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Sample records for neutron-gamma fields specific

  1. ESR response of CFQ-Gd2O3 dosimeters to a mixed neutron-gamma field: Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Hoseininaveh, M; Ranjbar, A H

    2015-11-01

    Clear fused quartz (CFQ) may be considered a suitable material for electron and gamma dose measurements using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. Research has been ongoing to optimize the neutron capture therapy (NCT) mechanism and its effects in cancer treatment. Neutron sources of the mixed neutron-gamma field are a challenge for this treatment method. A reliable dosimetric measurement and treatment should be able to determine various components of this mixed field. In this study, the ESR response of cylindrical and spherical shells of CFQ dosimeters, filled with Gd2O3, when exposed to a thermal neutron beam, has been investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. In order to maximize the ESR response, the dimensions of the outer and inner parts of the samples have been chosen as variables, and the amount of energy deposited in the samples has been determined. The optimum size of the samples has been determined, and the capability of discriminating gamma and neutron dose in a mixed neutron-gamma field regarding the CFQ-Gd2O3 dosimeter has also been widely studied.

  2. Plasma driven neutron/gamma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Antolak, Arlyn

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for the generation of neutron/gamma rays is described including a chamber which defines an ion source, said apparatus including an RF antenna positioned outside of or within the chamber. Positioned within the chamber is a target material. One or more sets of confining magnets are also provided to create a cross B magnetic field directly above the target. To generate neutrons/gamma rays, the appropriate source gas is first introduced into the chamber, the RF antenna energized and a plasma formed. A series of high voltage pulses are then applied to the target. A plasma sheath, which serves as an accelerating gap, is formed upon application of the high voltage pulse to the target. Depending upon the selected combination of source gas and target material, either neutrons or gamma rays are generated, which may be used for cargo inspection, and the like.

  3. Pulse-shape discrimination of the new plastic scintillators in neutron-gamma mixed field using fast digitizer card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jančář, A.; Kopecký, Z.; Dressler, J.; Veškrna, M.; Matěj, Z.; Granja, C.; Solar, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently invented plastic scintillator EJ-299-33 enables pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and thus measurement of neutron and photon spectra in mixed fields. In this work we compare the PSD properties of EJ-299-33 plastic and the well-known NE-213 liquid scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator using the 3H(d, n)4He reaction. Pulses from the scintillators are processed by a newly developed digital measuring system employing the fast digitizer card. This card contains two AD converters connected to the measuring computer via 10 Gbps optical ethernet. The converters operate with a resolution of 12 bits and have two differential inputs with a sampling frequency 1 GHz. The resulting digital channels with different gains are merged into one composite channel with a higher digital resolution in a wide dynamic range of energies. Neutron signals are fully discriminated from gamma signals. Results are presented.

  4. Measurements of neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma-rays mixed field using imaging plate for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    The imaging plate (IP) technique is tried to be used as a handy method to measure the spatial neutron distribution via the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction for neutron capture therapy (NCT). For this purpose, IP is set in a water phantom and irradiated in a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays. The Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator is utilized for this experiment. The neutrons are moderated with 20-cm-thick D(2)O to obtain suitable neutron field for NCT. The signal for IP doped with Gd as a neutron-response enhancer is subtracted with its contribution by gamma-rays, which was estimated using IP without Gd. The gamma-ray response of Gd-doped IP to non-Gd IP is set at 1.34, the value measured for (60)Co gamma-rays, in estimating the gamma-ray contribution to Gd-doped IP signal. Then measured distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate agrees within 10% with the calculated value based on the method that has already been validated for its reproducibility of Au activation. However, the evaluated distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate is so sensitive to gamma-ray energy, e.g. the discrepancy of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate between measurement and calculation becomes 30% for the photon energy change from 33keV to 1.253MeV.

  5. Development of monitoring method of spatial neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma rays mixed field using imaging plate for NCT--depression of the field.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun

    2011-12-01

    The degree of depression in the neutron field caused by neutron absorption in the materials of an imaging plate (IP) was investigated using MCNP-4C. Consequently, the IP doped with Gd, which reproduced the distribution of (157)Gd(n,γ)(158)Gd reaction rate in the previous study, depresses the relative distribution by about 50%. The depression for the IP in which Gd is replaced with similar amount of B atoms was estimated to be about 10%. The signal intensity for this IP is estimated to be at a similar level with that for Gd-doped IP.

  6. An apparatus for the study of high temperature water radiolysis in a nuclear reactor: calibration of dose in a mixed neutron/gamma radiation field.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Eric J; Wilson, Paul P H; Anderson, Mark H; Mezyk, Stephen P; Pimblott, Simon M; Bartels, David M

    2007-12-01

    The cooling water of nuclear reactors undergoes radiolytic decomposition induced by gamma, fast electron, and neutron radiation in the core. To model the process, recombination reaction rates and radiolytic yields for the water radical fragments need to be measured at high temperature and pressure. Yields for the action of neutron radiation are particularly hard to determine independently because of the beta/gamma field also present in any reactor. In this paper we report the design of an apparatus intended to measure neutron radiolysis yields as a function of temperature and pressure. A new methodology for separation of neutron and beta/gamma radiolysis yields in a mixed radiation field is proposed and demonstrated.

  7. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Tobias; Blaickner, Matthias; Schütz, Christian; Wiehl, Norbert; Kratz, Jens V; Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Otto, Gerd; Hampel, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using FLUKA, a multipurpose Monte Carlo transport code. The pin-diode is augmented by a lithium fluoride foil. This foil converts the neutrons into alpha and tritium particles which are products of the (7)Li(n,α)(3)H-reaction. These particles are detected by the diode and their amount correlates to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also

  8. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Tobias; Blaickner, Matthias; Schütz, Christian; Wiehl, Norbert; Kratz, Jens V; Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Otto, Gerd; Hampel, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using FLUKA, a multipurpose Monte Carlo transport code. The pin-diode is augmented by a lithium fluoride foil. This foil converts the neutrons into alpha and tritium particles which are products of the (7)Li(n,α)(3)H-reaction. These particles are detected by the diode and their amount correlates to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also

  9. The neutron-gamma Feynman variance to mean approach: Gamma detection and total neutron-gamma detection (theory and practice)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikova, Dina; Axell, Kåre; Avdic, Senada; Pázsit, Imre; Nordlund, Anders; Allard, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Two versions of the neutron-gamma variance to mean (Feynman-alpha method or Feynman-Y function) formula for either gamma detection only or total neutron-gamma detection, respectively, are derived and compared in this paper. The new formulas have particular importance for detectors of either gamma photons or detectors sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. If applied to a plastic or liquid scintillation detector, the total neutron-gamma detection Feynman-Y expression corresponds to a situation where no discrimination is made between neutrons and gamma particles. The gamma variance to mean formulas are useful when a detector of only gamma radiation is used or when working with a combined neutron-gamma detector at high count rates. The theoretical derivation is based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation with the inclusion of general reactions and corresponding intensities for neutrons and gammas, but with the inclusion of prompt reactions only. A one energy group approximation is considered. The comparison of the two different theories is made by using reaction intensities obtained in MCNPX simulations with a simplified geometry for two scintillation detectors and a 252Cf-source. In addition, the variance to mean ratios, neutron, gamma and total neutron-gamma are evaluated experimentally for a weak 252Cf neutron-gamma source, a 137Cs random gamma source and a 22Na correlated gamma source. Due to the focus being on the possibility of using neutron-gamma variance to mean theories for both reactor and safeguards applications, we limited the present study to the general analytical expressions for Feynman-alpha formulas.

  10. MCNP Capabilities at the Dawn of the 21st Century: Neutron-Gamma Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcow, E. C.; McKinney, G. W.; Booth, T. E.; Briesmeister, J. F.; Cox, L. J.; Forster, R. A.; Hendricks, J. S.; Mosteller, R. D.; Prael, R. E.; Sood, A.; White, S. W.

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron-gamma radiation transport applications. These include nuclear criticality safety, radiation shielding, nuclear safeguards, nuclear oil-well logging, fission and fusion reactor design, accelerator target design, detector design and analysis, health physics, medical radiation therapy and imaging, radiography, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste storage and disposal. The latest version of the code, MCNP4C [1], was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the new features and capabilities of the code, and discusses the specific applicability to neutron-gamma problems. We will also discuss some of the future directions for MCNP code development.

  11. MCNP capabilities at the dawn of the 21st century: Neutron-gamma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; McKinney, G.W.

    2000-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron-gamma radiation transport applications. These include nuclear criticality safety, radiation shielding, nuclear safeguards, nuclear well-logging, fission and fusion reactor design, accelerator target design, detector design and analysis, health physics, medical radiation therapy and imaging, radiography, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste storage and disposal. The latest version of the code, MCNP4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000.This paper described the new features and capabilities of the code, and discusses the specific applicability to neutron-gamma problems. We will also discuss the future directions for MCNP code development, including rewriting the code in Fortran 90.

  12. Using singular value decomposition for neutron-gamma discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linczuk, Maciej; Korolczuk, Stefan; Cieszewski, Radosław

    2015-09-01

    A Digital Signal Processing method for Neutron Gamma Discrimination [1] is described in this paper. A Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) was used for estimation noiseless signal shape. Based on this shape, detection method was introduced. This method uses projection operation into signal and noise subspace and Signal to Noise Ratio estimation. This method was compared with another one proposed by [2]. Booth method was implemented in MATLAB. Computation was done on signals from scintillators. Data acquisition was dome with high quality hardware. The Neutron Gamma Discrimination algorithm operate on digital samples from ADC converter. Hardware used for data acquisition in this this paper was described in [3]. On the end, the results of this two methods was presented and compared. The signal model in this methods assume additional, white, Gaussian noise.

  13. Neutron-gamma hodoscope detection of fissile materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The neutron-gamma hodoscope has been developed to make use of two aspects of the fission process that occur during severe safety testing of nuclear reactor fuel; fission-product heating that induces realistic effects in the fuel and penetrating radiation that enables the imaging of fuel behavior. During in-pile transient reactor experiments, the radiation which escapes from the test fuel, its surrounding coolant, and a thick-walled container is detected by a large collimated array that produced cineradiographic images. Phenomena observed in hundreds of destructive experiments have included pre-failure fuel motion, cladding breach, and post-failure fuel motion. On the basis of this successful 25-year experience, application of hodoscope techniques to arms control treaty verification is now being studied. 7 refs., 13 figs.

  14. Integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitors for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1993-09-01

    Radiation monitoring is one nuclear-safeguards measure used to protect against the theft of special nuclear materials (SNM) by pedestrians departing from SNM access areas. The integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitor is an ideal radiation monitor for the task when the SNM is plutonium. It achieves high sensitivity for detecting both bare and shielded plutonium by combining two types of radiation detector. One type is a neutron-chamber detector, comprising a large, hollow, neutron moderator that contains a single thermal-neutron proportional counter. The entrance wall of each chamber is thin to admit slow neutrons from plutonium contained in a moderating shield, while the other walls are thick to moderate fast neutrons from bare or lead-shielded plutonium so that they can be detected. The other type of detector is a plastic scintillator that is primarily for detecting gamma rays from small amounts of unshielded plutonium. The two types of detector are easily integrated by making scintillators part of the thick back wall of each neutron chamber or by inserting them into each chamber void. We compared the influence of the two methods of integration on detecting neutrons and gamma rays, and we examined the effectiveness of other design factors and the methods for signal detection as well.

  15. Development of a New Fast Neutron/Gamma Spectrometer Array Using CLYC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olympia, Nathan; Chowdhury, Partha; Lister, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Neutron physics has long suffered from a lack of detectors that provide spectroscopic information without the need for inefficient time-of-flight techniques. Any headway made towards a spectrometer with good energy resolution and neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination represents an important step forward in the field. Recent investigations at the University of Massachusetts Lowell with Cs2LiYCl6 (CLYC) scintillators have demonstrated their potential for direct pulse-height measurements via the 35Cl(n,p) reaction. From this work, it was recognized that CLYC could be optimized for fast neutron detection by growing 6Li-depleted crystals to suppress the overwhelming thermal neutron response. A project is now underway to develop a versatile array of 16 1'' ×1'' 6Li-depleted CLYC detectors for measurements in nuclear astrophysics, reactor data, homeland security, and nuclear structure. Initial measurements of interest include prompt fission neutrons, β-delayed neutrons, and scattering cross sections. Characterizations of the neutron and gamma-ray response for the first two detectors of the array are being carried out at various facilities with both mono-energetic and continuous fast neutron beams. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant #DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  16. Interactions between endothelial cells and T cells modulate responses to mixed neutron/gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Cary, Lynnette H; Noutai, Daniel; Salber, Rudolph E; Williams, Margaret S; Ngudiankama, Barbara F; Whitnall, Mark H

    2014-06-01

    Detonation of an improvised nuclear device near a population center would cause significant casualties from the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) due to exposure to mixed neutron/gamma fields (MF). The pathophysiology of ARS involves inflammation, microvascular damage and alterations in immune function. Interactions between endothelial cells (EC) and hematopoietic cells are important not only for regulating immune cell traffic and function, but also for providing the microenvironment that controls survival, differentiation and migration of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in blood-forming tissues. Endothelial cells/leukocyte interactions also influence tumor progression and the results of anticancer therapies. In this study, we hypothesized that irradiation of endothelial cells would modulate their effects on hematopoietic cells and vice versa. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and immortalized T lymphocytes (Jurkat cells) were cultured individually and in co-culture after exposure to mixed fields. Effects of nonirradiated cells were compared to effects of irradiated cells and alterations in signaling pathways were determined. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38 and p44/42 (ERK1/2) in HUVEC exhibited higher levels of phosphorylated protein after exposure to mixed field radiation. IL-6, IL-8, G-CSF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and angiopoietin 2 (ANG2) protein expression were upregulated in HUVEC by exposure to mixed field radiation. PCR arrays using HUVEC mRNA revealed alterations in gene expression after exposure to mixed fields and/or co-culture with Jurkat cells. The presence of HUVEC also influenced the function of Jurkat cells. Nonirradiated Jurkat cells showed an increase in proliferation when co-cultured with nonirradiated HUVEC, and a decrease in proliferation when co-cultured with irradiated HUVEC. Additionally, nonirradiated Jurkat cells incubated in media from irradiated HUVEC exhibited upregulation of activated

  17. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huawei; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Jiaxin; Gardner, Robin P

    2011-09-01

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties. PMID:21550259

  18. Investigation about decoupling capacitors of PMT voltage divider effects on neutron-gamma discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Divani, Nazila Firoozabadi, Mohammad M.; Bayat, Esmail

    2014-11-24

    Scintillators are almost used in any nuclear laboratory. These detectors combine of scintillation materials, PMT and a voltage divider. Voltage dividers are different in resistive ladder design. But the effect of decoupling capacitors and damping resistors haven’t discussed yet. In this paper at first a good equilibrium circuit designed for PMT, and it was used for investigating about capacitors and resistors in much manner. Results show that decoupling capacitors have great effect on PMT output pulses. In this research, it was tried to investigate the effect of Capacitor’s value and places on PMT voltage divider in Neutron-Gamma discrimination capability. Therefore, the voltage divider circuit for R329-02 Hamamatsu PMT was made and Zero Cross method used for neutron-gamma discrimination. The neutron source was a 20Ci Am-Be. Anode and Dynode pulses and discrimination spectrum were saved. The results showed that the pulse height and discrimination quality change with the value and setting of capacitors.

  19. Neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination in plastic scintillators: Preparation and characterization of various compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Pauline; Hamel, Matthieu; Dehé-Pittance, Chrystèle; Rocha, Licinio; Pansu, Robert B.; Normand, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    This work deals with the preparation and evaluation of plastic scintillators for neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD). We succeeded in developing a plastic scintillator with good neutron/gamma discrimination properties in the range of what is already being commercialized. Several combinations of primary and secondary fluorophores were implemented in chemically modified polymers. These scintillators were fully characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy and under neutron irradiation. The materials proved to be stable for up to 5 years without any degradation of PSD properties. They were then classified in terms of their PSD capabilities and light yield. Our best candidate, 28.6 wt% of primary fluorophore with a small amount of secondary fluorophore, shows promising PSD results and is particularly suited to industrial development, because its preparation does not involve the use of expensive or exotic compounds. Furthermore, even at the highest prepared concentration, high stability over time was observed. As a proof of concept, one sample with dimensions 109 mm ∅×114 mm height (≈1 L) was prepared.

  20. Development of neutron/gamma generators and a polymer semiconductor detector for homeland security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Michael Joseph

    Instrumentation development is essential to the advancement and success of homeland security systems. Active interrogation techniques that scan luggage and cargo containers for shielded special nuclear materials or explosives hold great potential in halting further terrorist attacks. The development of more economical, compact and efficient source and radiation detection devices will facilitate scanning of all containers and luggage while maintaining high-throughput and low-false alarms Innovative ion sources were developed for two novel, specialized neutron generating devices and initial generator tests were performed. In addition, a low-energy acceleration gamma generator was developed and its performance characterized. Finally, an organic semiconductor was investigated for direct fast neutron detection. A main part of the thesis work was the development of ion sources, crucial components of the neutron/gamma generator development. The use of an externally-driven radio-frequency antenna allows the ion source to generate high beam currents with high, mono-atomic species fractions while maintaining low operating pressures, advantageous parameters for neutron generators. A dual "S" shaped induction antenna was developed to satisfy the high current and large extraction area requirements of the high-intensity neutron generator. The dual antenna arrangement generated a suitable current density of 28 mA/cm2 at practical RF power levels. The stringent requirements of the Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy neutron generator necessitated the development of a specialized ten window ion source of toroidal shape with a narrow neutron production target at its center. An innovative ten antenna arrangement with parallel capacitors was developed for driving the multi-antenna arrangement and uniform coupling of RF power to all ten antennas was achieved. To address the desire for low-impact, low-radiation dose active interrogation systems, research was performed on mono

  1. Fast-neutron/gamma-ray radiography scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, J.; Liu, Y.; Rainey, S.; Roach, G.; Sowerby, B.; Stevens, R.; Tickner, J.

    2006-05-01

    There is a worldwide need for efficient inspection of cargo containers at airports, seaports and road border crossings. The main objectives are the detection of contraband such as illicit drugs, explosives and weapons. Due to the large volume of cargo passing through Australia's airports every day, it is critical that any scanning system should be capable of working on unpacked or consolidated cargo, taking at most 1-2 minutes per container. CSIRO has developed a fast-neutron/gamma-ray radiography (FNGR) method for the rapid screening of air freight. By combining radiographs obtained using 14 MeV neutrons and 60Co gamma-rays, high resolution images showing both density and material composition are obtained. A near full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory. With the support of the Australian Customs Service, a full-scale scanner has recently been installed and commissioned at Brisbane International Airport.

  2. The Neutron-Gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination Method for Neutron Flux Detection in the ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiufeng; Li, Shiping; Cao, Hongrui; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Qingwei; Yin, Zejie

    2013-05-01

    The neutron flux monitor (NFM), as a significant diagnostic system in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will play an important role in the readings of a series of key parameters in the fusion reaction process. As the core of the main electronic system of the NFM, the neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination (n-γ PSD) can distinguish the neutron pulse from the gamma pulse and other disturbing pulses according to the thresholds of the rising time and the amplitude pre-installed on the board, the double timing point CFD method is used to get the rising time of the pulse. The n-γ PSD can provide an accurate neutron count.

  3. Fast neutron-gamma discrimination on neutron emission profile measurement on JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Shinohara, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Baba, M.; Isobe, M.

    2010-10-15

    A digital signal processing (DSP) system is applied to stilbene scintillation detectors of the multichannel neutron emission profile monitor in JT-60U. Automatic analysis of the neutron-{gamma} pulse shape discrimination is a key issue to diminish the processing time in the DSP system, and it has been applied using the two-dimensional (2D) map. Linear discriminant function is used to determine the dividing line between neutron events and {gamma}-ray events on a 2D map. In order to verify the validity of the dividing line determination, the pulse shape discrimination quality is evaluated. As a result, the {gamma}-ray contamination in most of the beam heating phase was negligible compared with the statistical error with 10 ms time resolution.

  4. Neutron-Gamma-ray-coupled albedo Monte Carlo method streaming analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Kawai, M.; Seki, Y.

    1986-11-01

    The neutron-gamma-ray-coupled albedo Monte Carlo (AMC) method has been developed and implemented in MORSE-I. The energy- and angle-dependent differential albedo data, which include secondary gamma rays, are calculated for a slab layer with one dimensional transport theory. Fundamental formulas for this method are described. The applicability to shielding design of fusion reactors is confirmed by analyzing the radiation streaming experiment conducted at the Fusion Neutronics Source facility, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The AMC method has reproduced well the experimental data of radiation dose rates and spectra with an accuracy of approximately 10%. It is shown that the AMC method is several times more efficient than the ordinary Monte Carlo calculation in obtaining data necessary for the design with expected accuracy.

  5. Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on the electrical characteristics of thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasca, A. J.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons, gamma rays, and temperature on the electrical and switching characteristics of phase-control and inverter-type SCR's are presented. The special test fixture built for mounting, heating, and instrumenting the test devices is described. Four SCR's were neutron irradiated at 300 K and four at 365 K for fluences up to 3.2 x 10 exp 13 pn/sq. cm, and eight were gamma irradiated at 300 K only for gamma doses up to 5.1 Mrads. The electrical measurements were made during irradiation and the switching measurements were made only before and after irradiation. Radiation induced crystal defects, resulting primarily from fast neutrons, caused the reduction of minority carrier lifetime through the generation of R-G centers. The reduction in lifetime caused increases in the on-state voltage drop and in the reverse and forward leakage currents, and decreases in the turn-off time.

  6. Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on the electrical characteristics of thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasca, A. J.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons, gamma rays, and temperature on the electrical and switching characteristics of phase-control and inverter-type SCR's are presented. The special test fixture built for mounting, heating, and instrumenting the test devices is described. Four SCR's were neutron irradiated at 300 K and four at 365 K for fluences up to 3.2 x 10 exp 13 n/sq. cm, and eight were gamma irradiated at 300 K only for gamma doses up to 5.1 Mrads. The electrical measurements were made during irradiation and the switching measurements were made only before and after irradiation. Radiation induced crystal defects, resulting primarily from fast neutrons, caused the reduction of minority carrier lifetime through the generation of R-G centers. The reduction in lifetime caused increases in the on-state voltage drop and in the reverse and forward leakage currents, and decreases in the turn-off time.

  7. Nondestructive assay of small PuO{sub 2} samples by neutron-gamma counting-expectations and achievements

    SciTech Connect

    Ottmar, H.; Schubert, A.; Cromboom, O.; Eberle, H.

    1995-12-31

    The accurate determination of the plutonium content in samples of plutonium oxide powders will constitute an important part of the analytical work at future on-site laboratories (OSL) to be installed at the Sellafield and the La Hague reprocessing plants. In this concept, the major part of the work has been assigned to neutron-gamma counter combining the techniques of passive neutron-coincidence counting and high-resolution gamma spectrometry. This paper reviews the development of this technique.

  8. Development of a digital method for neutron/gamma-ray discrimination based on matched filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolczuk, S.; Linczuk, M.; Romaniuk, R.; Zychor, I.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron/gamma-ray discrimination is crucial for measurements with detectors sensitive to both neutron and gamma-ray radiation. Different techniques to discriminate between neutrons and gamma-rays based on pulse shape analysis are widely used in many applications, e.g., homeland security, radiation dosimetry, environmental monitoring, fusion experiments, nuclear spectroscopy. A common requirement is to improve a radiation detection level with a high detection reliability. Modern electronic components, such as high speed analog to digital converters and powerful programmable digital circuits for signal processing, allow us to develop a fully digital measurement system. With this solution it is possible to optimize digital signal processing algorithms without changing any electronic components in an acquisition signal path. We report on results obtained with a digital acquisition system DNG@NCBJ designed at the National Centre for Nuclear Research. A 2'' × 2'' EJ309 liquid scintillator was used to register mixed neutron and gamma-ray radiation from PuBe sources. A dedicated algorithm for pulse shape discrimination, based on real-time filtering, was developed and implemented in hardware.

  9. Digitized two-parameter spectrometer for neutron-gamma mixed field

    SciTech Connect

    Matej, Z.; Cvachovec, J.; Prenosil, V.; Cvachovec, F.; Zaritski, S.

    2011-07-01

    This paper shows the results of digital processing of output pulses from combined photon-neutron detector using a commercially available digitizer ACQUIRIS DP 210. The advantage of digital processing is reduction of the apparatus in weight and size, acceleration of measurement, and increased resistance to pile-up of pulses. The neutron and photon spectrum of radionuclide source {sup 252}Cf is presented. (authors)

  10. The field theory of specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    Finite temperature quantum field theory in the heat kernel method is used to study the heat capacity of condensed matter. The lattice heat is treated à la P. Debye as energy of the elastic (sound) waves. The dimensionless functional of free energy is re-derived with a cut-off parameter and used to obtain the specific heat of crystal lattices. The new dimensionless thermodynamical variable is formed as Planck's inverse temperature divided by the lattice constant. The dimensionless constant, universal for the class of crystal lattices, which determines the low temperature region of molar specific heat, is introduced and tested with the data for diamond lattice crystals. The low temperature asymptotics of specific heat is found to be the fourth power in temperature instead of the cubic power law of the Debye theory. Experimental data for the carbon group elements (silicon, germanium) and other materials decisively confirm the quartic law. The true low temperature regime of specific heat is defined by the surface heat, therefore, it depends on the geometrical characteristics of the body, while the absolute zero temperature limit is geometrically forbidden. The limit on the growth of specific heat at temperatures close to critical points, known as the Dulong-Petit law, appears from the lattice constant cut-off. Its value depends on the lattice type and it is the same for materials with the same crystal lattice. The Dulong-Petit values of compounds are equal to those of elements with the same crystal lattice type, if one mole of solid state matter were taken as the Avogadro number of the composing atoms. Thus, the Neumann-Kopp law is valid only in some special cases.

  11. Global and site specific multimedia (field) studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cutshall, N.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with radioactive fallout, with organic contaminants and with heavy metals has amply demonstrated that cross-media transfers are common and that understanding the transport, cycling, and fate of these contaminants requires a multimedia approach. Nonetheless, pollutants with similar physical and chemical attributes may follow markedly different pathways. The frequency of exceptions to predictions based on simplistic models is also sufficient to show that direct investigation of environmental contamination is essential to confirm validity of models used for conceptualizing a problem or for control. Modeling based on multimedia premises and regulatory controls that encompass multimedia considerations are challenged by a dilemma, however. First, the development of multimedia models or regulatory frameworks represents simplification and generalization. This is true for several reasons: (1) inadequate understanding of physical and environmental factors which control specific cross-media transfer; (2) the absence of specific data on certain multimedia pollutant concentrations; (3) even the most powerful computers do not have sufficient speed and capacity to deal with the known complexities of natural systems. On the other hand, for contaminants such as mercury, it may be necessary to include great detail; the overall distribution in the environment may be less important than the rate of some minor process. With sufficient experience and good judgment of what can be ignored, the simplifications and generalizations can be made. For the present, and for the foreseeable future, however, they absolutely must be accompanied by thorough field validation and monitoring.

  12. Improved neutron-gamma discrimination for a 6Li-glass neutron detector using digital signal analysis methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Cai -Lin; Riedel, Richard A.

    2016-01-14

    A 6Li-glass scintillator (GS20) based neutron Anger camera was developed for time-of-flight single-crystal diffraction instruments at SNS. Traditional pulse-height analysis (PHA) for neutron-gamma discrimination (NGD) resulted in the neutron-gamma efficiency ratio (defined as NGD ratio) on the order of 104. The NGD ratios of Anger cameras need to be improved for broader applications including neutron reflectometers. For this purpose, five digital signal analysis methods of individual waveforms from PMTs were proposed using: i). pulse-amplitude histogram; ii). power spectrum analysis combined with the maximum pulse amplitude; iii). two event parameters (a1, b0) obtained from Wiener filter; iv). an effective amplitude (m)more » obtained from an adaptive least-mean-square (LMS) filter; and v). a cross-correlation (CC) coefficient between an individual waveform and a reference. The NGD ratios can be 1-102 times those from traditional PHA method. A brighter scintillator GS2 has better NGD ratio than GS20, but lower neutron detection efficiency. The ultimate NGD ratio is related to the ambient, high-energy background events. Moreover, our results indicate the NGD capability of neutron Anger cameras can be improved using digital signal analysis methods and brighter neutron scintillators.« less

  13. Improved neutron-gamma discrimination for a (6)Li-glass neutron detector using digital signal analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L; Riedel, R A

    2016-01-01

    A (6)Li-glass scintillator (GS20) based neutron Anger camera was developed for time-of-flight single-crystal diffraction instruments at Spallation Neutron Source. Traditional Pulse-Height Analysis (PHA) for Neutron-Gamma Discrimination (NGD) resulted in the neutron-gamma efficiency ratio (defined as NGD ratio) on the order of 10(4). The NGD ratios of Anger cameras need to be improved for broader applications including neutron reflectometers. For this purpose, six digital signal analysis methods of individual waveforms acquired from photomultiplier tubes were proposed using (i) charge integration, (ii) pulse-amplitude histograms, (iii) power spectrum analysis combined with the maximum pulse-amplitude, (iv) two event parameters (a1, b0) obtained from a Wiener filter, (v) an effective amplitude (m) obtained from an adaptive least-mean-square filter, and (vi) a cross-correlation coefficient between individual and reference waveforms. The NGD ratios are about 70 times those from the traditional PHA method. Our results indicate the NGD capabilities of neutron Anger cameras based on GS20 scintillators can be significantly improved with digital signal analysis methods. PMID:26827314

  14. Improved neutron-gamma discrimination for a 6Li-glass neutron detector using digital signal analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. L.; Riedel, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    A 6Li-glass scintillator (GS20) based neutron Anger camera was developed for time-of-flight single-crystal diffraction instruments at Spallation Neutron Source. Traditional Pulse-Height Analysis (PHA) for Neutron-Gamma Discrimination (NGD) resulted in the neutron-gamma efficiency ratio (defined as NGD ratio) on the order of 104. The NGD ratios of Anger cameras need to be improved for broader applications including neutron reflectometers. For this purpose, six digital signal analysis methods of individual waveforms acquired from photomultiplier tubes were proposed using (i) charge integration, (ii) pulse-amplitude histograms, (iii) power spectrum analysis combined with the maximum pulse-amplitude, (iv) two event parameters (a1, b0) obtained from a Wiener filter, (v) an effective amplitude (m) obtained from an adaptive least-mean-square filter, and (vi) a cross-correlation coefficient between individual and reference waveforms. The NGD ratios are about 70 times those from the traditional PHA method. Our results indicate the NGD capabilities of neutron Anger cameras based on GS20 scintillators can be significantly improved with digital signal analysis methods.

  15. Mobile neutron/gamma waste assay system for characterization of waste containing transuranics, uranium, and fission/activation products

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, D.R.; Haggard, D.; Lemons, C.

    1994-12-31

    A new integrated neutron/gamma assay system has been built for measuring 55-gallon drums at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The system is unique because it allows simultaneous measurement of neutrons and gamma-rays. This technique also allows measurement of transuranics (TRU), uranium, and fission/activation products, screening for shielded Special Nuclear Material prior to disposal, and critically determinations prior to transportation. The new system is positioned on a platform with rollers and installed inside a trailer or large van to allow transportation of the system to the waste site instead of movement of the drums to the scanner. The ability to move the system to the waste drums is particularly useful for drum retrieval programs common to all DOE sites and minimizes transportation problems on the site. For longer campaigns, the system can be moved into a facility. The mobile system consists of two separate subsystems: a passive Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS) and a {open_quotes}clam-shell{close_quotes} passive neutron counter. The SGS with high purity germanium detector and {sup 75}Se transmission source simultaneously scan the height of the drum allowing identification of unshieled {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} in the drum or segments where the matrix is too dense for the transmission source to penetrate. Dense segments can flag shielding material that could be used to hide plutonium or uranium during the gamma analysis. The passive nuetron counter with JSR-12N Neutron Coincidence Analyzer measures the coincident neutrons from the spontaneous fission of even isotopes of plutonium. Because high-density shielding produces minimal absorption of neutrons, compared to gamma rays, the passive neutron portion of the system can detect shielded SNM. Measurements to evaluate the performance of the system are still underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  16. Operational specificity: implications for field-based replications.

    PubMed

    Derer, K R

    1985-03-01

    This paper discusses problems with field-based replications of behavioral interventions. Major issues identified include operational specificity, mislabelling of procedures, relative contributions of components in multi-faceted treatment packages, and impediments to systematic replication. The paper concludes with a call for increased operational specificity in the reporting of both baseline and intervention procedures on the part of researchers and clinicians responsible for dissemination. PMID:3998180

  17. An overview of field-specific designs of microbial EOR

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Fox, S.L.; Jackson, J.D.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    The selection and design of an MEOR process for application in a specific field involves geological, reservoir, and biological characterization. Microbially mediated oil recovery mechanisms (bigenic gas, biopolymers, and biosurfactants) are defined by the types of microorganisms used. The engineering and biological character of a given reservoir must be understood to correctly select a microbial system to enhance oil recovery. This paper discusses the methods used to evaluate three fields with distinct characteristics and production problems for the applicability of MEOR would not be applicable in two of the three fields considered. The development of a microbial oil recovery process for the third field appeared promising. Development of a bacterial consortium capable of producing the desired metabolites was initiated, and field isolates were characterized.

  18. An overview of field specific designs of microbial EOR

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Fox, S.L.; Jackson, J.D.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-12-01

    The selection and design of a microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process for application in a specific field involves geological, reservoir, and biological characterization. Microbially mediated oil recovery mechanisms (biogenic gas, biopolymers, and biosurfactants) are defined by the types of microorganisms used. The engineering and biological character of a given reservoir must be understood to correctly select a microbial system to enhance oil recovery. The objective of this paper is to discuss the methods used to evaluate three fields with distinct characteristics and production problems for the applicability of MEOR technology. Reservoir characteristics and laboratory results indicated that MEOR would not be applicable in two of the three fields considered. The development of a microbial oil recovery process for the third field appeared promising. Development of a bacterial consortium capable of producing the desired metabolites was initiated and field isolates were characterized.

  19. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), and static induction transistors (SITs) are given. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Postirradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  20. MA-NRBC: First successful attempt for neutron gamma discrimination in plastic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, S.; Kondrasovs, V.; Corre, G.; Bourbotte, J. M.; Ferragut, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a new electronic hardware and algorithms enabling discrimination between neutron and gamma in plastic scintillators together with the first associated experimental results, are presented. This electronic platform is mainly based onto a quad 200 MHz ADCs. Using phase rotating, it is possible to sample the signal up to 800 MHz equivalent, with 8 bits precision. This sampling frequency allows a real time signal processing. Despite all previous work, we have shown during this study that it is possible to discriminate neutron from gamma in plastic scintillators even for low energy neutrons (less than 10 MeV). Two patents have been accepted and registered; the first deals with the intrinsic signal processing and the second with thermal stabilization methods of photomultiplier tubes. The system could be used up to 100 000 events per second (both gamma and neutron). This system is currently dedicated to homeland security devices; this is due to its response time (in the order of 1 up to 3 seconds). The next step is to implement the thermal stabilization algorithm in the FPGA and micro-controller to obtain a global system free from any trouble caused by the environment thermal variations. This aspect of the research is crucial for measurements in the field. The time response should also be improved to make it a reliable alternative to Helium-3 shortage for neutron detection at borders checkpoint. (authors)

  1. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of neutron and gamma rays on the electrical and switching characteristics of power semiconductor switches must be known and understood by the designer of the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. The SP-100 radiation requirements at 25 m from the nuclear source are a neutron fluence of 10(exp 13) n/sq cm and a gamma dose of 0.5 Mrads. Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are presented. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  2. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, G.E.; Frasca, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the electrical and switching characteristics of power semiconductor switches must be known and understood by the designer of the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. The SP-100 radiation requirements at 25 m from the nuclear source are a neutron fluence of 10{sup 13} n/cm {sup 2} and a gamma dose of 0.5 Mrads. Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are given in this paper. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  3. Dose homogeneity specification for reference dosimetry of nonstandard fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eunah; Soisson, Emilie; Seuntjens, Jan

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity of the plan-class specific correction factor to dose distributions in composite nonstandard field dosimetry. Methods: A cylindrical water-filled PMMA phantom was constructed at the center of which reference absorbed dose could be measured. Ten different TomoTherapy-based IMRT fields were created on the CT images of the phantom. The dose distribution for each IMRT field was estimated at the position of a radiation detector or ionization chamber. The dose in each IMRT field normalized to that in a reference 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field was measured using a PTW micro liquid ion chamber. Based on the new dosimetry formalism, a plan-class specific correction factor k{sub Q{sub p{sub c{sub s{sub r,Q}{sup f{sub p}{sub c}{sub s}{sub r},f{sub r}{sub e}{sub f}}}}}} for each field was measured for two Farmer-type chambers, Exradin A12 and NE2571, as well as for a smaller Exradin A1SL chamber. The dependence of the measured correction factor on parameters characterizing dose distribution was analyzed. Results: Uncertainty on the plan-class specific correction factor measurement was in the range of 0.3%-0.5% and 0.3%-0.8% for the Farmer-type chambers and the Exradin A1SL, respectively. When the heterogeneity of the central region of the target volume was less than 5%, the correction factor did not differ from unity by more than 0.7% for the three air-filled ionization chambers. For more heterogeneous dose deliveries, the correction factor differed from unity by up to 2.4% for the Farmer-type chambers. For the Exradin A1SL, the correction factor was closer to unity due to the reduced effect of dose gradients, while it was highly variable in different IMRT fields because of a more significant impact of positioning uncertainties on the response of this chamber. Conclusions: The authors have shown that a plan-class specific correction factor can be specified as a function of plan evaluation parameters especially for Farmer-type chambers. This work

  4. Pulsed-Neutron-Gamma (PNG) saturation monitoring at the Ketzin pilot site considering displacement and evaporation/precipitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Gunther; Henninges, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in saline aquifers is a promising option to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere and to mitigate global climate change. During the proposed CO2 injection process, application of suitable techniques for monitoring of the induced changes in the subsurface is required. Existing models for the spreading of the CO2, as well as mixing of the different fluids associated with saturation changes or resulting issues from mutual solubility between brine and CO2, need to be checked. For well logging in cased boreholes, which would be the standard situation encountered under the given conditions, only a limited number of techniques like pulsed neutron-gamma (PNG) logging are applicable. The PNG technique uses controlled neutron bursts, which interact with the nuclei of the surrounding borehole and formation. Due to the collision with these neutrons, atoms from the surrounding environment emit gamma rays. The main PNG derived parameter is the capture cross section (Σ) which is derived from the decline of gamma rays with time from neutron capture processes. The high Σ contrast between brine and CO2 results in a high sensitivity to evaluate saturation changes. This makes PNG monitoring favourable for saturation profiling especially in time-lapse mode. Previously, the conventional PNG saturation model based on a displacement process has been used for PNG interpretation in different CO2 storage projects in saline aquifers. But in addition to the displacement process, the mutual solubility between brine and CO2 adds further complex processes like evaporation and salt precipitation, which are not considered in PNG saturation models. These evaporation and precipitation processes are relevant in the vicinity of an injection well, where dry CO2 enters the reservoir. The Σ brine value depends strongly on the brine salinity e.g. its chlorine content which makes PNG measurements suitable for evaporation and salt precipitation

  5. Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) data processing system specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, D.; Gomez, R.; Miller, A.

    1980-01-01

    The software specifications for the MAGSAT data processing system (MDPS) are presented. The MDPS is divided functionally into preprocessing of primary input data, data management, chronicle processing, and postprocessing. Data organization and validity, and checks of spacecraft and instrumentation are dicussed. Output products of the MDPS, including various plots and data tapes, are described. Formats for important tapes are presented. Dicussions and mathematical formulations for coordinate transformations and field model coefficients are included.

  6. Development of a specific anaerobic field test for aerobic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Christiano Robles Rodrigues; Borelli, Marcello Tadeu Caetano; Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen's d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

  7. Development of a Specific Anaerobic Field Test for Aerobic Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen’s d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

  8. Tissue-specific transcriptomics in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Nathan W; Veltsos, Paris; Tan, Yew-Foon; Millar, A Harvey; Ritchie, Michael G; Simmons, Leigh W

    2013-02-01

    Field crickets (family Gryllidae) frequently are used in studies of behavioral genetics, sexual selection, and sexual conflict, but there have been no studies of transcriptomic differences among different tissue types. We evaluated transcriptome variation among testis, accessory gland, and the remaining whole-body preparations from males of the field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. Non-normalized cDNA libraries from each tissue were sequenced on the Roche 454 platform, and a master assembly was constructed using testis, accessory gland, and whole-body preparations. A total of 940,200 reads were assembled into 41,962 contigs, to which 36,856 singletons (reads not assembled into a contig) were added to provide a total of 78,818 sequences used in annotation analysis. A total of 59,072 sequences (75%) were unique to one of the three tissues. Testis tissue had the greatest proportion of tissue-specific sequences (62.6%), followed by general body (56.43%) and accessory gland tissue (44.16%). We tested the hypothesis that tissues expressing gene products expected to evolve rapidly as a result of sexual selection--testis and accessory gland--would yield a smaller proportion of BLASTx matches to homologous genes in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster compared with whole-body tissue. Uniquely expressed sequences in both testis and accessory gland showed a significantly lower rate of matching to annotated D. melanogaster genes compared with those from general body tissue. These results correspond with empirical evidence that genes expressed in testis and accessory gland tissue are rapidly evolving targets of selection.

  9. Hemisphere-specific treatment of dyslexia subtypes: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Bakker, D J; Bouma, A; Gardien, C J

    1990-01-01

    Evidence is discussed to show that so-called L- and P-type dyslexia result from deviations in the development of hemispheric subservience in learning to read. Investigations into the validity of the L/P classification are reviewed, as are laboratory experiments on the effects of so-called hemisphere-specific stimulation (HSS). In the present field experiment, 28 L-dyslexic children (mean chronological and reading age 10.6 and 7.5 years, respectively) received HSS of the right hemisphere by the presentation of words to the fingers of the left hand, and 26 P-dyslexic children (mean chronological and reading age 9.4 and 7.2 years, respectively) received HSS of the left hemisphere by the presentation of words to the fingers of the right hand. Control L and P subjects were treated according to the discretion of the remedial teacher. The results underscore the findings of previous laboratory experiments in that (a) HSS-treated L-dyslexics, relative to controls, tended to show larger improvement of accuracy in text reading; and (b) HSS-treated P-dyslexics, relative to controls, showed larger improvement of fluency in word reading. PMID:2398315

  10. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Exceed test procedures, use the test procedures and equipment specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart J. ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing...

  11. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Exceed test procedures, use the test procedures and equipment specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart J. ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing...

  12. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR Free-Field Environment (ACRR-FF-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity free-field reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  13. A computerized perimeter for assessing modality-specific visual field loss.

    PubMed

    Calabro, Finnegan J; Vaina, Lucia M

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of visual field loss provides a valuable diagnostic metric for studying the effects of damage to the retina, optic nerve or visual cortex. We describe a tool, the Quadrant Vision Perimeter (QVp), to rapidly and accurately measure visual fields. In addition to measuring the location of visual deficits, the tool can assess modality-specific field loss (e.g., impaired detection of luminance, motion, depth and color) and severity of the deficit. We present validation and normalization for parameters of visual attributes, as well as exemplar comparisons of visual fields obtained automatically using QVp to standardized perimeters for three stroke patients. Patient visual fields are compared among visual features to assess modality-specific deficits, and over time, to measure fine changes in visual fields, due either to spontaneous recovery or visual degradation. PMID:22254733

  14. Application of LiF thermoluminescence dosimeter powders in neutron gamma mixed field dosimetry and dose mapping in the thermal column of a triga Mk II reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Böck, Helmut; Vana, Norbert

    1987-02-01

    Thermal neutron and fission product gamma dose rates at different positions in the horizontal thermal column of a TRIGA Mk-II reactor, as well as in a cadmium cladded cylindrical cavity embedded in a borated wooden box placed in the thermal column, were assessed with TLD-600 and TLD-700 dosimeter powders.

  15. Assessing Field-Specific Risk of Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome Using Satellite Imagery in Iowa.

    PubMed

    Yang, S; Li, X; Chen, C; Kyveryga, P; Yang, X B

    2016-08-01

    Moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite imagery from 2004 to 2013 were used to assess the field-specific risks of soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by Fusarium virguliforme in Iowa. Fields with a high frequency of significant decrease (>10%) of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) observed in late July to middle August on historical imagery were hypothetically considered as high SDS risk. These high-risk fields had higher slopes and shorter distances to flowlines, e.g., creeks and drainages, particularly in the Des Moines lobe. Field data in 2014 showed a significantly higher SDS level in the high-risk fields than fields selected without considering NDVI information. On average, low-risk fields had 10 times lower F. virguliforme soil density, determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, compared with other surveyed fields. Ordinal logistic regression identified positive correlations between SDS and slope, June NDVI, and May maximum temperature, but high June maximum temperature hindered SDS. A modeled SDS risk map showed a clear trend of potential disease occurrences across Iowa. Landsat imagery was analyzed similarly, to discuss the ability to utilize higher spatial resolution data. The results demonstrated the great potential of both MODIS and Landsat imagery for SDS field-specific risk assessment. PMID:27070424

  16. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  17. Specific heat in KFe2As2 in zero and applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Kim, E. G.; Stewart, G. R.; Chen, X. H.; Wang, X. F.

    2011-05-01

    The specific heat down to 0.08 K of the iron pnictide superconductor KFe2As2 was measured on a single-crystal sample with a residual resistivity ratio of ˜650, with a Tconset determined by a specific heat of 3.7 K. The zero-field normal-state specific heat divided by temperature, C/T, was extrapolated from above Tc to T=0 by insisting on agreement between the extrapolated normal-state entropy at Tc, Snextrap(Tc), and the measured superconducting-state entropy at Tc, Ssmeas(Tc), since for a second-order phase transition the two entropies must be equal. This extrapolation would indicate that this rather clean sample of KFe2As2 exhibits non-Fermi-liquid behavior; i.e., C/T increases at low temperatures, in agreement with the reported non-Fermi-liquid behavior in the resistivity. However, specific heat as a function of magnetic field shows that the shoulder feature around 0.7 K, which is commonly seen in KFe2As2 samples, is not evidence for a second superconducting gap as has been previously proposed but instead is due to an unknown magnetic impurity phase, which can affect the entropy balance and the extrapolation of the normal-state specific heat. This peak (somewhat larger in magnitude) with similar field dependence is also found in a less pure sample of KFe2As2, with a residual resistivity ratio of only 90 and Tconset=3.1 K. These data, combined with the measured normal-state specific heat in field to suppress superconductivity, allow the conclusion that an increase in the normal-state specific heat as T→0 is in fact not seen in KFe2As2; i.e., Fermi-liquid behavior is observed.

  18. General and Supervision-Specific Attachment Styles: Relations to Student Perceptions of Field Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Susanne; BrintzenhofeSzoc, Karlynn; Mohr, Jonathan; Saks, Loretta Vitale

    2008-01-01

    This study extends research on the field supervisory relationship by examining general attachment style and supervision-specific attachment style in a sample of 72 master's-level social work students. Attachment variables were investigated in relation to student perceptions of the supervisory working alliance and supervisory style. Students with…

  19. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume III: Inspection Procedures for Specific Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume III, explains in detail the following: inspection procedures for specific sources, kraft pulp mills, animal rendering, steel mill furnaces, coking operations, petroleum refineries, chemical plants, non-ferrous smelting and refining, foundries, cement plants, aluminum…

  20. Influence of size distribution and field amplitude on specific loss power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boskovic, M.; Goya, G. F.; Vranjes-Djuric, S.; Jovic, N.; Jancar, B.; Antic, B.

    2015-03-01

    Herein we present the results of specific loss power (SLP) analysis of polydisperse water based ferrofluids, Fe3O4/PEG200 and Fe3O4/PEG6000, with average Fe3O4 particle size of 9 nm and 11 nm, respectively. Specific loss power was measured in alternating magnetic field of various amplitudes and at fixed frequency of 580.5 kHz. Maximum SLP values acquired were 195 W/g for Fe3O4/PEG200 and 60 W/g for Fe3O4/PEG6000 samples. The samples were labeled as superparamagnetic by magnetization measurements, but SLP field dependence showed deviation from the behavior predicted by the commonly employed linear response theory. The scope of this theory for both samples with wide particle size distribution is discussed. Deviation from the expected behavior is explained by referring to polydisperse nature of the samples and field dependent relaxation rates.

  1. Field experimental approach to bromide leaching as affected by scale-specific rainfall characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendroth, Ole; Vasquez, Vicente; Matocha, Christopher J.

    2011-06-01

    Although inherent soil spatial and temporal variabilities complicate analysis of solute leaching, impacts of specific processes associated with rainfall amount, intensity, and frequency on solute leaching under field conditions require investigation. The objective of this study was to introduce (1) a new experimental approach to quantify bromide (Br-) leaching under field conditions as influenced by rainfall characteristics and (2) analytical opportunities applicable to scale-specific spatial treatment distribution. The quantitative range of treatments was established in nonrandom periodically oscillating patterns. The characteristic length of a period over which a treatment fluctuates was considered the specific treatment scale. A Br- tracer study was established in the field with treatments applied at two different spatial scales. The tracer was applied with a sprayer in a transect of 32 plots, each 2 m long, followed by a site-specific sprinkler irrigation, and 128 soil cores subsequently taken at 0.5 m intervals and divided into 10-cm depth increments. The scale-specific associations between treatments and Br- center of mass (COM) were addressed. Treatments can be periodically imposed over specific scales and their spatial relationships quantified with semivariance and power spectral analysis. An additive state-space model was applied to separate the long- and short-wave components of Br- COM. Subsequently, the large-scale process was described in an autoregressive state-space model. The proposed experimental approach and the separation of small- and large-scale variability components support studying soil ecosystem processes that vary at different scales even in the presence of underlying large-scale trends that are currently considered obstacles in field research.

  2. The role of specific humidity fields in the diagnosis of stratosphere troposphere exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.J.; Bithell, M.; Cox, B.D.

    1994-09-01

    METEOSAT 4 satellite observations of water vapor show evidence of a rich spectrum of fine scale structure that may be indicative of the transfer of dry, ozone-rich air from the stratosphere deep into the troposphere (Appenzeller and Davies, 1992). The extent to which air within stratospheric intrusions is irreversibly mixed and remains in the troposphere is of considerable current interest, particularly in respect of pollution effects of increasing numbers of subsonic and supersonic aircraft flights that traverse the lower stratosphere. We diagnose potential vorticity and the corresponding distributions of specific humidity from a numerical weather forecast model and show that the latter field displays many of the characteristics of the Meteosat data. Specific humidity fields on both a pressure surface which corresponds approximately to the Meteosat data sampling and on an isentropic surface are compared. We show the presence of streamer-like features in specific humidity that are not evident in the PV fields. We also note the prediliction for the streamers to break off, be advected by the flow and to subsequently become `attached` to other features. Care is therefore required in the interpretation of the Meteosat data for stratosphere troposphere exchange studies. Nevertheless, we suggest that the importance of specific humidity as an indicator of the dynamical evolution of upper level atmospheric flow has previously been overlooked.

  3. Magnetic Field Dependence of the Specific Heat of CuGeO_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, J. W.; Kuo, Y.-K.; Powell, D. K.

    1996-03-01

    In previous work,(Y.K. Kuo, et al. al), Solid State Commun. \\underline94, 385 (1995). we showed that the specific heat anomaly of CuGeO3 at its T_c=14 K spin-Peierls transition was surprisingly close to mean-field in magnitude, but that at lower temperatures the excess specific heat (Δc ≡ cP - βT^3) greatly exceeded its mean-field value. We have now measured the magnetic field (B<7T) dependence of cP in the low field, diamagnetic, dimerized state using ac (f ≈ 30 Hz) calorimetry.^1 We find that Δc(T/T_c(B),B) ≈ Δc(T/T_c(0),0) this field dependence is at least 3 times weaker than expected from the Zeeman splitting of the triplet magnon excitations,(O. Fujita, et al. al), Phys. Rev. Lett. \\underline74, 1677 (1995). suggesting that changes in thermal occupation of Sz = ±1 magnons (at τ ≈ 5 ms) is suppressed. *Supported in part by NSF Grants EHR-9108764 and DMR-9300507.

  4. Structure-specific magnetic field inhomogeneities and its effect on the correlation time.

    PubMed

    Ziener, Christian H; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Melkus, Gerd; Weber, Thomas; Herold, Volker; Jakob, Peter M

    2006-12-01

    We describe the relationship between the correlation time and microscopic spatial inhomogeneities in the static magnetic field. The theory takes into account diffusion of nuclear spins in the inhomogeneous field created by magnetized objects. A simple general expression for the correlation time is obtained. It is shown that the correlation time is dependent on a characteristic length, the diffusion coefficient of surrounding medium, the permeability of the surface and the volume fraction of the magnetized objects. For specific geometries (spheres and cylinders), exact analytical expressions for the correlation time are given. The theory can be applied to contrast agents (magnetically labeled cells), capillary network, BOLD effect and so forth.

  5. Reference field specification and preliminary beam selection strategy for accelerator-based GCR simulation.

    PubMed

    Slaba, Tony C; Blattnig, Steve R; Norbury, John W; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities and possible biological considerations. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, a preliminary approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. This approach is not a final design for the GCR simulator, but rather a single step within a broader design strategy. It is shown that the beam selection methodology is tied directly to the reference environment, allows facility constraints to be incorporated, and may be adjusted to account for additional constraints imposed by biological or animal care considerations. The major biology questions are not addressed herein but are discussed in a companion paper published in the present issue of this journal. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed

  6. Reference field specification and preliminary beam selection strategy for accelerator-based GCR simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities and possible biological considerations. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, a preliminary approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. This approach is not a final design for the GCR simulator, but rather a single step within a broader design strategy. It is shown that the beam selection methodology is tied directly to the reference environment, allows facility constraints to be incorporated, and may be adjusted to account for additional constraints imposed by biological or animal care considerations. The major biology questions are not addressed herein but are discussed in a companion paper published in the present issue of this journal. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed

  7. Recommendations for Guidelines for Environment-Specific Magnetic-Field Measurements, Rapid Program Engineering Project #2

    SciTech Connect

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.; IIT Research Institute; Magnetic Measurements; Survey Research Center, University of California; T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The purpose of this project was to document widely applicable methods for characterizing the magnetic fields in a given environment, recognizing the many sources co-existing within that space. The guidelines are designed to allow the reader to follow an efficient process to (1) plan the goals and requirements of a magnetic-field study, (2) develop a study structure and protocol, and (3) document and carry out the plan. These guidelines take the reader first through the process of developing a basic study strategy, then through planning and performing the data collection. Last, the critical factors of data management, analysis reporting, and quality assurance are discussed. The guidelines are structured to allow the researcher to develop a protocol that responds to specific site and project needs. The Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) is based on exposure to magnetic fields and the potential health effects. Therefore, the most important focus for these magnetic-field measurement guidelines is relevance to exposure. The assumed objective of an environment-specific measurement is to characterize the environment (given a set of occupants and magnetic-field sources) so that information about the exposure of the occupants may be inferred. Ideally, the researcher seeks to obtain complete or "perfect" information about these magnetic fields, so that personal exposure might also be modeled perfectly. However, complete data collection is not feasible. In fact, it has been made more difficult as the research field has moved to expand the list of field parameters measured, increasing the cost and complexity of performing a measurement and analyzing the data. The guidelines address this issue by guiding the user to design a measurement protocol that will gather the most exposure-relevant information based on the locations of people in relation to the sources. We suggest that the "microenvironment" become the base unit of area in a study, with

  8. High-k Dielectric Passivation: Novel Considerations Enabling Cell Specific Lysis Induced by Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Klemens J; Barth, Sven; Keplinger, Franz; Noehammer, Christa; Peham, Johannes R

    2016-08-24

    A better understanding of the electrodynamic behavior of cells interacting with electric fields would allow for novel scientific insights and would lead to the next generation of cell manipulation, diagnostics, and treatment. Here, we introduce a promising electrode design by using metal oxide high-k dielectric passivation. The thermally generated dielectric passivation layer enables efficient electric field coupling to the fluid sample comprising cells while simultaneously decoupling the electrode ohmically from the electrolyte, allowing for better control and adjustability of electric field effects due to reduced electrochemical reactions at the electrode surface. This approach demonstrates cell-size specific lysis with electric fields in a microfluidic flow-through design resulting in 99.8% blood cell lysis at 6 s exposure without affecting the viability of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial spike-ins. The advantages of this new approach can support next-generation investigations of electrodynamics in biological systems and their exploitation for cell manipulation in multiple fields of medicine, life science, and industry. PMID:27466697

  9. Specific heat versus field for LiFe(1-x)Cu(x)As.

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Stewart, G R; Xing, L Y; Wang, X C; Jin, C Q

    2012-11-28

    LiFeAs is one of the new class of iron superconductors with a bulk [Formula: see text] in the 15-17 K range. We report on the specific heat characterization of single crystal material prepared by self-flux growth techniques with significantly improved properties, including a much decreased residual gamma, γ(r) (≡C/T as T → 0), in the superconducting state. Thus, in contrast to previous explanations of a finite γ(r) in LiFeAs being due to intrinsic states in the superconducting gap, the present work shows that such a finite residual γ in LiFeAs is instead a function of sample quality. Further, since LiFeAs has been characterized as nodeless with multiple superconducting gaps, we report here on its specific heat properties in zero and applied magnetic fields, to compare to similar results on nodal iron superconductors. For comparison, we also investigate LiFe(0.98)Cu(0.02)As, which has the reduced T(c) of ≈9 K and an H(c2) of 15 T. Interestingly, although presumably both LiFeAs and LiFe(0.98)Cu(0.02)As are nodeless, they clearly show a non-linear dependence of the electronic density of states (is proportional to specific heat γ) at the Fermi energy in the mixed state with the applied field, similar to the Volovik effect for nodal superconductors. However, rather than indicating nodal behavior, the satisfactory comparison with a recent theory for γ(H) for a superconductor with two isotropic gaps in the presence of impurities argues for nodeless behavior. Thus, in terms of specific heat in a magnetic field, LiFeAs can serve as the prototypical multiband, nodeless iron superconductor.

  10. Surface tension of electrolyte interfaces: ionic specificity within a field-theory approach.

    PubMed

    Markovich, Tomer; Andelman, David; Podgornik, Rudi

    2015-01-28

    We study the surface tension of ionic solutions at air/water and oil/water interfaces by using field-theoretical methods and including a finite proximal surface-region with ionic-specific interactions. The free energy is expanded to first-order in a loop expansion beyond the mean-field result. We calculate the excess surface tension and obtain analytical predictions that reunite the Onsager-Samaras pioneering result (which does not agree with experimental data), with the ionic specificity of the Hofmeister series. We derive analytically the surface-tension dependence on the ionic strength, ionic size, and ion-surface interaction, and show consequently that the Onsager-Samaras result is consistent with the one-loop correction beyond the mean-field result. Our theory fits well a wide range of salt concentrations for different monovalent ions using one fit parameter per electrolyte and reproduces the reverse Hofmeister series for anions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces.

  11. Mapping soil attributes for site-specific management of a Montana field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John P.; Spangrud, Damian J.; Landon, Melissa A.; Jacobsen, Jeffrey S.; Nielson, Gerald A.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional soil maps represent the distribution of soil attributes across landscapes but with less precision than is needed to obtain the full economic and environmental benefits of site- specific crop management. This study quantifies the spatial variability of three agronomically significant soil attributes: (1) thickness of mollic epipedon, (2) organic matter content (OM), and (3) pH as related to soil survey map units, spectral data, and terrain attributes for a 20 ha field in Montana. Analysis of Order 1 (1:7920-scale) Soil Survey map units indicates substantial variation in all three soil attributes. There was some evidence that similar attribute values were clustered in the field (0.40 - 0.46 Moran's Coefficients). Two spectral band ratios explained 64% of the variation in OM across the field. GPS/GIS-derived wetness index, sediment transport index, elevation, and slope gradient explained 48% of OM variation. Wetness index, slope gradient, and plan curvature combined to explain 48% of the variation in mollic epipedon thickness. Elevation and wetness index explained just 13% of pH variation. Two spectral band ratios, specific catchment area, and wetness index combined to explain 70% of the variation in OM at 66 sampling sites. Four contour map representations of OM illustrate the sensitivity of the final maps to variations in input data and interpolation method.

  12. Rehabilitation of reading and visual exploration in visual field disorders: transfer or specificity?

    PubMed

    Schuett, Susanne; Heywood, Charles A; Kentridge, Robert W; Dauner, Ruth; Zihl, Josef

    2012-03-01

    Reading and visual exploration impairments in unilateral homonymous visual field disorders are frequent and disabling consequences of acquired brain injury. Compensatory therapies have been developed, which allow patients to regain sufficient reading and visual exploration performance through systematic oculomotor training. However, it is still unclear whether the reading and visual exploration impairments require specific compensatory training for their improvement. We present the first cross-over rehabilitation study to determine whether the training-related performance improvements are task-specific, or whether there is a transfer of training-related improvements between reading and visual exploration. We compared the therapeutic effects of compensatory oculomotor reading and visual exploration training in 36 patients with unilateral homonymous visual field loss in a cross-over design. In addition, we explored whether the training sequence determines the overall treatment outcome. Our findings demonstrate that the training-related improvements in reading and visual exploration are highly specific and task-dependent, and there was no effect of training sequence. PMID:22307201

  13. Soil specific re-calibration of water content sensors for a field-scale sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, Caley K.; Brown, David J.; Anderson, Todd; Brooks, Erin S.; Yourek, Matt A.

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining accurate soil moisture data from a sensor network requires sensor calibration. Soil moisture sensors are factory calibrated, but multiple site specific factors may contribute to sensor inaccuracies. Thus, sensors should be calibrated for the specific soil type and conditions in which they will be installed. Lab calibration of a large number of sensors prior to installation in a heterogeneous setting may not be feasible, and it may not reflect the actual performance of the installed sensor. We investigated a multi-step approach to retroactively re-calibrate sensor water content data from the dielectric permittivity readings obtained by sensors in the field. We used water content data collected since 2009 from a sensor network installed at 42 locations and 5 depths (210 sensors total) within the 37-ha Cook Agronomy Farm with highly variable soils located in the Palouse region of the Northwest United States. First, volumetric water content was calculated from sensor dielectric readings using three equations: (1) a factory calibration using the Topp equation; (2) a custom calibration obtained empirically from an instrumented soil in the field; and (3) a hybrid equation that combines the Topp and custom equations. Second, we used soil physical properties (particle size and bulk density) and pedotransfer functions to estimate water content at saturation, field capacity, and wilting point for each installation location and depth. We also extracted the same reference points from the sensor readings, when available. Using these reference points, we re-scaled the sensor readings, such that water content was restricted to the range of values that we would expect given the physical properties of the soil. The re-calibration accuracy was assessed with volumetric water content measurements obtained from field-sampled cores taken on multiple dates. In general, the re-calibration was most accurate when all three reference points (saturation, field capacity, and wilting

  14. Specific heating power of fatty acid and phospholipid stabilized magnetic fluids in an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCuyper, M.; Hodenius, M.; Ivanova, G.; Baumann, M.; Paciok, E.; Eckert, T.; Soenen, S. J. H.; Schmitz-Rode, T.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic fluids (MFs) with a similar narrow size distribution of the iron oxide core were stabilized with lauric acid (MF 1), oleate (MF 2) or, after dialysis in the presence of liposomes, with phospholipid molecules (MF 3 and MF 4, respectively). The hydrodynamic sizes of the MF 1 and MF 3 were half those found for MF 2 and MF 4. The MFs were exposed to inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field at a frequency of 200 kHz and a maximum magnetic field strength of 3.8 kA m-1. Specific absorption rates (SAR) of 294 ± 42 (MF 1), 214 ± 16 (MF 2), 297 ± 13 (MF 3) and 213 ± 6 W g-1 Fe (MF 4) were obtained. The data for MF 2 and MF 4 were identical to those found for the commercially available ferucarbotran. The biomedical relevance of the phospholipid-coated MFs is briefly discussed.

  15. Comparing intra- and inter-specific effects on litter decomposition in an old-field ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Crutsinger, Greg; Sanders, Dr. Nathan James; Classen, Aimee T

    2009-09-01

    Plant species can differ in the quantity and quality of leaf litter they produce, and many studies have examined whether plant species diversity affects leaf-litter decomposition and nutrient release. A growing number of studies have indicated that intra-specific variation within plant species can also affect key ecosystem processes. However, the relative importance of intra- versus inter-specific variation for the functioning of ecosystems remains poorly known. Here, we investigate the effects of intra-specific variation in a dominant old-field plant species, tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), and inter-specific variation among goldenrod species on litter quality, decomposition, and nitrogen (N) release. We found that the nutrient concentration of leaf litter varied among genotypes, which translated into 50% difference in decomposition rates. Variation among other goldenrod species in decomposition rate was more than twice that of genetic variation within S. altissima. Furthermore, by manipulating litterbags to contain 1, 3, 6, or 9 genotypes, we found that S. altissima genotype identity had much stronger effects than did genotypic diversity on leaf-litter quality, decomposition, and N release. Taken together, these results suggest that the order of ecological importance for controlling leaf-litter decomposition and N release dynamics is plant species identitygenotype identity>genotypic diversity.

  16. Genus-Specific Primers for Study of Fusarium Communities in Field Samples.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Ida; Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Gautheron, Nadine; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Kolseth, Anna-Karin; Steinberg, Christian; Persson, Paula; Friberg, Hanna

    2015-10-30

    Fusarium is a large and diverse genus of fungi of great agricultural and economic importance, containing many plant pathogens and mycotoxin producers. To date, high-throughput sequencing of Fusarium communities has been limited by the lack of genus-specific primers targeting regions with high discriminatory power at the species level. In the present study, we evaluated two Fusarium-specific primer pairs targeting translation elongation factor 1 (TEF1). We also present the new primer pair Fa+7/Ra+6. Mock Fusarium communities reflecting phylogenetic diversity were used to evaluate the accuracy of the primers in reflecting the relative abundance of the species. TEF1 amplicons were subjected to 454 high-throughput sequencing to characterize Fusarium communities. Field samples from soil and wheat kernels were included to test the method on more-complex material. For kernel samples, a single PCR was sufficient, while for soil samples, nested PCR was necessary. The newly developed primer pairs Fa+7/Ra+6 and Fa/Ra accurately reflected Fusarium species composition in mock DNA communities. In field samples, 47 Fusarium operational taxonomic units were identified, with the highest Fusarium diversity in soil. The Fusarium community in soil was dominated by members of the Fusarium incarnatum-Fusarium equiseti species complex, contradicting findings in previous studies. The method was successfully applied to analyze Fusarium communities in soil and plant material and can facilitate further studies of Fusarium ecology.

  17. Genus-Specific Primers for Study of Fusarium Communities in Field Samples

    PubMed Central

    Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Gautheron, Nadine; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Kolseth, Anna-Karin; Steinberg, Christian; Persson, Paula; Friberg, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium is a large and diverse genus of fungi of great agricultural and economic importance, containing many plant pathogens and mycotoxin producers. To date, high-throughput sequencing of Fusarium communities has been limited by the lack of genus-specific primers targeting regions with high discriminatory power at the species level. In the present study, we evaluated two Fusarium-specific primer pairs targeting translation elongation factor 1 (TEF1). We also present the new primer pair Fa+7/Ra+6. Mock Fusarium communities reflecting phylogenetic diversity were used to evaluate the accuracy of the primers in reflecting the relative abundance of the species. TEF1 amplicons were subjected to 454 high-throughput sequencing to characterize Fusarium communities. Field samples from soil and wheat kernels were included to test the method on more-complex material. For kernel samples, a single PCR was sufficient, while for soil samples, nested PCR was necessary. The newly developed primer pairs Fa+7/Ra+6 and Fa/Ra accurately reflected Fusarium species composition in mock DNA communities. In field samples, 47 Fusarium operational taxonomic units were identified, with the highest Fusarium diversity in soil. The Fusarium community in soil was dominated by members of the Fusarium incarnatum-Fusarium equiseti species complex, contradicting findings in previous studies. The method was successfully applied to analyze Fusarium communities in soil and plant material and can facilitate further studies of Fusarium ecology. PMID:26519387

  18. Compound specific isotope analysis to investigate pesticide degradation in lysimeter experiments at field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabenko, Evgenia; Elsner, Martin; Bakkour, Rani; Hofstetter, Thomas; Torrento, Clara; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The frequent detection of organic micropollutants such as pesticides, consumer care products or pharmaceuticals in water is an increasing concern for human and ecosystem health. Degradation analysis of these compounds can be challenging in complex systems due to the fact that metabolites are not always found and mass balances frequently cannot be closed. Many abiotic and biotic degradation pathways cause, however, distinct isotope fractionation, where light isotopes are transferred preferentially from the reactant to the product pool (normal isotope fractionation). Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of multiple elements is a particularly powerful method to evaluate organic micropollutant transformation, because it can even give pathway-specific isotope fractionation (1,2). Available CSIA field studies, however, have focused almost exclusively on volatile petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons, which are present in high concentrations in the environment and can be extracted easily from water for GC-IRMS analysis. In the case of micropollutants, such as pesticides, CSIA in more challenging since it needs to be conducted at lower concentrations and requires pre-concentration, purification and high chromatographic performance (3). In this study we used lysimeters experiments to analyze transformation of atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor and chloridazone by studying associated isotope fractionation. The project combines a) analytical method development for CSIA, b) identification of pathways of micropollutant degradation and c) quantification of transformation processes under field condition. The pesticides were applied both, at the soil surface and below the top soil under field-relevant concentrations in May 2014. After typical irrigation of the lysimeters, seepage water was collected in 50L bottles and stored for further SPE and CSIA. Here we present the very first result of a) analytical method development, b) improvement of SPE methods for complex pesticide

  19. Retesting The Validity Of A Specific Field Test For Judo Training

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Luis; González, Vicente; Iscar, Marta; Brime, Juan I.; Fernández-Río, Javier; Rodríguez, Blanca; Montoliu, Mª Ángeles

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this research project was to retest the validity of a specifically designed judo field test (Santos Test) in a different group of judokas. Eight (n=8) national-level male judokas underwent laboratory and field testing. The mean data (mean +/− SD) obtained in the laboratory tests was: HRmax: 200 ± 4.0 beats × min−1, VO2 max: 52.8 ± 7.9 ± ml × kg−1 × min−1, lactate max: 12 ± 2.5 mmol × l−1, HR at the anaerobic threshold: 174.2 ± 9.4 beats × min−1, percentage of maximum heart rate at which the anaerobic threshold appears: 87 ± 3.6 %, lactate threshold: 4.0 ± 0.2 mmol × l−1, and RPE: 17.2 ± 1.0. The mean data obtained in the field test (Santos) was: HRmax: 201.3 ± 4.1 beats × min−1, VO2 max: 55.6 ± 5.8 ml × kg−1 × min−1, lactate max: 15.6 ± 2.8 mmol × l−1, HR at the anaerobic threshold: 173.2 ± 4.3 beats × min−1, percentage of maximum heart rate at which the anaerobic threshold appears: 86 ± 2.5 %, lactate threshold: 4.0 ± 0.2 mmol × l−1, and RPE: 16.7 ± 1.0. There were no significant differences between the data obtained on both tests in any of the parameters, except for maximum lactate concentration. Therefore, the Santos test can be considered a valid tool specific for judo training. PMID:23486994

  20. Topographic Distribution of Stimulus-Specific Adaptation across Auditory Cortical Fields in the Anesthetized Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Diego, Javier; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) in single neurons of the auditory cortex was suggested to be a potential neural correlate of the mismatch negativity (MMN), a widely studied component of the auditory event-related potentials (ERP) that is elicited by changes in the auditory environment. However, several aspects on this SSA/MMN relation remain unresolved. SSA occurs in the primary auditory cortex (A1), but detailed studies on SSA beyond A1 are lacking. To study the topographic organization of SSA, we mapped the whole rat auditory cortex with multiunit activity recordings, using an oddball paradigm. We demonstrate that SSA occurs outside A1 and differs between primary and nonprimary cortical fields. In particular, SSA is much stronger and develops faster in the nonprimary than in the primary fields, paralleling the organization of subcortical SSA. Importantly, strong SSA is present in the nonprimary auditory cortex within the latency range of the MMN in the rat and correlates with an MMN-like difference wave in the simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFP). We present new and strong evidence linking SSA at the cellular level to the MMN, a central tool in cognitive and clinical neuroscience. PMID:26950883

  1. Specific identification of coconut tinangaja viroid for differential field diagnosis of viroids in coconut palm.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, R A; Wall, G C; Randles, J W

    1998-08-01

    ABSTRACT Tinangaja is a widespread lethal disease of putative viroid etiology affecting coconut palm on the island of Guam. Determination of its distribution and mode of spread requires a simple and reliable diagnostic procedure that is specific for the associated coconut tinangaja viroid (CTiVd). A method of extracting tissue followed by analytical agarose gel electrophoresis for CTiVd detection has been developed and used to identify the viroid in leaf samples of suspect symptomatic palms growing in the field. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the viroid band contained circular molecules that are typical for viroids. Confirmation of the identity of CTiVd and detection of low levels of viroid below the threshold of detection by agarose gel electrophoresis was achieved either by diagnostic oligonucleotide-probe (DOP) hybridization assay or by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with the oligonucleotide probe as one of the two PCR primers. RT-PCR was not substantially more sensitive than DOP-hybridization assay. This procedure also was applicable to coconut cadang-cadang viroid (CCCVd), and oligonucleotide probes designed to be specific for either CTiVd or CCCVd distinguished between these two viroids in coconut leaf extracts. This strategy provides a rapid and specific indexing procedure for the two characterized viroids of coconut palm and will be applicable to further studies on the viroid-like sequences previously reported in tropical monocotyledons. PMID:18944882

  2. Correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in CyberKnife: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Antolin, Elena; Fayos-Ferrer, Francisco; Simon, Rocio; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Gomez, Faustino; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the application of the formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [R. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjaell, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich, and S. Vatnitsky, 'A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields,' Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] to the CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system. Correction factors for intermediate calibration fields, a machine-specific reference field (msr) and two plan-class specific reference fields (pcsr), have been studied. Furthermore, the applicability of the new formalism to clinical dosimetry has been analyzed through the investigation of two clinical treatments. Methods: PTW31014 and Scanditronix-Wellhofer CC13 ionization chamber measurements were performed for the fields under investigation. Absorbed dose to water was determined using alanine reference dosimetry, and experimental correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber readings ratios. In addition, correction factors were calculated for the intermediate calibration fields and one of the clinical treatment fields using the Monte Carlo method and these were compared with the experimental values. Results: Overall correction factors deviating from unity by approximately 2% were obtained from both measurements and simulations, with values below and above unity for the studied intermediate calibration fields and clinical fields for the ionization chambers under consideration. Monte Carlo simulations yielded correction factors comparable with those obtained from measurements for the machine-specific reference field, although differences from 1% to 3.3% were observed between measured and calculated correction factors for the composite intermediate calibration fields. Dose distribution inhomogeneities are thought to be responsible for such discrepancies. Conclusions: The differences found between overall

  3. The transcription factor Glass links eye field specification with photoreceptor differentiation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bernardo-Garcia, F Javier; Fritsch, Cornelia; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-04-15

    Eye development requires an evolutionarily conserved group of transcription factors, termed the retinal determination network (RDN). However, little is known about the molecular mechanism by which the RDN instructs cells to differentiate into photoreceptors. We show that photoreceptor cell identity in Drosophila is critically regulated by the transcription factor Glass, which is primarily expressed in photoreceptors and whose role in this process was previously unknown. Glass is both required and sufficient for the expression of phototransduction proteins. Our results demonstrate that the RDN member Sine oculis directly activates glass expression, and that Glass activates the expression of the transcription factors Hazy and Otd. We identified hazy as a direct target of Glass. Induced expression of Hazy in the retina partially rescues the glass mutant phenotype. Together, our results provide a transcriptional link between eye field specification and photoreceptor differentiation in Drosophila, placing Glass at a central position in this developmental process.

  4. Magnetic Nanoparticles with High Specific Absorption Rate at Low Alternating Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Kekalo, K.; Baker, I.; Meyers, R.; Shyong, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of a new type of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) for use in the hyperthermia treatment of tumors. These particles consist of 2–4 nm crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 gathered in 20–40 nm aggregates with a coating of carboxymethyl-dextran, producing a zetasize of 110–120 nm. Despite their very low saturation magnetization (1.5–6.5 emu/g), the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the nanoparticles is 22–200 W/g at applied alternating magnetic field (AMF) with strengths of 100–500 Oe at a frequency of 160 kHz. PMID:26884816

  5. Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate as a Dosimetric Quantity for Electromagnetic Fields Bioeffects

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J.; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate SAR as a dosimetric quantity for EMF bioeffects, and identify ways for increasing the precision in EMF dosimetry and bioactivity assessment. Methods We discuss the interaction of man-made electromagnetic waves with biological matter and calculate the energy transferred to a single free ion within a cell. We analyze the physics and biology of SAR and evaluate the methods of its estimation. We discuss the experimentally observed non-linearity between electromagnetic exposure and biological effect. Results We find that: a) The energy absorbed by living matter during exposure to environmentally accounted EMFs is normally well below the thermal level. b) All existing methods for SAR estimation, especially those based upon tissue conductivity and internal electric field, have serious deficiencies. c) The only method to estimate SAR without large error is by measuring temperature increases within biological tissue, which normally are negligible for environmental EMF intensities, and thus cannot be measured. Conclusions SAR actually refers to thermal effects, while the vast majority of the recorded biological effects from man-made non-ionizing environmental radiation are non-thermal. Even if SAR could be accurately estimated for a whole tissue, organ, or body, the biological/health effect is determined by tiny amounts of energy/power absorbed by specific biomolecules, which cannot be calculated. Moreover, it depends upon field parameters not taken into account in SAR calculation. Thus, SAR should not be used as the primary dosimetric quantity, but used only as a complementary measure, always reporting the estimating method and the corresponding error. Radiation/field intensity along with additional physical parameters (such as frequency, modulation etc) which can be directly and in any case more accurately measured on the surface of biological tissues, should constitute the primary measure for EMF exposures, in spite of similar uncertainty to predict

  6. Wireless communication fields and non-specific symptoms of ill health: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Röösli, Martin; Hug, Kerstin

    2011-05-01

    This is an update of a previous systematic review on the association between radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure and health-related quality of life that included studies published before August 2007 [1]. Since then, nine randomized trials addressed short-term exposures from close-to-body RF-EMF sources such as mobile phones, and two observational studies investigated the effects of mobile phone use on health-related quality of life. Six randomized trials addressed short-term far-field exposure arising, for instance, from mobile phone base stations, and eight studies evaluated the effects of environmental far-field RF-EMF exposure. In most of the randomized trials, no exposure-response association was observed. The sporadically reported associations did not show a consistent pattern regarding the type of symptoms or the direction of the effects (increase/decrease). Similarly, most of the recent observational studies did not show associations between RF-EMF exposure and non-specific symptoms. However, the exposure gradients were small and possible exposure misclassification is a limitation of these studies. Longitudinal studies as well as studies in children and adolescents are scarce. In summary, recent research did not indicate health-related quality of life to be affected by RF-EMF exposure in our everyday environment. Furthermore, none of the studies showed that individuals with self-reported electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) were more susceptible to RF-EMF than the rest of the population. Nevertheless, the rapid technological development and anticipated increase in exposure levels warrant the conduct of further longitudinal studies. Due to the widespread use of wireless communication technologies potential adverse health effects would have major public health consequences.

  7. Validation of a field test for the non-invasive determination of badminton specific aerobic performance

    PubMed Central

    Wonisch, M; Hofmann, P; Schwaberger, G; von Duvillard, S P; Klein, W

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To develop a badminton specific test to determine on court aerobic and anaerobic performance. Method: The test was evaluated by using a lactate steady state test. Seventeen male competitive badminton players (mean (SD) age 26 (8) years, weight 74 (10) kg, height 179 (7) cm) performed an incremental field test on the badminton court to assess the heart rate turn point (HRTP) and the individual physical working capacity (PWCi) at 90% of measured maximal heart rate (HRmax). All subjects performed a 20 minute steady state test at a workload just below the PWCi. Results: Significant correlations (p<0.05) for Pearson's product moment coefficient were found between the two methods for HR (r = 0.78) and velocity (r = 0.93). The HR at the PWCi (176 (5.5) beats/min) was significantly lower than the HRTP (179 (5.5) beats/min), but no significant difference was found for velocity (1.44 (0.3) m/s, 1.38 (0.4) m/s). The constant exercise test showed steady state conditions for both HR (175 (9) beats/min) and blood lactate concentration (3.1 (1.2) mmol/l). Conclusion: The data indicate that a valid determination of specific aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance for the sport of badminton is possible without HRTP determination. PMID:12663351

  8. Nociceptive Local Field Potentials Recorded from the Human Insula Are Not Specific for Nociception.

    PubMed

    Liberati, Giulia; Klöcker, Anne; Safronova, Marta M; Ferrão Santos, Susana; Ribeiro Vaz, Jose-Geraldo; Raftopoulos, Christian; Mouraux, André

    2016-01-01

    The insula, particularly its posterior portion, is often regarded as a primary cortex for pain. However, this interpretation is largely based on reverse inference, and a specific involvement of the insula in pain has never been demonstrated. Taking advantage of the high spatiotemporal resolution of direct intracerebral recordings, we investigated whether the human insula exhibits local field potentials (LFPs) specific for pain. Forty-seven insular sites were investigated. Participants received brief stimuli belonging to four different modalities (nociceptive, vibrotactile, auditory, and visual). Both nociceptive stimuli and non-nociceptive vibrotactile, auditory, and visual stimuli elicited consistent LFPs in the posterior and anterior insula, with matching spatial distributions. Furthermore, a blind source separation procedure showed that nociceptive LFPs are largely explained by multimodal neural activity also contributing to non-nociceptive LFPs. By revealing that LFPs elicited by nociceptive stimuli reflect activity unrelated to nociception and pain, our results confute the widespread assumption that these brain responses are a signature for pain perception and its modulation. PMID:26734726

  9. Scale-Specific Field Bromide Transport and Identification of Leaching at Different Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendroth, O.; Matocha, C. J.; Vasquez, V.

    2012-04-01

    Inherent soil spatial variability complicates the experimental diagnosis and understanding of tracer transport at the field scale. Spatial soil processes vary at different scales and the study of rainfall scenarios on solute transport appears obsolete using a randomized treatment design. The objectives of this study were to derive a field experimental approach resulting in a spatially representative process of bromide leaching depth under different rainfall treatments and to develop a statistical protocol that helps to quantify the spatial covariance structure and decompose scale-specific treatment effects. In a Maury silt loam soil in Kentucky, treatments of rainfall amount, intensity and time between surface application of the tracer and subsequent rainfall initiation were laid out across different scales. Bromide concentrations were measured from soil samples taken every 0.5 m in horizontal distance at 0.1 cm depth increments down to 0.5 m. Spatial variation scales of the leaching behavior and their association with scales of spatial treatment distributions were identified using semi- and cross-semivariograms and co-spectral analysis. In a subsequent analysis, the impact of rainfall and intensity representing the variation at the large scale was separated from the small-scale effect imposed through the time delay between tracer application and rainfall. This decomposition of scale-specific variation was based on an additive state-space model approach adapted from time series analysis. The large-scale trend component was then described in an autoregressive state-space model. In our case, the origin of the large-scale component of bromide leaching was known. In many field and landscape experiments, the cause for large scale variation is unknown when small-scale treatments are imposed on top of large scale variation. The analysis applied here reveals opportunities to address and quantify the causes of large scale processes. Therefore, the experimental and

  10. Class-specific weighting for Markov random field estimation: application to medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Monaco, James P; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-12-01

    Many estimation tasks require Bayesian classifiers capable of adjusting their performance (e.g. sensitivity/specificity). In situations where the optimal classification decision can be identified by an exhaustive search over all possible classes, means for adjusting classifier performance, such as probability thresholding or weighting the a posteriori probabilities, are well established. Unfortunately, analogous methods compatible with Markov random fields (i.e. large collections of dependent random variables) are noticeably absent from the literature. Consequently, most Markov random field (MRF) based classification systems typically restrict their performance to a single, static operating point (i.e. a paired sensitivity/specificity). To address this deficiency, we previously introduced an extension of maximum posterior marginals (MPM) estimation that allows certain classes to be weighted more heavily than others, thus providing a means for varying classifier performance. However, this extension is not appropriate for the more popular maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. Thus, a strategy for varying the performance of MAP estimators is still needed. Such a strategy is essential for several reasons: (1) the MAP cost function may be more appropriate in certain classification tasks than the MPM cost function, (2) the literature provides a surfeit of MAP estimation implementations, several of which are considerably faster than the typical Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods used for MPM, and (3) MAP estimation is used far more often than MPM. Consequently, in this paper we introduce multiplicative weighted MAP (MWMAP) estimation-achieved via the incorporation of multiplicative weights into the MAP cost function-which allows certain classes to be preferred over others. This creates a natural bias for specific classes, and consequently a means for adjusting classifier performance. Similarly, we show how this multiplicative weighting strategy can be applied to the MPM

  11. Class-specific weighting for Markov random field estimation: application to medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Monaco, James P; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-12-01

    Many estimation tasks require Bayesian classifiers capable of adjusting their performance (e.g. sensitivity/specificity). In situations where the optimal classification decision can be identified by an exhaustive search over all possible classes, means for adjusting classifier performance, such as probability thresholding or weighting the a posteriori probabilities, are well established. Unfortunately, analogous methods compatible with Markov random fields (i.e. large collections of dependent random variables) are noticeably absent from the literature. Consequently, most Markov random field (MRF) based classification systems typically restrict their performance to a single, static operating point (i.e. a paired sensitivity/specificity). To address this deficiency, we previously introduced an extension of maximum posterior marginals (MPM) estimation that allows certain classes to be weighted more heavily than others, thus providing a means for varying classifier performance. However, this extension is not appropriate for the more popular maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. Thus, a strategy for varying the performance of MAP estimators is still needed. Such a strategy is essential for several reasons: (1) the MAP cost function may be more appropriate in certain classification tasks than the MPM cost function, (2) the literature provides a surfeit of MAP estimation implementations, several of which are considerably faster than the typical Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods used for MPM, and (3) MAP estimation is used far more often than MPM. Consequently, in this paper we introduce multiplicative weighted MAP (MWMAP) estimation-achieved via the incorporation of multiplicative weights into the MAP cost function-which allows certain classes to be preferred over others. This creates a natural bias for specific classes, and consequently a means for adjusting classifier performance. Similarly, we show how this multiplicative weighting strategy can be applied to the MPM

  12. Class-Specific Weighting for Markov Random Field Estimation: Application to Medical Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, James P.; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-01-01

    Many estimation tasks require Bayesian classifiers capable of adjusting their performance (e.g. sensitivity/Specificity). In situations where the optimal classification decision can be identified by an exhaustive search over all possible classes, means for adjusting classifier performance, such as probability thresholding or weighting the a posteriori probabilities, are well established. Unfortunately, analogous methods compatible with Markov random fields (i.e. large collections of dependent random variables) are noticeably absent from the literature. Consequently, most Markov random field (MRF) based classification systems typically restrict their performance to a single, static operating point (i.e. a paired sensitivity/Specificity). To address this deficiency, we previously introduced an extension of maximum posterior marginals (MPM) estimation that allows certain classes to be weighted more heavily than others, thus providing a means for varying classifier performance. However, this extension is not appropriate for the more popular maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. Thus, a strategy for varying the performance of MAP estimators is still needed. Such a strategy is essential for several reasons: 1) the MAP cost function may be more appropriate in certain classification tasks than the MPM cost function, 2) the literature provides a surfeit of MAP estimation implementations, several of which are considerably faster than the typical Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods used for MPM, and 3) MAP estimation is used far more often than MPM. Consequently, in this paper we introduce multiplicative weighted MAP (MWMAP) estimation — achieved via the incorporation of multiplicative weights into the MAP cost function — which allows certain classes to be preferred over others. This creates a natural bias for Specific classes, and consequently a means for adjusting classifier performance. Similarly, we show how this multiplicative weighting strategy can be applied to the

  13. Effect of heat exposure on thermoregulation and hockey-specific response time in field hockey goalkeepers.

    PubMed

    Malan, Marcelle; Dawson, Brian; Goodman, Carmel; Peeling, Peter

    2010-05-01

    This study examined the thermoregulatory responses in field hockey goalkeepers during games (Part A), and assessed the effect of heat stress on hockey-specific response time (Part B). In Part A, core temperature (T(c)), skin temperature (T(sk)), body mass, fluid consumption and heart rate (HR) responses of six goalkeepers during two premier level club games in the Western Australian (winter) hockey season were recorded. Part B assessed the same measures, plus a response time test on four goalkeepers playing a simulated game inside a climate chamber in cool (COOL: 20 degrees C, 40% RH) and hot (HOT: 35 degrees C, 40% RH) conditions. In Part A, the mean (+/-SD) T(c) and T(sk) measured in games was 38.49+/-0.20 degrees C and 34.99+/-0.99 degrees C, with increases from baseline of 1.34+/-0.19 degrees C and 1.08+/-0.30 degrees C, respectively. Most of the increase in T(c) resulted from the pre-game warm-up. In Part B, T(c) and T(sk) only increased significantly (p<0.05) from baseline in the HOT condition (0.62+/-0.18 degrees C and 1.61+/-0.82 degrees C, respectively). Response time was significantly slower (0.87+/-0.14s, p<0.01) after heat exposure, compared to COOL (0.75+/-0.15s), but the number of correct responses was not affected. For optimal performance, careful attention should be given to strategies to limit T(c) increases in field hockey goalkeepers during matches.

  14. Context-specific influence of water temperature on brook trout growth rates in the field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, C.; Letcher, B.H.; Nislow, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    1. Modelling the effects of climate change on freshwater fishes requires robust field-based estimates accounting for interactions among multiple factors.2. We used data from an 8-year individual-based study of a wild brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) population to test the influence of water temperature on season-specific growth in the context of variation in other environmental (i.e. season, stream flow) or biotic factors (local brook trout biomass density and fish age and size) in West Brook, a third-order stream in western Massachusetts, U.S.A.3. Changes in ambient temperature influenced individual growth rates. In general, higher temperatures were associated with higher growth rates in winter and spring and lower growth rates in summer and autumn. However, the effect of temperature on growth was strongly context-dependent, differing in both magnitude and direction as a function of season, stream flow and fish biomass density.4. We found that stream flow and temperature had strong and complex interactive effects on trout growth. At the coldest temperatures (in winter), high stream flows were associated with reduced trout growth rates. During spring and autumn and in typical summers (when water temperatures were close to growth optima), higher flows were associated with increased growth rates. In addition, the effect of flow at a given temperature (the flow-temperature interaction) differed among seasons.5. Trout density negatively affected growth rate and had strong interactions with temperature in two of four seasons (i.e. spring and summer) with greater negative effects at high temperatures.6. Our study provided robust, integrative field-based estimates of the effects of temperature on growth rates for a species which serves as a model organism for cold-water adapted ectotherms facing the consequences of environmental change. Results of the study strongly suggest that failure to derive season-specific estimates, or to explicitly consider interactions with

  15. A SUGGESTED CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ELECTRO-MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY ORIENTED SPECIFICALLY TO THE COMPUTER AND BUSINESS MACHINE FIELDS. INTERIM REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LESCARBEAU, ROLAND F.; AND OTHERS

    A SUGGESTED POST-SECONDARY CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ELECTRO-MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY ORIENTED SPECIFICALLY TO THE COMPUTER AND BUSINESS MACHINE FIELDS WAS DEVELOPED BY A GROUP OF COOPERATING INSTITUTIONS, NOW INCORPORATED AS TECHNICAL EDUCATION CONSORTIUM, INCORPORATED. SPECIFIC NEEDS OF THE COMPUTER AND BUSINESS MACHINE INDUSTRY WERE DETERMINED FROM…

  16. The Application Of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery On Unconventional Oil: A Field Specific Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Sean; Millar, Andrew; Allison, Heather; McCarthy, Alan

    2014-05-01

    A substantial amount of the world's recoverable oil reserves are made from unconventional or heavy resources. However, great difficulty has been had in recovering this oil after primary and secondary recovery methods have been employed. Therefore, tertiary methods such as microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) have been employed. MEOR involves the use of bacteria and their metabolic products to alter the oil properties or rock permeability within a reservoir in order to promote the flow of oil. Although MEOR has been trialed in the past with mixed outcomes, its feasibility on heavier oils has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to show that MEOR can be successfully applied to unconventional oils. By using an indigenous strain of bacteria isolated from a reservoir of interest and applied to field specific microcosms, we will look into the effect of these bacteria compared to variant inoculums to identify which mechanisms of action the bacteria are using to improve recovery. Using this information, we will be able to identify genes of interest and groups of bacteria that may be beneficial for MEOR and look accurately identify favorable bacteria within a reservoir.

  17. Variational state specific solvent models for excited states from time dependent self-consistent field methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorgaard, Josiah; Velizhanin, Kirill; Tretiak, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    The effect of a dielectric environment on a molecule can be profound, causing changes in nuclear configuration and electronic structure. Quantum chemical simulation of a solute-solvent system can be prohibitively expensive due to the large number of degrees of freedom attributed to the solvent. To remedy this, the solvent can be treated as a dielectric cavity. Mutual polarization of the solute and solvent must be considered for accurate treatment of an optically excited state (ES) with a state-specific solvent model (SSM). In vacuum, time dependent self-consistent field (TD-SCF) methods (e,g, TD-HF, TD-DFT) give variational excitation energies. With the well known Z-vector equation, a variational ES energy is used to explore the ES potential energy surface (PES) with analytical gradients. Modification of the standard TD-SCF eigensystem to accommodate a SSM creates a nonlinear TD-SCF equation with non-variational excitation energies. This prevents analytical gradients from being formulated so that the ES PES cannot be explored. Here, we show how a variational formulation of existing SSMs can be derived from a Lagrangian formalism and give numerical results for the variability of calculated quantities. Model dynamics using SSMs are showcased.

  18. Removal of F-specific RNA bacteriophages in artificial recharge of groundwater--a field study.

    PubMed

    Niemi, R M; Kytövaara, A; Pääkkönen, J; Lahti, K

    2004-01-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater offers a semi-natural means to produce raw water for drinking-water plants. Surface water works are increasingly being replaced by artificial groundwater works in Finland. Two municipalities, one serving 30,000 and the other 170,000 inhabitants, have considered filtering river water through eskers for the production of potable water. In this study the removal of bacteriophages during infiltration of river water was estimated, for the evaluation of treatment adequacy in a field study. A 5-m-deep column of sand was constructed and used to mimic the percolating phase in infiltration. An artificial esker was constructed on the riverbank by isolating a 2-m-wide, 2-m-deep and 18-m-long bed of coarse sand with plastic. The sand bed represented the saturated zone. River water was pumped at a rate of 40 L/h to the sand column. The river water was spiked with F+ specific RNA phage MS2 by adding phage suspension during one week at an average concentration of 4.3 x 10(9) PFU/mL. Samples for phage assays were taken during one month, from four sampling sites, on the basis of detention time as estimated by a tracer experiment with sodium chloride. The median count of MS2 for percolated water was 2.4 x 10(5) PFU/mL, representing a 96.7% reduction. During the passage of 6 m in the saturated zone, a further reduction of 98.5% occurred. During the passage from 6 m to 12 m the additional reduction was 99.97%. The overall reduction was between 6 and 7 log10 units. The removal of MS2 phages was rather efficient, although the esker material was coarse, mainly sandy, gravel.

  19. The GIPC1-Akt1 pathway is required for the specification of the eye field in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Anna; Hoshino, Akina; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B.; Reh, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    During early patterning of the neural plate, a single region of the embryonic forebrain, the eye field, becomes competent for eye development. The hallmark of eye field specification is the expression of the eye field transcription factors (EFTFs). Experiments in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals have demonstrated largely conserved roles for the EFTFs. Although some of the key signaling events that direct the synchronized expression of these factors to the eye field have been elucidated in fish and frogs, it has been more difficult to study these mechanisms in mammalian embryos. In this study, we have used two different methods for directed differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to generate eye field cells and retina in vitro to test for a role of the PDZ domain-containing protein GIPC1 in the specification of the mammalian eye primordia. We find that the overexpression of a dominant-negative form of GIPC1 (dnGIPC1), as well as the downregulation of endogenous GIPC1, is sufficient to inhibit the development of eye field cells from mESCs. GIPC1 interacts directly with IGFR and participates in Akt1 activation, and pharmacological inhibition of Akt1 phosphorylation mimics the dnGIPC1 phenotype. Our data, together with previous studies in Xenopus, support the hypothesis that the GIPC1-PI3K-Akt1 pathway plays a key role in eye field specification in vertebrates. PMID:26013465

  20. Geochemical Specific Characters of the Oil and the Origin of the Oil and Gas Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottikh, Rimma; Pisotskiy, Bogdan; Plotnikova, Irina

    2010-05-01

    and porous rocks. The high metal content of carbonaceous substances and their compositional variations governed by homogenisation temperatures of the inclusions suggest that they are not the products of the decomposition of oil fields. The constant presence of uranium in the fluid and its differentiation products allows the tracing of the systems' migration ways from the crystalline basement to oil-saturated reservoir zones of the sedimentary cover The known geochemical properties of bitumen and oil - high platinum content, specific distributions of rare earth elements, that are not characteristic of the upper crust formations, as well as 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic compounds, which are out of balance with the organic matter of sedimentary rocks - suggest that hydrocarbons are accumulated in the presence of cooling high-alkalinity mafite-ultramafite intrusions. This logically corresponds to the distribution of seismic anomalies and magnetic and gravity fields in the consolidated crust below the various petroleum fields (for example, South Tatarstan and Nepsky arches of the Romashkino and Verkhne-Chonskoye oil fields). The acquired geochemical and thermodynamic characteristics of the reduced fluids and their differentiation products from the crystalline basement and the sedimentary cover of the southern Siberian and eastern East European platforms indicate that these were formed outside of the sedimentary cover and that the migration was directed upwards. The analysis of the magmatic evolution on platforms reveals its alkaline trend due to the impeded degassing of magmatic sources at depth and the inflow of new doses of alkaline fluids or melts into them. Further evolution of the zones of partial melting of the substratum led, in the authors' view, to the generation of oil-forming fluids and their transportation into the Earth's upper crust. Their interaction with the surrounding rocks in turn led to the formation of oil accumulations. Thus, oil is the product

  1. Species-specific photosynthetic responses of four coniferous seedlings to open-field experimental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Yoon, S. J.; Yoon, T. K.; Han, S. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, D.; Kim, S.; Hwang, J.; Cho, M.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature increase under climate change is expected to affect photosynthesis of tree species. Biochemical models generally suggest that the elevated temperature increases the photosynthetic carbon fixation, however, many opposing results were reported as well. We aimed to examine the photosynthetic responses of four coniferous seedlings to projected future temperature increase, by conducting an open-field warming experiment. Experimental warming set-up using infra-red heater was built in 2011 and the temperature in warming plots has been regulated to be consistently 3oC higher than that of control plots. The seeds of Abies holophylla (AH), A. koreana (AK), Pinus densiflora (PD), and P. koraiensis (PK) were planted in each 1 m × 1 m plot (n=3) in April, 2012. Monthly net photosynthetic rates (Pn; μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) of 1-year-old seedlings (n=9) from June to November, 2013 were measured using CIRAS-2 (PP-Systems, UK) and photosynthetic parameters (the apparent quantum yield; ф; µmol CO2 mol-1, the dark respiration rate; Rd; µmol CO2 mol-1, and the light compensation point; LCP; µmol mol-1 s-1) were also calculated from the light-response curve of photosynthesis in August, 2013. Chlorophyll contents were measured using DMSO extraction method. Monthly Pn was generally higher for PD and decreased for AK in warmed plots than in control plots (Fig. 1). Pn of AK and PK did not show any significant difference, however, Pn of PK in October and November increased by experimental warming. Pn of PD also showed the highest increase in November and this distinct increase of Pn in autumn might be caused by delayed cessation of photosynthesis by temperature elevation. ф and Rd in warmed plots were higher for PD and lower for AK, while LCP did not significantly differ by treatments for all species. Because ф is considered to be related to the efficiency of harvesting and using light, the change in ф might have caused the response of Pn to warming in this study. Decreases

  2. Model for the orientation, magnetic field, and temperature dependence of the specific heat of CeCu6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, A. S.

    1988-03-01

    The results of a model calculation of the orientation, magnetic field, and temperature dependence of the specific heat C of CeCu6 are found to be in good agreement with the single-crystal data of Amato et al. The model incorporates both the Kondo and crystal-field effects. It is suggested that the low-temperature Wilson's ratio C/Tχ, where χ is the susceptibility, may not change in an applied field H and that both C/T and χ at low temperatures as a function of H may be proportional to the many-body density of states at the energy μH.

  3. Field experiments to evaluate host plant specificity of prospective agents of Onopordum acanthium in Bulgaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scotch thistle, Onopordum acanthium, is an invasive alien weed in North America that originates from Europe. Previous field observations in Bulgaria have confirmed the presence of prospective biological control agents including Cassida rubiginosa, Chaetostomella cylindrica, Eublemma amoena, Larinus ...

  4. Homosexuality in Specific Fields: The Arts, the Military, the Ministry, Prisons, Sports, Teaching and Transsexuals. A Selected Bibliography. Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Alan V., Comp.

    This bibliography represents the third in a series of three dealing with employment of homosexuals, to be published by the Ontario Ministry of Labour Library. All asterisked titles deal with the employment problems of and discrimination against homosexuals. This bibliography is concerned with homosexuality in the specific fields of the arts, the…

  5. A Method to Teach Age-Specific Demography with Field Grown Rapid Cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Martin G.; Terrana, Sebastian

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that rapid cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants) can be used in inquiry-based, student ecological fieldwork. We are the first to describe age-specific survival for field-grown Fast Plants and identify life history traits associated with individual survival. This experiment can be adapted by educators as a…

  6. Characterisation of neutron fields at Cernavoda NPP.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Dumitrescu, Dorin; Chirosca, Alecsandru; Hager, Luke; Million, Marc; Bartz, James

    2013-04-01

    Near a nuclear reactor or a fuel container, mixed neutron/gamma fields are very common, necessitating routine neutron dosimetry. Accurate neutron dosimetry is complicated by the fact that the neutron effective dose is strongly dependent on the neutron energy and the direction distribution of the neutron fluence. Neutron field characterisation is indispensable if one wants to obtain a reliable estimate for the neutron dose. A measurement campaign at CANDU nuclear power plant located in Cernavoda, Romania, was set up to characterise the neutron fields in four different locations and to investigate the behaviour of different neutron personal dosemeters. This investigation intends to assist in choosing a suitable neutron dosimetry system at this nuclear power plant.

  7. Specific heat of the Skyrmion lattice phase and field-induced tricritical point in MnSi.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A; Garst, M; Pfleiderer, C

    2013-04-26

    We report high-precision measurements of the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the specific heat, C(T,H), across the magnetic phase diagram of MnSi. Clear anomalies establish the Skyrmion lattice unambiguously as a thermodynamic phase. The evolution of the specific heat anomalies, the field dependence of the entropy released at the phase transitions, and the temperature versus field dependence of crossover lines provide striking evidence of a tricritical point at μ0H(TCP)(int) = 340  mT and T(TCP) = 28.5  K. The existence of this tricritical point represents strong support of a helimagnetic Brazovskii transition, i.e., a fluctuation-induced first-order transition at H = 0. PMID:23679769

  8. Combination neutron-gamma ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Stuart, Travis P.; Tipton, Wilbur J.

    1976-10-26

    A radiation detection system capable of detecting neutron and gamma events and distinguishing therebetween. The system includes a detector for a photomultiplier which utilizes a combination of two phosphor materials, the first of which is in the form of small glass beads which scintillate primarily in response to neutrons and the second of which is a plastic matrix which scintillates in response to gammas. A combination of pulse shape and pulse height discrimination techniques is utilized to provide an essentially complete separation of the neutron and gamma events.

  9. Low temperature specific heat of CeRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} at the field induced metamagnetic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, K.; Scheidt, E.W.; Schreiner, T.; Fisk, Z.; Stewart, G.R.

    2000-02-01

    The authors report specific heat measurements in a broad temperature range between 0.06 and 20 K on single crystalline CeRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} in magnetic fields applied parallel to the c-direction around the critical field B{sub M}, where the metamagnetic transition from the itinerant to the localized state takes place. In the critical field B{sub M} {parallel} c = 7.8 T a distinct deviation from the usual Fermi-liquid behavior is found down to the lowest temperature. below 1.8 K C/T varies as (1{minus}aT), while for 1.8K < T < 20 K a power law T{sup {lambda}{minus}1} with {lambda} = 0.66 is found. Small deviations from the critical magnetic field leads to the recovery of a Fermi-liquid ground state. The observed behavior of the specific heat at the field induced magnetic instability is discussed in the context of a non-Fermi-liquid state and compared with those for the field-induced nFl CeCu{sub 6{minus}x}Ag{sub x} and the recent observation of nFl behavior at B{sub M} in UPt{sub 3}.

  10. Timing-specific transfer of adapted muscle activity after walking in an elastic force field.

    PubMed

    Blanchette, Andreanne; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2009-07-01

    Human locomotion results from interactions between feedforward (central commands from voluntary and automatic drive) and feedback (peripheral commands from sensory inputs) mechanisms. Recent studies have shown that locomotion can be adapted when an external force is applied to the lower limb. To better understand the neural control of this adaptation, the present study investigated gait modifications resulting from exposure to a position-dependent force field. Ten subjects walked on a treadmill before, during, and after exposure to a force field generated by elastic tubing that pulled the foot forward and up during swing. Lower limb kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) activity were recorded during each walking period. During force field exposure, peak foot velocity was initially increased by 38%. As subjects adapted, peak foot velocity gradually returned to baseline in field exposure, foot velocity was initially reduced by 22% and returned to baseline in 9-51 strides. Aftereffects in hamstring EMGs consisted of increased activity around toe off. Contrary to the adapted state, this increase was not maintained during the rest of swing. Together, these results suggest that while the neural control of human locomotion can adapt to force field exposure, the mechanisms underlying this adaptation may vary according to the timing in the gait cycle. Adapted hamstring EMG activity may rely more on feedforward mechanisms around toe off and more on feedback mechanisms during the rest of swing. PMID:19420121

  11. Knowledge About Sounds-Context-Specific Meaning Differently Activates Cortical Hemispheres, Auditory Cortical Fields, and Layers in House Mice.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Diana B; Schmidt, H Sabine; Ehret, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the auditory cortex (AC) by a given sound pattern is plastic, depending, in largely unknown ways, on the physiological state and the behavioral context of the receiving animal and on the receiver's experience with the sounds. Such plasticity can be inferred when house mouse mothers respond maternally to pup ultrasounds right after parturition and naïve females have to learn to respond. Here we use c-FOS immunocytochemistry to quantify highly activated neurons in the AC fields and layers of seven groups of mothers and naïve females who have different knowledge about and are differently motivated to respond to acoustic models of pup ultrasounds of different behavioral significance. Profiles of FOS-positive cells in the AC primary fields (AI, AAF), the ultrasonic field (UF), the secondary field (AII), and the dorsoposterior field (DP) suggest that activation reflects in AI, AAF, and UF the integration of sound properties with animal state-dependent factors, in the higher-order field AII the news value of a given sound in the behavioral context, and in the higher-order field DP the level of maternal motivation and, by left-hemisphere activation advantage, the recognition of the meaning of sounds in the given context. Anesthesia reduced activation in all fields, especially in cortical layers 2/3. Thus, plasticity in the AC is field-specific preparing different output of AC fields in the process of perception, recognition and responding to communication sounds. Further, the activation profiles of the auditory cortical fields suggest the differentiation between brains hormonally primed to know (mothers) and brains which acquired knowledge via implicit learning (naïve females). In this way, auditory cortical activation discriminates between instinctive (mothers) and learned (naïve females) cognition.

  12. Knowledge About Sounds—Context-Specific Meaning Differently Activates Cortical Hemispheres, Auditory Cortical Fields, and Layers in House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Diana B.; Schmidt, H. Sabine; Ehret, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the auditory cortex (AC) by a given sound pattern is plastic, depending, in largely unknown ways, on the physiological state and the behavioral context of the receiving animal and on the receiver's experience with the sounds. Such plasticity can be inferred when house mouse mothers respond maternally to pup ultrasounds right after parturition and naïve females have to learn to respond. Here we use c-FOS immunocytochemistry to quantify highly activated neurons in the AC fields and layers of seven groups of mothers and naïve females who have different knowledge about and are differently motivated to respond to acoustic models of pup ultrasounds of different behavioral significance. Profiles of FOS-positive cells in the AC primary fields (AI, AAF), the ultrasonic field (UF), the secondary field (AII), and the dorsoposterior field (DP) suggest that activation reflects in AI, AAF, and UF the integration of sound properties with animal state-dependent factors, in the higher-order field AII the news value of a given sound in the behavioral context, and in the higher-order field DP the level of maternal motivation and, by left-hemisphere activation advantage, the recognition of the meaning of sounds in the given context. Anesthesia reduced activation in all fields, especially in cortical layers 2/3. Thus, plasticity in the AC is field-specific preparing different output of AC fields in the process of perception, recognition and responding to communication sounds. Further, the activation profiles of the auditory cortical fields suggest the differentiation between brains hormonally primed to know (mothers) and brains which acquired knowledge via implicit learning (naïve females). In this way, auditory cortical activation discriminates between instinctive (mothers) and learned (naïve females) cognition. PMID:27013959

  13. Effects of Site-specific Application of Aldicarb on Cotton in a Meloidogyne incognita-infested Field

    PubMed Central

    Wrather, J. A.; Stevens, W. E.; Kirkpatrick, T. L.; Kitchen, N. R.

    2002-01-01

    Cotton farmers in Missouri commonly apply a single rate of aldicarb throughout the field at planting to protect their crop from Meloidogyne incognita, even though these nematodes are spatially aggregated. Our purpose was to determine the effect of site-specific application of aldicarb on cotton production in a field infested with these nematodes in 1997 and 1998. Cotton yields were collected from sites not treated with aldicarb (control), sites receiving aldicarb at the standard recommended rate of 0.58 kg a.i./ha, and sites receiving specific aldicarb rates based on the soil population densities of second-stage infective juveniles of root-knot nematode. Yields for the standard rate and site-specific rate treatments were similar and greater (P ≤ 0.05) than the control treatment. Less aldicarb was used for the site-specific than the uniform-rate treatment each year—46% less in 1997 and 61% less in 1998. Costs associated with the site-specific treatment were very high compared with the uniform-rate treatment due to a greater number of soil samples analyzed for nematodes. Site-specific application of aldicarb for root-knot nematode management in cotton may pose fewer environmental risks than the uniform-rate application of aldicarb. PMID:19265917

  14. SU-C-304-07: Are Small Field Detector Correction Factors Strongly Dependent On Machine-Specific Characteristics?

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, D; Tanny, S; Parsai, E; Sperling, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The current small field dosimetry formalism utilizes quality correction factors to compensate for the difference in detector response relative to dose deposited in water. The correction factors are defined on a machine-specific basis for each beam quality and detector combination. Some research has suggested that the correction factors may only be weakly dependent on machine-to-machine variations, allowing for determinations of class-specific correction factors for various accelerator models. This research examines the differences in small field correction factors for three detectors across two Varian Truebeam accelerators to determine the correction factor dependence on machine-specific characteristics. Methods: Output factors were measured on two Varian Truebeam accelerators for equivalently tuned 6 MV and 6 FFF beams. Measurements were obtained using a commercial plastic scintillation detector (PSD), two ion chambers, and a diode detector. Measurements were made at a depth of 10 cm with an SSD of 100 cm for jaw-defined field sizes ranging from 3×3 cm{sup 2} to 0.6×0.6 cm{sup 2}, normalized to values at 5×5cm{sup 2}. Correction factors for each field on each machine were calculated as the ratio of the detector response to the PSD response. Percent change of correction factors for the chambers are presented relative to the primary machine. Results: The Exradin A26 demonstrates a difference of 9% for 6×6mm{sup 2} fields in both the 6FFF and 6MV beams. The A16 chamber demonstrates a 5%, and 3% difference in 6FFF and 6MV fields at the same field size respectively. The Edge diode exhibits less than 1.5% difference across both evaluated energies. Field sizes larger than 1.4×1.4cm2 demonstrated less than 1% difference for all detectors. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest that class-specific correction may not be appropriate for micro-ionization chamber. For diode systems, the correction factor was substantially similar and may be useful for class-specific

  15. Generality with Specificity: The Dynamic Field Theory Generalizes across Tasks and Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmering, Vanessa R.; Spencer, John P.

    2008-01-01

    A central goal in cognitive and developmental science is to develop models of behavior that can generalize across both tasks and development while maintaining a commitment to detailed behavioral prediction. This paper presents tests of one such model, the Dynamic Field Theory (DFT). The DFT was originally proposed to capture delay-dependent biases…

  16. Rehabilitation of Reading and Visual Exploration in Visual Field Disorders: Transfer or Specificity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuett, Susanne; Heywood, Charles A.; Kentridge, Robert W.; Dauner, Ruth; Zihl, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Reading and visual exploration impairments in unilateral homonymous visual field disorders are frequent and disabling consequences of acquired brain injury. Compensatory therapies have been developed, which allow patients to regain sufficient reading and visual exploration performance through systematic oculomotor training. However, it is still…

  17. Magneto-electric nanoparticles to enable field-controlled high-specificity drug delivery to eradicate ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guduru, Rakesh; Liang, Ping; Runowicz, Carolyn; Nair, Madhavan; Atluri, Venkata; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology capable of high-specificity targeted delivery of anti-neoplastic drugs would be a significant breakthrough in Cancer in general and Ovarian Cancer in particular. We addressed this challenge through a new physical concept that exploited (i) the difference in the membrane electric properties between the tumor and healthy cells and (ii) the capability of magneto-electric nanoparticles (MENs) to serve as nanosized converters of remote magnetic field energy into the MENs' intrinsic electric field energy. This capability allows to remotely control the membrane electric fields and consequently trigger high-specificity drug uptake through creation of localized nano-electroporation sites. In in-vitro studies on human ovarian carcinoma cell (SKOV-3) and healthy cell (HOMEC) lines, we applied a 30-Oe d.c. field to trigger high-specificity uptake of paclitaxel loaded on 30-nm CoFe₂O₄ @BaTiO₃ MENs. The drug penetrated through the membrane and completely eradicated the tumor within 24 hours without affecting the normal cells. PMID:24129652

  18. Magneto-electric Nanoparticles to Enable Field-controlled High-Specificity Drug Delivery to Eradicate Ovarian Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guduru, Rakesh; Liang, Ping; Runowicz, Carolyn; Nair, Madhavan; Atluri, Venkata; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2013-10-01

    The nanotechnology capable of high-specificity targeted delivery of anti-neoplastic drugs would be a significant breakthrough in Cancer in general and Ovarian Cancer in particular. We addressed this challenge through a new physical concept that exploited (i) the difference in the membrane electric properties between the tumor and healthy cells and (ii) the capability of magneto-electric nanoparticles (MENs) to serve as nanosized converters of remote magnetic field energy into the MENs' intrinsic electric field energy. This capability allows to remotely control the membrane electric fields and consequently trigger high-specificity drug uptake through creation of localized nano-electroporation sites. In in-vitro studies on human ovarian carcinoma cell (SKOV-3) and healthy cell (HOMEC) lines, we applied a 30-Oe d.c. field to trigger high-specificity uptake of paclitaxel loaded on 30-nm CoFe2O4@BaTiO3 MENs. The drug penetrated through the membrane and completely eradicated the tumor within 24 hours without affecting the normal cells.

  19. Magnetic Soft Mode Behavior of the Field-Dependent Specific Heat of SrIrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Long, Lance; He, Daheng; Bhat, Vinayak; Cao, Gang

    2009-03-01

    Previous workootnotetextCao et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 100402(R),(2007) indicates SrIrO3 is a strongly exchange-enhanced paramagnet (Wilson ratio = 75) exhibiting non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behavior at low magnetic fields, and a cross-over to weak ferromagnetism (0.025 μB/Ir at μoH = 7.0 T and T = 1.7 K) at applied fields μoH 3 T and temperatures T < 4 K. Measurements of the specific heat performed in constant field for 1.8 < T < 4K have been used to extract the field dependence CP(H,To)(constant To), which exhibits a Schottky-like peak as a function field in the range 1.0 < μoH < 1.5 T at increasing temperatures 1.8 < To< 3.9 K, respectively. Fits of CP(H,To) imply a nonmagnetic ground state is separated from magnetic excited states by an energy splitting δ(H,T)/kB = T* that decreases from 7.5 to 2 K as μoH increases from 0 to 8 T. The Schottky peak field increases as μoH* = 0.94 T + (0.03 T/K^3)T^3.1. We discuss how a semi-classical two-level model reproduces the NFL-weak ferromagnet cross-over with applied field.

  20. Specificity in Interest Measurement: Basic Interest Scales and Major Field of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Chistopher A.; Borgen, Fred H.; Rottinghaus, Patrick J.; Donnay, David A. C.

    2004-01-01

    The Basic Interest Scales (BISs) of the Strong Interest Inventory (SII; Harmon, Hansen, Borgen, & Hammer, 1994) have a 35-year history. The BISs are the specific content scales of the SII, as opposed to the SII general content scales, the General Occupational Themes (GOTs), which measure the six Holland (1997) RIASEC themes. Using 17,074…

  1. Crystal-field study of magnetization and specific heat properties of frustrated pyrochlore Pr2Zr2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, J.; Jana, Y. M.; Biswas, A. Ali

    2016-10-01

    The experimental results of temperature dependent dc magnetic susceptibility, field dependent isothermal magnetization, magnetic specific heat and entropy of the pyrochlore Pr2Zr2O7 are simulated and analyzed using appropriate D3d crystal-field (CF) and anisotropic molecular field tensors at Pr-sites in the self-consistent mean-field approach involving four magnetically non-equivalent rare-earth spins on the tetrahedral unit of the pyrochlore structure. CF level pattern and wave-functions of the ground 3H4 multiplet of the Pr3+ ions are obtained considering intermediate coupling between different Russell-Saunders terms of the 4f2 electronic configurations of Pr-ion and J-mixing effects. CF analysis shows that the CF ground-state of the Pr3+ ion in Pr2Zr2O7 is a well-isolated doublet, with significant admixtures of terms coming from |MJ=±4> and |MJ=±1>, and the Pr-spins are effectively Ising-like along the local <111> axes. Magnetic specific heat in zero-field is simulated by considering a temperature dependence of the exchange splitting of the ground doublet.

  2. Determination of canine dose conversion factors in mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.A.; Bhatt, R.C.; Myska, J.C.; Holland, B.K.

    1996-07-01

    The primary objective of mixed-field neutron/gamma radiation dosimetry in canine irradiation experiments conducted at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is to determine the absorbed midline tissue dose (MLT) at the region of interest in the canine. A dose conversion factor (DCF) can be applied to free-in-air (FIA) dose measurements to estimate the MLT doses to canines. This report is a summary of the measured DCFs that were used to determine the MLT doses in canines at AFRRI from 1979 to 1992.

  3. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Amirhajeloo, Leila Rasouli; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m and 2.23±0.39 v/m, respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23% and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone.

  4. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Rasouli Amirhajeloo, Leila; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m  and 2.23±0.39 v/m , respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23 %and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart  mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz  was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone.

  5. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Rasouli Amirhajeloo, Leila; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m  and 2.23±0.39 v/m , respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23 %and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart  mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz  was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone. PMID:27157169

  6. MHD-Based Specification of Magnetotail Plasma and Fields: Possibilities and Limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, M.; Birn, J.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) constitutes the simplest comprehensive and self-consistent formulation of the properties of space plasmas. As such, it has been applied with large success to the dynamics of solar system plasmas. For the nightside region of the Earth, the magnetotail, MHD simulations have led to new understanding of the structure and dynamics of the plasmas, in response to both changes in boundary conditions as well as internal dynamical processes. As a result, substantial knowledge of the structure and dynamics of the nightside region have been accumulated. In basic MHD conservation laws on magnetospheric structure, as well as the role of non-MHD processes in the initiation and evolution of dynamical processes of the magnetotail. This presentation will consist of three parts, the first of which addresses the basic constraints on magnetotail structure as well as their consequences for magnetotail specification and forecasting. We will then review some examples of magnetotail structural changes brought about by solar-wind-like boundary conditions. Last, we consider the role of non-MHD processes in magnetotail specification and forecasting. The emphasis here will be on inclusion of these processes into MHD models, and their impact on the overall structure and dynamics.

  7. Residue-specific force field based on the protein coil library. RSFF1: modification of OPLS-AA/L.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Zhou, Chen-Yang; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2014-06-26

    Traditional protein force fields use one set of parameters for most of the 20 amino acids (AAs), allowing transferability of the parameters. However, a significant shortcoming is the difficulty to fit the Ramachandran plots of all AA residues simultaneously, affecting the accuracy of the force field. In this Feature Article, we report a new strategy for protein force field parametrization. Backbone and side-chain conformational distributions of all 20 AA residues obtained from protein coil library were used as the target data. The dihedral angle (torsion) potentials and some local nonbonded (1-4/1-5/1-6) interactions in OPLS-AA/L force field were modified such that the target data can be excellently reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations of dipeptides (blocked AAs) in explicit water, resulting in a new force field with AA-specific parameters, RSFF1. An efficient free energy decomposition approach was developed to separate the corrections on ϕ and ψ from the two-dimensional Ramachandran plots. RSFF1 is shown to reproduce the experimental NMR (3)J-coupling constants of AA dipeptides better than other force fields. It has a good balance between α-helical and β-sheet secondary structures. It can successfully fold a set of α-helix proteins (Trp-cage and Homeodomain) and β-hairpins (Trpzip-2, GB1 hairpin), which cannot be consistently stabilized by other state-of-the-art force fields. Interestingly, the RSFF1 force field systematically overestimates the melting temperature (and the stability of native state) of these peptides/proteins. It has a potential application in the simulation of protein folding and protein structure refinement. PMID:24815738

  8. Residue-specific force field based on the protein coil library. RSFF1: modification of OPLS-AA/L.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Zhou, Chen-Yang; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2014-06-26

    Traditional protein force fields use one set of parameters for most of the 20 amino acids (AAs), allowing transferability of the parameters. However, a significant shortcoming is the difficulty to fit the Ramachandran plots of all AA residues simultaneously, affecting the accuracy of the force field. In this Feature Article, we report a new strategy for protein force field parametrization. Backbone and side-chain conformational distributions of all 20 AA residues obtained from protein coil library were used as the target data. The dihedral angle (torsion) potentials and some local nonbonded (1-4/1-5/1-6) interactions in OPLS-AA/L force field were modified such that the target data can be excellently reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations of dipeptides (blocked AAs) in explicit water, resulting in a new force field with AA-specific parameters, RSFF1. An efficient free energy decomposition approach was developed to separate the corrections on ϕ and ψ from the two-dimensional Ramachandran plots. RSFF1 is shown to reproduce the experimental NMR (3)J-coupling constants of AA dipeptides better than other force fields. It has a good balance between α-helical and β-sheet secondary structures. It can successfully fold a set of α-helix proteins (Trp-cage and Homeodomain) and β-hairpins (Trpzip-2, GB1 hairpin), which cannot be consistently stabilized by other state-of-the-art force fields. Interestingly, the RSFF1 force field systematically overestimates the melting temperature (and the stability of native state) of these peptides/proteins. It has a potential application in the simulation of protein folding and protein structure refinement.

  9. Host specificity of North American Rhabdias spp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae): combining field data and experimental infections with a molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Langford, Gabriel J; Janovy, John

    2013-04-01

    Lungworms of the cosmopolitan genus Rhabdias are among the most common parasites of amphibians and squamate reptiles. The present study used experimental infections, field studies, and a molecular phylogeny to determine the host specificity of 6 Rhabdias spp. that infect snakes and anurans from North America. The molecular phylogeny suggests Rhabdias ranae from Nebraska and Mississippi may represent separate, cryptic species. In addition, the phylogeny strongly supports separate clades for anuran and snake lungworms. Field studies and experimental infections indicate that snake lungworms are generalist snake parasites; however, laboratory experiments also suggest that lizards can be infected under some environmental conditions. Lungworms from anurans were found not to infect salamanders or reptiles, in nature or in the laboratory; anuran lungworm species ranged from strict host specificity, e.g., R. ranae from Nebraska, to relative generalist, e.g., Rhabdias joaquinensis from Nebraska. Overall, host specificity for species of Rhabdias does not provide support for the evolution of progressive specialization over time. For most species of lungworms, host specificity in nature appears to be limited by both ecological and physiological factors, which vary between species and their hosts. Furthermore, some lungworms, e.g., Rhabdias bakeri from Missouri, appear to be tracking host resources instead of host phylogenies, an example of ecological fitting. PMID:22988815

  10. Radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure and non-specific symptoms of ill health: A systematic review

    SciTech Connect

    Roeoesli, Martin

    2008-06-15

    This article is a systematic review of whether everyday exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) causes symptoms, and whether some individuals are able to detect low-level RF-EMF (below the ICNIRP [International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection] guidelines). Peer-reviewed articles published before August 2007 were identified by means of a systematic literature search. Meta-analytic techniques were used to pool the results from studies investigating the ability to discriminate active from sham RF-EMF exposure. RF-EMF discrimination was investigated in seven studies including a total of 182 self-declared electromagnetic hypersensitive (EHS) individuals and 332 non-EHS individuals. The pooled correct field detection rate was 4.2% better than expected by chance (95% CI: -2.1 to 10.5). There was no evidence that EHS individuals could detect presence or absence of RF-EMF better than other persons. There was little evidence that short-term exposure to a mobile phone or base station causes symptoms based on the results of eight randomized trials investigating 194 EHS and 346 non-EHS individuals in a laboratory. Some of the trials provided evidence for the occurrence of nocebo effects. In population based studies an association between symptoms and exposure to RF-EMF in the everyday environment was repeatedly observed. This review showed that the large majority of individuals who claims to be able to detect low level RF-EMF are not able to do so under double-blind conditions. If such individuals exist, they represent a small minority and have not been identified yet. The available observational studies do not allow differentiating between biophysical from EMF and nocebo effects.

  11. Residue-Specific Force Field (RSFF2) Improves the Modeling of Conformational Behavior of Peptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuxiang; Elcock, Adrian H

    2015-06-01

    A recent report of (3)J(HNHα) scalar coupling constants for hundreds of two-residue peptides has provided an important opportunity to test simulation force fields for proteins. Here, we compare the abilities of three derivatives of the Amber ff99SB force field to reproduce these data. We report molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 256 two-residue peptides and show that the recently developed residue-specific force field (RSFF2) produces a dramatic improvement in the agreement with experimental (3)J(HNHα) coupling constants. We further show that RSFF2 also appears to produce a modest improvement in reproducing the (3)J(HNHα) coupling constants of five model proteins. Perhaps surprisingly, an analysis of neighboring residue effects (NREs) on the (3)J(HNHα) coupling constants of the two-residue peptides indicates little difference between the force fields' abilities to reproduce experimental NREs. We speculate that this might indicate limitations in the force fields' descriptions of nonbonded interactions between adjacent side chains or with terminal capping groups.

  12. On the importance of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for groundwater transport: an investigation from pore to field scale.

    PubMed

    Rolle, Massimo; Chiogna, Gabriele; Hochstetler, David L; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2013-10-01

    Mixing processes significantly affect and limit contaminant transport and transformation rates in the subsurface. The correct quantification of mixing in groundwater systems must account for diffusion, local-scale dispersion and the flow variability in heterogeneous flow fields (e.g., flow-focusing in high-conductivity and de-focusing in low-conductivity zones). Recent results of multitracer laboratory experiments revealed the significant effect of compound-specific diffusive properties on the physical displacement of dissolved species across a representative range of groundwater flow velocities. The goal of this study is to investigate the role of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for solute transport across a range of scales including: (i) pore-scale (~10⁻² m), (ii) laboratory bench-scale (~10⁰ m) and (iii) field-scale (~10² m). We investigate both conservative and mixing-controlled reactive transport using pore-scale modeling, flow-through laboratory experiments and simulations, and field-scale numerical modeling of complex heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields with statistical properties similar to the ones reported for the extensively investigated Borden aquifer (Ontario, Canada) and Columbus aquifer (Mississippi, USA, also known as MADE site). We consider different steady-state and transient transport scenarios. For the conservative cases we use as a metric of mixing the exponential of the Shannon entropy to quantify solute dilution either in a given volume (dilution index) or in a given solute flux (flux-related dilution index). The decrease in the mass and the mass-flux of the contaminant plumes is evaluated to quantify reactive mixing. The results show that diffusive processes, occurring at the small-scale of a pore channel, strongly affect conservative and reactive solute transport at larger macroscopic scales. The outcomes of our study illustrate the need to consider and properly account for compound-specific diffusion and mixing

  13. On the importance of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for groundwater transport: An investigation from pore to field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolle, Massimo; Chiogna, Gabriele; Hochstetler, David L.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2013-10-01

    Mixing processes significantly affect and limit contaminant transport and transformation rates in the subsurface. The correct quantification of mixing in groundwater systems must account for diffusion, local-scale dispersion and the flow variability in heterogeneous flow fields (e.g., flow-focusing in high-conductivity and de-focusing in low-conductivity zones). Recent results of multitracer laboratory experiments revealed the significant effect of compound-specific diffusive properties on the physical displacement of dissolved species across a representative range of groundwater flow velocities. The goal of this study is to investigate the role of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for solute transport across a range of scales including: (i) pore-scale (~ 10- 2 m), (ii) laboratory bench-scale (~ 100 m) and (iii) field-scale (~ 102 m). We investigate both conservative and mixing-controlled reactive transport using pore-scale modeling, flow-through laboratory experiments and simulations, and field-scale numerical modeling of complex heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields with statistical properties similar to the ones reported for the extensively investigated Borden aquifer (Ontario, Canada) and Columbus aquifer (Mississippi, USA, also known as MADE site). We consider different steady-state and transient transport scenarios. For the conservative cases we use as a metric of mixing the exponential of the Shannon entropy to quantify solute dilution either in a given volume (dilution index) or in a given solute flux (flux-related dilution index). The decrease in the mass and the mass-flux of the contaminant plumes is evaluated to quantify reactive mixing. The results show that diffusive processes, occurring at the small-scale of a pore channel, strongly affect conservative and reactive solute transport at larger macroscopic scales. The outcomes of our study illustrate the need to consider and properly account for compound-specific diffusion and mixing

  14. On the importance of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for groundwater transport: an investigation from pore to field scale.

    PubMed

    Rolle, Massimo; Chiogna, Gabriele; Hochstetler, David L; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2013-10-01

    Mixing processes significantly affect and limit contaminant transport and transformation rates in the subsurface. The correct quantification of mixing in groundwater systems must account for diffusion, local-scale dispersion and the flow variability in heterogeneous flow fields (e.g., flow-focusing in high-conductivity and de-focusing in low-conductivity zones). Recent results of multitracer laboratory experiments revealed the significant effect of compound-specific diffusive properties on the physical displacement of dissolved species across a representative range of groundwater flow velocities. The goal of this study is to investigate the role of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for solute transport across a range of scales including: (i) pore-scale (~10⁻² m), (ii) laboratory bench-scale (~10⁰ m) and (iii) field-scale (~10² m). We investigate both conservative and mixing-controlled reactive transport using pore-scale modeling, flow-through laboratory experiments and simulations, and field-scale numerical modeling of complex heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields with statistical properties similar to the ones reported for the extensively investigated Borden aquifer (Ontario, Canada) and Columbus aquifer (Mississippi, USA, also known as MADE site). We consider different steady-state and transient transport scenarios. For the conservative cases we use as a metric of mixing the exponential of the Shannon entropy to quantify solute dilution either in a given volume (dilution index) or in a given solute flux (flux-related dilution index). The decrease in the mass and the mass-flux of the contaminant plumes is evaluated to quantify reactive mixing. The results show that diffusive processes, occurring at the small-scale of a pore channel, strongly affect conservative and reactive solute transport at larger macroscopic scales. The outcomes of our study illustrate the need to consider and properly account for compound-specific diffusion and mixing

  15. Gender and diurnal effects on specific open-field behavioral patterns in the portacaval shunted rat.

    PubMed

    Theander, B; Apelqvist, G; Bugge, M; Andersson, G; Hindfelt, B; Bengtsson, F

    1997-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequently observed neuropsychiatric syndrome with unknown pathogenesis in patients suffering from chronic liver failure. The portacaval shunted (PCS) rat has been extensively used as an experimental model for HE and for studying the effects of portal-systemic shunting. Previous behavioral studies on PCS rats have shown a number of abnormalities but there is no consensus about which abnormalities are characteristic. We therefore made a thorough descriptive study of 100 male and female PCS rats and sham-operated controls four to six weeks after the shunting procedure in an open field. The frequency, duration and average time sequence of various kinds of defined spontaneous behavioral patterns were investigated during both night and day in order to assess behavioral differences between PCS rats and sham-operated controls. The results indicate differences especially regarding motor exploratory behaviors such as forward locomotion and rearing. There were also differences in eating and sniffing behaviors. Our results show that the overall behavioral alteration seen in PCS rats compared to sham-operated controls is that of hypoactivity.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2–5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20–40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110–120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99–164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue. PMID:25825545

  17. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  18. Entirely Carbohydrate-Based Vaccines: An Emerging Field for Specific and Selective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nishat, Sharmeen; Andreana, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates are regarded as promising targets for vaccine development against infectious disease because cell surface glycans on many infectious agents are attributed to playing an important role in pathogenesis. In addition, oncogenic transformation of normal cells, in many cases, is associated with aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycan generating tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). Technological advances in glycobiology have added a new dimension to immunotherapy when considering carbohydrates as key targets in developing safe and effective vaccines to combat cancer, bacterial infections, viral infections, etc. Many consider effective vaccines induce T-cell dependent immunity with satisfactory levels of immunological memory that preclude recurrence. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone are poorly immunogenic as they do not bind strongly to the MHCII complex and thus fail to elicit T-cell immunity. To increase immunogenicity, carbohydrates have been conjugated to carrier proteins, which sometimes can impede carbohydrate specific immunity as peptide-based immune responses can negate antibodies directed at the targeted carbohydrate antigens. To overcome many challenges in using carbohydrate-based vaccine design and development approaches targeting cancer and other diseases, zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs), isolated from the capsule of commensal anaerobic bacteria, will be discussed as promising carriers of carbohydrate antigens to achieve desired immunological responses. PMID:27213458

  19. From field barley to malt: detection and specification of microbial activity for quality aspects.

    PubMed

    Noots, I; Delcour, J A; Michiels, C W

    1999-01-01

    Barley grain carries a numerous, variable, and complex microbial population that mainly consists of bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous fungi and that can partly be detected and quantified using plating methods and microscopic and molecular techniques. The extent and the activity of this microflora are determined by the altering state of the grain and the environmental conditions in the malt production chain. Three ecological systems can be distinguished: the growing cereal in the field, the dry barley grain under storage, and the germinating barley kernel during actual malting. Microorganisms interact with the malting process both by their presence and by their metabolic activity. In this respect, interference with the oxygen uptake by the barley grain and secretion of enzymes, hormones, toxins, and acids that may affect the plant physiological processes have been studied. As a result of the interaction, microorganisms can cause important losses and influence malt quality as measured by brewhouse performance and beer quality. Of particular concern is the occurrence of mycotoxins that may affect the safety of malt. The development of the microflora during malt production can to a certain extent be controlled by the selection of appropriate process conditions. Physical and chemical treatments to inactivate the microbial population on the barley grain are suggested. Recent developments, however, aim to control the microbial activity during malt production by promoting the growth of desirable microbial cultures, selected either as biocontrol agents inhibiting mycotoxin-producing molds or as starter cultures actively contributing to malt modification. Such techniques may offer natural opportunities to improve the quality and safety of malt.

  20. Sex-specific effect of juvenile diet on adult disease resistance in a field cricket.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Clint D; Tawes, Brittany R

    2013-01-01

    Food limitation is expected to reduce an individual's body condition (body mass scaled to body size) and cause a trade-off between growth and other fitness-related traits, such as immunity. We tested the condition-dependence of growth and disease resistance in male and female Gryllus texensis field crickets by manipulating diet quality via nutrient content for their entire life and then subjecting individuals to a host resistance test using the live bacterium Serratia marcescens. As predicted, crickets on a high-quality diet eclosed more quickly, and at a larger body size and mass. Crickets on a high-quality diet were not in better condition at the time of eclosion, but they were in better condition 7-11 days after eclosion, with females also being in better condition than males. Despite being in better condition, however, females provided with a high-quality diet had significantly poorer disease resistance than females on a low-quality diet and in poor condition. Similarly, males on low- and high-quality diets did not differ in their disease resistance, despite differing in their body condition. A sex difference in disease resistance under diet-restriction suggests that females might allocate resources toward immunity during development if they expect harsh environmental conditions as an adult or it might suggest that females allocate resources toward other life history activities (i.e. reproduction) when food availability increases. We do not know what immune effectors were altered under diet-restriction to increase disease resistance, but our findings suggest that increased immune function might provide an explanation for the sexually-dimorphic increase in longevity generally observed in diet-restricted animals.

  1. Revisiting the scaling of the specific heat of the three-dimensional random-field Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytas, Nikolaos G.; Theodorakis, Panagiotis E.; Hartmann, Alexander K.

    2016-09-01

    We revisit the scaling behavior of the specific heat of the three-dimensional random-field Ising model with a Gaussian distribution of the disorder. Exact ground states of the model are obtained using graph-theoretical algorithms for different strengths 𝒩 = 268 3 spins. By numerically differentiating the bond energy with respect to h, a specific-heat-like quantity is obtained whose maximum is found to converge to a constant in the thermodynamic limit. Compared to a previous study following the same approach, we have studied here much larger system sizes with an increased statistical accuracy. We discuss the relevance of our results under the prism of a modified Rushbrooke inequality for the case of a saturating specific heat. Finally, as a byproduct of our analysis, we provide high-accuracy estimates of the critical field h c = 2.279(7) and the critical exponent of the correlation exponent ν = 1.37(1), in excellent agreement to the most recent computations in the literature.

  2. Settling Velocity Specific SOC Distribution along Hillslopes - A field investigation in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Hu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The net effects of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric CO2, are decisively affected by the spatial re-distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC). The deposition position of eroded SOC, into terrestrial or aquatic systems, is actually decided by the transport distances of soil fractions where the SOC is stored. In theory, the transport distances of aggregated soil fractions are related to their settling velocities under given layer conditions. Yet, little field investigation has been conducted to examine the actual movement of eroded soil fractions along hillslopes, let alone the re-distribution pattern of functional SOC fractions. Eroding sandy soils and sediment were sampled after a series of rainfall events from different topographic positions along a slope on a freshly seeded cropland in Jutland, Denmark. All the soil samples from difference topographic positions along the slope were fractionated into five settling classes using a settling tube apparatus. The SOC content, 13C signature, and C:N ratios of all settling fractions were measured. Our results show that: 1) the spatial distribution of soil settling classes along the slope clearly shows a coarsening effect at the deposition area immediately below the eroding slope, followed by a fining trend on the deposition area at the slope tail. This proves the validity of the conceptual model in Starr et al. 2000 to predict SOC redistribution patterns along eroding hillslopes. 2) The isotopically enriched 13C on the slope back suggests greater decomposition rates possibly experienced by eroded SOC during transport, while the pronounced respiration rates at the slope tail indicate a great potential of CO2 emissions after deposition. Overall, our results illustrate that immediate deposition of fast settling soil fractions, and the thus induced preferential deposition of SOC at foot slope and potential CO2 emissions during transport, must be appropriately accounted for in

  3. Tonotopic and Field-Specific Representation of Long-Lasting Sustained Activity in Rat Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo I.; Noda, Takahiro; Akutsu, Kan; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Cortical information processing of the onset, offset, and continuous plateau of an acoustic stimulus should play an important role in acoustic object perception. To date, transient activities responding to the onset and offset of a sound have been well investigated and cortical subfields and topographic representation in these subfields, such as place code of sound frequency, have been well characterized. However, whether these cortical subfields with tonotopic representation are inherited in the sustained activities that follow transient activities and persist during the presentation of a long-lasting stimulus remains unknown, because sustained activities do not exhibit distinct, reproducible, and time-locked responses in their amplitude to be characterized by grand averaging. To address this gap in understanding, we attempted to decode sound information from densely mapped sustained activities in the rat auditory cortex using a sparse parameter estimation method called sparse logistic regression (SLR), and investigated whether and how these activities represent sound information. A microelectrode array with a grid of 10 × 10 recording sites within an area of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm was implanted in the fourth layer of the auditory cortex in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Sustained activities in response to long-lasting constant pure tones were recorded. SLR then was applied to discriminate the sound-induced band-specific power or phase-locking value from those of spontaneous activities. The highest decoding performance was achieved in the high-gamma band, indicating that cortical inhibitory interneurons may contribute to the sparse tonotopic representation in sustained activities by mediating synchronous activities. The estimated parameter in the SLR decoding revealed that the informative recording site had a characteristic frequency close to the test frequency. In addition, decoding of the four test frequencies demonstrated that the decoding performance of the SLR

  4. Tonotopic and Field-Specific Representation of Long-Lasting Sustained Activity in Rat Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo I; Noda, Takahiro; Akutsu, Kan; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Cortical information processing of the onset, offset, and continuous plateau of an acoustic stimulus should play an important role in acoustic object perception. To date, transient activities responding to the onset and offset of a sound have been well investigated and cortical subfields and topographic representation in these subfields, such as place code of sound frequency, have been well characterized. However, whether these cortical subfields with tonotopic representation are inherited in the sustained activities that follow transient activities and persist during the presentation of a long-lasting stimulus remains unknown, because sustained activities do not exhibit distinct, reproducible, and time-locked responses in their amplitude to be characterized by grand averaging. To address this gap in understanding, we attempted to decode sound information from densely mapped sustained activities in the rat auditory cortex using a sparse parameter estimation method called sparse logistic regression (SLR), and investigated whether and how these activities represent sound information. A microelectrode array with a grid of 10 × 10 recording sites within an area of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm was implanted in the fourth layer of the auditory cortex in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Sustained activities in response to long-lasting constant pure tones were recorded. SLR then was applied to discriminate the sound-induced band-specific power or phase-locking value from those of spontaneous activities. The highest decoding performance was achieved in the high-gamma band, indicating that cortical inhibitory interneurons may contribute to the sparse tonotopic representation in sustained activities by mediating synchronous activities. The estimated parameter in the SLR decoding revealed that the informative recording site had a characteristic frequency close to the test frequency. In addition, decoding of the four test frequencies demonstrated that the decoding performance of the SLR

  5. Minimizing the magnetic field effect in MR-linac specific QA-tests: the use of electron dense materials.

    PubMed

    van Zijp, H M; van Asselen, B; Wolthaus, J W H; Kok, J M G; de Vries, J H W; Ishakoglu, K; Beld, E; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2016-02-01

    To address the quality assurance (QA) of a MR-linac which is an MRI combined with a linear accelerator (linac), the traditional linac QA-tests need to be redesigned, since the presence of the static magnetic field in the MR-linac alters the electron trajectory. The latter causes the asymmetry in the dose kernel which is introduced by the magnetic field and hinders accurate geometrical QA-tests for the MR-linac. We introduced the use of electron dense materials (e.g. copper) to reduce the size of the dose kernel and thereby the magnetic field effect on the dose deposition. Two examples of QA-tests are presented in which the geometrical accuracy of the MR-linac was addressed; beam profile and star-shot measurements. The introduced setup was compared with a reference setup and both were tested on a conventional and the MR-linac. The results showed that the symmetry of the recorded beam profile was restored in presence of the copper material and that the isocenter size of the MR-linac can be determined accurately with the introduced star-shot setup. The use of electron dense materials is not limited to the presented QA-tests but has a broad application for beam-specific QA-tests in presence of a magnetic field. PMID:26758570

  6. Minimizing the magnetic field effect in MR-linac specific QA-tests: the use of electron dense materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijp, H. M.; van Asselen, B.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Kok, J. M. G.; de Vries, J. H. W.; Ishakoglu, K.; Beld, E.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2016-02-01

    To address the quality assurance (QA) of a MR-linac which is an MRI combined with a linear accelerator (linac), the traditional linac QA-tests need to be redesigned, since the presence of the static magnetic field in the MR-linac alters the electron trajectory. The latter causes the asymmetry in the dose kernel which is introduced by the magnetic field and hinders accurate geometrical QA-tests for the MR-linac. We introduced the use of electron dense materials (e.g. copper) to reduce the size of the dose kernel and thereby the magnetic field effect on the dose deposition. Two examples of QA-tests are presented in which the geometrical accuracy of the MR-linac was addressed; beam profile and star-shot measurements. The introduced setup was compared with a reference setup and both were tested on a conventional and the MR-linac. The results showed that the symmetry of the recorded beam profile was restored in presence of the copper material and that the isocenter size of the MR-linac can be determined accurately with the introduced star-shot setup. The use of electron dense materials is not limited to the presented QA-tests but has a broad application for beam-specific QA-tests in presence of a magnetic field.

  7. Efficacy of a piglet-specific commercial inactivated vaccine against Porcine circovirus type 2 in clinical field trials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kiwon; Seo, Hwi Won; Oh, Yeonsu; Park, Changhoon; Kang, Ikjae; Jang, Hyun; Chae, Chanhee

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of a piglet-specific inactivated Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccine was evaluated with clinical field trials, as recommended by the Republic of Korea’s Animal, Plant & Fisheries Quarantine & Inspection Agency. Three farms were selected on the basis of their history of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. On each farm 60, 1-week-old pigs were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups: vaccination at 1 and 3 wk of age or no vaccination. The 2-dose schedule of vaccination with inactivated PCV2 vaccine improved the average daily weight gain from birth to 16 wk of age, the PCV2 load in the blood, and the frequency and severity of lymph node lesions. Inactivated PCV2 vaccine seems to be very effective in controlling PCV2 infection under field conditions. PMID:24101803

  8. A Feasibility Study of a Field-specific Weather Service for Small-scale Farms in a Topographically Complex Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. O.; Shim, K. M.; Shin, Y. S.; Yun, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    Adequate downscaling of synoptic forecasts is a prerequisite for improved agrometeorological service to rural areas in South Korea where complex terrain and small farms are common. Geospatial schemes based on topoclimatology were used to scale down the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) temperature forecasts to the local scale (~30 m) across a rural catchment. Local temperatures were estimated at 14 validation sites at 0600 and 1500 LST in 2013/2014 using these schemes and were compared with observations. A substantial reduction in the estimation error was found for both 0600 and 1500 temperatures compared with uncorrected KMA products. Improvement was most remarkable at low lying locations for the 0600 temperature and at the locations on west- and south-facing slopes for the 1500 temperature. Using the downscaled real-time temperature data, a pilot service has started to provide field-specific weather information tailored to meet the requirements of small-scale farms. For example, the service system makes a daily outlook on the phenology of crop species grown in a given field using the field-specific temperature data. When the temperature forecast is given for tomorrow morning, a frost risk index is calculated according to a known phenology-frost injury relationship. If the calculated index is higher than a pre-defined threshold, a warning is issued and delivered to the grower's cellular phone with relevant countermeasures to help protect crops against frost damage. The system was implemented for a topographically complex catchment of 350km2with diverse agricultural activities, and more than 400 volunteer farmers are participating in this pilot service to access user-specific weather information.

  9. Design of an ecological momentary assessment study of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields and non-specific physical symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Bogers, Rik P; Bolte, John F B; Houtveen, Jan H; Lebret, Erik; van Strien, Rob T; Schipper, C Maarten A; Alkadhimi, Mehdi; Baliatsas, Christos; van Kamp, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance (IEI) attributed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) refers to self-reported sensitivity mainly characterised by the attribution of non-specific physical symptoms to low-level EMF exposure emitted from sources such as mobile phones. Scientific studies have not provided evidence for the existence of IEI-EMF, but these studies did not resemble the real-life situation or suffered from poor exposure characterisation and biased recall of health symptoms. To improve existing methods for the study of IEI-EMF, an Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) study is designed. Methods and analysis The study is an EMA study in which respondents carry personal exposure metres (exposimeters) that measure radiofrequency (RF) EMF, with frequent assessment of health symptoms and perceived EMF exposure through electronic diary registration during five consecutive days. Participants will be a selection from an epidemiological study who report to be sensitive to RF EMF. The exposimeters measure electric field strength in 12 frequency bands. Diary questions include the occurrence and severity of 10 non-specific physical symptoms, mood states and perceived exposure to (sources of) EMF. The relationship of actual and perceived EMF exposure and mood with non-specific physical symptoms will be analysed using multilevel regression analysis with time-shift models. Discussion The study has several advantages over previous studies, including assessment of personal EMF exposure and non-specific physical symptoms by an ecological method with a minimised chance of recall bias. The within-person design reduces confounding by time-stable factors (eg, personal characteristics). In the conduct of the study and the analysis and interpretation of its outcomes, some methodological issues including a high participant burden, reactivity, compliance to the study protocol and the potential of chance findings due to multiple statistical testing will be accounted for

  10. Microelectrode mapping of tonotopic, laminar, and field-specific organization of thalamo-cortical pathway in rat.

    PubMed

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo Isoguchi; Takahashi, Kazusa; Noda, Takahiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Nakahara, Haruka; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-09-22

    The rat has long been considered an important model system for studying neural mechanisms of auditory perception and learning, and particularly mechanisms involving auditory thalamo-cortical processing. However, the functional topography of the auditory thalamus, or medial geniculate body (MGB) has not yet been fully characterized in the rat, and the anatomically-defined features of field-specific, layer-specific and tonotopic thalamo-cortical projections have never been confirmed electrophysiologically. In the present study, we have established a novel technique for recording simultaneously from a surface microelectrode array on the auditory cortex, and a depth electrode array across auditory cortical layers and within the MGB, and characterized the rat MGB and thalamo-cortical projections under isoflurane anesthesia. We revealed that the ventral division of the MGB (MGv) exhibited a low-high-low CF gradient and long-short-long latency gradient along the dorsolateral-to-ventromedial axis, suggesting that the rat MGv is divided into two subdivisions. We also demonstrated that microstimulation in the MGv elicited cortical activation in layer-specific, region-specific and tonotopically organized manners. To our knowledge, the present study has provided the first and most compelling electrophysiological confirmation of the anatomical organization of the primary thalamo-cortical pathway in the rat, setting the groundwork for further investigation. PMID:27329334

  11. Microelectrode mapping of tonotopic, laminar, and field-specific organization of thalamo-cortical pathway in rat.

    PubMed

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo Isoguchi; Takahashi, Kazusa; Noda, Takahiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Nakahara, Haruka; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-09-22

    The rat has long been considered an important model system for studying neural mechanisms of auditory perception and learning, and particularly mechanisms involving auditory thalamo-cortical processing. However, the functional topography of the auditory thalamus, or medial geniculate body (MGB) has not yet been fully characterized in the rat, and the anatomically-defined features of field-specific, layer-specific and tonotopic thalamo-cortical projections have never been confirmed electrophysiologically. In the present study, we have established a novel technique for recording simultaneously from a surface microelectrode array on the auditory cortex, and a depth electrode array across auditory cortical layers and within the MGB, and characterized the rat MGB and thalamo-cortical projections under isoflurane anesthesia. We revealed that the ventral division of the MGB (MGv) exhibited a low-high-low CF gradient and long-short-long latency gradient along the dorsolateral-to-ventromedial axis, suggesting that the rat MGv is divided into two subdivisions. We also demonstrated that microstimulation in the MGv elicited cortical activation in layer-specific, region-specific and tonotopically organized manners. To our knowledge, the present study has provided the first and most compelling electrophysiological confirmation of the anatomical organization of the primary thalamo-cortical pathway in the rat, setting the groundwork for further investigation.

  12. Field applicability of Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) for characterization and quantification of in situ contaminant degradation in aquifers.

    PubMed

    Braeckevelt, M; Fischer, A; Kästner, M

    2012-06-01

    Microbial processes govern the fate of organic contaminants in aquifers to a major extent. Therefore, the evaluation of in situ biodegradation is essential for the implementation of Natural Attenuation (NA) concepts in groundwater management. Laboratory degradation experiments and biogeochemical approaches are often biased and provide only indirect evidence of in situ degradation potential. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) is at present among the most promising tools for assessment of the in situ contaminant degradation within aquifers. One- and two-dimensional (2D) CSIA provides qualitative and quantitative information on in situ contaminant transformation; it is applicable for proving in situ degradation and characterizing degradation conditions and reaction mechanisms. However, field application of CSIA is challenging due to a number of influencing factors, namely those affecting the observed isotope fractionation during biodegradation (e.g., non-isotope-fractionating rate-limiting steps, limited bioavailability), potential isotope effects caused by processes other than biodegradation (e.g., sorption, volatilization, diffusion), as well as non-isotope-fractionating physical processes such as dispersion and dilution. This mini-review aims at guiding practical users towards the sound interpretation of CSIA field data for the characterization of in situ contaminant degradation. It focuses on the relevance of various constraints and influencing factors in CSIA field applications and provides advice on when and how to account for these constraints. We first evaluate factors that can influence isotope fractionation during biodegradation, as well as potential isotope-fractionating and non-isotope-fractionating physical processes governing observed isotope fractionation in the field. Finally, the potentials of the CSIA approach for site characterization and the proper ways to account for various constraints are illustrated by means of a comprehensive CSIA field

  13. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  14. From usability requirement to technical specifications for hand-held tools and materials: an applied research in the construction field.

    PubMed

    Duca, Gabriella; Attaianese, Erminia

    2012-01-01

    Literature shows incidence of musculoskeletal disorders in bricklaying workers as well as the relevance of good designed hand-held tools in musculoskeletal disorders prevention. In this framework, it can be supposed that providing usable hand-held tools and material in construction worksites will help to improve bricklayers' working conditions. Here a study is presented aimed at framing a methodology for usability assessment of bricklayers handled objects, in order to provide employers with practical indicators for choosing tools and materials best fitting workers needs, under the effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction perspective. On the basis of a task analysis, usability requirements for bricklaying hand-held tools and materials have been detailed and related, quantitative and qualitative, technical specifications have been elicited. Theoretical framework and usability assessment methodology are presented and, finally, findings from a field application are discussed.

  15. Recent Results From Internal and Very-Near-Field Plasma Diagnostics of a High Specific Impulse Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Jacobson, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Floating potential and ion current density measurements were taken on the laboratory model NASA-173Mv2 in order to improve understanding of the physical processes affecting Hall thruster performance at high specific impulse. Floating potential was measured on discharge chamber centerline over axial positions spanning 10 mm from the anode to 100 mm downstream of the exit plane. Ion current density was mapped radially up to 300 mm from thruster centerline over axial positions in the very-near-field (10 to 250 mm from the exit plane). All data were collected using a planar probe in conjunction with a high-speed translation stage to minimize probe-induced thruster perturbations. Measurements of floating potential at a xenon flow rate of 10 mg/s have shown that the acceleration layer moved upstream 3 1 mm when the voltage increased from 300 to 600 V. The length of the acceleration layer was 14 2 mm and was approximately constant with voltage and magnetic field. Ion current density measurements indicated the annular ion beam crossed the thruster centerline 163 mm downstream of the exit plane. Radial integration of the ion current density at the cathode plane provided an estimate of the ion current fraction. At 500 V and 5 mg/s, the ion current fraction was calculated as 0.77.

  16. Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Famiano, M.A.

    1997-07-07

    A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.

  17. Protein-specific force field derived from the fragment molecular orbital method can improve protein-ligand binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Kuwata, Kazuo; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-30

    Accurate computational estimate of the protein-ligand binding affinity is of central importance in rational drug design. To improve accuracy of the molecular mechanics (MM) force field (FF) for protein-ligand simulations, we use a protein-specific FF derived by the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method and by the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) method. Applying this FMO-RESP method to two proteins, dodecin, and lysozyme, we found that protein-specific partial charges tend to differ more significantly from the standard AMBER charges for isolated charged atoms. We did not see the dependence of partial charges on the secondary structure. Computing the binding affinities of dodecin with five ligands by MM PBSA protocol with the FMO-RESP charge set as well as with the standard AMBER charges, we found that the former gives better correlation with experimental affinities than the latter. While, for lysozyme with five ligands, both charge sets gave similar and relatively accurate estimates of binding affinities.

  18. REWIRING THE GUSTATORY SYSTEM: SPECIFICITY BETWEEN NERVE AND TASTE BUD FIELD IS CRITICAL FOR NORMAL SALT DISCRIMINATION

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Alan C.; Blonde, Ginger; Garcea, Mircea; Jiang, Enshe

    2009-01-01

    Forty years have passed since it was demonstrated that a cross-regenerated gustatory nerve in the rat tongue adopts the stimulus-response properties of the taste receptor field it cross-reinnervates. Nevertheless, the functional consequences of channeling peripheral taste signals through inappropriate central circuits remain relatively unexplored. Here we tested whether histologically confirmed cross-regeneration of the chorda tympani nerve (CT) into the posterior tongue in the absence of the glossopharyngeal nerve (GL) (CT-PostTongue) or cross-regeneration of the GL into the anterior tongue in the absence of the CT (GL-AntTongue) would maintain presurgically trained performance in an operant NaCl vs. KCl taste discrimination task in rats. Before surgery all groups were averaging over 90% accuracy. Oral amiloride treatment dropped performance to virtually chance levels. During the first week after surgery, sham-operated rats, GL-transected rats, and rats with regenerated CTs displayed highly competent discrimination performance. In contrast, CT-transected rats were severely impaired (59% accuracy). Both the CT-PostTongue and the GL-AntTongue groups were impaired to a similar degree as CT-transected rats. These initially impaired groups improved their performance over the weeks of postsurgical testing suggesting that the rats were capable of relearning the task with discriminable signals in the remaining taste nerves. This relearned performance was dependent on input from amiloride-sensitive receptors likely in the palate. Overall, these results suggest that normal competence in a salt discrimination task is dependent on the taste receptor field origin of the input as well as the specific nerve transmitting the signals to it associated circuits in the brain. PMID:19941834

  19. Site-specific distribution and competitive ability of indigenous bean-nodulating rhizobia isolated from organic fields in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Wongphatcharachai, Manoosak; Wang, Ping; Staley, Christopher; Chun, Chan Lan; Ferguson, John A; Moncada, Kristine M; Sheaffer, Craig C; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-11-20

    Organic dry bean production systems have received increasing interest in many regions of the US, including Minnesota. Thus, improving biological N2 fixation would be highly beneficial for organic crop production. To date, only limited work has been done to select efficient N2-fixing rhizobia for organic dry bean production. In this study, soil samples from 25 organic fields in Minnesota, with a previous cropping history of dry beans, soybeans or both, were collected during May to July 2012. Genetic diversity of indigenous dry bean-rhizobia (511 isolates) was determined by using horizontal, fluorophore-enhanced, repetitive, extragenic, and palindromic-PCR (HFERP) DNA fingerprinting and isolates were classified as belonging to 58 different genotypes. The more abundant rhizobia isolated from bean nodules comprised 35.6% of the population. None of the isolates were identical to commonly-used commercial strains used in the U.S., including Rhizobium tropici CIAT899. Seventeen predominant genotypes were shown to represent two main species, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli (67.1%) and Rhizobium etli (30.2%). One of the indigenous strains, orgK9, displayed efficient N2-fixation and competitive ability relative to the commercial strains tested. The lack of large numbers of indigenous dry bean-rhizobia at most study sites will be useful to avoid competition problems between inoculant strains and indigenous rhizobia. This will allow inoculation with highly effective N2-fixing rhizobia, thus resulting in improved crop productivity. Our results highlight the existence of site-specific rhizobial genotypes in different organic fields and identify strains that may prove useful as novel inoculants for organic dry bean production systems.

  20. Effects of magnetic field strength and b value on the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative breast diffusion-weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Eghtedari, Mohammad; Fox, Patricia; Guvenc, Inanc; Yang, Wei T.; Dogan, Basak E.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of b value or the magnetic field strength (B0) on the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative breast diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Methods A total of 126 patients underwent clinical breast MRI that included pre-contrast DWI imaging using b values of both 1,000 and 1,500 s/mm2 at either 1.5 T (n=86) or 3.0 T (n=40). Quantitative apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were measured and compared for 18 benign, 33 malignant lesions, and 126 normal breast tissues. Optimal ADCmean threshold for differentiating benign and malignant lesions was estimated and the effect of b values and B0 were examined using a generalized estimating equations (GEE) model. Results The optimal ADCmean threshold was 1.235×10–3 mm2/s for b value of 1,000 and 0.934×10–3 mm2/s for b value of 1,500. Using these thresholds, the sensitivities and specificities were 96% and 89% (b value =1,000, B0 =1.5 T), 89% and 98% (b value =1,000, B0 =3.0 T), 88% and 96% (b value =1,500, B0 =1.5 T), and 67% and 100% (b value =1,500, B0 =3.0 T). No significant difference was found between different B0 (P=0.26) or b values (P=0.28). Conclusions Better sensitivity is achieved with DWI of b value =1,000 than with b value =1,500. However, b value and B0 do not significantly impact diagnostic performance of DWI when using appropriate thresholds. PMID:27709073

  1. Subject-specific modulation of local field potential spectral power during brain-machine interface control in primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Kelvin; Dangi, Siddharth; Orsborn, Amy L.; Gastpar, Michael C.; Carmena, Jose M.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have predominantly utilized spike activity as the control signal. However, an increasing number of studies have shown the utility of local field potentials (LFPs) for decoding motor related signals. Currently, it is unclear how well different LFP frequencies can serve as features for continuous, closed-loop BMI control. Approach. We demonstrate 2D continuous LFP-based BMI control using closed-loop decoder adaptation, which adapts decoder parameters to subject-specific LFP feature modulations during BMI control. We trained two macaque monkeys to control a 2D cursor in a center-out task by modulating LFP power in the 0-150 Hz range. Main results. While both monkeys attained control, they used different strategies involving different frequency bands. One monkey primarily utilized the low-frequency spectrum (0-80 Hz), which was highly correlated between channels, and obtained proficient performance even with a single channel. In contrast, the other monkey relied more on higher frequencies (80-150 Hz), which were less correlated between channels, and had greater difficulty with control as the number of channels decreased. We then restricted the monkeys to use only various sub-ranges (0-40, 40-80, and 80-150 Hz) of the 0-150 Hz band. Interestingly, although both monkeys performed better with some sub-ranges than others, they were able to achieve BMI control with all sub-ranges after decoder adaptation, demonstrating broad flexibility in the frequencies that could potentially be used for LFP-based BMI control. Significance. Overall, our results demonstrate proficient, continuous BMI control using LFPs and provide insight into the subject-specific spectral patterns of LFP activity modulated during control.

  2. Sex-specific evolutionary potential of pre- and postcopulatory reproductive interactions in the field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew D; Lailvaux, Simon P; Brooks, Robert C

    2013-06-01

    Mate choice often depends on the properties of both sexes, such as the preference and responsiveness of the female and the sexual display traits of the male. Quantitative genetic studies, however, traditionally explore the outcome of an interaction between males and females based solely on the genotype of one sex, treating the other sex as a source of environmental variance. Here, we use a half-sib breeding design in the field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, to estimate the additive genetic contribution of both partners to three steps of the mate choice process: the time taken to mate; the duration of spermatophore attachment; and the intensity of mate guarding. Rather than each sex contributing equally to the interactions, we found that genetic variation for latency to mate and spermatophore attachment was sex-specific, and in the case of mate-guarding intensity, largely absent. For a given interaction, genetic variation in one sex also appears to be largely independent of the other, and is also uncorrelated with the other traits. We discuss how pre- and postcopulatory interactions have the potential to evolve as an interacting phenotype, but that any coevolution between these traits, due to sexual selection or sexual conflict, may be limited.

  3. Wireless hippocampal neural recording via a multiple input RF receiver to construct place-specific firing fields.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Bae; Manns, Joseph R; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports scientifically meaningful in vivo experiments using a 32-channel wireless neural recording system (WINeR). The WINeR system is divided into transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) parts. On the Tx side, we had WINeR-6, a system-on-a-chip (SoC) that operated based on time division multiplexing (TDM) of pulse width modulated (PWM) samples. The chip was fabricated in a 0.5-µm CMOS process, occupying 4.9 × 3.3 mm(2) and consuming 15 mW from ±1.5V supplies. The Rx used two antennas with separate pathways to down-convert the RF signal from a large area. A time-to-digital converter (TDC) in an FPGA converted the PWM pulses into digitized samples. In order to further increase the wireless coverage area and eliminate blind spots within a large experimental arena, two receivers were synchronized. The WINeR system was used to record epileptic activities from a rat that was injected with tetanus toxin (TT) in the dorsal hippocampus. In a different in vivo experiment, place-specific firing fields of place cells, which are parts of the hippocampal-dependent memory, were mapped from a series of behavioral experiments from a rat running in a circular track. Results from the same animal were compared against a commercial hard-wired recording system to evaluate the quality of the wireless recordings.

  4. Sex-specific life history responses to nymphal diet quality and immune status in a field cricket.

    PubMed

    Kelly, C D; Neyer, A A; Gress, B E

    2014-02-01

    Individual fitness is expected to benefit from earlier maturation at a larger body size and higher body condition. However, poor nutritional quality or high prevalence of disease make this difficult because individuals either cannot acquire sufficient resources or must divert resources to other fitness-related traits such as immunity. Under such conditions, individuals are expected to mature later at a smaller body size and in poorer body condition. Moreover, the juvenile environment can also produce longer-term effects on adult fitness by causing shifts in resource allocation strategies that could alter investment in immune function and affect adult lifespan. We manipulated diet quality and immune status of juvenile Texas field crickets, Gryllus texensis, to investigate how poor developmental conditions affect sex-specific investment in fitness-related traits. As predicted, a poor juvenile diet was related to smaller mass and body size at eclosion in both sexes. However, our results also reveal sexually dimorphic responses to different facets of the rearing environment: female life history decisions are affected more by diet quality, whereas males are affected more by immune status. We suggest that females respond to decreased nutritional income because this threatens their ability to achieve a large adult body size, whereas male fitness is more dependent on reaching adulthood and so they invest in immunity and survival to eclosion.

  5. A mean field model of the decrease of the specific surface area of dry snow during isothermal metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legagneux, LoïC.; Domine, Florent

    2005-12-01

    The surface area of snow that is accessible to gases is an essential parameter for quantifying the exchange of trace gases between the snowpack and the atmosphere and is called the specific surface area (SSA). Snow SSA decreases during metamorphism, but this is not described in current snow models owing to the complexity of the physics and geometry of snow. In this paper, we test whether it is possible to model snow SSA changes during isothermal metamorphism without accounting for all the complexity of the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of real snow. We have developed a mean field model of snow metamorphism under isothermal conditions, grounded in the theoretical framework of transient Ostwald ripening and representing snow as a distribution of spherical particles. Analytical expressions of the growth rates of these spheres are obtained, and the evolution of two measurable parameters that characterize snow geometry, the SSA and the distribution of radii of curvature (DRC), are simulated and compared to experimental data obtained by X-ray tomography. The qualitative effects of temperature, snow density, and the condensation coefficient on the rate of SSA decrease are examined. The model predicts very well the rate of evolution of the particle size distribution, which validates our physical description of isothermal metamorphism. In particular, we find that vapor phase diffusion is rate limiting. However, the calculation of the SSA from the DRC appears delicate and evidences too crude approximations in our description of the 3-D geometry of snow. Finally, it is stressed that the initial DRC can greatly influence the rate of SSA decrease, while experimental measurements of the rate of SSA decrease suggest that all snow types evolve in a similar way. It is thus proposed that most natural fresh snows have similar DRCs.

  6. Magnetic field dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat of the doped plasticized polyaniline (PANI-DB3EPSA)0.5.

    PubMed

    Djurado, D; Pron, A; Jacquot, J F; Travers, J P; Adriano, C; Vargas, J M; Pagliuso, P G; Rettori, C; Lesseux, G G; Fier, I; Walmsley, L

    2011-05-25

    Specific heat, magnetization and electron spin resonance (ESR) data obtained from a self-standing film of the doped plasticized polyaniline (PANI-DB3EPSA)(0.5) are shown. No long range magnetic order has been observed at zero magnetic field, above 2 K. For a magnetic field of 3.3 kOe applied perpendicular to the plane of the film, a clear signature of an induced ordered state can be seen in the specific heat data and ESR also reveals this antiferromagnetic order. An electronic contribution is detected from ESR, magnetization and specific heat; however, for T ≤ 5 K, the specific heat data show the existence of a gap. Magnetization data also show a low temperature dominant Curie behaviour which cannot be seen from ESR, probably due to a very large linewidth, suggesting short range correlations among spin 1/2 polarons.

  7. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-01

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg-1 and 91 mV m-1 for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg-1) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m-1) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines.

  8. Specific Intensity Direct Current (DC) Electric Field Improves Neural Stem Cell Migration and Enhances Differentiation towards βIII-Tubulin+ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiping; Steiger, Amanda; Nohner, Mitch; Ye, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Control of stem cell migration and differentiation is vital for efficient stem cell therapy. Literature reporting electric field–guided migration and differentiation is emerging. However, it is unknown if a field that causes cell migration is also capable of guiding cell differentiation—and the mechanisms for these processes remain unclear. Here, we report that a 115 V/m direct current (DC) electric field can induce directional migration of neural precursor cells (NPCs). Whole cell patching revealed that the cell membrane depolarized in the electric field, and buffering of extracellular calcium via EGTA prevented cell migration under these conditions. Immunocytochemical staining indicated that the same electric intensity could also be used to enhance differentiation and increase the percentage of cell differentiation into neurons, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The results indicate that DC electric field of this specific intensity is capable of promoting cell directional migration and orchestrating functional differentiation, suggestively mediated by calcium influx during DC field exposure. PMID:26068466

  9. A method to measure specific absorption rate of nanoparticles in colloidal suspension using different configurations of radio-frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketharnath, Dhivya; Pande, Rohit; Xie, Leiming; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Godin, Biana; Wosik, Jarek

    2012-08-01

    We report a method for characterization of the efficiency of radio-frequency (rf) heating of nanoparticles (NPs) suspended in an aqueous medium. Measurements were carried out for water suspended 5 nm superparamagnetic iron-oxide NPs with 30 nm dextran matrix for three different configurations of rf electric and magnetic fields. A 30 MHz high-Q resonator was designed to measure samples placed inside a parallel plate capacitor and solenoid coil with or without an rf electric field shield. All components of rf losses were analyzed and rf electric and magnetic field induced heating of NPs and the dispersion medium was determined and discussed.

  10. A method to measure specific absorption rate of nanoparticles in colloidal suspension using different configurations of radio-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Ketharnath, Dhivya; Pande, Rohit; Xie, Leiming; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Godin, Biana; Wosik, Jarek

    2012-08-20

    We report a method for characterization of the efficiency of radio-frequency (rf) heating of nanoparticles (NPs) suspended in an aqueous medium. Measurements were carried out for water suspended 5 nm superparamagnetic iron-oxide NPs with 30 nm dextran matrix for three different configurations of rf electric and magnetic fields. A 30 MHz high-Q resonator was designed to measure samples placed inside a parallel plate capacitor and solenoid coil with or without an rf electric field shield. All components of rf losses were analyzed and rf electric and magnetic field induced heating of NPs and the dispersion medium was determined and discussed.

  11. The Influence of Current Density and Magnetic Field Topography in Optimizing the Performance, Divergence, and Plasma Oscillations of High Specific Impulse Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies of xenon Hall thrusters have shown peak efficiencies at specific impulses of less than 3000 s. This was a consequence of modern Hall thruster magnetic field topographies, which have been optimized for 300 V discharges. On-going research at the NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating this behavior and methods to enhance thruster performance. To conduct these studies, a laboratory model Hall thruster that uses a pair of trim coils to tailor the magnetic field topography for high specific impulse operation has been developed. The thruster-the NASA-173Mv2 was tested to determine how current density and magnetic field topography affect performance, divergence, and plasma oscillations at voltages up to 1000 V. Test results showed there was a minimum current density and optimum magnetic field topography at which efficiency monotonically increased with voltage. At 1000 V, 10 milligrams per second the total specific impulse was 3390 s and the total efficiency was 60.8%. Plume divergence decreased at 400-1000 V, but increased at 300-400 V as the result of plasma oscillations. The dominant oscillation frequency steadily increased with voltage, from 14.5 kHz at 300 V, to 22 kHz at 1000 V. An additional oscillatory mode in the 80-90 kHz frequency range began to appear above 500 V. The use of trim coils to modify the magnetic field improved performance while decreasing plume divergence and the frequency and magnitude of plasma oscillations.

  12. Phylogenomics of Xanthomonas field strains infecting pepper and tomato reveals diversity in effector repertoires and identifies determinants of host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Allison R.; Potnis, Neha; Timilsina, Sujan; Wilson, Mark; Patané, José; Martins, Joaquim; Minsavage, Gerald V.; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Akhunova, Alina; Almeida, Nalvo; Vallad, Gary E.; Barak, Jeri D.; White, Frank F.; Miller, Sally A.; Ritchie, David; Goss, Erica; Bart, Rebecca S.; Setubal, João C.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial spot disease of pepper and tomato is caused by four distinct Xanthomonas species and is a severely limiting factor on fruit yield in these crops. The genetic diversity and the type III effector repertoires of a large sampling of field strains for this disease have yet to be explored on a genomic scale, limiting our understanding of pathogen evolution in an agricultural setting. Genomes of 67 Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xe), Xanthomonas perforans (Xp), and Xanthomonas gardneri (Xg) strains isolated from diseased pepper and tomato fields in the southeastern and midwestern United States were sequenced in order to determine the genetic diversity in field strains. Type III effector repertoires were computationally predicted for each strain, and multiple methods of constructing phylogenies were employed to understand better the genetic relationship of strains in the collection. A division in the Xp population was detected based on core genome phylogeny, supporting a model whereby the host-range expansion of Xp field strains on pepper is due, in part, to a loss of the effector AvrBsT. Xp-host compatibility was further studied with the observation that a double deletion of AvrBsT and XopQ allows a host range expansion for Nicotiana benthamiana. Extensive sampling of field strains and an improved understanding of effector content will aid in efforts to design disease resistance strategies targeted against highly conserved core effectors. PMID:26089818

  13. Phylogenomics of Xanthomonas field strains infecting pepper and tomato reveals diversity in effector repertoires and identifies determinants of host specificity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Allison R; Potnis, Neha; Timilsina, Sujan; Wilson, Mark; Patané, José; Martins, Joaquim; Minsavage, Gerald V; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Akhunova, Alina; Almeida, Nalvo; Vallad, Gary E; Barak, Jeri D; White, Frank F; Miller, Sally A; Ritchie, David; Goss, Erica; Bart, Rebecca S; Setubal, João C; Jones, Jeffrey B; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial spot disease of pepper and tomato is caused by four distinct Xanthomonas species and is a severely limiting factor on fruit yield in these crops. The genetic diversity and the type III effector repertoires of a large sampling of field strains for this disease have yet to be explored on a genomic scale, limiting our understanding of pathogen evolution in an agricultural setting. Genomes of 67 Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xe), Xanthomonas perforans (Xp), and Xanthomonas gardneri (Xg) strains isolated from diseased pepper and tomato fields in the southeastern and midwestern United States were sequenced in order to determine the genetic diversity in field strains. Type III effector repertoires were computationally predicted for each strain, and multiple methods of constructing phylogenies were employed to understand better the genetic relationship of strains in the collection. A division in the Xp population was detected based on core genome phylogeny, supporting a model whereby the host-range expansion of Xp field strains on pepper is due, in part, to a loss of the effector AvrBsT. Xp-host compatibility was further studied with the observation that a double deletion of AvrBsT and XopQ allows a host range expansion for Nicotiana benthamiana. Extensive sampling of field strains and an improved understanding of effector content will aid in efforts to design disease resistance strategies targeted against highly conserved core effectors. PMID:26089818

  14. Specific features of attenuated light transmission by liquid-crystal twist cells in constant and alternating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konshina, E. A.; Amosova, L. P.

    2012-07-01

    Optical transmission characteristics of dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal (NLC) twist cells with different alignment layers (rubbed polyimide and obliquely deposited cerium dioxide) have been studied in constant and alternating electric fields. It has been established that a change in the optical (twist effect) threshold and dynamic range of attenuated transmission depend both on the boundary conditions (that influence the screening of applied voltage) and on the parameters of the applied electric field. The maximum dynamic range (49.5 dB) has been obtained in the cell with a CeO2 alignment layer controlled by a constant potential. In the case of an alternating electric field, the dynamic range decreases because of reduced effective voltage.

  15. Ion Voltage Diagnostics in the Far-Field Plume of a High-Specific Impulse Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Haas, James M.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic field and discharge voltage on the far-field plume of the NASA 173Mv2 laboratory-model Hall thruster were investigated. A cylindrical Langmuir probe was used to measure the plasma potential and a retarding potential analyzer was employed to measure the ion voltage distribution. The plasma potential was affected by relatively small changes in the external magnetic field, which suggested a means to control the plasma surrounding the thruster. As the discharge voltage increased, the ion voltage distribution showed that the acceleration efficiency increased and the dispersion efficiency decreased. This implied that the ionization zone was growing axially and moving closer to the anode, which could have affected thruster efficiency and lifetime due to higher wall losses. However, wall losses may have been reduced by improved focusing efficiency since the total efficiency increased and the plume divergence decreased with discharge voltage.

  16. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specifications: ACRR Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) Bucket Environment (ACRR-PLG-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parm, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 37 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  17. Ultra-high field NMR studies of antibody binding and site-specific phosphorylation of {alpha}-synuclein

    SciTech Connect

    Sasakawa, Hiroaki |; Sakata, Eri; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Masuda, Masami |; Mori, Tetsuya; Kurimoto, Eiji; Iguchi, Takeshi; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kato, Koichi |

    2007-11-23

    Although biological importance of intrinsically disordered proteins is becoming recognized, NMR analyses of this class of proteins remain as tasks with more challenge because of poor chemical shift dispersion. It is expected that ultra-high field NMR spectroscopy offers improved resolution to cope with this difficulty. Here, we report an ultra-high field NMR study of {alpha}-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein identified as the major component of the Lewy bodies. Based on NMR spectral data collected at a 920 MHz proton frequency, we performed epitope mapping of an anti-{alpha}-synuclein monoclonal antibody, and furthermore, characterized conformational effects of phosphorylation at Ser129 of {alpha}-synuclein.

  18. A field-based method to derive macroinvertebrate benchmark for specific conductivity adapted for small data sets and demonstrated in the Hun-Tai River Basin, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Jia, Xiaobo; Xia, Rui; Lin, Jianing; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Ionic mixtures, measured as specific conductivity, have been increasingly concerned because of their toxicities to aquatic organisms. However, identifying protective values of specific conductivity for aquatic organisms is challenging given that laboratory test systems cannot examine more salt-intolerant species nor effects occurring in streams. Large data sets used for deriving field-based benchmarks are rarely available. In this study, a field-based method for small data sets was used to derive specific conductivity benchmark, which is expected to prevent the extirpation of 95% of local taxa from circum-neutral to alkaline waters dominated by a mixture of SO4(2-) and HCO3(-) anions and other dissolved ions. To compensate for the smaller sample size, species level analyses were combined with genus level analyses. The benchmark is based on extirpation concentration (XC95) values of specific conductivity for 60 macroinvertebrate genera estimated from 296 sampling sites in the Hun-Tai River Basin. We derived the specific conductivity benchmark by using a 2-point interpolation method, which yielded the benchmark of 249 μS/cm. Our study tailored the method that was developed by USEPA to derive aquatic life benchmark for specific conductivity for basin scale application, and may provide useful information for water pollution control and management.

  19. A field-based method to derive macroinvertebrate benchmark for specific conductivity adapted for small data sets and demonstrated in the Hun-Tai River Basin, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Jia, Xiaobo; Xia, Rui; Lin, Jianing; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Ionic mixtures, measured as specific conductivity, have been increasingly concerned because of their toxicities to aquatic organisms. However, identifying protective values of specific conductivity for aquatic organisms is challenging given that laboratory test systems cannot examine more salt-intolerant species nor effects occurring in streams. Large data sets used for deriving field-based benchmarks are rarely available. In this study, a field-based method for small data sets was used to derive specific conductivity benchmark, which is expected to prevent the extirpation of 95% of local taxa from circum-neutral to alkaline waters dominated by a mixture of SO4(2-) and HCO3(-) anions and other dissolved ions. To compensate for the smaller sample size, species level analyses were combined with genus level analyses. The benchmark is based on extirpation concentration (XC95) values of specific conductivity for 60 macroinvertebrate genera estimated from 296 sampling sites in the Hun-Tai River Basin. We derived the specific conductivity benchmark by using a 2-point interpolation method, which yielded the benchmark of 249 μS/cm. Our study tailored the method that was developed by USEPA to derive aquatic life benchmark for specific conductivity for basin scale application, and may provide useful information for water pollution control and management. PMID:27389551

  20. Effective Field Study of Canted Antiferromagnetic Insulating Phase in Magnetic Organic Conductor λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 through Specific Heat Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Kazuo; Tajima, Naoya; Kajita, Koji; Nishio, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between magnetism and superconductivity has been intensively studied by many researchers. The organic conductor λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 [BETS = bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene] undergoes a metal-insulator (M-I) transition with antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering under zero magnetic field. The magnetic field (μ0H ˜ 11 T) induces the transition from the insulating state to the metallic state and then to the superconducting state (μ0H ˜ 17 T). The origin and mechanism of the M-I transition accompanying AF ordering have not been clarified yet. In the present study, to investigate the origin and mechanism of the M-I and AF transitions in λ-(BETS)2FeCl4, we derived key information on these phase transitions by studying the effective magnetic field on an FeCl4 site through specific heat measurements under a magnetic field.

  1. Monte Carlo study of the potential reduction in out-of-field dose using a patient-specific aperture in pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Dowdell, Stephen J; Clasie, Benjamin; Depauw, Nicolas; Metcalfe, Peter; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Kooy, Hanne M; Flanz, Jacob B; Paganetti, Harald

    2012-05-21

    This study is aimed at identifying the potential benefits of using a patient-specific aperture in proton beam scanning. For this purpose, an accurate Monte Carlo model of the pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy (PT) treatment head at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) was developed based on an existing model of the passive double-scattering (DS) system. The Monte Carlo code specifies the treatment head at MGH with sub-millimeter accuracy. The code was configured based on the results of experimental measurements performed at MGH. This model was then used to compare out-of-field doses in simulated DS treatments and PBS treatments. For the conditions explored, the penumbra in PBS is wider than in DS, leading to higher absorbed doses and equivalent doses adjacent to the primary field edge. For lateral distances greater than 10 cm from the field edge, the doses in PBS appear to be lower than those observed for DS. We found that placing a patient-specific aperture at nozzle exit during PBS treatments can potentially reduce doses lateral to the primary radiation field by over an order of magnitude. In conclusion, using a patient-specific aperture has the potential to further improve the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS.

  2. Monte Carlo study of the potential reduction in out-of-field dose using a patient-specific aperture in pencil beam scanning proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dowdell, S J; Clasie, B; Depauw, N; Metcalfe, P; Rosenfeld, A B; Kooy, H M; Flanz, J; Paganetti, H

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the potential benefits of using a patient specific aperture in proton beam scanning. For this purpose an accurate Monte Carlo model of the pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy (PT) treatment head at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) was developed based on an existing model of the passive double-scattering (DS) system. The Monte Carlo code specifies the treatment head at MGH with sub-millimeter accuracy. The code was configured based on the results of experimental measurements performed at MGH. This model was then used to compare out-of-field doses in simulated double-scattering (DS) treatments and PBS treatments For the conditions explored, the penumbra in PBS is wider than in DS, leading to higher absorbed doses and equivalent doses adjacent to the primary field edge. For lateral distances greater than 10cm from the field edge, the doses in PBS appear to be lower than those observed for DS. We found that placing a patient-specific aperture at nozzle exit during PBS treatments can potentially reduce doses lateral to the primary radiation field by over an order of magnitude. In conclusion, using a patient-specific aperture has the potential to further improve the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS. PMID:22513726

  3. Isoform-specific quantification of metallothionein in the terrestrial gastropod Helix pomatia. II. A differential biomarker approach under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Dallinger, Reinhard; Chabicovsky, Monika; Lagg, Bernhard; Schipflinger, Rouven; Weirich, Harald G; Berger, Burkhard

    2004-04-01

    The two function-specific metallothionein (MT) isoforms characterized from the midgut gland and mantle tissue of Helix pomatia differ substantially in their metal-binding preferences, as well as molecular and biochemical features. These differences make them potential candidates for biomarker studies based on a differential, isoform-specific approach. To prove this hypothesis, induction experiments with two metals (Cd and Cu) that are normally bound by the two isoforms were compared with a range of organic chemicals and physical stressors under laboratory conditions to test the responsiveness of the two isoforms to the stressors applied. In addition, field studies were conducted with Roman snails and substrate samples collected from different metal-contaminated sites in Austria to test the suitability of the two isoforms as biomarkers under field conditions. The results of these combined laboratory and field studies confirmed the validity of the biomarker approach with the two metal- and tissue-specific isoforms. It is demonstrated that the Cd-binding MT specifically and exclusively responds to Cd exposure by increasing concentrations, whereas the Cu-binding MT isoform decreases in its concentration upon exposure to physical stress (X-ray irradiation and cold). This suggests researchers should adopt, under certain preconditions, a dual biomarker approach by combining the simultaneous quantification of Cd-MT concentrations in the midgut gland as a biomarker for Cd pollution and of Cu-MT concentration in the mantle as a biomarker for the impairment of snails by additional physical stressors.

  4. Conversion of upland to paddy field specifically alters the community structure of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in an acid soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. S.; Ren, G. D.; Lu, L.; Zheng, Y.; Peng, X. H.; Jia, Z. J.

    2013-08-01

    The function of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) depends on the major energy-generating compounds (i.e., ammonia and oxygen). The diversification of AOA and AOB communities along ecological gradients of substrate availability in a complex environment have been much debated but rarely tested. In this study, two ecosystems of maize and rice crops under different fertilization regimes were selected to investigate the community diversification of soil AOA and AOB upon conversion of an upland field to a paddy field and long-term field fertilization in an acid soil. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that the abundance of AOA was significantly stimulated after conversion of upland to paddy soils for more than 100 yr, whereas a slight decline in AOB numbers was observed. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints of amoA genes further revealed remarkable changes in the community compositions of AOA after conversion of aerobic upland to flooded paddy field. Sequencing analysis revealed that upland soil was dominated by AOA within the soil group 1.1b lineage, whereas the marine group 1.1a-associated lineage predominated in AOA communities in paddy soils. Irrespective of whether the soil was upland or paddy soil, long-term field fertilization led to increased abundance of amoA genes in AOA and AOB compared with control treatments (no fertilization), whereas archaeal amoA gene abundances outnumbered their bacterial counterparts in all samples. Phylogenetic analyses of amoA genes showed that Nitrosospira cluster-3-like AOB dominated bacterial ammonia oxidizers in both paddy and upland soils, regardless of fertilization treatment. The results of this study suggest that the marine group 1.1a-associated AOA will be better adapted to the flooded paddy field than AOA ecotypes of the soil group 1.1b lineage, and indicate that long-term flooding is the dominant selective force driving the

  5. Physiological observations validate finite element models for estimating subject-specific electric field distributions induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Legon, Wynn; Rowlands, Abby; Bickel, Warren K; Paulus, Walter; Tyler, William J

    2013-11-01

    Recent evidence indicates subject-specific gyral folding patterns and white matter anisotropy uniquely shape electric fields generated by TMS. Current methods for predicting the brain regions influenced by TMS involve projecting the TMS coil position or center of gravity onto realistic head models derived from structural and functional imaging data. Similarly, spherical models have been used to estimate electric field distributions generated by TMS pulses delivered from a particular coil location and position. In the present paper we inspect differences between electric field computations estimated using the finite element method (FEM) and projection-based approaches described above. We then more specifically examined an approach for estimating cortical excitation volumes based on individualistic FEM simulations of electric fields. We evaluated this approach by performing neurophysiological recordings during MR-navigated motormapping experiments. We recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in response to single pulse TMS using two different coil orientations (45° and 90° to midline) at 25 different locations (5×5 grid, 1cm spacing) centered on the hotspot of the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle in left motor cortex. We observed that motor excitability maps varied within and between subjects as a function of TMS coil position and orientation. For each coil position and orientation tested, simulations of the TMS-induced electric field were computed using individualistic FEM models and compared to MEP amplitudes obtained during our motormapping experiments. We found FEM simulations of electric field strength, which take into account subject-specific gyral geometry and tissue conductivity anisotropy, significantly correlated with physiologically observed MEP amplitudes (rmax=0.91, p=1.8×10(-5) rmean=0.81, p=0.01). These observations validate the implementation of individualistic FEM models to account for variations in gyral folding patterns and tissue

  6. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-21

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg(-1) and 91 mV m(-1) for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg(-1)) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m(-1)) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines. PMID:24936747

  7. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-21

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg(-1) and 91 mV m(-1) for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg(-1)) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m(-1)) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines.

  8. Correction factors for A1SL ionization chamber dosimetry in TomoTherapy: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Rodriguez-Romero, Ruth; Sanchez-Rubio, Patricia; Miguel Gonzalez-Castano, Diego; Gomez, Faustino; Nunez, Luis; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, an international working group on nonstandard fields presented a new formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [Alfonso et al., Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] which has been adopted by AAPM TG-148. This work presents an experimental determination of the correction factors for reference dosimetry with an Exradin A1SL thimble ionization chamber in a TomoTherapy unit, focusing on: (i) machine-specific reference field, (ii) plan-class-specific reference field, and (iii) two clinical treatments. Methods: Ionization chamber measurements were performed in the TomoTherapy unit for intermediate (machine-specific and plan-class-specific) calibration fields, based on the reference conditions defined by AAPM TG-148, and two clinical treatments (lung and head-and-neck). Alanine reference dosimetry was employed to determine absorbed dose to water at the point of interest for the fields under investigation. The corresponding chamber correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber measurements ratios. Results: Two different methods of determining the beam quality correction factor k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} for the A1SL ionization chamber in this TomoTherapy unit, where reference conditions for conventional beam quality determination cannot be met, result in consistent values. The observed values of overall correction factors obtained for intermediate and clinical fields are consistently around 0.98 with a typical expanded relative uncertainty of 2% (k = 2), which when considered make such correction factors compatible with unity. However, all of them are systematically lower than unity, which is shown to be significant when a hypothesis test assuming a t-student distribution is performed (p=1.8x10{sup -2}). Correction factors k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub p{sub c{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub p}{sub c}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}} and k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s

  9. Patient-specific models of deep brain stimulation: Influence of field model complexity on neural activation predictions

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Butson, Christopher R.; Lempka, Scott F.; Cooper, Scott E.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become the surgical therapy of choice for medically intractable Parkinson’s disease. However, quantitative understanding of the interaction between the electric field generated by DBS and the underlying neural tissue is limited. Recently, computational models of varying levels of complexity have been used to study the neural response to DBS. The goal of this study was to evaluate the quantitative impact of incrementally incorporating increasing levels of complexity into computer models of STN DBS. Our analysis focused on the direct activation of experimentally measureable fiber pathways within the internal capsule (IC). Our model system was customized to an STN DBS patient and stimulation thresholds for activation of IC axons were calculated with electric field models that ranged from an electrostatic, homogenous, isotropic model to one that explicitly incorporated the voltage-drop and capacitance of the electrode-electrolyte interface, tissue encapsulation of the electrode, and diffusion-tensor based 3D tissue anisotropy and inhomogeneity. The model predictions were compared to experimental IC activation defined from electromyographic (EMG) recordings from eight different muscle groups in the contralateral arm and leg of the STN DBS patient. Coupled evaluation of the model and experimental data showed that the most realistic predictions of axonal thresholds were achieved with the most detailed model. Furthermore, the more simplistic neurostimulation models substantially overestimated the spatial extent of neural activation. PMID:20607090

  10. Ion Species Fractions in the Far-Field Plume of a High-Specific Impulse Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2003-01-01

    An ExB probe was used to measure the ion species fractions of Xe(+), Xe(2+), and Xe(3+) in the far-field plume of the NASA-173Mv2 laboratory-model Hall thruster. The thruster was operated at a constant xenon flow rate of 10 milligrams per second and discharge voltages of 300 to 900 V. The ExB probe was placed two meters downstream of the thruster exit plane on the thruster centerline. At a discharge voltage of 300 V, the species fractions of Xe(2+) and Xe(3+) were lower, but still consistent with, previous Hall thruster studies using other mass analyzers. Over discharge voltages of 300 to 900 V, the Xe(2+) species fractions increased from 0.04 to 0.12 and the Xe(3+) species fraction increased from 0.01 to 0.02.

  11. Investigating temporal field sampling strategies for site-specific calibration of three soil moisture-neutron intensity parameterisation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, J.; Rosolem, R.; Baatz, R.; Wagener, T.; Bogena, H. R.

    2015-07-01

    The Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensor (CRNS) can provide soil moisture information at scales relevant to hydrometeorological modelling applications. Site-specific calibration is needed to translate CRNS neutron intensities into sensor footprint average soil moisture contents. We investigated temporal sampling strategies for calibration of three CRNS parameterisations (modified N0, HMF, and COSMIC) by assessing the effects of the number of sampling days and soil wetness conditions on the performance of the calibration results while investigating actual neutron intensity measurements, for three sites with distinct climate and land use: a semi-arid site, a temperate grassland, and a temperate forest. When calibrated with 1 year of data, both COSMIC and the modified N0 method performed better than HMF. The performance of COSMIC was remarkably good at the semi-arid site in the USA, while the N0mod performed best at the two temperate sites in Germany. The successful performance of COSMIC at all three sites can be attributed to the benefits of explicitly resolving individual soil layers (which is not accounted for in the other two parameterisations). To better calibrate these parameterisations, we recommend in situ soil sampled to be collected on more than a single day. However, little improvement is observed for sampling on more than 6 days. At the semi-arid site, the N0mod method was calibrated better under site-specific average wetness conditions, whereas HMF and COSMIC were calibrated better under drier conditions. Average soil wetness condition gave better calibration results at the two humid sites. The calibration results for the HMF method were better when calibrated with combinations of days with similar soil wetness conditions, opposed to N0mod and COSMIC, which profited from using days with distinct wetness conditions. Errors in actual neutron intensities were translated to average errors specifically to each site. At the semi-arid site, these errors were below the

  12. SU-D-304-06: Measurement of LET in Patient-Specific Proton Therapy Treatment Fields Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Granville, DA; Sahoo, N; Sawakuchi, GO

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors (OSLDs) for measurements of dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET) in patient-specific proton therapy treatment fields. Methods: We used Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs made from the same material as commercially available nanoDot OSLDs from Landauer, Inc. We calibrated two parameters of the OSL signal as functions of LET in therapeutic proton beams: the ratio of the ultraviolet and blue emission intensities (UV/blue ratio) and the OSL curve shape. These calibration curves were created by irradiating OSLDs in passively scattered beams of known LET (0.96 to 3.91 keV/µm). The LET values were determined using a validated Monte Carlo model of the beamline. We then irradiated new OSLDs with the prescription dose (16 to 74 cGy absorbed dose to water) at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of four patient-specific treatment fields. From readouts of these OSLDs, we determined both the UV/blue ratio and OSL curve shape parameters. Combining these parameters with the calibration curves, we were able to measure LET using the OSLDs. The measurements were compared to the theoretical LET values obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of the patient-specific treatments fields. Results: Using the UV/blue ratio parameter, we were able to measure LET within 3.8%, 6.2%, 5.6% and 8.6% of the Monte Carlo value for each of the patient fields. Similarly, using the OSL curve shape parameter, LET measurements agreed within 0.5%, 11.0%, 2.5% and 7.6% for each of the four fields. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a method to verify LET in patient-specific proton therapy treatment fields using OSLDs. The possibility of enhancing biological effectiveness of proton therapy treatment plans by including LET in the optimization has been previously shown. The LET verification method we have demonstrated will be useful in the quality assurance of such LET optimized treatment plans. DA Granville received

  13. Early auditory experience induces frequency-specific, adaptive plasticity in the forebrain gaze fields of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Miller, G L; Knudsen, E I

    2001-05-01

    Binaural acoustic cues such as interaural time and level differences (ITDs and ILDs) are used by many species to determine the locations of sound sources. The relationship between cue values and locations in space is frequency dependent and varies from individual to individual. In the current study, we tested the capacity of neurons in the forebrain localization pathway of the barn owl to adjust their tuning for binaural cues in a frequency-dependent manner in response to auditory experience. Auditory experience was altered by raising young owls with a passive acoustic filtering device that caused frequency-dependent changes in ITD and ILD. Extracellular recordings were made in normal and device-reared owls to characterize frequency-specific ITD and ILD tuning in the auditory archistriatum (AAr), an output structure of the forebrain localization pathway. In device-reared owls, individual sites in the AAr exhibited highly abnormal, frequency-dependent variations in ITD tuning, and across the population of sampled sites, there were frequency-dependent shifts in the representation of ITD. These changes were in a direction that compensated for the acoustic effects of the device on ITD and therefore tended to restore a normal representation of auditory space. Although ILD tuning was degraded relative to normal at many sites in the AAr of device-reared owls, the representation of frequency-specific ILDs across the population of sampled sites was shifted in the adaptive direction. These results demonstrate that early auditory experience shapes the representation of binaural cues in the forebrain localization pathway in an adaptive, frequency-dependent manner. PMID:11353033

  14. Importance of Diffusion and Compound-Specific Mixing for Conservative and Reactive Transport in Groundwater: An Investigation from Pore to Field Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolle, M.; Chiogna, G.; Hochstetler, D. L.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    Mixing processes significantly affect and limit contaminant transport and transformation rates in the subsurface. The correct quantification of mixing in groundwater systems must account for diffusion, local-scale dispersion and the flow variability in heterogeneous flow fields. Recent results of multi-tracer laboratory experiments revealed the significant effect of compound-specific diffusive properties on the physical displacement of dissolved species across a representative range of groundwater flow velocities. The goal of this study is to investigate the role of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for solute transport across a range of scales including: (i) pore-scale (~10^-2 m), (ii) laboratory bench-scale (~10^0 m) and (iii) field-scale (~10^2 m). We investigate both conservative and mixing-controlled reactive transport using pore-scale modeling, flow-through laboratory experiments and simulations, and field-scale numerical modeling of complex heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields with statistical properties similar to the ones reported for the extensively investigated Borden aquifer (Ontario, Canada) and Columbus aquifer (Mississippi, USA). We consider different steady-state and transient transport scenarios. For the conservative cases we use as a metric of mixing the exponential of the Shannon entropy to quantify solute dilution either in a given volume (dilution index) or in a given solute flux (flux-related dilution index). The decrease in the mass and the mass-flux of the contaminant plumes is evaluated to quantify reactive mixing. The results show that diffusive processes, occurring at the small-scale of a pore channel, strongly affect conservative and reactive solute transport at larger macroscopic scales. The outcomes of our study illustrate the need to consider and properly account for compound-specific diffusion and mixing limitations in order to accurately describe and predict conservative and reactive transport in porous media.

  15. Retinoic acid is required for specification of the ventral eye field and for Rathke's pouch in the avian embryo.

    PubMed

    Maden, Malcolm; Blentic, Aida; Reijntjes, Susan; Seguin, Sophie; Gale, Emily; Graham, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the role of retinoic acid (RA) in eye development using the vitamin A deficient quail model system, which overcomes problems of retinoic acid synthesising enzyme redundancy in the embryo. In the absence of retinoic acid, the ventral optic stalk and ventral retina are missing, whereas the dorsal optic stalk and dorsal retina develop appropriately. Other ocular abnormalities observed were a thinner retina and the lack of differentiation of the lens. In an attempt to explain this, we studied the expression of various dorsally and ventrally expressed genes such as Pax2, Pax6, Tbx6, Vax2, Raldh1 and Raldh3 and noted that they were unchanged in their expression patterns. In contrast, the RA catabolising enzymes Cyp26A1 and Cyp26B1 which are known to be RA-responsive were not expressed at all in the developing eye. At much earlier stages, the expression domain of Shh in the prechordal plate was reduced, as was Nkx2.1 and we suggest a model whereby the eye field is specified according to the concentration of SHH protein that is present. We also describe another organ, Rathke's pouch which fails to develop in the absence of retinoic acid. We attribute this to the down-regulation of Bmp2, Shh and Fgf8 which are known to be involved in the induction of this structure.

  16. Region-specific age effects on AMPA sensitivity: electrophysiological evidence for loss of synaptic contacts in hippocampal field CA1.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C A; Rao, G; Foster, T C; McNaughton, B L

    1992-10-01

    The effects of aging on the responsiveness of hippocampal neurons to iontophoretic application of L-glutamate and AMPA were studied in vitro. There were no effects of age on neuronal responses to L-glutamate; however, CA1 pyramidal cells of old rats, but not granule cells in the fascia dentata, showed both a smaller reduction in extracellularly-recorded synaptic responses following application of AMPA (presumably mediated by depolarization), and smaller extracellular "DC" fields (measured by subtracting the DC potentials at the dendrite and soma following AMPA application in the dendrites). To examine the cellular bases of this age-related alteration in AMPA sensitivity, two additional electrophysiological approaches were used: (1) measurement of the amplitude ratios of extracellular EPSP and fiber potential components of the Schaffer collateral-CA1 response; (2) measurement of intracellularly recorded unitary EPSPs and quantal analysis of their fluctuations. The interpretations that would be placed on four hypothetical possible outcomes of such experiments are outlined and assessed in relation to the experimental data. The pattern of results obtained in the present experiments supports the following conclusions: In old rats, individual Schaffer collateral synapses do not appear to have altered AMPA receptor properties, as neither the mean size of the unitary synaptic response nor the apparent quantal size differs between age groups; however, the data do support the conclusion that there are fewer synapses per Schaffer collateral branch in old versus young CA1 pyramidal cells.

  17. Field and laboratory investigations of the thermal influence on tissue-specific Hsp70 levels in common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbiao; Xu, Jingbo; Sheng, Lianxi; Zheng, Yongchen

    2007-12-01

    Thermal discharge from power stations can affect normal environmental conditions and change in heat shock proteins expression of native fish with increasing temperature. In this study, we investigated levels of Hsp70 in the heart, kidney, brain and gill of the common carp Cyprinus carpio both in long-term heat discharge environment and after 24 h acute heat shock exposure. In laboratory exposure experiments, fish acclimated at 10 degrees C were exposed to various elevated temperatures (20, 24 and 28 degrees C). Hsp70 concentrations were determined in tissues by Western blotting analysis after one dimensional SDS-PAGE separation. In the field study, the level of Hsp70 in the gill of the carp remained at control values, and Hsp70 expression in the heart, kidney and brain underwent a 2.8 to 3.7-fold increase. A lower thermal sensitivity of the Hsp70 response of the brain, compared with the heart, kidney and gill, was observed in the laboratory experiments. Our data show that these tissues had different levels of Hsp70 responses to thermal influence both in acute exposure and long-term acclimation. The pattern of tissue Hsp70 expression may have a close relationship with the thermal tolerance of the carp and allows the fish to survive long-term thermal pollution.

  18. Rock specific hydraulic fracturing and matrix acidizing to enhance a geothermal system — Concepts and field results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Günter; Blöcher, Guido; Reinicke, Andreas; Brandt, Wulf

    2011-04-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) are engineered reservoirs developed to extract economic amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. To enhance the productivity of reservoirs, a site specific concept is necessary to actively make reservoir conditions profitable using specially adjusted stimulation treatments, such as multi fracture concepts and site specific well path design. The results of previously performed stimulation treatments in the geothermal research well GtGrSk4/05 at Groß Schönebeck, Germany are presented. The reservoir is located at a 4100-4300 m depth within the Lower Permian of the NE German Basin with a bottom-hole temperature of 150 °C. The reservoir rock is classified by two lithological units from bottom to top: volcanic rocks (andesitic rocks) and siliciclastics ranging from conglomerates to fine-grained sandstones (fluvial sediments). The stimulation treatments included multiple hydraulic stimulations and an acid treatment. In order to initiate a cross-flow from the sandstone layer, the hydraulic stimulations were performed in different depth sections (two in the sandstone section and one in the underlying volcanic section). In low permeability volcanic rocks, a cyclic hydraulic fracturing treatment was performed over 6 days in conjunction with adding quartz in low concentrations to maintain a sustainable fracture performance. Flow rates of up to 150 l/s were realized, and a total of 13,170 m 3 of water was injected. A hydraulic connection to the sandstone layer was successfully achieved in this way. However, monitoring of the water level in the offsetting well EGrSk3/90, which is 475 m apart at the final depth, showed a very rapid water level increase due to the stimulation treatment. This can be explained by a connected fault zone within the volcanic rocks. Two gel-proppant treatments were performed in the slightly higher permeability sandstones to obtain long-term access to the reservoir rocks. During each

  19. Technical specifications of low-frequency radio identification bedload tracking from field experiments: Differences in antennas, tags and operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, F.; Piégay, H.; Vaudor, L.; Bultingaire, L.; Fantino, G.

    2015-06-01

    Low-frequency passive integrated transponders (PIT tags) have been increasingly used for tracking bedload transport in gravel-bed rivers. Prior studies have reported high recovery rates in small streams, while recovery rates remained much lower in large systems, in large part because of the limited reading distance of the tags (< 1 m). Some laboratory tests have identified controlling factors for detection ranges (tag and antenna size, tag orientation, burial, submergence, etc.). Beyond these tests, improving our understanding of PIT tag functioning, using different equipment within different environments, is still needed in order to select the most suitable device for each geomorphic context. We address this knowledge gap with technical specifications for a low-frequency radio identification (RFID) device by working for the first time with real fluvial constraints, i.e., the gravel deposits and the aquatic channel. The three-dimensional detection envelopes of two types of tags and three types of antennas are quantified as well as the effect of practices (interoperator bias, battery power) on the detection. The interoperator variability and the intertag variability can be considered as negligible. The influence of burial in dry and water-saturated sediment and the influence of water immersion are shown to be minor. Finally, we summarize practical implications for RFID bedload tracking through these experiments.

  20. Investigation of Specific Substitutions in Virulence Genes Characterizing Phenotypic Groups of Low-Virulence Field Strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Roche, S. M.; Gracieux, P.; Milohanic, E.; Albert, I.; Virlogeux-Payant, I.; Témoin, S.; Grépinet, O.; Kerouanton, A.; Jacquet, C.; Cossart, P.; Velge, P.

    2005-01-01

    Several models have shown that virulence varies from one strain of Listeria monocytogenes to another, but little is known about the cause of low virulence. Twenty-six field L. monocytogenes strains were shown to be of low virulence in a plaque-forming assay and in a subcutaneous inoculation test in mice. Using the results of cell infection assays and phospholipase activities, the low-virulence strains were assigned to one of four groups by cluster analysis and then virulence-related genes were sequenced. Group I included 11 strains that did not enter cells and had no phospholipase activity. These strains exhibited a mutated PrfA; eight strains had a single amino acid substitution, PrfAK220T, and the other three had a truncated PrfA, PrfAΔ174-237. These genetic modifications could explain the low virulence of group I strains, since mutated PrfA proteins were inactive. Group II and III strains entered cells but did not form plaques. Group II strains had low phosphatidylcholine phospholipase C activity, whereas group III strains had low phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C activity. Several substitutions were observed for five out of six group III strains in the plcA gene and for one out of three group II strains in the plcB gene. Group IV strains poorly colonized spleens of mice and were practically indistinguishable from fully virulent strains on the basis of the above-mentioned in vitro criteria. These results demonstrate a relationship between the phenotypic classification and the genotypic modifications for at least group I and III strains and suggest a common evolution of these strains within a group. PMID:16204519

  1. Large field-of-view and depth-specific cortical microvascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-02-01

    Ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify of blood flow, blood vessel morphology, oxygenation and tissue morphology is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of various neurovascular disorders, e.g., stroke. Currently, no imaging technique is available that can satisfactorily extract these parameters from in vivo microcirculatory tissue beds, with large field of view and sufficient resolution at defined depth without any harm to the tissue. In order for more effective therapeutics, we need to determine the area of brain that is damaged but not yet dead after focal ischemia. Here we develop an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which SDW-LSCI (synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle imaging) is used as a guiding tool for OMAG (optical microangiography) to investigate the fine detail of tissue hemodynamics, such as vessel flow, profile, and flow direction. We determine the utility of the integrated system for serial monitoring afore mentioned parameters in experimental stroke, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice. For 90 min MCAO, onsite and 24 hours following reperfusion, we use SDW-LSCI to determine distinct flow and oxygenation variations for differentiation of the infarction, peri-infarct, reduced flow and contralateral regions. The blood volumes are quantifiable and distinct in afore mentioned regions. We also demonstrate the behaviors of flow and flow direction in the arterials connected to MCA play important role in the time course of MCAO. These achievements may improve our understanding of vascular involvement under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitate clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  2. Specific heats and thermodynamic critical fields in Zn-doped YBa2Cu3O(7-x) according to an induced-pairing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagles, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Electronic specific heats and thermodynamic critical fields are calculated in a mean-field version of an induced-pairing model for superconductivity, and compared with results of Loram et al. (1990) on YBa2(Cu(1-y)Zn(y))3O(7-x). This model involves induction of pairing of holes in a wideband by strongly bound electronlike pairs. It is assumed that the planar hole concentration for no Zn addition is close to, but slightly higher than, that for the maximum Tc, and that it increases by 0.015 per planar Cu ion for each increase of y by 0.01. Parameters of the model are taken to be the same as in a previous publication in which energy gaps were discussed, except that an effective hybridization parameter is adjusted for each Zn concentration to give agreement with the observed Tc. Results are presented for y = 0.0, 0.01, and 0.03. The agreement with experiment is good for thermodynamic critical fields, and is fair for specific heats. For specimens with larger y, with relatively low T(c)s, it is argued that the model should be supplemented to include effects of a BCS-type interaction amongst the wideband carriers.

  3. Tuber-specific silencing of asparagine synthetase-1 reduces the acrylamide-forming potential of potatoes grown in the field without affecting tuber shape and yield.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rekha; Shakya, Roshani; Rommens, Caius M

    2012-10-01

    Simultaneous silencing of asparagine synthetase (Ast)-1 and -2 limits asparagine (ASN) formation and, consequently, reduces the acrylamide-forming potential of tubers. The phenotype of silenced lines appears normal in the greenhouse, but field-grown tubers are small and cracked. Assessing the effects of silencing StAst1 and StAst2 individually, we found that yield drag was mainly linked to down-regulation of StAst2. Interestingly, tubers from untransformed scions grafted onto intragenic StAst1/2-silenced rootstock contained almost the same low ASN levels as those in the original silenced lines, indicating that ASN is mainly formed in tubers rather than being transported from leaves. This conclusion was further supported by the finding that overexpression of StAst2 caused ASN to accumulate in leaves but not tubers. Thus, ASN does not appear to be the main form of organic nitrogen transported from leaves to tubers. Because reduced ASN levels coincided with increased levels of glutamine, it appears likely that this alternative amide amino acid is mobilized to tubers, where it is converted into ASN by StAst1. Indeed, tuber-specific silencing of StAst1, but not of StAst2, was sufficient to substantially lower ASN formation in tubers. Extensive field studies demonstrated that the reduced acrylamide-forming potential achieved by tuber-specific StAst1 silencing did not affect the yield or quality of field-harvested tubers.

  4. Specification of embryonic stem cell-derived tissues into eye fields by Wnt signaling using rostral diencephalic tissue-inducing culture.

    PubMed

    Sakakura, Eriko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Takata, Nozomu

    2016-08-01

    The eyes are subdivided from the rostral diencephalon in early development. How the neuroectoderm regulates this subdivision, however, is largely unknown. Taking advantage of embryonic stem cell (ESC) culture using a Rax reporter line to monitor rostral diencephalon formation, we found that ESC-derived tissues at day 7 grown in Glasgow Minimum Expression Media (GMEM) containing knockout serum replacement (KSR) exhibited higher levels of expression of axin2, a Wnt target gene, than those grown in chemically defined medium (CDM). Surprisingly, Wnt agonist facilitated eye field-like tissue specification in CDM. In contrast, the addition of Wnt antagonist diminished eye field tissue formation in GMEM+KSR. Furthermore, the morphological formation of the eye tissue anlage, including the optic vesicle, was accompanied by Wnt signaling activation. Additionally, using CDM culture, we developed an efficient method for generating Rax+/Chx10+ retinal progenitors, which could become fully stratified retina. Here we provide a new avenue for exploring the mechanisms of eye field specification in vitro.

  5. Investigating temporal field sampling strategies for site-specific calibration of three soil moisture - neutron flux interaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Baatz, Roland; Wagener, Thorsten; Bogena, Heye

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture is an important state variable in land-atmosphere interaction and hydrological processes. The novel Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensor (CRNS) can be used to determine soil moisture at the sub-kilometre scale, which is relevant to these processes. The CRNS is usually calibrated with soil moisture samples taken on a single day. We investigated whether using data from only one day can be sufficient and, if not, how many days would be needed to obtain a reliable calibration. Therefore temporal sampling strategies for calibration of three widely used soil moisture - cosmic-ray neutron interaction models were investigated for three distinct sites: an arid site in Arizona (USA), a temperate humid grassland and a temperate humid spruce forest, both located in Germany. First, the effects of the number of sampling days on the calibration results were analysed and the effects of different soil wetness conditions of the sampling days on the quality of the calibration results were then investigated. Independent point-scale (TDT) soil moisture measurements from a sensor network were used as input to all three models. Simulated neutron intensity was then compared against measurements from cosmic-ray sensors at all sites. It was found that, if wetness conditions were not taken into account, collecting soil moisture samples on more than one day is needed to obtain a reliable calibration result, regardless of which model is used. We typically find that two to four days are normally sufficient. Sampling on days or combinations of days with appropriate wetness conditions for specific sites can reduce the needed number of sampling days. What appropriate wetness conditions are, differs between sites and different soil moisture - cosmic-ray neutron interaction models.

  6. Communication: An efficient approach to compute state-specific nuclear gradients for a generic state-averaged multi-configuration self consistent field wavefunction

    SciTech Connect

    Granovsky, Alexander A.

    2015-12-21

    We present a new, very efficient semi-numerical approach for the computation of state-specific nuclear gradients of a generic state-averaged multi-configuration self consistent field wavefunction. Our approach eliminates the costly coupled-perturbed multi-configuration Hartree-Fock step as well as the associated integral transformation stage. The details of the implementation within the Firefly quantum chemistry package are discussed and several sample applications are given. The new approach is routinely applicable to geometry optimization of molecular systems with 1000+ basis functions using a standalone multi-core workstation.

  7. Communication: An efficient approach to compute state-specific nuclear gradients for a generic state-averaged multi-configuration self consistent field wavefunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovsky, Alexander A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new, very efficient semi-numerical approach for the computation of state-specific nuclear gradients of a generic state-averaged multi-configuration self consistent field wavefunction. Our approach eliminates the costly coupled-perturbed multi-configuration Hartree-Fock step as well as the associated integral transformation stage. The details of the implementation within the Firefly quantum chemistry package are discussed and several sample applications are given. The new approach is routinely applicable to geometry optimization of molecular systems with 1000+ basis functions using a standalone multi-core workstation.

  8. Specific Heat vs Field in the 30 K Superconductor BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, G. R.; Kim, J. S.; Hirschfeld, P. J.; Kasahara, S.; Shibauchi, T.; Terashima, T.; Matsuda, Y.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, superconductivity at 30 K has been reported [1] in P-doped BaFe2As2, with 1/3 of the As replaced by P. Magnetic penetration and thermal conductivity measurements [2] indicate a nodally gapped superconductor. We report here on measurements of the specific heat divided by temperature, C/T, as a function of field up to 15 T and down to 0.4 K in order to further investigate the nodal structure with another probe. [4pt] [1] S. Kasahara, et al., arXiv0905.4427. [0pt] [2] K. Hashimoto, et al., arXiv0907.4399.

  9. Electronic properties of UX{sub 3} (X=Ga, Al, and Sn) compounds in high magnetic fields: Transport, specific heat, magnetization, and quantum oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, A.L.; Arko, A.J.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Hundley, M.F.; Booth, C.H.; Harrison, N.; Oppeneer, P.M.

    1999-06-01

    We have performed measurements of the specific heat and resistivity in static magnetic fields up to 12 T, as well as magnetic measurements in a static field of 0.1 T and in pulsed fields up to 50 T on high-quality UX{sub 3} (X=Ga, Al, and Sn) single crystals. The behavior of the electronic specific heat coefficients in applied field {gamma}(B) either remains nearly constant or increases as {ital B} increases and is inconsistent with the expectations of the single-impurity model. For UGa{sub 3}, different de Haas{endash}van Alphen (dHvA) frequencies are observed above and below a magnetic transition at a field B{sub M}{approximately}12 T at T{approximately}0.5 K, indicating that a major reconstruction of the Fermi surface occurs. Neither USn{sub 3} nor UAl{sub 3} exhibited a magnetic transition in fields to 50 T, and only a single weak dHvA frequency was observed in these compounds. The difference between the behavior of the UX{sub 3} compounds can be attributed to the degree of hybridization of the 5f orbitals with the conduction electron orbitals. UGa{sub 3} behaves as an itinerant 5f-electron system, while UAl{sub 3} has a tendency to localization, but is still relatively delocalized. USn{sub 3} is a heavy fermion compound. Concurrent to our experimental investigations we have performed calculations of the energy band structures of the three compounds. Owing to the delocalized 5f behavior of UGa{sub 3}, and also of UAl{sub 3}, we find that an itinerant, energy band approach explains the dHvA frequencies of antiferromagnetic UGa{sub 3} and paramagnetic UAl{sub 3} reasonably well. For UGa{sub 3} an unusual sensitivity of the magnetic moment to the magnetic structure and the lattice parameter occurs, providing evidence that UGa{sub 3} is an unique example of an itinerant uranium-based antiferromagnet. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. A new compact neutron/gamma ray scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffler, A.; Comrie, A. C.; Smit, F. D.; Wörtche, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    Progress towards the realization of a new compact neutron spectrometer is described. The detector is based on EJ299-33 plastic scintillator coupled to silicon photomultipliers, and a digital implementation of pulse shape discrimination is used to separate events associated with neutrons from those associated with gamma rays. The spectrometer will be suitable over the neutron energy range 1-100 MeV, illustrated in this work with measurements made using an AmBe radioisotopic source and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams produced using a cyclotron.

  11. A novel dual mode neutron-gamma imager.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Gerling, Mark; Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Mrowka, Stanley; Marleau, Peter

    2010-05-01

    The Neutron Scatter Camera (NSC) can image fission sources and determine their energy spectra at distances of tens of meters and through significant thicknesses of intervening materials in relatively short times [1]. We recently completed a 32 element scatter camera and will present recent advances made with this instrument. A novel capability for the scatter camera is dual mode imaging. In normal neutron imaging mode we identify and image neutron events using pulse shape discrimination (PSD) and time of flight in liquid scintillator. Similarly gamma rays are identified from Compton scatter in the front and rear planes for our segmented detector. Rather than reject these events, we show it is possible to construct a gamma-ray image by running the analysis in a 'Compton mode'. Instead of calculating the scattering angle by the kinematics of elastic scatters as is appropriate for neutron events, it can be found by the kinematics of Compton scatters. Our scatter camera has not been optimized as a Compton gamma-ray imager but is found to work reasonably. We studied imaging performance using a Cs137 source. We find that we are able to image the gamma source with reasonable fidelity. We are able to determine gamma energy after some reasonable assumptions. We will detail the various algorithms we have developed for gamma image reconstruction. We will outline areas for improvement, include additional results and compare neutron and gamma mode imaging.

  12. Root-specific expression of OsNAC10 improves drought tolerance and grain yield in rice under field drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Seo; Kim, Youn Shic; Baek, Kwang Hun; Jung, Harin; Ha, Sun-Hwa; Do Choi, Yang; Kim, Minkyun; Reuzeau, Christophe; Kim, Ju-Kon

    2010-05-01

    Drought poses a serious threat to the sustainability of rice (Oryza sativa) yields in rain-fed agriculture. Here, we report the results of a functional genomics approach that identified a rice NAC (an acronym for NAM [No Apical Meristem], ATAF1-2, and CUC2 [Cup-Shaped Cotyledon]) domain gene, OsNAC10, which improved performance of transgenic rice plants under field drought conditions. Of the 140 OsNAC genes predicted in rice, 18 were identified to be induced by stress conditions. Phylogenic analysis of the 18 OsNAC genes revealed the presence of three subgroups with distinct signature motifs. A group of OsNAC genes were prescreened for enhanced stress tolerance when overexpressed in rice. OsNAC10, one of the effective members selected from prescreening, is expressed predominantly in roots and panicles and induced by drought, high salinity, and abscisic acid. Overexpression of OsNAC10 in rice under the control of the constitutive promoter GOS2 and the root-specific promoter RCc3 increased the plant tolerance to drought, high salinity, and low temperature at the vegetative stage. More importantly, the RCc3:OsNAC10 plants showed significantly enhanced drought tolerance at the reproductive stage, increasing grain yield by 25% to 42% and by 5% to 14% over controls in the field under drought and normal conditions, respectively. Grain yield of GOS2:OsNAC10 plants in the field, in contrast, remained similar to that of controls under both normal and drought conditions. These differences in performance under field drought conditions reflect the differences in expression of OsNAC10-dependent target genes in roots as well as in leaves of the two transgenic plants, as revealed by microarray analyses. Root diameter of the RCc3:OsNAC10 plants was thicker by 1.25-fold than that of the GOS2:OsNAC10 and nontransgenic plants due to the enlarged stele, cortex, and epidermis. Overall, our results demonstrated that root-specific overexpression of OsNAC10 enlarges roots, enhancing

  13. Evidence for Chiral d-Wave Superconductivity in URu2Si2 from the Field-Angle Variation of Its Specific Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittaka, Shunichiro; Shimizu, Yusei; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Nomoto, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-03-01

    Low-energy quasiparticle (QP) excitations in the heavy-fermion superconductor URu2Si2 were investigated by specific-heat C(T,H,φ ,θ ) measurements of a high-quality single crystal. The occurrence of QP excitations due to the Doppler-shift effect was detected regardless of the field direction in C(H) of the present clean sample, which is in sharp contrast to a previous report. Furthermore, the polar-angle-dependent C(θ) measured under a rotating magnetic field within the ac plane exhibits a shoulder-like anomaly at θ ˜ 45° and a sharp dip at θ = 90° (H || a) in the moderate-field region. These features are supported by theoretical analyses based on microscopic calculations assuming the gap symmetry of kz(kx + iky), whose gap structure is characterized by a combination of a horizontal line node at the equator and point nodes at the poles. The present results have settled the previous controversy over the gap structure of URu2Si2 and have authenticated its chiral d-wave superconductivity.

  14. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: A review of current work. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Ledney, G.D.; Madonna, G.S.; Elliott, T.B.; Moore, M.M.; Jackson, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, the authors developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60 (Co sources). Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections.

  15. Clarification of the confusion concerning the crystal-field quantities vs. the zero-field splitting quantities in magnetism studies: Part I—Survey of literature dealing with specific compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, C.

    2008-05-01

    Physically distinct notions: (i) crystal field (CF) or equivalently ligand field (LF), (ii) magnetic or magneto-crystalline anisotropy (MA) or equivalently single-ion anisotropy, and (iii) exchange interactions (EI) or spin-spin couplings, appear to be confused in magnetism studies with zero-field splitting (ZFS) or equivalently fine structure (FS). Confusion X= Y consists in incorrect referral to the quantity Y by the name X of another well-defined quantity. Survey of magnetism literature indicates numerous cases of confusion of the type: CF=ZFS, MA=ZFS, EI=ZFS. Since muddled terminology is unhealthy for any area of science, each type of confusion must be clarified. In this review, the CF=ZFS confusion in magnetism literature dealing with specific compounds is clarified. To elucidate this confusion, the CF/LF and ZFS/FS quantities are briefly overviewed. The cases of terminology mixing up: the pertinent Hamiltonians, respective parameters, and energy level splittings, are systematically analysed, classified, and clarified. The structural and/or physical consequences of the confusion as well as of the non-standard parameters are also considered. Implications of each type of confusion go beyond the simple semantic issues and concern misinterpretation of data from a wide range of experimental techniques. The incorrect terminology contributes also to misleading keyword classifications of papers in journals and scientific databases.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Internal Field by Analysis of Specific Heat on an Organic Conductor λ-BETS2FeCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Kazuo; Akiba, Hiroshi; Tajima, Naoya; Kajita, Koji; Nishio, Yutaka; Kato, Reizo; Kobayashi, Akiko; Kobayashi, Hayao

    λ-BETS2FeCl4 (BETS = bis (ethylenedithio) tetraselenafulvalene) system exhibits a mysterious paramagnetic metal (PM)-antiferromagnetic insulator (AFI) phase transition. Just after AF ordering, the large entropy of the Fe 3d localized spin still remains. To investigate why the mysterious free 3d spin exists in the π spin AF ordered state, we measured the specific heat in the vicinity of the PM-AFI transition. The formation process of this AF ordering is discussed in the context of a low-dimensional spin network. It is proposed that the FeCl4 crystal field plays a crucial role in this magnetic ordering via a π-d interaction.

  17. A mean field model of ligand-protein interactions: implications for the structural assessment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease complexes and receptor-specific binding.

    PubMed Central

    Verkhivker, G M; Rejto, P A

    1996-01-01

    We propose a general mean field model of ligand-protein interactions to determine the thermodynamic equilibrium of a system at finite temperature. The method is employed in structural assessments of two human immuno-deficiency virus type 1 protease complexes where the gross effects of protein flexibility are incorporated by utilizing a data base of crystal structures. Analysis of the energy spectra for these complexes has revealed that structural and thermo-dynamic aspects of molecular recognition can be rationalized on the basis of the extent of frustration in the binding energy landscape. In particular, the relationship between receptor-specific binding of these ligands to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease and a minimal frustration principle is analyzed. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8552675

  18. Complement-mediated bacteriolysis after binding of specific antibodies to drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: morphological changes observed by using a field emission scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Jun; Nakae, Takashi; Onoe, Takatoshi; Horiuchi, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Hiroyoshi; Adan-Kubo, Jun; Adachi, Hiroaki; Ono, Yasuo

    2010-12-01

    A bactericidal mechanism mediated by human serum was investigated by a field emission scanning electron microscope and a strain of drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When the bacteria were treated with meropenem, a carbapenem antibiotic, spheroplasts and bulges (spheroidization) appeared after 1-3 h. When 40% serum was added to the bacteria, the bacteria agglutinated within 2 min and then lysed after 5-30 min. Immunoelectron micrographic analyses showed dispositions of complement component C9 molecules on the cell surface of lysed bacteria by the serum treatment that might suggest formation of a membrane attack complex. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) depletion from the serum diminished the lytic activity and adding human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) restored it, suggesting that lysis was induced by specific IgG binding to the bacteria. IVIG may help patients with less IgG against bacteria to overcome severe infection.

  19. Characterization of BoHV-5 field strains circulation and report of transient specific subtype of bovine herpesvirus 5 in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5) is a member of the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae responsible for meningo-encephalitis in young cattle. The first case of bovine meningo-encephalitis associated with a herpesvirus infection was reported in Australia. The current geographical distribution of BoHV-5 infection is mainly restricted to South America, especially Brazil and Argentina. Outbreaks of BoHV-5 are regularly observed in Argentina suggesting the circulation of the virus in the bovine population. Results Seventeen field strains of BoHV-5 isolated from 1984 to now were confirmed by differential PCR and subjected to restriction endonuclease analysis (REA). Viral DNA was cleaved with BstEII which allows the differentiation among subtypes a, b and non a, non b. According to the REA with BstEII, only one field strain showed a pattern similar to the Argentinean A663 strain (prototype of BoHV-5b). All other isolates showed a clear pattern similar to the Australian N569 strain (prototype of BoHV-5a) consistent with the subtypes observed in Brazil, the other South-American country where BoHV-5 is known to be prevalent. The genomic region of subtype b responsible for the distinct pattern was determined and amplified by PCR; specifically a point mutation was identified in glycoprotein B gene, on the BstEII restriction site, which generates the profile specific of BoHV-5b. Conclusions This is the first report of circulation of BoHV-5a in Argentina as the prevailing subtype. Therefore the circulation of BoHV-5b was restricted to a few years in Argentina, speculating that this subtype was not able to be maintained in the bovine population. The mutation in the gB gene is associated with the difference in the restriction patterns between subtypes "a" and "b". PMID:21299866

  20. How accurately can subject-specific finite element models predict strains and strength of human femora? Investigation using full-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Lorenzo; Väänänen, Sami P; Ristinmaa, Matti; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-03-21

    Subject-specific finite element models have been proposed as a tool to improve fracture risk assessment in individuals. A thorough laboratory validation against experimental data is required before introducing such models in clinical practice. Results from digital image correlation can provide full-field strain distribution over the specimen surface during in vitro test, instead of at a few pre-defined locations as with strain gauges. The aim of this study was to validate finite element models of human femora against experimental data from three cadaver femora, both in terms of femoral strength and of the full-field strain distribution collected with digital image correlation. The results showed a high accuracy between predicted and measured principal strains (R(2)=0.93, RMSE=10%, 1600 validated data points per specimen). Femoral strength was predicted using a rate dependent material model with specific strain limit values for yield and failure. This provided an accurate prediction (<2% error) for two out of three specimens. In the third specimen, an accidental change in the boundary conditions occurred during the experiment, which compromised the femoral strength validation. The achieved strain accuracy was comparable to that obtained in state-of-the-art studies which validated their prediction accuracy against 10-16 strain gauge measurements. Fracture force was accurately predicted, with the predicted failure location being very close to the experimental fracture rim. Despite the low sample size and the single loading condition tested, the present combined numerical-experimental method showed that finite element models can predict femoral strength by providing a thorough description of the local bone mechanical response. PMID:26944687

  1. A novel field transplantation technique reveals intra-specific metal-induced oxidative responses in strains of Ectocarpus siliculosus with different pollution histories.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Claudio A; González, Alberto; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Moody, A John; Moenne, Alejandra; Brown, Murray T

    2015-04-01

    A novel field transplantation technique, in which seaweed material is incorporated into dialysis tubing, was used to investigate intra-specific responses to metals in the model brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus. Metal accumulation in the two strains was similar, with higher concentrations in material deployed to the metal-contaminated site (Ventanas, Chile) than the pristine site (Quintay, Chile). However, the oxidative responses differed. At Ventanas, strain Es147 (from low-polluted site) underwent oxidative damage whereas Es524 (from highly polluted site) was not affected. Concentrations of reduced ascorbate (ASC) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were significantly higher in Es524. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR) all increased in Es524, whereas only SOD increased in Es147. For the first time, employing a field transplantation technique, we provide unambiguous evidence of inter-population variation of metal-tolerance in brown algae and establish that antioxidant defences are, in part, responsible.

  2. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Gandolfo, D.; McKay, F.; Medal, J.C.; Cuda, J.P.

    2007-03-15

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author) [Spanish] Una prueba de campo fue conducida para evaluar la especificidad del escarabajo suramericano defoliador Gratiana boliviana Spaeth para control biologico de Solanum viarum Dunal en los Estados Unidos. La prueba con berenjena se realizo en el campo experimental de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, y una parcela control con S. viarum fue establecida a 40 km. Cien escarabajos adultos fueron liberados en cada parcela al inicio del experimento durante la fase vegetativa, y cuarenta escarabajos adicionales fueron liberados en la parcela de berenjena durante la floracion. Todas las plantas en cada parcela fueron

  3. Regional and field-specific factors affect the composition of fusarium head blight pathogens in subtropical no-till wheat agroecosystem of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Del Ponte, Emerson M; Spolti, Piérri; Ward, Todd J; Gomes, Larissa B; Nicolli, Camila P; Kuhnem, Paulo R; Silva, Cleiltan N; Tessmann, Dauri J

    2015-02-01

    A multiyear survey of >200 wheat fields in Paraná (PR) and Rio Grande do Sul (RS) states was conducted to assess the extent and distribution of Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) diversity in the southern Brazilian wheat agroecosystem. Five species and three trichothecene genotypes were found among 671 FGSC isolates from Fusarium head blight (FHB)-infected wheat heads: F. graminearum (83%) of the 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON) genotype, F. meridionale (12.8%) and F. asiaticum (0.4%) of the nivalenol (NIV) genotype, and F. cortaderiae (2.5%) and F. austroamericanum (0.9%) with either the NIV or the 3-ADON genotype. Regional differences in FGSC composition were observed, with F. meridionale and the NIV type being significantly (P<0.001) more prevalent in PR (>28%) than in RS (≤9%). Within RS, F. graminearum was overrepresented in fields below 600 m in elevation and in fields with higher levels of FHB incidence (P<0.05). Species composition was not significantly influenced by previous crop or the stage of grain development at sampling. Habitat-specific differences in FGSC composition were evaluated in three fields by characterizing a total of 189 isolates collected from corn stubble, air above the wheat canopy, and symptomatic wheat kernels. Significant differences in FGSC composition were observed among these habitats (P<0.001). Most strikingly, F. meridionale and F. cortaderiae of the NIV genotype accounted for the vast majority (>96%) of isolates from corn stubble, whereas F. graminearum with the 15-ADON genotype was dominant (>84%) among isolates from diseased wheat kernels. Potential differences in pathogenic fitness on wheat were also suggested by a greenhouse competitiveness assay in which F. graminearum was recovered at much higher frequency (>90%) than F. meridionale from four wheat varieties inoculated with an equal mixture of F. graminearum and F. meridionale isolates. Taken together, the data presented here suggest that FGSC composition and

  4. The experimental study of the magnetic field dependence of specific heat in S = {1}/{2} quantum-spin chain CuSO 4 · 5H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kačmár, M.; Orendáč, M.; Černák, J.; Feher, A.

    1999-05-01

    The magnetic specific heat measurements were performed on monocrystalline CuSO 4·5H 2O in a magnetic field from 0 up to T applied in a direction parallel to the easy axis at temperatures 415, 615 and 815 mK. The specific heat as a function of the applied magnetic field exhibits behaviour that cannot be accounted for by the spin-wave approximation.

  5. Inhibition of Cancer Cell Growth by Exposure to a Specific Time-Varying Electromagnetic Field Involves T-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Carly A.; Buckner, Alison L.; Koren, Stan A.; Persinger, Michael A.; Lafrenie, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposures affect many biological systems. The reproducibility of these effects is related to the intensity, duration, frequency, and pattern of the EMF. We have shown that exposure to a specific time-varying EMF can inhibit the growth of malignant cells. Thomas-EMF is a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz) EMF pattern. Daily, 1 h, exposures to Thomas-EMF inhibited the growth of malignant cell lines including B16-BL6, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of non-malignant cells. Thomas-EMF also inhibited B16-BL6 cell proliferation in vivo. B16-BL6 cells implanted in syngeneic C57b mice and exposed daily to Thomas-EMF produced smaller tumours than in sham-treated controls. In vitro studies showed that exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF for > 15 min promoted Ca2+ influx which could be blocked by inhibitors of voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels. Blocking Ca2+ uptake also blocked Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Exposure to Thomas-EMF delayed cell cycle progression and altered cyclin expression consistent with the decrease in cell proliferation. Non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in Ca2+ influx or cell growth. These data confirm that exposure to a specific EMF pattern can affect cellular processes and that exposure to Thomas-EMF may provide a potential anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25875081

  6. THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF z ∼ 8 GALAXIES FROM THE IRAC ULTRA DEEP FIELDS: EMISSION LINES, STELLAR MASSES, AND SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATES AT 650 MYR

    SciTech Connect

    Labbé, I.; Bouwens, R. J.; Franx, M.; Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; González, V.; Trenti, M.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Stiavelli, M.

    2013-11-10

    Using new ultradeep Spitzer/InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) photometry from the IRAC Ultra Deep Field program, we investigate the stellar populations of a sample of 63 Y-dropout galaxy candidates at z ∼ 8, only 650 Myr after the big bang. The sources are selected from HST/ACS+WFC3/IR data over the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), two HUDF parallel fields, and wide area data over the CANDELS/GOODS-South. The new Spitzer/IRAC data increase the coverage in [3.6] and [4.5] to ∼120h over the HUDF reaching depths of ∼28 (AB,1σ). The improved depth and inclusion of brighter candidates result in direct ≥3σ InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) detections of 20/63 sources, of which 11/63 are detected at ≥5σ. The average [3.6]-[4.5] colors of IRAC detected galaxies at z ∼ 8 are markedly redder than those at z ∼ 7, observed only 130 Myr later. The simplest explanation is that we witness strong rest-frame optical emission lines (in particular [O III] λλ4959, 5007 + Hβ) moving through the IRAC bandpasses with redshift. Assuming that the average rest-frame spectrum is the same at both z ∼ 7 and z ∼ 8 we estimate a rest-frame equivalent width of contributing 0.56{sup +0.16}{sub -0.11} mag to the [4.5] filter at z ∼ 8. The corresponding W{sub Hα}=430{sup +160}{sub -110} Å implies an average specific star formation rate of sSFR=11{sub -5}{sup +11} Gyr{sup –1} and a stellar population age of 100{sub -50}{sup +100} Myr. Correcting the spectral energy distribution for the contribution of emission lines lowers the average best-fit stellar masses and mass-to-light ratios by ∼3 ×, decreasing the integrated stellar mass density to ρ{sup *}(z=8,M{sub UV}<-18)=0.6{sup +0.4}{sub -0.3}×10{sup 6} M{sub sun} Mpc{sup –3}.

  7. Assessing microbial degradation of o-xylene at field-scale from the reduction in mass flow rate combined with compound-specific isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Peter, A; Steinbach, A; Liedl, R; Ptak, T; Michaelis, W; Teutsch, G

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, natural attenuation (NA) has evolved into a possible remediation alternative, especially in the case of BTEX spills. In order to be approved by the regulators, biodegradation needs to be demonstrated which requires efficient site investigation and monitoring tools. Three methods--the Integral Groundwater Investigation method, the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and a newly developed combination of both--were used in this work to quantify at field scale the biodegradation of o-xylene at a former gasworks site which is heavily contaminated with BTEX and PAHs. First, the Integral Groundwater Investigation method [Schwarz, R., Ptak, T., Holder, T., Teutsch, G., 1998. Groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites: a new investigation approach. In: Herbert, M. and Kovar, K. (Editors), GQ'98 Groundwater Quality: Remediation and Protection. IAHS Publication 250, pp. 68-71; COH 4 (2000) 170] was applied, which allows the determination of mass flow rates of o-xylene by integral pumping tests. Concentration time series obtained during pumping at two wells were used to calculate inversely contaminant mass flow rates at the two control planes that are defined by the diameter of the maximum isochrone. A reactive transport model was used within a Monte Carlo approach to identify biodegradation as the dominant process for reduction in the contaminant mass flow rate between the two consecutive control planes. Secondly, compound-specific carbon isotope analyses of o-xylene were performed on the basis of point-scale samples from the same two wells. The Rayleigh equation was used to quantify the degree of biodegradation that occurred between the wells. Thirdly, a combination of the Integral Groundwater Investigation method and the compound-specific isotope analysis was developed and applied. It comprises isotope measurements during the integral pumping tests and the evaluation of delta13C time series by an inversion algorithm to obtain spatially

  8. Assessing microbial degradation of o-xylene at field-scale from the reduction in mass flow rate combined with compound-specific isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, A.; Steinbach, A.; Liedl, R.; Ptak, T.; Michaelis, W.; Teutsch, G.

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, natural attenuation (NA) has evolved into a possible remediation alternative, especially in the case of BTEX spills. In order to be approved by the regulators, biodegradation needs to be demonstrated which requires efficient site investigation and monitoring tools. Three methods—the Integral Groundwater Investigation method, the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and a newly developed combination of both—were used in this work to quantify at field scale the biodegradation of o-xylene at a former gasworks site which is heavily contaminated with BTEX and PAHs. First, the Integral Groundwater Investigation method [Schwarz, R., Ptak, T., Holder, T., Teutsch, G., 1998. Groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites: a new investigation approach. In: Herbert, M. and Kovar, K. (Editors), GQ'98 Groundwater Quality: Remediation and Protection. IAHS Publication 250, pp. 68-71; COH 4 (2000) 170] was applied, which allows the determination of mass flow rates of o-xylene by integral pumping tests. Concentration time series obtained during pumping at two wells were used to calculate inversely contaminant mass flow rates at the two control planes that are defined by the diameter of the maximum isochrone. A reactive transport model was used within a Monte Carlo approach to identify biodegradation as the dominant process for reduction in the contaminant mass flow rate between the two consecutive control planes. Secondly, compound-specific carbon isotope analyses of o-xylene were performed on the basis of point-scale samples from the same two wells. The Rayleigh equation was used to quantify the degree of biodegradation that occurred between the wells. Thirdly, a combination of the Integral Groundwater Investigation method and the compound-specific isotope analysis was developed and applied. It comprises isotope measurements during the integral pumping tests and the evaluation of δ13C time series by an inversion algorithm to obtain spatially

  9. Assessing microbial degradation of o-xylene at field-scale from the reduction in mass flow rate combined with compound-specific isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Peter, A; Steinbach, A; Liedl, R; Ptak, T; Michaelis, W; Teutsch, G

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, natural attenuation (NA) has evolved into a possible remediation alternative, especially in the case of BTEX spills. In order to be approved by the regulators, biodegradation needs to be demonstrated which requires efficient site investigation and monitoring tools. Three methods--the Integral Groundwater Investigation method, the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and a newly developed combination of both--were used in this work to quantify at field scale the biodegradation of o-xylene at a former gasworks site which is heavily contaminated with BTEX and PAHs. First, the Integral Groundwater Investigation method [Schwarz, R., Ptak, T., Holder, T., Teutsch, G., 1998. Groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites: a new investigation approach. In: Herbert, M. and Kovar, K. (Editors), GQ'98 Groundwater Quality: Remediation and Protection. IAHS Publication 250, pp. 68-71; COH 4 (2000) 170] was applied, which allows the determination of mass flow rates of o-xylene by integral pumping tests. Concentration time series obtained during pumping at two wells were used to calculate inversely contaminant mass flow rates at the two control planes that are defined by the diameter of the maximum isochrone. A reactive transport model was used within a Monte Carlo approach to identify biodegradation as the dominant process for reduction in the contaminant mass flow rate between the two consecutive control planes. Secondly, compound-specific carbon isotope analyses of o-xylene were performed on the basis of point-scale samples from the same two wells. The Rayleigh equation was used to quantify the degree of biodegradation that occurred between the wells. Thirdly, a combination of the Integral Groundwater Investigation method and the compound-specific isotope analysis was developed and applied. It comprises isotope measurements during the integral pumping tests and the evaluation of delta13C time series by an inversion algorithm to obtain spatially

  10. Columnar specificity of microvascular oxygenation and blood flow response in primary visual cortex: evaluation by local field potential and spiking activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Roe, Anna W

    2012-01-01

    The relation of cortical microcirculation, oxygen metabolism, and underlying neuronal network activity remains poorly understood. Anatomical distribution of cortical microvasculature and its relationship to cortical functional domains suggests that functional organizations may be revealed by mapping cerebral blood flow responses. However, there is little direct experimental evidence and a lack of electrophysiological evaluation. In this study, we mapped ocular-dominance columns in primary visual cortex (V1) of anesthetized macaques with capillary flow-based laser speckle contrast imaging and deoxyhemoglobin-based intrinsic optical imaging. In parallel, the local field potentials (LFPs) and spikes were recorded from a linear array of eight microelectrodes, carefully positioned into left and right eye columns in V1. We found differential activation maps of blood flow, after masking large superficial draining vessels, exhibited a column-like pattern similar as the oximetric maps. Both the activated spikes and γ-band LFP demonstrated corresponding eye preference, consistent with the imaging maps. Our results present direct support in favor of previous proposals that the regulation of microcirculation can be as fine as the submillimeter scale, suggesting that cortical vasculature is functionally organized at the columnar level in a manner appropriate for supplying energy demands of functionally specific neuronal populations. PMID:22027939

  11. Delineation of multiple chlorinated ethene sources in an industrialized area--a forensic field study using compound-specific isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Blessing, Michaela; Schmidt, Torsten C; Dinkel, Rainer; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2009-04-15

    Identification of polluters and the allocation of contaminant sources are key tasks when evaluating complex subsurface contamination with multiple and overlapping plumes, as frequently found in industrial areas. Under certain conditions, compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) may provide decisive information in such environmental litigation studies. Here, we present an illustrative case study highlighting the potential and limitations of using delta13C values of halogenated hydrocarbons (tetrachloroethene and its transformation products) as a keytracer for discriminating different contaminant sources, even in the presence of biodegradation and a complex hydrogeology. A multiple-line-of-evidence approach, including evaluation of historical, hydrological, geochemical, and isotopic data as well as statistical analysis, was applied to unravel the contamination scenario at the site. A key factor was the coverage of a wide area of the contaminant plumes with highly precise delta13C values of chlorinated ethenes in groundwater at trace concentrations in the low microgram per liter range made possible by the application of online purge-and-trap-GC/IRMS. Our work is the first successful example of a forensic isotope field study on chlorinated ethenes in a fractured bedrock aquifer.

  12. Ultra-low specific on-resistance high-voltage vertical double diffusion metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor with continuous electron accumulation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, Ma; Xiao-Rong, Luo; Jie, Wei; Qiao, Tan; Kun, Zhou; Jun-Feng, Wu

    2016-04-01

    A new ultra-low specific on-resistance (R on,sp) vertical double diffusion metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (VDMOS) with continuous electron accumulation (CEA) layer, denoted as CEA-VDMOS, is proposed and its new current transport mechanism is investigated. It features a trench gate directly extended to the drain, which includes two PN junctions. In on-state, the electron accumulation layers are formed along the sides of the extended gate and introduce two continuous low-resistance current paths from the source to the drain in a cell pitch. This mechanism not only dramatically reduces the R on,sp but also makes the R on,sp almost independent of the n-pillar doping concentration (N n). In off-state, the depletion between the n-pillar and p-pillar within the extended trench gate increases the N n, and further reduces the R on,sp. Especially, the two PN junctions within the trench gate support a high gate-drain voltage in the off-state and on-state, respectively. However, the extended gate increases the gate capacitance and thus weakens the dynamic performance to some extent. Therefore, the CEA-VDMOS is more suitable for low and medium frequencies application. Simulation indicates that the CEA-VDMOS reduces the R on,sp by 80% compared with the conventional super-junction VDMOS (CSJ-VDMOS) at the same high breakdown voltage (BV). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176069 and 61376079) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. ZYGX2014Z006).

  13. Ultra-low specific on-resistance high-voltage vertical double diffusion metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor with continuous electron accumulation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, Ma; Xiao-Rong, Luo; Jie, Wei; Qiao, Tan; Kun, Zhou; Jun-Feng, Wu

    2016-04-01

    A new ultra-low specific on-resistance (R on,sp) vertical double diffusion metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor (VDMOS) with continuous electron accumulation (CEA) layer, denoted as CEA-VDMOS, is proposed and its new current transport mechanism is investigated. It features a trench gate directly extended to the drain, which includes two PN junctions. In on-state, the electron accumulation layers are formed along the sides of the extended gate and introduce two continuous low-resistance current paths from the source to the drain in a cell pitch. This mechanism not only dramatically reduces the R on,sp but also makes the R on,sp almost independent of the n-pillar doping concentration (N n). In off-state, the depletion between the n-pillar and p-pillar within the extended trench gate increases the N n, and further reduces the R on,sp. Especially, the two PN junctions within the trench gate support a high gate–drain voltage in the off-state and on-state, respectively. However, the extended gate increases the gate capacitance and thus weakens the dynamic performance to some extent. Therefore, the CEA-VDMOS is more suitable for low and medium frequencies application. Simulation indicates that the CEA-VDMOS reduces the R on,sp by 80% compared with the conventional super-junction VDMOS (CSJ-VDMOS) at the same high breakdown voltage (BV). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176069 and 61376079) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. ZYGX2014Z006).

  14. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR 44 Inch Lead-Boron (LB44) Bucket Environment (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the 44 inch Lead-Boron (LB44) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  15. FIELD CHECK MANUAL FOR LANGUAGE LABORATORIES, A SERIES OF TESTS WHICH A NON-TECHNICAL PERSON CAN CONDUCT TO VERIFY SPECIFICATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRITTNER, FRANK; PAVLAT, RUSSELL

    IN ORDER TO ASSIST NON-TECHNICAL PEOPLE IN SCHOOLS TO CONDUCT A FIELD CHECK OF LANGUAGE LABORATORY EQUIPMENT BEFORE THEY MAKE FINAL PAYMENTS, THIS MANUAL OFFERS CRITERIA, TESTS, AND METHODS OF SCORING THE QUALITY OF THE EQUIPMENT. CHECKLISTS ARE PROVIDED FOR EVALUATING CONSOLE FUNCTIONS, TAPE RECORDERS, AMPLIFIERS, SOUND QUALITY (INCLUDING…

  16. The effects of repeated planting, planting density, and specific transfer pathways on PCB uptake by Cucurbita pepo grown in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L; Rutter, Allison; Reimer, Kenneth J; Zeeb, Barbara A

    2008-11-01

    An in situ field investigation into the potential of PCB phytoextraction by Cucurbita pepo ssp. pepo (pumpkin) plants was continued for a second year at a field site known to be contaminated with a mixture of Aroclors 1254 and 1260 (average soil [PCB]=21 microg/g). Plant stem and leaf PCB concentrations in this second field season (11 and 8.9 microg/g, respectively) were observed to increase significantly from the stem and leaf PCB concentrations reported in the previous year (5.7 and 3.9 microg/g, respectively) while the total biomass produced as well as soil and plant root PCB concentrations did not change. Furthermore, the lower stems of some plants exhibited PCB concentrations as high as 43 microg/g, resulting in bioaccumulation factors (where BAF(plant part)=[PCB](plant part)/[PCB](soil)) for parts of the plant shoot as high as 2. Increased planting density was observed to significantly decrease both plant biomass and plant stem PCB concentrations (to 7.7 microg/g), but did not change plant root PCB concentrations. Finally, the results from this study provided further evidence that that under realistic field conditions, PCB transfer to pumpkin plants was primarily via root uptake and translocation. Other contaminant transfer pathways such as direct soil contamination, atmospheric deposition and volatilization from soil and subsequent redeposition on shoots appeared to have negligible contributions to overall pumpkin plant PCB burdens.

  17. RESEARCH PROGRAM FOR BRACE - PROVIDING NO AND SPECIFIC NO2 MEASUREMENTS FOR THE BRACE DATABASE DURING THE MAY '02 FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three scientists from the EPA, RTP facility in Research Triangle Park, N.C. worked with the State of Florida and BRACE scientists to provide accurate and precise NO and specific NO2 measurements at two monitoring sites, the rural Sydney site and the near-bay, suburban Gandy sit...

  18. Ceratapion basicorne (Illiger) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): laboratory and open field trials to assess its specificity as biocontrol agent of Centaurea solstitialis (Asteraceae: Cardueae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prospective biological control agents generally must be demonstrated to not pose risks to non-target plants. Laboratory experiments evaluating host plant specificity are the most common method of evaluating such risk; however, they are constrained by limitations of space and number of replicates, gi...

  19. Specific spin-correlation dependent magnetic field effects on radical pairs photo-generated by electron transfer from biphenyl to phenyl-pyrilium salts in micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, Partha Pratim; Manoj, N.; Banerjee, Sudip; Chowdhury, Mihir

    2009-09-01

    We have studied the magnetic field effects (MFEs) on photo-generated various geminate phenyl-pyrilium/biphenyl radical pair (PP rad /BP + rad ) of variable singlet/triplet spin-correlations within SDS micelle. When RPs are produced largely with singlet spin-correlation, the MFEs have been observed in two different time domains. It consists of both the initial ( t = 0) decrease of radical yield with field, considering nanosecond phenomenon, and comparatively slow microsecond MFE. However, the RPs of relatively lower singlet spin-correlation shows only slow μs behavior, which may indicate that only singlet spin-state is responsible for exhibiting initial stage MFEs. A kinetic scheme, based on Pedersen's 'super-cage model' for two-stage RP reaction in micelle, has been proposed for analysis.

  20. Genotype-specific responses of Bromus erectus to elevated CO{sub 2} at different levels of biodiversity and endophyte infection - a field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steinger, T.; Groppe, K.; Schmid, B. |

    1995-06-01

    In 1994 we initiated a long-term field experiment in a calcareous grassland to study the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on individuals, populations, and communities. Clonal replicates of 54 genotypes of the dominant grass Bromus erectus were grown in communities planted at three levels of biodiversity (5-, 12-, 31-species plots) and exposed to ambient and elevated CO{sub 2}. The same genotypes were also individually grown in tubes within the field plots. Some genotypes were infected by the endophytic fungus Epichloee typhina. Elevated CO{sub 2} had no significant effects on plant growth, however, there was large variation among genotypes in all measured characters. A significant CO{sub 2}-by-genotype interaction was found for leaf length in the competition-free tubes. Infection by the endophyte led to the abortion of all inflorescences but increased vegetative growth, especially under competitive conditions.

  1. Energy spectrum and specific heat of two-dimensional electron systems with spin-orbit interaction in a magnetic field parallel to the conducting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, O. S.; Kopeliovich, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The energy spectrum of a quasi-two-dimensional electron gas in an in-plane magnetic field is studied using the perturbation theory and quasiclassical approach in the presence of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. The existence of the intersection of energy sublevels in electron spectrum is demonstrated. The reciprocal mass tensor of electrons is analyzed. The heat capacity of the degenerate electron gas is examined, and its relations with the key features of the spectrum are shown.

  2. External control of the Drosophila melanogaster egg to imago development period by specific combinations of 3D low-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Vladimir I; Khmelinskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We report that the duration of the egg-to-imago development period of the Drosophila melanogaster, and the imago longevity, are both controllable by combinations of external 3-dimensional (3D) low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (LFEMFs). Both these periods may be reduced or increased by applying an appropriate configuration of external 3D LFEMFs. We report that the longevity of D. melanogaster imagoes correlates with the duration of the egg-to-imago development period of the respective eggs. We infer that metabolic processes in both eggs and imago are either accelerated (resulting in reduced time periods) or slowed down (resulting in increased time periods). We propose that external 3D LFEMFs induce electric currents in live systems as well as mechanical vibrations on sub-cell, whole-cell and cell-group levels. These external fields induce media polarization due to ionic motion and orientation of electric dipoles that could moderate the observed effects. We found that the longevity of D. melanogaster imagoes is affected by action of 3D LFEMFs on the respective eggs in the embryonic development period (EDP). We interpret this effect as resulting from changes in the regulation mechanism of metabolic processes in D. melanogaster eggs, inherited by the resulting imagoes. We also tested separate effects of either 3D electric or 3D magnetic fields, which were significantly weaker.

  3. Simple, Sensitive, and Specific Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype B DNA in Dried Blood Samples for Diagnosis in Infants in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Ingrid A.; Drennan, Kathryn D.; Melvin, Ann J.; Mohan, Kathey M.; Herz, Arnd M.; Alarcón, Jorge; Piscoya, Julia; Velázquez, Carlos; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of virus is used to diagnose human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants due to the persistence of maternal antibodies for a year or more. An HIV-1 DNA PCR assay with simple specimen collection and processing was developed and evaluated. Whole blood was collected on filter paper that lysed cells and bound the DNA, eliminating specimen centrifugation and extraction procedures. The DNA remained bound to the filter paper during PCR amplification. Assays of copy number standards showed reproducible detection of 5 to 10 copies of HIV-1 in 5 μl of whole blood. The sensitivity of the assay did not decrease after storage of the standards on filter paper for 3 months at room temperature or after incubation at 37 or 45°C for 20 h. The primers used for nested PCR of the HIV-1 pol gene amplified templates from a reference panel of multiple HIV-1 subtypes but did not amplify a subtype A or a subtype C virus from children living in Seattle. The assay had a sensitivity of 98.4% and a specificity of 98.3% for testing of 122 specimens from 35 HIV-1-infected and 16 uninfected children and 43 seronegative adults living in Washington. The assay had a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 100% for testing of 102 HIV-1-positive (as determined by enzyme immunoassay) Peruvian women and 6 seropositive and 34 seronegative infants. This assay, with adsorption of whole blood to filter paper and no specimen processing, provides a practical, economical, sensitive, and specific method for the diagnosis of HIV-1 subtype B infection in infants. PMID:11136743

  4. Novel genus-specific broad range primers for the detection of furoviruses, hordeiviruses and rymoviruses and their application in field surveys in South-East Australia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Linda; Tang, Joe; Clover, Gerard R G; Spackman, Merrin E; Freeman, Angela J; Rodoni, Brendan C

    2015-03-01

    A number of viruses from the genera Furovirus, Hordeivirus and Rymovirus are known to infect and damage the four major temperate cereal crops, wheat, barley, sorghum and oats. Currently, there is no active testing in Australia for any of these viruses, which pose a significant biosecurity threat to the phytosanitary status of Australia's grains industry. To address this, broad spectrum PCR assays were developed to target virus species within the genera Furovirus, Hordeivirus and Rymovirus. Five sets of novel genus-specific primers were designed and tested in reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assays against a range of virus isolates in plant virus diagnostic laboratories in both Australia and New Zealand. Three of these assays were then chosen to screen samples in a three-year survey of cereal crops in western Victoria, Australia. Of the 8900 cereal plants screened in the survey, all were tested free of furoviruses, hordeiviruses and rymoviruses. To date, there were no published genus-specific primers available for the detection of furoviruses, hordeiviruses and rymoviruses. This study shows for the first time a broad-spectrum molecular test being used in a survey for exotic grain viruses in Australia. Results from this survey provide important evidence of the use of this method to demonstrate the absence of these viruses in Victoria, Australia. The primer pairs reported here are expected to detect a wide range of virus species within the three genera.

  5. Novel genus-specific broad range primers for the detection of furoviruses, hordeiviruses and rymoviruses and their application in field surveys in South-East Australia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Linda; Tang, Joe; Clover, Gerard R G; Spackman, Merrin E; Freeman, Angela J; Rodoni, Brendan C

    2015-03-01

    A number of viruses from the genera Furovirus, Hordeivirus and Rymovirus are known to infect and damage the four major temperate cereal crops, wheat, barley, sorghum and oats. Currently, there is no active testing in Australia for any of these viruses, which pose a significant biosecurity threat to the phytosanitary status of Australia's grains industry. To address this, broad spectrum PCR assays were developed to target virus species within the genera Furovirus, Hordeivirus and Rymovirus. Five sets of novel genus-specific primers were designed and tested in reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assays against a range of virus isolates in plant virus diagnostic laboratories in both Australia and New Zealand. Three of these assays were then chosen to screen samples in a three-year survey of cereal crops in western Victoria, Australia. Of the 8900 cereal plants screened in the survey, all were tested free of furoviruses, hordeiviruses and rymoviruses. To date, there were no published genus-specific primers available for the detection of furoviruses, hordeiviruses and rymoviruses. This study shows for the first time a broad-spectrum molecular test being used in a survey for exotic grain viruses in Australia. Results from this survey provide important evidence of the use of this method to demonstrate the absence of these viruses in Victoria, Australia. The primer pairs reported here are expected to detect a wide range of virus species within the three genera. PMID:25497413

  6. Drilling Specifications: Well Installations in the 300 Area to Support PNNL’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2008-01-21

    Part of the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) will be installation of a network of high density borings and wells to monitor migration of fluids and contaminants (uranium), both in groundwater and vadose zone, away from an surface infiltration plot (Figure A-1). The infiltration plot will be located over an area of suspected contamination at the former 300 Area South Process Pond (SPP). The SPP is located in the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site, within the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with the support of FH shall stake the well locations prior to the start of drilling. Final locations will be based on accessibility and will avoid any surface or underground structures or hazards as well as surface contamination.

  7. Note: steps taken to optimise probe specificity and signal intensity prior to field validation of the MIDTAL (Microarray for the Detection of Toxic Algae).

    PubMed

    Medlin, Linda K

    2013-10-01

    A microarray for the detection of toxic algal species was developed in the European Union 7th Framework project MIDTAL. We initially tested all available fluorescence in situ hybridisation probes for toxic algae, which are normally designed to a length of 18 nt, and found that in most cases the signal was rather weak or all probes designed from the second half of the molecule were inaccessible in a microarray format because of secondary structure of the ribosomal RNA molecule We modified the length of the probes, the fragmentation of the rRNA, the stringency of the washing buffers and the length of the spacer molecules linking the probes to the glass surface of the microarray. Because of the secondary structure of the rRNA molecule, regions of the molecule can be difficult to access by the probes. Each of these modifications has improved probe accessibility and probe specificity to reduce false positives.

  8. Resistance and mutations of non-specificity in the field of anxiety-depressive disorders in Canadian medical journals, 1950-1990.

    PubMed

    Collin, Johanne; Otero, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Pharmaceuticalisation is a complex phenomenon, co-constitutive of what scholars identify as a pharmaceutical regime, comprised of networks of actors, institutions and artefacts as well as cognitive structures that underlie the production, promotion and use of medications. The aim of this paper is to explore the linkages between different components of this pharmaceutical regime through the analysis of psychotropic drug advertising in Canadian medical journals between 1950 and 1990. Advertisements stand at the nexus of macro-level processes related to the development, regulation and marketing of new drug treatments and of micro-level processes related to the use of these drug treatments, both by clinicians and lay persons. We thus examine advertisements from the angle of the mental and classificatory universes to which doctors were exposed through direct-to-prescriber advertisement strategies implemented during this period. Furthermore, we explore to what extent the rationale behind advertisements was permeated by both scientific/professional and popular narratives of mind-body connections. This paper demonstrates that, although this period was marked by paradigm shifts in the classification of mental diseases, the development of modern psychopharmacology, and the questioning of the scientific legitimacy of psychiatry, advertisements unveil a remarkable continuity: that of the mass management of anxiety-depressive disorders by primary care physicians through psychotropic drugs. Also, despite the effective resistance to specificity as shown by the constant redefinitions of diagnostic categories and therapeutic indications, our analysis suggests that the language of specificity used in the promotion of new drugs and in the various narratives of mind-body connection may have been appealing to general practitioners. Finally, our study of the classes of psychoactive medications that have been in use for over half a century reveals a complex, non-linear dynamic of

  9. Resistance and mutations of non-specificity in the field of anxiety-depressive disorders in Canadian medical journals, 1950-1990.

    PubMed

    Collin, Johanne; Otero, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Pharmaceuticalisation is a complex phenomenon, co-constitutive of what scholars identify as a pharmaceutical regime, comprised of networks of actors, institutions and artefacts as well as cognitive structures that underlie the production, promotion and use of medications. The aim of this paper is to explore the linkages between different components of this pharmaceutical regime through the analysis of psychotropic drug advertising in Canadian medical journals between 1950 and 1990. Advertisements stand at the nexus of macro-level processes related to the development, regulation and marketing of new drug treatments and of micro-level processes related to the use of these drug treatments, both by clinicians and lay persons. We thus examine advertisements from the angle of the mental and classificatory universes to which doctors were exposed through direct-to-prescriber advertisement strategies implemented during this period. Furthermore, we explore to what extent the rationale behind advertisements was permeated by both scientific/professional and popular narratives of mind-body connections. This paper demonstrates that, although this period was marked by paradigm shifts in the classification of mental diseases, the development of modern psychopharmacology, and the questioning of the scientific legitimacy of psychiatry, advertisements unveil a remarkable continuity: that of the mass management of anxiety-depressive disorders by primary care physicians through psychotropic drugs. Also, despite the effective resistance to specificity as shown by the constant redefinitions of diagnostic categories and therapeutic indications, our analysis suggests that the language of specificity used in the promotion of new drugs and in the various narratives of mind-body connection may have been appealing to general practitioners. Finally, our study of the classes of psychoactive medications that have been in use for over half a century reveals a complex, non-linear dynamic of

  10. The specific role of fungal community structure on soil aggregation and carbon sequestration: results from long-term field study in a paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Rajasekaran; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a crucial soil property that affects soil biota, biogeochemical processes and C sequestration. The relationship between soil aggregate stability and soil C cycling is well known but the influence of specific fungal community structure on this relationship is largely unknown in paddy soils. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term fertilisation (mineral fertiliser-MIN; farmyard manure-FYM; groundnut oil cake-GOC) effects on soil fungal community shifts associated with soil aggregates under rice-monoculture (RRR) and rice-legume-rice (RLR) systems. Fungal and bacterial communities were characterized using phospholipid fatty acids, and glucosamine and muramic acid were used as biomarkers for fungal and bacterial residues, respectively. Microbial biomass C and N, fungal biomass and residues were significantly higher in the organic fertiliser treatments than in the MIN treatment, for all aggregate sizes under both crop rotation systems. In general, fungal/bacterial biomass ratio and fungal residue C/bacterial residue C ratio were significantly higher in macroaggregate fractions (> 2000 and 250-2000 μm) than in microaggregate fractions (53-250 and <53 μm). In both crop rotation systems, the long-term application of FYM and GOC led to increased accumulation of saprotrophic fungi (SF) in aggregate fractions > 2000 μm. In contrast, we found that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was surprisingly higher in aggregate fractions > 2000 μm than in aggregate fraction 250-2000 μm under MIN treatment. The RLR system showed significantly higher AMF biomass and fungal residue C/ bacterial residue C ratio in both macroaggregate fractions compared to the RRR system. The strong relationships between SF, AMF and water stable aggregates shows the specific contribution of fungi community on soil aggregate stability. Our results highlight the fact that changes within fungal community structure play an important role in shaping the soil

  11. Accuracy and reliability of GPS devices for measurement of sports-specific movement patterns related to cricket, tennis, and field-based team sports.

    PubMed

    Vickery, William M; Dascombe, Ben J; Baker, John D; Higham, Dean G; Spratford, Wayne A; Duffield, Rob

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of 5, 10, and 15 Hz global positioning system (GPS) devices. Two male subjects (mean ± SD; age, 25.5 ± 0.7 years; height, 1.75 ± 0.01 m; body mass, 74 ± 5.7 kg) completed 10 repetitions of drills replicating movements typical of tennis, cricket, and field-based (football) sports. All movements were completed wearing two 5 and 10 Hz MinimaxX and 2 GPS-Sports 15 Hz GPS devices in a specially designed harness. Criterion movement data for distance and speed were provided from a 22-camera VICON system sampling at 100 Hz. Accuracy was determined using 1-way analysis of variance with Tukey's post hoc tests. Interunit reliability was determined using intraclass correlation (ICC), and typical error was estimated as coefficient of variation (CV). Overall, for the majority of distance and speed measures, as measured using the 5, 10, and 15 Hz GPS devices, were not significantly different (p > 0.05) to the VICON data. Additionally, no improvements in the accuracy or reliability of GPS devices were observed with an increase in the sampling rate. However, the CV for the 5 and 15 Hz devices for distance and speed measures ranged between 3 and 33%, with increasing variability evident in higher speed zones. The majority of ICC measures possessed a low level of interunit reliability (r = -0.35 to 0.39). Based on these results, practitioners of these devices should be aware that measurements of distance and speed may be consistently underestimated, regardless of the movements performed.

  12. Position-specific performance indicators that discriminate between successful and unsuccessful teams in elite women's indoor field hockey: implications for coaching.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Don; Peters, Derek M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to establish median performance profiles for the six playing positions in elite women's indoor hockey and then identify whether these position-specific profiles could discriminate between qualifying (top four), mid-table and relegated teams in the 2011-2012 England Hockey premier league. Successful passing in relegated teams was significantly lower (P < 0.008) than in mid-table and qualifying teams in four of the five outfield positions. Furthermore, the right backs of qualifying teams demonstrated significantly fewer (P < 0.008) unsuccessful passes (x̃ = 15.5 ± CLs 15.0 and 10.0, respectively) and interceptions (x̃ = 4.0 ± CLs 4.0 and 3.0, respectively) than relegated teams (x̃ = 19.5 ± CLs 21.0 and 17.0; x̃ = 7.5 ± CLs 8.0 and 6.0, respectively). Finally, the right forwards of relegated teams demonstrated significantly fewer (P < 0.008) successful interceptions (x̃ = 4.0 ± CLs 5.0 and 4.0, respectively) than qualifying teams (x̃ = 5.0 ± CLs 6.0 and 3.0, respectively) and significantly more (P < 0.008) unsuccessful interceptions (x̃ = 5.5 ± CLs 6.0 and 4.0, respectively) than mid-table teams (x̃ = 3.0 ± CLs 3.0 and 2.0, respectively). Based on these findings, coaches should adapt tactical strategies and personnel deployment accordingly to enhance the likelihood of preparing a qualifying team. Research should build from these data to examine dribbling, pressing and patterns of play when outletting.

  13. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Sayenko, S. Yu.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Shkuropatenko, V. A.; Tarasov, R. V.; Rybka, A. V.; Zakharchenko, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete's tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry.

  14. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  15. Beyond Field Education: Leadership of Field Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertheimer, Mindy R.; Sodhi, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual model of the field director's role outside of field education, specifically in the following 3 areas of leadership: (1) curricular, (2) programmatic, and (3) institutional. A survey was conducted to explore the field director's input targeted in these areas beyond prescribed field education tasks. The…

  16. Validation of a simplified field-adapted procedure for routine determinations of methyl mercury at trace levels in natural water samples using species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lambertsson, Lars; Björn, Erik

    2004-12-01

    A field-adapted procedure based on species-specific isotope dilution (SSID) methodology for trace-level determinations of methyl mercury (CH(3)Hg(+)) in mire, fresh and sea water samples was developed, validated and applied in a field study. In the field study, mire water samples were filtered, standardised volumetrically with isotopically enriched CH(3) (200)Hg(+), and frozen on dry ice. The samples were derivatised in the laboratory without further pre-treatment using sodium tetraethyl borate (NaB(C(2)H(5))(4)) and the ethylated methyl mercury was purge-trapped on Tenax columns. The analyte was thermo-desorbed onto a GC-ICP-MS system for analysis. Investigations preceding field application of the method showed that when using SSID, for all tested matrices, identical results were obtained between samples that were freeze-preserved or analysed unpreserved. For DOC-rich samples (mire water) additional experiments showed no difference in CH(3)Hg(+) concentration between samples that were derivatised without pre-treatment or after liquid extraction. Extractions of samples for matrix-analyte separation prior to derivatisation are therefore not necessary. No formation of CH(3)Hg(+) was observed during sample storage and treatment when spiking samples with (198)Hg(2+). Total uncertainty budgets for the field application of the method showed that for analyte concentrations higher than 1.5 pg g(-1) (as Hg) the relative expanded uncertainty (REU) was approximately 5% and dominated by the uncertainty in the isotope standard concentration. Below 0.5 pg g(-1) (as Hg), the REU was >10% and dominated by variations in the field blank. The uncertainty of the method is sufficiently low to accurately determine CH(3)Hg(+) concentrations at trace levels. The detection limit was determined to be 4 fg g(-1) (as Hg) based on replicate analyses of laboratory blanks. The described procedure is reliable, considerably faster and simplified compared to non-SSID methods and thereby very

  17. Quality-assurance results for field pH and specific-conductance measurements, and for laboratory analysis, National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network; January 1980-September 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Brooks, M.H.; Malo, B.A.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Five intersite comparison studies for the field determination of pH and specific conductance, using simulated-precipitation samples, were conducted by the U.S.G.S. for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network. These comparisons were performed to estimate the precision of pH and specific conductance determinations made by sampling-site operators. Simulated-precipitation samples were prepared from nitric acid and deionized water. The estimated standard deviation for site-operator determination of pH was 0.25 for pH values ranging from 3.79 to 4.64; the estimated standard deviation for specific conductance was 4.6 microsiemens/cm at 25 C for specific-conductance values ranging from 10.4 to 59.0 microsiemens/cm at 25 C. Performance-audit samples with known analyte concentrations were prepared by the U.S.G.S.and distributed to the National Atmospheric Deposition Program 's Central Analytical Laboratory. The differences between the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and national Trends Network-reported analyte concentrations and known analyte concentrations were calculated, and the bias and precision were determined. For 1983, concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride were biased at the 99% confidence limit; concentrations of potassium and sulfate were unbiased at the 99% confidence limit. Four analytical laboratories routinely analyzing precipitation were evaluated in their analysis of identical natural- and simulated precipitation samples. Analyte bias for each laboratory was examined using analysis of variance coupled with Duncan 's multiple-range test on data produced by these laboratories, from the analysis of identical simulated-precipitation samples. Analyte precision for each laboratory has been estimated by calculating a pooled variance for each analyte. Interlaboratory comparability results may be used to normalize natural-precipitation chemistry data obtained from two or more of these laboratories. (Author

  18. Building Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The building in the top photo is the new home of the National Permanent Savings Bank in Washington, D.C., designed by Hartman-Cox Architects. Its construction was based on a money-saving method of preparing building specifications which derived from NASA technology developed to obtain quality construction while holding down cost of launch facilities, test centers and other structures. Written technical specifications spell out materials and components to be used on construction projects and identify the quality tests each item must pass. Specifications can have major impact on construction costs. Poorly formulated specifications can lead to unacceptable construction which must be replaced, unnecessarily high materials costs, safety hazards, disputes and often additional costs due to delays and litigation. NASA's Langley Research Center developed a novel approach to providing accurate, uniform, cost-effective specifications which can be readily updated to incorporate new building technologies. Called SPECSINTACT, it is a computerized - system accessible to all NASA centers involved in construction programs. The system contains a comprehensive catalog of master specifications applicable to many types of construction. It enables designers of any structure to call out relevant sections from computer storage and modify them to fit the needs of the project at hand. Architects and engineers can save time by concentrating their efforts on needed modifications rather than developing all specifications from scratch. Successful use of SPECSINTACT has led to a number of spinoff systems. One of the first was MASTERSPEC, developed from NASA's experience by Production Systems for Architects and Engineers, Inc., an organization established by the American Institute of Architects. MASTERSPEC, used in construction of the bank building pictured, follows the same basic format as SPECSINTACT and can be used in either automated or manual modes. The striking appearance of the bank

  19. Specifying Specification.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    This paper tackles the accusation that applied ethics is no serious academic enterprise because it lacks theoretical bracing. It does so in two steps. In the first step I introduce and discuss a highly acclaimed method to guarantee stability in ethical theories: Henry Richardson's specification. The discussion shows how seriously ethicists take the stability of the connection between the foundational parts of their theories and their further development as well as their "application" to particular problems or cases. A detailed scrutiny of specification leads to the second step, where I use insights from legal theory to inform the debate around stability from that point of view. This view reveals some of specification's limitations. I suggest that, once specification is sufficiently specified, it appears astonishingly similar to deduction as used in legal theory. Legal theory also provides valuable insight into the functional range of deduction and its relation to other forms of reasoning. This leads to a richer understanding of stability in normative theories and to a smart division of labor between deduction and other forms of reasoning. The comparison to legal theory thereby provides a framework for how different methods such as specification, deduction, balancing, and analogy relate to one another. PMID:27157109

  20. Specifying Specification.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    This paper tackles the accusation that applied ethics is no serious academic enterprise because it lacks theoretical bracing. It does so in two steps. In the first step I introduce and discuss a highly acclaimed method to guarantee stability in ethical theories: Henry Richardson's specification. The discussion shows how seriously ethicists take the stability of the connection between the foundational parts of their theories and their further development as well as their "application" to particular problems or cases. A detailed scrutiny of specification leads to the second step, where I use insights from legal theory to inform the debate around stability from that point of view. This view reveals some of specification's limitations. I suggest that, once specification is sufficiently specified, it appears astonishingly similar to deduction as used in legal theory. Legal theory also provides valuable insight into the functional range of deduction and its relation to other forms of reasoning. This leads to a richer understanding of stability in normative theories and to a smart division of labor between deduction and other forms of reasoning. The comparison to legal theory thereby provides a framework for how different methods such as specification, deduction, balancing, and analogy relate to one another.

  1. Exposure to a specific pulsed low-frequency magnetic field: A double-blind placebo-controlled study of effects on pain ratings in rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    Shupak, Naomi M; McKay, Julia C; Nielson, Warren R; Rollman, Gary B; Prato, Frank S; Thomas, Alex W

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Specific pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) have been shown to induce analgesia (antinociception) in snails, rodents and healthy human volunteers. OBJECTIVE The effect of specific PEMF exposure on pain and anxiety ratings was investigated in two patient populations. DESIGN A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled parallel design was used. METHOD The present study investigated the effects of an acute 30 min magnetic field exposure (less than or equal to 400 μTpk; less than 3 kHz) on pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire [MPQ], visual analogue scale [VAS]) and anxiety (VAS) ratings in female rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n=13; mean age 52 years) and fibromyalgia (FM) patients (n=18; mean age 51 years) who received either the PEMF or sham exposure treatment. RESULTS A repeated measures analysis revealed a significant pre-post-testing by condition interaction for the MPQ Pain Rating Index total for the RA patients, F(1,11)=5.09, P<0.05, estimate of effect size = 0.32, power = 0.54. A significant pre-post-effect for the same variable was present for the FM patients, F(1,15=16.2, P<0.01, estimate of effect size = 0.52, power =0.96. Similar findings were found for MPQ subcomponents and the VAS (pain). There was no significant reduction in VAS anxiety ratings pre- to post-exposure for either the RA or FM patients. CONCLUSION These findings provide some initial support for the use of PEMF exposure in reducing pain in chronic pain populations and warrants continued investigation into the use of PEMF exposure for short-term pain relief. PMID:16770449

  2. Facilities Specifications Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athletic Business, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Provides line drawings of indoor and outdoor sporting fields reflecting the specifications and dimensional standards of each, including where additional information can be found. Sporting events from badminton, baseball, and basketball to lacrosse, swimming/diving, and volleyball are addressed. (GR)

  3. Specific Suspicion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a recent case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court which highlights the importance of having specific suspicions of misbehavior before conducting a strip search. The case involves an eighth-grade female student who was being strip-searched by a middle school assistant principal, a school nurse, and an administrative assistant…

  4. Comparison between Steroid Binding to Progesterone Membrane Receptor α (mPRα) and to Progesterone Nuclear Receptor: Correlation with Physicochemical Properties Assessed by Comparative Molecular Field Analysis and Identification of mPRα-specific Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kelder, Jan; Azevedo, Rita; Pang, Yefei; de Vlieg, Jacob; Dong, Jing; Thomas, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Recent results showing that the binding characteristics of 33 steroids for human membrane progesterone receptor alpha (hu-mPRα) differ from those for the nuclear progesterone receptor (nPR) suggest that hu-mPRα-specific agonists can be identified for investigating its physiological functions. The binding affinities of an additional 21 steroids for hu-mPRα were determined to explore the structure-activity relationships in more detail and to identify potent, specific mPRα agonists. Four synthetic progesterone derivatives with methyl or methylene groups on positions 18 or 19, 18a-methylprogesterone (18-CH3P4, Org OE 64-0), 13-ethenyl-18-norprogesterone (18-CH2P4, Org 33663-0), 19a-methylprogesterone (19-CH3P4, Org OD 13-0) and 10-ethenyl-19-norprogesterone (19-CH2P4, Org OD 02-0), showed similar or higher affinities than progesterone for hu-mPRα and displayed mPRα agonist activities in G-protein and MAP kinase activation assays. All four steroids also bound to the nPR in cytosolic fractions of MCF-7 cells. However, two compounds, 19-CH2P4 and 19-CH3P4, showed no nPR agonist activity in a nPR reporter assay and therefore are selective mPRα agonists suitable for physiological investigations. The structure-binding relationships of the combined series of 54 steroids for hu-mPRα deviated strikingly from those of a published set of 60 3-keto or 3-desoxy steroids for nPR. Close correlations were observed between the receptor binding affinities of the steroids and their physicochemical properties calculated by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) for both hu-mPRα and nPR. A comparison of the CoMFA field graphs for the two receptors revealed several differences in the structural features required for binding to hu-mPRα and nPR which could be exploited to develop additional mPR-specific ligands. PMID:20096719

  5. Field Campaign Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, J. W.; Chapman, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    This document establishes a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking System and are specifically tailored to meet the scope of each field campaign.

  6. Testing the Effects of dl-Alpha-Tocopherol Supplementation on Oxidative Damage, Total Antioxidant Protection and the Sex-Specific Responses of Reproductive Effort and Lifespan to Dietary Manipulation in Australian Field Crickets (Teleogryllus commodus)

    PubMed Central

    Archer, C. Ruth; Hempenstall, Sarah; Royle, Nick J.; Selman, Colin; Willis, Sheridan; Rapkin, James; Blount, Jon D.; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative stress theory predicts that the accumulation of oxidative damage causes aging. More generally, oxidative damage could be a cost of reproduction that reduces survival. Both of these hypotheses have mixed empirical support. To better understand the life-history consequences of oxidative damage, we fed male and female Australian field crickets (Teleogryllus commodus) four diets differing in their protein and carbohydrate content, which have sex-specific effects on reproductive effort and lifespan. We supplemented half of these crickets with the vitamin E isoform dl-alpha-tocopherol and measured the effects of nutrient intake on lifespan, reproduction, oxidative damage and antioxidant protection. We found a clear trade-off between reproductive effort and lifespan in females but not in males. In direct contrast to the oxidative stress theory, crickets fed diets that improved their lifespan had high levels of oxidative damage to proteins. Supplementation with dl-alpha-tocopherol did not significantly improve lifespan or reproductive effort. However, males fed diets that increased their reproductive investment experienced high oxidative damage to proteins. While this suggests that male reproductive effort could elevate oxidative damage, this was not associated with reduced male survival. Overall, these results provide little evidence that oxidative damage plays a central role in mediating life-history trade-offs in T. commodus. PMID:26783958

  7. Testing the Effects of DL-Alpha-Tocopherol Supplementation on Oxidative Damage, Total Antioxidant Protection and the Sex-Specific Responses of Reproductive Effort and Lifespan to Dietary Manipulation in Australian Field Crickets (Teleogryllus commodus).

    PubMed

    Archer, C Ruth; Hempenstall, Sarah; Royle, Nick J; Selman, Colin; Willis, Sheridan; Rapkin, James; Blount, Jon D; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative stress theory predicts that the accumulation of oxidative damage causes aging. More generally, oxidative damage could be a cost of reproduction that reduces survival. Both of these hypotheses have mixed empirical support. To better understand the life-history consequences of oxidative damage, we fed male and female Australian field crickets (Teleogryllus commodus) four diets differing in their protein and carbohydrate content, which have sex-specific effects on reproductive effort and lifespan. We supplemented half of these crickets with the vitamin E isoform DL-alpha-tocopherol and measured the effects of nutrient intake on lifespan, reproduction, oxidative damage and antioxidant protection. We found a clear trade-off between reproductive effort and lifespan in females but not in males. In direct contrast to the oxidative stress theory, crickets fed diets that improved their lifespan had high levels of oxidative damage to proteins. Supplementation with DL-alpha-tocopherol did not significantly improve lifespan or reproductive effort. However, males fed diets that increased their reproductive investment experienced high oxidative damage to proteins. While this suggests that male reproductive effort could elevate oxidative damage, this was not associated with reduced male survival. Overall, these results provide little evidence that oxidative damage plays a central role in mediating life-history trade-offs in T. commodus. PMID:26783958

  8. Testing the Effects of DL-Alpha-Tocopherol Supplementation on Oxidative Damage, Total Antioxidant Protection and the Sex-Specific Responses of Reproductive Effort and Lifespan to Dietary Manipulation in Australian Field Crickets (Teleogryllus commodus).

    PubMed

    Archer, C Ruth; Hempenstall, Sarah; Royle, Nick J; Selman, Colin; Willis, Sheridan; Rapkin, James; Blount, Jon D; Hunt, John

    2015-12-04

    The oxidative stress theory predicts that the accumulation of oxidative damage causes aging. More generally, oxidative damage could be a cost of reproduction that reduces survival. Both of these hypotheses have mixed empirical support. To better understand the life-history consequences of oxidative damage, we fed male and female Australian field crickets (Teleogryllus commodus) four diets differing in their protein and carbohydrate content, which have sex-specific effects on reproductive effort and lifespan. We supplemented half of these crickets with the vitamin E isoform DL-alpha-tocopherol and measured the effects of nutrient intake on lifespan, reproduction, oxidative damage and antioxidant protection. We found a clear trade-off between reproductive effort and lifespan in females but not in males. In direct contrast to the oxidative stress theory, crickets fed diets that improved their lifespan had high levels of oxidative damage to proteins. Supplementation with DL-alpha-tocopherol did not significantly improve lifespan or reproductive effort. However, males fed diets that increased their reproductive investment experienced high oxidative damage to proteins. While this suggests that male reproductive effort could elevate oxidative damage, this was not associated with reduced male survival. Overall, these results provide little evidence that oxidative damage plays a central role in mediating life-history trade-offs in T. commodus.

  9. LiCaAlF6 scintillators in neutron and gamma radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Klupák, V.; Vinš, M.; Koleška, M.; Šoltés, J.; Yoshikawa, A.; Nikl, M.

    2016-09-01

    Intentionally doped LiCaAlF6 (LiCAF) single crystals are prospective scintillators, especially for thermal neutron detection through the 6Li(n,t)4He nuclear reaction. Four different LiCAF scintillator samples were tested in various neutron and gamma fields. Two of the tested samples were LiCAF:Eu and LiCAF:Eu,Na single crystals, and another two samples were made of LiCAF:Eu micro crystals dispersed in transparent rubber, with different rubber dimensions. All LiCAF samples contain lithium enriched to6Li. A plutonium-beryllium source was used as a neutron source. The neutron spectrum was modified by moderator and filter to get different ratios between thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The MCNP code was used for calculations of the fluence rates for different configurations. Radionuclides 137Cs and 60Co were applied as gamma radiation sources. The light signal from the scintillator was evaluated with a photomultiplier and a multichannel analyzer. The purpose of this work was to study the characteristics of LiCAF scintillators, especially the ability to discriminate signals from neutron and gamma radiation, which is the basic scintillator condition for neutron detection in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields. Generally, the discrimination can be done by the pulse height and/or the pulse shape of the evaluated signals. Both methods can be used for a LiCAF scintillator. However, only the pulse height discrimination method is discussed in this paper. The possibility of fast neutron detection with LiCAF scintillators was also tested.

  10. Intent Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy G.

    1995-01-01

    We have been investigating the implications of using abstractions based on intent rather than the aggregation and information-hiding abstractions commonly used in software en- gineering: Cognitive psychologists have shown that intent abstraction is consistent with human problem-solving processes. We believe that new types of specifications and designs based on this concept can assist in understanding and specifying requirements, capturing the most important design rationale information in an efficient and economical way, and supporting the process of identifying and analyzing required changes to minimize the introduction of errors. The goal of hierarchical abstraction is to allow both top-down and bottom-up reasoning about a complex system. In computer science, we have made much use of (1) part-whole abstractions where each level of a hierarchy represents an aggregation of the components at a lower level and of (2) information-hiding abstractions where each level contains the same conceptual information but hides some details about the concepts, that is, each level is a refinement of the information at a higher level.

  11. Fasciola hepatica: Specificity of a coproantigen ELISA test for diagnosis of fasciolosis in faecal samples from cattle and sheep concurrently infected with gastrointestinal nematodes, coccidians and/or rumen flukes (paramphistomes), under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Kajugu, P-E; Hanna, R E B; Edgar, H W; McMahon, C; Cooper, M; Gordon, A; Barley, J P; Malone, F E; Brennan, G P; Fairweather, I

    2015-09-15

    Chronic fasciolosis is often diagnosed by faecal egg counting (FEC), following concentration of the eggs in the sample by a zinc sulphate floatation method. However, concentration by a sedimentation technique gives improved sensitivity. Interpretation of FEC results for fasciolosis is complicated by factors such as the long pre-patent period and irregular egg shedding. Thus, FEC reduction tests (FECRT), when used alone, are not completely reliable for diagnosis of anthelmintic susceptibility or resistance in local fluke populations, especially when parasite burdens are small. A Fasciola hepatica coproantigen ELISA test has been introduced which more accurately reflects the presence of flukes in the host bile ducts in late pre-patent infections, and absence of flukes following successful chemotherapeutic intervention. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the specificity of the F. hepatica coproantigen ELISA technique, particularly regarding potential cross-reactivity with rumen fluke (paramphistome), gastrointestinal nematode and coccidian infections. The method involved parallel testing of a large battery of faecal samples from field-infected cattle and sheep using floatation and sedimentation FECs and coproantigen analysis. No evidence was found for significant false positivity in the F. hepatica coproantigen ELISA due to paramphistome, coccidian and/or gastrointestinal nematode co-infections. With sedimentation FECs less than 10 F. hepatica eggs per gram (epg), the likelihood of a positive coproantigen result for the sample progressively decreased. Diagnosis of fasciolosis should be based on consideration of both FEC and coproantigen ELISA findings, to ensure optimum sensitivity for pre-patent and low-level infections.

  12. Multigroup Neutron/Gamma-Ray Direct Integration Transport Code System for Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Geometry.

    1980-10-15

    Version 00 PALLAS-2DCY-FX is a code for direct integration of the transport equation in two-dimensional (r,z) geometry. It solves the energy and angular-dependent Boltzmann transport equation with general anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry. Its principal applications are to neutron or gamma-ray transport problems in the forward mode. The code is particularly designed for and suited to the solution of deep penetration radiation transport problems with an external (fixed) source.

  13. Testing of regolith of celestial bolides with active neutron gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrukhin, Andrey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Golovin, Dmitry; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Current space instruments for studying planet's surface include gamma ray spectrometers that detect natural radioactive isotopes as well as gamma-rays induced in subsurface by galactic cosmic rays. When measuring from celestial body's surface, statistics and amount of detected elements can be dramatically increased with active methods, where soil exposed to artificial flux of particles. One good example is the Russian Dynamic Albedo of Neutron (DAN) instrument onboard Martian Science Laboratory mission (Curiosity rover) developed in 2005-2011. It is the first active neutron spectrometer flown to another planet as part of a landed mission to investigate subsurface water distribution and which has now successfully operated for more than two years on the Martian surface. Presentation describes a number of space instruments for different landers and rovers being developed in Russian Space Research Institute for studying Moon and Mars, as well as method of active neutron and gamma spectrometry overview.

  14. Investigating the Anisotropic Scintillation Response in Anthracene through Neutron, Gamma-Ray, and Muon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Patricia; Brubaker, Erik

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline anthracene to incident DT neutrons, DD neutrons, Cs-137 gamma rays, and, for the first time, cosmic ray muons. The neutron measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature. In similar measurements using incident gamma rays, no directional effect is evident, and any anisotropy with respect to the electron recoil direction is constrained to have a magnitude of less than a tenth of that present in the proton recoil events. Cosmic muons are measured at two directions, and no anisotropy is observed. This set of observations indicates that high dE/dx is necessary for an anisotropy to be present for a given type of scintillation event, which in turn could be used to discriminate among different hypotheses for the underlying causes of the anisotropy, which are not well understood.

  15. Neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in plastic scintillators with digital PSD electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Simonson, Duane L.; Christophersen, Marc; Phlips, Bernard F.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Piqué, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is a common method to distinguish between pulses produced by gamma rays and neutrons in scintillator detectors. This technique takes advantage of the property of many scintillators that excitations by recoil protons and electrons produce pulses with different characteristic shapes. Unfortunately, many scintillating materials with good PSD properties have other, undesirable properties such as flammability, toxicity, low availability, high cost, and/or limited size. In contrast, plastic scintillator detectors are relatively low-cost, and easily handled and mass-produced. Recent studies have demonstrated efficient PSD in plastic scintillators using a high concentration of fluorescent dyes. To further investigate the PSD properties of such systems, mixed plastic scintillator samples were produced and tested. The addition of up to 30 wt. % diphenyloxazole (DPO) and other chromophores in polyvinyltoluene (PVT) results in efficient detection with commercial detectors. These plastic scintillators are produced in large diameters up to 4 inches by melt blending directly in a container suitable for in-line detector use. This allows recycling and reuse of materials while varying the compositions. This strategy also avoids additional sample handling and polishing steps required when using removable molds. In this presentation, results will be presented for different mixed-plastic compositions and compared with known scintillating materials

  16. Time-resolved Neutron-gamma-ray Data Acquisition for in Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, Julie G.; Burger, Dan Michael; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  17. Investigating the anisotropic scintillation response in anthracene through neutron, gamma-ray, and muon measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schuster, Patricia; Brubaker, Erik

    2016-05-05

    Our paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline anthracene to incident DT neutrons, DD neutrons, 137Cs gamma rays, and, for the first time, cosmic ray muons. Moreover, the neutron measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature. In similar measurements using incident gamma rays, no directional effect is evident, and any anisotropy with respect to the electron recoil direction is constrained to have a magnitude of less than a tenth ofmore » that present in the proton recoil events. Cosmic muons are measured at two directions, and no anisotropy is observed. Our set of observations indicates that high dE/dx is necessary for an anisotropy to be present for a given type of scintillation event, which in turn could be used to discriminate among different hypotheses for the underlying causes of the anisotropy, which are not well understood.« less

  18. [sup 3]He neutron detector performance in mixed neutron gamma environments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N. H.; Beddingfield, D. H.

    2002-01-01

    A test program of the performance of 3He neutron proportional detectors with varying gas pressures, and their response to lligh level gamma-ray exposure in a mixed neutrodgamma environment, ha$ been performed Our intent was to identie the optimal gas pressure to reduce the gamma-ray sensitivity of these detectors. These detectors were manufxtured using materials to minimize their gamma response. Earlier work focused on 3He fill pressures of four atmospheres and above, whereas the present work focuses on a wider range of pressures. Tests have shown that reducing the .filling pressure will M e r increase the gamma-ray dose range in which the detectors can be operated.

  19. A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo; McDaniel, Floyd Del; Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Raber, Thomas N.

    2008-12-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

  20. Design and performance of a new high accuracy combined small sample neutron/gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.; Davidson, D.; Verplancke, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Wagner, H.G.; Wellum, R.; Brandelise, B.; Mayer, K.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes the design of an optimized combined neutron and gamma detector installed around a measurement well protruding from the floor of a glove box. The objective of this design was to achieve an overall accuracy for the plutonium element concentration in gram-sized samples of plutonium oxide powder approaching the {approximately}0.1--0.2% accuracies routinely achieved by inspectors` chemical analysis. The efficiency of the clam-shell neutron detector was increased and the flat response zone extended in axial and radial directions. The sample holder introduced from within the glove box was designed to form the upper reflector, while two graphite half-shells fitted around the thin neck of the high-resolution LEGE detector replaced the lower plug. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel prepared special plutonium oxide test samples whose plutonium concentration was determined to better than 0.05%. During a three week initial performance test in July 1992 at ITU Karlsruhe and in long term tests, it was established that the target accuracy can be achieved provided sufficient care is taken to assure the reproducibility of sample bottling and sample positioning. The paper presents and discusses the results of all test measurements.

  1. Design and performance of a new high accuracy combined small sample neutron/gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.; Davidson, D.; Verplancke, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Wagner, H.G.; Wellum, R.; Brandelise, B.; Mayer, K.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the design of an optimized combined neutron and gamma detector installed around a measurement well protruding from the floor of a glove box. The objective of this design was to achieve an overall accuracy for the plutonium element concentration in gram-sized samples of plutonium oxide powder approaching the {approximately}0.1--0.2% accuracies routinely achieved by inspectors` chemical analysis. The efficiency of the clam-shell neutron detector was increased and the flat response zone extended in axial and radial directions. The sample holder introduced from within the glove box was designed to form the upper reflector, while two graphite half-shells fitted around the thin neck of the high-resolution LEGe detector replaced the lower plug. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel prepared special plutonium oxide test samples whose plutonium concentration was determined to better than 0.05%. During a three week initial performance test in July 1992 at ITU Karlsruhe and in long term tests, it was established that the target accuracy can be achieved provided sufficient care is taken to assure the reproducibility of sample bottling and sample positioning. The paper presents and discusses the results of all test measurements.

  2. Improved pulse shape discriminator for fast neutron-gamma ray detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; St. Onge, R.

    1969-01-01

    Discriminator in nuclear particle detection system distinguishes nuclear particle type and energy among many different nuclear particles. Discriminator incorporates passive, linear circuit elements so that it will operate over a wide dynamic range.

  3. Anisn-Dort Neutron-Gamma Flux Intercomparison Exercise for a Simple Testing Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehmer, B.; Konheiser, J.; Borodkin, G.; Brodkin, E.; Egorov, A.; Kozhevnikov, A.; Zaritsky, S.; Manturov, G.; Voloschenko, A.

    2003-06-01

    The ability of transport codes ANISN, DORT, ROZ-6, MCNP and TRAMO, as well as nuclear data libraries BUGLE-96, ABBN-93, VITAMIN-B6 and ENDF/B-6 to deliver consistent gamma and neutron flux results was tested in the calculation of a one-dimensional cylindrical model consisting of a homogeneous core and an outer zone with a single material. Model variants with H2O, Fe, Cr and Ni in the outer zones were investigated. The results are compared with MCNP-ENDF/B-6 results. Discrepancies are discussed. The specified test model is proposed as a computational benchmark for testing calculation codes and data libraries.

  4. Electric Field Imaging Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcutt, Terrence; Hughitt, Brian; Burke, Eric; Generazio, Edward

    2016-01-01

    NDE historically has focused technology development in propagating wave phenomena with little attention to the field of electrostatics and emanating electric fields. This work is intended to bring electrostatic imaging to the forefront of new inspection technologies, and new technologies in general. The specific goals are to specify the electric potential and electric field including the electric field spatial components emanating from, to, and throughout volumes containing objects or in free space.

  5. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Lin, Y; Tsai, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  6. Visual field

    MedlinePlus

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam : This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  7. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A series of interdisciplinary modeling and analysis techniques that were specialized to address three specific hot section components are presented. These techniques will incorporate data as well as theoretical methods from many diverse areas including cycle and performance analysis, heat transfer analysis, linear and nonlinear stress analysis, and mission analysis. Building on the proven techniques already available in these fields, the new methods developed will be integrated into computer codes to provide an accurate, efficient and unified approach to analyzing combustor burner liners, hollow air-cooled turbine blades and air-cooled turbine vanes. For these components, the methods developed will predict temperature, deformation, stress and strain histories throughout a complete flight mission.

  8. Characteristic crossing point (T(*)≈2.7 K) in specific heat curves of samples RuSr(2)Gd(1.5)Ce(0.5)Cu(2)O(10-δ) taken for different values of magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Belevtsev, B I; Krasovitsky, V B; Naugle, D G; Rathnayaka, K D D; Agnolet, G; Felner, I

    2009-11-11

    Magnetic properties of polycrystalline samples of RuSr(2)(Gd(1.5)Ce(0.5))Cu(2)O(10-δ), as-prepared (by solid-state reaction) and annealed (12 h at 845 °C) in pure oxygen at different pressure (30, 62 and 78 atm) are presented. The specific heat and magnetization were investigated in the temperature range 1.8-300 K with a magnetic field up to 8 T. The specific heat, C(T), shows a jump at the superconducting transition (with an onset at T≈37.5 K). Below 20 K, a Schottky-type anomaly becomes apparent in C(T). This low-temperature anomaly can be attributed to splitting of the ground term (8)S(7/2) of paramagnetic Gd(3+) ions by internal and external magnetic fields. It is found that curves C(T) taken for different values of magnetic field have the same crossing point (at T(*)≈2.7 K) for all the samples studied. At the same time, C(H) curves taken for different temperatures have a crossing point at a characteristic field H(*)≈3.7 T. These effects can be considered as a manifestation of the crossing point phenomenon which is supposed to be inherent for strongly correlated electron systems.

  9. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  10. Application specific serial arithmetic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, K.; Mathews, D.; Thompson, T.

    1990-01-01

    High performance systolic arrays of serial-parallel multiplier elements may be rapidly constructed for specific applications by applying hardware description language techniques to a library of full-custom CMOS building blocks. Single clock pre-charged circuits have been implemented for these arrays at clock rates in excess of 100 Mhz using economical 2-micron (minimum feature size) CMOS processes, which may be quickly configured for a variety of applications. A number of application-specific arrays are presented, including a 2-D convolver for image processing, an integer polynomial solver, and a finite-field polynomial solver.

  11. Electromagnetic fields and cells.

    PubMed

    Goodman, R; Chizmadzhev, Y; Shirley-Henderson, A

    1993-04-01

    There is strong public interest in the possibility of health effects associated with exposure to extremely low frequency (elf) electromagnetic (EM) fields. Epidemiological studies suggest a probable, but controversial, link between exposure to elf EM fields and increased incidence of some cancers in both children and adults. There are hundreds of scientific studies that have tested the effects of elf EM fields on cells and whole animals. A growing number of reports show that exposure to elf EM fields can produce a large array of effects on cells. Of interest is an increase in specific transcripts in cultured cells exposed to EM fields. The interaction mechanism with cells, however, remains elusive. Evidence is presented for a model based on cell surface interactions with EM fields.

  12. Mining Specifications: A Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Andreas

    Recent advances in software validation and verification make it possible to widely automate whether a specification is satisfied. This progress is hampered, though, by the persistent difficulty of writing specifications. Are we facing a “specification crisis”? In this paper, I show how to alleviate the burden of writing specifications by reusing and extending specifications as mined from existing software and give an overview on the state of the art in specification mining, its origins, and its potential.

  13. Field Evaluation of a Combination of Monospecific Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Type-Specific Diagnosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 Infections in HIV-Seropositive Persons in Abidjan, Ivory Coast

    PubMed Central

    Nkengasong, John N.; Maurice, Chantal; Koblavi, Stéphania; Kalou, Mireille; Bile, Celestin; Yavo, Daniel; Boateng, Emmanuel; Wiktor, Stefan Z.; Greenberg, Alan E.

    1998-01-01

    reagent cost for the CME strategy was 59% lower than the cost of the Peptilav strategy. These results suggest that a combination of highly sensitive and specific commercially available monospecific ELISAs is a reliable and cost-effective strategy for type-specific serodiagnosis of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections in HIV-seropositive persons and therefore represents a recommended strategy in areas where both HIV-1 and HIV-2 are endemic. PMID:9431934

  14. ADANS database specification

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-16

    The purpose of the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Deployment Analysis System (ADANS) Database Specification (DS) is to describe the database organization and storage allocation and to provide the detailed data model of the physical design and information necessary for the construction of the parts of the database (e.g., tables, indexes, rules, defaults). The DS includes entity relationship diagrams, table and field definitions, reports on other database objects, and a description of the ADANS data dictionary. ADANS is the automated system used by Headquarters AMC and the Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC) for airlift planning and scheduling of peacetime and contingency operations as well as for deliberate planning. ADANS also supports planning and scheduling of Air Refueling Events by the TACC and the unit-level tanker schedulers. ADANS receives input in the form of movement requirements and air refueling requests. It provides a suite of tools for planners to manipulate these requirements/requests against mobility assets and to develop, analyze, and distribute schedules. Analysis tools are provided for assessing the products of the scheduling subsystems, and editing capabilities support the refinement of schedules. A reporting capability provides formatted screen, print, and/or file outputs of various standard reports. An interface subsystem handles message traffic to and from external systems. The database is an integral part of the functionality summarized above.

  15. Field test experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    As a part of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), a field-test program was developed to obtain solar photovoltaic (PV) module performance and endurance data. These data are used to identify the specific characteristics of module designs under various environmental conditions. The information obtained from field testing is useful to all participants in the National Photovoltaics Program, from the research planner to the life-cycle cost analyst.

  16. Formalisms for user interface specification and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auernheimer, Brent J.

    1989-01-01

    The application of formal methods to the specification and design of human-computer interfaces is described. A broad outline of human-computer interface problems, a description of the field of cognitive engineering and two relevant research results, the appropriateness of formal specification techniques, and potential NASA application areas are described.

  17. Phobia - simple/specific

    MedlinePlus

    Anxiety disorder - phobia ... Specific phobias are a type of anxiety disorder in which a person may feel extremely anxious or has a ... when exposed to the object of fear. Specific phobias are a common mental disorder. Common phobias include ...

  18. Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Bill

    1993-01-01

    Reports the results of a field trip to measure the intensity of electromagnetic fields generated by electronic devices in the home, in cars, at work, outside, and in places people visit during the day. Found that a person gets more intense exposure while working at a computer than by living next to an electrical substation. (MDH)

  19. Improved technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Improved technical specifications for nuclear power plants are outlined. The objectives of this work are to improve safety, provide a clearer understanding of safety significance, and ease NRC and industry administrative burdens. Line item improvements, bases, and implementation of the specifications are discussed.

  20. Prototype Facility Educational Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Div. of Professional-Technical Education, Boise.

    This document presents prototypical educational specifications to guide the building and renovation of Idaho vocational schools so they can help communities meet the advanced, professional-technical programs of the future. The specifications start with points to consider when determining school site suitability. The document then sets forth…

  1. Point specificity in acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The existence of point specificity in acupuncture is controversial, because many acupuncture studies using this principle to select control points have found that sham acupoints have similar effects to those of verum acupoints. Furthermore, the results of pain-related studies based on visual analogue scales have not supported the concept of point specificity. In contrast, hemodynamic, functional magnetic resonance imaging and neurophysiological studies evaluating the responses to stimulation of multiple points on the body surface have shown that point-specific actions are present. This review article focuses on clinical and laboratory studies supporting the existence of point specificity in acupuncture and also addresses studies that do not support this concept. Further research is needed to elucidate the point-specific actions of acupuncture. PMID:22373514

  2. Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

  3. Specific Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Genetic Terms Definitions for genetic terms Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  4. VOST charcoal specification study

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, A.L.; Bursey, J.T.

    1995-07-01

    The volatile organic sampling train, SW-846 Method 0030, (VOST) is currently one of the leading methodology`s available for the sampling and analysis of volatile organic hazardous compounds from stationary sources at very low levels. The method does not identify a specific equivalent sorbent, nor the performance specifications which would allow determination of an equivalent. Lot 104 petroleum-based charcoal is no longer commercially available. Laboratories are presently using a wide range of substitutes with varying performance from batch to batch of charcoal. To provide performance specifications and identify a replacement for SKC Lot 104 charcoal, a VOST charcoal specification study was initiated. Performance, cost, ease of handling, and plentiful supply make Anasorb 747 a good choice for replacement of SKX Lot 104.

  5. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The osmolality test may not be needed. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

  6. Statistical and Economic Techniques for Site-specific Nematode Management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Griffin, Terry; Kirkpatrick, Terrence L

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in precision agriculture technologies and spatial statistics allow realistic, site-specific estimation of nematode damage to field crops and provide a platform for the site-specific delivery of nematicides within individual fields. This paper reviews the spatial statistical techniques that model correlations among neighboring observations and develop a spatial economic analysis to determine the potential of site-specific nematicide application. The spatial econometric methodology applied in the context of site-specific crop yield response contributes to closing the gap between data analysis and realistic site-specific nematicide recommendations and helps to provide a practical method of site-specifically controlling nematodes.

  7. Arun field

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.F. Jr.; Abdullah, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Arun field is a giant gas-condensate field operated by Mobil and Pertamina with over 20,000 acres of closure at the top of the Arun reservoir. A middle-shelf patch reef complex of early to middle Miocene age is the producing facies at the Arun field. About 1,100 ft of porous limestones, encased in shales, create a stratigraphic trap for overpressure hydrocarbons. Three main carbonate lithologies were encountered during the examination of over 4,300 ft of core; (1) a reef facies consisting of vuggy, coral encrusting, red-algal boundstones, (2) a near-reef facies consisting of foraminiferal, mixed-skeletal packstones with gravel-size coral fragments, and (3) an interreef lagoonal facies consisting of benthonic-foram packstones. Twenty-two species of corals have been identified from Arun reef facies; major reef-forming coals, listed in order of decreasing abundance, are Porites cf P. Lutes, Cyphastrea microphthalma, Astreopora myriophthalma, Styloconiella gunetheri, Porites solida, and Acropora ssp. The Arun reef is comprised of limestones (with minor amounts of dolomite). No shale beds occur in the sequence, and all carbonate facies are in communication. A pervasive microporosity, occurring throughout the Arun Limestone, results from meteoric alteration of original carbonate mud to form a microrhombic porosity that accounts for about three-fourths of the field's total porosity.

  8. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Darsow, Ulf; Forer, Ingeborg; Ring, Johannes

    2011-08-01

    Aeroallergens are relevant eliciting factors of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma but also of atopic eczema. The use of allergen-specific immunotherapy as in respiratory atopic diseases is controversial in patients with atopic eczema, but refined diagnostic methods to characterize subgroups of patients with relevant allergies and the results of smaller controlled studies give rise to new approaches in this field. This article reviews the theoretical problems and practical results associated with allergen-specific immunotherapy in atopic eczema. PMID:21461718

  9. GMSEC Interface Specification Document 2016 March

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handy, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The GMSEC Interface Specification Document contains the standard set of defined messages. Each GMSEC standard message contains a GMSEC Information Bus Header section and a Message Contents section. Each message section identifies required fields, optional fields, data type and recommended use of the fields. Additionally, this document includes the message subjects associated with the standard messages. The system design of the operations center should ensure the components that are selected use both the API and the defined standard messages in order to achieve full interoperability from component to component.

  10. Allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Harold S; Norman, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy was introduced for the treatment of grass pollen-induced hay fever in 1911. The treatment was soon extended to other pollens as well as perennial allergens, and to the treatment of bronchial asthma. Definitive studies of its efficacy for both rhinitis and asthma came only many decades later. Understanding gradually emerged of the underlying immunologic mechanisms that include the generation of regulatory T lymphocytes, immune deviation from allergen-specific Th2 to Th1 responses, and a shift in allergen-specific antibody production from immunoglobulin (Ig) E to IgG4. Along with understanding of the immune basis came an appreciation that immunotherapy modifies allergic disease expression, producing protection against disease progression and symptomatic improvement that persists for years after the treatment is discontinued. Recent new directions for immunotherapy include sublingual administration of inhalant allergens and use of the oral route to treat food allergy.

  11. Lidar base specification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidemann, Hans Karl.

    2012-01-01

    Lidar is a fast evolving technology, and much has changed in the industry since the final draft of the “Lidar Base Specification Version 1.0” was written. Lidar data have improved in accuracy and spatial resolution, geospatial accuracy standards have been revised by the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), industry standard file formats have been expanded, additional applications for lidar have become accepted, and the need for interoperable data across collections has been realized. This revision to the “Lidar Base Specification Version 1.0” publication addresses those changes and provides continued guidance towards a nationally consistent lidar dataset.

  12. Task-specific Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Russotto, Diego; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific dystonias are primary focal dystonias characterized by excessive muscle contractions producing abnormal postures during selective motor activities that often involve highly skilled, repetitive movements. Historically these peculiar postures were considered psychogenic but have now been classified as forms of dystonia. Writer’s cramp is the most commonly identified task-specific dystonia and has features typical of this group of disorders. Symptoms may begin with lack of dexterity during performance of a specific motor task with increasingly abnormal posturing of the involved body part as motor activity continues. Initially, the dystonia may manifest only during the performance of the inciting task, but as the condition progresses it may also occur during other activities or even at rest. Neurological exam is usually unremarkable except for the dystonia-related abnormalities. Although the precise pathophysiology remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests reduced inhibition at different levels of the sensorimotor system. Symptomatic treatment options include oral medications, botulinum toxin injections, neurosurgical procedures, and adaptive strategies. Prognosis may vary depending upon body part involved and specific type of task affected. Further research may reveal new insights into the etiology, pathophysiology, natural history, and improved treatment of these conditions. PMID:18990127

  13. Sports-specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Plancher, K D; Minnich, J M

    1996-04-01

    Injuries to the upper extremities can happen in any sport. Injury patterns are common to specific sports. Understanding which injuries occur with these sports allows the examiner to diagnose and treat the athlete easily. This article reviews some of the injuries common in sports such as bicycling, golf, gymnastics, martial arts, racquet sports, and weightlifting.

  14. IDC System Specification Document.

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, David J.

    2014-12-01

    This document contains the system specifications derived to satisfy the system requirements found in the IDC System Requirements Document for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 project. Revisions Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Reengineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  15. Gauge fields and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleknejad, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Soda, J.

    2013-07-01

    The isotropy and homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) favors “scalar driven” early Universe inflationary models. However, gauge fields and other non-scalar fields are far more common at all energy scales, in particular at high energies seemingly relevant to inflation models. Hence, in this review we consider the role and consequences, theoretical and observational, that gauge fields can have during the inflationary era. Gauge fields may be turned on in the background during inflation, or may become relevant at the level of cosmic perturbations. There have been two main classes of models with gauge fields in the background, models which show violation of the cosmic no-hair theorem and those which lead to isotropic FLRW cosmology, respecting the cosmic no-hair theorem. Models in which gauge fields are only turned on at the cosmic perturbation level, may source primordial magnetic fields. We also review specific observational features of these models on the CMB and/or the primordial cosmic magnetic fields. Our discussions will be mainly focused on the inflation period, with only a brief discussion on the post inflationary (p)reheating era. Large field models: The initial value of the inflaton field is large, generically super-Planckian, and it rolls slowly down toward the potential minimum at smaller φ values. For instance, chaotic inflation is one of the representative models of this class. The typical potential of large-field models has a monomial form as V(φ)=V0φn. A simple analysis using the dynamical equations reveals that for number of e-folds Ne larger than 60, we require super-Planckian initial field values,5φ0>3M. For these models typically ɛ˜η˜Ne-1. Small field models: Inflaton field is initially small and slowly evolves toward the potential minimum at larger φ values. The small field models are characterized by the following potential V(φ)=V0(1-(), which corresponds to a Taylor expansion about the origin, but more realistic

  16. Cockpit display requirements and specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.

    1993-12-01

    Flight instrument design has begun to include a new electronic technology for the display head: active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD). This is a significant design transition and applies across the board to complete cockpit modernization programs, individual instrument replacement projects, and new systems. AMLCD-based instruments are expected to have a substantially higher mean time between failure compared to both electromechanical and CRT- based instruments. Thus, the new technology will pay for itself. Furthermore, AMLCDs are truly sunlight-readable whereas CRT displays are not; it is mission critical that a pilot be able to see an instrument with the sun shining directly in the eye or onto the display. AMLCDs can also provide larger display areas enabling formats which increase situational awareness. As this is a new technology for the military, an industrial base for militarized AMLCDs must be created based on present research capabilities. The requirements for AMLCDs in DOD programs have been analyzed. Projects to build infrastructure and capacity are described. Applications include not only cockpits, but also digital map/GPS integrated displays for tank commanders and field laptop computers. We have the opportunity with this new technology to establish a common critical item product function specification for sunlight-readable, color and grayscale capable, flat panel displays for military applications. the Wright Laboratory is leading the development of such functional specification for U.S. military aircraft.

  17. Gauge fields and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleknejad, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Soda, J.

    2013-07-01

    The isotropy and homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) favors “scalar driven” early Universe inflationary models. However, gauge fields and other non-scalar fields are far more common at all energy scales, in particular at high energies seemingly relevant to inflation models. Hence, in this review we consider the role and consequences, theoretical and observational, that gauge fields can have during the inflationary era. Gauge fields may be turned on in the background during inflation, or may become relevant at the level of cosmic perturbations. There have been two main classes of models with gauge fields in the background, models which show violation of the cosmic no-hair theorem and those which lead to isotropic FLRW cosmology, respecting the cosmic no-hair theorem. Models in which gauge fields are only turned on at the cosmic perturbation level, may source primordial magnetic fields. We also review specific observational features of these models on the CMB and/or the primordial cosmic magnetic fields. Our discussions will be mainly focused on the inflation period, with only a brief discussion on the post inflationary (p)reheating era. Large field models: The initial value of the inflaton field is large, generically super-Planckian, and it rolls slowly down toward the potential minimum at smaller φ values. For instance, chaotic inflation is one of the representative models of this class. The typical potential of large-field models has a monomial form as V(φ)=V0φn. A simple analysis using the dynamical equations reveals that for number of e-folds Ne larger than 60, we require super-Planckian initial field values,5φ0>3M. For these models typically ɛ˜η˜Ne-1. Small field models: Inflaton field is initially small and slowly evolves toward the potential minimum at larger φ values. The small field models are characterized by the following potential V(φ)=V0(1-(), which corresponds to a Taylor expansion about the origin, but more realistic

  18. [Pregnancy-specific dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Soutou, B; Aractingi, S

    2015-03-01

    Pregnancy-specific dermatoses include polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, atopic eczema of pregnancy, and pemphigoid gestationis. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and impetigo herpetiformis are not real pregnancy-specific dermatoses but they are important to know considering the fetal and maternal risks. Polymorphic eruption of pregnancy is a pruritic disease that usually occurs in primiparous women during the last trimester of pregnancy. Atopic eczema of pregnancy is still controversial as an entity covering conditions with eczematous lesions, prurigo, or folliculitis, and inconstantly associated with a personal history of atopy. Skin biopsy with direct immunofluorescence or search for serum anti-BPAg1 (180kD) NC16a antibodies is mandatory in pruritic dermatoses of pregnancy in order to rule out pemphigoid gestationis. Serum bile salts levels should be tested whenever a generalized pruritus develops during pregnancy in order to rule out intrahepatic cholestasis. PMID:25194221

  19. NOSS altimeter algorithm specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Forsythe, R. G.; Mcmillan, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A description of all algorithms required for altimeter processing is given. Each description includes title, description, inputs/outputs, general algebraic sequences and data volume. All required input/output data files are described and the computer resources required for the entire altimeter processing system were estimated. The majority of the data processing requirements for any radar altimeter of the Seasat-1 type are scoped. Additions and deletions could be made for the specific altimeter products required by other projects.

  20. Baseball-specific conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Matthew R; Bunker, Derek

    2009-09-01

    Baseball demands speed, power, and quickness. To perform at a high level, and avoid injuries that are common among baseball players, an evaluation of current trends in strength and conditioning practices is helpful. Based on the demands of the sport and the injury risks, qualified strength and conditioning professionals can develop effective baseball-specific conditioning programs. This commentary briefly covers historical aspects of baseball conditioning, recent injury trends, current practices among elite baseball professionals, and provides suggestions for future improvements in training.

  1. SPECIFIC HEAT INDICATOR

    DOEpatents

    Horn, F.L.; Binns, J.E.

    1961-05-01

    Apparatus for continuously and automatically measuring and computing the specific heat of a flowing solution is described. The invention provides for the continuous measurement of all the parameters required for the mathematical solution of this characteristic. The parameters are converted to logarithmic functions which are added and subtracted in accordance with the solution and a null-seeking servo reduces errors due to changing voltage drops to a minimum. Logarithmic potentiometers are utilized in a unique manner to accomplish these results.

  2. LCLS Far-Field Spontaneous Radiation

    2004-04-16

    This application (FarFieldDisplay) is a tool for displaying and analyzing far-field spontaneous spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Calculated by Roman Tatchyn (Stanford University). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the fat-field photons selected for specific energies or positions transverse to the beam axis,

  3. 24 CFR 3285.601 - Field assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Field assembly. 3285.601 Section... § 3285.601 Field assembly. Home manufacturers must provide specific installation instructions for the proper field assembly of manufacturer-supplied and shipped loose ducts, plumbing, and fuel supply...

  4. 30 CFR 250.1607 - Field rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Field rules. 250.1607 Section 250.1607 Mineral... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1607 Field rules. When geological and engineering information in a field enables a District Manager to determine specific operating...

  5. 24 CFR 3285.601 - Field assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Field assembly. 3285.601 Section... § 3285.601 Field assembly. Home manufacturers must provide specific installation instructions for the proper field assembly of manufacturer-supplied and shipped loose ducts, plumbing, and fuel supply...

  6. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  7. Data specifications for INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portele, Clemens; Woolf, Andrew; Cox, Simon

    2010-05-01

    In Europe a major recent development has been the entering in force of the INSPIRE Directive in May 2007, establishing an infrastructure for spatial information in Europe to support Community environmental policies, and policies or activities which may have an impact on the environment. INSPIRE is based on the infrastructures for spatial information established and operated by the 27 Member States of the European Union. The Directive addresses 34 spatial data themes needed for environmental applications, with key components specified through technical implementing rules. This makes INSPIRE a unique example of a legislative "regional" approach. One of the requirements of the INSPIRE Directive is to make existing spatial data sets with relevance for one of the spatial data themes available in an interoperable way, i.e. where the spatial data from different sources in Europe can be combined to a coherent result. Since INSPIRE covers a wide range of spatial data themes, the first step has been the development of a modelling framework that provides a common foundation for all themes. This framework is largely based on the ISO 19100 series of standards. The use of common generic spatial modelling concepts across all themes is an important enabler for interoperability. As a second step, data specifications for the first set of themes has been developed based on the modelling framework. The themes include addresses, transport networks, protected sites, hydrography, administrative areas and others. The data specifications were developed by selected experts nominated by stakeholders from all over Europe. For each theme a working group was established in early 2008 working on their specific theme and collaborating with the other working groups on cross-theme issues. After a public review of the draft specifications starting in December 2008, an open testing process and thorough comment resolution process, the draft technical implementing rules for these themes have been

  8. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the second year effort of a 3-year program to develop methodology for component specific modeling of aircraft engine hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models; (2) geometry model generators; (3) remeshing; (4) specialty 3-D inelastic stuctural analysis; (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies; (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis; (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  9. Master Software Requirements Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Chaumin

    2003-01-01

    A basic function of a computational grid such as the NASA Information Power Grid (IPG) is to allow users to execute applications on remote computer systems. The Globus Resource Allocation Manager (GRAM) provides this functionality in the IPG and many other grids at this time. While the functionality provided by GRAM clients is adequate, GRAM does not support useful features such as staging several sets of files, running more than one executable in a single job submission, and maintaining historical information about execution operations. This specification is intended to provide the environmental and software functional requirements for the IPG Job Manager V2.0 being developed by AMTI for NASA.

  10. 310 Facility chemical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerty, K.J.

    1997-05-21

    The 300 area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) was designed and built to treat the waste water from the 300 area process sewer system. Several treatment technologies are employed to remove the trace quantities of contaminants in the stream, including iron coprecipitation, clarification, filtration, ion exchange, and ultra violet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation of organics. The chemicals that will be utilized in the treatment process are hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, and ferric chloride. This document annotates the required chemical characteristics of TEDF bulk chemicals as well as the criteria that were used to establish these criteria. The chemical specifications in appendix B are generated from this information.

  11. Disease specific protein corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  12. VOST charcoal specification study

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, R.G.; Foster, A.L.; Bursey, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    The volatile organic sampling train (VOST) is currently one the leading methodologies available for the sampling and analysis of volatile principal organic hazardous constituents (POHCs) and products of incomplete combustion (PICs) from stationary sources at very low levels. However, revisions to the original method are necessary to maintain VOST as a viable regulatory tool. To provide performance specifications and identify a replacement for SKC Lot 104 charcoal, a VOST charcoal specification study was initiated. The following carbon-based candidate sorbents were considered: Tenax-GR (a graphitized Tenax); a Petroleum-based Charcoal; Ambersorbe XE-340 (hydrophobic carbonized resin bead); Anasorb 747 (beaded active carbon with very regular pore size); Carbosieve{reg_sign} S-III (carbon molecular sieve); and a Beaded Activated Charcoal (BAC) (with a very regular pore size). The results indicated that Tenax-GR showed significantly poorer performance than the other candidates in preliminary experimental results. Ambersorb did not retain the gaseous volatile organic compounds tested as well as the others and recovery of vinyl chloride was very low at all levels of spiking. Carbosieve was eliminated as a candidate replacement because of cost and handling problems. The petroleum-based charcoal was eliminated because of difficulties in handling a finely-divided powder. The availability of Anasorb 747 proved to be the deciding factor between it and the BAC. Performance, cost, ease of handling, and plentiful supply make Anasorb{reg_sign} 747 a good choice for replacement of SKC Lot 104. 1 tab.

  13. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2005-04-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period. This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered. The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  14. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  15. Cylinder Test Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Catanach; Larry Hill; Herbert Harry; Ernest Aragon; Don Murk

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of the cylinder testis two-fold: (1) to characterize the metal-pushing ability of an explosive relative to that of other explosives as evaluated by the E{sub 19} cylinder energy and the G{sub 19} Gurney energy and (2) to help establish the explosive product equation-of-state (historically, the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation). This specification details the material requirements and procedures necessary to assemble and fire a typical Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) cylinder test. Strict adherence to the cylinder. material properties, machining tolerances, material heat-treatment and etching processes, and high explosive machining tolerances is essential for test-to-test consistency and to maximize radial wall expansions. Assembly and setup of the cylinder test require precise attention to detail, especially when placing intricate pin wires on the cylinder wall. The cylinder test is typically fired outdoors and at ambient temperature.

  16. Patient specific instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Lionberger, David R; Crocker, Catherine L; Chen, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Patient specific instrumentation (PSI) has recently been developed as a replacement for traditional instrumentation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The study aim was to assess efficiency via the mean total OR time using the PSI versus computer-assisted (CAS) TKAs with accuracy as a secondary endpoint. Sixty patients were randomized to CAS or PSI. A formula was developed to derive a profit ratio (PR) that incorporated costs, revenue, and total OR time. The PSI cases were 1.45 times more profitable than CAS allowing for approximately 3 PSI cases versus 2 CAS cases in one 8 hour OR day. Results from this series show that PSI improves OR efficiency, but does not improve accuracy.

  17. Field spectroscopy of agricultural crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Hall, F. G.

    1986-01-01

    The development of the full potential of multispectral data acquired from satellites, requires quantitative knowledge, and physical models of the spectral properties of specific earth surface features. Knowledge of the relationships between spectral-radiometric characteristics and important biophysical parameters of agricultural crops and soils can best be obtained by carefully controlled studies of fields or plots. It is important to select plots where data describing the agronomic-biophysical properties of the crop canopies and soil background are attainable, taking into account also the feasibility of frequent timely calibrated spectral measurements. The term 'field spectroscopy' is employed for this research. The present paper is concerned with field research which was sponsored by NASA as part of the AgRISTARS Supporting Research Project. Attention is given to field research objectives, field research instrumentation, measurement procedures, spectral-temporal profile modeling, and the effects of cultural and environmental factors on crop reflectance.

  18. USA Track & Field Coaching Manual. USA Track & Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Track and Field, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    This book presents comprehensive, ready-to-apply information from 33 world-class coaches and experts about major track and field events for high school and college coaches. The volume features proven predictive testing procedures; detailed event-specific technique instruction; carefully crafted training programs; and preparation and performance…

  19. Intent Specifications: An Approach to Building Human-Centered Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines and proposes an approach to writing software specifications, based on research in systems theory, cognitive psychology, and human-machine interaction. The goal is to provide specifications that support human problem solving and the tasks that humans must perform in software development and evolution. A type of specification, called intent specifications, is constructed upon this underlying foundation.

  20. Specificity factors in cytoplasmic polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Amanda; Meijer, Hedda A; de Moor, Cornelia H

    2013-01-01

    Poly(A) tail elongation after export of an messenger RNA (mRNA) to the cytoplasm is called cytoplasmic polyadenylation. It was first discovered in oocytes and embryos, where it has roles in meiosis and development. In recent years, however, has been implicated in many other processes, including synaptic plasticity and mitosis. This review aims to introduce cytoplasmic polyadenylation with an emphasis on the factors and elements mediating this process for different mRNAs and in different animal species. We will discuss the RNA sequence elements mediating cytoplasmic polyadenylation in the 3' untranslated regions of mRNAs, including the CPE, MBE, TCS, eCPE, and C-CPE. In addition to describing the role of general polyadenylation factors, we discuss the specific RNA binding protein families associated with cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements, including CPEB (CPEB1, CPEB2, CPEB3, and CPEB4), Pumilio (PUM2), Musashi (MSI1, MSI2), zygote arrest (ZAR2), ELAV like proteins (ELAVL1, HuR), poly(C) binding proteins (PCBP2, αCP2, hnRNP-E2), and Bicaudal C (BICC1). Some emerging themes in cytoplasmic polyadenylation will be highlighted. To facilitate understanding for those working in different organisms and fields, particularly those who are analyzing high throughput data, HUGO gene nomenclature for the human orthologs is used throughout. Where human orthologs have not been clearly identified, reference is made to protein families identified in man.

  1. Specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Kamhi, Alan G; Clark, Mary Kristen

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of language is one of the most important achievements in young children, in part because most children appear to acquire language with little effort. Some children are not so fortunate, however. There is a large group of children who also have difficulty learning language, but do not have obvious neurological, cognitive, sensory, emotional, or environmental deficits. Clinicians often refer to these children as language disordered or language impaired. Researchers tend to refer to these children as specific language impaired (SLI). Children with SLI have intrigued researchers for many years because there is no obvious reason for their language learning difficulties. SLI has been found to be an enduring condition that begins in early childhood and often persists into adolescence and adulthood. The language problems of children with SLI are not limited to spoken language; they also affect reading and writing and thus much of academic learning. Knowledge of the characteristics of SLI should aid physicians, pediatricians, and early childhood specialists to identify these children during the preschool years and ensure that they receive appropriate services. With high-quality language intervention and literacy instruction, most children with SLI should be able to perform and function adequately in school and beyond. PMID:23622167

  2. Genotype Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin H; Sagawa, Shiori; Weis, James W; Schubert, Max G; Bissell, Michael; Hawthorne, Brian; Reeves, Christopher D; Dean, Jed; Platt, Darren

    2016-06-17

    We describe here the Genotype Specification Language (GSL), a language that facilitates the rapid design of large and complex DNA constructs used to engineer genomes. The GSL compiler implements a high-level language based on traditional genetic notation, as well as a set of low-level DNA manipulation primitives. The language allows facile incorporation of parts from a library of cloned DNA constructs and from the "natural" library of parts in fully sequenced and annotated genomes. GSL was designed to engage genetic engineers in their native language while providing a framework for higher level abstract tooling. To this end we define four language levels, Level 0 (literal DNA sequence) through Level 3, with increasing abstraction of part selection and construction paths. GSL targets an intermediate language based on DNA slices that translates efficiently into a wide range of final output formats, such as FASTA and GenBank, and includes formats that specify instructions and materials such as oligonucleotide primers to allow the physical construction of the GSL designs by individual strain engineers or an automated DNA assembly core facility. PMID:26886161

  3. Genotype Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin H; Sagawa, Shiori; Weis, James W; Schubert, Max G; Bissell, Michael; Hawthorne, Brian; Reeves, Christopher D; Dean, Jed; Platt, Darren

    2016-06-17

    We describe here the Genotype Specification Language (GSL), a language that facilitates the rapid design of large and complex DNA constructs used to engineer genomes. The GSL compiler implements a high-level language based on traditional genetic notation, as well as a set of low-level DNA manipulation primitives. The language allows facile incorporation of parts from a library of cloned DNA constructs and from the "natural" library of parts in fully sequenced and annotated genomes. GSL was designed to engage genetic engineers in their native language while providing a framework for higher level abstract tooling. To this end we define four language levels, Level 0 (literal DNA sequence) through Level 3, with increasing abstraction of part selection and construction paths. GSL targets an intermediate language based on DNA slices that translates efficiently into a wide range of final output formats, such as FASTA and GenBank, and includes formats that specify instructions and materials such as oligonucleotide primers to allow the physical construction of the GSL designs by individual strain engineers or an automated DNA assembly core facility.

  4. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  5. The devil is in the specificity: the negative effect of prediction specificity on prediction accuracy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Song-Oh; Suk, Kwanho; Goo, Jin Kyung; Lee, Jiheon; Lee, Seon Min

    2013-07-01

    In the research reported here, we proposed and demonstrated the prediction-specificity effect, which states that people's prediction of the general outcome of an event (e.g., the winner of a soccer match) is less accurate when the prediction question is framed in a more specific manner (e.g., guessing the score) rather than in a less specific manner (e.g., guessing the winner). We demonstrated this effect by examining people's predictions on actual sports games both in field and laboratory studies. In Study 1, the analysis of 19 billion bets from a commercial sports-betting business provided evidence for the effect of prediction specificity. This effect was replicated in three controlled laboratory studies, in which participants predicted the outcomes of a series of soccer matches. Furthermore, the negative effect of prediction specificity was mediated by participants' underweighting of important holistic information during decision making.

  6. Pairing and specific heat in hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Lacroix, Denis; Sandulescu, N.

    2013-09-01

    The thermodynamics of pairing phase-transition in nuclei is studied in the canonical ensemble and treating the pairing correlations in a finite-temperature variation after projection BCS approach (FT-VAP). Due to the restoration of particle number conservation, the pairing gap and the specific heat calculated in the FT-VAP approach vary smoothly with the temperature, indicating a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal phase, as expected in finite systems. We have checked that the predictions of the FT-VAP approach are very accurate when compared to the results obtained by an exact diagonalization of the pairing Hamiltonian. The influence of pairing correlations on specific heat is analyzed for the isotopes 161,162Dy and 171,172Yb. It is shown that the FT-VAP approach, applied with a level density provided by mean field calculations and supplemented, at high energies, by the level density of the back-shifted Fermi gas model, can approximate reasonably well the main properties of specific heat extracted from experimental data. However, the detailed shape of the calculated specific heat is rather sensitive to the assumption made for the mean field.

  7. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1995-12-31

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with an electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater than the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. Magnetic switches and particularly fast kicker magnets are used in the accelerator industry to quickly deflect particle beams into and out of various transport lines, storage rings, dumps, and specifically to differentially route individual bunches of particles from a train of bunches which are injected or ejected from a given ring.

  8. Specification-Based Testing Via Domain Specific Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Michal; Nagy, Roman; Fisch, Dominik

    2014-12-01

    The article presents tCF (testCaseFramework) - a domain specific language with corresponding toolchain for specification-based software testing of embedded software. tCF is designed for efficient preparation of maintainable and intelligible test cases and for testing process automation, as it allows to generate platform specific test cases for various testing levels. The article describes the essential parts of the tCF meta-model and the applied concept of platform specific test cases generators.

  9. Markov random field surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Rasmus R; Baerentzen, Jakob Andreas; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    A method for implicit surface reconstruction is proposed. The novelty in this paper is the adaptation of Markov Random Field regularization of a distance field. The Markov Random Field formulation allows us to integrate both knowledge about the type of surface we wish to reconstruct (the prior) and knowledge about data (the observation model) in an orthogonal fashion. Local models that account for both scene-specific knowledge and physical properties of the scanning device are described. Furthermore, how the optimal distance field can be computed is demonstrated using conjugate gradients, sparse Cholesky factorization, and a multiscale iterative optimization scheme. The method is demonstrated on a set of scanned human heads and, both in terms of accuracy and the ability to close holes, the proposed method is shown to have similar or superior performance when compared to current state-of-the-art algorithms.

  10. Let's Get Specific: Clear Specifications Save Time and Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gretton, William R., III

    1994-01-01

    The primary objective of the purchasing specification is to provide an accurate basis for obtaining a product or service that will satisfy a particular need at a reasonable cost. Describes material vs. performance specifications and brand-name or equal specifications. (MLF)

  11. The Research Base in Languages for Specific Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    More than 200 publications regarding Languages for Specific Purposes (LSP) from the past 25 years, excluding work on English for Specific Purposes, are compiled in this literature review. In introductory comments that precede the bibliography, it is noted that most of the activity in this field has occurred in the last decade, with eight…

  12. Site-specific crop management using geophysical proximal sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Key components of site-specific crop management are (i) identifying the site-specific factors that influence within-field crop yield variation and (ii) spatially characterizing those factors. Geo-referenced measurements of apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) provide a potential means of cha...

  13. Applied-field MPD thruster geometry effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    Eight MPD thruster configurations were used to study the effects of applied field strength, propellant, and facility pressure on thruster performance. Vacuum facility background pressures higher than approx. 0.12 Pa were found to greatly influence thruster performance and electrode power deposition. Thrust efficiency and specific impulse increased monotonically with increasing applied field strength. Both cathode and anode radii fundamentally influenced the efficiency specific impulse relationship, while their lengths influence only the magnitude of the applied magnetic field required to reach a given performance level. At a given specific impulse, large electrode radii result in lower efficiencies for the operating conditions studied. For all test conditions, anode power deposition was the largest efficiency loss, and represented between 50 and 80 pct. of the input power. The fraction of the input power deposited into the anode decreased with increasing applied field and anode radii. The highest performance measured, 20 pct. efficiency at 3700 seconds specific impulse, was obtained using hydrogen propellant.

  14. Internal split field generator

    DOEpatents

    Thundat; ,Thomas George; Van Neste, Charles W.; Vass, Arpad Alexander

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  15. Topological properties of microwave magnetoelectric fields.

    PubMed

    Berezin, M; Kamenetskii, E O; Shavit, R

    2014-02-01

    Collective excitations of electron spins in a ferromagnetic sample dominated by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction strongly influence the field structure of microwave radiation. A small quasi-two-dimensional ferrite disk with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillation spectra can behave as a source of specific fields in vacuum, termed magnetoelectric (ME) fields. A coupling between the time-varying electric and magnetic fields in the ME-field structures is different from such a coupling in regular electromagnetic fields. The ME fields are characterized by strong energy confinement at a subwavelength region of microwave radiation, topologically distinctive power-flow vortices, and helicity parameters [E. O. Kamenetskii, R. Joffe, and R. Shavit, Phys. Rev. E 87, 023201 (2013)]. We study topological properties of microwave ME fields by loading a MDM ferrite particle with different dielectric samples. We establish a close connection between the permittivity parameters of dielectric environment and the topology of ME fields. We show that the topology of ME fields is strongly correlated with the Fano-resonance spectra observed at terminals of a microwave structure. We reveal specific thresholds in the Fano-resonance spectra appearing at certain permittivity parameters of dielectric samples. We show that ME fields originated from MDM ferrite disks can be distinguished by topological portraits of the helicity parameters and can have a torsion degree of freedom. Importantly, the ME-field phenomena can be viewed as implementations of space-time coordinate transformations on waves.

  16. Topological properties of microwave magnetoelectric fields.

    PubMed

    Berezin, M; Kamenetskii, E O; Shavit, R

    2014-02-01

    Collective excitations of electron spins in a ferromagnetic sample dominated by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction strongly influence the field structure of microwave radiation. A small quasi-two-dimensional ferrite disk with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillation spectra can behave as a source of specific fields in vacuum, termed magnetoelectric (ME) fields. A coupling between the time-varying electric and magnetic fields in the ME-field structures is different from such a coupling in regular electromagnetic fields. The ME fields are characterized by strong energy confinement at a subwavelength region of microwave radiation, topologically distinctive power-flow vortices, and helicity parameters [E. O. Kamenetskii, R. Joffe, and R. Shavit, Phys. Rev. E 87, 023201 (2013)]. We study topological properties of microwave ME fields by loading a MDM ferrite particle with different dielectric samples. We establish a close connection between the permittivity parameters of dielectric environment and the topology of ME fields. We show that the topology of ME fields is strongly correlated with the Fano-resonance spectra observed at terminals of a microwave structure. We reveal specific thresholds in the Fano-resonance spectra appearing at certain permittivity parameters of dielectric samples. We show that ME fields originated from MDM ferrite disks can be distinguished by topological portraits of the helicity parameters and can have a torsion degree of freedom. Importantly, the ME-field phenomena can be viewed as implementations of space-time coordinate transformations on waves. PMID:25353595

  17. [Electromagnetic fields hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Sobiczewska, Elzbieta; Szmigielski, Stanisław

    2009-01-01

    The development of industry, particularly of new technologies in communication systems, gives rise to the number and diversty of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources in the environment. These sources, including power-frequent, radiofrequent and microwaves, make human life richer, safer and easier. But at the same time, there is growing concern about possible health risks connected with EMF exposure. An increasing number of persons have recently reported on a variety of health problems induced, in their opinion, by exposure to EMF. It is important to note that EMF levels to which these individuals are exposed are generally well below the recommended exposure limits and are certainly far below those known to produce any adverse effects. These persons call themselves "electromagnetic hypersensitivity individuals" And complain about experiencing various types of non-specific symptoms, including dermatological, neurological and vegetative. In the present paper, the problem of electromagnetic hypersensitivity phenomenon is discussed based on the recently published literature.

  18. Specificity and non-specificity in RNA–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by complex networks of interactions between RNAs and proteins. Proteins that interact with RNA have been traditionally viewed as either specific or non-specific; specific proteins interact preferentially with defined RNA sequence or structure motifs, whereas non-specific proteins interact with RNA sites devoid of such characteristics. Recent studies indicate that the binary “specific vs. non-specific” classification is insufficient to describe the full spectrum of RNA–protein interactions. Here, we review new methods that enable quantitative measurements of protein binding to large numbers of RNA variants, and the concepts aimed as describing resulting binding spectra: affinity distributions, comprehensive binding models and free energy landscapes. We discuss how these new methodologies and associated concepts enable work towards inclusive, quantitative models for specific and non-specific RNA–protein interactions. PMID:26285679

  19. Current Status of Protein Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Pedro E.M.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Summary The current status of classical force fields for proteins is reviewed. These include additive force fields as well as the latest developments in the Drude and AMOEBA polarizable force fields. Parametrization strategies developed specifically for the Drude force field are described and compared with the additive CHARMM36 force field. Results from molecular simulations of proteins and small peptides are summarized to illustrate the performance of the Drude and AMOEBA force fields. PMID:25330958

  20. Current status of protein force fields for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Pedro E M; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    The current status of classical force fields for proteins is reviewed. These include additive force fields as well as the latest developments in the Drude and AMOEBA polarizable force fields. Parametrization strategies developed specifically for the Drude force field are described and compared with the additive CHARMM36 force field. Results from molecular simulations of proteins and small peptides are summarized to illustrate the performance of the Drude and AMOEBA force fields.

  1. The Capodimonte Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-04-01

    . Four adjacent 30 x 30 arcmin 2 fields, together covering a 1 x 1 deg 2 field in the sky, were observed for the shallow survey. Two of these fields were chosen for the 0.5 x 1 deg 2 deep survey; OACDF2 shown above is one of these. The deep survey was performed in the B, V, R broad-bands and in other intermediate-band filters. The OACDF data are fully reduced and the catalogue extraction has started. A two-processor (500 Mhz each) DS20 machine with 100 Gbyte of hard disk, specifically acquired at the OAC for WFI data reduction, was used. The detailed guidelines of the data reduction, as well as the catalogue extraction, are reported in a research paper that will appear in the European research journal Astronomy & Astrophysics . Notes [1]: The team members are: Massimo Capaccioli, Juan M. Alcala', Roberto Silvotti, Magda Arnaboldi, Vincenzo Ripepi, Emanuella Puddu, Massimo Dall'Ora, Giuseppe Longo and Roberto Scaramella . [2]: This is a preliminary result by Juan Alcala', Massimo Capaccioli, Giuseppe Longo, Mikhail Sazhin, Roberto Silvotti and Vincenzo Testa , based on recent observations with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) which show that the spectra of the two objects are identical. Technical information about the photos PR Photo 15a/01 has been obtained by the combination of the B, V, and R stacked images of the OACDF2 field. The total exposure times in the three bands are 2 hours in B and V (12 ditherings of 10 min each were stacked to produce the B and V images) and 3 hours in R (13 ditherings of 15 min each). The mosaic images in the B and V bands were aligned relative to the R-band image and adjusted to a logarithmic intensity scale prior to the combination. The typical seeing was of the order of 1 arcsec in each of the three bands. Preliminary estimates of the three-sigma limiting magnitudes in B, V and R indicate 25.5, 25.0 and 25.0, respectively. More than 35,000 objects are detected above the three-sigma level. PR Photos 15b-f/01 display selected areas

  2. 7 CFR 1755.3 - Field trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.3 Field..., the borrower possesses: (1) Adequate financial resources so that no delay in the project will result... Telecommunications Equipment Field Trial (available from the Director, Administrative Services Division,...

  3. Discover and Create Your Own Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Stephanie

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of virtual field trips based on experiences in a grade 6 science classroom. Considers cost effectiveness, lists online resources, and includes a chart and descriptions of 11 specific virtual field trip sites suitable for elementary and secondary school classes. (LRW)

  4. 30 CFR 250.1607 - Field rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1607 Field rules. When geological and engineering information in a field enables a District Manager to determine specific operating... Manager's initiative or in response to a request from a lessee; such rules may modify the...

  5. 30 CFR 250.1607 - Field rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1607 Field rules. When geological and engineering information in a field enables a District Manager to determine specific operating... Manager's initiative or in response to a request from a lessee; such rules may modify the...

  6. 30 CFR 250.1607 - Field rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1607 Field rules. When geological and engineering information in a field enables a District Manager to determine specific operating... Manager's initiative or in response to a request from a lessee; such rules may modify the...

  7. Track and Field Omnibook. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, J. Kenneth

    This track and field text is a second edition of the 1971 Track and Field Omnibook, a synthesis of the author's forty-five years experience as a participant in and coach of the sport. Divided into two sections, the text deals with both the event-specific techniques of coaching and the overall development of the coaching role. Part one, "The Human…

  8. Teaching Historical Geography in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keighren, Innes M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the pedagogical and practical challenges associated with teaching historical geography, and archival research specifically, in the context of the undergraduate field trip. In so doing, it draws upon students' own reflections on the experience of conducting archival research during a field trip to New York City and presents…

  9. 30 CFR 250.512 - Field well-completion rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Field well-completion rules. 250.512 Section... Field well-completion rules. When geological and engineering information available in a field enables the District Manager to determine specific operating requirements, field well-completion rules may...

  10. The Styx field trial

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    An assessment was made of the effectiveness of the generally accepted methods recommended for controlling hydatid disease during the course of a field-trial, initiated in 1943 in an isolated region of New Zealand. The results obtained during the first 21 years are described. Basically, the trial was an attempt to compare the effectiveness of a general public health educational programme and an anthelmintic programme using arecoline hydrobromide for treatment of dogs with that of a specific educational programme using this compound as a diagnostic agent. Arecoline hydrobromide was found to be too uncertain in its action to be of practical value as an anthelmintic. The development of diagnostic techniques, described in this paper, made it possible to use the compound for diagnostic purposes and thus for educational purposes, since each dog could be examined for tapeworms in the presence of the owner. Using changes in the annual prevalence rate in sheep of the cysts of E. granulosus and those of T. hydatigena as the principal indicators, the conclusion has been reached that the specific diagnostic approach achieved more success than the general educational and treatment programme. The principal reason for this appears to be that the former approach induced a greater awareness in owners of the need for strict management to prevent dogs gaining access to infective raw offal than that stimulated in the community when the dogs were dosed but not examined. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:5303843

  11. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case.

  12. 7 CFR 58.140 - Field service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.140 Field service. A representative of the plant shall arrange to promptly visit the farm of each producer whose milk tests positive for drug residue, exceeds the maximum somatic cell count...

  13. 7 CFR 58.140 - Field service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.140 Field service. A representative of the plant shall arrange to promptly visit the farm of each producer whose milk tests positive for drug residue, exceeds the maximum somatic cell count...

  14. 7 CFR 58.140 - Field service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.140 Field service. A representative of the plant shall arrange to promptly visit the farm of each producer whose milk tests positive for drug residue, exceeds the maximum somatic cell count...

  15. 7 CFR 58.140 - Field service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.140 Field service. A representative of the plant shall arrange to promptly visit the farm of each producer whose milk tests positive for drug residue, exceeds the maximum somatic cell count...

  16. 7 CFR 58.140 - Field service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.140 Field service. A representative of the plant shall arrange to promptly visit the farm of each producer whose milk tests positive for drug residue, exceeds the maximum somatic cell count...

  17. Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An engine is disclosed, including a controllable output plasma generator, a controllable heater for selectably raising a temperature of the plasma connected to an outlet of the plasma generator, and a nozzle connected to an outlet of the heater, through which heated plasma is discharged to provide thrust. In one embodiment, the source of plasma is a helicon generator. In one embodiment, the heater is an ion cyclotron resonator. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a radially diverging magnetic field disposed on a discharge side of the heater so that helically travelling particles in the beater exit the heater at high axial velocity. A particular embodiment includes control circuits for selectably directing a portion of radio frequency power from an RF generator to the helicon generator and to the cyclotron resonator so that the thrust output and the specific impulse of the engine can be selectively controlled. A method of propelling a vehicle is also disclosed. The method includes generating a plasma, heating said plasma, and discharging the heated plasma through a nozzle. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a diverging magnetic field. In this embodiment, the heating is performed by applying a radio frequency electro magnetic field to the plasma at the ion cyclotron frequency in an axially polarized DC magnetic field.

  18. [What are specific performance weaknesses?].

    PubMed

    Remschmidt, H

    1987-06-01

    The term "specific developmental disorder" means localized deficits in very different functions contrasting fit in the general otherwise normal performance level of a child. These disorders are mostly looked upon in a developmental context and differentiated from acquired neuropsychological syndromes (e.g. aphasia, apraxia). The most important clinically relevant disorders are: the specific reading disability, the specific dyscalculia, other specific learning disabilities, the specific developmental language disorder, the specific retardation in the motor development, and multiple developmental retardations. In a population of all patients treated in institutions for children and adolescents, 30% show specific developmental disorders with a predominance of boys. There is no correlation between dyslexia and social class but it does exist for specific developmental language disorder and motor retardation. As to the etiology of specific developmental disorders, genetic factors, congenital or acquired cerebral dysfunctions, maturation or developmental retardation and cognitive variables are discussed. The multifactor-approach seems to be the best way of understanding specific developmental disorders, which are difficult to prove. PMID:2441253

  19. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  20. Variola Virus-Specific Diagnostic Assays: Characterization, Sensitivity, and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kondas, Ashley V.; Olson, Victoria A.; Li, Yu; Abel, Jason; Laker, Miriam; Rose, Laura; Wilkins, Kimberly; Turner, Jonathan; Kline, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A public health response relies upon rapid and reliable confirmation of disease by diagnostic assays. Here, we detail the design and validation of two variola virus-specific real-time PCR assays, since previous assays cross-reacted with newly identified cowpox viruses. The assay specificity must continually be reassessed as other closely related viruses are identified. PMID:25673790

  1. Variola virus-specific diagnostic assays: characterization, sensitivity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Kondas, Ashley V; Olson, Victoria A; Li, Yu; Abel, Jason; Laker, Miriam; Rose, Laura; Wilkins, Kimberly; Turner, Jonathan; Kline, Richard; Damon, Inger K

    2015-04-01

    A public health response relies upon rapid and reliable confirmation of disease by diagnostic assays. Here, we detail the design and validation of two variola virus-specific real-time PCR assays, since previous assays cross-reacted with newly identified cowpox viruses. The assay specificity must continually be reassessed as other closely related viruses are identified.

  2. [Multilingualism and specific language impairment].

    PubMed

    Arkkila, Eva; Smolander, Sini; Laasonen, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Specific language impairment is one of the most common developmental disturbances in childhood. With the increase of the foreign language population group an increasing number of children assimilating several languages and causing concern in language development attend clinical examinations. Knowledge of factors underlying the specific language impairment and the specific impairment in general, special features of language development of those learning several languages, as well as the assessment and support of the linguistic skills of a multilingual child is essential. The risk of long-term problems and marginalization is high for children having specific language impairment.

  3. Pulse-shape discrimination scintillators for homeland security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Mark E.; Duroe, Kirk; Kendall, Paul A.

    2016-09-01

    An extensive programme of research has been conducted for scintillation liquids and plastics capable of neutron-gamma discrimination for deployment in future passive and active Homeland Security systems to provide protection against radiological and nuclear threats. The more established detection materials such as EJ-301 and EJ-309 are compared with novel materials such as EJ-299-33 and p-terphenyl. This research also explores the benefits that can be gained from improvements in the analogue-to-digital sampling rate and sample bit resolution. Results are presented on the Pulse Shape Discrimination performance of various detector and data acquisition combinations and how optimum configurations from these studies have been developed into field-ready detector arrays. Early results from application-specific experimental configurations of multi-element detector arrays are presented.

  4. Field method for sulfide determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B L; Schwarser, R R; Chukwuenye, C O

    1982-01-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed for determining the total sulfide concentration in water in the field. Direct measurements were made using a silver/sulfide ion selective electrode in conjunction with a double junction reference electrode connected to an Orion Model 407A/F Specific Ion Meter. The method also made use of a sulfide anti-oxidant buffer (SAOB II) which consists of ascorbic acid, sodium hydroxide, and disodium EDTA. Preweighed sodium sulfide crystals were sealed in air tight plastic volumetric flasks which were used in standardization process in the field. Field standards were prepared by adding SAOB II to the flask containing the sulfide crystals and diluting it to the mark with deionized deaerated water. Serial dilutions of the standards were used to prepare standards of lower concentrations. Concentrations as low as 6 ppB were obtained on lake samples with a reproducibility better than +- 10%.

  5. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications. PMID:26552343

  6. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  7. External split field generator

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas George; Van Neste, Charles W.; Vass, Arpad Alexander

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  8. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-11-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications.

  9. Parallel field penetration in a layered superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzdin, A.; Feinberg, D.

    1992-05-01

    The Bean-Livingston entrance field Hs for vortex penetration at the surface is calculated for layered superconductors with Josephson interlayer coupling and field parallel to the layers. Two regimes must be distinguished: close to Tc, one can use the anisotropic London theory, so Hs is of the order of Hc, the thermodynamic critical field, and is the same as for a field normal to the layers. On the opposite, when the transverse coherence length ξ c is smaller than the interlayer distance d, Hs becomes smaller than Hc and is of the order of ( {ξ c}/{d})H c. Contrary to the entrance field for pure Josephson vortices (fluxons) in junctions, this field is still much larger than the first critical field Hc1∥. This behaviour is a consequence of the specific structure of the vortex core in a layered superconductor and results in a crossover from a linear to a square root temperature dependence as the temperature is lowered.

  10. Response to "Transfer or Specificity?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to "Transfer or Specificity?" and reports a research that supports a strong case for a fundamental motor skill as a precursor to two sport specific skills as in Gallahue and Ozmun's (2002) theoretical model of motor development. Reported changes in performance of the overarm throw are attributed to the…

  11. Specific Learning Difficulties in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weedon, Charles

    Specific difficulties in mathematics tend to receive much less attention than do parallel difficulties with language. Accordingly, as its contribution to an ongoing project on children's learning difficulties and what to do about them, the Tayside (Scotland) Region decided to focus on children's specific problems with mathematics/arithmetic and…

  12. Hanford Site environmental management specification

    SciTech Connect

    Grygiel, M.L.

    1998-06-10

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

  13. The Development of Educational Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Board of Education, Raleigh.

    This publication is intended to assist local boards of education, superintendents, and staff in the organization and development of educational specifications. It was written because most educators have little knowledge about the purpose, process, organization, or contents of the finished product (educational specifications). It provides a…

  14. Performance Specifications for Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Career Technology and Adult Learning.

    This document lists and discusses the development of Maryland's performance specifications for occupational programs. The introduction explains the process used to develop performance standards and specifications for 10 career cluster majors that were identified by a task force of educators and employers as high-demand occupational areas in…

  15. Magnetic fields from heterotic cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Rhiannon; Alexander, Stephon H.; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Dasgupta, Keshav

    2009-04-15

    Large-scale magnetic fields are observed today to be coherent on galactic scales. While there exists an explanation for their amplification and their specific configuration in spiral galaxies--the dynamo mechanism--a satisfying explanation for the original seed fields required is still lacking. Cosmic strings are compelling candidates because of their scaling properties, which would guarantee the coherence on cosmological scales of any resultant magnetic fields at the time of galaxy formation. We present a mechanism for the production of primordial seed magnetic fields from heterotic cosmic strings arising from M theory. More specifically, we make use of heterotic cosmic strings stemming from M5-branes wrapped around four of the compact internal dimensions. These objects are stable on cosmological time scales and carry charged zero modes. Therefore a scaling solution of such defects will generate seed magnetic fields which are coherent on galactic scales today.

  16. Wake fields and wake field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Wilson, P.B.; Weiland, T.

    1984-12-01

    In this lecture we introduce the concepts of wake fields and wake potentials, examine some basic properties of these functions, show how they can be calculated, and look briefly at a few important applications. One such application is wake field acceleration. The wake field accelerator is capable of producing the high gradients required for future very high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. The principles of wake field acceleration, and a brief description of experiments in progress in this area, are presented in the concluding section. 40 references, 27 figures.

  17. Specificity of Exercise and Specificity of Training: A Subcellular Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCafferty, William B.; Horvath, Steven M.

    1977-01-01

    Selection of proper competitive activities for athletes is discussed in relation to the acknowledged fact that cellular adaptation is dependent upon the specific program employed in training for competitive events. (MB)

  18. The specific heat of potassium holmium double tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, M. T.; Dyakonov, V. P.; Szewczyk, A.; Gutowska, M. U.; Zayarnyuk, T.; Zubov, E. E.; Majchrowski, A.; Michalski, E.; Hoffmann, J.-U.; Prokes, K.; Woźniak, K.; Dobrzycki, Ł.; Khatsko, E. N.; Rykova, A. I.; Domukhovski, V.; Barański, M.; Shtyrkhunova, V.; Żmija, J.; Szymczak, H.

    2011-11-01

    The results of measurements of thermal properties (specific heat) of potassium holmium double tungstate KHo(WO4)2 as a function of temperature (from 0.5 to 300 K) and magnetic field (up to 2 T) are presented. The total specific heat without the phonon and Schottky contributions is found to have the anomaly with maximum at T SPT ∼ 5 K. This anomaly is likely related with the structural phase transition (SPT) caused by the cooperative Jahn-Teller effect. The increase of specific heat at very low temperatures and its shift towards high temperatures with increasing magnetic field are observed. The origin of this behaviour can be connected with possible magnetic phase transition induced by magnetic field.

  19. Topics in Double Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Seung Ki

    The existence of momentum and winding modes of closed string on a torus leads to a natural idea that the field theoretical approach of string theory should involve winding type coordinates as well as the usual space-time coordinates. Recently developed double field theory is motivated from this idea and it implements T-duality manifestly by doubling the coordinates. In this thesis we will mainly focus on the double field theory formulation of different string theories in its low energy limit: bosonic, heterotic, type II and its massive extensions, and N = 1 supergravity theory. In chapter 2 of the thesis we study the equivalence of different formulations of double field theory. There are three different formulations of double field theory: background field E formulation, generalized metric H formulation, and frame field EAM formulation. Starting from the frame field formalism and choosing an appropriate gauge, the equivalence of the three formulations of bosonic theory are explicitly verified. In chapter 3 we construct the double field theory formulation of heterotic strings. The global symmetry enlarges to O( D, D + n) for heterotic strings and the enlarged generalized metric features this symmetry. The structural form of bosonic theory can directly be applied to the heterotic theory with the enlarged generalized metric. In chapter 4 we develop a unified framework of double field theory for type II theories. The Ramond-Ramond potentials fit into spinor representations of the duality group O( D, D) and the theory displays Spin+( D, D) symmetry with its self-duality relation. For a specific form of RR 1-form the theory reduces to the massive deformation of type IIA theory due to Romans. In chapter 5 we formulate the N = 1 supersymmetric extension of double field theory including the coupling to n abelian vector multiplets. This theory features a local O(1, 9 + n) x O(1, 9) tangent space symmetry under which the fermions transform. (Copies available exclusively from

  20. Field Trips. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally; Aronson, Susan S.; Stacey, Susan; Winbush, Olga

    2001-01-01

    Five articles highlight benefits and organization of field trips: (1) "Field Trips Promote Child Learning at Its Best"; (2) "Planning for Maximum Benefit, Minimum Risk"; (3) "Coaching Community Hosts"; (4) "The Story of a Field Trip: Trash and Its Place within Children's Learning and Community"; and (5) "Field Trip Stories and Perspectives" (from…

  1. Quality specifications for reference methods.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, L M

    1999-11-01

    Reference methods are a key element to the objective of traceability in laboratory medicine. However, to serve this purpose adequately, minimum analytical quality specifications are required. Here, possible strategies for deriving such specifications are presented, being based on concepts developed before by a European Working Group. Distinction is made between "genuine requirements" for reference methods (direct calibration with primary reference materials; absence of sample-related effects) and "performance specifications" (limits for random, systematic and total error, the latter in association with the number of measurements). While the former requirements are considered as conditio sine-qua-non, the latter specifications should be variable, which means that they should be tailored to the specific application of the methods. In general, it is advocated to derive performance specifications for reference methods from desirable specifications of routine methods (analyte-related), although other models should not be ruled out beforehand. Further, it is recommended that reference laboratories make special efforts to demonstrate and maintain a uniform level of quality of reference methods.

  2. PREPROCESSING MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH CHROMOSPHERIC LONGITUDINAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Kusano, K.

    2012-06-20

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  3. SSL: A software specification language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, S. L.; Buckles, B. P.; Ryan, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    SSL (Software Specification Language) is a new formalism for the definition of specifications for software systems. The language provides a linear format for the representation of the information normally displayed in a two-dimensional module inter-dependency diagram. In comparing SSL to FORTRAN or ALGOL, it is found to be largely complementary to the algorithmic (procedural) languages. SSL is capable of representing explicitly module interconnections and global data flow, information which is deeply imbedded in the algorithmic languages. On the other hand, SSL is not designed to depict the control flow within modules. The SSL level of software design explicitly depicts intermodule data flow as a functional specification.

  4. Site Specific Evaluation of Multisensor Capacitance Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, R. A.; Guber, A. K.; Pachepsky, Y.; Gish, T. J.; Daughtry, C. S.

    2007-12-01

    Multisensor capacitance probes (MCPs) are widely used for measuring soil water content (SWC) at the field scale. Although manufacturers supply a generic MCP calibration, many researchers recognize that MCPs should be calibrated for specific field conditions. MCPs measurements are typically associated with small soil volumes, and are subsequently scaled up to the plot or field scale. Research is needed to understand how representative are these measurements for water monitoring studies that operate with the elementary area from one to tens square meters. The objectives of this study were: (a) to test the accuracy of SWC field measurements using generic and laboratory MCP calibrations; (b) to test applicability of a single MCP calibration for SWC measurements at different depths; and (c) to compare the accuracy of two and three-parameter equations using scaled frequency (SF). Four 1x1 m plots were equipped with MCPs to measure SWC at 9 depths at the OPE3 USDA-ARS research site at Beltsville, MD. Within each plot, three undisturbed soil cores were taken with a 100 cm3 soil auger. SWC sampling was made on three different dates when soil water contents were distinctly different. To compare MCP measurements with observed SWC, the SF was converted into SWC using: (a) the manufacturer generic calibration; and (b) calibration obtained in laboratory for a mesic Aquic Hapludult soil. Parameters of three different calibration equations were also obtained by fitting the equations to the water contents measurements at the plots. This fit was done: (a) for all observations regardless the depth, (b) for observations at each genetic horizon, and (c) for each depth separately. Results show that the manufacturer and the laboratory calibrations provided a satisfactory fit to the field-measured SWC at depths of 30, 40 and 50 cm. The fit was about two times less accurate at depths of 10, 20, 60, 70 80 and 90 cm. A minor improvement was obtained at depths of 10 and 20 cm after

  5. Methods for Optimizing CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing Specificity.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Josh; Myer, Vic E; Hsu, Patrick D

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the development of delivery, repair, and specificity strategies for the CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering toolbox are helping researchers understand gene function with unprecedented precision and sensitivity. CRISPR-Cas9 also holds enormous therapeutic potential for the treatment of genetic disorders by directly correcting disease-causing mutations. Although the Cas9 protein has been shown to bind and cleave DNA at off-target sites, the field of Cas9 specificity is rapidly progressing, with marked improvements in guide RNA selection, protein and guide engineering, novel enzymes, and off-target detection methods. We review important challenges and breakthroughs in the field as a comprehensive practical guide to interested users of genome editing technologies, highlighting key tools and strategies for optimizing specificity. The genome editing community should now strive to standardize such methods for measuring and reporting off-target activity, while keeping in mind that the goal for specificity should be continued improvement and vigilance. PMID:27494557

  6. Methods for Optimizing CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing Specificity.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Josh; Myer, Vic E; Hsu, Patrick D

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the development of delivery, repair, and specificity strategies for the CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering toolbox are helping researchers understand gene function with unprecedented precision and sensitivity. CRISPR-Cas9 also holds enormous therapeutic potential for the treatment of genetic disorders by directly correcting disease-causing mutations. Although the Cas9 protein has been shown to bind and cleave DNA at off-target sites, the field of Cas9 specificity is rapidly progressing, with marked improvements in guide RNA selection, protein and guide engineering, novel enzymes, and off-target detection methods. We review important challenges and breakthroughs in the field as a comprehensive practical guide to interested users of genome editing technologies, highlighting key tools and strategies for optimizing specificity. The genome editing community should now strive to standardize such methods for measuring and reporting off-target activity, while keeping in mind that the goal for specificity should be continued improvement and vigilance.

  7. Grade 6 Science Curriculum Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    This material describes curriculum specifications for grade 6 science in Alberta. Emphases recommended are: (1) process skills (50%); (2) psychomotor skills (10%); (3) attitudes (10%); and (4) subject matter (30%). Priorities within each category are identified. (YP)

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Margeta, Milica A.; Shen, Kang

    2011-01-01

    Synapses are specialized junctions that mediate information flow between neurons and their targets. A striking feature of the nervous system is the specificity of its synaptic connections: an individual neuron will form synapses only with a small subset of available presynaptic and postsynaptic partners. Synaptic specificity has been classically thought to arise from homophilic or heterophilic interactions between adhesive molecules acting across the synaptic cleft. Over the past decade, many new mechanisms giving rise to synaptic specificity have been identified. Synapses can be specified by secreted molecules that promote or inhibit synaptogenesis, and their source can be a neighboring guidepost cell, not just presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Furthermore, lineage, fate, and timing of development can also play critical roles in shaping neural circuits. Future work utilizing large-scale screens will aim to elucidate the full scope of cellular mechanisms and molecular players that can give rise to synaptic specificity. PMID:19969086

  9. Are specific allergen sensitivities inherited?

    PubMed

    Misiak, Rana Tawil; Wegienka, Ganesa; Zoratti, Edward

    2010-09-01

    A family history of an allergic condition is a well-accepted risk factor for the development of an allergic condition in an individual, particularly for allergic disorders such as asthma, eczema, and allergic rhinitis. However, the question of whether specific allergen sensitization is inherited requires a complicated answer, as environmental exposure plays an important role in the development of allergen-specific IgE. This article summarizes the findings of recent studies in the literature regarding what is known about the inheritance of specific allergens. Overall, properly collected and analyzed data appear to both support and refute the hypothesis that specific allergen sensitization is inherited, even when attempting to account for the complexities of varying study methodologies and the evaluation of diverse populations and communities. PMID:20574668

  10. Electric motor model repair specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

  11. Patient-specific surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Technological innovations of the twentieth century have provided medicine and surgery with new tools for education and therapy definition. Thus, by combining Medical Imaging and Virtual Reality, patient-specific applications providing preoperative surgical simulation have become possible.

  12. The somatosensory evoked magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kakigi, R; Hoshiyama, M; Shimojo, M; Naka, D; Yamasaki, H; Watanabe, S; Xiang, J; Maeda, K; Lam, K; Itomi, K; Nakamura, A

    2000-08-01

    Averaged magnetoencephalography (MEG) following somatosensory stimulation, somatosensory evoked magnetic field(s) (SEF), in humans are reviewed. The equivalent current dipole(s) (ECD) of the primary and the following middle-latency components of SEF following electrical stimulation within 80-100 ms are estimated in area 3b of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), the posterior bank of the central sulcus, in the hemisphere contralateral to the stimulated site. Their sites are generally compatible with the homunculus which was reported by Penfield using direct cortical stimulation during surgery. SEF to passive finger movement is generated in area 3a or 2 of SI, unlike with electrical stimulation. Long-latency components with peaks of approximately 80-120 ms are recorded in the bilateral hemispheres and their ECD are estimated in the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) in the bilateral hemispheres. We also summarized (1) the gating effects on SEF by interference tactile stimulation or movement applied to the stimulus site, (2) clinical applications of SEF in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology and (3) cortical plasticity (reorganization) of the SI. SEF specific to painful stimulation is also recorded following painful stimulation by CO(2) laser beam. Pain-specific components are recorded over 150 ms after the stimulus and their ECD are estimated in the bilateral SII and the limbic system. We introduced a newly-developed multi (12)-channel gradiometer system with the smallest and highest quality superconducting quantum interference device (micro-SQUID) available to non-invasively detect the magnetic fields of a human peripheral nerve. Clear nerve action fields (NAFs) were consistently recorded from all subjects.

  13. Generic specifications for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-04-01

    The general requirements for circuit-type approval, procurement, lot-acceptance testing, and delivery of thick and thin film hybrid microcircuits suitable for space application are specified. It is used in conjunction with the detail specification applicable to the actual circuit type and is valid only for procurement from manufacturers whose capability is approved by ESA in accordance with specifications ESA PSS-01-605 or ESA PSS-01-606.

  14. mREST Interface Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCartney, Patrick; MacLean, John

    2012-01-01

    mREST is an implementation of the REST architecture specific to the management and sharing of data in a system of logical elements. The purpose of this document is to clearly define the mREST interface protocol. The interface protocol covers all of the interaction between mREST clients and mREST servers. System-level requirements are not specifically addressed. In an mREST system, there are typically some backend interfaces between a Logical System Element (LSE) and the associated hardware/software system. For example, a network camera LSE would have a backend interface to the camera itself. These interfaces are specific to each type of LSE and are not covered in this document. There are also frontend interfaces that may exist in certain mREST manager applications. For example, an electronic procedure execution application may have a specialized interface for configuring the procedures. This interface would be application specific and outside of this document scope. mREST is intended to be a generic protocol which can be used in a wide variety of applications. A few scenarios are discussed to provide additional clarity but, in general, application-specific implementations of mREST are not specifically addressed. In short, this document is intended to provide all of the information necessary for an application developer to create mREST interface agents. This includes both mREST clients (mREST manager applications) and mREST servers (logical system elements, or LSEs).

  15. Organ-Specific Membrane Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Sell, K. W.; Mori, W.; Rack, J. H.; Gurner, B. W.; Coombs, R. R. A.

    1969-01-01

    A satisfactory system for testing the reaction of rabbit antisera with membrane antigens of human tissue cells is described. This method allows the differentiation between IgG and IgM antibodies and provides an extremely sensitive method for the detection of antigens on all cells including non-viable fixed cells. Anti-organ serum before selective absorption showed very little organ specificity in their reactions, but may be made specific by extensive absorption although often the resulting specific titre was very low. Organ-specific membrane antigens were also identified and shown to be represented on tumour cells, although in some cases such as the colon the reactions were weaker with tumour cells than with normal parenchymal cells of an organ. On the other hand, in one case of carcinoma of the kidney the organ-specific antigens were detectably stronger on tumour cells than on normal kidney cells. Preliminary studies on human ascitic tumour cells from 4 different cancer patients show that species-specific membrane antigens can be demonstrated. Unfortunately none of the cases were derived from organs whose origin could be identified with the antisera which had been prepared for this series of experiments. ImagesFigs. 2-3 PMID:5806432

  16. Choosing an information system to meet specific needs.

    PubMed

    Burton, J A

    1983-07-01

    Because of the increasing number of information systems on the market today, the user must select the system wisely according to the vendor's ability to solve specific company needs. An organization must know its filing and retrieval requirements, its potential for growth, etc., and must then contact only those vendors that fit specific company requirements. The vendor's reputation in the field, service history, "after-sales support," and ability to supply cost analyses should all be examined. PMID:10263971

  17. A Domain-Specific Language for Discrete Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Rohit; Samuel, Alfy; Pawar, Ashmee; Kiruthika, M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper discusses a Domain Specific Language (DSL) that has been developed to enable implementation of concepts of discrete mathematics. A library of data types and functions provides functionality which is frequently required by users. Covering the areas of Mathematical Logic, Set Theory, Functions, Graph Theory, Number Theory, Linear Algebra and Combinatorics, the language's syntax is close to the actual notation used in the specific fields.

  18. Geoscience Field Education: A Recent Resurgence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmeyer, Steven J.; Mogk, David W.

    2009-10-01

    Field education traditionally has been an integral component of undergraduate geoscience curricula. Students have learned the fundamentals of field techniques during core geology courses and have honed their field credentials during class-specific field trips, semester-long field courses, and capstone summer field camps. In many geoscience departments, field camp remains a graduation requirement, and more than 100 field camps currently are offered by U.S. universities and colleges (see http://geology.com/field-camp.shtml). During the past several decades, however, many geoscience departments have moved away from traditional geologic fieldwork and toward a broader theoretical and laboratory-intensive focus that encompasses a range of subdisciplines. Trends that have influenced these shifts include (1) the decline in the late twentieth century of the petroleum and mining industries, which have consistently championed the values of fieldwork; (2) a decrease in the number of professional jobs that incorporate field mapping; (3) a decline in the number of geoscience majors nationwide [American Geological Institute (AGI), 2009]; and (4) barriers to fieldwork, including time requirements, cost, liability, and decreasing access to field sites.

  19. The specificity triad: notions of disease and therapeutic specificity in biomedical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Mulinari, Shai

    2014-10-18

    Biomedicine is typically defined as the branch of medicine that is based on the principles of biology and biochemistry. A central tenet for biomedicine is the notion of disease and therapeutic specificity, i.e. the idea of tailored treatments for discrete disorders underpinned by specific pathologies. The present paper is concerned with how notions of disease and therapeutic specificity guide biomedical reasoning. To that end, the author proposes a model - the specificity triad - that draws on late philosopher and physician Ludwik Fleck's concept of "style of thought" to offer a frame for investigating the intricate process through which links between disorders, mechanisms, and therapeutics are established by biomedicine. Next by applying the specificity triad model to scrutinize research efforts in two discrete areas of medicine-psychiatry and regenerative medicine-this paper seeks to stimulate pertinent discussions in and about biomedicine. These include discussions on the ambiguous epistemic status of psychiatry within contemporary biomedicine, as well as the relationship between developmental biology - historically relatively disjointed from biomedical enterprise - and the burgeoning field of regenerative medicine.

  20. The specificity triad: notions of disease and therapeutic specificity in biomedical reasoning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biomedicine is typically defined as the branch of medicine that is based on the principles of biology and biochemistry. A central tenet for biomedicine is the notion of disease and therapeutic specificity, i.e. the idea of tailored treatments for discrete disorders underpinned by specific pathologies. The present paper is concerned with how notions of disease and therapeutic specificity guide biomedical reasoning. To that end, the author proposes a model – the specificity triad – that draws on late philosopher and physician Ludwik Fleck’s concept of “style of thought” to offer a frame for investigating the intricate process through which links between disorders, mechanisms, and therapeutics are established by biomedicine. Next by applying the specificity triad model to scrutinize research efforts in two discrete areas of medicine—psychiatry and regenerative medicine—this paper seeks to stimulate pertinent discussions in and about biomedicine. These include discussions on the ambiguous epistemic status of psychiatry within contemporary biomedicine, as well as the relationship between developmental biology — historically relatively disjointed from biomedical enterprise — and the burgeoning field of regenerative medicine. PMID:25326797

  1. Quantifying group specificity of animal vocalizations without specific sender information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vester, Heike; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Timme, Marc; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Recordings of animal vocalization can lack information about sender and context. This is often the case in studies on marine mammals or in the increasing number of automated bioacoustics monitorings. Here, we develop a framework to estimate group specificity without specific sender information. We introduce and apply a bag-of-calls-and-coefficients approach (BOCCA) to study ensembles of cepstral coefficients calculated from vocalization signals recorded from a given animal group. Comparing distributions of such ensembles of coefficients by computing relative entropies reveals group specific differences. Applying the BOCCA to ensembles of calls recorded from group of long-finned pilot whales in northern Norway, we find that differences of vocalizations within social groups of pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are significantly lower than intergroup differences.

  2. Quantifying group specificity of animal vocalizations without specific sender information.

    PubMed

    Vester, Heike; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Timme, Marc; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Recordings of animal vocalization can lack information about sender and context. This is often the case in studies on marine mammals or in the increasing number of automated bioacoustics monitorings. Here, we develop a framework to estimate group specificity without specific sender information. We introduce and apply a bag-of-calls-and-coefficients approach (BOCCA) to study ensembles of cepstral coefficients calculated from vocalization signals recorded from a given animal group. Comparing distributions of such ensembles of coefficients by computing relative entropies reveals group specific differences. Applying the BOCCA to ensembles of calls recorded from group of long-finned pilot whales in northern Norway, we find that differences of vocalizations within social groups of pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are significantly lower than intergroup differences. PMID:26986319

  3. Velocity specificity, combination training and sport specific tasks.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J; McNair, P J; Marshall, R N

    2001-06-01

    Whether velocity-specific resistance training is important for improving functional sporting performance was investigated by studying the effect of isoinertial training velocity on netball chest pass throwing velocity. Twenty-one female netball players were randomly assigned to a strength-trained group (80% 1RM - average training velocity = .308 m/s), power-trained group (60% 1RM - average training velocity = .398 m/s) and a control group. Resistance training was combined with sport specific motion training for both groups over a ten-week training duration. Pre- and post-training testing revealed that the training velocity associated with the strength-trained group produced significantly greater improvement in mean volume of weight lifted (85kg) and mean power output (13.25 W) as compared to the power and control groups (P< 0.05). The strength-trained and power-trained groups significantly improved netball throw velocity by 12.4% and 8.8% respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups. The validity of velocity-specific training and subsequent adaptations to improve functional sporting performance appears highly questionable, due to the disparity between training velocity and actual movement velocity (11.38 m x s(-1)) for a given sport specific task such as the netball throw it was proposed that the repeated intent to move an isoinertial load as rapidly as possible coupled with performance of the sport-specific movement promote efficient coordination and activation patterns. Such mechanisms might be more important determinants of sport-specific high velocity adaptation.

  4. Evolution of magnetic fields at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibel, E. G.

    2006-06-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in the Universe is a cosmology problem. The evolution of the field is a plasma physics problem. I review these problems and focus on magnetogenesis in accretion disks, specifically, the transition from the Biermann battery, which creates seed fields, to amplification by turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability. In collisional disks, there is a gap between the fieldstrength characteristic of the battery and the fieldstrength necessary to sustain magnetorotational instability, but in collisionless disks the transition occurs at low fieldstrength. Because collisionless disks are generally hot, and have short dynamical times, they are likely to be small. Thus, in the battery scenario, magnetic fields on large scales were built from fields created in many small sources. Simple estimates based on turbulent diffusion suggest that galaxies and the cores of galaxy clusters can be magnetized in this way, but not the intergalactic medium at large. The problem of creating a large-scale field remains unsolved.

  5. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, J.

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -11/ Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components. (LEW)

  6. Specificity of hammerhead ribozyme cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, K J; Herschlag, D; Uhlenbeck, O C

    1996-01-01

    To be effective in gene inactivation, the hammerhead ribozyme must cleave a complementary RNA target without deleterious effects from cleaving non-target RNAs that contain mismatches and shorter stretches of complementarity. The specificity of hammerhead cleavage was evaluated using HH16, a well-characterized ribozyme designed to cleave a target of 17 residues. Under standard reaction conditions, HH16 is unable to discriminate between its full-length substrate and 3'-truncated substrates, even when six fewer base pairs are formed between HH16 and the substrate. This striking lack of specificity arises because all the substrates bind to the ribozyme with sufficient affinity so that cleavage occurs before their affinity differences are manifested. In contrast, HH16 does exhibit high specificity towards certain 3'-truncated versions of altered substrates that either also contain a single base mismatch or are shortened at the 5' end. In addition, the specificity of HH16 is improved in the presence of p7 nucleocapsid protein from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, which accelerates the association and dissociation of RNA helices. These results support the view that the hammerhead has an intrinsic ability to discriminate against incorrect bases, but emphasizes that the high specificity is only observed in a certain range of helix lengths. Images PMID:8670879

  7. 1997 hybrid electric vehicle specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Sluder, S.; Larsen, R.; Duoba, M.

    1996-10-01

    The US DOE sponsors Advanced Vehicle Technology competitions to help educate the public and advance new vehicle technologies. For several years, DOE has provided financial and technical support for the American Tour de Sol. This event showcases electric and hybrid electric vehicles in a road rally across portions of the northeastern United States. The specifications contained in this technical memorandum apply to vehicles that will be entered in the 1997 American Tour de Sol. However, the specifications were prepared to be general enough for use by other teams and individuals interested in developing hybrid electric vehicles. The purpose of the specifications is to ensure that the vehicles developed do not present a safety hazard to the teams that build and drive them or to the judges, sponsors, or public who attend the competitions. The specifications are by no means the definitive sources of information on constructing hybrid electric vehicles - as electric and hybrid vehicles technologies advance, so will the standards and practices for their construction. In some cases, the new standards and practices will make portions of these specifications obsolete.

  8. Compiler writing system detail design specification. Volume 1: Language specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Construction within the Meta language for both language and target machine specification is reported. The elements of the function language as a meaning and syntax are presented, and the structure of the target language is described which represents the target dependent object text representation of applications programs.

  9. Particlelike distributions of the Higgs field nonminimally coupled to gravity.

    PubMed

    Füzfa, André; Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Schlögel, Sandrine

    2013-09-20

    When the Higgs field is nonminimally coupled to gravity, there exists a family of spherically symmetric particlelike solutions to the field equations. These monopoles are the only globally regular and asymptotically flat distributions with finite energy of the Higgs field around compact objects. Moreover, spontaneous scalarization is strongly amplified for specific values of their mass and compactness.

  10. Carrier signal technology applied to solar collector field control

    SciTech Connect

    Alvis, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The development and operational performance are described of a control system designed specifically for solar distributed collector field systems. Carrier technology is employed to eliminate costly field constructed control wiring and allows the control system quality to be controlled at system suppliers' plants. Prototype hardware has been built and tested in the field with excellent operating results.

  11. Technology-Focused Early Field Experiences in Preservice Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lux, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Although a broad body of research exists on field experiences in teacher education, one specific area of inquiry lacking substantial current research is that of technology-focused early field experiences, or field experiences that occur prior to student teaching and more formal clinical experiences. To address this gap, I conducted this…

  12. 30 CFR 250.512 - Field well-completion rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.512 Field well-completion rules. When geological and engineering information available in a field enables the District Manager to determine specific operating requirements, field...

  13. 30 CFR 250.512 - Field well-completion rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.512 Field well-completion rules. When geological and engineering information available in a field enables the District Manager to determine specific operating requirements, field...

  14. 30 CFR 250.612 - Field well-workover rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.612 Field well-workover rules. When geological and engineering information available in a field enables the District Manager to determine specific operating requirements, field...

  15. 30 CFR 250.512 - Field well-completion rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.512 Field well-completion rules. When geological and engineering information available in a field enables the District Manager to determine specific operating requirements, field...

  16. 30 CFR 250.612 - Field well-workover rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.612 Field well-workover rules. When geological and engineering information available in a field enables the District Manager to determine specific operating requirements, field...

  17. 30 CFR 250.612 - Field well-workover rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.612 Field well-workover rules. When geological and engineering information available in a field enables the District Manager to determine specific operating requirements, field...

  18. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated.

  19. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  20. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated. PMID:26651869

  1. Specific probiotics or 'fecal transplantation'.

    PubMed

    Kruis, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal ecosystem consists mainly of the enteric flora and to a large extent determines intestinal but also extraintestinal health and disease. General alterations and specific molecular changes of intestinal bacteria cause local as well as systemic immune reactions. Nonantibiotic treatment of the enteric flora has a long tradition and spans a range of different interventions from nutrition to specific probiotics and complete fecal transplantation. When comparing therapy to specific probiotics and fecal transplantation, several aspects need to be considered, like biological consequences, safety and therapeutic evidence. The introduction of probiotics into therapy occurred more than hundred years ago. In contrast, experiences with fecal transplantation are more recent and more limited. Safety issues have not been definitively clarified. Because of the different biological activities of probiotics and fecal transplantation, it can be hypothesized that they may play different roles in the treatment of various diseases. More research is needed before the details, safety and therapeutic effects of bacteriotherapy for IBD become sufficiently clear.

  2. The specificity of social stress.

    PubMed

    Zayan, R

    1991-12-01

    This paper attempts to clarify the concept of "social stress" as implicitly understood in the ethological literature. With respect to the general characteristics of stressors and stress responses, the concept when applied to crowding or to encounters with unfamiliar conspecifics does not appear to denote a specific process. The concept is more specific when it refers to the psychological (emotional, perceptive or cognitive) processes that accompany "behavioural stress", e.g. agonistic interactions and subordination experience. The concept of "sociological stress" is proposed to denote the very specific process whereby stress responses of individuals result from a group's social structure, and whereby the former determine the latter via behavioural interactions and the other types of couplings (e.g. perceptive) between the group-members. Finally, it is submitted that social stress at the group level may not be adequately reflected by traditional hormonal indicators of physiological stress. PMID:24923968

  3. Magnetic field mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, R. M.; Stenger, F. J.

    1969-01-01

    Magnetic field mapper locates imperfections in cadmium sulphide solar cells by detecting and displaying the variations of the normal component of the magnetic field resulting from current density variations. It can also inspect for nonuniformities in other electrically conductive materials.

  4. What Are Electromagnetic Fields?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with distance from it. Conductors such as metal shield them very effectively. Other materials, such as building ... with distance from the source. Most building materials shield electric fields to some extent. Magnetic fields arise ...

  5. Planning a Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forecast for Home Economics, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The showroom of a button manufacturer was the site of a successful field trip for a New York City home economics class. Suggestions for field trip preparation are included as well as directions for making button jewelry. (EA)

  6. Dissipative Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kheirandish, F.; Amooshahi, M.

    2008-11-18

    Quantum field theory of a damped vibrating string as the simplest dissipative scalar field theory is investigated by introducing a minimal coupling method. The rate of energy flowing between the system and its environment is obtained.

  7. Covariant Noncommutative Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Jimenez, S.; Garcia-Compean, H.; Obregon, O.; Ramirez, C.

    2008-07-02

    The covariant approach to noncommutative field and gauge theories is revisited. In the process the formalism is applied to field theories invariant under diffeomorphisms. Local differentiable forms are defined in this context. The lagrangian and hamiltonian formalism is consistently introduced.

  8. Electromagnetic properties of high specific surface minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Katherine Anne

    Interparticle electrical forces play a dominant role in the behaviour of high specific surface minerals, such as clays. This fact encourages the use of small electromagnetic perturbations to assess the microscale properties of these materials. Thus, this research focuses on using electromagnetic waves to understand fundamental particle-particle and particle-fluid interactions, and fabric formation in high specific surface mineral-fluid mixtures (particle size <~1 μm). Topics addressed in this study include: the role of specific surface and double layer phenomena in the engineering behaviour of clay-water-electrolyte mixtures; the interplay between surface conduction, double layer polarization, and interfacial polarization; the relationship between fabric, permittivity, shear wave velocity, and engineering properties in soft slurries; and the effect of ferromagnetic impurities on electromagnetic measurements. The critical role of specific surface on the engineering properties of fine-grained soils is demonstrated through fundamental principles and empirical correlations. Afterwards, the effect of specific surface on the electromagnetic properties of particulate materials is studied using simple microscale analyses of conduction and polarization phenomena in particle-fluid mixtures, and corroborated by experimentation. These results clarify the relative importance of specific surface, water content, electrolyte type, and ionic concentration on the electrical properties of particulate materials. The sensitivity of electromagnetic parameters to particle orientation is addressed in light of the potential assessment of anisotropy in engineering properties. It is shown that effective conductivity measurements provide a robust method to determine electrical anisotropy in particle-fluid mixtures. However, real relative dielectric measurements at frequencies below 1 MHz are unreliable due to electrode effects (especially in highly conductive mixtures). The relationship

  9. Specific ion adsorption and surface forces in colloid science.

    PubMed

    Lima, E R A; Horinek, D; Netz, R R; Biscaia, E C; Tavares, F W; Kunz, W; Boström, M

    2008-02-14

    Mean-field theories that include nonelectrostatic interactions acting on ions near interfaces have been found to accommodate many experimentally observed ion specific effects. However, it is clear that this approach does not fully account for the liquid molecular structure and hydration effects. This is now improved by using parametrized ionic potentials deduced from recent nonprimitive model molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in a generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. We investigate how ion distributions and double layer forces depend on the choice of background salt. There is a strong ion specific double layer force set up due to unequal ion specific short-range potentials acting between ions and surfaces. PMID:18205350

  10. Host Specificity of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, Andreas; Fang, Ferric C.

    2013-01-01

    Most pathogens are able to infect multiple hosts but some are highly adapted to a single-host species. A detailed understanding of the basis of host specificity can provide important insights into molecular pathogenesis, the evolution of pathogenic microbes, and the potential for pathogens to cross the species barrier to infect new hosts. Comparative genomics and the development of humanized mouse models have provided important new tools with which to explore the basis of generalism and specialism. This review will examine host specificity of bacterial pathogens with a focus on generalist and specialist serovars of Salmonella enterica. PMID:24296346

  11. High specific heat superconducting composite

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1979-01-01

    A composite superconductor formed from a high specific heat ceramic such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium-aluminum oxide and a conventional metal conductor such as copper or aluminum which are insolubly mixed together to provide adiabatic stability in a superconducting mode of operation. The addition of a few percent of insoluble gadolinium-aluminum oxide powder or gadolinium oxide powder to copper, increases the measured specific heat of the composite by one to two orders of magnitude below the 5.degree. K. level while maintaining the high thermal and electrical conductivity of the conventional metal conductor.

  12. Procedures for evaluating technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Boccio, J.L.; Robinson, R.C.; Samanta, P.K.; Vesely, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Procedures for Evaluating Technical Specifications (PETS) Program being conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Research, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is developing various risk-based approaches for modifying Technical Specifications (TS). This paper highlights the various risk-based issues being addressed by the program and presents examples that exemplify the use of PRA models for modifying TS, primarily elements of the Limiting Condition of Operation (LCOs) and Surveillance Requirements (SRs). PETS approaches to TS modification using more detailed analysis are presented in a companion paper.

  13. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  14. Magnetic field influence on paramecium motility

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.F.; Rosen, A.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The influence of a moderately intense static magnetic field on movement patterns of free swimming Paramecium was studied. When exposed to fields of 0.126 T, these ciliated protozoa exhibited significant reduction in velocity as well as a disorganization of movement pattern. It is suggested that these findings may be explained on the basis of alteration in function of ion specific channels within the cell membrane.

  15. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  16. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  17. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  18. Politics of aviation fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivent, Jacques

    1922-01-01

    In short, the "politics of aviation" lies in a few propositions: the need of having as large a number of fields as possible and of sufficient area; the utilization of the larger part of the existing military fields; the selection of uncultivated or unproductive fields, whenever technical conditions permit; ability to disregard (save in exceptional cases) objections of an agricultural nature.

  19. Geological Field Trip Guidebooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Harriet E.

    1978-01-01

    Geological field trip guidebooks, developed for use during a field trip or field conference, are considered ephemeral publications by their compilers and publishers. Too few copies are printed and little attention is paid to bibliographic format and information. These difficulties are discussed and recommendations are made to alleviate the…

  20. Modelling enzyme reaction mechanisms, specificity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Adrian J

    2005-10-15

    Modern modelling methods can now give uniquely detailed understanding of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, including the analysis of mechanisms and the identification of determinants of specificity and catalytic efficiency. A new field of computational enzymology has emerged that has the potential to contribute significantly to structure-based design and to develop predictive models of drug metabolism and, for example, of the effects of genetic polymorphisms. This review outlines important techniques in this area, including quantum-chemical model studies and combined quantum-mechanics and molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Some recent applications to enzymes of pharmacological interest are also covered, showing the types of problems that can be tackled and the insight they can give.

  1. Copula method for specific Burr distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Nor Hidayah Binti; Khalid, Zarina Binti Mohd

    2015-02-01

    Copula method is discovered to become a useful method to joint two distributions and is known as dependence functions. It is a multivariate distribution functions whose one-dimensional margins are uniform on the interval (0, 1). The used of copula has expanded in many fields of study. Copula has many classes and families. However, in this research, copula methods which are Ali-Mikhail-Haq (AMH), Clayton and Gumbel are used on uncensored data to join specific Burr Type III and XII distributions using the theorem and algorithm of construction the copula. The result showed that AMH, Clayton and Gumbel copula fitted well with Burr distribution since the values of copula lie on the interval (0, 1).

  2. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  3. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  4. The Continuing Evolution of Languages for Specific Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Christine Uber; Voght, Geoffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    This overview to "The Modern Language Journal"'s Focus Issue on Languages for Specific Purposes (LSP) takes a fresh look at issues examined in a 1991 article by Grosse and Voght. Reflecting on change drivers and growth in LSP, the authors comment on current challenges to the field and future research needs. Their remarks are based on new insights…

  5. English for Specific Purposes: Negotiating Needs, Possibilities, and Promises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Spencer; Mercado, Leonardo A.; Ouedraogo, Lynn Hanson; Musetti, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    The authors espouse the need for negotiation in designing and delivering English for Specific Purposes (ESP) programs. Such negotiations take into account learners' needs as well as structural limitations of the context and candid assessment of ESP providers. The article explores lessons from the field and the importance of needs analysis.

  6. Addressing the Mathematics-Specific Needs of Beginning Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Beginning mathematics teachers at the secondary level (middle and high school grades) have mathematics-specific needs that induction programs should address more substantially. However, a number of issues in how programs can accomplish this are more complex than often framed in discussions occurring in the induction programs and the field of…

  7. [Specific anaesthetic procedures for nasal and sinus surgery].

    PubMed

    Boisson-Bertrand, D; Jacquot, C

    2014-12-01

    In nasal and sinus surgery, the anaesthetist must share the operating field with the surgeon and take into account some patients' specific pathologies. Bleeding must be avoided by different means but the accurate gesture of the surgeon, added to the properties of the new anaesthetic drugs, may reduce the risk of this functional surgery. PMID:25458457

  8. English for Specific Purposes (ESP): A Holistic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Momtazur

    2015-01-01

    English for Specific Purposes, known as acronym-"ESP", has been a distinct activity in the field of English Language Teaching (ELT) since 1960s. The flowering period of ESP has been identified due to many incidents like the second world war in 1945, the rapid expansion in scientific, the growth of science and technology, the increased…

  9. Analytical modeling of the acoustic field during a direct field acoustic test.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Rouse, Jerry W.; Mesh, Mikhail

    2010-12-01

    The acoustic field generated during a Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT) has been analytically modeled in two space dimensions using a properly phased distribution of propagating plane waves. Both the pure-tone and broadband acoustic field were qualitatively and quantitatively compared to a diffuse acoustic field. The modeling indicates significant non-uniformity of sound pressure level for an empty (no test article) DFAT, specifically a center peak and concentric maxima/minima rings. This spatial variation is due to the equivalent phase among all propagating plane waves at each frequency. The excitation of a simply supported slender beam immersed within the acoustic fields was also analytically modeled. Results indicate that mid-span response is dependent upon location and orientation of the beam relative to the center of the DFAT acoustic field. For a diffuse acoustic field, due to its spatial uniformity, mid-span response sensitivity to location and orientation is nonexistent.

  10. Practical Issues with Formal Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenhofen, Michael; Brucker, Achim D.

    Many software companies still seem to be reluctant to use formal specifications in their development processes. Nevertheless, the trend towards implementing critical business applications in distributed environments makes such applications an attractive target for formal methods. Additionally, the rising complexity also increases the willingness of the development teams to apply formal techniques.

  11. Specificity of Cardiovascular Endurance Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Calberth B., Jr.; Johnson, James H.

    This study determined the specificity of cardiovascular endurance training on a bicycle ergometer. Eighteen male subjects were tested on a heart rate response test of 150 beats per minute on a bicycle ergometer at the pace of 50 revolutions per minute (rpm) and at 160 beats per minute at 60 and 80 rpm, with the resistance equal to the force of…

  12. Priming the Query Specification Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toms, Elaine G.; Freund, Luanne

    2003-01-01

    Tests the use of questions as a technique in the query specification process. Using a within-subjects design, 48 people interacted with a modified Google interface to solve four information problems in four domains. Half the tasks were entered as typical keyword queries, and half as questions or statements. Results suggest the typical search box…

  13. Portable File Format (PFF) specifications.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2015-02-01

    Created at Sandia National Laboratories, the Portable File Format (PFF) allows binary data transfer across computer platforms. Although this capability is supported by many other formats, PFF files are still in use at Sandia, particularly in pulsed power research. This report provides detailed PFF specifications for accessing data without relying on legacy code.

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 3 - Specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specifications. Sec. 3 Section 3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec....

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 3 - Specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specifications. Sec. 3 Section 3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec....

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 3 - Specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specifications. Sec. 3 Section 3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec....

  17. 46 CFR Sec. 3 - Specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specifications. Sec. 3 Section 3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec....

  18. 46 CFR Sec. 3 - Specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specifications. Sec. 3 Section 3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec....

  19. Grade 3 Science Curriculum Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    The specific content areas and objectives from which the Alberta, Canada, Grade 3 Science Achievement Test questions were derived are outlined in this bulletin. The document contains: (1) curriculum summary (providing a general listing of the process skills, psychomotor skills, attitudes, and subject matter covered at the grade 3 level); (2) a…

  20. Netware-Specific Network Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Robin M.

    This paper focuses on practical and cost-effective NetWare-specific approaches to information systems and computer security. A series of real world experiences is presented that illustrate fundamental information systems and security concepts. A NetWare network is a client-server network which uses a file server to share files while client…

  1. 76 FR 7482 - Operations Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... in common carriage (75 FR 25127). Specifically, the FAA proposed to clarify and standardize the rules.... The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) obtained competence from the European Parliament to... European Community (EC) in 2008. Regulation (EC) No 216/2008 provides competence to EASA to issue and...

  2. CONTRACT DOCUMENTS AND PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    First California Commission on School Construction Systems, Palo Alto.

    A SET OF EDUCATIONAL SPECIFICATION DRAFTED BY THE FIRST CALIFORNIA COMMISSION ON SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS GIVES INFORMATION ON BIDDING PROCEDURES, A DESCRIPTION OF THE CURRENT CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM, PROCEDURES FOR SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL, DATA AND CONDITIONS RELATED TO THE DEVELOPMENT PHASE OF THE PROJECT, COMPONENT CONTRACTS, AND GENERAL…

  3. Reflight certification software design specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The PDSS/IMC Software Design Specification for the Payload Development Support System (PDSS)/Image Motion Compensator (IMC) is contained. The PDSS/IMC is to be used for checkout and verification of the IMC flight hardware and software by NASA/MSFC.

  4. Adaptive Assessments Using Open Specifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Hector Barbosa; Garcia-Penalvo, Francisco J.; Rodriguez-Conde, Maria Jose; Morales, Erla M.; de Pablos, Patricia Ordonez

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation is a key element in formal education processes; it must be constructed in a way that the item questions within help students understand by adapting them to the learning style as well. The focus of the present research work specifically in the convenience to adapt an associated multimedia material in each single question besides the…

  5. Effects of mixed neutron-gamma beams in both sequential and simultaneous irradiation modalities on chromosomal aberrations of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in-vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, P.K.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Meisner, L.F.; Gould, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    Initial irradiations have been performed in preparation for testing the independent action hypothesis for chromosomal abnormality production between low- and high-LET radiation. Results of these irradiations are compared with typical dose response curves. Lessons learned and proposed experiments for the future are discussed. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Development and testing of the VITAMIN-B7/BUGLE-B7 coupled neutron-gamma multigroup cross-section libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Risner, J.M.; Wiarda, D.; Miller, T.M.; Peplow, D.E.; Patton, B.W.; Dunn, M.E.; Parks, B.T.

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.190 states that calculational methods used to estimate reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fluence should use the latest version of the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF). The VITAMIN-B6 fine-group library and BUGLE-96 broad-group library, which are widely used for RPV fluence calculations, were generated using ENDF/B-VI.3 data, which was the most current data when Regulatory Guide 1.190 was issued. We have developed new fine-group (VITAMIN-B7) and broad-group (BUGLE-B7) libraries based on ENDF/B-VII.0. These new libraries, which were processed using the AMPX code system, maintain the same group structures as the VITAMIN-B6 and BUGLE-96 libraries. Verification and validation of the new libraries were accomplished using diagnostic checks in AMPX, 'unit tests' for each element in VITAMIN-B7, and a diverse set of benchmark experiments including critical evaluations for fast and thermal systems, a set of experimental benchmarks that are used for SCALE regression tests, and three RPV fluence benchmarks. The benchmark evaluation results demonstrate that VITAMIN-B7 and BUGLE-B7 are appropriate for use in RPV fluence calculations and meet the calculational uncertainty criterion in Regulatory Guide 1.190. (authors)

  7. Development and Testing of the VITAMIN-B7/BUGLE-B7 Coupled Neutron-Gamma Multigroup Cross-Section Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Risner, Joel M; Wiarda, Dorothea; Miller, Thomas Martin; Peplow, Douglas E.; Patton, Bruce W; Dunn, Michael E; Parks, Benjamin T

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s Regulatory Guide 1.190 states that calculational methods used to estimate reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fluence should use the latest version of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). The VITAMIN-B6 fine-group library and BUGLE-96 broad-group library, which are widely used for RPV fluence calculations, were generated using ENDF/B-VI data, which was the most current data when Regulatory Guide 1.190 was issued. We have developed new fine-group (VITAMIN-B7) and broad-group (BUGLE-B7) libraries based on ENDF/B-VII. These new libraries, which were processed using the AMPX code system, maintain the same group structures as the VITAMIN-B6 and BUGLE-96 libraries. Verification and validation of the new libraries was accomplished using diagnostic checks in AMPX, unit tests for each element in VITAMIN-B7, and a diverse set of benchmark experiments including critical evaluations for fast and thermal systems, a set of experimental benchmarks that are used for SCALE regression tests, and three RPV fluence benchmarks. The benchmark evaluation results demonstrate that VITAMIN-B7 and BUGLE-B7 are appropriate for use in LWR shielding applications, and meet the calculational uncertainty criterion in Regulatory Guide 1.190.

  8. Organic liquid scintillation detectors for on-the-fly neutron/gamma alarming and radionuclide identification in a pedestrian radiation portal monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc Gerrit; Ruch, Marc L.; Poitrasson-Riviere, Alexis; Sagadevan, Athena; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-07-01

    We present new experimental results from a radiation portal monitor based on the use of organic liquid scintillators. The system was tested as part of a 3He-free radiation portal monitor testing campaign at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, in February 2014. The radiation portal monitor was subjected to a wide range of test conditions described in ANSI N42.35, including a variety of gamma-ray sources and a 20,000 n/s 252Cf source. A false alarm test tested whether radiation portal monitors ever alarmed in the presence of only natural background. The University of Michigan Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Group's system triggered zero false alarms in 2739 trials. It consistently alarmed on a variety of gamma-ray sources travelling at 1.2 m/s at a 70 cm source to detector distance. The neutron source was detected at speeds up to 3 m/s and in configurations with up to 8 cm of high density polyethylene shielding. The success of on-the-fly radionuclide identification varied with the gamma-ray source measured as well as with which of two radionuclide identification methods was used. Both methods used a least squares comparison between the measured pulse height distributions to library spectra to pick the best match. The methods varied in how the pulse height distributions were modified prior to the least squares comparison. Correct identification rates were as high as 100% for highly enriched uranium, but as low as 50% for 241Am. Both radionuclide identification algorithms produced mixed results, but the concept of using liquid scintillation detectors for gamma-ray and neutron alarming in radiation portal monitor was validated.

  9. Category Specific Dictionary Learning for Attribute Specific Feature Selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yan, Yan; Winkler, Stefan; Sebe, Nicu

    2016-03-01

    Attributes, as mid-level features, have demonstrated great potential in visual recognition tasks due to their excellent propagation capability through different categories. However, existing attribute learning methods are prone to learning the correlated attributes. To discover the genuine attribute specific features, many feature selection methods have been proposed. However, these feature selection methods are implemented at the level of raw features that might be very noisy, and these methods usually fail to consider the structural information in the feature space. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose a label constrained dictionary learning approach combined with a multilayer filter. The feature selection is implemented at dictionary level, which can better preserve the structural information. The label constrained dictionary learning suppresses the intra-class noise by encouraging the sparse representations of intra-class samples to lie close to their center. A multilayer filter is developed to discover the representative and robust attribute specific bases. The attribute specific bases are only shared among the positive samples or the negative samples. The experiments on the challenging Animals with Attributes data set and the SUN attribute data set demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  10. Oil and gas field code master list 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the sixteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the US. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry. As a result of their widespread adoption they have in effect become a national standard. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on survey forms and other reports regarding field-specific data collected by EIA. There are 58,366 field records in this year`s FCML, 437 more than last year. The FCML includes: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (definition of alias is listed); fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. This report also contains an Invalid Field Record List of 4 records that have been removed from the FCML since last year`s report. These records were found to be either technically incorrect or to represent field names which were never recognized by State naming authorities.

  11. Structure-based modeling of protein: DNA specificity

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Adam P.; Zhang, Chi; Bradley, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Protein:DNA interactions are essential to a range of processes that maintain and express the information encoded in the genome. Structural modeling is an approach that aims to understand these interactions at the physicochemical level. It has been proposed that structural modeling can lead to deeper understanding of the mechanisms of protein:DNA interactions, and that progress in this field can not only help to rationalize the observed specificities of DNA-binding proteins but also to allow researchers to engineer novel DNA site specificities. In this review we discuss recent developments in the structural description of protein:DNA interactions and specificity, as well as the challenges facing the field in the future. PMID:25414269

  12. CMB non-gaussianity from vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The Planck satellite has recently measured the CMB temperature anisotropies with unprecedented accuracy, and it has provided strong bounds on primordial non-gaussianity. Such bounds constrain models of inflation, and mechanisms that produce the primordial perturbations. We discuss the non-gaussian signatures from the interactions of the inflation φ with spin-1 fields. We study the two different cases in which the inflaton is (i) a pseudo-scalar field with a (φ)/(fa) F·F interaction with a vector field, and (ii) a scalar field with a f (φ)F² interaction. In the first case we obtain the strong limit f{sub a} ≥ 10¹⁶GeV on the decay constant. In the second case, specific choices of the function f (φ) can lead to a non-gaussianity with a characteristic shape not encountered in standard models of scalar field inflation, and which has also been constrained by Planck.

  13. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Adey, W R

    1993-04-01

    Life on earth has evolved in a sea of natural electromagnetic (EM) fields. Over the past century, this natural environment has sharply changed with introduction of a vast and growing spectrum of man-made EM fields. From models based on equilibrium thermodynamics and thermal effects, these fields were initially considered too weak to interact with biomolecular systems, and thus incapable of influencing physiological functions. Laboratory studies have tested a spectrum of EM fields for bioeffects at cell and molecular levels, focusing on exposures at athermal levels. A clear emergent conclusion is that many observed interactions are not based on tissue heating. Modulation of cell surface chemical events by weak EM fields indicates a major amplification of initial weak triggers associated with binding of hormones, antibodies, and neurotransmitters to their specific binding sites. Calcium ions play a key role in this amplification. These studies support new concepts of communication between cells across the barriers of cell membranes; and point with increasing certainty to an essential physical organization in living matter, at a far finer level than the structural and functional image defined in the chemistry of molecules. New collaborations between physical and biological scientists define common goals, seeking solutions to the physical nature of matter through a strong focus on biological matter. The evidence indicates mediation by highly nonlinear, nonequilibrium processes at critical steps in signal coupling across cell membranes. There is increasing evidence that these events relate to quantum states and resonant responses in biomolecular systems, and not to equilibrium thermodynamics associated with thermal energy exchanges and tissue heating.

  14. Isotope specific arbitrary material sorter

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2015-12-08

    A laser-based mono-energetic gamma-ray source is used to provide a rapid and unique, isotope specific method for sorting materials. The objects to be sorted are passed on a conveyor in front of a MEGa-ray beam which has been tuned to the nuclear resonance fluorescence transition of the desired material. As the material containing the desired isotope traverses the beam, a reduction in the transmitted MEGa-ray beam occurs. Alternately, the laser-based mono-energetic gamma-ray source is used to provide non-destructive and non-intrusive, quantitative determination of the absolute amount of a specific isotope contained within pipe as part of a moving fluid or quasi-fluid material stream.

  15. Certifying Domain-Specific Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, Thomas; Rosu, Grigore; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Proof-checking code for compliance to safety policies potentially enables a product-oriented approach to certain aspects of software certification. To date, previous research has focused on generic, low-level programming-language properties such as memory type safety. In this paper we consider proof-checking higher-level domain -specific properties for compliance to safety policies. The paper first describes a framework related to abstract interpretation in which compliance to a class of certification policies can be efficiently calculated Membership equational logic is shown to provide a rich logic for carrying out such calculations, including partiality, for certification. The architecture for a domain-specific certifier is described, followed by an implemented case study. The case study considers consistency of abstract variable attributes in code that performs geometric calculations in Aerospace systems.

  16. Introduction to field tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, F.; Kuhn, M.

    2011-03-01

    Field tracing is the generalization of ray tracing and enables electromagnetic system modeling. Harmonic fields are traced through the optical system instead of ray bundles. This allows the smooth combination of different modeling techniques in different subdomains of the system, e.g. to use the rigorous spectrum-of-plane-wave operator for homogeneous media, geometrical optics to trace through a lens and finite element methods to include the effect of some scatterer. All modeling techniques have to be formulated for vectorial harmonic fields. The paper introduces the basic concepts of field tracing and derives the corresponding operator equations. Propagation in homogeneous media is of special concern in field tracing to interconnect the modeling in different subdomains of the system. A new concept for a smart propagation algorithm is presented. Because of the success of geometrical optics in ray tracing, it is reasonable to consider its application in field tracing. In this paper we discuss generalizations of geometrical optics that have been enforced by field tracing. Although the basic field tracing equations are formulated for vectorial harmonic fields, general fields can be treated by suitable decompositions into sets of harmonic modes.

  17. Pattern specificity of contrast adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Anstis, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Contrast adaptation is specific to precisely localised edges, so that adapting to a flickering photograph makes one less sensitive to that same photograph, but not to similar photographs. When two low-contrast photos, A and B, are transparently superimposed, then adapting to a flickering high-contrast B leaves no net afterimage, but it makes B disappear from the A+B picture, which now simply looks like A. PMID:25165518

  18. Host specificity of parasite manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recently we presented how Camponotus ants in Thailand infected with the fungus Ophiocordyceps unilateralis are behaviorally manipulated into dying where the conditions are optimal for fungal development. Death incurred in a very narrow zone of space and here we compare this highly specific manipulation with a related system in Brazil. We show that the behavioral manipulation is less fine-tuned and discuss the potential explanations for this by examining differences in ant host and environmental characteristics. PMID:22808322

  19. SDPSK-Specific Demodulation Method for the Nanortu Field-Programmable Gate Array / SDPSK-Specifiska Demodulācijas Metode Nanortutm Programmētajām Loģiskajām Integrācijas Shēmām

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorodumovs, A.

    2013-02-01

    The software-defined radio (SDR) solutions inpart flexibility to the satellite applications when the devices are physically inaccessible after the launch. The nanoRTU FPGA-based controller (AAC Microtec) may be programmed to serve as a software-defined differential phase shift keying (SDPSK) modem backend to be used in satellites for communication with the Earth. The modem consists of two units - a modulator and a demodulator. A fully functional symmetric SDPSK modulator for nanoRTU FPGA has already been implemented. The next step of the modem implementation is the development of demodulator. In order to implement such facilities, the existing demodulation techniques should be reviewed in order to propose the appropriate method in which the demodulator would be capable of demodulating a signal, and, at the same time, would be resource-efficient. The author describes a valid method of specific SDPSK signal demodulation for the nanoRTU FPGA. Rakstā piedāvāts SDPSK modulēta signāla apstrādes veids, kas ir optimizēts izmantošanai FPGA, kā arī demodulatora realizācija ÅAC nanoRTU radiācijas noturīgajai aparatūras platformai. Galvenais darba mērķis ir maksimāli efektīva aparatūras resursu izmantošana.

  20. Intron-Specific Neuropeptide Probes

    PubMed Central

    Gainer, Harold; Ponzio, Todd A.; Yue, Chunmei; Kawasaki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of changes in pre-mRNA levels by intron-specific probes are generally accepted as more closely reflecting changes in gene transcription rates than are measurements of mRNA levels by exonic probes. This is, in part, because the pre-mRNAs, which include the primary transcript and various splicing intermediates located in the nucleus (also referred to as heteronuclear RNAs, or hnRNAs), are processed rapidly (with half-lives <60 min) as compared to neuropeptide mRNAs, which are then transferred to the cytoplasm and which have much longer half-lives (often over days). In this chapter, we describe the use of exon-and intron-specific probes to evaluate oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) neuropeptide gene expression by analyses of their mRNAs and hnRNAs by quantitative in situ hybridization (qISH) and also by using specific PCR primers in quantitative, real-time PCR (qPCR) procedures. PMID:21922402