flux for treatment is achievable with the current DD neutron technology. With a well-designed beam shaping assembly and treatment geometry, the neutron flux can be further improved and a 60-Gy prescription can be accurately delivered to the target while maintaining tolerable normal tissue doses. Further experimental studies will be developed and conducted to validate the simulation results.

  15. Thermonuclear processes on accreting neutron stars - A systematic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayasli, S.; Joss, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    A series of model calculations for the evolution of the surface layers of an accreting neutron star is carried out. The neutron star mass, radius, core temperature, and surface magnetic field strength are systematically varied, as are the accretion rate onto the neutron star surface and the metallicity of the accreting matter, in order to determine the effects of these parameters on the properties of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers and the emitted X-ray bursts that result from such flashes. The core temperatures required for thermal equilibrium are found to be approximately a factor of 2 lower than estimated in earlier work. Owing to the effects of the gravitational redshift, the emitted X-ray bursts have lower peak luminosities and longer durations than those calculated in the Newtonian approximation. The entrainment of hydrogen into helium flashes can cause the flashes to exhibit a rather wide range of observable effects and can decrease by a factor of more than 2 the ratio of persistent accretion-driven luminosity to time-averaged burst luminosity emitted by the neutron star.

  16. Preliminary Neutronics Design Studies for a Molten Salt Blanket LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J

    2008-10-23

    The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Program being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) aims to design a hybrid fission-fusion subcritical nuclear engine that uses a laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) system to drive a subcritical fission blanket. This combined fusion-fission hybrid system could be used for generating electricity, material transmutation or incineration, or other applications. LIFE does not require enriched fuel since it is a sub-critical system and LIFE can sustain power operation beyond the burnup levels at which typical fission reactors need to be refueled. In light of these factors, numerous options have been suggested and are being investigated. Options being investigated include fueling LIFE engines with spent nuclear fuel to aid in disposal/incineration of commercial spent nuclear fuel or using depleted uranium or thorium fueled options to enhance proliferation resistance and utilize non-fissile materials [1]. LIFE engine blanket designs using a molten salt fuel system represent one area of investigation. Possible applications of a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket include uses as a spent nuclear fuel burner, fissile fuel breeding platform, and providing a backup alternative to other LIFE engine blanket designs using TRISO fuel particles in case the TRISO particles are found to be unable to withstand the irradiation they will be subjected to. These molten salts consist of a mixture of LiF with UF{sub 4} or ThF{sub 4} or some combination thereof. Future systems could look at using PuF{sub 3} or PuF{sub 4} as well, though no work on such system with initial plutonium loadings has been performed for studies documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to document preliminary neutronics design studies performed to support the development of a molten salt blanket LIFE engine option, as part of the LIFE Program being performed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory

  17. [Matrix Support: a bibliographical study].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alexandra; Avellar, Luziane Zacché

    2014-09-01

    This article presents a bibliographical review of matrix support in mental health. A search was conducted in the Virtual Health Library and the LILACS, SciELO and Google Scholar databases using the key words: "matrix support in mental health." Fourteen articles were located with the desired characteristics, which indicates that only a restricted number of publications are in circulation. The articles were analyzed with respect to their structural and methodological aspects, which revealed the absolute predominance of the use of qualitative methods and health professionals as the target research population. The same articles were then analyzed for their theoretical discussions. Among other issues, the importance of matrix support to enhance the primary health care teams provided to people suffering from psychic distress is highlighted. However, there is still considerable confusion regarding the proposal of the matrix support and shared responsibilities between teams of reference and mental health professionals, which emphasizes the need for training of these professionals, as well as better coordination and organization of the mental health care network.

  18. Study on the novel neutron-to-proton convertor for improving the detection efficiency of a triple GEM based fast neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Yang, He-Run; Ren, Zhong-Guo; Zhang, Jun-We; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Ha, Ri-Ba-La; An, Lü-Xing; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2015-02-01

    A high-efficiency fast neutron detector prototype based on a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector, which, coupled with a novel multi-layered high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as a neutron-to-proton converter for improving the neutron detection efficiency, is introduced and tested with the Am-Be neutron source in the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) at Lanzhou in the present work. First, the developed triple GEM detector is tested by measuring its effective gain and energy resolution with 55Fe X-ray source to ensure that it has a good performance. The effective gain and obtained energy resolution is 5.0×104 and around 19.2%, respectively. Secondly, the novel multi-layered HDPE converter is coupled with the cathode of the triple GEM detector making it a high-efficiency fast neutron detector. Its effective neutron response is four times higher than that of the traditional single-layered conversion technique when the converter layer number is 38. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11305232, 11175076)

  19. Deuterium Labeling Strategies for Creating Contrast in Structure-Function Studies of Model Bacterial Outer Membranes Using Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Le Brun, Anton P; Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Holden, Peter J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-01-01

    Studying the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is challenging due to the complex nature of its structure. Therefore, simplified models are required to undertake structure-function studies of processes that occur at the outer membrane/fluid interface. Model membranes can be created by immobilizing bilayers to solid supports such as gold or silicon surfaces, or as monolayers on a liquid support where the surface pressure and fluidity of the lipids can be controlled. Both model systems are amenable to having their structure probed by neutron reflectometry, a technique that provides a one-dimensional depth profile through a membrane detailing its thickness and composition. One of the strengths of neutron scattering is the ability to use contrast matching, allowing molecules containing hydrogen and those enriched with deuterium to be highlighted or matched out against the bulk isotopic composition of the solvent. Lipopolysaccharides, a major component of the outer membrane, can be isolated for incorporation into model membranes. Here, we describe the deuteration of lipopolysaccharides from rough strains of Escherichia coli for incorporation into model outer membranes, and how the use of deuterated materials enhances structural analysis of model membranes by neutron reflectometry. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pulsed Neutron Scattering Studies of Strongly Fluctuating solids, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin Broholm

    2006-06-22

    The conventional description of a solid is based on a static atomic structure with small amplitude so-called harmonic fluctuations about it. This is a final technical report for a project that has explored materials where fluctuations are sufficiently strong to severely challenge this approach and lead to unexpected and potentially useful materials properties. Fluctuations are enhanced when a large number of configurations share the same energy. We used pulsed spallation source neutron scattering to obtain detailed microscopic information about structure and fluctuations in such materials. The results enhance our understanding of strongly fluctuating solids and their potential for technical applications. Because new materials require new experimental techniques, the project has also developed new techniques for probing strongly fluctuating solids. Examples of material that were studied are ZrW2O8 with large amplitude molecular motion that leads to negative thermal expansion, NiGa2S4 where competing interactions lead to an anomalous short range ordered magnet, Pr1- xBixRu2O7 where a partially filled electron shell (Pr) in a weakly disordered environment produces anomalous metallic properties, and TbMnO3 where competing interactions lead to a magneto-electric phase. The experiments on TbMnO3 exemplify the relationship between research funded by this project and future applications. Magneto-electric materials may produce a magnetic field when an electric field is applied or vise versa. Our experiments have clarified the reason why electric and magnetic polarization is coupled in TbMnO3. While this knowledge does not render TbMnO3 useful for applications it will focus the search for a practical room temperature magneto-electric for applications.

  1. Interfacial Adsorption of Antifreeze Proteins: A Neutron Reflection Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Perumal, Shiamalee; Zhao, Xiubo; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Jia, Zongchao; Lu, Jian R.

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial adsorption from two antifreeze proteins (AFP) from ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus, type III AFP, AFP III, or maAFP) and spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana, isoform 501, or cfAFP) were studied by neutron reflection. Hydrophilic silicon oxide was used as model substrate to facilitate the solid/liquid interfacial measurement so that the structural features from AFP adsorption can be examined. All adsorbed layers from AFP III could be modeled into uniform layer distribution assuming that the protein molecules were adsorbed with their ice-binding surface in direct contact with the SiO2 substrate. The layer thickness of 32 Å was consistent with the height of the molecule in its crystalline form. With the concentration decreasing from 2 mg/ml to 0.01 mg/ml, the volume fraction of the protein packed in the monolayer decreased steadily from 0.4 to 0.1, consistent with the concentration-dependent inhibition of ice growth observed over the range. In comparison, insect cfAFP showed stronger adsorption over the same concentration range. Below 0.1 mg/ml, uniform layers were formed. But above 1 mg/ml, the adsorbed layers were characterized by a dense middle layer and two outer diffuse layers, with a total thickness around 100 Å. The structural transition indicated the responsive changes of conformational orientation to increasing surface packing density. As the higher interfacial adsorption of cfAFP was strongly correlated with the greater thermal hysteresis of spruce budworm, our results indicated the important relation between protein adsorption and antifreeze activity. PMID:18234809

  2. From asymmetric nuclear matter to neutron stars: A functional renormalization group study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2015-03-01

    A previous study of nuclear matter in a chiral nucleon-meson model is extended to isospin-asymmetric matter. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated in the framework of the functional renormalization group. The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is investigated in detail as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of both symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with realistic many-body computations. We also study the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium. The question of chiral symmetry restoration in neutron matter is addressed; we find a stabilization of the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry once fluctuations are included. Finally, neutron-star matter including β equilibrium is discussed. The model satisfies the constraints imposed by the existence of two-solar mass neutron stars.

  3. Fully self-consistent thermal evolution studies of rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, Rodrigo; Schramm, Stefan; Weber, Fridolin

    2017-07-01

    In this work we study the thermal evolution of rotating, axis-symmetric neutron stars, which are subjected to structural and compositional changes during spin-down. Our aim is to go beyond standard thermal evolution calculations where neutron stars are considered spherically-symmetric and with a static, "frozen-in" composition. Building on previous work, we carry out fully self-consistent thermal evolution calculations where the neutron star has an axis-symmetric, time-dependent structure. Such an approach allows us to consider, during the thermal evolution, changes of the star's geometry as well as its microscopic particle population. As a proof-of-concept, we study the thermal evolution of a neutron star subjected to magnetic braking spin-down. We show that the spin-evolution, combined with the accompanying structural and compositional changes lead to a substantially distinct thermal evolution scenario.

  4. Neutron scattering studies of BiFeO(3) multiferroics: a review for microscopists.

    PubMed

    Sosnowska, I M

    2009-11-01

    Application of the neutron scattering technique in the study of crystal and magnetic properties of multiferroic BiFeO(3) is presented. The crucial role of the neutron scattering technique, complementary to X-ray diffraction method and transmission electron microscopy, is shown. Especially the ultra high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction technique used by Sosnowska et al. to detect the magnetic cycloid ordering and its role in studies of physical properties of BiFeO(3) and its alloys are reviewed. The first inelastic neutron scattering patterns of magnetic excitations in BiFeO(3) are also presented. Applications of different microscopy techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission TEM and SEM (FESEM and FETEM), magnetic force microscope (MFM) and polarization force microscopy (PFM) bring insight on the fundamental problem of ferroelectricity and confirm the potential of BiFeO(3) multiferroic material for nanoscale devices.

  5. Monte Carlo study on secondary neutrons in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy: identification of the main source and reduction in the secondary neutron dose.

    PubMed

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2009-10-01

    Recent successful results in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy allow the patient to live for a longer time and allow younger patients to receive the radiotherapy. Undesired radiation exposure in normal tissues far from the target volume is considerably lower than that close to the treatment target, but it is considered to be non-negligible in the estimation of the secondary cancer risk. Therefore, it is very important to reduce the undesired secondary neutron exposure in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy without influencing the clinical beam. In this study, the source components in which the secondary neutrons are produced during passive carbon-ion radiotherapy were identified and the method to reduce the secondary neutron dose effectively based on the identification of the main sources without influencing the clinical beam was investigated. A Monte Carlo study with the PHITS code was performed by assuming the beamline at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). At first, the authors investigated the main sources of secondary neutrons in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy. Next, they investigated the reduction in the neutron dose with various modifications of the beamline device that is the most dominant in the neutron production. Finally, they investigated the use of an additional shield for the patient. It was shown that the main source is the secondary neutrons produced in the four-leaf collimator (FLC) used as a precollimator at HIAMC, of which contribution in the total neutron ambient dose equivalent is more than 70%. The investigations showed that the modification of the FLC can reduce the neutron dose at positions close to the beam axis by 70% and the FLC is very useful not only for the collimation of the primary beam but also the reduction in the secondary neutrons. Also, an additional shield for the patient is very effective to reduce the neutron dose at positions farther than 50 cm from the beam axis. Finally, they showed that the neutron dose can be

  6. Calculation Package: Derivation of Facility-Specific Derived Air Concentration (DAC) Values in Support of Spallation Neutron Source Operations

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, David A

    2009-12-01

    Derived air concentration (DAC) values for 175 radionuclides* produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), but not listed in Appendix A of 10 CFR 835 (01/01/2009 version), are presented. The proposed DAC values, ranging between 1 E-07 {micro}Ci/mL and 2 E-03 {micro}Ci/mL, were calculated in accordance with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and are intended to support an exemption request seeking regulatory relief from the 10 CFR 835, Appendix A, requirement to apply restrictive DACs of 2E-13 {micro}Ci/mL and 4E-11 {micro}Ci/mL and for non-listed alpha and non-alpha-emitting radionuclides, respectively.

  7. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the steam reforming of methane over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Andrew R.; Silverwood, Ian P.; Norris, Elizabeth L.; Ormerod, R. Mark; Frost, Christopher D.; Parker, Stewart F.; Lennon, David

    2013-12-01

    An alumina-supported nickel catalyst, previously used in methane reforming experiments employing CO2 as the oxidant, is applied here in the steam reforming variant of the process. Micro-reactor experiments are used to discern an operational window compatible with sample cells designed for inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments. INS spectra are recorded after 6 h reaction of a 1:1 mixture of CH4 and H2O at 898 K. Weak INS spectra are observed, indicating minimal hydrogen retention by the catalyst in this operational regime. Post-reaction, the catalyst is further characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. In a comparable fashion to that seen for the ‘dry’ reforming experiments, the catalyst retains substantial quantities of carbon in the form of filamentous coke. The role for hydrogen incorporation by the catalyst is briefly considered.

  8. Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, D. Q.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    We study the relation between neutron removal cross section (sigma{sub -N}) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron-rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between sigma{sub -N} and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increase of neutron removal cross section could be used as a quantitative measure for neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei.

  9. A New Neutron Time-of-Flight Array for β-Decay Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sénoville, M.; Delaunay, F.; Achouri, N. L.; Pârlog, M.; Orr, N. A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carniol, B.; Étasse, D.; Fontbonne, C.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Gibelin, J.; Hommet, J.; Laurent, B.; Ledoux, X.; Marqués, F. M.; Martínez, T.; De Séréville, N.

    A new time-of-flight array for β-delayed neutron spectroscopy (En < 5 MeV) is being developed with the aim of improved performance compared to existing arrays. We report on the status of this development, in particular the study of the n-γ discrimination quality with digital electronics, a comparison of several organic scintillators, including new discriminating plastics, as well as the characterisation of detectors with monoenergetic neutrons to measure intrinsic efficiencies and cross-talk probabilities.

  10. High-resolution neutron diffraction study of CuNCN: New evidence of structure anomalies at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Philipp; Houben, Andreas; Dronskowski, Richard; Tchougréeff, Andrei L.

    2013-12-14

    Copper carbodiimide (CuNCN) is the nitrogen-containing analogue of cupric oxide. Based on high-resolution neutron-diffraction data, CuNCN's lattice parameters are derived as a function of the temperature. In accordance with a recent synchrotron study, a clear trend in the cell parameter a is observed accompanying the changing magnetic behavior. With decreasing temperature, a slowly decreases to a minimum at ∼100 K after which it rises again. The same trend—albeit more pronounced—is observed for the c lattice parameter at ∼35 K. The herein presented neutron powder-diffraction data also support the conjectured sequence of transitions from the high-temperature one-dimensional resonating valence-bond (RVB) state to a transient two-dimensional RVB state and eventually, at lowest temperatures, into another two-dimensional RVB state, presumably the ground state.

  11. High-resolution neutron diffraction study of CuNCN: new evidence of structure anomalies at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Philipp; Houben, Andreas; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2013-12-14

    Copper carbodiimide (CuNCN) is the nitrogen-containing analogue of cupric oxide. Based on high-resolution neutron-diffraction data, CuNCN's lattice parameters are derived as a function of the temperature. In accordance with a recent synchrotron study, a clear trend in the cell parameter a is observed accompanying the changing magnetic behavior. With decreasing temperature, a slowly decreases to a minimum at ~100 K after which it rises again. The same trend-albeit more pronounced-is observed for the c lattice parameter at ~35 K. The herein presented neutron powder-diffraction data also support the conjectured sequence of transitions from the high-temperature one-dimensional resonating valence-bond (RVB) state to a transient two-dimensional RVB state and eventually, at lowest temperatures, into another two-dimensional RVB state, presumably the ground state.

  12. A preliminary neutron diffraction study of rasburicase, a recombinant urate oxidase enzyme, complexed with 8-azaxanthin

    SciTech Connect

    Budayova-Spano, Monika; Bonneté, Françoise; Ferté, Natalie; El Hajji, Mohamed; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew Paul; Castro, Bertrand

    2006-03-01

    Neutron diffraction data of hydrogenated recombinant urate oxidase enzyme (Rasburicase), complexed with a purine-type inhibitor 8-azaxanthin, was collected to 2.1 Å resolution from a crystal grown in D{sub 2}O by careful control and optimization of crystallization conditions via knowledge of the phase diagram. Deuterium atoms were clearly seen in the neutron-scattering density map. Crystallization and preliminary neutron diffraction measurements of rasburicase, a recombinant urate oxidase enzyme expressed by a genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, complexed with a purine-type inhibitor (8-azaxanthin) are reported. Neutron Laue diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution using the LADI instrument from a crystal (grown in D{sub 2}O) with volume 1.8 mm{sup 3}. The aim of this neutron diffraction study is to determine the protonation states of the inhibitor and residues within the active site. This will lead to improved comprehension of the enzymatic mechanism of this important enzyme, which is used as a protein drug to reduce toxic uric acid accumulation during chemotherapy. This paper illustrates the high quality of the neutron diffraction data collected, which are suitable for high-resolution structural analysis. In comparison with other neutron protein crystallography studies to date in which a hydrogenated protein has been used, the volume of the crystal was relatively small and yet the data still extend to high resolution. Furthermore, urate oxidase has one of the largest primitive unit-cell volumes (space group I222, unit-cell parameters a = 80, b = 96, c = 106 Å) and molecular weights (135 kDa for the homotetramer) so far successfully studied with neutrons.

  13. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux beam reactor (HFBR).

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R. B.

    1998-01-16

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm{sup 3} in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept.

  14. Preliminary study of nuclear fuel element testing based on coded source neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Wang; Hang Li; Chao Cao; Yang Wu; Heyong Huo; Bin Tang

    2015-07-01

    Neutron radiography (NR) is one of the most important nondestructive testing methods, which is sensitive to low density materials. Especially, Neutron transfer imaging method could be used to test radioactivity materials refraining from γ effect, but it is difficult to realize tomography. Coded source neutron imaging (CSNI) is a newly NR method developed fast in the last several years. The distance between object and detector is much longer than traditional NR, which could be used to test radioactivity materials. With pre-reconstruction process from fold-cover projections, CSNI could easily realize tomography. This thesis carries out preliminary study on the nuclear fuel element testing by coded source neutron imaging. We calculate different enrichment, flaws and activity in nuclear fuel elements tested by CSNI with Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that CSNI could be a useful testing method for nuclear fuel element testing. (authors)

  15. Calculation of neutron and gamma fluxes in support to the interpretation of measuring devices irradiated in the core periphery of the OSIRIS Material Testing Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Malouch, Fadhel

    2015-07-01

    Technological irradiations carried out in material testing reactors (MTRs) are used to study the behavior of materials under irradiation conditions required by different types of nuclear power plants (NPPs). For MTRs, specific instrumentation is required for the experiment monitoring and for the characterization of irradiation conditions, in particular the flux of neutrons and photons. To measure neutron and photon flux in experimental locations, different sensors can be used, such as SPNDs (self-powered neutron detectors), SPGDs (self-powered gamma detectors) and ionization chambers. These sensors involve interactions producing ultimately a measurable electric current. Various sensors have been recently tested in the core periphery of the OSIRIS reactor (located at the CEA-Saclay center) in order to qualify their responses to the neutron and the photon flux. One of the key input data for this qualification is to have a relevant evaluation of neutron and gamma fluxes at the irradiation location. The objective of this work is to evaluate the neutron and the gamma flux in the core periphery of the OSIRIS reactor. With this intention, specific neutron-photonic three-dimensional calculations have been performed and are mainly based on the TRIPOLI-4{sup R} three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, developed by CEA (Saclay Center) and extensively validated against reactor dosimetry benchmarks. In the case of the OSIRIS reactor, TRIPOLI-4{sup R} code has been validated against experimental results based on neutron flux and nuclear heating measurements performed in ex-core and in-core experiments. In this work, simultaneous contribution of neutrons and gamma photons in the core periphery is considered using neutron-photon coupled transport calculations. Contributions of prompt and decay photons have been taken into account for the gamma flux calculation. Specific depletion codes are used upstream to provide the decay-gamma sources required by TRIPOLI-4

  16. Neutron radiation damage and recovery studies of SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, T.; Rao, T.; Stoll, S.; Woody, C.

    2016-12-01

    We characterized the performance of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) before and after exposure of up to 1012 neutron/cm2 dosage. We show that the typical orders of magnitude increase of dark current upon neutron irradiation can be suppressed by operating it at a lower temperature and single-photoelectron detection capability can be restored. The required operating temperature depends on the dosage received. Furthermore, after high temperature thermal annealing, there is compelling evidence that the extrinsic dark current is lowered by orders of magnitude and single-photon detection performance are to some extent recovered at room temperature. Our experimental findings might have widespread implications for extending the functionality and the useful lifetime of current and future large scale SiPM detectors deployed in ionization radiation environment.

  17. Passive neutron design study for 200-L waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Beddingfield, D.B.; Pickrell, M.M.

    1997-09-01

    We have developed a passive neutron counter for the measurement of plutonium in 200-L drums of scrap and waste. The counter incorporates high efficiency for the multiplicity counting in addition to the traditional coincidence counting. The {sup 252}Cf add-a-source feature is used to provide an accurate assay over a wide range of waste matrix materials. The room background neutron rate is reduced by using 30 cm of external polyethylene shielding and the cosmic-ray background is reduced by statistical filtering techniques. Monte Carlo Code calculations were used to determine the optimum detector design, including the gas pressure, size, number, and placement of the {sup 3}He tubes in the moderator. Various moderators, including polyethylene, plastics, teflon, and graphite, were evaluated to obtain the maximum efficiency and minimum detectable mass of plutonium.

  18. Neutron radiation damage and recovery studies of SiPMs

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Rao, T.; Stoll, S.; Woody, C.

    2016-12-01

    We characterized the performance of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) before and after exposure of up to 1012 neutron/cm2 dosage. We show that the typical orders of magnitude increase of dark current upon neutron irradiation can be suppressed by operating it at a lower temperature and single-photoelectron detection capability can be restored. The required operating temperature depends on the dosage received. Furthermore, after high temperature thermal annealing, there is compelling evidence that the extrinsic dark current is lowered by orders of magnitude and single-photon detection performance are to some extent recovered at room temperature. Our experimental findings might have widespread implications for extending the functionality and the useful lifetime of current and future large scale SiPM detectors deployed in ionization radiation environment.

  19. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vapor Deposited Amorphous Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, A. I.; Li, J.-C.; Dong, S.; Bailey, I. F.; Eccleston, R. S.; Hahn, W.; Parker, S. F.

    1997-09-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra were measured for amorphous ice H2O and D2O produced by low-temperature and low-rate vapor deposition. The data show that the deposition produced the low-density amorphous form of ice, i.e., the high-density amorphous ice observed by x-ray [A. H. Narten, C. G. Venkatesh, and S. A. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 64, 1106 (1976)] and electron diffraction [P. Jenniskens and D. F. Blake, Science 265, 753 (1994)] under similar conditions was not detected. This result was confirmed by separate neutron diffraction experiments. Vibrational spectra of the deposited amorphous ice were dissimilar to that of ice Ih/Ic, as was believed previously.

  20. Neutron diffraction study of α-iron titanium cerium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Niu, Shiwen; Gou, Cheng; Jin, Longhuan; Tao, Fang; Bao, Deyou; Su, Lanying

    1987-03-01

    The results of the neutron scattering method shows that the crystal structure of Fe0.94TiCe0.06H0.03 is the same as that of the FeTiH0.02. However, its diffraction peak intensities drop by 47-58%, the background increased markedly about 2 times and the lattice constant increase by 5%.

  1. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of POSS ligand dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jalarvo, Niina H; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Crawford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Polyoligosilsesquioxanes are molecules having cage-like structures composed of silicon and oxygen. These molecules can have a wide variety of functional ligands attached to them. Depending on the nature of the ligand, interesting properties and applications are found. In this work we present results from quasielastic neutron scattering measurements of four different POSS molecules that illustrate the presence of strong coupling between the ligand dynamics and the POSS crystal structures.

  2. Neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: a summary (1981-1986).

    PubMed

    Swaja, R E; Sims, C S

    1988-09-01

    To provide an opportunity for dosimetrists to test and calibrate their neutron personnel monitoring systems, the staff of the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies (PDIS) periodically since 1974. During these studies, personnel dosimeters are mailed to ORNL, exposed to low-level (less than 15 mSv) neutron dose equivalents in a variety of mixed-radiation fields, and then returned to the participants for evaluation. These intercomparisons have provided more data on neutron dosimeter performance than any other periodic test program conducted to date. This report presents a summary and analysis of about 3450 neutron dose equivalent measurements reported for PDIS 7 through 12 (1981-1986) with emphasis on low dose equivalent sensitivity, accuracy and precision, and performance relative to accreditation standards for the basic types of personnel dosimetry systems. Relationships of the PDIS results to occupational neutron monitoring, accreditation testing, and methods to improve personnel neutron dosimetry performance are also discussed.

  3. Feasibility of Small Animal Anatomical and Functional Imaging with Neutrons: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medich, David C.; Currier, Blake H.; Karellas, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    A novel technique is presented for obtaining a single in-vivo image containing both functional and anatomical information in a small animal model such as a mouse. This technique, which incorporates appropriate image neutron-scatter rejection and uses a neutron opaque contrast agent, is based on neutron radiographic technology and was demonstrated through a series of Monte Carlo simulations. With respect to functional imaging, this technique can be useful in biomedical and biological research because it could achieve a spatial resolution orders of magnitude better than what presently can be achieved with current functional imaging technologies such as nuclear medicine (PET, SPECT) and fMRI. For these studies, Monte Carlo simulations were performed with thermal (0.025 eV) neutrons in a 3 cm thick phantom using the MCNP5 simulations software. The goals of these studies were to determine: 1) the extent that scattered neutrons degrade image contrast; 2) the contrasts of various normal and diseased tissues under conditions of complete scatter rejection; 3) the concentrations of Boron-10 and Gadolinium-157 required for contrast differentiation in functional imaging; and 4) the efficacy of collimation for neutron scatter image rejection. Results demonstrate that with proper neutron-scatter rejection, a neutron fluence of 2 ×107 n/cm2 will provide a signal to noise ratio of at least one ( S/N ≥ 1) when attempting to image various 300 μm thick tissues placed in a 3 cm thick phantom. Similarly, a neutron fluence of only 1 ×107 n/cm2 is required to differentiate a 300 μm thick diseased tissue relative to its normal tissue counterpart. The utility of a B-10 contrast agent was demonstrated at a concentration of 50 μg/g to achieve S/N ≥ 1 in 0.3 mm thick tissues while Gd-157 requires only slightly more than 10 μg/g to achieve the same level of differentiation. Lastly, neutron collimator with an L/D ratio from 50 to 200 were calculated to provide appropriate scatter

  4. Local atomic structure of CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst support determined by pulsed neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, W.; Louca, D.; Egami, T.; Brezny, R.

    1997-12-31

    The capability of CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} mixture as a catalyst support in automobile exhaust three-way catalytic converters depends critically upon processing conditions of the mixture. In order to understand this dependence the atomic structure of various forms of CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} fine powder was studied using pulsed neutron scattering and the atomic pair-distribution analysis. The results indicate that a sample with the highest oxygen storage capacity has an inhomogeneous structure, and is segregated into two nano-phases with severe local lattice distortion. It is suggested that distortion in the local atomic structure, particularly at the interfaces, facilitate the oxygen transport at the oxide/metal interface.

  5. Feasibility study for the investigation of Nitinol self-expanding stents by neutron techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogante, M.; Pasquini, U.; Rosta, L.; Lebedev, V.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, neutron techniques - in particular, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron diffraction (ND) - are considered for the non-destructive characterization of Nitinol artery stents. This roughly equiatomic (50Ni-50Ti at%) shape memory alloy (SMA) exhibits significant properties of superelasticity and biocompatibility that make it suitable to be typically used as smart material for medical implants and devices. Nitinol self-expanding artery stents, as permanent vascular support structures, supply an ideal option to bypass surgery, but they are submitted for the whole of patient's life to the dynamical stress of the artery pulsation and the aggression from the biological environment. These stents, consequently, can suffer from wear and fracture occurrence likely due to a variety of cyclic fatigue, overload conditions and residual stresses. Neutrons have recently become a progressively more important probe for various materials and components and they allow achieving information complementary to those obtained from the traditional microstructural analyses. The outputs from the preliminary works already carried out in this field consent to consider neutron techniques capable to contribute to the development of these crucial medical implants. The achievable results can yield trends adoptable in monitoring of the stent features.

  6. A neutron diffraction study of the zeolite edingtonitea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvick, Åke; Smith, Joseph V.

    1983-09-01

    A neutron diffraction study at 294 K of a single crystal of edingtonite (Ba2Al4Si6O20 ṡ 7H2O; a 9.537(3) b 9.651(2) c 6.509(2) Å; P21212) utilized 1876 diffraction intensities from the Brookhaven National Laboratory high-flux beam reactor. The agreement factor R(F2)=0.055 for conventional anisotropic refinement was reduced to 0.045 for a Gram-Charlier expansion up to fourth order for the thermal factors of the water atoms. The Si-O and Al-O distances correlate inversely with the Si-O-Al angle as in scolecite. There is no indication of substitutional disorder. The barium atom is coordinated to three pairs of framework oxygens (2.89, 2.96, and 3.04 Å) and two pairs of water oxygens (2.79 and 2.79 Å). Two framework oxygens have weak hydrogen bonds to both water molecules [O(4)-OW(1) 2.87, -OW(2) 2.96; O(5) -OW(1) 3.02, -OW(2) 3.02 Å] and the other three framework oxygens are each bonded to a Ba atom. The OW-H ṡṡṡ O angles (163.5°, 165.1°, 173.9°, and 178.0°) are fairly close to 180°, the H ṡṡṡ O distances are long (1.91, 2.02, 2.09, and 2.10 Å) and the observed uncorrected OW-H distances range from 0.928(6) to 0.959(4) Å. Only seven out of the eight water positions are occupied [W(1) 84% occupancy; W(2) 91%]. The average rms displacement of each hydrogen (0.32, 0.29, 0.27, and 0.24 Å) correlates approximately with the hydrogen bond length (2.09, 2.10, 2.02, and 1.91 Å). Third- and fourth-order tensor components in the displacements of the water molecules may result from anharmonic or curvilinear vibrations; however, the effect of the static displacements of the center-of-motion from interaction with unoccupied water sites may also be important.

  7. HEIMDAL: A thermal neutron powder diffractometer with high and flexible resolution combined with SANS and neutron imaging - Designed for materials science studies at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Lefmann, Kim; Henry, Paul F.; Bertelsen, Mads; Schefer, Jürg; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-08-01

    HEIMDAL will be a multi length scale neutron scattering instrument for the study of structures covering almost nine orders of magnitude from 0.01 nm to 50 mm. The instrument is accepted for construction at the European Spallation Source (ESS) and features a variable resolution thermal neutron powder diffractometer (TNPD), combined with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron imaging (NI). The instrument uses a novel combination of a cold and a thermal guide to fulfill the diverse requirements for diffraction and SANS. With an instrument length of 170 m, HEIMDAL will take advantage of the high neutron flux of the long pulse at ESS, whilst maintaining a high q-resolution due to the long flight path. The q-range coverage is up to 20 Å-1 allowing low-resolution PDF analysis. With the addition of SANS, HEIMDAL will be able to cover a uniquely broad length scale within a single instrumental set-up. HEIMDAL will be able to accommodate modern materials research in a broad variety of fields, and the task of the instrument will be to study advanced functional materials in action, as in situ and in operandi at multiple length scales (0.01-100 nm) quasi simultaneously. The instrument combines state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques (TNPD, SANS, and NI) with the goal of studying real materials, in real time, under real conditions. This article describes the instrument design ideas, calculations and results of simulations and virtual experiments.

  8. Neutron Radiography and Tomography for the in situ Study of Geological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, D. S.; Jacobson, D. L.; LaManna, J.; Baltic, E.

    2016-12-01

    Neutron radiography and tomography are powerful methods to non-destructively study geological specimens in controlled laboratory experiments in situ. This is due to the remarkable nature of neutrons to penetrate high Z materials and still maintain sensitivity to small quantities of liquid water or hydrocarbons bound inside or flowing through geological specimens. The use of neutron imaging as a tool for geology is a relatively recent development. The National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research has two neutron imaging user facilities available to the geology community. Here we will introduce the facilities, method, present data and show how technique applies to geology specimens. We will examine how to quantify the data and the show basic analysis methods and tools that have been developed to convert neutron radiographs into quantifiable information relevant to the geology community. Also the way that the attenuation coefficients for specific rock specimens and the effect of beam hardening will be presented. The freely available software tools used for this analysis will be discussed as well.

  9. Studies on new neutron-sensitive dosimeters using an optically stimulated luminescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M. S.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Behrens, R.; Muthe, K. P.; Rawat, N. S.; Gupta, S. K.; Sharma, D. N.

    2011-07-01

    The neutron response of detectors prepared using α-Al 2O 3:C phosphor developed using a melt processing technique and mixed with neutron converters was studied in monoenergetic neutron fields. The detector pellets were arranged in two different pairs: α-Al 2O 3:C + 6LiF/α-Al 2O 3:C + 7LiF and α-Al 2O 3:C + high-density polyethylene/α-Al 2O 3:C + Teflon, for neutron dosimetry using albedo and recoil proton techniques. The optically stimulated luminescence response of the Al 2O 3:C + 6,7LiF dosimeter to radiation from a 252Cf source was 0.21, in terms of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and relative to radiation from a 137Cs source. This was comparable to results obtained with similar detectors prepared using commercially available α-Al 2O 3:C phosphor. The Hp(10) response of the α-Al 2O 3:C + 6,7LiF dosimeters was found to decrease by more than two orders of magnitude with increasing neutron energy, as expected for albedo dosimeters. The response of the α-Al 2O 3:C + high-density polyethylene/α-Al 2O 3:C + Teflon dosimeters was small, of the order of 1% to 2% in terms of Hp(10) and relative to radiation from a 137Cs source, for neutron energies greater than 1 MeV.

  10. Study of the response of PICASSO bubble detectors to neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlisov, Daniiar

    The objective of this work was to simulate the PICASSO experiment and to study the detector response to neutron irradiation. The results of the simulation show the rock neutron rate to be 1-2 neutrons/day for the setup used until 2009 and less than 0.1 neutrons/day for the setup used after 2010. The shielding efficiency was calculated to be 98% and 99.6% for the two setups respectively. The detector response to an AmBe source was simulated. Neutron rates differ for two AmBe source spectra from the literature. The observed data rate is in agreement with the rate from the simulation. The detector stability was examined and found to be stable. The source position and orientation affect the detector efficiency creating a systematic uncertainity on the order of 10-35%. This uncertainity was eliminated with a source holder. The localisation of recorded events inside the detector and the simulated neutron distribution agree.

  11. Small-angle neutron scattering study of radiation-induced defects in synthetic quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. M. Lebedev, V. T.; Orlov, S. P.; Pevzner, B. Z.; Tolstikhin, I. N.

    2006-12-15

    The supraatomic structure of single crystals of synthetic quartz was studied by thermal neutron small-angle scattering in the initial state (dislocation densities 54 and 570 cm{sup -2}) and after irradiation in the WWR-M reactor (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute) by fast neutrons with energies E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV at fluences F{sub n} = 0.2 x 10{sup 17} -5 x 10{sup 18} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. It is established that fast neutrons form point, linear, and volume defects in the lattice throughout the entire volume of a sample. Large-volume structures-amorphous-phase nuclei-reach sizes of {approx}100 nm in quartz, while occupying a small total volume of {approx}0.3% even at the maximum fluence 5 x 10{sup 18} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. The main fraction of the damaged volume (up to 5%) corresponds to point (with a radius of gyration of 1-2 nm) and linear defects, giving a comparable contribution ({approx}1-4%). The extended linear structures with a radius of 2 nm, even at a moderate fluence of 7.7 x 10{sup 17} neutrons/cm{sup 2}, have a significant total length per volume unit ({approx}10{sup 11} cm/cm{sup 3}) and can form a connected network with a cell {approx}30 nm in size in the sample. Foreign atoms and molecules can migrate through channels of this network.

  12. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  13. SU-E-T-304: Study of Secondary Neutrons From Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M; Zheng, Y; Benton, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are unwanted byproducts from proton therapy and exposure from secondary radiation during treatment could increase risk of developing a secondary cancer later in a patient's lifetime. The purpose of this study is to investigate secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams under various beam conditions using both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: CR-39 Plastic Track Nuclear Detectors (PNTD) were used for the measurement. CR-39 PNTD has tissue like sensitivity to the secondary neutrons but insensitive to the therapeutic protons. In this study, we devised two experimental conditions: a) hollow-phantom; phantom is bored with a hollow cylinder along the direction of the beam so that the primary proton passes through the phantom without interacting with the phantom material, b) cylindrical-phantom; a solid cylinder of diameter close to the beam diameter is placed along the beam path. CR-39 PNTDs were placed laterally inside a 60X20X35 cm3 phantom (hollow-phantom) and in air (cylindrical-phantom) at various angles with respect to the primary beam axis. We studied for three different proton energies (78 MeV, 162 MeV and 226 MeV), using a 4 cm modulation width and 5cm diameter brass aperture for the entire experiment and simulation. A comparison of the experiment was performed using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Results: The measured secondary neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranges from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 25.42 ± 2.3 mSv/Gy for the hollow phantom study, and 2.7 ± 0.3 to 46.4 ± 3.4 mSv/Gy for the cylindrical phantom study. Monte Carlo simulations predicated neutron dose equivalent from measurements within a factor of 5. Conclusion: The study suggests that the production of external neutrons is significantly higher than the production of internal neutrons.

  14. Geant4 Simulation of A Multi-layered target for the Study of Neutron-Unbound Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, Paul; Freeman, Jessica; Frank, Nathan; Thoennessen, Michael; MONA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The MoNA/LISA setup at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University has provided an avenue to study the nuclear structure of unbound states/nuclei at and beyond the neutron dripline for the past decade using secondary beams from the Coupled Cyclotron Facility. A new multi-layered Si/Be active target is being designed to specifically study neutron-unbound nuclei. In these experiments the decay energy is reconstructed from fragment-neutron coincidence measurements that are typically low in count rate. The multi-layered target will allow the use of thicker targets to increase the reaction rates, thus enabling to study currently out of reach nuclei such as 21C, 23C and 24N. The Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit is currently used to model these physics processes within the multi-layered target and expected invariant mass distributions. A description of the experimental setup and simulation work will be discussed. This work is supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0000979.

  15. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  16. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H *(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy-1 was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H *(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy-1 at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to thermal

  17. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M

    2016-06-07

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H (*)(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H (*)(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy(-1) was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H (*)(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy(-1) at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to

  18. Different routes to methanol: Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy of adsorbates on supported copper catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kandemir, Timur; Friedrich, Matthias; Parker, Stewart F.; Studt, Felix; Lennon, David; Schlögl, Robert; Behrens, Malte

    2016-04-14

    We have investigated methanol synthesis with model supported copper catalysts, Cu/ZnO and Cu/MgO, using CO/H2 and CO2/H2 as feedstocks. Under CO/H2 both catalysts show chemisorbed methoxy as a stable intermediate, the Cu/MgO catalyst also shows hydroxyls on the support. Under CO2/H2 the catalysts behave differently, in that formate is also seen on the catalyst. For the Cu/ZnO catalyst hydroxyls are present on the metal whereas for the Cu/MgO hydroxyls are found on the support. Furthermore, these results are consistent with a recently published model for methanol synthesis and highlight the key role of ZnO in the process.

  19. Different routes to methanol: Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy of adsorbates on supported copper catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Kandemir, Timur; Friedrich, Matthias; Parker, Stewart F.; ...

    2016-04-14

    We have investigated methanol synthesis with model supported copper catalysts, Cu/ZnO and Cu/MgO, using CO/H2 and CO2/H2 as feedstocks. Under CO/H2 both catalysts show chemisorbed methoxy as a stable intermediate, the Cu/MgO catalyst also shows hydroxyls on the support. Under CO2/H2 the catalysts behave differently, in that formate is also seen on the catalyst. For the Cu/ZnO catalyst hydroxyls are present on the metal whereas for the Cu/MgO hydroxyls are found on the support. Furthermore, these results are consistent with a recently published model for methanol synthesis and highlight the key role of ZnO in the process.

  20. A Study of Predoctoral Student Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Interagency Committee on Education, Washington, DC. Student Support Study Group.

    This report of the Federal Interagency Committee on Education (FCIE) presents recommendations for expanding current federal support for graduate study. Federal agencies allocated $226.2 million for predoctoral fellowships and supported some 12.9% of the full-time graduate students in the US during the 1968-1969 school year. This support increased…

  1. Performance Support Case Studies from IBM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke-Moran, Celia; Swope, Ginger; Morariu, Janis; deKam, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Presents two case studies that show how IBM addressed performance support solutions and electronic learning. The first developed a performance support and expert coaching solution; the second applied performance support to reducing implementation time and total cost of ownership of enterprise resource planning systems. (Author/LRW)

  2. Sensitivity study of neutron transport through standard and rebar concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Roussin, R.W.; Lucius, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is under way at ORNL to (1) develop a data base pertinent to the transport of neutrons through thick concrete shields, (2) use the data base in an energy group boundary selection and collapsing scheme, and (3) develop a simple methodology to access the data base to provide rapid solutions to practical shielding problems. This paper describes work carried out to fulfill objective (1), the work consisting of calculations of the transport of fission neutrons through 1- and 2-m-thick slabs of standard concrete and rebar (steel-reinforced) concrete, together with calculations of the sensitivities of the results to total, absorption, and elastic cross sections. The transport calculations were performed with the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN in both forward and adjoint modes. The DLC-41C/VITAMIN-C cross-section library (171 neutron, 36 gamma groups) was employed, with a P/sub 3/ cross-section expansion and an S/sub 16/ angular quadrature. In all cases the fission source was assumed to be distributed within the first 1-cm thickness of the slab and the detector was assumed to occupy the last 1-cm thickness of the slab. For the rebar concrete the slab constituents were homogenized, with the horizontal and vertical No. 11 reinforcing steel rods comprising 7.6 vol. % of the slab. The quantity calculated was the absorbed dose rate, and care was taken in the mesh interval selection and source description to ensure agreement between the forward and adjoint results to within 0.02%.

  3. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  4. Thermal Denaturation of DNA Studied with Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wildes, Andrew; Theodorakopoulos, Nikos; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Peyrard, Michel; Garden, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-28

    The melting transition of DNA, whereby the strands of the double-helix structure completely separate at a certain temperature, has been characterized using neutron scattering. A Bragg peak from B-form fiber DNA has been measured as a function of temperature, and its widths and integrated intensities have been interpreted using the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model with only one free parameter. The experiment is unique, as it gives spatial correlation along the molecule through the melting transition where other techniques cannot.

  5. Membrane Structure Studies by Means of Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R. B.

    2008-03-17

    The basic model for membrane structure--a lipid bilayer with imbedded proteins--was formulated 35 years ago, however the detailed structure is still under active investigation using a variety of physical, chemical and computational techniques. Every biologically active cell is encapsulated by a plasma membrane with most cells also equipped with an extensive intracellular membrane system. The plasma membrane is an important boundary between the cytoplasm of the cell and the external environment, and selectively isolates the cell from that environment. Passive diffusion and/or active transport mechanisms are provided for water, ions, substrates etc. which are vital for cell metabolism and viability. Membranes also facilitate excretion of substances either as useful cellular products or as waste. Despite their complexity and diverse function, plasma membranes from quite different cells have surprisingly similar compositions. A typical membrane structure consists of a phospholipid bilayer with a number of proteins scattered throughout, along with carbohydrates (glycoproteins), glycolipids and sterols. The plasma membranes of most eukaryotic cells contain approximately equal weights of lipid and protein, which corresponds to about 100 lipid molecules per protein molecule. Clearly, lipids are a major constituent and the study of their structure and function in isolation provides valuable insight into the more complex intact multicomponent membrane. The membrane bound protein is the other major constituent and is a very active area of research for a number of reasons including the fact that over 60% of modern drugs act on their receptor sites. The interaction between the protein and the supporting lipid bilayer is clearly of major importance. Neutron scattering is a powerful technique for exploring the structure of membranes, either as reconstituted membranes formed from well characterised lipids, or as intact membranes isolated from selected biological systems. A brief

  6. Feasibility study of Self Powered Neutron Detectors in Fast Reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, Christian; Filliatre, Philippe; Verma, Vasudha; Hellesen, Carl; Jacobsson Svard, Staffan

    2015-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor system. Diverse possibilities of detector systems installation have to be investigated with respect to practicality and feasibility according to the detection parameters. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution. We show that the gamma contribution from fission products decay in the fuel and activation of structural materials is very small compared to the fission gammas. Thus, it is possible for the in-core SPND signal to follow changes in local neutron flux as they are proportional to each other. This implies that the signal from an in-core SPND can provide dynamic information on the neutron flux perturbations occurring inside the reactor core. (authors)

  7. Aerosol backscatter studies supporting LAWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1989-01-01

    Optimized Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS) algorithm for low backscatter conditions was developed. The algorithm converts backscatter intensity measurements from focused continuous-wave (CW) airborne Doppler lidar into backscatter coefficients. The performance of optimized algorithm under marginal backscatter signal conditions was evaluated. The 10.6 micron CO2 aerosol backscatter climatologies were statistically analyzed. Climatologies reveal clean background aerosol mode near 10(exp -10)/kg/sq m/sr (mixing ratio units) through middle and upper troposhere, convective mode associated with planetary boundary layer convective activity, and stratospheric mode associated with volcanically-generated aerosols. Properties of clean background mode are critical to design and simulation studies of Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), a MSFC facility Instrument on the Earth Observing System (Eos). Previous intercomparisons suggested correlation between aerosol backscatter at CO2 wavelength and water vapor. Field measurements of backscatter profiles with MSFC ground-based Doppler lidar system (GBDLS) were initiated in late FY-88 to coincide with independent program of local rawinsonde releases and overflights by Multi-spectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), a multi-channel infrared radiometer capable of measuring horizontal and vertical moisture distributions. Design and performance simulation studies for LAWS would benefit from the existence of a relationship between backscatter and water vapor.

  8. Neutron diffraction studies of welds of aerospace aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Martukanitz, R.P.; Howell, P.R.; Payzant, E.A.; Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron diffraction and electron microscopy were done on residual stress in various regions comprising variable polarity plasma arc welds of alloys 2219 (Al-6.3Cu) and 2195 (Al-4.0Cu-1.0Li-0.5Mg-0.5Ag). Results indicate that lattice parameter changes in the various weld regions may be attributed to residual stresses generated during welding, as well as local changes in microstructure. Distribution of longitudinal and transverse stress of welded panels shows peaks of tension and compression, respectively, within the HAZ and corroborate earlier theoretical results. Position of these peaks are related to position of minimum strength within the HAZ, and the magnitude of these peaks are a fraction of the local yield strength in this region. Weldments of alloy 2195-T8 exhibited higher peak residual stress than alloy 2219-T87. Comparison of neutron diffraction and microstructural analysis indicate decreased lattice parameters associated with the solid solution of the near HAZ; this results in decreased apparent tensile residual stress within this region and may significantly alter interpretation of residual stress measurements of these alloys. Considerable relaxation of residual stress occurs during removal of specimens from welded panels and was used to aid in differentiating changes in lattice parameters attributed to residual stress from welding and modifications in microstructure.

  9. Focused Study of Thermonuclear Bursts on Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevez, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    X-ray bursters form a class of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries where accreted material from a donor star undergoes rapid thermonuclear burning in the surface layers of a neutron star. The flux released can temporarily exceed the Eddington limit and drive the photosphere to large radii. Such photospheric radius expansion bursts likely eject nuclear burning ashes into the interstellar medium, and may make possible the detection of photoionization edges. Indeed, theoretical models predict that absorption edges from 58Fe at 9.2 keV, 60Zn and 62Zn at 12.2 keV should be detectable by the future missions Simbol-X and NuSTAR. A positive detection would thus probe the nuclear burning as well as the gravitational redshift from the neutron star. Moreover, likely observations of atomic X-ray spectral components reflected from the inner accretion disk have been reported. The high spectral resolution capabilities of the focusing X-ray telescopes may therefore make possible to differentiate between the potential interpretations of the X-ray bursts spectral features.

  10. STS Case Study Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa de Jesus, Dan A.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    The Shuttle Case Study Collection (SCSC) has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. The SCSC provides educators with a new tool to teach real-world engineering processes with the goal of providing unique educational materials that enhance critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving skills. During this third phase of the project, responsibilities included: the revision of the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) source code to ensure all pages follow World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards, and the addition and edition of website content, including text, documents, and images. Basic HTML knowledge was required, as was basic knowledge of photo editing software, and training to learn how to use NASA's Content Management System for website design. The outcome of this project was its release to the public.

  11. Cosmic ray heliospheric transport study with neutron monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Ygbuhay, R. C.; Modzelewska, R.; Dorman, L. I.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Determining transport coefficients for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) propagation in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) poses a fundamental challenge in modeling cosmic ray modulation processes. GCR scattering in the solar wind involves wave-particle interaction, the waves being Alfven waves which propagate along the ambient field (B). Empirical values at 1 AU are determined for the components of the diffusion tensor for GCR propagation in the heliosphere using neutron monitor (NM) data. At high rigidities, particle density gradients and mean free paths at 1 AU in B can only be computed from the solar diurnal anisotropy (SDA) represented by a vector A (components Ar, Aϕ, and Aθ) in a heliospherical polar coordinate system. Long-term changes in SDA components of NMs (with long track record and the median rigidity of response Rm ~ 20 GV) are used to compute yearly values of the transport coefficients for 1963-2013. We confirm the previously reported result that the product of the parallel (to B) mean free path (λ||) and radial density gradient (Gr) computed from NM data exhibits a weak Schwabe cycle (11y) but strong Hale magnetic cycle (22y) dependence. Its value is most depressed in solar activity minima for positive (p) polarity intervals (solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere points outward from the Sun) when GCRs drift from the polar regions toward the helioequatorial plane and out along the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), setting up a symmetric gradient Gθs pointing away from HCS. Gr drives all SDA components and λ|| Gr contributes to the diffusive component (Ad) of the ecliptic plane anisotropy (A). GCR transport is commonly discussed in terms of an isotropic hard sphere scattering (also known as billiard-ball scattering) in the solar wind plasma. We use it with a flat HCS model and the Ahluwalia-Dorman master equations to compute the coefficients α (=λ⊥/λ∥) and ωτ (a measure of turbulence in the solar wind) and transport

  12. In-situ, Gate Bias Dependent Study of Neutron Irradiation Effects on AlGaN/GaN HFETs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    equivalent neutron fluence in gallium arsenide. Gallium arsenide was chosen instead of Si due to more similar structure to GaN. The equivalent fluence...IN-SITU GATE BIAS DEPENDENT STUDY OF NEUTRON IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON ALGAN/GAN HFETS THESIS...AFIT/GNE/ENP/10M-06 IN-SITU GATE BIAS DEPENDENT STUDY OF NEUTRON IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON ALGAN/GAN HFETS THESIS Presented to the

  13. Background studies for the COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane M.; COHERENT Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The COHERENT experiment is designed for a first measurement and N2 dependence study of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). CEvNS is a standard model process that is important in understanding supernova neutrinos, the structure of the weak interaction and backgrounds for dark matter searches. The COHERENT collaboration is placing a suite of detector technologies in a basement location at the SNS: 14 kg CsI[Na] crystals; 185 kg NaI crystals; 35 kg single-phase LAr; 10kg high-purity, point contact Ge. Previous attempts to measure the CEvNS process have grappled with very high background rates. One class of troublesome backgrounds is accelerator-correlated neutrons because a simple accelerator on/off background subtraction procedure fails to remove these events. The collaboration has completed a comprehensive background study in the basement region where the experiments are located. We conclude from these studies that the neutron background is sufficiently low for successful CEvNS measurement in the SNS basement region. Neutron measurements from the Indiana University SciBath detector and the Sandia Neutron Scatter Camera are presented here.

  14. Inelastic Neutron Scattering studies of pure and Mo doped VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arnab; Granroth, Garrett E.; Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Koleshnikov, Alexander I.; Luo, Huxia; Cava, Robert J.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Princeton University Collaboration; Sequoia Team

    2014-03-01

    For the last half-century VO2 has been viewed as an archetypal system for studying the metal-insulator transition (MIT). Moreover, there is currently intense interest in this material arising from its promising use in fast energy efficient electronic devices. There are key unresolved issues connected with the origin of the MIT, including the role of magnetism arising from the S =1/2 V4+ ions. It is known that below 340 K in undoped VO2 the V ions form structural dimers in the insulating M1 monoclinic phase. Here we report the results of new inelastic neutron scattering measurements of VO2 and V0.75Mo0.25O2. Using the SEQUOIA chopper spectrometer at the SNS possible lattice and magnetic excitations for energies up to 600 meV were investigated. We discuss the results in the context of current ideas concerning the MIT in VO2. The research at ORNL is supported by the DOE BES, Division of Scientific User Facilities. Work at Princeton University is supported by the DOE grant number DE-FG02-98ER45706.

  15. Neutron scattering study of the freezing of water near a cupric oxide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J.; Buck, Z. N.; Zhang, F. Z.; Chen, T.; Winholtz, R. A.; Kaiser, H.; Ma, H. B.; Taub, H.; Tyagi, M.

    Oscillating heat pipes (OHP) offer promising two-phase heat transfer for a variety of applications, including cooling of electronic devices.2 Recently, it has been shown that a hydrophilic CuO coating on either the evaporator or condenser sections of a flat-plate OHP can significantly enhance its thermal performance.3 This finding has motivated us to assess the strength of the CuO/H2O interaction by investigating the freezing behavior of H2O in proximity to a CuO surface. Using the High-Flux Backscattering Spectrometer at NIST, we have measured the intensity of neutrons scattered elastically from a well-hydrated sample of CuO-coated Cu foils that mimic the oxide surfaces in a flat-plate OHP. We observe abrupt freezing of bulk-like H2O above the CuO surface at 270 K followed by continuous freezing of the interfacial H2O down to 265 K. This freezing behavior is qualitatively similar to that found for water near a zwitterionic single-supported bilayer lipid membrane.3 Further studies are planned to compare the diffusion coefficients of the interfacial water for the coated and uncoated OHPs.22F.Z. Zhang et al., submitted to J. Heat Transfer. 3M. Bai et al., Europhys. Lett. 98, 48006 (2012); Miskowiec et al., Europhys. Lett. 107, 28008 (2014). Supported by NSF Grant Nos. DMR-0944772 and DGE-1069091.

  16. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei far from stability at TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The ISOL facility, TRISTAN, is a user facility located at Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor. Short-lived, neutron-rich nuclei, far from stability, are produced by thermal neutron fission of /sup 235/U. An extensive array of experimental end stations are available for nuclear structure studies. These studies are augmented by a variety of long-lived ion sources suitable for use at a reactor facility. Some recent results at TRISTAN are presented as examples of using an ISOL facility to study series of nuclei, whereby an effective means of conducting nuclear structure investigations is available.

  17. A feasibility study of a deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based boron neutron capture therapy system for treatment of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Mindy; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Poulson, Jean M; Nie, Linda H

    2017-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that uses high LET particles to achieve tumor cell killing. Deuterium-deuterium (DD) compact neutron generators have advantages over nuclear reactors and large accelerators as the BNCT neutron source, such as their compact size, low cost, and relatively easy installation. The purpose of this study is to design a beam shaping assembly (BSA) for a DD neutron generator and assess the potential of a DD-based BNCT system using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The MC model consisted of a head phantom, a DD neutron source, and a BSA. The head phantom had tally cylinders along the centerline for computing neutron and photon fluences and calculating the dose as a function of depth. The head phantom was placed at 4 cm from the BSA. The neutron source was modeled to resemble the source of our current DD neutron generator. A BSA was designed to moderate and shape the 2.45-MeV DD neutrons to the epithermal (0.5 eV to 10 keV) range. The BSA had multiple components, including moderator, reflector, collimator, and filter. Various materials and configurations were tested for each component. Each BSA layout was assessed in terms of the in-air and in-phantom parameters. The maximum brain dose was limited to 12.5 Gray-Equivalent (Gy-Eq) and the skin dose to 18 Gy-Eq. The optimized BSA configuration included 30 cm of lead for reflector, 45 cm of LiF, and 10 cm of MgF2 for moderator, 10 cm of lead for collimator, and 0.1 mm of cadmium for thermal neutron filter. Epithermal flux at the beam aperture was 1.0 × 10(5)  nepi /cm(2) -s; thermal-to-epithermal neutron ratio was 0.05; fast neutron dose per epithermal was 5.5 × 10(-13)  Gy-cm(2) /φepi , and photon dose per epithermal was 2.4 × 10(-13)  Gy-cm(2) /φepi . The AD, AR, and the advantage depth dose rate were 12.1 cm, 3.7, and 3.2 × 10(-3)  cGy-Eq/min, respectively. The maximum skin dose was 0.56 Gy-Eq. The DD neutron yield that is needed to

  18. A Multi-layered target for the Study of Neutron-Unbound Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, Paul; Frank, Nathan; Thoennessen, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The MoNA/LISA setup at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University has provided an avenue to study the nuclear structure of unbound states/nuclei at and beyond the neutron drip line for the past decade using secondary beams from the Coupled Cyclotron Facility. A new multi-layered Si/Be active target is planned to be built to specifically study neutron unbound nuclei. In these experiments the decay energy is reconstructed from fragment-neutron coincidence measurements which are typically low in count rate. The multi-layered target will allow the use of thicker targets to increase the reaction rates, thus enabling to study currently out of reach nuclei such as 21C, 23C, and 24N. A description of the new setup and physics impact will be discussed.

  19. High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction Studies for Materials Sciences and Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Los Alamos High Pressure Materials Research Team

    2013-05-01

    The development of neutron diffraction under extreme pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions is highly valuable to condensed matter physics, crystal chemistry, materials sciences, as well as earth and planetary sciences. We have incorporated a 500-ton press TAP-98 into the HiPPO diffractometer at LANSCE to conduct in situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments. We have worked out a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP, to conduct neutron diffraction experiments at high-P and low-T. The ZAP cell can be used to integrate multiple experimental techniques such as neutron diffraction, laser spectroscopy, and ultrasonic interferometery. Recently, we have developed high-P low-T gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments. These techniques enable in-situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes and allow high-resolution time-dependent determination of changes in crystal structure and related reaction kinetics. We have successfully used these techniques to study the equation of state, structural phase transition, and thermo-mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, and minerals. We have conducted researches on the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, and hydrogen adsorption of the inclusion compounds such as the recently discovered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The aim of our research is to accurately map phase diagram, lattice parameters, thermal parameters, bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. We are currently developing further high P-T technology with a new "true" triaxial loading press, TAP_6x, to compress cubic sample package to achieve pressures up to 20 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K in routine experiments. The implementation of TAP_6x300 with high-pressure neutron beamlines is underway for simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction, ultrasonic, calorimetry, radiography, and tomography studies. Studies based on high

  20. Study of a Li doped CsI scintillator crystal as a neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi Filho, T.; Pereira, M. C. C.; Berretta, J. R.; Cárdenas, J. P. N.

    2015-07-01

    The radiation monitoring system is an important requirement in the premises of a nuclear reactor. A variety of types of radiation (neutrons. gamma. beta and fission products) exist in a reactor. associated to the broad energy spectrum of these radiations. implying the need of detectors to be used in the reactor system and security. as well as radiation monitoring. As the neutron sources are associated to gamma radiation. it is necessary that the neutron detecting system may be capable to discriminate the gamma interference. In our work environment. there are two Nuclear Research Reactors and a neutron irradiator with two AmBe sources (592GBq of Am. each). These conditions warrant the development of new types of detectors. Due to the absence of charge in the neutron. it is necessary to use a converter material that generates radiations capable to produce signals in the detector. Materials with high cross section. like Li or B. are used for this purpose. The CsIcrystal doped with 6Li has been studied. The concentration of the lithium doping element (Li) studied was 10-3M. The detector test was done using an AmBe source (37GBq) and gamma sources. The crystal was coupled to a photomultiplier.

  1. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    covered, particularly as a compendium of papers on spectrometry for radiation protection has been published relatively recently [1]. The CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA), whereby national measurement standards and certificates issued by different national metrology institutes (NMIs) can be recognized internationally, is covered only briefly, although the key comparisons which underpin the CIPM MRA are highlighted. The papers included in this issue concentrate on the primary physical quantities—neutron source emission rate and neutron fluence, papers on the latter quantity covering the wide range of neutron energies for which standards are required. Neutron cross sections are fundamental to neutron physics and their importance in neutron metrology is also covered. A large amount of work by acknowledged experts in neutron metrology has gone into the preparation of this special issue and we are indebted to them for their time and effort. The list of contributors begins with the authors of the papers but also includes the referees who provided invisible but invaluable input. We are grateful for the support and encouragement of Professor Georgio Moscati, president of the CCRI when the work was proposed, Dr Kim Carneiro the current president, and Dr Penny Allisy-Roberts the executive secretary of the CCRI. When this work was first proposed a list of potential topics was drawn up by the then chairman of Section (III) Dr Horst Klein. It is a measure of his insight and knowledge of the field that the resulting document matches almost exactly the original plan he drew up. This special issue is thus a tribute to his very extensive contribution to the field. We sincerely hope its contents provide an accurate picture of the present state of neutron metrology in view of Dr Klein's conviction of the importance in metrology of getting things right. Reference [1] Thomas D J and Klein H (ed) 2003 Neutron and photon spectrometry techniques for radiation protection Radiat

  2. Small angle neutron scattering studies of vesicle stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, J.T.; Hjelm, R.P.

    1997-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate the structure of mixed colloids of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) with the bile salt, cholylglycine (CG), in D{sub 2}O as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). At atmospheric pressure, the system forms an isotropic phase of mixed, single bilayer vesicles (SLV`s). Increasing the external hydrostatic pressure brought about significant changes in particle morphology. At T = 25 C, application of a pressure of 3.5 MPa resulted in the collapse of the SLV`s. Further increase of P, up to 51.8 MPa, resulted in a transition from a phase of ordered (stacked), collapsed vesicles to one of stacked, ribbon-like particles. A similar collapse of the vesicles was observed at higher temperature (T = 37 C) with increasing P, but at this temperature, no ribbon phase was found at the highest pressure explored.

  3. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  4. Powder neutron diffraction studies of a carbonate fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Leventouri, Th.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Moghaddam, H. Y.; Perdikatsis, V.

    2000-02-01

    Atomic positional disorder of a single-phase natural carbonate fluorapatite (francolite) is revealed from analysis of the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) refined from neutron powder diffraction data as a function of temperature and carbonate content. The ADPs of the francolite show a strong disturbance at the P, O3, and F sites. When it is heat treated to partially or completely remove the carbonate, the ADPs as well as the other structural parameters resemble those of a fluorapatite (Harding pegmatite) that was measured under the same conditions. The various structural changes are consistent with a substitution mechanism whereby the planar carbonate group replaces a phosphate group and lies on the mirror plane of the apatite structure. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society.

  5. Radiation damage study using small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rétfalvi, E.; Török, Gy; Rosta, L.

    2000-03-01

    Nuclear radiation provides important changes in the microstructure of metallic components of nuclear power plant and research reactors, influencing their mechanical properties. The investigation of this problem has primary interest for the safety and life-time of such nuclear installations. For the characterization of this kind of nanostructures small angle neutron scattering technique is a very useful tool. We have carried out experiments on samples of irradiated reactor vessel material and welded components of VVER-440-type reactors on the SANS instrument at the Budapest Research Reactor. In our measurements irradiated as well as non-irradiated samples were compared and magnetic field was applied for viewing the magnetic structure effects of the materials. A clear modification of the structure due to irradiation was obtained. Our data were analyzed by the ITP92 code, the inverse Fourier transform program of O. Glatter [1].

  6. Error-disturbance uncertainty relations studied in neutron optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponar, Stephan; Sulyok, Georg; Demirel, Bulent; Hasegawa, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is probably the most famous statement of quantum physics and its essential aspects are well described by a formulations in terms of standard deviations. However, a naive Heisenberg-type error-disturbance relation is not valid. An alternative universally valid relation was derived by Ozawa in 2003. Though universally valid Ozawa's relation is not optimal. Recently, Branciard has derived a tight error-disturbance uncertainty relation (EDUR), describing the optimal trade-off between error and disturbance. Here, we report a neutron-optical experiment that records the error of a spin-component measurement, as well as the disturbance caused on another spin-component to test EDURs. We demonstrate that Heisenberg's original EDUR is violated, and the Ozawa's and Branciard's EDURs are valid in a wide range of experimental parameters, applying a new measurement procedure referred to as two-state method.

  7. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of water confined in carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Chathoth, S. M.; Mamontov, E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Gogotsi, Y.; Wesolowski, D. J.

    2011-07-26

    Microscopic dynamics of water confined in nanometer and sub-nanometer pores of carbide-derived carbon (CDC) were investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The temperature dependence of the average relaxation time, ‹τ›, exhibits super-Arrhenius behavior that could be described by Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) law in the range from 250 K to 190 K; below this temperature, ‹τ› follows Arrhenius temperature dependence. The temperature of the dynamic crossover between the two regimes in water confined in the CDC pores is similar to that observed for water in hydrophobic confinement of the larger size, such as 14 Å ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK) and 16 Å double-wall carbon nanotubes. Thus, the dynamical behavior of water remains qualitatively unchanged even in the very small hydrophobic pores.

  8. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of water confined in carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Mavila Chathoth, Suresh; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Wesolowski, David J

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic dynamics of water confined in nanometer and sub-nanometer pores of carbide-derived carbon (CDC) were investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The temperature dependence of the average relaxation time, {tau}, exhibits super-Arrhenius behavior that could be described by Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) law in the range from 250 K to 190 K; below this temperature, {tau} follows Arrhenius temperature dependence. The temperature of the dynamic crossover between the two regimes in water confined in the CDC pores is similar to that observed for water in hydrophobic confinement of the larger size, such as 14 {angstrom} ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK) and 16 {angstrom} double-wall carbon nanotubes. Thus, the dynamical behavior of water remains qualitatively unchanged even in the very small hydrophobic pores.

  9. Study on induced radioactivity of China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Biao; Wang, Qing-Bin; Wu, Jing-Min; Ma, Zhong-Jian

    2011-06-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is the first High Energy Intense Proton Accelerator planned to be constructed in China during the State Eleventh Five-Year Plan period, whose induced radioactivity is very important for occupational disease hazard assessment and environmental impact assessment. Adopting the FLUKA code, the authors have constructed a cylinder-tunnel geometric model and a line-source sampling physical model, deduced proper formulas to calculate air activation, and analyzed various issues with regard to the activation of different tunnel parts. The results show that the environmental impact resulting from induced activation is negligible, whereas the residual radiation in the tunnels has a great influence on maintenance personnel, so strict measures should be adopted.

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering study of polymeric micellar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Chu, B. ); Schneider, D.K. )

    1994-11-17

    Polymeric micellar structures formed by a PEO-PPO-PEO copolymer in o-xylene in the presence of water were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. In order to reveal the detailed micellar structure, different contrasts among the micellar core, the micellar shell, and the dispersing medium (background) were constructed by selectively changing the protonated/deuterated combination of water and xylene. The micellar structure could be well described by a core-shell structure with the scattering behavior of the micellar shell being very similar to that of a star polymer. The solubilized water existed not only in the micellar core but also in the micellar shell. The volume fraction of a copolymer segments in the micellar shell was rather low, being of the order of 0.2. There seemed to be no sharp interface between the micellar core and the micellar shell. 25 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Fast Neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.; Spencer, J.; Wolf, Z.; Baldwin, A.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.; /UC, Davis

    2005-05-17

    Many materials and electronics need to be tested for the radiation environment expected at linear colliders (LC) since both accelerator and detectors will be subjected to large fluences of hadrons, leptons and {gamma}'s over the life of the facility [1]. While the linacs will be superconducting, there are still many uses for NdFeB in the damping rings, injection and extraction lines and final focus. Our understanding of the situation for rare earth, permanent magnet materials was presented at PAC03 [2]. Our first measurements of fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC Davis McClellan Nuclear Reactor Center (UCD MNRC) were presented at EPAC04 [3]. We have extended the doses, included other manufacturer's samples, and measured induced radioactivities which are discussed in detail.

  12. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR).

    SciTech Connect

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-01-14

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two possible LEU cores were identified that would provide nearly the same neutron flux and spectrum as the present HEU core at irradiation facilities that are used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and for animal research. One core has 17 and the other has 18 LEU MTR-type fuel assemblies with uranium densities of 2.5g U/cm{sup 3} or less in the fuel meat. This LEU fuel is fully-qualified for routine use. Thermal hydraulics and safety analyses need to be performed to complete the feasibility study.

  13. Studies of Neutron and Proton Nuclear Activation in Low-Earth Orbit 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The study of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit reported in NASA CR-162051 has been continued with increasing emphasis given to primary and secondary neutron activation. The previously reported activation due to protons has been modified to include: (1) flux attenuation caused by all inelastic reactions; (2) the modification of the proton flux distribution caused by sample covering material; and (3) the activation of the sample as a function of the distance into the sample from the surface of incidence. A method has been developed for including the effects on the activation of the finite width and length of the samples. The reactant product spectra produced by proton-induced reactions has been studied. Cross sections needed for neutron induced reactions leading to long-lived (half-life 1 day) radioisotopes have been identified and, in some cases, compiled.

  14. Neutronic studies on decoupled hydrogen moderator for a short-pulse spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kai, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2005-02-01

    Neutronic studies of decoupled hydrogen moderators were performed by calculations taking into account para hydrogen content, decoupling energy, moderator dimensions/shapes and reflector material. Low-energy parts of calculated spectral intensities with different para hydrogen contents were analyzed by a modified Maxwell function to characterize neutron spectra. The result shows that a 100% para hydrogen moderator gives the highest pulse peak intensity together with the narrowest pulse width and the shortest decay times. Pulse broadening with a reflector was explained by time distributions of source neutrons entering into the moderator through a decoupler. Material dependence of time distribution was studied. A decoupling energy higher than 1 eV does not bring about a large improvement in pulse widths and decay times, even at a large penalty in the peak intensity. The optimal moderator thickness was also discussed for a rectangular parallelepipe-shaped and a canteen-shaped moderator.

  15. Neutronics assessment for the ARIES advanced reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    El-Guebaly, L.A.

    1994-12-31

    To enhance the attractiveness of fusion reactors as a clean and safe source of energy, several recent tokamak designs have incorporated the environmental and safety constraints in the design from the beginning. As such, limitations have been imposed on the type of materials that can be used in the design and the potential of low neutron yield fuel cycles (like D-{sup 3}He) to fulfill the safety goals was investigated. Over the past 5 years, several designs have emerged highlighting the safety and environmental features of tokamaks. Theses designs are the ARIES (I,II,III and IV) and PULSAR (I and II) series. PULSAR designs are pulsed versions of ARIES-II and IV. All designs employ D-T fuel cycles except ARIES-III which is D-{sup 3}He fueled. Low activation materials such as SiC/SiC composites, vanadium alloys, and modified HT-9 ferritic steel were utilized as the main structural materials. Neutronics related issues were assessed for these designs. These include breeding capability of blankets, radiation damage to structural components, and shielding requirements. The D-T fueled designs need a blanket to breed tritium (T). The breeder of choice is ceramics for ARIES-I and IV and liquid metal for ARIES-II. ARIES-III employs pure shield to protect the magnets with no need for breeding blanket. It appears that the Li{sub 2}O breeder requires beryllium multiplier to achieve tritium self-sufficiency in the ARIES-IV design while the lithium has the ability to breed sufficient T in ARIES-II without multiplier. An overall tritium breeder ratio of 1.12 seems adequate for ARIES-II/IV. The 12% excess breeding is necessary to account for uncertainties in cross section data and to supply the T inventory for startup of new reactors.

  16. Neutron and light scattering studies of light-harvesting photosynthetic antenna complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-06-28

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been employed in studying the structural information of various biological systems, particularly in systems without high-resolution structural information available. In this report, we briefly present some principles and biological applications of neutron scattering and DLS, compare the differences in information that can be obtained with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and then report recent studies of SANS and DLS, together with other biophysical approaches, for light-harvesting antenna complexes and reaction centers of purple and green phototrophic bacteria.

  17. Background Studies at the Spallation Neutron Source for the COHERENT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Matthew; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The COHERENT experiment is attempting a first measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab. CEvNS is a standard model process that is important in understanding supernova neutrinos, the structure of the weak interaction, and as a background for dark matter searches. COHERENT is placing a suite of four detector technologies in a basement location at the SNS: point contact germanium detectors, CsI[Na] crystals, NaI[Tl] crystals, and single phase liquid argon. Previous attempts to measure the CEvNS process have grappled with very high rates of backgrounds due to the low energy thresholds required. Accelerator-correlated neutrons are the most troublesome background for COHERENT because a simple accelerator on/off background subtraction procedure fails to remove them. To understand these backgrounds, COHERENT features measurements from the SciBath detector and the Sandia Neutron Scatter Camera (NSC). Important neutron measurements from both SciBath and the NSC, as well as gamma measurements from the SNS basement location where the four detector technologies for COHERENT will be placed will be discussed. COHERENT collaborators are supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science, the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Sloan Foundation.

  18. Design studies related to an in vivo neutron activation analysis facility for measuring total body nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Stamatelatos, I E; Chettle, D R; Green, S; Scott, M C

    1992-08-01

    Design studies relating to an in vivo prompt capture neutron activation analysis facility measuring total body nitrogen are presented. The basis of the design is a beryllium-graphite neutron collimator and reflector configuration for (alpha, n) type radionuclide neutron sources (238PuBe or 241AmBe), so as to reflect leaking, or out-scattered, neutrons towards the subject. This improves the ratio of thermal neutron flux to dose and the spatial distribution of thermal flux achieved with these sources, whilst retaining their advantage of long half-lives as compared to 252Cf based systems. The common problem of high count-rate at the detector, and therefore high nitrogen region of interest background due to pile-up, is decreased by using a set of smaller (5.1 cm diameter x 10.2 cm long) NaI(Tl) detectors instead of large ones. The facility described presents a relative error of nitrogen measurement of 3.6% and a nitrogen to background ratio of 2.3 for 0.45 mSv skin dose (assuming ten 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm NaI(Tl) detectors).

  19. A study on artificial rare earth (RE2O3) based neutron absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-O; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2015-11-01

    A new concept of a neutron absorption material (i.e., an artificial rare earth compound) was introduced for criticality control in a spent fuel storage system. In particular, spent nuclear fuels were considered as a potential source of rare earth elements because the nuclear fission of uranium produces a full range of nuclides. It was also found that an artificial rare earth compound (RE2O3) as a High-Level Waste (HLW) was naturally extracted from pyroprocessing technology developed for recovering uranium and transuranic elements (TRU) from spent fuels. In this study, various characteristics (e.g., activity, neutron absorption cross-section) were analyzed for validating the application possibility of this waste compound as a neutron absorption material. As a result, the artificial rare earth compound had a higher neutron absorption probability in the entire energy range, and it can be used for maintaining sub-criticality for more than 40 years on the basis of the neutron absorption capability of Boral™. Therefore, this approach is expected to vastly improve the efficiency of radioactive waste management by simultaneously keeping HLW and spent nuclear fuel in a restricted space.

  20. Response of the central nervous system to fractionated boron neutron capture irradiation: studies with borocaptate sodium.

    PubMed

    Morris, G M; Coderre, J A; Hopewell, J W; Rezvani, M; Micca, P L; Fisher, C D

    1997-02-01

    The response of the central nervous system (CNS) to fractionated doses of boron neutron capture (BNC) irradiation was assessed using a rat spinal cord model. The thermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) was used for the spinal cord irradiations, with borocaptate sodium (BSH) as the neutron capture agent. Irradiations were given as a single dose or as two or four equal fractions. The ED50 for radiation-induced myeloparesis, as indicated by limb paralysis within 7 months, after a single exposure to thermal neutrons in the presence of BSH (blood boron-10 content approximately 70 micrograms/g) was 27.2 +/- 0.9 Gy. This was expressed as the total physical dose to the blood. Dividing the radiation dose into two consecutive daily fractions or four fractions given over 1 week, resulted in ED50 = 32.0 +/- 1.4 and 31.5 +/- 0.4 Gy respectively. Although there was no significant dose sparing in moving from two to four fractions, there was a dose increment of approximately 17% as compared with single-dose irradiation. The variation in the relative biological effectiveness of the thermal neutron beam, with dose per fraction, was established using data from a previous study with single and fractionated doses of thermal neutrons in the absence of a neutron capture agent. This varied from 1.40 to 3.74 for thermal neutron dose per fraction in the range 13.6-1.5 Gy. Previously published CBE factors for both BSH and BPA have been recalculated in the present report to take into account the change in the RBE of the thermal neutron beam with dose. In all cases the recalculated CBE factors were lower than those obtained previously. Values for this parameter increased with fraction number. In the case of BSH, the CBE factor increased from 0.36 +/- 0.03 after a single-dose to 0.51 +/- 0.06 after four fractions.

  1. Hydration dependent studies of highly aligned multilayer lipid membranes by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, Marcus; Gutberlet, Thomas; Juranyi, Fanni; Unruh, Tobias; Demé, Bruno; Tehei, Moeava; Peters, Judith

    2010-10-01

    We investigated molecular motions on a picosecond timescale of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) model membranes as a function of hydration by using elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering. Two different hydrations corresponding to approximately nine and twelve water molecules per lipid were studied, the latter being the fully hydrated state. In our study, we focused on head group motions by using chain deuterated lipids. Information on in-plane and out-of-plane motions could be extracted by using solid supported DMPC multilayers. Our studies confirm and complete former investigations by König et al. [J. Phys. II (France) 2, 1589 (1992)] and Rheinstädter et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 248106 (2008)] who described the dynamics of lipid membranes, but did not explore the influence of hydration on the head group dynamics as presented here. From the elastic data, a clear shift of the main phase transition from the Pβ ripple phase to the Lα liquid phase was observed. Decreasing water content moves the transition temperature to higher temperatures. The quasielastic data permit a closer investigation of the different types of head group motion of the two samples. Two different models are needed to fit the elastic incoherent structure factor and corresponding radii were calculated. The presented data show the strong influence hydration has on the head group mobility of DMPC.

  2. Hydration dependent studies of highly aligned multilayer lipid membranes by neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Marcus; Gutberlet, Thomas; Juranyi, Fanni; Unruh, Tobias; Demé, Bruno; Tehei, Moeava; Peters, Judith

    2010-10-28

    We investigated molecular motions on a picosecond timescale of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) model membranes as a function of hydration by using elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering. Two different hydrations corresponding to approximately nine and twelve water molecules per lipid were studied, the latter being the fully hydrated state. In our study, we focused on head group motions by using chain deuterated lipids. Information on in-plane and out-of-plane motions could be extracted by using solid supported DMPC multilayers. Our studies confirm and complete former investigations by König et al. [J. Phys. II (France) 2, 1589 (1992)] and Rheinstädter et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 248106 (2008)] who described the dynamics of lipid membranes, but did not explore the influence of hydration on the head group dynamics as presented here. From the elastic data, a clear shift of the main phase transition from the P(β) ripple phase to the L(α) liquid phase was observed. Decreasing water content moves the transition temperature to higher temperatures. The quasielastic data permit a closer investigation of the different types of head group motion of the two samples. Two different models are needed to fit the elastic incoherent structure factor and corresponding radii were calculated. The presented data show the strong influence hydration has on the head group mobility of DMPC.

  3. Study of the magnetic structure of multilayers and of an ultracold neutron storage anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, Dmitry

    This thesis describes the results of polarized neutron reflectometry experiments with spin-valve samples performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD). The study was motivated by the strong technological interest in spin-valve structures exhibiting the effect of giant magnetoresistance. This phenomenon has been widely utilized in a new generation of magnetoresistive memory, reading heads for magnetic disk drives, and field sensors. The study showed that the interfacial roughness strongly depends on the conditions of sample preparation. We have also observed a non-collinear coupling of magnetization between the ferromagnetic layers of the spin-valve samples. The signs of the coupling constants were determined from the neutron reflectometry data using a minimum energy model for the relative orientations of magnetization. The results are consistent with the theoretical values obtained from the RKKY model of oscillatory exchange coupling. We also present the results of specific ultracold neutron (UCN) storage experiments performed at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France). We investigated certain anomalous features of UCN storage. The UCN were filled into a container whose walls were coated by a good neutron reflector (Fomblin grease). Then the neutrons were quickly removed by an absorber, until their residual density in the trap was measured to be negligible. Nevertheless, when the absorber was withdrawn, a measurable number of neutrons emerged from the trap. We have also found that application of a magnetic field gradient at the trap bottom as well as replacement of some Fomblin grease by liquid Fornblin oil gave rise to alterations of UCN count rate. These surprising phenomena are not well understood so far and require further experimental study.

  4. Study for Improvement of VVER-440 Reactor Vessel Neutron Fluence Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, K.; Belousov, S.

    2003-06-01

    A study of the influence of the multigroup representation of the neutron cross sections for the purpose of improving the VVER-440 reactor vessel fluence determination was carried out. To assess this influence a comparison of calculational results obtained on the base of the DORT Discrete Ordinates' code and the multigroup cross-section library BGL440, and results obtained by the MCNP Monte Carlo code and the continuous representation of neutron cross sections was carried out. The MCNP results for the fluence onto the vessel, after neutron transmission through the downcomer, in direction of maximum exposure were about 8% higher than the DORT ones. The results for the flux attenuation through the vessel were practically consistent between the two methods.

  5. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makishima, K.

    2016-05-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1?7) × 10^8 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states.

  6. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1-7) × 10(8) T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states.

  7. Neutron reflectivity studies on the DNA adsorption on lipid monolayers at the air liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Jeng, U.-Ser; Torikai, Naoya

    2006-11-01

    In situ neutron reflectivity was used to study the DC-Chol and TC-Chol monolayers at the air-liquid interface in the presence and absence of DNA in the subphase. It was found that the DC-Chol is more effective in adsorbing the DNA than the TC-Chol. It was also found that a compact DNA layer formed beneath the DC-Chol monolayer with a DNA gap spacing around 20 Å and a less compact DNA layer adsorbed to the TC-Chol monolayer with a DNA spacing around 60 Å, as estimated from the determined neutron scattering length density. From the determined neutron scattering length density profiles, the adsorbed DNA somewhat penetrates into the head group region of the charged lipids.

  8. Protein crystallization and initial neutron diffraction studies of the photosystem II subunit PsbO.

    PubMed

    Bommer, Martin; Coates, Leighton; Dau, Holger; Zouni, Athina; Dobbek, Holger

    2017-09-01

    The PsbO protein of photosystem II stabilizes the active-site manganese cluster and is thought to act as a proton antenna. To enable neutron diffraction studies, crystals of the β-barrel core of PsbO were grown in capillaries. The crystals were optimized by screening additives in a counter-diffusion setup in which the protein and reservoir solutions were separated by a 1% agarose plug. Crystals were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Initial neutron diffraction data were collected from a 0.25 mm(3) crystal at room temperature using the MaNDi single-crystal diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    MAKISHIMA, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1–7) × 108 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states. PMID:27169348

  10. Mössbauer studies of hemoglobin in erythrocytes exposed to neutron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemiec, Katarzyna; Kaczmarska, Magdalena; Buczkowski, Mateusz; Fornal, Maria; Pohorecki, Władysław; Matlak, Krzysztof; Korecki, Józef; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Burda, Kvetoslava

    2012-03-01

    We studied radiation effects on the stability of various states of hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBC) irradiated with a very low dose of neutron rays, 50 μGy. We investigated RBCs isolated from blood of healthy donors. Mössbauer spectroscopy was applied to monitor different forms of Hb. Our results show, for the first time, that oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (DeoxyHb) are two Hb forms sensitive to such a low neutron radiation. Both Hbs change into a new Hb form (Hbirr). Additionally, OxyHb transfers into HbOH/H2O, which under our experimental conditions is resistant to the action of neutron rays.

  11. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis facility for in vivo body composition studies in small animals.

    PubMed

    Stamatelatos, I E; Kasviki, K; Green, S; Gainey, M; Kalef-Ezra, J; Beddoe, A

    2004-05-01

    The design, calibration, dosimetry and performance evaluation of a prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis facility for in vivo body composition studies in small animals (i.e. rats or rabbits) is discussed. The system design was guided by Monte Carlo transport calculations using MCNP-4C code. A system was built and performance evaluation was made using a 185-GBq Pu-Be neutron source. Prompt-gamma rays produced by neutron capture reactions were detected by a combination of a NaI(Tl) scintillation and a HPGe semiconductor detectors. Nitrogen and chlorine were quantified by analysis of the 10.83-MeV and 6.11-MeV peaks, respectively. Appropriate corrections for the animal body size were determined. The facility described allows the in vivo determination of protein and extracellular space in sets of experimental animals.

  12. A study of neutron radiation quality with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter for a low-energy accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Waker, A J

    2011-02-01

    The accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility at McMaster University has been used successfully for the measurement of several minor and trace elements in human hand bones due to their importance to health. Most of these in vivo measurements have been conducted at a proton beam energy (E(p)) of 2.00 MeV to optimise the activation of the selected element of interest with an effective dose of the same order as that received in chest X rays. However, measurement of other elements at the same facility requires beam energies other than 2.00 MeV. The range of energy of neutrons produced at these proton beam energies comes under the region where tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) are known to experience difficulty in assessing the quality factor and dose equivalent. In this study, the response of TEPCs was investigated to determine the quality factor of neutron fields generated via the (7)Li(p, n)(7)Be reaction as a function of E(p) in the range 1.884-2.56 MeV at the position of hand irradiation in the facility. An interesting trend has been observed in the quality factor based on ICRP 60, Q(ICRP60), such that the maximum value was observed at E(p)=1.884 MeV (E(n)=33±16 keV) and then continued to decline with increasing E(p) until achieving a minimum value at E(p)=2.0 MeV despite a continuous increase in the mean neutron energy with E(p). This observation is contrary to what has been observed with direct fast neutrons where the quality factor was found to increase continuously with an increase in E(p) (i.e. increasing E(n)). The series of measurements conducted with thermal and fast neutron fields demonstrate that the (14)N(n, p)(14)C produced 580 keV protons in the detector play an important role in the response of the counter under 2.0 MeV proton energy (E(n) ≤ 250 keV). In contrast to the lower response of TEPCs to low-energy neutrons, the quality factor is overestimated in the range 1-2 depending on beam energy <2.0 MeV. This study provides

  13. Feasibility study on pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Hales, Brian; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Igashira, Masayuki; Khan, Zareen; Kobayashi, Tooru; Matsuhashi, Taihei; Miyazaki, Koichi; Ogawa, Koichi; Terada, Kazushi

    2014-06-01

    The feasibility of a pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was studied. A prototype system was designed and built. Prompt γ-rays from the (10)B(n,α)(7)Li reaction from a phantom irradiated with neutrons were detected with the prototype system. An image was reconstructed from the experimental data. The reconstructed image showed a good separation of the two borated regions in the phantom. The counting rates and signal-to-noise ratio when using the system in actual BNCT applications are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Large sample neutron activation analysis: a challenge in cultural heritage studies.

    PubMed

    Stamatelatos, Ion E; Tzika, Faidra

    2007-07-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis compliments and significantly extends the analytical tools available for cultural heritage and authentication studies providing unique applications of non-destructive, multi-element analysis of materials that are too precious to damage for sampling purposes, representative sampling of heterogeneous materials or even analysis of whole objects. In this work, correction factors for neutron self-shielding, gamma-ray attenuation and volume distribution of the activity in large volume samples composed of iron and ceramic material were derived. Moreover, the effect of inhomogeneity on the accuracy of the technique was examined.

  15. Correlated atomic motions in liquid deuterium fluoride studied by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alonso, F; McLain, S E; Taylor, J W; Bermejo, F J; Bustinduy, I; Ruiz-Martín, M D; Turner, J F C

    2007-06-21

    The collective dynamics of liquid deuterium fluoride are studied by means of high-resolution quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering over a range of four decades in energy transfer. The spectra show a low-energy coherent quasielastic component which arises from correlated stochastic motions as well as a broad inelastic feature originating from overdamped density oscillations. While these results are at variance with previous works which report on the presence of propagating collective modes, they are fully consistent with neutron diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and infrared/Raman experiments on this prototypical hydrogen-bonded fluid.

  16. Study of asymmetric fission yield behavior from neutron-deficient Hg isotope

    SciTech Connect

    Perkasa, Y. S.; Waris, A. Kurniadi, R. Su'ud, Z.

    2014-09-30

    A study of asymmetric fission yield behavior from a neutron-deficient Hg isotope has been conducted. The fission yield calculation of the neutron-deficient Hg isotope using Brownian Metropolis shape had showed unusual result at decreasing energy. In this paper, this interesting feature will be validated by using nine degree of scission shapes parameterization from Brosa model that had been implemented in TALYS nuclear reaction code. This validation is intended to show agreement between both model and the experiment result. The expected result from these models considered to be different due to dynamical properties that implemented in both models.

  17. Neutron Reflectivity as a Tool for Physics-Based Studies of Model Bacterial Membranes.

    PubMed

    Barker, Robert D; McKinley, Laura E; Titmuss, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The principles of neutron reflectivity and its application as a tool to provide structural information at the (sub-) molecular unit length scale from models for bacterial membranes are described. The model membranes can take the form of a monolayer for a single leaflet spread at the air/water interface, or bilayers of increasing complexity at the solid/liquid interface. Solid-supported bilayers constrain the bilayer to 2D but can be used to characterize interactions with antimicrobial peptides and benchmark high throughput lab-based techniques. Floating bilayers allow for membrane fluctuations, making the phase behaviour more representative of native membranes. Bilayers of varying levels of compositional accuracy can now be constructed, facilitating studies with aims that range from characterizing the fundamental physical interactions, through to the characterization of accurate mimetics for the inner and outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Studies of the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with monolayer and bilayer models for the inner and outer membranes have revealed information about the molecular control of the outer membrane permeability, and the mode of interaction of antimicrobials with both inner and outer membranes.

  18. PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, J.J.; Detwiler, C.G. Jr.

    1960-05-24

    A description is given of a personnel neutron dosimeter capable of indicating the complete spectrum of the neutron dose received as well as the dose for each neutron energy range therein. The device consists of three sets of indium foils supported in an aluminum case. The first set consists of three foils of indium, the second set consists of a similar set of indium foils sandwiched between layers of cadmium, whereas the third set is similar to the second set but is sandwiched between layers of polyethylene. By analysis of all the foils the neutron spectrum and the total dose from neutrons of all energy levels can be ascertained.

  19. ANSL-V: ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E. III; Arwood, J.W.; Greene, N.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Waddell, M.W.; Webster, C.C.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Multigroup P3 neutron, P0-P3 secondary gamma ray production (SGRP), and P6 gamma ray interaction (GRI) cross section libraries have been generated to support design work on the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. The libraries, designated ANSL-V (Advanced Neutron Source Cross-Section Libraries), are data bases in a format suitable for subsequent generation of problem dependent cross sections. The ANSL-V libraries are available on magnetic tape from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  20. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Parrot, I. M.; Urban, Volker S; Gardner, K. H.; Forsyth, V. T.

    2005-04-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar{reg_sign} or Twaron{reg_sign}.

  1. Polarized neutron reflectivity study of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFeB/W thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaye, Haile; Zhan, Xiao; Li, Shufa; Lauter, Valeria; Zhu, Tao

    In this work we study the origin of PMA in MgO/CoFeB/W trilayer systems using polarized neutron reflectivity. Recently, the spin Hall effect in the heavy metals, such as Pt and Ta, has been of significant interest for highly efficient magnetization switching of the ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched by such a heavy metal and an oxide, which can be used for spintronic based memory and logic devices. Most work has focused on heavy-metal/ferromagnet/oxide trilayer (HM/FM/MO) structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), where the oxide layer plays the role of breaking inversion symmetry .No PMA was found in W/CoFeB/MgO films. An insertion of Hf layer in between the W and CoFeB layers, however, has been found to create a strong PMA. Roughness and formation of interface alloys by interdiffusion influences the extent of PMA. We intend to identify these influences using the depth sensitive technique of PNR. In our previous study, we have successfully performed polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) measurements on the Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/Ta thin film with MgO thickness of 1 nm. The PNR measurements were carried out using the BL-4A Magnetic Reflectometer at SNS. This work has been supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB933102). Research at SNS was supported by the Office of BES, DOE.

  2. The neutronics studies of fusion fission hybrid power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Youqi; Wu Hongchun; Zu Tiejun; Yang Chao; Cao Liangzhi

    2012-06-19

    In this paper, a series of neutronics analysis of hybrid power reactor is proposed. The ideas of loading different fuels in a modular-type fission blanket is analyzed, fitting different level of fusion developments, i.e., the current experimental power output, the level can be obtained in the coming future and the high-power fusion reactor like ITER. The energy multiplication of fission blankets and tritium breeding ratio are evaluated as the criterion of design. The analysis is implemented based on the D-type simplified model, aiming to find a feasible 1000MWe hybrid power reactor for 5 years' lifetime. Three patterns are analyzed: 1) for the low fusion power, the reprocessed fuel is chosen. The fuel with high plutonium content is loaded to achieve large energy multiplication. 2) For the middle fusion power, the spent fuel from PWRs can be used to realize about 30 times energy multiplication. 3) For the high fusion power, the natural uranium can be directly used and about 10 times energy multiplication can be achieved.

  3. Density functional and neutron diffraction studies of lithium polymer electrolytes.

    SciTech Connect

    Baboul, A. G.

    1998-06-26

    The structure of PEO doped with lithium perchlorate has been determined using neutron diffraction on protonated and deuterated samples. The experiments were done in the liquid state. Preliminary analysis indicates the Li-O distance is about 2.0 {angstrom}. The geometries of a series of gas phase lithium salts [LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}, Li(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}N, Li(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}CH, LiClO{sub 4}, LiPF{sub 6}, LiAsF{sub 6}] used in polymer electrolytes have been optimized at B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional level of theory. All local minima have been identified. For the triflate, imide, methanide, and perchlorate anions, the lithium cation is coordinated to two oxygens and have binding energies of ca 141 kcal/mol at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)/B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. For the hexafluoroarsenate and hexafluorophosphate the lithium cation is coordinated to three oxygens and have binding energies of ca. 136 kcal/mol.

  4. Neutron Studies of Tb2Mo2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Jason; Ehlers, Georg; Diallo, Souleymane Omar

    2012-01-01

    We have used the new high energy resolution spectrometer (BaSiS), at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge, to conclusively prove the existence of a low energy mode at 0.34(1) meV in the spin glass Tb{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This mode is reminiscent of the excitation observed in the ordered phases of both Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The dynamical nature of the transition seen in the magnetization at {approx} 25 K suggests that this frustrated magnet shows a dynamic crossover between a high-temperature phase of poorly correlated, quickly relaxing spins to a low-temperature regime with much slower, short ranged spin correlations extending no further than to the next nearest neighbor. Existing theories explain the spin glass transition in terms of a phase transition and order parameters, and assume the existence of a distinct spin glass phase. There is no evidence for such a phase in Tb{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

  5. Elastic neutron scattering studies at 96 MeV for transmutation.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, M; Blomgren, J; Hayashi, M; Mermod, P; Nilsson, L; Pomp, S; Ohrn, A; Prokofiev, A V; Tippawan, U

    2007-01-01

    Elastic neutron scattering from (12)C, (14)N, (16)O, (28)Si, (40)Ca, (56)Fe, (89)Y and (208)Pb has been studied at 96 MeV in the10-70 degrees interval, using the SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy) facility. The results for (12)C and (208)Pb have recently been published, while the data on the other nuclei are under analysis. The achieved energy resolution, 3.7 MeV, is about an order of magnitude better than for any previous experiment above 65 MeV incident energy. A novel method for normalisation of the absolute scale of the cross section has been used. The estimated normalisation uncertainty, 3%, is unprecedented for a neutron-induced differential cross section measurement on a nuclear target. Elastic neutron scattering is of utmost importance for a vast number of applications. Besides its fundamental importance as a laboratory for tests of isospin dependence in the nucleon-nucleon, and nucleon-nucleus, interaction, knowledge of the optical potentials derived from elastic scattering come into play in virtually every application where a detailed understanding of nuclear processes is important. Applications for these measurements are dose effects due to fast neutrons, including fast neutron therapy, as well as nuclear waste incineration and single event upsets in electronics. The results at light nuclei of medical relevance ((12)C, (14)N and (16)O) are presented separately. In the present contribution, results on the heavier nuclei are presented, among which several are of relevance to shielding of fast neutrons.

  6. Experimental study of neutron-induced soft errors in modern cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Trigano, Alexandre; Hubert, Guillaume; Marfaing, Jannie; Castellani, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Density of circuits and size reduction of microelectronic devices increase the sensitivity to natural terrestrial radiation environment. Atmospheric particles, mainly neutrons can cause non-destructive or destructive failures in most electronic circuits, including volatile static memories. The failure occurrence probability of a soft error in real life is very low. However, in the last few years, a safety alert had to be communicated to the physicians for a few defibrillator models potentially affected by background levels of atmospheric ionizing cosmic radiation. The aim of this study was to test in vitro a variety of currently available pacemakers exposed to experimental neutron irradiation. The neutron irradiation at high flux fast neutron beam was performed using Cyclone facility, with the cyclotron of the University of Leuven, Belgium. The neutron energy spectrum was obtained with a peak around 20 mega-electron volt (MeV) energy range from 3 to 50 MeV, and tests were performed at three fluence levels: 1E9, 5E9, and 1E10 neutrons/cm(2). A total of 14 tests were conducted on 14 devices from four manufacturers. Following the test, the devices were functioning normally in eight cases. In six cases, the response at interrogation was a message on the programmer screen announcing an electrical reset. In all of these cases, the programmer reset command was activated and immediately restored normal functioning and programmability. For a same model, the electrical reset was present at high fluence (1E10 or/and 5E9 n/cm²) and not at the lower level (1E9 n/cm²). Obvious differences among manufacturers were shown in this small sample study. This experiment shows the sensibility of modern pacemakers to neutron-induced soft errors and effectiveness of backup reversion in response to irradiation. The lower neutron fluence associated with a positive test was used to propose the calculation of the very low soft error rate for the tested devices in real-life atmospheric

  7. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of ^{78}Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies.

    PubMed

    Madurga, M; Paulauskas, S V; Grzywacz, R; Miller, D; Bardayan, D W; Batchelder, J C; Brewer, N T; Cizewski, J A; Fijałkowska, A; Gross, C J; Howard, M E; Ilyushkin, S V; Manning, B; Matoš, M; Mendez, A J; Miernik, K; Padgett, S W; Peters, W A; Rasco, B C; Ratkiewicz, A; Rykaczewski, K P; Stracener, D W; Wang, E H; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Zganjar, E F

    2016-08-26

    The β-delayed neutron emission of ^{83,84}Ga isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to ^{78}Ni core-excited states in ^{83,84}Ge favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton fpg_{9/2} and neutron extended fpg_{9/2}+d_{5/2} valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β-decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β-decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β-delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models.

  8. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of 78Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Grzywacz, R.; Miller, D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Fijałkowska, A.; Gross, C. J.; Howard, M. E.; Ilyushkin, S. V.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Padgett, S. W.; Peters, W. A.; Rasco, B. C.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Stracener, D. W.; Wang, E. H.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    The β -delayed neutron emission of Ga,8483 isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to 78Ni core-excited states in Ge,8483 favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton f p g9 /2 and neutron extended f p g9 /2+d5 /2 valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β -decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β -decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β -delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models.

  9. Computational studies of radiation characteristics for U-238 gamma and neutron protection

    SciTech Connect

    Babicheva, T.S.; Vatulin, V.V.; Zhitnik, A.K.

    1993-12-31

    This paper is devoted to predicting the radiation security and nuclear safety of the ZhT-80 container design used to transport 18 WWER-1000 fuel assemblies and is promising in terms of increasing specific loading based on U-238 and hard neutron protection consisting of boron filled organic materials. Studies were carried out using the Monte Carlo Method.

  10. NEUTRONICS STUDIES OF URANIUM-BASED FULLY CERAMIC MICRO-ENCAPSULATED FUEL FOR PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    George, Nathan M; Maldonado, G Ivan; Terrani, Kurt A; Gehin, Jess C; Godfrey, Andrew T

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the core neutronics and fuel cycle characteristics that result from employing uranium-based fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Specific PWR bundle designs with FCM fuel have been developed, which by virtue of their TRISO particle based elements, are expected to safely reach higher fuel burnups while also increasing the tolerance to fuel failures. The SCALE 6.1 code package, developed and maintained at ORNL, was the primary software employed to model these designs. Analysis was performed using the SCALE double-heterogeneous (DH) fuel modeling capabilities. For cases evaluated with the NESTLE full-core three-dimensional nodal simulator, because the feature to perform DH lattice physics branches with the SCALE/TRITON sequence is not yet available, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) method was used as workaround to support the full core analyses. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In addition, a parametric study was performed by varying the various TRISO particle design features; such as kernel diameter, coating layer thicknesses, and packing fractions. Also, other features such as the selection of matrix material (SiC, Zirconium) and fuel rod dimensions were perturbed. After evaluating different uranium-based fuels, the higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, as the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design will need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. Neutronically, the FCM fuel designs evaluated maintain acceptable design features in the areas of fuel lifetime, temperature

  11. Neutron total scattering study of the delta and beta phases of Bi2O3.

    PubMed

    Hull, Stephen; Norberg, Stefan T; Tucker, Matthew G; Eriksson, Sten G; Mohn, Chris E; Stølen, Svein

    2009-10-28

    The highly disordered structure of the delta phase of Bi2O3, which possesses the highest known oxide-ion conductivity, has been studied using neutron powder diffraction. A detailed analysis of data collected at 1033(3) K using Rietveld refinement indicates that the time-averaged structure of delta-Bi2O3 can be described using the accepted model of a disordered, anion-deficient fluorite structure in space group Fm3m. However, reverse Monte Carlo modelling of the total (Bragg plus diffuse) scattering demonstrates that the local anion environment around the Bi3+ resembles the distorted square pyramidal arrangement found within the stable alpha and metastable beta phases at ambient temperature, which is characteristic of the cation's 6s2 lone-pair configuration. Similarities between the structures of the highly disordered delta phase and the ambient temperature metastable beta phase are used to support this assignment and assess the validity of previous structural models based on short-range ordering of vacancies within the cubic lattice of delta-Bi2O3.

  12. Neutron Scattering Study of Magnetic Field Effect on the Stripe Order in LBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Xu, Guangyong; Hücker, Markus; Tranquada, John; Gu, Genda

    2009-03-01

    We have been investigating the relationship of stripe order to high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates. In particular, our neutron scattering results indicate that spin-stripe order is present in La2-xBaxCuO4 (LBCO) over a substantial range of doping about x = 1/8, where the bulk superconductivity is anomalously suppressed. Focusing on the x = 1/8 composition, we have recently studied the impact on stripe order of a magnetic field applied along the c-axis [1]. Applying a field up to 7 T, we observed a small enhancement of the intensity of the incommensurate antiferromagnetic superlattice peaks and a slight increase in the ordering temperature. In measurements of the spin dynamics, the field had no significant impact on the small spin gap (˜ 0.5 meV) found in the ordered phase [2]. [1] Jinsheng Wen et al., arXiv:0810.4085. [2] J.M. Tranquada et al., arXiv:0809.0711. Work supported by Office of Science, U.S. DOE, under Contract No. DEAC02-98CH10886

  13. A trapped-ion technique for beta-delayed neutron studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Shane

    The properties of beta-delayed neutron emission (betan) are important in basic and applied nuclear physics. The neutron spectra and branching ratios of betan emitters reflect the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei. Branching ratios affect the heavy-element abundances resulting from the astrophysical r process. Energy spectra and branching ratios are also important to nuclear stockpile stewardship and the safe design of nuclear reactors. Recently we demonstrated a novel technique for betan spectroscopy using I137+ ions confined to a ˜1 mm 3 volume within a linear RFQ ion trap [61, 77]. By measuring the time-of-flight spectrum of ions recoiling from both beta and betan decays, the betan branching ratio and spectrum can be determined. This recoil-ion technique has several advantages over techniques that rely on neutron detection: the recoil-ions are easily detectable; complications due to scattered neutrons and gamma-rays are avoided; and the betan branching ratio can be extracted in several ways. In this thesis we present new measurements of the delayed-neutron energy spectra and branching ratios of 137I, 135Sb, and 136Sb, which include the first observation of the 136Sb spectrum. These measurements were motivated by the impact that the branching ratios of 135Sb and136Sb can have on the r-process abundances and by the use of 137 I, a well-studied case, as a benchmark for the new technique. Our current understanding of the r process is severely limited by the lack of an exhaustive body of data on neutron-rich nuclei. Relative to the previous demonstration on 137I, the present iteration of the experiment incorporates a 10x improvement in both the detection efficiencies and the beam intensity, as well as a position-sensitive design for the recoil-ion detectors that enables an improvement in energy resolution. An important analytical tool is introduced, which models the evolution of each ion population in the trap and is used to provide a needed

  14. Generation of neutronic thermal data in support of space nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.; Schmidt, E.; Ludewig, H.

    1993-01-01

    The scattering kernel data for [sup 7]LiH have been generated for the first time in the temperature range 50--1000 K. This is based on a phonon distribution function derived from both experimental data and theoretical calculations. A detailed study of the variation of the moderator temperature coefficient [alpha][sub m](T) with temperature, T, is carried out for a typical space nuclear reactor of the particle bed type. It is established that the moderator temperature coefficient due to chemical binding effects follows the relationship [alpha][sub m](T) = C F[sub v](H)[sup 1.6] where F[sub v](H) is the volume fraction of bound solid hydrogen and C is a normalization constant which depends on the moderator capture thermal cross section. The value 1.65 is to be compared with 1.54 [plus minus] 0.06 derived in a previous study where water scattering kernels are applied. For control and safety reasons, a minimization of this positive component temperature coefficient can be most effective by operating the moderator at high temperatures. Advantages of this approach are outlined. In addition, suggestions are made to render the overall temperature coefficient negative.

  15. Generation of neutronic thermal data in support of space nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.; Schmidt, E.; Ludewig, H.

    1993-05-01

    The scattering kernel data for {sup 7}LiH have been generated for the first time in the temperature range 50--1000 K. This is based on a phonon distribution function derived from both experimental data and theoretical calculations. A detailed study of the variation of the moderator temperature coefficient {alpha}{sub m}(T) with temperature, T, is carried out for a typical space nuclear reactor of the particle bed type. It is established that the moderator temperature coefficient due to chemical binding effects follows the relationship {alpha}{sub m}(T) = C F{sub v}(H){sup 1.6} where F{sub v}(H) is the volume fraction of bound solid hydrogen and C is a normalization constant which depends on the moderator capture thermal cross section. The value 1.65 is to be compared with 1.54 {plus_minus} 0.06 derived in a previous study where water scattering kernels are applied. For control and safety reasons, a minimization of this positive component temperature coefficient can be most effective by operating the moderator at high temperatures. Advantages of this approach are outlined. In addition, suggestions are made to render the overall temperature coefficient negative.

  16. Lunar Outpost Life Support Trade Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, Michael; Barta, Daniel J.; Lange, Kevin; Anderson, Molly

    Engineering trade-off studies of life support system architecture and technology options were conducted for potential lunar surface mission scenarios within NASA's Constellation Program. The scenarios investigated are based largely on results of the NASA Lunar Architecture Team (LAT) Phase II study. In particular, the possibility of "Hosted Sortie" missions, the high cost of power during eclipse periods, and the potential to reduce life support consumables through scavenging, in-situ resources, and alternative EVA technologies were all examined. These trade studies were performed within the Systems Integration, Modeling and Analysis (SIMA) element of NASA's Exploration Life Support (ELS) technology development project. The tools and methodology used in the study are described briefly, followed by a discussion of mission scenarios, life support technology options and results presented in terms of "equivalent system mass" for various regenerative life support technologies and architectures. Three classes of repeated or extended lunar surface missions were investigated in this study along with several life support resource scenarios for each mission class. Individual mission durations of 14 days, 90 days and 180 days were considered with 10 missions assumed for each at a rate of 2 missions per year. The 14-day missions represent a class of "Hosted Sortie" missions where a pre-deployed and potentially mobile habitat provides life support for multiple crews at one or more locations. The 90-day and 180-day missions represent lunar outpost expeditions with a larger fixed habitat. The 180-day missions assume continuous human presence and must provide life support through eclipse periods of up to 122 hours while the 90-day missions are planned for best-case periods of nearly continuous sunlight. This paper investigates system optimization within the assumptions of each scenario and addresses how the scenario selected drives the life support system to different designs

  17. Lunar Outpost Life Support Trade Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.; Ewert, Michael K.; Barta, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Engineering trade-off studies of life support system architecture and technology options were conducted for potential lunar surface mission scenarios within NASA's Constellation Program. The scenarios investigated are based largely on results of the NASA Lunar Architecture Team (LAT) Phase II study. In particular, the possibility of Hosted Sortie missions, the high cost of power during eclipse periods, and the potential to reduce life support consumables through scavenging, in-situ resources, and alternative EVA technologies were all examined. These trade studies were performed within the Systems Integration, Modeling and Analysis (SIMA) element of NASA's Exploration Life Support (ELS) technology development project. The tools and methodology used in the study are described briefly, followed by a discussion of mission scenarios, life support technology options and results presented in terms of equivalent system mass for various regenerative life support technologies and architectures. Three classes of repeated or extended lunar surface missions were investigated in this study along with several life support resource scenarios for each mission class. Individual mission durations of 14 days, 90 days and 180 days were considered with 10 missions assumed for each at a rate of 2 missions per year. The 14-day missions represent a class of Hosted Sortie missions where a pre-deployed and potentially mobile habitat provides life support for multiple crews at one or more locations. The 90-day and 180-day missions represent lunar outpost expeditions with a larger fixed habitat. The 180-day missions assume continuous human presence and must provide life support through eclipse periods of up to 122 hours while the 90-day missions are planned for best-case periods of nearly continuous sunlight. This paper investigates system optimization within the assumptions of each scenario and addresses how the scenario selected drives the life support system to different designs

  18. Lunar Outpost Life Support Trade Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.; Ewert, Michael K.; Barta, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Engineering trade-off studies of life support system architecture and technology options were conducted for potential lunar surface mission scenarios within NASA's Constellation Program. The scenarios investigated are based largely on results of the NASA Lunar Architecture Team (LAT) Phase II study. In particular, the possibility of Hosted Sortie missions, the high cost of power during eclipse periods, and the potential to reduce life support consumables through scavenging, in-situ resources, and alternative EVA technologies were all examined. These trade studies were performed within the Systems Integration, Modeling and Analysis (SIMA) element of NASA's Exploration Life Support (ELS) technology development project. The tools and methodology used in the study are described briefly, followed by a discussion of mission scenarios, life support technology options and results presented in terms of equivalent system mass for various regenerative life support technologies and architectures. Three classes of repeated or extended lunar surface missions were investigated in this study along with several life support resource scenarios for each mission class. Individual mission durations of 14 days, 90 days and 180 days were considered with 10 missions assumed for each at a rate of 2 missions per year. The 14-day missions represent a class of Hosted Sortie missions where a pre-deployed and potentially mobile habitat provides life support for multiple crews at one or more locations. The 90-day and 180-day missions represent lunar outpost expeditions with a larger fixed habitat. The 180-day missions assume continuous human presence and must provide life support through eclipse periods of up to 122 hours while the 90-day missions are planned for best-case periods of nearly continuous sunlight. This paper investigates system optimization within the assumptions of each scenario and addresses how the scenario selected drives the life support system to different designs

  19. Event-by-event study of neutron observables in spontaneous and thermal fission

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R; Randrup, J

    2011-09-14

    The event-by-event fission model FREYA is extended to spontaneous fission of actinides and a variety of neutron observables are studied for spontaneous fission and fission induced by thermal neutrons with a view towards possible applications for SNM detection. We have shown that event-by-event models of fission, such as FREYA, provide a powerful tool for studying fission neutron correlations. Our results demonstrate that these correlations are significant and exhibit a dependence on the fissioning nucleus. Since our method is phenomenological in nature, good input data are especially important. Some of the measurements employed in FREYA are rather old and statistics limited. It would be useful to repeat some of these studies with modern detector techniques. In addition, most experiments made to date have not made simultaneous measurements of the fission products and the prompt observables, such as neutron and photons. Such data, while obviously more challenging to obtain, would be valuable for achieving a more complete understanding of the fission process.

  20. Hierarchical Pore Morphology of Cretaceous Shale: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, J.; Melnichenko, Y. B.; Mastalerz, Maria; ...

    2014-09-25

    Shale reservoirs are becoming an increasingly important source of oil and natural gas supply and a potential candidate for CO2 sequestration. Understanding the pore morphology in shale may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient and cost-effective. The porosity of Cretaceous shale samples from Alberta, Canada, collected from different depths with varying mineralogical compositions, has been investigated by small- and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering. Moreover these samples come from the Second White Specks and Belle Fourche formations, and their organic matter content ranges between 2 and 3%. The scattering length density of the shale specimens has been estimated using themore » chemical composition of the different mineral components. Scattering experiments reveal the presence of fractal and non-fractal pores. It has been shown that the porosity and specific surface area are dominated by the contribution from meso- and micropores. The fraction of closed porosity has been calculated by comparing the porosities estimated by He pycnometry and scattering techniques. There is no correlation between total porosity and mineral components, a strong correlation has been observed between closed porosity and major mineral components in the studied specimens.« less

  1. Hierarchical Pore Morphology of Cretaceous Shale: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, J.; Melnichenko, Y. B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Furmann, Agnieszka; Clarkson, Chris R.

    2014-09-25

    Shale reservoirs are becoming an increasingly important source of oil and natural gas supply and a potential candidate for CO2 sequestration. Understanding the pore morphology in shale may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient and cost-effective. The porosity of Cretaceous shale samples from Alberta, Canada, collected from different depths with varying mineralogical compositions, has been investigated by small- and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering. Moreover these samples come from the Second White Specks and Belle Fourche formations, and their organic matter content ranges between 2 and 3%. The scattering length density of the shale specimens has been estimated using the chemical composition of the different mineral components. Scattering experiments reveal the presence of fractal and non-fractal pores. It has been shown that the porosity and specific surface area are dominated by the contribution from meso- and micropores. The fraction of closed porosity has been calculated by comparing the porosities estimated by He pycnometry and scattering techniques. There is no correlation between total porosity and mineral components, a strong correlation has been observed between closed porosity and major mineral components in the studied specimens.

  2. Dynamics of water in prussian blue analogues: Neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V. K.; Mitra, S.; Thakur, N.; Yusuf, S. M.; Mukhopadhyay, R.; Juranyi, Fanni

    2014-07-21

    Dynamics of crystal water in Prussian blue (PB), Fe(III){sub 4}[Fe(II)(CN){sub 6}]{sub 3}.14H{sub 2}O and its analogue Prussian green (PG), ferriferricynaide, Fe(III){sub 4}[Fe(III)(CN){sub 6}]{sub 4}.16H{sub 2}O have been investigated using Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) technique. PB and its analogue compounds are important materials for their various interesting multifunctional properties. It is known that crystal water plays a crucial role towards the multifunctional properties of Prussian blue analogue compounds. Three structurally distinguishable water molecules: (i) coordinated water molecules at empty nitrogen sites, (ii) non-coordinated water molecules in the spherical cavities, and (iii) at interstitial sites exist in PB. Here spherical cavities are created due to the vacant sites of Fe(CN){sub 6} units. However, PG does not have any such vacant N or Fe(CN){sub 6} units, and only one kind of water molecules, exists only at interstitial sites. QENS experiments have been carried out on both the compounds in the temperature range of 260–360 K to elucidate the dynamical behavior of different kinds of water molecules. Dynamics is found to be much more pronounced in case of PB, compared to PG. A detailed data analysis showed that localized translational diffusion model could describe the observed data for both PB and PG systems. The average diffusion coefficient is found to be much larger in the PB than PG. The obtained domain of dynamics is found to be consistent with the geometry of the structure of the two systems. Combining the data of the two systems, a quantitative estimate of the dynamics, corresponding to the water molecules at different locations is made.

  3. Off-axis neutron study from a uniform scanning proton beam using Monte Carlo code FLUKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul

    The production of secondary neutrons is an undesirable byproduct of proton therapy. It is important to quantify the contribution from secondary neutrons to patient dose received outside the treatment volume. The purpose of this study is to investigate the off-axis dose equivalent from secondary neutrons using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code FLUKA. The study is done using a simplified version of the beam delivery system used at ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK. In this study, a particular set of treatment parameters were set to study the dose equivalent outside the treatment volume inside a phantom and in air at various depths and angles with respect to the primary beam axis. Three different proton beams with maximum energies of 78 MeV, 162 MeV and 226 MeV and 4 cm modulation width, a 5 cm diameter brass aperture, and a small snout located 38 cm from isocenter were used for the study. The FLUKA calculated secondary neutron dose equivalent to absorbed proton dose, Hn/Dp, decreased with distance from beam isocenter. The Hn/Dp ranged from 0.11 +/- 0.01 mSv/Gy for a 78 MeV proton beam to 111.01 +/- 1.99 mSv/Gy for a 226 MeV proton beam. Overall, Hn/D p was observed to be higher in air than in the phantom, indicating the predominance of external neutrons produced in the nozzle rather than inside the body.

  4. Preliminary neutronic studies for the liquid-salt-cooled very hightemperature reactor (LS-VHTR).

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Yang, W. S.

    2005-10-05

    Preliminary neutronic studies have been performed in order to provide guidelines to the design of a liquid-salt cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR) using Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (FLiBe) as coolant and a solid cylindrical core. The studies were done using the lattice codes (WIMS8 and DRAGON) and the linear reactivity model to estimate the core reactivity balance, fuel composition, discharge burnup, and reactivity coefficients. An evaluation of the lattice codes revealed that they give very similar accuracy as the Monte Carlo MCNP4C code for the prediction of the fuel element multiplication factor (kinf) and the double heterogeneity effect of the coated fuel particles in the graphite matrix. The loss of coolant from the LS-VHTR core following coolant voiding was found to result in a positive reactivity addition, due primarily to the removal of the strong neutron absorber Li-6. To mitigate this positive reactivity addition and its impact on reactor design (positive void reactivity coefficient), the lithium in the coolant must be enriched to greater than 99.995% in its Li-7 content. For the reference LS-VHTR considered in this work, it was found that the magnitude of the coolant void reactivity coefficient (CVRC) is quite small (less than $1 for 100% voiding). The coefficient was found to become more negative or less positive with increase in the lithium enrichment (Li-7 content). It was also observed that the coefficient is positive at the beginning of cycle and becomes more negative with increasing burnup, indicating that by using more than one fuel batch, the coefficient could be made negative at the beginning of cycle. It might, however, still be necessary at the beginning of life to design for a negative CVRC value. The study shows that this can be done by using burnable poisons (erbium is a leading candidate) or by changing the reference assembly design (channel dimensions) in order to modify the neutron spectrum. Parametric studies have been performed to

  5. Sustaining knowledge in the neutron generator community and benchmarking study. Phase II.

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, Tameka B.; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Cole, Benjamin Holland, II; Baldonado, Esther

    2010-08-01

    This report documents the second phase of work under the Sustainable Knowledge Management (SKM) project for the Neutron Generator organization at Sandia National Laboratories. Previous work under this project is documented in SAND2008-1777, Sustaining Knowledge in the Neutron Generator Community and Benchmarking Study. Knowledge management (KM) systems are necessary to preserve critical knowledge within organizations. A successful KM program should focus on people and the process for sharing, capturing, and applying knowledge. The Neutron Generator organization is developing KM systems to ensure knowledge is not lost. A benchmarking study involving site visits to outside industry plus additional resource research was conducted during this phase of the SKM project. The findings presented in this report are recommendations for making an SKM program successful. The recommendations are activities that promote sharing, capturing, and applying knowledge. The benchmarking effort, including the site visits to Toyota and Halliburton, provided valuable information on how the SEA KM team could incorporate a KM solution for not just the neutron generators (NG) community but the entire laboratory. The laboratory needs a KM program that allows members of the workforce to access, share, analyze, manage, and apply knowledge. KM activities, such as communities of practice (COP) and sharing best practices, provide a solution towards creating an enabling environment for KM. As more and more people leave organizations through retirement and job transfer, the need to preserve knowledge is essential. Creating an environment for the effective use of knowledge is vital to achieving the laboratory's mission.

  6. High-resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zöe; Hoffman, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-06-01

    High-resolution crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin have provided hydrogen-bond parameters of unprecedented accuracy for a biomacromolecule. The hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high-resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of 0.92 Å on the original D19 diffractometer with a prototype 4° × 64° detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue–Langevin. The resulting structure provides hydrogen-bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for the efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultrahigh resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data during commissioning of the TOPAZ diffractometer with a prototype array of 14 modular 2° × 21° detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction study on diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Marc-Michael; Koglin, Alexander; Rüterjans, Heinz; Schoenborn, Benno; Langan, Paul; Chen, Julian C.-H.

    2007-01-01

    Diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) effectively hydrolyzes a number of organophosphorus nerve agents, including sarin, cyclohexylsarin, soman and tabun. Neutron diffraction data have been collected from DFPase crystals to 2.2 Å resolution in an effort to gain further insight into the mechanism of this enzyme. The enzyme diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris is capable of decontaminating a wide variety of toxic organophosphorus nerve agents. DFPase is structurally related to a number of enzymes, such as the medically important paraoxonase (PON). In order to investigate the reaction mechanism of this phosphotriesterase and to elucidate the protonation state of the active-site residues, large-sized crystals of DFPase have been prepared for neutron diffraction studies. Available H atoms have been exchanged through vapour diffusion against D{sub 2}O-containing mother liquor in the capillary. A neutron data set has been collected to 2.2 Å resolution on a relatively small (0.43 mm{sup 3}) crystal at the spallation source in Los Alamos. The sample size and asymmetric unit requirements for the feasibility of neutron diffraction studies are summarized.

  8. Neutron single-particle states above the N=164 subshell in {sub 98}{sup 251}Cf and {sub 96}{sup 249}Cm studied by neutron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Chasman, R. R.

    2009-12-15

    Single-particle state assignments in {sup 251}Cf and {sup 249}Cm at {approx}1 MeV excitation have been deduced from cross sections previously measured for the {sup 250}Cf(d,p){sup 251}Cf and {sup 248}Cm({sup 4}He,{sup 3}He){sup 249}Cm reactions. The assignments are supported by observed cross-section signatures and intraband level spacings. The observed energies of these single-particle states, after pairing effects are removed, are in good agreement with values calculated using a Woods-Saxon single-particle potential. Neutron level diagrams, showing level spacings as a function of {nu}{sub 2},{nu}{sub 4}, and {nu}{sub 6}, are extended to include neutron orbitals above N=164.

  9. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vortex Matter in Type-II Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Xinsheng Ling

    2012-02-02

    The proposed program is an experimental study of the fundamental properties of Abrikosov vortex matter in type-II superconductors. Most superconducting materials used in applications such as MRI are type II and their transport properties are determined by the interplay between random pinning, interaction and thermal fluctuation effects in the vortex state. Given the technological importance of these materials, a fundamental understanding of the vortex matter is necessary. The vortex lines in type-II superconductors also form a useful model system for fundamental studies of a number of important issues in condensed matter physics, such as the presence of a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the presence of random pinning. Recent advances in neutron scattering facilities such as the major upgrade of the NIST cold source and the Spallation Neutron Source are providing unprecedented opportunities in addressing some of the longstanding issues in vortex physics. The core component of the proposed program is to use small angle neutron scattering and Bitter decoration experiments to provide the most stringent test of the Bragg glass theory by measuring the structure factor in both the real and reciprocal spaces. The proposed experiments include a neutron reflectometry experiment to measure the precise Q-dependence of the structure factor of the vortex lattice in the Bragg glass state. A second set of SANS experiments will be on a shear-strained Nb single crystal for testing a recently proposed theory of the stability of Bragg glass. The objective is to artificially create a set of parallel grain boundaries into a Nb single crystal and use SANS to measure the vortex matter diffraction pattern as a function of the changing angle between the applied magnetic field to the grain boundaries. The intrinsic merits of the proposed work are a new fundamental understanding of type-II superconductors on which superconducting technology is based, and a firm understanding of phases

  10. A system of materials composition and geometry arrangement for fast neutron beam thermalization: An MCNP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlář, Radim; Alexa, Petr; Pištora, Jaromír

    2013-03-01

    Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generators emit fast neutrons (14.2 MeV) that have to be thermalized for neutron activation analysis experiments. To maximize thermal neutron flux and minimize epithermal and fast neutron fluxes across the output surface of the neutron generator facility, Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5; Los Alamos National Laboratory) for different moderator types and widths and collimator and reflector designs have been performed. A thin lead layer close to the neutron generator as neutron multiplier followed by polyethylene moderator and surrounded by a massive lead and nickel collimator and reflector was obtained as the optimum setup.

  11. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  12. Studies on depth-dose-distribution controls by deuteration and void formation in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori

    2004-08-07

    Physical studies on (i) replacement of heavy water for body water (deuteration), and (ii) formation of a void in human body (void formation) were performed as control techniques for dose distribution in a human head under neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were performed for a human-head-size cylindrical phantom using a two-dimensional transport calculation code for mono-energetic incidences of higher-energy epi-thermal neutrons (1.2-10 keV), lower-energy epi-thermal neutrons (3.1-23 eV) and thermal neutrons (1 meV to 0.5 eV). The deuteration was confirmed to be effective both in thermal neutron incidence and in epi-thermal neutron incidence from the viewpoints of improvement of the thermal neutron flux distribution and elimination of the secondary gamma rays. For the void formation, a void was assumed to be 4 cm in diameter and 3 cm in depth at the surface part in this study. It was confirmed that the treatable depth was improved almost 2 cm for any incident neutron energy in the case of the 10 cm irradiation field diameter. It was made clear that the improvement effect was larger in isotropic incidence than in parallel incidence, in the case that an irradiation field size was delimited fitting into a void diameter.

  13. Fast neutrons compared with megavoltage x-rays in the treatment of patients with supratentorial glioblastoma: a controlled pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, M.; Bloom, H.J.G.; Ash, D.V.; Walsh, L.; Richardson, A.; Uttley, D.; Gowing, N.F.C.; Lewis, P.; Chaucer, B.

    1980-03-01

    The radioresistance of glioblastoma presumably results from the presence of hypoxic cells. In an attempt to overcome this problem, fast neutrons were compared in a controlled pilot study with conventional megavoltage x-rays (photons). 63 patients entered the study between January, 1973 and July, 1976, 30 patients received neutron and 33 received x-ray therapy. The overall mean survival was 11.4 months for those who received photon and 10 months for those who received neutron therapy. Survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 72 and 36% respectively for photon treated patients, and 77 and 30% for those treated with neutrons. Although neutron therapy did not improve overall survival, examination of the histological material indicated a considerably greater antitumor effect after neutron therapy than after treatment with photons. In the neutron treated group, at post-mortem examination no tumor or only minimal tumor was found in 10 of 12 patients and in one of 4 patients where tissue was obtained from a second craniotomy. In some cases, there was evidence of diffuse damage to normal brain which was in keeping with a clinical syndrome of progressive dementia without localizing signs. Dose, time, and volume factors for neutron therapy to the brain and possible ways of improving results are discussed.

  14. Inverse kinematics (p, n) reactions studies using the WINDS slow neutron detector and the SAMURAI spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, J.; Sasano, M.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Baba, H.; Chao, W.; Dozono, M.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jhang, G.; Kameda, D.; Kubo, T.; Kurata-Nishimura, M.; Milman, E.; Motobayashi, T.; Otsu, H.; Panin, V.; Powell, W.; Sakai, H.; Sako, M.; Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Stuhl, L.; Suzuki, H.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Takeda, H.; Uesaka, T.; Yoneda, K.; Zenihiro, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Sumikama, T.; Tako, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.; Togano, Y.; Shikata, M.; Tsubota, J.; Yako, K.; Shimoura, S.; Ota, S.; Kawase, S.; Kubota, Y.; Takaki, M.; Michimasa, S.; Kisamori, K.; Lee, C. S.; Tokieda, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Koyama, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Wakasa, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Murakami, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Kaneko, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Mucher, D.; Reichert, S.; Bazin, D.; Lee, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined the low-energy neutron detector WINDS (Wide-angle Inverse-kinematics Neutron Detectors for SHARAQ) and the SAMURAI spectrometer at RIKEN Nishina Center RI Beam Factory (RIBF) in order to perform (p, n) reactions in inverse kinematics for unstable nuclei in the mass region around A ∼ 100 . In this setup, WINDS is used for detecting recoil neutrons and the SAMURAI spectrometer is used for tagging decay channel of heavy residue. The first experiment by using the setup was performed to study Gamow-Teller transitions from 132Sn in April 2014. The atomic number Z and mass-to-charge ratio A / Q of the beam residues were determined from the measurements of time of flight, magnetic rigidity and energy loss. The obtained A / Q and Z resolutions were σA/Q = 0.14 % and σZ = 0.22 , respectively. Furthermore, owing to the large momentum acceptance (50 %) of SAMURAI, the beam residues associated with the γ , 1n and 2n decay channel were measured in the same magnetic field setting. The kinematic loci of the measured recoil neutron energy and laboratory angle are clearly seen. It shows that the excitation energy up to about 20 MeV can be reconstructed.

  15. High resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zoe; Hoffmann, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for 0.92 on the original diffractometer D19 with a prototype 4o x 64o detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue Langevin. The resulting structure provides H bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force-fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultra high resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data on diffractometer TOPAZ with a prototype array of 14 modular 21o x 21o detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  16. High-resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin.

    PubMed

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax A; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zöe; Hoffman, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-06-01

    The hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high-resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of 0.92 Å on the original D19 diffractometer with a prototype 4° × 64° detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue-Langevin. The resulting structure provides hydrogen-bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for the efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultrahigh resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data during commissioning of the TOPAZ diffractometer with a prototype array of 14 modular 2° × 21° detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  17. Study on the impact of pair production interaction on D-T controllable neutron density logging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huawei; Zhang, Li; Hou, Boran

    2016-05-01

    This paper considers the effect of pair production on the precision of D-T controllable neutron source density logging. Firstly, the principle of the traditional density logging and pulsed neutron density logging are analyzed and then gamma ray cross sections as a function of energy for various minerals are compared. In addition, the advantageous areas of Compton scattering and pair production interactions on high-energy gamma ray pulse height spectrum and the errors of a controllable source density measurement are studied using a Monte Carlo simulation method. The results indicate that density logging mainly utilizes the Compton scattering of gamma rays, while the attenuation of neutron induced gamma rays and the precision of neutron gamma density measurements are affected by pair production interactions, particularly in the gamma rays with energy higher than 2MeV. By selecting 0.2-2MeV energy range and performing proper lithology correction, the effect of pair production can be eliminated effectively and the density measurement error can be rendered close to the precision of chemical source density logging.

  18. Feasibility study of the neutron dose for real-time image-guided proton therapy: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Sung; Shin, Jung Suk; Kim, Daehyun; Shin, Eunhyuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungkoo; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sanggyu; Chung, Yoonsun; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    Two full rotating gantries with different nozzles (multipurpose nozzle with MLC, scanning dedicated nozzle) for a conventional cyclotron system are installed and being commissioned for various proton treatment options at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The purpose of this study is to use Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, for X-ray imaging equipment under various treatment conditions. At first, we investigated the H/D for various modifications of the beamline devices (scattering, scanning, multi-leaf collimator, aperture, compensator) at the isocenter and at 20, 40 and 60 cm distances from the isocenter, and we compared our results with those of other research groups. Next, we investigated the neutron dose at the X-ray equipment used for real-time imaging under various treatment conditions. Our investigation showed doses of 0.07 ~ 0.19 mSv/Gy at the X-ray imaging equipment, depending on the treatment option and interestingly, the 50% neutron dose reduction was observed due to multileaf collimator during proton scanning treatment with the multipurpose nozzle. In future studies, we plan to measure the neutron dose experimentally and to validate the simulation data for X-ray imaging equipment for use as an additional neutron dose reduction method.

  19. Informing Neutron-Capture Rates through (d,p) Reactions on Neutron-Rich Tin Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, B.; Cizewski, J. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Howard, M. E.; Jones, K. L.; Liang, J. F.; Matos, M.; Nunes, F. M.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M. S.; Titus, L.

    2014-03-01

    Level energies and spectroscopic information for neutron-rich nuclei provide important input for r-process nucleosynthesis calculations; specifically, the location and strength of single-neutron l = 1 states when calculating neutron-capture rates. Surman and collaborators have performed sensitivity studies to show that varying neutron-capture rates can significantly alter final r-process abundances. However, there are many nuclei important to the r-process that cannot be studied. Extending studies to more neutron-rich nuclei will help constrain the nuclear shell-model in extrapolating to nuclei even further from stability. The (d,p) reaction has been measured with radioactive ion beams of 126Sn and 128Sn to complete the set of (d,p) studies on even mass tin isotopes from doubly-magic 132 to stable 124Sn. Work supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  20. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of complex confined fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S. K.

    1999-08-04

    We review recent X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of confined complex fluids. This includes the study of polymer conformations and binary fluid phase transitions in porous media using Small Angle Neutron scattering, and the use of synchrotrons radiation to study ordering and fluctuation phenomena at solid/liquid and liquid/air interfaces. Ordering of liquids near a solid surface or in confinement will be discussed, and the study, via specular and off-specular X-ray reflectivity, of capillary wave fluctuations on liquid polymer films. Finally, we shall discuss the use of high-brilliance beams from X-ray synchrotrons to study via photon correlation spectroscopy the slow dynamics of soft condensed matter systems.

  1. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  2. Internal Molecular Motions of Bacteriorhodopsin: Hydration-Induced Flexibility Studied by Quasielastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering Using Oriented Purple Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitter, J.; Lechner, R. E.; Buldt, G.; Dencher, N. A.

    1996-07-01

    Quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering from hydrogen atoms, which are distributed nearly homogeneously in biological molecules, allows the investigation of diffusive motions occurring on the pico- to nanosecond time scale. A quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering study was performed on the integral membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR), which is a light-driven proton pump in Halobacterium salinarium. BR is embedded in lipids, forming patches in the cell membrane of the organism, which are the so called purple membranes (PMs). Measurements were carried out at room temperature on oriented PM-stacks hydrated at two different levels (low hydration, h = 0.03 g of D2O per g of PM; high hydration, h = 0.28 g of D2O per g of PM) using time-of-flight spectrometers. From the measured spectra, different diffusive components were identified and analyzed with respect to the influence of hydration. This study supports the idea that a decrease in hydration results in an appreciable decrease in internal molecular flexibility of the protein structure. Because it is known from studies on the function of BR that the pump activity is reduced if the hydration level of the protein is insufficient, we conclude that the observed diffusive motions are essential for the function of this protein. A detailed analysis and classification of the different kinds of diffusive motions, predominantly occurring in PMs under physiological conditions, is presented.

  3. Body composition to climate change studies - the many facets of neutron induced prompt gamma-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra,S.

    2008-11-17

    In-vivo body composition analysis of humans and animals and in-situ analysis of soil using fast neutron inelastic scattering and thermal neutron capture induced prompt-gamma rays have been described. By measuring carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O), protein, fat and water are determined. C determination in soil has become important for understanding below ground carbon sequestration process in the light of climate change studies. Various neutron sources ranging from radio isotopic to compact 14 MeV neutron generators employing the associated particle neutron time-of-flight technique or micro-second pulsing were implemented. Gamma spectroscopy using recently developed digital multi-channel analyzers has also been described.

  4. Theoretical study of triaxial shapes of neutron-rich Mo and Ru nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, C. L.; Bhat, G. H.; Nazarewicz, W.; ...

    2015-09-10

    Here, whether atomic nuclei can possess triaxial shapes at their ground states is still a subject of ongoing debate. According to theory, good prospects for low-spin triaxiality are in the neutron-rich Mo-Ru region. Recently, transition quadrupole moments in rotational bands of even-mass neutron-rich isotopes of molybdenum and ruthenium nuclei have been measured. The new data have provided a challenge for theoretical descriptions invoking stable triaxial deformations. The purpose of this study is to understand experimental data on rotational bands in the neutron-rich Mo-Ru region, we carried out theoretical analysis of moments of inertia, shapes, and transition quadrupole moments of neutron-richmore » even-even nuclei around 110Ru using self-consistent mean-field and shell model techniques. Methods: To describe yrast structures in Mo and Ru isotopes, we use nuclear density functional theory (DFT) with the optimized energy density functional UNEDF0. We also apply triaxial projected shell model (TPSM) to describe yrast and positive-parity, near-yrast band structures. As a result, our self-consistent DFT calculations predict triaxial ground-state deformations in 106,108Mo and 108,110,112Ru and reproduce the observed low-frequency behavior of moments of inertia. As the rotational frequency increases, a negative-gamma structure, associated with the aligned ν(h11/2)2 pair, becomes energetically favored. The computed transition quadrupole moments vary with angular momentum, which reflects deformation changes with rotation; those variations are consistent with experiment. The TPSM calculations explain the observed band structures assuming stable triaxial shapes. Lastly, the structure of neutron-rich even-even nuclei around Ru-110 is consistent with triaxial shape deformations. Our DFT and TPSM frameworks provide a consistent and complementary description of experimental data.« less

  5. Theoretical study of triaxial shapes of neutron-rich Mo and Ru nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C. L.; Bhat, G. H.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Shi, Yue

    2015-09-10

    Here, whether atomic nuclei can possess triaxial shapes at their ground states is still a subject of ongoing debate. According to theory, good prospects for low-spin triaxiality are in the neutron-rich Mo-Ru region. Recently, transition quadrupole moments in rotational bands of even-mass neutron-rich isotopes of molybdenum and ruthenium nuclei have been measured. The new data have provided a challenge for theoretical descriptions invoking stable triaxial deformations. The purpose of this study is to understand experimental data on rotational bands in the neutron-rich Mo-Ru region, we carried out theoretical analysis of moments of inertia, shapes, and transition quadrupole moments of neutron-rich even-even nuclei around 110Ru using self-consistent mean-field and shell model techniques. Methods: To describe yrast structures in Mo and Ru isotopes, we use nuclear density functional theory (DFT) with the optimized energy density functional UNEDF0. We also apply triaxial projected shell model (TPSM) to describe yrast and positive-parity, near-yrast band structures. As a result, our self-consistent DFT calculations predict triaxial ground-state deformations in 106,108Mo and 108,110,112Ru and reproduce the observed low-frequency behavior of moments of inertia. As the rotational frequency increases, a negative-gamma structure, associated with the aligned ν(h11/2)2 pair, becomes energetically favored. The computed transition quadrupole moments vary with angular momentum, which reflects deformation changes with rotation; those variations are consistent with experiment. The TPSM calculations explain the observed band structures assuming stable triaxial shapes. Lastly, the structure of neutron-rich even-even nuclei around Ru-110 is consistent with triaxial shape deformations. Our DFT and TPSM frameworks provide a consistent and complementary description of experimental data.

  6. Subaru/HDS study of CH stars: elemental abundances for stellar neutron-capture process studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Aruna; Aoki, Wako; Karinkuzhi, Drisya

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive abundance analysis providing rare insight into the chemical history of lead stars is still lacking. We present results from high-resolution (R ˜ 50 000) spectral analyses of three CH stars, HD 26, HD 198269 and HD 224959, and, a carbon star with a dusty envelope, HD 100764. Previous studies on these objects are limited by both resolution and wavelength regions and the results differ significantly from each other. We have undertaken to reanalyse the chemical composition of these objects based on high-resolution Subaru spectra covering the wavelength regions 4020-6775 Å. Considering local thermodynamic equilibrium and using model atmospheres, we have derived the stellar parameters, the effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, and metallicities [Fe/H] for these objects. The derived parameters for HD 26, HD 100764, HD 198269 and HD 224959 are (5000, 1.6, -1.13), (4750, 2.0 -0.86), (4500, 1.5, -2.06) and (5050, 2.1, -2.44), respectively. The stars are found to exhibit large enhancements of heavy elements relative to iron in conformity to previous studies. Large enhancement of Pb with respect to iron is also confirmed. Updates on the elemental abundances for several s-process elements (Y, Zr, La, Ce, Nd, Sm and Pb) along with the first-time estimates of abundances for a number of other heavy elements (Sr, Ba, Pr, Eu, Er and W) are reported. Our analysis suggests that neutron-capture elements in HD 26 primarily originate in the s-process while the major contributions to the abundances of neutron-capture elements in the more metal-poor objects HD 224959 and HD 198269 are from the r-process, possibly from materials that are pre-enriched with products of the r-process.

  7. Preliminary investigations of Monte Carlo Simulations of neutron energy and LET spectra for fast neutron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    No fast neutron therapy facility has been built with optimized beam quality based on a thorough understanding of the neutron spectrum and its resulting biological effectiveness. A study has been initiated to provide the information necessary for such an optimization. Monte Carlo studies will be used to simulate neutron energy spectra and LET spectra. These studies will be bench-marked with data taken at existing fast neutron therapy facilities. Results will also be compared with radiobiological studies to further support beam quality ptimization. These simulations, anchored by this data, will then be used to determine what parameters might be optimized to take full advantage of the unique LET properties of fast neutron beams. This paper will present preliminary work in generating energy and LET spectra for the Fermilab fast neutron therapy facility.

  8. Thermal Motions and Function of Bacteriorhodopsin in Purple Membranes: Effects of Temperature and Hydration Studied by Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, M.; Dianoux, A. J.; Petry, W.; Zaccai, G.

    1993-10-01

    The internal dynamics of bacteriorhodopsin, the light-driven proton pump in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium, has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering for various conditions of temperature and hydration. Light activation can take place when the membrane is vibrating harmonically. The ability of the protein to functionally relax and complete the photocycle initiated by the absorption of a photon, however, is strongly correlated with the onset of low-frequency, large-amplitude anharmonic atomic motions in the membrane. For a normally hydrated sample, this occurs at about 230 K, where a dynamical transition from a low-temperature harmonic regime is observed. In moderately dry samples, on the other hand, in which the photocycle is slowed down by several orders of magnitude, no transition is observed and protein motions remain approximately harmonic up to room temperature. These results support the hypothesis, made from previous neutron diffraction studies, that the "softness" of the membrane modulates the function of bacteriorhodopsin by allowing or not allowing large-amplitude motions in the protein.

  9. Thermal motions and function of bacteriorhodopsin in purple membranes: Effects of temperature and hydration studied by neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, M.; Dianoux, A.J.; Petry, W. ); Zaccai, G. Institut de Biologie Structurale, Grenoble )

    1993-10-15

    The internal dynamics of bacteriorhodopsin, the light-driven proton pump in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium, has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering for various conditions of temperature and hydration. Light activation can take place when the membrane is vibrating harmonically. The ability of the protein to functionally relax and complete the photocycle initiated by the absorption of a photon, however, is strongly correlated with the onset of low-frequency, large-amplitude anharmonic atomic motions in the membrane. For a normally hydrated sample, this occurs at about 230 K, where a dynamical transition from a low-temperature harmonic regime is observed. In moderately dry samples, on the other hand, in which the photocycle is slowed down by several orders of magnitude, no transition is observed and protein motions remain approximately harmonic up to room temperature. These results support the hypothesis, made from previous neutron diffraction studies, that the [open quotes]softness[close quotes] of the membrane modulates the function of bacteriorhodopsin by allowing or not allowing large-amplitude motions in the protein. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Nanoscale structural and mechanical effects of beta-amyloid (1-42) on polymer cushioned membranes: a combined study by neutron reflectometry and AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dante, Silvia; Hauss, Thomas; Steitz, Roland; Canale, Claudio; Dencher, Norbert A

    2011-11-01

    The interaction of beta-amyloid peptides with lipid membranes is widely studied as trigger agents in Alzheimer's disease. Their mechanism of action at the molecular level is unknown and their interaction with the neural membrane is crucial to elucidate the onset of the disease. In this study we have investigated the interaction of water soluble forms of beta-amyloid Aβ(1-42) with lipid bilayers supported by polymer cushion. A reproducible protocol for the preparation of a supported phospholipid membrane with composition mimicking the neural membrane and in physiological condition (PBS buffer, pH=7.4) was refined by neutron reflectivity. The change in structure and local mechanical properties of the membrane in the presence of Aβ(1-42) was investigated by neutron reflectivity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Force Spectroscopy. Neutron reflectivity evidenced that Aβ(1-42) interacts strongly with the supported membrane, causing a change in the scattering length density profile of the lipid bilayer, and penetrates into the membrane. Concomitantly, the local mechanical properties of the bilayer are deeply modified by the interaction with the peptide as seen by AFM Force Spectroscopy. These results may be of great importance for the onset of the Alzheimer's disease, since a simultaneous change in the structural and mechanical properties of the lipid matrix could influence all membrane based signal cascades. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental study of neutron noise with criticality safety applications in mind

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, C.S.

    1985-11-01

    A study has been conducted on the statistics of detected neutrons that leaked from four subcritical reflected, enriched-uranium assemblies, to explore the feasibility of developing a criticality warning system based on neutron noise analysis. Studies were conducted on three possible discriminators, i.e., three signatures that might be used to discriminate among assemblies of various multiplications. The noise analysis techniques studied performed well enough in deeply subcritical situations to deserve testing in an applications environment. They have a good chance of detecting changes in reactivity that are potentially dangerous. One can expect sharpest results when doing comparisons, i.e., when comparing two records, one taken in the past under circumstances known to be normal and one taken now to search for change.

  12. Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that

  13. Microdosimetric study for secondary neutrons in phantom produced by a 290 MeV/nucleon carbon beam.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Takada, Masashi; Onizuka, Yoshihiko; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Ishikawa, Masayori; Maeda, Naoko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2007-09-01

    Absorbed doses from main charged-particle beams and charged-particle fragments have been measured with high accuracy for particle therapy, but there are few reports for doses from neutron components produced as fragments. This study describes the measurements on neutron doses produced by carbon beams; microdosimetric distributions of secondary neutrons produced by 290 MeV/nucleon carbon beams have been measured by using a tissue equivalent proportional counter at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The microdosimetric distributions of the secondary neutron were measured on the distal and lateral faces of a body-simulated acrylic phantom (300 mm height x 300 mm width x 253 mm thickness). To confirm the dose measurements, the neutron energy spectra produced by incident carbon beams in the acrylic phantom were simulated by the particle and heavy ion transport code system. The absorbed doses obtained by multiplying the simulated neutron energy spectra with the kerma factor calculated by MCNPX agree with the corresponding experimental data fairly well. Downstream of the Bragg peak, the ratio of the neutron dose to the carbon dose at the Bragg peak was found to be a maximum of 1.4 x 10(-4) and the ratio of neutron dose was a maximum of 3.0 x 10(-7) at a lateral face of the acrylic phantom. The ratios of neutrons to charged particle fragments were 11% to 89% in the absorbed doses at the lateral and the distal faces of the acrylic phantom. We can conclude that the treatment dose will not induce serious secondary neutron effects at distances greater than 90 mm from the Bragg peak in carbon particle therapy.

  14. Neutron field for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the development of an epithermal neutron source has been required by medical doctors for deeper neutron penetrations, which is to be used for deep tumor treatment and diagnosis of metastasis. Several attempts have already been made to realize an epithermal neutron field, such as the undermoderated neutron beam, the filtered neutron beam, and the use of a fission plate. At present, these facilities can not be used for actual therapy. For the treatment of deep tumor, another method has been also proposed in normal water in the body is replaced by heavy water to attain a deeper neutron penetration. At Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute, almost all physics problems have been settled relative to thermal neutron capture therapy that has been used for treating brain tumors and for biological experiments on malignant melanoma. Very recently feasibility studies to use heavy water have been started both theoretically and experimentally. The calculation shows the deeper penetration of neutrons as expected. Two kinds of experiments were done by using the KUR guide tube: 1. Thermal neutron penetration measurement. 2. Heavy water uptake in vitro sample. In addition to the above experiment using heavy water, the development of a new epithermal neutron source using a large fission plate is in progress, which is part of a mockup experiment of an atomic bomb field newly estimated.

  15. Radiation transport analyses in support of the SNS Target Station Neutron Beam Line Shutters Title I Design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.M.; Pevey, R.E.; Lillie, R.A.; Johnson, J.O.

    2000-12-01

    A detailed radiation transport analysis of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) shutters is important for the construction of the SNS because of its impact on conventional facility design, normal operation of the facility, and maintenance operations. Thus far the analysis of the SNS shutter travel gaps has been completed. This analysis was performed using coupled Monte Carlo and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations.

  16. Effects of Pressure on Stability of Biomolecules in Solutions Studied by Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire-; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Gibrat, Gabriel

    Studies of the pressure dependence on protein structure and dynamics contribute not only to the basic knowledge of biological molecules but have also a considerable relevance in full technology, like in food sterilization and pharmacy. Conformational changes induced by pressure as well as the effects on the protein stability have been mostly studied by optical techniques (optical absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence), and by NMR. Most optical techniques used so far give information related to the local nature of the used probe (fluorescent or phosphorescent tryptophan). Small angle neutron scattering and quasi-elastic neutron scattering provide essential complementary information to the optical data, giving quantitative data on change of conformation of soluble globular proteins such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and on the mobility of protons belonging to the protein surface residues.

  17. A flow-through hydrothermal cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Brian; Tenailleau, Christophe; Nogthai, Yung; Studer, Andrew; Brugger, Joël; Pring, Allan

    2006-11-01

    A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in situ neutron diffraction study of crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. It is specifically designed for use on the medium-resolution powder diffractometer (MRPD) at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the Polaris beamline at ISIS and the new high-intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The cell will operate in a flow-through mode over the temperature range from 25-300 °C and up to pressures of 100 bar. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite (Fe,Ni) 9S 8 to violarite (Fe,Ni) 3S 4 under mild conditions (pH∼4) at 120 °C and 3 bar using in situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented.

  18. Microscopic study of 1S0 superfluidity in dilute neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlou, G. E.; Mavrommatis, E.; Moustakidis, Ch.; Clark, J. W.

    2017-05-01

    Singlet S -wave superfluidity of dilute neutron matter is studied within the correlated BCS method, which takes into account both pairing and short-range correlations. First, the equation of state (EOS) of normal neutron matter is calculated within the Correlated Basis Function (CBF) method in the lowest cluster order using the 1 S 0 and 3 P components of the Argonne V_{18} potential, assuming trial Jastrow-type correlation functions. The 1 S 0 superfluid gap is then calculated with the corresponding component of the Argonne V_{18} potential and the optimally determined correlation functions. The dependence of our results on the chosen forms for the correlation functions is studied, and the role of the P -wave channel is investigated. Where comparison is meaningful, the values obtained for the 1 S 0 gap within this simplified scheme are consistent with the results of similar and more elaborate microscopic methods.

  19. Studies of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The expected induced radioactivity of experimental material in low Earth orbit was studied for characteristics of activating particles such as cosmic rays, high energy Earth albedo neutrons, trapped protons, and secondary protons and neutrons. The activation cross sections for the production of long lived radioisotopes and other existing nuclear data appropriate to the study of these reactions were compiled. Computer codes which are required to calculate the expected activation of orbited materials were developed. The decreased computer code used to predict the activation of trapped protons of materials placed in the expected orbits of LDEF and Spacelab II. Techniques for unfolding the fluxes of activating particles from the measured activation of orbited materials are examined.

  20. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Tyagi, Madhu; Brown, Craig; Udovic, Terrence J.; Jenkins, T. J.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-03-05

    Hydrogen is known to damage or degrade piezoelectric materials, at low pressure for ferroelectric random access memory applications, and at high pressure for hydrogen powered vehicle applications. The piezoelectric degradation is in part governed by the motion of hydrogen species within the piezoelectric materials. We present here Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) measurements of the local hydrogen species motion within lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and barium titanate (BTO) on samples charged by gaseous exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen {approx}17 MPa. Filter Analyzed Neutron Spectroscopy (FANS) studies of the hydrogen enhanced vibrational modes are presented as well. Results are discussed in context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and compared to comparable bulk diffusion studies of hydrogen diffusion in lead zirconate titanate.

  1. Transport in fuel cells: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and neutron imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Douglas Scott

    . To explore water loss from the EFC cathode, neutron imaging was performed on a working EFC. These studies allowed quantification of the water loss rate from the enzymatic cathode. It was found that increasing the air-side humidity and cathode solution salt content contributed to water retention in the cathode, which resulted in more stable power output over time. However, even saturated air in the cathode resulted in water loss. It was hypothesized that heating due to the cathode reaction in the EFC warmed the cathode and imposed an unsaturated state. Mass and energy balances were performed that support this hypothesis. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  2. A study on fast digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray for improvement neutron emission profile measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Y. Takada, E.; Fujisaki, A.; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Shinohara, K.; Tomita, H.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.

    2014-11-15

    Neutron and γ-ray (n-γ) discrimination with a digital signal processing system has been used to measure the neutron emission profile in magnetic confinement fusion devices. However, a sampling rate must be set low to extend the measurement time because the memory storage is limited. Time jitter decreases a discrimination quality due to a low sampling rate. As described in this paper, a new charge comparison method was developed. Furthermore, automatic n-γ discrimination method was examined using a probabilistic approach. Analysis results were investigated using the figure of merit. Results show that the discrimination quality was improved. Automatic discrimination was applied using the EM algorithm and k-means algorithm.

  3. A study on fast digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray for improvement neutron emission profile measurement.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Takada, E; Fujisaki, A; Isobe, M; Ogawa, K; Shinohara, K; Tomita, H; Kawarabayashi, J; Iguchi, T

    2014-11-01

    Neutron and γ-ray (n-γ) discrimination with a digital signal processing system has been used to measure the neutron emission profile in magnetic confinement fusion devices. However, a sampling rate must be set low to extend the measurement time because the memory storage is limited. Time jitter decreases a discrimination quality due to a low sampling rate. As described in this paper, a new charge comparison method was developed. Furthermore, automatic n-γ discrimination method was examined using a probabilistic approach. Analysis results were investigated using the figure of merit. Results show that the discrimination quality was improved. Automatic discrimination was applied using the EM algorithm and k-means algorithm.

  4. A study on fast digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray for improvement neutron emission profile measurementa)

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Y.; Takada, E.; Fujisaki, A.; Isobe, M.; Shinohara, K.; Tomita, H.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron and γ-ray (n-γ) discrimination with a digital signal processing system has been used to measure the neutron emission profile in magnetic confinement fusion devices. However, a sampling rate must be set low to extend the measurement time because the memory storage is limited. Time jitter decreases a discrimination quality due to a low sampling rate. As described in this paper, a new charge comparison method was developed. Furthermore, automatic n-γ discrimination method was examined using a probabilistic approach. Analysis results were investigated using the figure of merit. Results show that the discrimination quality was improved. Automatic discrimination was applied using the EM algorithm and k-means algorithm. PMID:25430297

  5. A study on fast digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray for improvement neutron emission profile measurementa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Y.; Takada, E.; Fujisaki, A.; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Shinohara, K.; Tomita, H.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.

    2014-11-01

    Neutron and γ-ray (n-γ) discrimination with a digital signal processing system has been used to measure the neutron emission profile in magnetic confinement fusion devices. However, a sampling rate must be set low to extend the measurement time because the memory storage is limited. Time jitter decreases a discrimination quality due to a low sampling rate. As described in this paper, a new charge comparison method was developed. Furthermore, automatic n-γ discrimination method was examined using a probabilistic approach. Analysis results were investigated using the figure of merit. Results show that the discrimination quality was improved. Automatic discrimination was applied using the EM algorithm and k-means algorithm.

  6. Molecular and Vibrational Dynamics in the Cholesterol-Lowering Agent Lovastatin: Solid-State NMR, Inelastic Neutron Scattering, and Periodic DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Bilski, Paweł; Drużbicki, Kacper; Jenczyk, Jacek; Mielcarek, Jadwiga; Wąsicki, Jan

    2017-04-06

    Molecular and vibrational dynamics of a widely used cholesterol-lowering agent, lovastatin, have been studied by combining nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments ((1)H NMR) with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and periodic density functional theory modeling (plane-wave DFT). According to a complementary experimental study, lovastatin shows no phase transitions down to cryogenic conditions, while a progressive, stepwise activation of several molecular motions is observed below room temperature. The molecular packing and intermolecular forces were analyzed theoretically, supported by a (13)C NMR study and further correlated with observed molecular dynamics. The NMR relaxation experiments combined with theoretical calculations disclose that molecular dynamics in solid lovastatin is related to methyl group motions and conformational disorder in the methylbutanoate fragment. This is precisely assigned and analyzed quantitatively from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. The neutron vibrational spectroscopy further corroborates that the methyl rotors have a classical nature. In addition to the intramolecular reorientations, the vibrational dynamics was analyzed with an emphasis on the low-wavenumber range. For the first time, the terahertz response of lovastatin was studied by confronting neutron and optical techniques and clearly illustrating their complementarity. The consistent picture of the molecular dynamics is provided, which may support further considerations on alternative drug formulations and the amorphization tendency in this important lipid-lowering drug.

  7. Structure of Light Neutron-rich Nuclei Studied with Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer reactions have been used for many years to understand the shell structure of nuclei. Recent studies with rare-isotope beams extend this work and make it possible to probe the evolution of shell structure far beyond the valley of stability, requiring measurements in inverse kinematics. We present a novel technical approach to measurements in inverse kinematics, and apply this method to different transfer reactions, each of which probes different properties of light, neutron-rich nuclei.

  8. Modeling and Simulation Optimization and Feasibility Studies for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.

    2013-01-01

    This report details the results of the modeling and simulation work accomplished for the ‘Neutron Detection without Helium-3’ project during the 2011 and 2012 fiscal years. The primary focus of the project is to investigate commercially available technologies that might be used in safeguards applications in the relatively near term. Other technologies that are being developed may be more applicable in the future, but are outside the scope of this study.

  9. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide as studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Mariette; Eckert, Juegen; Johnson, Susanna W.; Moret, Jacques; Swanson, Basil I.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    1992-10-01

    A study of the anomalous modes in acetanilide and five deuterated derivatives by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is reported. These data show that the dynamics of the amide and methyl groups influence each other. In addition, the anomalous temperature behaviour of the NH out-of-plane bending mode is confirmed. These observations suggest that the self-trapping mechanism in ACN may be more complex than hitherto assumed.

  10. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, Jennifer L; Stone, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80~K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  11. A comparative neutron activation analysis study of common generic manipulated and reference medicines commercialized in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Leal, A S; Menezes, M A B C; Rodrigues, R R; Andonie, O; Vermaercke, P; Sneyers, L

    2008-10-01

    In this work, a comparative study of neutron activation analysis (NAA) was performed by the nuclear institutes: CDTN/CNEN-Brazil, CCHEN-Chile and the SCK.CEN-Belgium aiming to investigate some generic, manipulated and reference medicines largely commercialized in Brazil. Some impurities such as: As, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Eu, Fe, Hf, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ti and Zn were found, and the heterogeneity of the samples pointed out the lack of an efficient public system of quality control.

  12. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, J. L.; Stone, M. B.

    2014-09-08

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80 K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  13. Studies on osteoporosis. V. Comparison of methods of evaluation of osteoporosis and study of chromosome changes induced by neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, J.C.; Sirianni, S.R.; Pragay, D.A.; Ambrus, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    In vivo activation analysis was compared with ashing and atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of total skeletal calcium content in mice. The results were close to identical. The possible mutagenic-carcinogenic effect of repeated exposure to whole body neutron irradiation was studied by chromosome analysis. Under the conditions of these experiments, no significant chromosome changes were seen.

  14. Study of neutron spectra in a water bath from a Pb target irradiated by 250 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Ju, Yong-Qin; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Chen, Liang; Ge, Hong-Lin; Wan, Bo; Luo, Peng; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Li, Jian-Yang; Xu, Jun-Kui; Wang, Song-Lin; Yang, Yong-Wei; Yang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Spallation neutrons were produced by the irradiation of Pb with 250 MeV protons. The Pb target was surrounded by water which was used to slow down the emitted neutrons. The moderated neutrons in the water bath were measured by using the resonance detectors of Au, Mn and In with a cadmium (Cd) cover. According to the measured activities of the foils, the neutron flux at different resonance energies were deduced and the epithermal neutron spectra were proposed. Corresponding results calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX were compared with the experimental data to check the validity of the code. The comparison showed that the simulation could give a good prediction for the neutron spectra above 50 eV, while the finite thickness of the foils greatly effected the experimental data in low energy. It was also found that the resonance detectors themselves had great impact on the simulated energy spectra. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation and Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (11305229, 11105186, 91226107, 91026009, XDA03030300)

  15. Study of resistive micromegas detectors in a mixed neutron and photon radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Iakovidis, G.; Tsipolitis, G.

    2012-05-01

    The Muon ATLAS Micromegas Activity (MAMMA) focuses on the development and testing of large-area muon detectors based on the bulk-Micromegas technology. These detectors are candidates for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon System in view of the luminosity upgrade of Large Hadron Collider at CERN (sLHC). They will combine trigger and precision measurement capability in a single device. A novel protection scheme using resistive strips above the readout electrode has been developed. The response and sparking properties of resistive Micromegas detectors were successfully tested in a mixed (neutron and gamma) high radiation environment supplied by the Tandem accelerator at the N.C.S.R. Demokritos in Athens. Monte-Carlo studies have been employed to study the effect of 5.5 MeV neutrons impinging on Micromegas detectors. The response of the Micromegas detectors on the photons originating from the inevitable neutron inelastic scattering on the surrounding materials of the experimental facility was also studied.

  16. Antibody adsorption on the surface of water studied by neutron reflection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Charles; Li, Zongyi; Holman, Robert; Pan, Fang; Campbell, Richard A; Campana, Mario; Li, Peixun; Webster, John R P; Bishop, Steven; Narwal, Rojaramani; Uddin, Shahid; van der Walle, Christopher F; Lu, Jian R

    2017-04-01

    Surface and interfacial adsorption of antibody molecules could cause structural unfolding and desorbed molecules could trigger solution aggregation, resulting in the compromise of physical stability. Although antibody adsorption is important and its relevance to many mechanistic processes has been proposed, few techniques can offer direct structural information about antibody adsorption under different conditions. The main aim of this study was to demonstrate the power of neutron reflection to unravel the amount and structural conformation of the adsorbed antibody layers at the air/water interface with and without surfactant, using a monoclonal antibody 'COE-3' as the model. By selecting isotopic contrasts from different ratios of H2O and D2O, the adsorbed amount, thickness and extent of the immersion of the antibody layer could be determined unambiguously. Upon mixing with the commonly-used non-ionic surfactant Polysorbate 80 (Tween 80), the surfactant in the mixed layer could be distinguished from antibody by using both hydrogenated and deuterated surfactants. Neutron reflection measurements from the co-adsorbed layers in null reflecting water revealed that, although the surfactant started to remove antibody from the surface at 1/100 critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactant, complete removal was not achieved until above 1/10 CMC. The neutron study also revealed that antibody molecules retained their globular structure when either adsorbed by themselves or co-adsorbed with the surfactant under the conditions studied.

  17. Neutron computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, R A; Brugger, R M; Schlapper, G A; Larsen, G N; Jost, R J

    1981-02-01

    A neutron-transmission computed tomography scanning system has been built for scanning biological materials. An oxygen filtered beam of 2.35 MeV neutrons was used for the measurements. The studies to date show that the interactions of these energy neutrons with samples simulating biological materials are more sensitive than X-rays to variations in the content of the material, thus providing the ability to produce high quality images. The neutron scans suggest that neutrons can be an effective radiation for the imaging of biological materials.

  18. Neutron diffraction studies of magnetic-shape memory Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heczko, Oleg; Prokes, Karel; Hannula, Simo-Pekka

    2007-09-01

    Neutron diffraction of single crystal of the typical example of magnetic-shape memory (MSM) alloy Ni 49.7Mn 29.3Ga 21 was carried out with a 2D position sensitive detector. The quality and inhomogeneity of the single crystal and martensite variant distribution was studied using ω-scan of selected nuclear Bragg reflections. The neutron diffraction reveals split of the (2 0 0) reflection of major martensite variant and large structural inhomogeneities in martensite phase. Using measurement in reciprocal space, we recorded a set of reflections that appear due to structural modulation (5 M) of the martensite, however, the set seems to be incomplete with missing or very weak reflections of second order compared with X-ray diffraction. The line of the magnetic reflection arising from the supposed antiferromagnetic ordering of the excess Mn atoms was very weak and it is difficult to discern from the background.

  19. Study of parity and time reversal violation in neutron-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Yi-Fen; Bowman, J.D.; Frankle, C.M.; Crawford, B.E. |

    1994-12-31

    The parity and time-reversal symmetries can be studies in neutron-nucleus interactions. Parity non-conserving asymmetries have been observed for many p-wave resonances in a compound nucleus and measurements were performed on several nuclei in the mass region of A{approximately}100 and A{approximately}230. The statistical model of the compound nucleus provides a theoretical basis for extracting mean-squared matrix elements from the experimental asymmetry data, and for interpreting the mean-squared matrix elements. The constraints on the weak meson-exchange couplings calculated from the compound-nucleus asymmetry data agree qualitatively with the results from few-body and light-nuclei experiments. The tests of time-reversal invariance in various experiments using thermal, epithermal and MeV neutrons are being developed.

  20. Inelastic neutron scattering study of water in hydrated LTA-type zeolites.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Crupi, Vincenza; Majolino, Domenico; Parker, Stewart F; Venuti, Valentina; Wanderlingh, Ulderico

    2006-01-26

    The vibrational dynamics of water molecules encapsulated in synthetic Na-A and Mg-exchanged A zeolites were studied versus temperature by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements (30-1200 cm(-1)) as a function of the induced ion-exchange percentage by using the indirect geometry tof spectrometer TOSCA at the ISIS pulse neutron facility (RAL, UK). The experimental INS spectra were compared with those of ice Ih to characterize the structural changes induced by confinement on the H2O hydrogen-bonded network. We observed, after increasing the Mg2+ content, a tendency of water molecules to restore the bulklike arrangements together with more hindered dynamics. These results are confirmed by the analysis of the evaluated one-phonon amplitude-weighted proton vibrational density of states aimed, in particular, to follow the evolution of the water molecules librational mode region.