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Sample records for neutrophil activity improves

  1. Mechanotransduction in neutrophil activation and deactivation.

    PubMed

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Toepfner, Nicole; Chilvers, Edwin R; Guck, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the processes through which cells sense mechanical stimuli by converting them to biochemical signals and, thus, eliciting specific cellular responses. Cells sense mechanical stimuli from their 3D environment, including the extracellular matrix, neighboring cells and other mechanical forces. Incidentally, the emerging concept of mechanical homeostasis,long term or chronic regulation of mechanical properties, seems to apply to neutrophils in a peculiar manner, owing to neutrophils' ability to dynamically switch between the activated/primed and deactivated/deprimed states. While neutrophil activation has been known for over a century, its deactivation is a relatively recent discovery. Even more intriguing is the reversibility of neutrophil activation and deactivation. We review and critically evaluate recent findings that suggest physiological roles for neutrophil activation and deactivation and discuss possible mechanisms by which mechanical stimuli can drive the oscillation of neutrophils between the activated and resting states. We highlight several molecules that have been identified in neutrophil mechanotransduction, including cell adhesion and transmembrane receptors, cytoskeletal and ion channel molecules. The physiological and pathophysiological implications of such mechanically induced signal transduction in neutrophils are highlighted as a basis for future work. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:26211453

  2. Improved viability and activity of neutrophils differentiated from HL-60 cells by co-culture with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yoon Shin; Lim, Goh-Woon; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Woo, So-Youn; Shin, Meeyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sun; Chan Ra, Jeong; Ryu, Kyung-Ha

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of neutrophils with AD-MSC retained cell survival and proliferation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum starved conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC increased functions of neutrophil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC promoted the viability of neutrophils by enhancing respiratory burst through the expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC can be used to improve immunity for neutropenia treatment. -- Abstract: Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. We investigated the supportive effect of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) on the viability and function of neutrophils. Neutrophils were derived from HL-60 cells by dimethylformamide stimulation and cultured with or without AD-MSCs under serum-starved conditions to evaluate neutrophil survival, proliferation, and function. Serum starvation resulted in the apoptosis of neutrophils and decreased cell survival. The co-culture of neutrophils and AD-MSCs resulted in cell survival and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum-starved conditions. The survival rate of neutrophils was prolonged up to 72 h, and the expression levels of interferon (IFN)-{alpha}, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} in AD-MSCs were increased after co-culture with neutrophils. AD-MSCs promoted the viability of neutrophils by inhibiting apoptosis as well as enhancing respiratory burst, which could potentially be mediated by the increased expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Thus, we conclude that the use of AD-MSCs may be a promising cell-based therapy for increasing immunity by accelerating neutrophil function.

  3. Immunomodulatory activity of plant residues on ovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Farinacci, Maura; Colitti, Monica; Sgorlon, Sandy; Stefanon, Bruno

    2008-11-15

    Neutrophils play an essential role in host defense and inflammation. Plants have long been used to improve the immune function, but for most of them specific investigations on animal health are lacking. In the present study, water and hydroethanolic extracts from 11 plant wastes have been screened on immune responses of ovine neutrophils. Eight sheep clinically healthy, not lactating, non-pregnant were selected and used for the experiment. Freshly isolated neutrophils were incubated with the extracts of the residues at increasing doses, and then they were tested for adhesion and superoxide production induced with PMA. The residues of Larix decidua, Thymus vulgaris, Salix alba, Sinupret, Helianthus annuus, Mangifera indica modulated the neutrophil immune functions, moreover, Larix decidua, Thymus vulgaris and Salix alba presented the highest anti-inflammatory activity.

  4. Exercise, training and neutrophil microbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Telford, R D; Mason, I B; Weidemann, M J

    1990-06-01

    The concentration in human plasma of putative neutrophil-"priming" cytokines like endogenous pyrogens is known to increase significantly in response to moderate exercise (11). This is characteristic of an acute-phase response. The ability of blood neutrophils isolated from both trained and untrained human subjects (n = 11, 9) to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species was determined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence both before and after one hour of aerobic exercise at 60% VO2max. Irrespective of training and stimulus concentration, exercise nearly always caused significant "priming" of the capacity of neutrophils to produce H2O2 and HOCl upon stimulation with opsonized zymosan (P less than 0.01); however, compared to their untrained counterparts, the activity of cells isolated from trained individuals was depressed about 50% at unit stimulus concentration, both before and after exercise (P less than 0.075), whilst remaining unaltered at saturating concentrations. Although neutrophil oxygenation activity is only one parameter that contributes to immunological status, regular episodes of moderate exercise may increase resistance to infection by priming the "killing capacity" of neutrophils. In contrast, prolonged periods of intensive training may lead to increased susceptibility to common infections by diminishing this activity. PMID:2115507

  5. Superoxide Anion Production by Human Neutrophils Activated by Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2.-) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis. PMID:24039294

  6. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis. PMID:24039294

  7. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  8. Pneumolysin activates neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    G Nel, J; Theron, A J; Durandt, C; Tintinger, G R; Pool, R; Mitchell, T J; Feldman, C; Anderson, R

    2016-06-01

    The primary objective of the current study was to investigate the potential of the pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (Ply), to activate neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation in vitro. Isolated human blood neutrophils were exposed to recombinant Ply (5-20 ng ml(-1) ) for 30-90 min at 37°C and NET formation measured using the following procedures to detect extracellular DNA: (i) flow cytometry using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Ruby; (ii) spectrofluorimetry using the fluorophore, Sytox(®) Orange (5 μM); and (iii) NanoDrop(®) technology. These procedures were complemented by fluorescence microscopy using 4', 6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) (nuclear stain) in combination with anti-citrullinated histone monoclonal antibodies to visualize nets. Exposure of neutrophils to Ply resulted in relatively rapid (detected within 30-60 min), statistically significant (P < 0·05) dose- and time-related increases in the release of cellular DNA impregnated with both citrullinated histone and myeloperoxidase. Microscopy revealed that NETosis appeared to be restricted to a subpopulation of neutrophils, the numbers of NET-forming cells in the control and Ply-treated systems (10 and 20 ng ml(-1) ) were 4·3 (4·2), 14.3 (9·9) and 16·5 (7·5), respectively (n = 4, P < 0·0001 for comparison of the control with both Ply-treated systems). Ply-induced NETosis occurred in the setting of retention of cell viability, and apparent lack of involvement of reactive oxygen species and Toll-like receptor 4. In conclusion, Ply induces vital NETosis in human neutrophils, a process which may either contribute to host defence or worsen disease severity, depending on the intensity of the inflammatory response during pneumococcal infection. PMID:26749379

  9. Neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (NAM).

    PubMed

    Rollo, Ellen E; Hymowitz, Michelle; Schmidt, Cathleen E; Montana, Steve; Foda, Hussein; Zucker, Stanley

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a novel soluble factor(s), neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinases (NAM), secreted by unstimulated normal human peripheral blood neutrophils that causes the activation of cell secreted promatrix metalloproteinase-2 (proMMP-2). Partially purified preparations of NAM have been isolated from the conditioned media of neutrophils employing gelatin-Sepharose chromatography and differential membrane filter centrifugation. NAM activity, as assessed by exposing primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or HT1080 cells to NAM followed by gelatin zymography, was seen within one hour. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and hydroxamic acid derived inhibitors of MMPs (CT1746 and BB94) abrogated the activation of proMMP-2 by NAM, while inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases showed no effect. NAM also produced an increase in TIMP-2 binding to HUVEC and HT1080 cell surfaces that was inhibited by TIMP-2, CT1746, and BB94. Time-dependent increases in MT1-MMP protein and mRNA were seen following the addition of NAM to cells. These data support a role for NAM in cancer dissemination.

  10. [Perfluorocarbon emulsions and other corpuscular systems influence on neutrophil activity].

    PubMed

    Shekhtman, D G; Safronova, V G; Sklifas, A N; Alovskaia, A A; Gapeev, A B; Obraztsov, V V; Chemeris, N K

    1997-01-01

    Influence of perfluorodecalin, perfluoromethilcyclohexylpiperidine, perfluorotributylamine emulsions on active oxygen form (AOF) generation by neutrophils has been studied. All investigated emulsions stabilized both proxanol 268 and egg yolk phospholipids inhibited PMA-stimulated neutrophil activity. Castor oil emulsion also inhibited the neutrophil activity. Neutrophil response for chemotactic peptide, was unchanged in the presence of all tested emulsions. We suppose that fast hydrophobic attachment of inert submicrone emulsion particles to cell surface provokes alteration of neutrophil plasma membrane function resulting in a decrease of AOF generation. PMID:9490112

  11. Exposure to Leishmania braziliensis Triggers Neutrophil Activation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hurrell, Benjamin P.; Celes, Fabiana S.; Curvelo, Rebecca P.; Prates, Deboraci B.; Barral, Aldina; Borges, Valeria M.; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; de Oliveira, Camila I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are rapidly recruited to the sites of Leishmania inoculation. During Leishmania braziliensis infection, depletion of inflammatory cells significantly increases the parasite load whereas co-inoculation of neutrophils plus L. braziliensis had an opposite effect. Moreover, the co-culture of infected macrophages and neutrophils also induced parasite killing leading us to ask how neutrophils alone respond to an L. braziliensis exposure. Herein we focused on understanding the interaction between neutrophils and L. braziliensis, exploring cell activation and apoptotic fate. Methods and Findings Inoculation of serum-opsonized L. braziliensis promastigotes in mice induced neutrophil accumulation in vivo, peaking at 24 h. In vitro, exposure of thyoglycollate-elicited inflammatory or bone marrow neutrophils to L. braziliensis modulated the expression of surface molecules such as CD18 and CD62L, and induced the oxidative burst. Using mCherry-expressing L. braziliensis, we determined that such effects were mainly observed in infected and not in bystander cells. Neutrophil activation following contact with L. braziliensis was also confirmed by the release of TNF-α and neutrophil elastase. Lastly, neutrophils infected with L. braziliensis but not with L. major displayed markers of early apoptosis. Conclusions We show that L. braziliensis induces neutrophil recruitment in vivo and that neutrophils exposed to the parasite in vitro respond through activation and release of inflammatory mediators. This outcome may impact on parasite elimination, particularly at the early stages of infection. PMID:25756874

  12. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of senescent neutrophils decreases procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Xie, Rui; Li, Wen; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Shuchuan; Cao, Fenglin; Liu, Yue; Ma, Ruishuang; Si, Yu; Liu, Yan; Bi, Yayan; Gilbert, Gary E; Shi, Jialan

    2013-06-01

    Abundant senescent neutrophils traverse the vascular compartment and may contribute to pathologic conditions. For example, they become procoagulant when undergoing apoptosis and may contribute to thrombosis or inflammation. Our previous studies demonstrated a dominant clearance pathway in which the neutrophils can be phagocytosed by liver macrophages. The aim of this study was to explore an alternate pathway of neutrophil clearance by endothelial cells. Phagocytosis of the neutrophils by endothelial cells was performed using various experimental approaches includingflow cytometry, confocal microscopy and electron microscopy assays in vitro and in vivo. Procoagulant activity of cultured neutrophils was evaluated by coagulation time, factor Xase and prothrombinase assays. Lactadherin functioned as a novel probe for the detection of phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells, an opsonin (bridge) between apoptotic cell and phagocyte for promoting phagocytosis, and an efficient anticoagulant for inhibition of factor Xase and thrombin formation. When cultured, purified human neutrophils spontaneously entered apoptosis and developed procoagulant activity that was directly related to the degree of phosphatidylserine exposure. Co-culture of aged neutrophils and endothelial cells resulted in phagocytosis of the neutrophils and prolonged coagulation time. Lactadherin diminished the procoagulant activity and increased the rate of neutrophil clearance. In vivo, neutrophils were sequestered by endothelial cells after blockade of Kupffer cells, a process that was dependent upon both phosphatidylserine exposure and P-selectin expression. Thus, the ability of endothelial cells to clear senescent neutrophils may limit the procoagulant and/or inflammatory impact of these cells.

  13. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  14. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  15. Exogenous melatonin inhibits neutrophil migration through suppression of ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da-Long; Sun, Ai-Ai; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Min; Ge, Shu-Chao; Hu, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil migration to inflammatory sites is the fundamental process of innate immunity among organisms against pathogen invasion. As a major sleep adjusting hormone, melatonin has also been proved to be involved in various inflammatory events. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of exogenous melatonin on neutrophil migration to the injury site in live zebrafish and further investigate whether ERK signaling is involved in this process. Using the tail fin transection model, the fluorescently labeled neutrophil was in vivo visualized in transgenic Tg(lyz:EGFP), Tg(lyz:DsRed) zebrafish. We found that exogenous melatonin administration dramatically inhibited the injury-induced neutrophil migration in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. The inhibited effect of melatonin on neutrophil migration could be attenuated by melatonin receptor 1, 2, and 3 antagonists. The ERK phosphorylation level was significantly decreased post injury when treated with melatonin. The blocking of ERK activation with inhibitor PD0325901 suppressed the number of migrated neutrophils in response to injury. However, the activation of ERK with the epidermal growth factor could impair the inhibited effect of melatonin on neutrophil migration. We also detected that PD0325901 significantly suppressed the in vivo neutrophils transmigrating over the vessel endothelial cell using the transgenic Tg(flk:EGFP);(lyz:DsRed) line labeled as both vessel and neutrophil. Taking all of these data together, the results indicated that exogenous melatonin had an anti-migratory effect on neutrophils by blocking the ERK phosphorylation signal, and it led to the subsequent adhesion molecule expression. Thus, the crossing of the vessel endothelial cells of neutrophils became difficult.

  16. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis- induced neutrophil extracellular traps activate human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braian, Clara; Hogea, Valentin; Stendahl, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils activated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), containing DNA and several biologically active cytosolic and granular proteins. These NETs may assist in the innate immune defense against different pathogens. We investigated whether the NET-forming neutrophils mediate an activating signal to macrophages during the early multicellular inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation. Mtb-induced NETs were found to be reactive oxygen species dependent and phagocytosis dependent. A neutrophil elastase inhibitor also delayed NET formation. However, NET formation occurred independently of Mtb-induced apoptosis. We observed close interactions between macrophages and Mtb-activated neutrophils, where macrophages bound and phagocytosed NETs. Significant secretion of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-10 were detected from macrophages cocultured with NETs from Mtb-activated but not phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. NETs binding heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) or recombinant Hsp72 were able to trigger cytokine release from macrophages. Only Mtb-induced NETs contained Hsp72, suggesting that these NETs can transfer this danger signal to adjacent macrophages. We propose that Hsp72 sequestered in NETs plays an important role in the interaction between neutrophils and macrophages during the early innate immune phase of an Mtb infection. The immunomodulatory role of NETs and proteins derived from them may influence not only chronic inflammation during tuberculosis but also immune regulation and autoimmunity.

  18. Neutrophils scan for activated platelets to initiate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Adrover, José M.; Ballesteros, Ivan; Cuartero, Maria Isabel; Rossaint, Jan; Bilbao, Izaskun; Nácher, Maria; Pitaval, Christophe; Radovanovic, Irena; Fukui, Yoshinori; McEver, Rodger P.; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Zarbock, Alexander; Moro, María A.; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory responses require leukocytes to migrate within and through the vasculature, a process that is facilitated by their capacity to switch to a polarized morphology with asymmetric distribution of receptors. We report that neutrophil polarization within activated venules served to organize a protruding domain that engaged activated platelets present in the bloodstream. The selectin ligand PSGL-1 transduced signals emanating from these interactions, resulting in redistribution of receptors that drive neutrophil migration. Consequently, neutrophils unable to polarize or to transduce signals through PSGL-1 displayed aberrant crawling, and blockade of this domain protected mice against thrombo-inflammatory injury. These results reveal that recruited neutrophils scan for activated platelets, and suggest that their bipolarity allows integration of signals present at both the endothelium and the circulation before inflammation proceeds. PMID:25477463

  19. Fluid Shear Stress Increases Neutrophil Activation via Platelet-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Lin, Kimberly S.; King, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte exposure to hemodynamic shear forces is critical for physiological functions including initial adhesion to the endothelium, the formation of pseudopods, and migration into tissues. G-protein coupled receptors on neutrophils, which bind to chemoattractants and play a role in neutrophil chemotaxis, have been implicated as fluid shear stress sensors that control neutrophil activation. Recently, exposure to physiological fluid shear stresses observed in the microvasculature was shown to reduce neutrophil activation in the presence of the chemoattractant formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Here, however, human neutrophil preexposure to uniform shear stress (0.1–2.75 dyn/cm2) in a cone-and-plate viscometer for 1–120 min was shown to increase, rather than decrease, neutrophil activation in the presence of platelet activating factor (PAF). Fluid shear stress exposure increased PAF-induced neutrophil activation in terms of L-selectin shedding, αMβ2 integrin activation, and morphological changes. Neutrophil activation via PAF was found to correlate with fluid shear stress exposure, as neutrophil activation increased in a shear stress magnitude- and time-dependent manner. These results indicate that fluid shear stress exposure increases neutrophil activation by PAF, and, taken together with previous observations, differentially controls how neutrophils respond to chemoattractants. PMID:24853753

  20. Tanshinone IIA Protects against Dextran Sulfate Sodium- (DSS-) Induced Colitis in Mice by Modulation of Neutrophil Infiltration and Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; He, Haiyue; Huang, Tingting; Lei, Zhen; Liu, Fuquan; An, Guangyu; Wen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the initiation and maintenance of intestinal inflammation. However, conventional neutrophil-targeted therapies can impair normal host defense. Tanshinone IIA has been recently revealed to act directly on neutrophils. Hence, we aimed at investigating whether Tanshinone IIA can protect against experimental colitis through modulation of neutrophils. We induced colitis in C57BL/6 mice by giving 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) orally, and meanwhile, we treated mice daily with Tanshinone IIA intraperitoneally. The severity of colitis was evaluated by calculating disease activity index (DAI) and histological parameters. Neutrophil infiltration and activation in the colons of mice were measured. Moreover, whether Tanshinone IIA has direct effects on neutrophil migration and activation was determined in vitro. Our data showed that Tanshinone IIA significantly ameliorated the severity of DSS-induced colitis in mice, evidenced by the reduced DAI and improved colonic inflammation. In addition, Tanshinone IIA decreased neutrophil infiltration of intestinal mucosa and activation and reduced colonic inflammatory cytokines in DSS-treated mice. Furthermore, Tanshinone IIA was demonstrated to significantly suppress neutrophil migration and activation. These results provide compelling evidence that Tanshinone IIA has a therapeutic potential for alleviating inflammatory colitis in mice, which is possibly mediated by the immunomodulation of neutrophils.

  1. The Neutrophil Btk Signalosome Regulates Integrin Activation during Sterile Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Volmering, Stephanie; Block, Helena; Boras, Mark; Lowell, Clifford A.; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are recruited from the blood to sites of sterile inflammation, where they are involved in wound healing but can also cause tissue damage. During sterile inflammation, necrotic cells release pro-inflammatory molecules including formylated peptides. However, the signaling pathway triggered by formylated peptides to integrin activation and leukocyte recruitment is unknown. By using spinning-disk confocal intravital microscopy, we examined the molecular mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment to sites of focal hepatic necrosis in vivo. We demonstrated that the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) was required for multiple Mac-1 activation events involved in neutrophil recruitment and functions during sterile inflammation triggered by fMLF. The Src family kinase Hck, Wiskott-Aldrich-syndrome protein, and phospholipase Cγ2 were also involved in this pathway required for fMLF-triggered Mac-1 activation and neutrophil recruitment. Thus, we have identified a neutrophil Btk signalosome that is involved in a signaling pathway triggered by formylated peptides leading to the selective activation of Mac-1 and neutrophil recruitment during sterile inflammation. PMID:26777396

  2. Human resistin promotes neutrophil proinflammatory activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation and increases severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2014-05-15

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. We examined whether the human-specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation and the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using humanized resistin mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN(+/-)(/-)) but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn(+/-/-) neutrophils compared with control Rtn(-/-/-) neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that also is implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced acute lung injury, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4-induced inflammatory responses, and it may be a target for future therapies aimed at reducing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations in which neutrophils play a major role.

  3. [Murine peritoneal neutrophil activation upon tungsten nanoparticles exposure in vivo].

    PubMed

    Martinova, E A; Baranov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Two examples of tungsten carbide nanoparticles (d = 15 nm, 50 nm) and tungsten carbide nanoparticles with 8% cobalt (d = 50 nm) have been found to induce the neutrophil activation 3 h and 36 h after intraperitoneal administration in the doses 0.005; 0.025; 0.05; 0.25; 0.5; 1; 2.5 and 5 microgram per 1 gram body weight to FVB mice. Neutrophil activation was calculated based on the CD11b and S100 antigen expression. Effect of nanoparticles is bimodal for all tested examples.

  4. Dimethylfumarate Impairs Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susen; Behnen, Martina; Bieber, Katja; Möller, Sonja; Hellberg, Lars; Witte, Mareike; Hänsel, Martin; Zillikens, Detlef; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens relies on neutrophil activation. Inadequate neutrophil activation is often associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils also constitute a significant portion of infiltrating cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, for example, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Fumarates improve the latter diseases, which so far has been attributed to the effects on lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Here, we focused on the effects of dimethylfumarate (DMF) on neutrophils. In vitro, DMF inhibited neutrophil activation, including changes in surface marker expression, reactive oxygen species production, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and migration. Phagocytic ability and autoantibody-induced, neutrophil-dependent tissue injury ex vivo was also impaired by DMF. Regarding the mode of action, DMF modulates-in a stimulus-dependent manner-neutrophil activation using the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. For in vivo validation, mouse models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen, were employed. In the presence of DMF, blistering induced by injection of anti-type VII collagen antibodies into mice was significantly impaired. DMF treatment of mice with clinically already-manifested epidermolysis bullosa acquisita led to disease improvement. Collectively, we demonstrate a profound inhibitory activity of DMF on neutrophil functions. These findings encourage wider use of DMF in patients with neutrophil-mediated diseases. PMID:26763431

  5. Neutrophil activation in ivermectin-treated onchocerciasis patients.

    PubMed

    Njoo, F L; Hack, C E; Oosting, J; Stilma, J S; Kijlstra, A

    1993-11-01

    Ivermectin is a safe and effective drug for onchocerciasis treatment. In certain individuals, however, therapy is accompanied by adverse reactions. The mechanisms underlying these reactions are not yet known. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether neutrophils are involved in the development of these adverse reactions. Elastase and lactoferrin, two markers for the release of neutrophil azurophilic and specific granule contents respectively, were measured by radioimmunoassays in plasma of onchocerciasis patients with varying degrees of side effects, as well as in control subjects before and 1 and 2 days after ivermectin treatment. A considerable increase of elastase levels after treatment was observed, whereas lactoferrin levels did not change. The percentage of patients with elevated elastase levels was significantly correlated with the degree of side effects. These findings suggest that neutrophil activation may be involved in the development of adverse reactions in these patients.

  6. Interleukin-8: an expanding universe beyond neutrophil chemotaxis and activation.

    PubMed

    Mukaida, N

    2000-12-01

    Since the discovery 13 years ago of interleukin (IL)-8 as a potent neutrophil chemotactic factor, accumulating evidence has established it as a crucial mediator in neutrophil-dependent acute inflammation. Numerous observations have demonstrated that various types of cells can produce a large amount of IL-8, either in response to various stimuli or constitutively, after malignant transformation. Recent studies of IL-8-mediated signaling have revealed that IL-8 activates a wide range of signaling molecules in a coordinate manner. IL-8 has been proven to have diverse actions on various types of leukocytic and nonleukocytic cells besides neutrophils. The author reviews recent progress in IL-8 signal transduction and biological actions on nonneutrophilic leukocytes, including T lymphocytes, monocytes, and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Potential involvement of IL-8 in viral infections and tumor progression is also discussed.

  7. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  8. Cyanate-mediated inhibition of neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, M; Eaton, J W; Wolff, S P

    1997-01-01

    Cyanate (CNO-) forms spontaneously in solutions containing urea, and is present in urine and the body fluids of uraemic patients. We have explored the possibility that CNO- might be one of the unknown substances responsible for the reported impairment, by urine and uraemic plasma, of neutrophil oxidative metabolism (especially as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence). Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence generated by human neutrophils derives predominantly from the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) which produces hypochlorous acid from H2O2 and Cl-. We hypothesized that CNO- (which resembles the 'pseudohalide' thiocyanate, an alternative substrate for MPO) might somehow interfere with the activity of MPO. In support of this, we find: (i) CNO- inhibits both peroxidative and halogenating activities of MPO and also inhibits the enzyme within intact human neutrophils; (ii) the inhibition is H2O2-dependent, irreversible, accompanied by covalent addition of [14C]CNO- (or a carbon-containing fragment thereof) to the enzyme; (iii) CNO- also inhibits Cl-/H2O2/MPO-mediated bacterial killing. Impairment of this arm of neutrophil bactericidal activity by CNO- formed from urea may be one factor in the risk of urinary-tract infection associated with urinary stasis and perhaps in the generalized increase in susceptibility to infection in uraemic patients. PMID:9337863

  9. Pentoxifylline attenuates neutrophil activation in experimental endotoxemia in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    van Leenen, D; van der Poll, T; Levi, M; ten Cate, H; van Deventer, S J; Hack, C E; Aarden, L A; ten Cate, J W

    1993-08-15

    Costimulation of neutrophils and cytokines may play an important role in organ injury in sepsis. Pentoxifylline inhibits various neutrophil functions in vitro, and attenuates endotoxin-induced production of TNF in both in vitro and in vivo models. To assess the effect of pentoxifylline on neutrophil activation in endotoxemia, nine adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) were i.v. injected with saline (n = 2), Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg; n = 4), or E. coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg) in combination with pentoxifylline (500 mg/3 h, starting 30 min before the endotoxin injection; n = 3). Serial blood samples were obtained for measurements of leukocyte counts and the granulocytic proteinases elastase complexed with alpha 1-antitrypsin and lactoferrin, and cytokines during the next 5 h. No changes were observed in the saline-treated chimpanzees. Endotoxin induced a marked leukocytosis and neutrophilia, which were slightly reduced by pentoxifylline. In contrast, pentoxifylline almost completely prevented endotoxin-induced neutrophil degranulation: peak elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin was 164 +/- 21 ng/ml (mean +/- SE) after endotoxin alone, vs 71 +/- 7 ng/ml after endotoxin with pentoxifylline (t = 3 h; p < 0.05); peak lactoferrin was 329 +/- 15 and 182 +/- 5 ng/ml, respectively (t = 5 h; p < 0.05). Pentoxifylline also inhibited the endotoxin-induced release of TNF (271 +/- 26 vs 55 +/- 23 pg/ml at t = 1.5 h; p < 0.05) and IL-6 (225 +/- 42 vs 73 +/- 25 pg/ml at t = 2 h; p < 0.05). IL-8 release was not significantly inhibited by pentoxifylline. In none of the animals activation of the C system could be detected. We conclude that pentoxifylline attenuates neutrophil activation in endotoxemia in chimpanzees, probably in part by inhibiting the release of TNF.

  10. Abrogation of NF-κB signaling in human neutrophils induces neutrophil survival through sustained p38-MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Langereis, Jeroen D; Raaijmakers, Hanneke A J A; Ulfman, Laurien H; Koenderman, Leo

    2010-10-01

    NF-κB, an important transcription factor in the regulation of cellular inflammation, is one of the prime targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Nowadays, anti-inflammatory therapies rely mostly on steroids, which among other effects, inhibit NF-κB activity. However, steroids have only limited efficacy in the treatment on neutrophil-driven diseases, such as COPD. Human neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of COPD, and clearance of these cells by apoptosis is an effective pathway for resolution of inflammation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that modulation of the NF-κB pathway in human neutrophils affects survival. Importantly, the pharmacological NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 inhibited NF-κB signaling in human neutrophils as expected. However, we found that complete inhibition of NF-κB activity with 10 μM Bay 11-7082 prolonged neutrophil survival significantly, which was not observed with inhibitors for other signaling pathways. Bay 11-7082-induced neutrophil survival was dependent on p38-MAPK kinase activity, as the p38 kinase activity inhibitor SB203580 abrogated this response completely. Bay 11-7082 induced rapid and sustained p38 activation that correlated with inhibited NF-κB signaling and prolonged neutrophil survival. The precise role of NF-κB in regulation of p38-MAPK activation remains to be established. Under these conditions of survival, the stability of Bcl-xL but not Mcl-1 was enhanced. Although inhibition of NF-κB leads to down-regulation of inflammatory genes in many cell types, our results illustrate that interference with basal NF-κB signaling in neutrophils as a drug target should be used with caution.

  11. Complement factor H modulates the activation of human neutrophil granulocytes and the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Kárpáti, Éva; Józsi, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Factor H (FH) is a major inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement activation in plasma and on certain host surfaces. In addition to being a complement regulator, FH can bind to various cells via specific receptors, including binding to neutrophil granulocytes through complement receptor type 3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18), and modulate their function. The cellular roles of FH are, however, poorly understood. Because neutrophils are important innate immune cells in inflammatory processes and the host defense against pathogens, we aimed at studying the effects of FH on various neutrophil functions, including the generation of extracellular traps. FH co-localized with CD11b on the surface of neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals, and cell-bound FH retained its cofactor activity and enhanced C3b degradation. Soluble FH supported neutrophil migration and immobilized FH induced cell spreading. In addition, immobilized but not soluble FH enhanced IL-8 release from neutrophils. FH alone did not trigger the cells to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), but NET formation induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus fungal β-glucan were inhibited by immobilized, but not by soluble, FH. Moreover, in parallel with NET formation, immobilized FH also inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus β-glucan. Altogether, these data indicate that FH has multiple regulatory roles on neutrophil functions. While it can support the recruitment of neutrophils, FH may also exert anti-inflammatory effects and influence local inflammatory and antimicrobial reactions, and reduce tissue damage by modulating NET formation. PMID:26938503

  12. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I{sub e}. In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 {mu}M), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  13. Association of microparticles and neutrophil activation with decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Bennett, Michael; Banham, Neil D; Chin, Walter; Blake, Denise F; Rosen, Anders; Pollock, Neal W; Madden, Dennis; Barak, Otto; Marroni, Alessandro; Balestra, Costantino; Germonpre, Peter; Pieri, Massimo; Cialoni, Danilo; Le, Phi-Nga Jeannie; Logue, Christopher; Lambert, David; Hardy, Kevin R; Sward, Douglas; Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena B; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-09-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a systemic disorder, assumed due to gas bubbles, but additional factors are likely to play a role. Circulating microparticles (MPs)--vesicular structures with diameters of 0.1-1.0 μm--have been implicated, but data in human divers have been lacking. We hypothesized that the number of blood-borne, Annexin V-positive MPs and neutrophil activation, assessed as surface MPO staining, would differ between self-contained underwater breathing-apparatus divers suffering from DCS vs. asymptomatic divers. Blood was analyzed from 280 divers who had been exposed to maximum depths from 7 to 105 meters; 185 were control/asymptomatic divers, and 90 were diagnosed with DCS. Elevations of MPs and neutrophil activation occurred in all divers but normalized within 24 h in those who were asymptomatic. MPs, bearing the following proteins: CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142, CD235, and von Willebrand factor, were between 2.4- and 11.7-fold higher in blood from divers with DCS vs. asymptomatic divers, matched for time of sample acquisition, maximum diving depth, and breathing gas. Multiple logistic regression analysis documented significant associations (P < 0.001) between DCS and MPs and for neutrophil MPO staining. Effect estimates were not altered by gender, body mass index, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or emergency oxygen treatment and were modestly influenced by divers' age, choice of breathing gas during diving, maximum diving depth, and whether repetitive diving had been performed. There were no significant associations between DCS and number of MPs without surface proteins listed above. We conclude that MP production and neutrophil activation exhibit strong associations with DCS.

  14. Repurposing Treatments to Enhance Innate Immunity. Can Statins Improve Neutrophil Functions and Clinical Outcomes in COPD?

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Georgia M.; Stockley, James A.; Griffiths, Diane; Sadhra, Charandeep S.; Purvis, Thomas; Sapey, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Drug classes used in the treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) have not changed for many years, and none to date have shown disease-modifying activity. Statins are used to help reduce cardiovascular risk, which is high in many patients with COPD. Their use has been associated with improvements in some respiratory manifestations of disease and reduction in all-cause mortality, with greatest reductions seen in patients with the highest inflammatory burden. The mechanism for these effects is poorly understood. Neutrophils are key effector cells in COPD, and correlate with disease severity and inflammation. Recent in vitro studies have shown neutrophil functions are dysregulated in COPD and this is thought to contribute both to the destruction of lung parenchyma and to the poor responses seen in infective exacerbations. In this article, we will discuss the potential utility of statins in COPD, with a particular emphasis on their immune-modulatory effects as well as presenting new data regarding the effects of statins on neutrophil function in vitro. PMID:27727158

  15. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of herb extracts.

    PubMed

    Denev, Petko; Kratchanova, Maria; Ciz, Milan; Lojek, Antonin; Vasicek, Ondrej; Blazheva, Denitsa; Nedelcheva, Plamena; Vojtek, Libor; Hyrsl, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive data on the antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of extracts from six medicinal plants--blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) leaves, chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) leaves, hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves, lady's mantle (Alchemilla glabra) aerial parts, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) aerial parts and raspberry (Rubus idaeus) leaves. In order to analyze the antioxidant activity of the herbs, several methods (ORAC, TRAP, HORAC and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) were used. Blackberry leaves and meadowsweet extracts revealed the highest antioxidant activities via all methods. All extracts studied blocked almost completely the opsonized zymosan particle-activated ROS production by neutrophils from human whole blood. On the other hand, the effect of extracts on phorbol myristate acetate-activated ROS production was much milder and even nonsignificant in the case of chokeberry leaves. This latter result suggests that extracts (apart from their antioxidative activity) interfere with the signaling cascade of phagocyte activation upstream of the protein kinase C activation. The antimicrobial activity of the investigated extracts against 11 human pathogens was investigated using three different methods. Meadowsweet and blackberry leaves extracts had the highest antimicrobial effect and the lowest minimal inhibiting concentrations (MICs) against the microorganisms tested.

  16. Colloidal polyaniline dispersions: antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Kucekova, Zdenka; Humpolicek, Petr; Kasparkova, Vera; Perecko, Tomas; Lehocký, Marián; Hauerlandová, Iva; Sáha, Petr; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2014-04-01

    Polyaniline colloids rank among promising application forms of this conducting polymer. Cytotoxicity, antibacterial activity, and neutrophil oxidative burst tests were performed on cells treated with colloidal polyaniline dispersions. The antibacterial effect of colloidal polyaniline against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was most pronounced for Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 3,500 μg mL(-1). The data recorded on human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and a mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell lines using an MTT assay and flow cytometry indicated a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of colloid, with the absence of cytotoxic effect at around 150 μg mL(-1). The neutrophil oxidative burst test then showed that colloidal polyaniline, in concentrations <150 μg mL(-1), was not able to stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils and whole human blood. However, it worked efficiently as a scavenger of those already formed.

  17. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  18. Epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78: a novel chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A E; Kunkel, S L; Harlow, L A; Mazarakis, D D; Haines, G K; Burdick, M D; Pope, R M; Walz, A; Strieter, R M

    1994-01-01

    We and others have shown that cells obtained from inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients produce interleukin-8, a potent chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils (PMNs). However, IL-8 accounted for only 40% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in these synovial fluids. Currently, we have examined the production of the novel PMN chemotactic cytokine, epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78 (ENA-78), using peripheral blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue from 70 arthritic patients. RA ENA-78 levels were greater in RA synovial fluid (239 +/- 63 ng/ml) compared with synovial fluid from other forms of arthritis (130 +/- 118 ng/ml) or osteoarthritis (2.6 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). RA peripheral blood ENA-78 levels (70 +/- 26 ng/ml) were greater than normal peripheral blood levels (0.12 +/- 0.04 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). Anti-ENA-78 antibodies neutralized 42 +/- 9% (mean +/- SE) of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in RA synovial fluids. Isolated RA synovial tissue fibroblasts in vitro constitutively produced significant levels of ENA-78, and this production was further augmented when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). In addition RA and osteoarthritis synovial tissue fibroblasts as well as RA synovial tissue macrophages were found to constitutively produce ENA-78. RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells spontaneously produced ENA-78, which was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Immunohistochemical localization of ENA-78 from the synovial tissue of patients with arthritis or normal subjects showed that the predominant cellular source of this chemokine was synovial lining cells, followed by macrophages, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Synovial tissue macrophages and fibroblasts were more ENA-78 immunopositive in RA than in normal synovial tissue (P < 0.05). These results, which are the first demonstration of ENA-78 in a human disease state, suggest that ENA-78 may play an important role in the recruitment of PMNs

  19. Activated neutrophils disrupt endothelial monolayer integrity by an oxygen radical-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, J.M.; Schwartz, B.R.; Reidy, M.A.; Schwartz, S.M.; Ochs, H.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1985-02-01

    The effect of activated neutrophils on endothelial monolayer integrity in vitro has been measured by assessing the capacity of endothelial monolayers on polycarbonate filters to exclude /sup 125/I-albumin. Although formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils failed to induce /sup 51/Cr-release or detachment after 4 hours of incubation with endothelial monolayers cultured in polystyrene wells, FMLP-activated neutrophils produced a marked increase in the passage of /sup 125/I-albumin across bovine aortic or pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers on polycarbonate filters. This effect was evident as early as 30 minutes following the addition of FMLP-activated neutrophils to the monolayer and reached 180% over control values at 2 hours (p . 0.001). Light and transmission electron microscopic examination of the polycarbonate filters exposed to FMLP-activated neutrophils revealed focal disruption of the endothelial monolayers. Chronic granulomatous disease neutrophils produced similar disruption of the endothelial monolayer at 2 hours. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase failed to reduce significantly the neutrophil-mediated increase in /sup 125/I-albumin passage at 2 hours. Cell-free postsecretory supernatants of FMLP-activated neutrophils, leukotriene C4, and platelet activating factor did not induce a significant increase in /sup 125/I-albumin passage across the endothelial monolayers. Of note, FMLP-activated neutrophils from a patient with a congenital abnormality of neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis did not induce disruption of the monolayer or increase /sup 125/I-albumin passage.

  20. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  1. Inhibitory effect of curcuminoids and tetrahydrocurcuminoids on equine activated neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Franck, T; Kohnen, S; Grulke, S; Neven, P; Goutman, Y; Peters, F; Pirotte, B; Deby-Dupont, G; Serteyn, D

    2008-01-01

    In the horse, the inflammation response to various pathologies (intestinal strangulations, laminitis, etc.) involves an excessive stimulation of the polymorphonuclear neutrophils releasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The aim of the present work was to study the effect of natural polyphenols, curcuminoids and tetrahydrocurcuminoids (THC) on isolated stimulated equine neutrophils and on the activity of purified MPO. The ROS production and the release of MPO by activated neutrophils were measured by chemiluminescence and ELISA techniques, respectively. The activity of purified MPO was measured by studying its nitration, chlorination or oxidation capacity and by using an original method called SIEFED allowing the study of drug interaction with the enzyme without interferences of the medium. Curcuminoids and THC had dose-dependent inhibitory effects on ROS production and MPO release by activated neutrophils and on purified MPO activity. We suggest that the higher efficacy of curcuminoids versus THC could be explained, at least partially, by its chemical structure: the conjugated double bounds and the plane structure of curcuminoids made easier the neutralization of the radical species generated by activated neutrophils and the interaction of the drug with the active site of MPO. These inhibitory effects of curcuminoids on the oxidant activity of equine neutrophils and on MPO activity open therapeutic perspectives in equine pathologies with excessive inflammatory reactions.

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis promotes apoptosis of human neutrophils by activating caspase-3 and reducing Mcl-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kang, J H; Song, H O; Ryu, J S; Shin, M H; Kim, J M; Cho, Y S; Alderete, J F; Ahn, M H; Min, D Y

    2006-09-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in the vaginal discharge of patients with Trichomonas vaginalis infection. However, it is not known whether neutrophil apoptosis is induced by live T. vaginalis. Therefore, we examined whether T. vaginalis can influence neutrophil apoptosis, and also whether caspase-3 and the Bcl-2 family members are involved in the apoptosis. Thus, human neutrophils were incubated with live T. vaginalis and neutrophil apoptosis was evaluated by Giemsa, annexin V-PI, and DiOC6 stainings. The neutrophil apoptosis was significantly higher in those incubated with T. vaginalis than in the control group. When trichomonads were pre-treated with mAb to AP65 (adhesin protein), or when trophozoites were separated from neutrophils using a Transwell chamber, neutrophil apoptosis was significantly reduced. The activation of caspase-3 was evident in neutrophils undergoing spontaneous apoptosis but was markedly enhanced during T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibition of caspase-3 effectively reduced T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Trichomonad-induced apoptosis was also associated with reduced expression of the neutrophil anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. These results indicate that T. vaginalis alters Mcl-1 expression and caspase-3 activation, thereby inducing apoptosis of human neutrophils. PMID:16916367

  3. Trichomonas vaginalis promotes apoptosis of human neutrophils by activating caspase-3 and reducing Mcl-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    KANG, J. H.; SONG, H. O.; RYU, J. S.; SHIN, M. H.; KIM, J. M.; CHO, Y. S.; ALDERETE, J. F.; AHN, M. H.; MIN, D. Y.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in the vaginal discharge of patients with Trichomonas vaginalis infection. However, it is not known whether neutrophil apoptosis is induced by live T. vaginalis. Therefore, we examined whether T. vaginalis can influence neutrophil apoptosis, and also whether caspase-3 and the Bcl-2 family members are involved in the apoptosis. Thus, human neutrophils were incubated with live T. vaginalis and neutrophil apoptosis was evaluated by Giemsa, annexin V-PI, and DiOC6 stainings. The neutrophil apoptosis was significantly higher in those incubated with T. vaginalis than in the control group. When trichomonads were pre-treated with mAb to AP65 (adhesin protein), or when trophozoites were separated from neutrophils using a Transwell chamber, neutrophil apoptosis was significantly reduced. The activation of caspase-3 was evident in neutrophils undergoing spontaneous apoptosis but was markedly enhanced during T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibition of caspase-3 effectively reduced T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Trichomonad-induced apoptosis was also associated with reduced expression of the neutrophil anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. These results indicate that T. vaginalis alters Mcl-1 expression and caspase-3 activation, thereby inducing apoptosis of human neutrophils. PMID:16916367

  4. Functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase.

    PubMed

    Mookhtiar, K A; Wang, F; Van Wart, H E

    1986-05-01

    A series of chemical modification reactions has been carried out to identify functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase. The enzyme is reversibly inhibited by the transition metal chelating agent 1,10-phenanthroline, and inhibition is fully reversed by zinc. Removal of weakly bound metal ions by gel filtration inactivates collagenase, and activity is fully restored on immediate readdition of calcium. The enzyme is unaffected by reagents that modify serine, cysteine, and arginine residues. However, reaction with the carboxyl reagents cyclohexylmorpholinocarbodiimide and Woodward's Reagent K lowers the activity of the enzyme substantially. Acetylimidazole inactivates the enzyme, but activity is completely restored on addition of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is also inactivated by tetranitromethane, indicating that it contains an essential tyrosine residue. Acylation of collagenase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, diketene, acetic anhydride, or trinitrobenzenesulfonate inactivates the enzyme, and activity is not restored on addition of hydroxylamine, indicating the presence of an essential lysine residue.

  5. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-12-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG.

  6. Isolation, antimicrobial activities, and primary structures of hamster neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P; Wójcik, K; Thogersen, I B; Dubin, A

    1996-01-01

    Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) neutrophil granules contain at least four microbicidal peptides belonging to the defensin family. These compounds were purified from granule acid extracts by reverse-phase chromatography and termed HaNP-1 to -4 (hamster neutrophil peptide). HaNP-1 and HaNP-3 revealed the most bactericidal activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.3 to 0.8 microg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes strains. The HaNP-4 was always isolated in concentrations exceeding about 10 times the concentrations of other hamster peptides, but its antibacterial activity as well as that of HaNP-2 was relatively lower, probably as a result of conserved Arg residue substitutions. Other microorganisms were also tested, and generally, hamster defensins exhibited less potency against gram-negative bacteria. The amino acid sequence of hamster defensins showed a high percentage of identity to the sequence of mouse enteric defensins, reaching about 60% identical residues in the case of HaNP-3 and cryptdin 3. PMID:8890190

  7. A PPARγ AGONIST ENHANCES BACTERIAL CLEARANCE THROUGH NEUTROPHIL EXTRACELLULAR TRAP FORMATION AND IMPROVES SURVIVAL IN SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Cláudia V; Campbell, Clarissa; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano F; Molinaro, Raphael; Cody, Mark J; Yost, Christian C; Bozza, Patricia T; Zimmerman, Guy A; Weyrich, Andrew S; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Silva, Adriana R

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the inflammatory response against infection contributes to mortality in sepsis. Inflammation provides critical host defense, but it can cause tissue damage, multiple organ failure, and death. Because the nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) exhibits therapeutic potential, we characterized the role of PPARγ in sepsis. We analyzed severity of clinical signs, survival rates, cytokine production, leukocyte influx, and bacterial clearance in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis in Swiss mice. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone treatment improved clinical status and mortality, while increasing IL-10 production and decreasing TNF-α and IL-6 levels, and peritoneal neutrophil accumulation 24 h after CLP. We noted increased bacterial killing in rosiglitazone treated mice, correlated with increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) incubated with LPS or Escherichia coli and rosiglitazone increased peritoneal neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-mediated bacterial killing, an effect reversed by the PPARγ antagonist (GW 9662) treatment. Rosiglitazone also enhanced the release of histones by PMN, a surrogate marker of NET formation, effect abolished by GW 9662. Rosiglitazone modulated the inflammatory response and increased bacterial clearance through PPARγ activation and NET formation, combining immunomodulatory and host-dependent anti-bacterial effects and, therefore, warrants further study as a potential therapeutic agent in sepsis. PMID:26618986

  8. Neutrophil-mediated damage to human vascular endothelium. Role of cytokine activation.

    PubMed Central

    Westlin, W. F.; Gimbrone, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Cytokine activation of cultured human vascular endothelial cells renders them hyperadhesive for blood leukocytes. Co-incubation of freshly isolated, unstimulated human blood neutrophils with confluent cytokine-activated human endothelial monolayers for 90 minutes results in extensive endothelial detachment and destruction of monolayer integrity. In contrast, unactivated endothelial monolayers remain intact. Using this in vitro model, we have explored the neutrophil-effector mechanisms involved in this injury. Coincubation in the presence of a serine protease inhibitor (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) or specific elastase inhibitors (Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethyl ketone or alpha-1-protease inhibitor) markedly diminished injury. In contrast, scavengers or inhibitors of oxygen-derived free radicals (superoxide dismutase, catalase, mannitol, or sodium azide) were not protective. Purified human neutrophil elastase mimicked the effect of the neutrophils suggesting a key role for elastase in the neutrophil-mediated injury in this model. Interfering with direct neutrophil-endothelial cell contact by interposing a microporous barrier insert prevented endothelial cell detachment. Furthermore, this neutrophil-mediated detachment could be inhibited with interleukin-8, an action correlated with a decrease in neutrophil adhesion to activated endothelial monolayers. By defining the role of endothelial activation in neutrophil-mediated injury, this in vitro model may provide useful insights into potential therapeutic interventions designed to prevent disruption of the endothelial barrier function. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 PMID:8424450

  9. Patrolling monocytes promote intravascular neutrophil activation and glomerular injury in the acutely inflamed glomerulus.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Michaela; Hall, Pam; Li, Anqi; Devi, Sapna; Westhorpe, Clare L V; Kitching, A Richard; Hickey, Michael J

    2016-08-30

    Nonclassical monocytes undergo intravascular patrolling in blood vessels, positioning them ideally to coordinate responses to inflammatory stimuli. Under some circumstances, the actions of monocytes have been shown to involve promotion of neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanisms whereby patrolling monocytes control the actions of neutrophils in the circulation are unclear. Here, we examined the contributions of monocytes to antibody- and neutrophil-dependent inflammation in a model of in situ immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Multiphoton and spinning disk confocal intravital microscopy revealed that monocytes patrol both uninflamed and inflamed glomeruli using β2 and α4 integrins and CX3CR1. Monocyte depletion reduced glomerular injury, demonstrating that these cells promote inappropriate inflammation in this setting. Monocyte depletion also resulted in reductions in neutrophil recruitment and dwell time in glomerular capillaries and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by neutrophils, suggesting a role for cross-talk between monocytes and neutrophils in induction of glomerulonephritis. Consistent with this hypothesis, patrolling monocytes and neutrophils underwent prolonged interactions in glomerular capillaries, with the duration of these interactions increasing during inflammation. Moreover, neutrophils that interacted with monocytes showed increased retention and a greater propensity for ROS generation in the glomerulus. Also, renal patrolling monocytes, but not neutrophils, produced TNF during inflammation, and TNF inhibition reduced neutrophil dwell time and ROS production, as well as renal injury. These findings show that monocytes and neutrophils undergo interactions within the glomerular microvasculature. Moreover, evidence indicates that, in response to an inflammatory stimulus, these interactions allow monocytes to promote neutrophil recruitment and activation within the glomerular microvasculature, leading to neutrophil

  10. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ) in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Yu, Shiyong; Song, Zifang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Wang, Cuiping; Yan, Jinchuan; Wu, Fusheng; Nanda, Anil; Granger, D Neil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40), i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ) is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b) and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the

  11. The murine neutrophil NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by soluble but not particulate or crystalline agonists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaiwen W; Bezbradica, Jelena S; Groß, Christina J; Wall, Adam A; Sweet, Matthew J; Stow, Jennifer L; Schroder, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils express pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and regulate immune responses via PRR-dependent cytokine production. An emerging theme is that neutrophil PRRs often exhibit cell type-specific adaptations in their signalling pathways. This prompted us to examine inflammasome signalling by the PRR NLRP3 in murine neutrophils, in comparison to well-established NLRP3 signalling pathways in macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that while murine neutrophils can indeed signal via the NLRP3 inflammasome, neutrophil NLRP3 selectively responds to soluble agonists but not to the particulate/crystalline agonists that trigger NLRP3 activation in macrophages via phagolysosomal rupture. In keeping with this, alum did not trigger IL-1β production from human PMN, and the lysosomotropic peptide Leu-Leu-OMe stimulated only weak NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production from murine neutrophils, suggesting that lysosomal rupture is not a strong stimulus for NLRP3 activation in neutrophils. We validated our in vitro findings for poor neutrophil NLRP3 responses to particles in vivo, where we demonstrated that neutrophils do not significantly contribute to alum-induced IL-1β production in mice. In all, our studies highlight that myeloid cell identity and the nature of the danger signal can strongly influence signalling by a single PRR, thus shaping the nature of the resultant immune response. PMID:27062120

  12. Neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 in term and preterm parturition.

    PubMed

    Romero, R; Ceska, M; Avila, C; Mazor, M; Behnke, E; Lindley, I

    1991-10-01

    The neutrophil is the leukocyte most frequently recruited into the amniotic fluid in cases of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity. Neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 is a newly identified cytokine that is capable of inducing selective neutrophil chemotaxis and activation. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between amniotic fluid concentrations of neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8, microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity, and parturition (term and preterm). Amniotic fluid neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 was measured with an immunoassay validated for human amniotic fluid (sensitivity 0.3 ng/ml). Fluid was obtained from women in the following groups: midtrimester (n = 38), term not in labor (n = 38), term in active labor (n = 67), and preterm labor with intact membranes (n = 62). Fluid was cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacterial and Mycoplasma. Sterile amniotic fluid from most women in the midtrimester of pregnancy and women at term not in labor did not contain immunoreactive neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8. Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity was associated with increased concentrations of neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8. The amniotic fluid of women with preterm labor and sterile amniotic fluid who had preterm delivery contained higher neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 levels than did the amniotic fluid of women who responded to tocolysis and had delivery at term. Term parturition is associated with increased concentrations of neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 in the amniotic fluid. We conclude that neutrophil attractant/activating peptide-1/interleukin-8 is part of the host response to microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and that increased amniotic fluid availability of this cytokine occurs in term and preterm parturition. PMID:1951537

  13. Neutrophils in cancer.

    PubMed

    Treffers, Louise W; Hiemstra, Ida H; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Matlung, Hanke L

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in cancer. This does not only relate to the well-established prognostic value of the presence of neutrophils, either in the blood or in tumor tissue, in the context of cancer progression or for the monitoring of therapy, but also to their active role in the progression of cancer. In the current review, we describe what is known in general about the role of neutrophils in cancer. What is emerging is a complex, rather heterogeneous picture with both pro- and anti-tumorigenic roles, which apparently differs with cancer type and disease stage. Furthermore, we will discuss the well-known role of neutrophils as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and also on the role of neutrophils as important effector cells during antibody therapy in cancer. It is clear that neutrophils contribute substantially to cancer progression in multiple ways, and this includes both direct effects on the cancer cells and indirect effect on the tumor microenvironment. While in many cases neutrophils have been shown to promote tumor progression, for instance by acting as MDSC, there are also protective effects, particularly when antibody immunotherapy is performed. A better understanding of the role of neutrophils is likely to provide opportunities for immunomodulation and for improving the treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27558343

  14. Monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils under inflammatory conditions via MKK6 activation

    PubMed Central

    Köffel, René; Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Warszawska, Joanna; Hennig, Annika; Wagner, Karin; Jörgl, Almut; Gubi, Daniela; Moser, Doris; Hladik, Anastasiya; Hoffmann, Ulrike; Fischer, Michael B.; van den Berg, Wim; Koenders, Marije; Scheinecker, Clemens; Gesslbauer, Bernhard; Knapp, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    During inflammation, neutrophils are rapidly mobilized from the bone marrow storage pool into peripheral blood (PB) to enter lesional sites, where most rapidly undergo apoptosis. Monocytes constitute a second wave of inflammatory immigrates, giving rise to long-lived macrophages and dendritic cell subsets. According to descriptive immunophenotypic and cell culture studies, neutrophils may directly “transdifferentiate” into monocytes/macrophages. We provide mechanistic data in human and murine models supporting the existence of this cellular pathway. First, the inflammatory signal–induced MKK6-p38MAPK cascade activates a monocyte differentiation program in human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor–dependent neutrophils. Second, adoptively transferred neutrophils isolated from G-CSF–pretreated mice rapidly acquired monocyte characteristics in response to inflammatory signals in vivo. Consistently, inflammatory signals led to the recruitment of osteoclast progenitor cell potential from ex vivo–isolated G-CSF–mobilized human blood neutrophils. Monocytic cell differentiation potential was retained in left-shifted band-stage neutrophils but lost in neutrophils from steady-state PB. MKK6-p38MAPK signaling in HL60 model cells led to diminishment of the transcription factor C/EBPα, which enabled the induction of a monocytic cell differentiation program. Gene profiling confirmed lineage conversion from band-stage neutrophils to monocytic cells. Therefore, inflammatory signals relayed by the MKK6-p38MAPK cascade induce monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils. PMID:25214442

  15. Chemokine CXCL1-mediated neutrophil trafficking in the lung: Role of CXCR2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Kirti V.; Xu, Renling; Cox, Robert; Hawkins, Hal; Sbrana, Elena; Kolli, Deepthi; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine CXCL1 and its receptor CXCR2 play a crucial role in host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. Dysregulation in this process has been implicated in collateral tissue damage causing disease. CXCL1 reversibly exists as monomers and dimers, and it has been proposed that distinct monomer and dimer activities and monomer-dimer equilibrium regulate neutrophil function. However, the molecular mechanisms linking CXCL1/CXCR2 axis and neutrophil ‘beneficial’ and ‘destructive’ phenotypes are not known. In this study, we characterized neutrophil trafficking and its consequence in the mouse lung by CXCL1 WT (exists as monomer and dimer) and a non-dissociating dimer. Whereas WT, compared to dimer, was more active at low doses, both WT and dimer elicited large neutrophil efflux at high doses. Importantly, robust neutrophil recruitment elicited by WT or dimer was not detrimental to lung tissue integrity, and further, could not be correlated to surface CXCR2 levels. We conclude that CXCL1 monomer/dimer distribution and receptor interactions are highly coupled and regulate neutrophil trafficking, and that injury in the context of disease is a consequence of inappropriate CXCR2 activation at the target tissue and not due to mechanical forces exerted by neutrophils during recruitment. PMID:26138727

  16. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound. PMID:27226531

  17. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound.

  18. Measurement of neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G activities using intramolecularly quenched fluorogenic substrates.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Brice; Attucci, Sylvie; Epinette, Christophe; Pitois, Elodie; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Juliano, Luiz; Gauthier, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are three hematopoietic serine proteases, large quantities of which are stored in neutrophil cytoplasmic azurophilic granules. They act in combination with reactive oxygen species to degrade engulfed microorganisms inside phagolysosomes. Active forms of these proteases are also externalized during neutrophil activation at inflammatory sites, thus helping to regulate inflammatory and immune responses. A fraction of secreted neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) remains bound to the external plasma membrane, where they remain enzymatically active. This protocol describes the spectrofluorometric measurement of NSP activities using sensitive ortho-aminobenzoyl-peptidyl-N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) ethylenediamine fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) substrates that fully discriminate between the three human NSPs. These are used to measure subnanomolar concentrations of free or membrane-bound NSPs in low-binding microplates and to quantify the activities of individual proteases in biological fluids. We describe the synthesis of FRET substrate, neutrophil purification, and kinetic experiments on activated neutrophils. The protocol for measuring NSP activity on the surface of activated neutrophils can be adapted to measure NSP activities in whole biological fluids. Such data clarify the contributions of individual NSPs to the development of inflammatory diseases. Ultimately, these proteases may be shown to be targets for therapeutic inhibitors.

  19. Human neutrophil-mediated nonoxidative antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Mambula, S S; Simons, E R; Hastey, R; Selsted, M E; Levitz, S M

    2000-11-01

    It has long been appreciated that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) kill Cryptococcus neoformans, at least in part via generation of fungicidal oxidants. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of nonoxidative mechanisms to the inhibition and killing of C. neoformans. Treatment of human PMN with inhibitors and scavengers of respiratory burst oxidants only partially reversed anticryptococcal activity, suggesting that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. To define the mediators of nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity, PMN were fractionated into cytoplasmic, primary (azurophil) granule, and secondary (specific) granule fractions. Incubation of C. neoformans with these fractions for 18 h resulted in percent inhibition of growth of 67.4 +/- 3.4, 84.6 +/- 4.4, and 29.2 +/- 10.5 (mean +/- standard error, n = 3), respectively. Anticryptococcal activity of the cytoplasmic fraction was abrogated by zinc and depletion of calprotectin. Antifungal activity of the primary granules was significantly reduced by pronase treatment, boiling, high ionic strength, and magnesium but not calcium. Fractionation of the primary granules by reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography on a C(4) column over an acetonitrile gradient revealed multiple peaks with anticryptococcal activity. Of these, peaks 1 and 6 had substantial fungistatic and fungicidal activity. Peak 1 was identified by acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and mass spectroscopy as human neutrophil proteins (defensins) 1 to 3. Analysis of peak 6 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE revealed multiple bands. Thus, human PMN have nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity residing principally in their cytoplasmic and primary granule fractions. Calprotectin mediates the cytoplasmic activity, whereas multiple proteins, including defensins, are responsible for activity of the primary granules. PMID:11035733

  20. Neutrophil activation induced by ArtinM: release of inflammatory mediators and enhancement of effector functions.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Karina Alves; Scwartz, Carolina; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina Cavalcanti Albuquerque Veiga; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; Fernandes, Luiz Cláudio; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; Moreno, Andréa Novais

    2009-03-24

    The D-mannose binding lectin ArtinM from Artocarpus integrifolia, previously known as KM+ and artocarpin, is considered a stimulant of Th1-type immunity, which is able to confer resistance to some intracellular pathogens. In addition, ArtinM induces neutrophil migration by haptotaxis through simultaneous interactions of its carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) with glycans expressed on the extracellular matrix and the neutrophil surface. In the present study, we have expanded the characterization of ArtinM as a neutrophil activator. Exposure of neutrophils to ArtinM for 15 min resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins, a process that was selectively inhibited by d-mannose or mannotriose. Shortly after stimulation, neutrophils secreted high levels of LTB(4) and underwent shedding of L-selectin from their surface. Exposure to ArtinM enhanced neutrophil functions, such as respiratory burst and zymozan and Listeria monocytogenes phagocytosis. In addition, ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils displayed increased CXCL-8 secretion and TLR2 gene transcription. These results demonstrate that ArtinM is able to induce potent neutrophil activation, a feature that should be strongly considered in the assessment of the lectin capacity to confer resistance against infections.

  1. Activated Neutrophils Are Associated with Pediatric Cerebral Malaria Vasculopathy in Malawian Children

    PubMed Central

    Feintuch, Catherine Manix; Saidi, Alex; Seydel, Karl; Chen, Grace; Goldman-Yassen, Adam; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; Kim, Ryung S.; Frenette, Paul S.; Taylor, Terrie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most patients with cerebral malaria (CM) sustain cerebral microvascular sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs). Although many young children are infected with P. falciparum, CM remains a rare outcome; thus, we hypothesized that specific host conditions facilitate iRBC cerebral sequestration. To identify these host factors, we compared the peripheral whole-blood transcriptomes of Malawian children with iRBC cerebral sequestration, identified as malarial-retinopathy-positive CM (Ret+CM), to the transcriptomes of children with CM and no cerebral iRBC sequestration, defined as malarial-retinopathy-negative CM (Ret-CM). Ret+CM was associated with upregulation of 103 gene set pathways, including cytokine, blood coagulation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) pathways (P < 0.01; false-discovery rate [FDR] of <0.05). Neutrophil transcripts were the most highly upregulated individual transcripts in Ret+CM patients. Activated neutrophils can modulate diverse host processes, including the ECM, inflammation, and platelet biology to potentially facilitate parasite sequestration. Therefore, we compared plasma neutrophil proteins and neutrophil chemotaxis between Ret+CM and Ret-CM patients. Plasma levels of human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, and proteinase 3, but not lactoferrin or lipocalin, were elevated in Ret+CM patients, and neutrophil chemotaxis was impaired, possibly related to increased plasma heme. Neutrophils were rarely seen in CM brain microvasculature autopsy samples, and no neutrophil extracellular traps were found, suggesting that a putative neutrophil effect on endothelial cell biology results from neutrophil soluble factors rather than direct neutrophil cellular tissue effects. Meanwhile, children with Ret-CM had lower levels of inflammation, higher levels of alpha interferon, and upregulation of Toll-like receptor pathways and other host transcriptional pathways, which may represent responses that do not favor

  2. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  3. Systemic neutrophil activation in a mouse model of ischemic stroke and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Helena; McKee, Dana; Ritter, Leslie

    2011-04-01

    As a natural response to injury and disease, neutrophils activate, adhere to the microvasculature, migrate into brain tissue, and release toxic substances such as reactive oxygen species and proteases. This neutrophil response occurs when blood flow is returned to brain tissue (reperfusion) after ischemic stroke. Thus, the presence of activated systemic neutrophils increases the potential for tissue injury during reperfusion after ischemic stroke. Although experiments in rat models suggest that activated neutrophils play a pivotal role in cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury, little is known about systemic neutrophil activation during reperfusion following ischemic stroke in a mouse model. The purpose of this study was to characterize systemic leukocyte responses and neutrophil CD11b expression 15-min and 24-hr post-reperfusion in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. The intraluminal filament method of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) with reperfusion or a sham procedure was performed in male C57Bl/6 mice. Automated leukocyte counts and manual white blood cell (WBC) differential counts were measured. Flow cytometry was used to assess systemic neutrophil surface CD11b expression. The data suggest that the damaging potential of systemic neutrophil activation begins as early as 15 min and remains evident at 24 hr after the initiation of reperfusion. In addition, because transgenic mouse models, bred on a C57Bl/6 background, are increasingly used to elucidate single mechanisms of reperfusion injury after ischemic stroke, findings from this study are foundational for future investigations examining the damaging potential of neutrophil responses post-reperfusion after ischemic stroke in genetically altered mouse models within this background strain. PMID:21044968

  4. Microparticle production, neutrophil activation, and intravascular bubbles following open-water SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Bhopale, Veena M; Yang, Ming; Bushmann, Kim; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate annexin V-positive microparticles (MPs) and neutrophil activation in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that changes are related to intravascular bubble formation. Sixteen male volunteer divers followed a uniform profile of four daily SCUBA dives to 18 m of sea water for 47 min. Blood was obtained prior to and at 80 min following the first and fourth dives to evaluate the impact of repetitive diving, and intravascular bubbles were quantified by trans-thoracic echocardiography carried out at 20-min intervals for 2 h after each dive. MPs increased by 3.4-fold after each dive, neutrophil activation occurred as assessed by surface expression of myeloperoxidase and the CD18 component of β(2)-integrins, and there was an increased presence of the platelet-derived CD41 protein on the neutrophil surface indicating interactions with platelet membranes. Intravascular bubbles were detected in all divers. Surprisingly, significant inverse correlations were found among postdiving bubble scores and MPs, most consistently at 80 min or more after the dive on the fourth day. There were significant positive correlations between MPs and platelet-neutrophil interactions after the first dive and between platelet-neutrophil interactions and neutrophil activation documented as an elevation in β(2)-integrin expression after the fourth dive. We conclude that MPs- and neutrophil-related events in humans are consistent with findings in an animal decompression model. Whether there are causal relationships among bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation remains obscure and requires additional study.

  5. Wolbachia-Induced Neutrophil Activation in a Mouse Model of Ocular Onchocerciasis (River Blindness)

    PubMed Central

    Gillette-Ferguson, Illona; Hise, Amy G.; McGarry, Helen F.; Turner, Joseph; Esposito, Andrew; Sun, Yan; Diaconu, Eugenia; Taylor, Mark J.; Pearlman, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria are abundant in the filarial nematodes that cause onchocerciasis (river blindness), including the larvae (microfilariae) that migrate into the cornea. Using a mouse model of ocular onchocerciasis, we recently demonstrated that it is these endosymbiotic bacteria rather than the nematodes per se that induce neutrophil infiltration to the corneal stroma and loss of corneal clarity (Saint Andre et al., Science 295:1892-1895, 2002). To better understand the role of Wolbachia organisms in the pathogenesis of this disease, we examined the fate of these bacteria in the cornea by immunoelectron microscopy. Microfilariae harboring Wolbachia organisms were injected into mouse corneas, and bacteria were detected with antibody to Wolbachia surface protein. Within 18 h of injection, neutrophils completely surrounded the nematodes and were in close proximity to Wolbachia organisms. Wolbachia surface protein labeling was also prominent in neutrophil phagosomes, indicating neutrophil ingestion of Wolbachia organisms. Furthermore, the presence of numerous electron-dense granules around the phagosomes indicated that neutrophils were activated. To determine if Wolbachia organisms directly activate neutrophils, peritoneal neutrophils were incubated with either parasite extracts containing Wolbachia organisms, parasite extracts depleted of Wolbachia organisms (by antibiotic treatment of worms), or Wolbachia organisms isolated from filarial nematodes. After 18 h of incubation, we found that isolated Wolbachia organisms stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and CXC chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and KC by neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, these cytokines were induced by filarial extracts containing Wolbachia organisms but not by Wolbachia-depleted extracts. Taken together, these findings indicate that neutrophil activation is an important mechanism by which Wolbachia organisms contribute to the pathogenesis of

  6. IL-17 Promotes Neutrophil-Mediated Immunity by Activating Microvascular Pericytes and Not Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rebecca; Lauridsen, Holly M; Amezquita, Robert A; Pierce, Richard W; Jane-Wit, Dan; Fang, Caodi; Pellowe, Amanda S; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C; Gonzalez, Anjelica L; Pober, Jordan S

    2016-09-15

    A classical hallmark of acute inflammation is neutrophil infiltration of tissues, a multistep process that involves sequential cell-cell interactions of circulating leukocytes with IL-1- or TNF-activated microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes (PCs) that form the wall of the postcapillary venules. The initial infiltrating cells accumulate perivascularly in close proximity to PCs. IL-17, a proinflammatory cytokine that acts on target cells via a heterodimeric receptor formed by IL-17RA and IL-17RC subunits, also promotes neutrophilic inflammation but its effects on vascular cells are less clear. We report that both cultured human ECs and PCs strongly express IL-17RC and, although neither cell type expresses much IL-17RA, PCs express significantly more than ECs. IL-17, alone or synergistically with TNF, significantly alters inflammatory gene expression in cultured human PCs but not ECs. RNA sequencing analysis identifies many IL-17-induced transcripts in PCs encoding proteins known to stimulate neutrophil-mediated immunity. Conditioned media from IL-17-activated PCs, but not ECs, induce pertussis toxin-sensitive neutrophil polarization, likely mediated by PC-secreted chemokines, and they also stimulate neutrophil production of proinflammatory molecules, including TNF, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8. Furthermore, IL-17-activated PCs, but not ECs, can prolong neutrophil survival by producing G-CSF and GM-CSF, delaying the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and caspase-9 activation. Importantly, neutrophils exhibit enhanced phagocytic capacity after activation by conditioned media from IL-17-treated PCs. We conclude that PCs, not ECs, are the major target of IL-17 within the microvessel wall and that IL-17-activated PCs can modulate neutrophil functions within the perivascular tissue space. PMID:27534549

  7. An improved strategy to recover large fragments of functional human neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Lorena; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Le-Moal, Vanessa Lievin; Sandré, Catherine; Bianchini, Elsa; Nicolas, Valerie; Pallardy, Marc; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Netosis is a recently described neutrophil function that leads to the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in response to various stimuli. NETs are filaments of decondensed chromatin associated with granular proteins. In addition to their role against microorganisms, NETs have been implicated in autoimmunity, thrombosis, and tissue injury. Access to a standardized source of isolated NETs is needed to better analyze the roles of NETs. The aim of this study was to develop a procedure yielding soluble, well-characterized NET preparations from fresh human neutrophils. The calcium ionophore A23187 was chosen to induce netosis, and the restriction enzyme AluI was used to prepare large NET fragments. DNA and proteins were detected by electrophoresis and specific labeling. Some NET proteins [histone 3, lactoferrin (LF)] were quantified by western blotting, and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was quantified by immunofluorescence. Co-existence of dsDNA and neutrophil proteins confirmed the quality of the NET preparations. Their biological activity was checked by measuring elastase (ELA) activity and bacterial killing against various strains. Interindividual differences in histone 3, LF, ELA, and dsDNA relative contents were observed in isolated NETs. However, the reproducibility of NET preparation and characterization was validated, suggesting that this interindividual variability was rather related to donor variation than to technical bias. This standardized protocol is suitable for producing, isolating, and quantifying functional NETs that could serve as a tool for studying NET effects on immune cells and tissues.

  8. Activation of Neutrophils via IP3 Pathway Following Exposure to Demodex-Associated Bacterial Proteins.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Fred; Banville, Nessa; Bergin, David A; Smedman, Christian; Paulie, Staffan; Reeves, Emer; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2016-02-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory condition that predominantly affects the skin of the face. Sera from rosacea patients display elevated reactivity to proteins from a bacterium (Bacillus oleronius) originally isolated from a Demodex mite from a rosacea patient suggesting a possible role for bacteria in the induction and persistence of this condition. This work investigated the ability of B. oleronius proteins to activate neutrophils and demonstrated activation via the IP3 pathway. Activated neutrophils displayed increased levels of IP1 production, F-actin formation, chemotaxis, and production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 following stimulation by pure and crude B. oleronius protein preparations (2 μg/ml), respectively. In addition, neutrophils exposed to pure and crude B. oleronius proteins (2 μg/ml) demonstrated increased release of internally stored calcium (Ca(2+)), a hallmark of the IP3 pathway of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils play a significant role in the inflammation associated with rosacea, and this work demonstrates how B. oleronius proteins can induce neutrophil recruitment and activation. PMID:26433579

  9. Role of Sphingomyelin Synthase in Controlling the Antimicrobial Activity of Neutrophils against Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Angus; Schey, Kevin; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Luberto, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    The key host cellular pathway(s) necessary to control the infection caused by inhalation of the environmental fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans are still largely unknown. Here we have identified that the sphingolipid pathway in neutrophils is required for them to exert their killing activity on the fungus. In particular, using both pharmacological and genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) activity profoundly impairs the killing ability of neutrophils by preventing the extracellular release of an antifungal factor(s). We next found that inhibition of protein kinase D (PKD), which controls vesicular sorting and secretion and is regulated by diacylglycerol (DAG) produced by SMS, totally blocks the extracellular killing activity of neutrophils against C. neoformans. The expression of SMS genes, SMS activity and the levels of the lipids regulated by SMS (namely sphingomyelin (SM) and DAG) are up-regulated during neutrophil differentiation. Finally, tissue imaging of lungs infected with C. neoformans using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), revealed that specific SM species are associated with neutrophil infiltration at the site of the infection. This study establishes a key role for SMS in the regulation of the killing activity of neutrophils against C. neoformans through a DAG-PKD dependent mechanism, and provides, for the first time, new insights into the protective role of host sphingolipids against a fungal infection. PMID:21203393

  10. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  11. Phagocytic activation of human neutrophils by the detergent component of fluosol.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D A; Forman, M B; Murray, J J

    1992-05-01

    Fluosol (Alpha Therapeutic Corporation, Los Angeles, CA) an emulsion of perfluorocarbons with a high oxygen-carrying capacity, was approved as an adjunct to alleviate myocardial ischemia during coronary angioplasty. This drug also significantly enhances myocardial salvage presumably related to an action on the neutrophil. The mechanism by which fluosol and its individual components, including the detergent Pluronic F-68, affected neutrophil function was examined. During the incubation of neutrophils with fluosol, a rapid stimulation of superoxide anion production and degranulation which progressively increased over a 30-minute period was detected. Neutrophils incubated with only Pluronic F-68 produced similar amounts of superoxide anion. Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of phagocytosis, significantly inhibited this superoxide anion generation. As shown previously, neutrophils incubated with fluosol for 30 minutes and then subsequently stimulated manifested a reduction in lysozyme release as compared with untreated cells. Results of an electron microscopic examination confirmed the cellular uptake of the fluosol within phagocytic vacuoles. Neutrophil viability determined by trypan blue was unaffected after fluosol treatment. These observations show that the fluosol emulsion, primarily through micelles formed by the detergent Pluronic F-68, activates human neutrophils by serving as a phagocytic stimulus, which produces a cell refractory to subsequent stimulation.

  12. Neutrophil activation induced by the lectin KM+ involves binding to CXCR2.

    PubMed

    Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; Moreno, Andréa N; Marques, Fabiana; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2006-01-01

    The lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia, also known as artocarpin, induces neutrophil migration by haptotaxis. The interactions of KM+ with both neutrophils and the extracellular matrix depend on the lectin's ability to recognize mannose-containing glycans. In the present study, we characterized the binding of KM+ to human neutrophils and the responses stimulated by this binding. Exposure to KM+ results in cell polarization, formation of a lamellipodium, and induction of deep ruffles on the cell surface. By fluorescence microscopy, we observed that KM+ is distributed homogeneously over the cell surface. KM+/ligand complexes are rapidly internalized, reaching maximum intracellular concentrations at 120 min, and decreasing thereafter. Furthermore, KM+ binding to the surface of human neutrophils is inhibited by the specific sugars, d-mannose or mannotriose. KM+-induced neutrophil migration is inhibited by pertussis toxin as well as by inhibition of CXCR2 activity. These results suggest that the KM+ ligand on the neutrophil surface is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The results also suggest that neutrophil migration induced by KM+ involves binding to CXCR2.

  13. Neutrophil cell death, activation and bacterial infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Watt, A; Courtney, J; Moore, J; Ennis, M; Elborn, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterised by chronic endobronchial bacterial infection and neutrophil mediated inflammation. Neutrophil apoptosis is essential for the resolution of inflammation. This study assessed the relationship between levels of neutrophil apoptosis and sputum microbiology in matched clinically stable patients with CF. Methods: Sputum was induced from 34 patients (nine with no Gram negative infection, 10 colonised with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 with Burkholderia cenocepacia, and five with other infections). Apoptotic neutrophils measured by flow cytometric Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and morphology were similar in all groups. Results: Patients infected with P aeruginosa or B cenocepacia had a significantly lower percentage of viable neutrophils in the sputum than those with no Gram negative infection (Kruskal-Wallis p = 0.01, median (interquartile range (IQR)) 14.2% (9.4–21.6), 15.8% (12.3–19.5), and 48.4% (23.0–66.4); p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). They also had significantly higher levels of secondary necrotic granulocytes in sputum than patients with no Gram negative infection (Kruskal-Wallis p<0.0001, median (IQR) 55.5% (48.4–64.5), 50.4% (44.6–61.9), and 24.8% (14.4–30.5); p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Neutrophils (x106/g sputum) in P aeruginosa infected patients (Kruskal-Wallis p = 0.05, median (IQR) 6.3 (3.5–12.7)) and B cenocepacia infected patients (5.7 (1.5–14.5)) were significantly higher than in the group with no Gram negative infection (0.5 (0.5–4.3), p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusion: These results suggest that cell death and clearance may be altered in patients with CF colonised with P aeruginosa and B cenocepacia compared with those with no Gram negative infection. PMID:16061707

  14. Sirtinol Inhibits Neutrophil Elastase Activity and Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yung-Fong; Yu, Huang-Ping; Chang, Wen-Yi; Liu, Fu-Chao; Huang, Zhen-Cheng; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced activity of neutrophil elastase leads to a protease–antiprotease imbalance, and plays an essential pathogenic role in acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We assayed the pharmacological effects and mechanisms of the action of sirtinol in human neutrophils, and in neutrophil elastase (HNE)-induced paw edema and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated ALI in mice. Sirtinol significantly inhibited the activity of HNE from human neutrophils in response to various stimulators. The inhibitory effects on HNE activity were not mediated through protein kinase A, calcium, extracellular-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Akt, or Src family kinases. Analysis of enzymatic activities showed that sirtinol inhibited HNE activity in a concentration-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that sirtinol does not affect neutrophil function and is an HNE inhibitor. In addition, administration of sirtinol significantly inhibited HNE-induced paw edema, and attenuated the myeloperoxidase activity and reduced pulmonary wet/dry weight ratio in the LPS-induced ALI mouse model. Our study indicates that sirtinol has anti-inflammatory effects through direct inhibition of HNE activity and attenuates HNE-induced and LPS-mediated tissue or organ injury in vivo. Sirtinol is a novel HNE inhibitor and may have the potential for clinical application in the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:25666548

  15. Activated human valvular interstitial cells sustain interleukin-17 production to recruit neutrophils in infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju; Chia, Jean-San

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4(+) CD45RA(-) CD25(-) CCR6(+) Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify

  16. The reported clinical utility of taurine in ischemic disorders may reflect a down-regulation of neutrophil activation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-10-01

    The first publications regarding clinical use of taurine were Italian reports claiming therapeutic efficacy in angina, intermittent claudication and symptomatic cerebral arteriosclerosis. A down-regulation of neutrophil activation and endothelial adhesion might plausibly account for these observations. Endothelial platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a crucial stimulus to neutrophil adhesion and activation, whereas endothelial nitric oxide (NO) suppresses PAF production and acts in various other ways to antagonize binding and activation of neutrophils. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a neutrophil product which avidly oxidizes many sulfhydryl-dependent proteins, can be expected to inhibit NO synthase while up-regulating PAF generation; thus, a vicious circle can be postulated whereby HOCl released by marginating neutrophils acts on capillary or venular endothelium to promote further neutrophil adhesion and activation. Taurine is the natural detoxicant of HOCl, and thus has the potential to intervene in this vicious circle, promoting a less adhesive endothelium and restraining excessive neutrophil activation. Agents which inhibit the action of PAF on neutrophils, such as ginkgolides and pentoxifylline, have documented utility in ischemic disorders and presumably would complement the efficacy of taurine in this regard. Fish oil, which inhibits endothelial expression of various adhesion factors and probably PAF as well, and which suppresses neutrophil leukotriene production, may likewise be useful in ischemia. These agents may additionally constitute a non-toxic strategy for treating inflammatory disorders in which activated neutrophils play a prominent pathogenic role. Double-blind studies to confirm the efficacy of taurine in symptomatic chronic ischemia are needed.

  17. Guarea kunthiana Bark Extract Enhances the Antimicrobial Activities of Human and Bovine Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jerjomiceva, Natalja; Seri, Hisham; Yaseen, Ragheda; de Buhr, Nicole; Setzer, William N; Naim, Hassan Y; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2016-06-01

    Guarea kunthiana is used in folk remedies for the treatment of several diseases including microbial infections. The mechanism behind this phenomenon still needs to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of G. kunthiana bark extract on antimicrobial functions of human and bovine neutrophils as the first line of defense against infections. For this aim, neutrophils were isolated from either human or bovine blood and treated with G. kunthiana bark extract. The antimicrobial activity of the neutrophils against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Escherichia (E.) coli was tested in a bacterial survival assay and a fluorescence-based phagocytosis assay. Furthermore, the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) was visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. We show that neutrophils treated with G. kunthiana extract distinctly increased phagocytosis of S. aureus or E. coli. Interestingly, we demonstrate that G. kunthiana bark extract induces the formation of NETs in both cell types. This effect was abolished when treating the cells with diphenyleniodonium chloride (DPI) pointing to a direct implication of the NADPH oxidase-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species in this process. In summary, our data strongly suggest that G. kunthiana bark extract boosts the antimicrobial activities of neutrophils as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. PMID:27534112

  18. Intravascular clearance of disseminating Cryptococcus neoformans in the brain can be improved by enhancing neutrophil recruitment in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Donglei; Zhang, Mingshun; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Li, Chang; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Xiquan; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-07-01

    Extrapulmonary dissemination of Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) is one of the most critical steps in the development of meningoencephalitis. Here, we report that clearance of the disseminating C. neoformans occurs within the brain microvasculature. Interestingly, the efficiency of the intravascular clearance in the brain is reduced compared to that in the lung. Intravascular clearance is mainly mediated by neutrophils, and complement C5a receptor signaling is crucial for mediating neutrophil recruitment in the vasculature. C. neoformans stimulated actin polymerization of neutrophils is critically involved in their recruitment to the lung, which is associated with the unique vascular structure detected in the lung. The relatively lower efficiency of fungal clearance in the brain vasculature correlates with less efficient recruitment of neutrophils. Accordingly, intravascular clearance of C. neoformans in the brain could be remarkably improved by increasing the recruitment of neutrophils. We conclude that neutrophils have the ability to eliminate C. neoformans arrested in the vasculature. However, insufficient recruitment of neutrophils limited the optimal clearance of this microorganism in the brain. These results imply that a therapeutic strategy aimed at enhancing the accumulation of neutrophils could help prevent cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. PMID:27109176

  19. Enhanced neutrophil activity is associated with shorter time to tumor progression in glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Afsar; Cederarv, Madeleine; Wolmer-Solberg, Nina; Tammik, Charlotte; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Peredo, Inti; Fornara, Olesja; Xu, Xinling; Dzabic, Mensur; Taher, Chato; Skarman, Petra; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant tumor with a poor outcome that is often positive for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). GBM patients often have excessive numbers of neutrophils and macrophages near and within the tumor. Here, we characterized the cytokine patterns in the blood of GBM patients with and without Valganciclovir treatment. Furthermore, we determined whether neutrophil activation is related to HCMV status and patient outcome. Blood samples for analyses of cytokines and growth factors were collected from 42 GBM patients at the time of diagnosis (n = 42) and at weeks 12 and 24 after surgery. Blood neutrophils of 28 GBM patients were examined for CD11b expression. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interferon-γ, interferon-α, tumor necrosis factor α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1were analyzed with a bead-based flow cytometry assay. During the first six months after surgery, neutrophil activity was increased in 12 patients and was unchanged or decreased in 16. Patients with increased neutrophil activity had enhanced IL-12p70, high grade HCMV and a shorter time to tumor progression (TTP) than patients without or decreased neutrophil activity (median TTP; 5.4 vs. 12 months, 95% confidence interval; 1.6–10 vs. 0.1–0.6, hazard ratio = 3 vs. 0.4, p = 0.004). The levels of IL-12p70 were significantly decreased in Valganciclovir treated patients (n = 22, T 12W vs. T 24W, p = 0.03). In conclusion, our findings suggest that neutrophil activation is an early sign of tumor progression in GBM patients. PMID:27057448

  20. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI.

  1. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI. PMID:26222277

  2. [Cytokines profile and metabolic activity of neutrophils of peripheral blood when progressing neoplasma].

    PubMed

    Abakumova, T V; Antoneeva, I I; Gening, T P; Gening, S O; Dolgova, D R; Fomina, A V

    2014-01-01

    The neutrophil is considered as the peculiar monocelled sekretorny gland realizing the effector potential including by secretion of soluble products - cytokines and for today. Influence of a tumor on functional activity of neutrophils depends on type, localization and a stage of its development. In our research dynamics of metabolic and of neutrophils of peripheral blood, the contents in a lysate and serums of blood of cytokines of IL-1β, 1Ra, 2, 6, 10, 18, TNF-α, IFN-γ and is studied when progressing a cervical cancer. Cytokines and metabolism indicators - activity of, determined by an immunofermental method, level of cationic proteins, a share of active cages in the spontaneous NST-test were cytochemical. It is shown that when progressing cervical cancer against increase in total of neutrophils significant decrease in their, aerobic and anaerobic bacterial action, decrease in the IL-1β and IL-1 Ra level, and also IFN-γ takes place at TNF-α increase, increase of production of matrix metalloproteinas-2 on Ib-IIa of a stage of a disease that allows to assume emergence at this stage of cervical cancer of pro-tumoral effect of neutrophils.

  3. Hypohalous acid-modified human serum albumin induces neutrophil NADPH oxidase activation, degranulation, and shape change.

    PubMed

    Gorudko, Irina V; Grigorieva, Daria V; Shamova, Ekaterina V; Kostevich, Valeria A; Sokolov, Alexey V; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Arnhold, Jürgen; Panasenko, Oleg M

    2014-03-01

    Halogenated lipids, proteins, and lipoproteins formed in reactions with myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypobromous acid (HOBr) can contribute to the regulation of functional activity of cells and serve as mediators of inflammation. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the major plasma protein target of hypohalous acids. This study was performed to assess the potency of HSA modified by HOCl (HSA-Cl) and HOBr (HSA-Br) to elicit selected neutrophil responses. HSA-Cl/Br were found to induce neutrophil degranulation, generation of reactive oxygen intermediates, shape change, and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Thus HSA-Cl/Br can initially act as a switch and then as a feeder of the "inflammatory loop" under oxidative stress. In HSA-Cl/Br-treated neutrophils, monoclonal antibodies against CD18, the β subunit of β2 integrins, reduced the production of superoxide anion radicals and hydrogen peroxide as well as MPO exocytosis, suggesting that CD18 contributed to neutrophil activation. HSA-Cl/Br-induced neutrophil responses were also inhibited by genistein, a broad-specificity tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, supporting the notion that activation of both tyrosine kinase and PI3K may play a role in neutrophil activation by HSA modified in MPO-dependent reactions. These results confirm the hypothesis that halogenated molecules formed in vivo via MPO-dependent reactions can be considered as a new class of biologically active substances potentially able to contribute to activation of myeloid cells in sites of inflammation and serve as inflammatory response modulators. PMID:24384524

  4. Repressor and activator protein accelerates hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang Xian; Lo, Chung Mau; Lian, Qizhou; Ng, Kevin Tak-Pan; Liu, Xiao Bing; Ma, Yuen Yuen; Qi, Xiang; Yeung, Oscar Wai Ho; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Yang, Xin Xiang; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jiang; Shao, Yan; Man, Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Repressor and activator protein (Rap1) directly regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent signaling, which contributes to hepatic IRI. We here intended to investigate the effect of Rap1 in hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and to explore the underlying mechanisms. The association of Rap1 expression with hepatic inflammatory response were investigated in both human and rat liver transplantation. The effect of Rap1 in hepatic IRI was studied in Rap1 knockout mice IRI model in vivo and primary cells in vitro. Our results showed that over expression of Rap1 was associated with severe liver graft inflammatory response, especially in living donor liver transplantation. The results were also validated in rat liver transplantation model. In mice hepatic IRI model, the knockout of Rap1 reduced hepatic damage and hepatic inflammatory response. In primary cells, the knockout of Rap1 suppressed neutrophils migration activity and adhesion in response to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells through down-regulating neutrophils F-Actin expression and CXCL2/CXCR2 pathway. In addition, the knockout of Rap1 also decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in primary neutrophils and neutrophils-induced hepatocyte damage. In conclusion, Rap1 may induce hepatic IRI through promoting neutrophils inflammatory response. Rap1 may be the potential therapeutic target of attenuating hepatic IRI. PMID:27050284

  5. Aberrant activation and regulation of the oxidative burst in neutrophils with Mo1 glycoprotein deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nauseef, W.M.; de Alarcon, P.; Bale, J.F.; Clark, R.A.

    1986-07-15

    Patients whose cells are deficient in the glycoproteins LFA-1, Mo1, and p150,95 have recurrent infections and pronounced abnormalities in neutrophil adherence, aggregation, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. Activation and regulation of oxidative metabolism of Mo1-deficient neutrophils have been characterized. These cells failed to depolarize or to produce O/sub 2//sup -/ or H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ normally when stimulated by opsonized zymosan. The chemotactic peptide formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine depolarized Mo1-deficient neutrophils normally but caused supernormal production of O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, a result of a prolonged burst in oxidative metabolism. Phorbol myristate acetate depolarized Mo1-deficient neutrophils at a nearly normal rate but evoked release of significantly less O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ than from normal PMN. The aberrant activation and regulation of the oxidative burst in Mo1-deficient neutrohpils are considered in light of recently neutrophils are considered in light of recently emerging concepts in the cell biology of this process, and the possibility that these abnormalities reflect a defect in the cytoskeleton-membrane interaction is discussed.

  6. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Induces NADPH-Oxidase Activity in Human Neutrophils by Interaction with Mobilizable Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Anna

    1999-01-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a lectin with specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid, was investigated with respect to its ability to activate the NADPH-oxidase of in vivo-exudated neutrophils (obtained from a skin chamber), and the activity was compared to that of peripheral blood neutrophils. The exudate cells responded to WGA, by both releasing reactive oxygen species into the extracellular milieu and producing oxygen metabolites intracellularly. The peripheral blood cells were unresponsive. To mimic the in vivo-exuded neutrophils with regards to receptor exposure, peripheral blood neutrophils were induced to mobilize their granules and vesicles to varying degrees (in vitro priming), prior to challenge with WGA. The oxidative response to WGA increased with increasing levels of granule mobilization, and the receptor(s) could be shown to reside in the secretory vesicles and/or the gelatinase granules in resting neutrophils. Several WGA-binding glycoproteins were detected in subcellular fractions containing these organelles. The extra- and intracellular NADPH-oxidase responses showed differences in sialic acid dependency, indicating that these two responses are mediated by different receptor structures. PMID:10377127

  7. Antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity as mediators of the neutrophil chemiluminescence inhibition by butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Kabeya, L M; Kanashiro, A; Azzolini, A E C S; Santos, A C; Lucisano-Valim, Y M

    2008-01-01

    The tissue damage found in some inflammatory and autoimmune diseases has been shown to be mediated by an increased activation of neutrophil effector functions. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of the phenolic compound butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by opsonized zymosan-stimulated neutrophils, assessed by luminol- and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL-lum and CL-luc, respectively), and some aspects of its mechanism of action. BHT showed concentration-dependent: (a) inhibitory effect on CL-lum and CL-luc; (b) cytotoxic effect, expressed by increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage by the cells; (c) interaction with neutrophil membranes; (d) ROS scavenger activity. These biological effects were observed in the same range of concentrations (0-5 x 10(-5) mol/l). Taken together, the results suggest that inhibition of neutrophil chemiluminescence by BHT was a result of multiple mechanisms, especially a cytotoxic effect probably mediated by BHT interaction with neutrophils membranes, and the ROS scavenging effect.

  8. Evaluation of endotoxin (LPS) activity in bovine blood using neutrophil dependent chemiluminescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of a neutrophil chemiluminescence-based assay for the measurement of LPS stimulatory activity in bovine whole blood. The assay is based on the capacity for LPS to trigger the respiratory oxidative burst activity (RBA) of autologous neutroph...

  9. Interferon-γ activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophil function

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Terri N; Beaman, Blaine L

    2004-01-01

    As current research illuminates the dynamic interplay between the innate and acquired immune responses, the interaction and communication between these two arms has yet to be fully investigated. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) are known critical components of innate and acquired immunity, respectively. However, recent studies have demonstrated that these two components are not entirely isolated. Treatment of PMNs with IFN-γ elicits a variety of responses depending on stimuli and environmental conditions. These responses include increased oxidative burst, differential gene expression, and induction of antigen presentation. Many of these functions have been overlooked in PMNs, which have long been classified as terminal phagocytic cells incapable of protein synthesis. As this review reports, the old definition of the PMN is in need of an update, as these cells have demonstrated their ability to mediate the transition between the innate and acquired immune responses. PMID:15096178

  10. Neutrophil-Derived Proteases Escalate Inflammation through Activation of IL-36 Family Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Henry, Conor M; Sullivan, Graeme P; Clancy, Danielle M; Afonina, Inna S; Kulms, Dagmar; Martin, Seamus J

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence has strongly implicated the IL-1 family cytokines IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ as key initiators of skin inflammation. Similar to the other members of the IL-1 family, IL-36 cytokines are expressed as inactive precursors and require proteolytic processing for activation; however, the responsible proteases are unknown. Here, we show that IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ are activated differentially by the neutrophil granule-derived proteases cathepsin G, elastase, and proteinase-3, increasing their biological activity ~500-fold. Active IL-36 promoted a strong pro-inflammatory signature in primary keratinocytes and was sufficient to perturb skin differentiation in a reconstituted 3D human skin model, producing features resembling psoriasis. Furthermore, skin eluates from psoriasis patients displayed significantly elevated cathepsin G-like activity that was sufficient to activate IL-36β. These data identify neutrophil granule proteases as potent IL-36-activating enzymes, adding to our understanding of how neutrophils escalate inflammatory reactions. Inhibition of neutrophil-derived proteases may therefore have therapeutic benefits in psoriasis. PMID:26776523

  11. 4-Methylcoumarin Derivatives Inhibit Human Neutrophil Oxidative Metabolism and Elastase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuzissaki, Carolina N.; Andrade, Micássio F.; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C.S.; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H.; Vermelho, Roberta B.; Lopes, João Luis C.; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Increased neutrophil activation significantly contributes to the tissue damage in inflammatory illnesses; this phenomenon has motivated the search for new compounds to modulate their effector functions. Coumarins are natural products that are widely consumed in the human diet. We have evaluated the antioxidant and immunomodulator potential of five 4-methylcoumarin derivatives. We found that the 4-methylcoumarin derivatives inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species by human neutrophils triggered by serum-opsonized zymosan or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate; this inhibition occurred in a concentration-dependent manner, as revealed by lucigenin- and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assays. Cytotoxicity did not mediate this inhibitory effect. The 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin suppressed the neutrophil oxidative metabolism more effectively than the 6,7- and 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins, but the 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins were less effective than their hydroxylated counterparts. An analysis of the biochemical pathways suggested that the 6,7- and 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins inhibit the protein kinase C-mediated signaling pathway, but 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, as well as 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins do not significantly interfere in this pathway of the activation of the human neutrophil oxidative metabolism. The 4-methylcoumarin derivatives bearing the catechol group suppressed the elastase and myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical the most strongly. Interestingly, the 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin scavenged hypochlorous acid more effectively than the o-dihydroxy-substituted 4-methylcoumarin derivatives, and the diacetoxylated 4-methylcoumarin derivatives scavenged hypochlorous acid as effectively as the 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. The significant influence of small structural modifications in the inhibitory potential of 4-methylcoumarin derivatives on the

  12. Activities of LL-37, a cathelin-associated antimicrobial peptide of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Cho, Y; Dinh, N N; Waring, A J; Lehrer, R I

    1998-09-01

    Human neutrophils contain two structurally distinct types of antimicrobial peptides, beta-sheet defensins (HNP-1 to HNP-4) and the alpha-helical peptide LL-37. We used radial diffusion assays and an improved National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards-type broth microdilution assay to compare the antimicrobial properties of LL-37, HNP-1, and protegrin (PG-1). Although generally less potent than PG-1, LL-37 showed considerable activity (MIC, <10 microgram/ml) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, even in media that contained 100 mM NaCl. Certain organisms (methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Candida albicans) were resistant to LL-37 in media that contained 100 mM NaCl but were susceptible in low-salt media. Burkholderia cepacia was resistant to LL-37, PG-1, and HNP-1 in low- or high-salt media. LL-37 caused outer and inner membrane permeabilization of E. coli ML-35p. Chromogenic Limulus assays revealed that LL-37 bound to E. coli O111:B4 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with a high affinity and that this binding showed positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient = 2.02). Circular dichroism spectrometry disclosed that LL-37 underwent conformational change in the presence of lipid A, transitioning from a random coil to an alpha-helical structure. The broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties of LL-37, its presence in neutrophils, and its inducibility in keratinocytes all suggest that this peptide and its precursor (hCAP-18) may protect skin and other tissues from bacterial intrusions and LPS-induced toxicity. The potent activity of LL-37 against P. aeruginosa, including mucoid and antibiotic-resistant strains, suggests that it or related molecules might have utility as topical bronchopulmonary microbicides in cystic fibrosis.

  13. Activities of LL-37, a cathelin-associated antimicrobial peptide of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Cho, Y; Dinh, N N; Waring, A J; Lehrer, R I

    1998-09-01

    Human neutrophils contain two structurally distinct types of antimicrobial peptides, beta-sheet defensins (HNP-1 to HNP-4) and the alpha-helical peptide LL-37. We used radial diffusion assays and an improved National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards-type broth microdilution assay to compare the antimicrobial properties of LL-37, HNP-1, and protegrin (PG-1). Although generally less potent than PG-1, LL-37 showed considerable activity (MIC, <10 microgram/ml) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, even in media that contained 100 mM NaCl. Certain organisms (methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Candida albicans) were resistant to LL-37 in media that contained 100 mM NaCl but were susceptible in low-salt media. Burkholderia cepacia was resistant to LL-37, PG-1, and HNP-1 in low- or high-salt media. LL-37 caused outer and inner membrane permeabilization of E. coli ML-35p. Chromogenic Limulus assays revealed that LL-37 bound to E. coli O111:B4 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with a high affinity and that this binding showed positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient = 2.02). Circular dichroism spectrometry disclosed that LL-37 underwent conformational change in the presence of lipid A, transitioning from a random coil to an alpha-helical structure. The broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties of LL-37, its presence in neutrophils, and its inducibility in keratinocytes all suggest that this peptide and its precursor (hCAP-18) may protect skin and other tissues from bacterial intrusions and LPS-induced toxicity. The potent activity of LL-37 against P. aeruginosa, including mucoid and antibiotic-resistant strains, suggests that it or related molecules might have utility as topical bronchopulmonary microbicides in cystic fibrosis. PMID:9736536

  14. A Chemoattractant-mediated Gi-coupled Pathway Activates Adenylyl Cyclase in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Mahadeo, Dana C.; Janka-Junttila, Mirkka; Smoot, Rory L.; Roselova, Pavla

    2007-01-01

    Neutrophils and Dictyostelium use conserved signal transduction pathways to decipher chemoattractant gradients and migrate directionally. In both cell types, addition of chemoattractants stimulates the production of cAMP, which has been suggested to regulate chemotaxis. We set out to define the mechanism by which chemoattractants increase cAMP levels in human neutrophils. We show that chemoattractants elicit a rapid and transient activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC). This activation is sensitive to pertussis toxin treatment but independent of phosphoinositide-3 kinase activity and an intact cytoskeleton. Remarkably, and in sharp contrast to Gαs-mediated activation, chemoattractant-induced AC activation is lost in cell lysates. Of the nine, differentially regulated transmembrane AC isoforms in the human genome, we find that isoforms III, IV, VII, and IX are expressed in human neutrophils. We conclude that the signal transduction cascade used by chemoattractants to activate AC is conserved in Dictyostelium and human neutrophils and is markedly different from the canonical Gαs-meditated pathway. PMID:17135293

  15. Activation and regulation of arachidonic acid release in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid release in rabbit neutrophils can be enhanced by the addition of chemotactic fMet-Leu-Phe, platelet-activating factor, PAF, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Over 80% of the release ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid comes from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The release is dose-dependent and increases with increasing concentration of the stimulus. The A23187-induced release increases with increasing time of the stimulation. ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid release, but not the rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium, is inhibited in pertussis toxin-treated neutrophils stimulated with PAF. The ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid released by A23187 is potentiated while that release by fMET-Leu-Phe or PAF is inhibited in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA, treated rabbit neutrophils. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H-7, has no effect on the potentiation by PMA of the A23187-induced release, it prevents the inhibition by PMA of the release produced by PAF or fMet-Leu-Phe. In addition, PMA increases arachidonic acid release in H-7-treated cells stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 increases the level of diacylglycerol in neutrophils stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, R59022 potentiates ({sup 3}H) arachidonic acid release produced by fMet-Leu-Phe. This potentiation is not inhibited by H-7, in fact, it is increased in H-7-treated neutrophils.

  16. Evidence for chronic, peripheral activation of neutrophils in polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, James N; Petty, Howard R; Tang, Yuhong; Frank, Mark Barton; Tessier, Philippe A; Dozmorov, Igor; Jiang, Kaiyu; Kindzelski, Andrei; Chen, Yanmin; Cadwell, Craig; Turner, Mary; Szodoray, Peter; McGhee, Julie L; Centola, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Although strong epidemiologic evidence suggests an important role for adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), there remain many aspects of the disease that suggest equally important contributions of the innate immune system. We used gene expression arrays and computer modeling to examine the function in neutrophils of 25 children with polyarticular JRA. Computer analysis identified 712 genes that were differentially expressed between patients and healthy controls. Computer-assisted analysis of the differentially expressed genes demonstrated functional connections linked to both interleukin (IL)-8- and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-regulated processes. Of special note is that the gene expression fingerprint of children with active JRA remained essentially unchanged even after they had responded to therapy. This result differed markedly from our previously reported work, in which gene expression profiles in buffy coats of children with polyarticular JRA reverted to normal after disease control was achieved pharmacologically. These findings suggest that JRA neutrophils remain in an activated state even during disease quiescence. Computer modeling of array data further demonstrated disruption of gene regulatory networks in clusters of genes modulated by IFN-gamma and IL-8. These cytokines have previously been shown to independently regulate the frequency (IFN-gamma) and amplitude (IL-8) of the oscillations of key metabolites in neutrophils, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) and superoxide ion. Using real-time, high-speed, single-cell photoimaging, we observed that 6/6 JRA patients displayed a characteristic defect in 12% to 23% of the neutrophils tested. Reagents known to induce only frequency fluctuations of NAD(P)H and superoxide ion induced both frequency and amplitude fluctuations in JRA neutrophils. This is a novel finding that was observed in children with both active (n = 4) and

  17. Neutrophil ageing is regulated by the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dachuan; Chen, Grace; Manwani, Deepa; Mortha, Arthur; Xu, Chunliang; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Burk, Robert D.; Kunisaki, Yuya; Jang, Jung-Eun; Scheiermann, Christoph; Merad, Miriam; Frenette, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils provide immune protection against pathogens but also may promote tissue injury in inflammatory diseases1,2. Although neutrophils are generally considered as a relatively homogeneous population, evidence for heterogeneity is emerging3,4. Under steady-state conditions, neutrophil heterogeneity may arise from ageing and the replenishment by newly released neutrophils from the bone marrow5. Aged neutrophils up-regulate CXCR4, a receptor allowing their clearance in the bone marrow6,7, with feedback inhibition of neutrophil production via the IL17/G-CSF axis8, and rhythmic modulation of the haematopoietic stem cell niche5. The aged subset also expresses low levels of L-selectin (CD62L)5,9. Previous studies have suggested that in vitro-aged neutrophils exhibit impaired migration and reduced pro-inflammatory properties6,10. Here, we show using in vivo ageing analyses that the neutrophil pro-inflammatory activity correlates positively with their ageing in the circulation. Aged neutrophils represent an overly active subset exhibiting enhanced αMβ2 integrin (Mac-1) activation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation under inflammatory conditions. Neutrophil ageing is driven by the microbiota via Toll-like receptors (TLRs)- and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (Myd88)-mediated signalling pathways. Depletion of the microbiota significantly reduces the number of circulating aged neutrophils and dramatically improves the pathogenesis and inflammation-related organ damage in models of sickle cell disease or endotoxin-induced septic shock. These results thus identify an unprecedented role for the microbiota in regulating a disease-promoting neutrophil subset. PMID:26374999

  18. Bubbles, microparticles, and neutrophil activation: changes with exercise level and breathing gas during open-water SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena M; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Madden, Dennis; Lozo, Mislav; Dujic, Zeljko

    2013-05-15

    The study goal was to evaluate responses in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that exertion underwater and use of a breathing mixture containing more oxygen and less nitrogen (enriched air nitrox) would alter annexin V-positive microparticle (MP) production and size changes and neutrophil activation, as well as their relationships to intravascular bubble formation. Twenty-four divers followed a uniform dive profile to 18 m of sea water breathing air or 22.5 m breathing 32% oxygen/68% nitrogen for 47 min, either swimming with moderately heavy exertion underwater or remaining stationary at depth. Blood was obtained pre- and at 15 and 120 min postdive. Intravascular bubbles were quantified by transthoracic echocardiography postdive at 20-min intervals for 2 h. There were no significant differences in maximum bubble scores among the dives. MP number increased 2.7-fold, on average, within 15 min after each dive; only the air-exertion dive resulted in a significant further increase to 5-fold over baseline at 2 h postdive. Neutrophil activation occurred after all dives. For the enriched air nitrox stationary at depth dive, but not for other conditions, the numbers of postdive annexin V-positive particles above 1 μm in diameter were correlated with intravascular bubble scores (correlation coefficients ∼0.9, P < 0.05). We conclude that postdecompression relationships among bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation appear to exist, but more study is required to improve confidence in the associations.

  19. Myeloperoxidase deficiency induces MIP-2 production via ERK activation in zymosan-stimulated mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tateno, N; Matsumoto, N; Motowaki, T; Suzuki, K; Aratani, Y

    2013-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major constituent of neutrophils, catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride anion. We have previously reported that MPO-deficient (MPO(-/-)) neutrophils produce greater amount of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in vitro than do wild type when stimulated with zymosan. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in the mutant neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 was blocked by pre-treatment with U0126, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blot analysis indicated that U0126 also inhibited the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-κB (p65), indicating that MIP-2 was produced via the ERK/NF-κB pathway. Intriguingly, we found that ERK1/2, p65, and alpha subunit of inhibitor of κB (IκBα) in the MPO(-/-) neutrophils were phosphorylated more strongly than in the wild type when stimulated with zymosan. Exogenous H2O2 treatment in addition to zymosan stimulation enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting the zymosan-induced MIP-2 production. In contrast, exogenous HOCl inhibited the production of MIP-2 as well as IκBα phosphorylation without affecting ERK activity. The zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 in the wild-type neutrophils was enhanced by pre-treatment of the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that both lack of HOCl and accumulation of H2O2 due to MPO deficiency contribute to the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in mouse neutrophils stimulated with zymosan.

  20. Myeloperoxidase deficiency induces MIP-2 production via ERK activation in zymosan-stimulated mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tateno, N; Matsumoto, N; Motowaki, T; Suzuki, K; Aratani, Y

    2013-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major constituent of neutrophils, catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride anion. We have previously reported that MPO-deficient (MPO(-/-)) neutrophils produce greater amount of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in vitro than do wild type when stimulated with zymosan. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in the mutant neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 was blocked by pre-treatment with U0126, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blot analysis indicated that U0126 also inhibited the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-κB (p65), indicating that MIP-2 was produced via the ERK/NF-κB pathway. Intriguingly, we found that ERK1/2, p65, and alpha subunit of inhibitor of κB (IκBα) in the MPO(-/-) neutrophils were phosphorylated more strongly than in the wild type when stimulated with zymosan. Exogenous H2O2 treatment in addition to zymosan stimulation enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting the zymosan-induced MIP-2 production. In contrast, exogenous HOCl inhibited the production of MIP-2 as well as IκBα phosphorylation without affecting ERK activity. The zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 in the wild-type neutrophils was enhanced by pre-treatment of the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that both lack of HOCl and accumulation of H2O2 due to MPO deficiency contribute to the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in mouse neutrophils stimulated with zymosan. PMID:23438680

  1. Similar activation state of neutrophils in sputum of asthma patients irrespective of sputum eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Tak, T; Hilvering, B; Tesselaar, K; Koenderman, L

    2015-11-01

    Inflammatory phenotypes of asthma are associated with differences in disease characteristics. It is unknown whether these inflammatory phenotypes are reflected by the activation status of neutrophils in blood and sputum. We obtained peripheral blood and induced sputum from 21 asthma patients and stratified our samples based on sputum eosinophilia resulting in two groups (>3% eosinophils: n = 13, <3%: n = 8). Eosinophils and neutrophils from blood and sputum were analysed for expression of activation and degranulation markers by flow cytometry. Data were analysed by both classical, non-parametric statistics and a multi-dimensional approach, using principal component analysis (PCA). Patients with sputum eosinophilia were characterized by increased asthma control questionnaire (ACQ) scores and blood eosinophil counts. Both sputum neutrophils and eosinophils displayed an activated and degranulated phenotype compared to cells obtained from blood. Specifically, degranulation of all granule types was detected in sputum cells, combined with an increased expression of the activation markers (activated) Mac-1 (CD11b), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) (CD274) and a decreased expression of CD62L. CD69 expression was only increased on sputum eosinophils. Surface marker expression of neutrophils was similar in the presence or absence of eosinophilia, either by single or multi-dimensional analysis. Sputum neutrophils were highly activated and degranulated irrespective of sputum eosinophilia. Therefore, we conclude that differences in granulocyte activation in sputum and/or blood are not associated with clinical differences in the two groups of asthma patients. The finding of PD-L1 expression on sputum granulocytes suggests an immunomodulatory role of these cells in the tissue.

  2. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chang, Ya-Wen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  3. Rat, mouse and human neutrophils stimulated by a variety of activating agents produce much less nitrite than rodent macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, E L; Pruett, S B

    1995-01-01

    The role of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) in the antimicrobial activities of neutrophils from various mammalian species is unclear. However, it has been reported that rodent neutrophils possess the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase and that inflammatory neutrophils from rats produce potentially antimicrobial levels of RNI. In the present study, neutrophils from humans, rats and mice were evaluated for production of nitrite, a stable end-product of RNI. Human neutrophil preparations (> 95% neutrophils) isolated from peripheral blood were stimulated for 2-24 hr with agents known to trigger the Ca(2+)-dependent constitutive nitric oxide synthase, or to stimulate synthesis of the inducible nitric oxide synthase. Superoxide dismutase was added to some cultures to decrease the levels of superoxide, a compound reported to react with RNI and yield products other than nitrite. Even though the cells were viable and responsive to stimuli, they did not produce nitrite concentrations indicative of antimicrobial potential. Preparations of inflammatory (casein-elicited) mouse neutrophils also failed to produce high concentrations of nitrite. Inflammatory rat neutrophils (2.5 x 10(6)/ml) produced nitrite concentrations of approximately 40 microM in 24-hr cultures, but plots of nitrite production versus cell number for neutrophil and macrophage preparations indicated that contaminating macrophages could account for all the nitrite production in the neutrophil preparations. Thus, neutrophils from rats, mice and humans seem comparable in their inability to produce high levels of nitrite in response to a variety of stimuli. This suggests that in most circumstances the constitutive nitric oxide synthase known to be present in these cells is limited to the production of low levels of nitric oxide for intercellular signalling. In addition, this raises questions about the presence or functional status of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rodent neutrophils. PMID:7534260

  4. Sustained activation of neutrophils in the course of Kawasaki disease: an association with matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Biezeveld, M H; van Mierlo, G; Lutter, R; Kuipers, I M; Dekker, T; Hack, C E; Newburger, J W; Kuijpers, T W

    2005-07-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute febrile syndrome of childhood, characterized by vasculitis of the medium-sized arteries. White blood cell counts and the inflammatory parameter C-reactive protein (CRP) are known to be elevated in the acute phase of the disease. In this study we investigated the course of inflammatory cell type-specific parameters in KD over a longer period of time. Plasma levels of human neutrophil elastase (HNE), matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 (MMP2, MMP9), and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), macrophage neopterin and CRP were measured. Plasma samples were collected in the acute, subacute and early convalescent stage, and three months after the onset of disease. Median CRP and neopterin normalized within two weeks. In contrast, six weeks and three months after onset of disease, levels of HNE were still elevated, with median values of 163 ng/ml and 156 ng/ml, respectively (control children median < 50 ng/ml; for all time-points P < 0.0001). Values of NGAL correlated with the levels of HNE (r = 0.39, P = 0.013). These results demonstrate a longer state of neutrophil activation in KD than was previously assumed. The potential relationship between this prolonged neutrophil activation, coronary artery lesion formation and their persistence, as well as the risk of premature atherosclerosis warrants further evaluation.

  5. Alkalinity of neutrophil phagocytic vacuoles is modulated by HVCN1 and has consequences for myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Levine, Adam P; Duchen, Michael R; de Villiers, Simon; Rich, Peter R; Segal, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase of neutrophils, essential for innate immunity, passes electrons across the phagocytic membrane to form superoxide in the phagocytic vacuole. Activity of the oxidase requires that charge movements across the vacuolar membrane are balanced. Using the pH indicator SNARF, we measured changes in pH in the phagocytic vacuole and cytosol of neutrophils. In human cells, the vacuolar pH rose to ~9, and the cytosol acidified slightly. By contrast, in Hvcn1 knock out mouse neutrophils, the vacuolar pH rose above 11, vacuoles swelled, and the cytosol acidified excessively, demonstrating that ordinarily this channel plays an important role in charge compensation. Proton extrusion was not diminished in Hvcn1-/- mouse neutrophils arguing against its role in maintaining pH homeostasis across the plasma membrane. Conditions in the vacuole are optimal for bacterial killing by the neutral proteases, cathepsin G and elastase, and not by myeloperoxidase, activity of which was unphysiologically low at alkaline pH.

  6. Activation of tracheal smooth muscle responsiveness by fMLP-treated HL-60 cells and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Munoz, N M; Hamann, K J; Vita, A; Cozzi, P J; Baranowski, S; Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1993-03-01

    We assessed the effects of cultured human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) isolated from peripheral human blood on tracheal smooth muscle responsiveness in 40 male Hartley guinea pigs. Undifferentiated HL-60 cells (16-25 passages) were activated in vitro by incubation with 1 microM f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP), and force of contraction was measured isometrically using an in situ preparation of tracheal smooth muscle. Increasing concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh; 10(-10) to 10(-6) mol/cm2 tracheal surface) were applied topically to the epithelial surface pretreated with 4 x 10(6) fMLP-activated HL-60 cells, 4 x 10(6) fMLP-activated neutrophils, 4 x 10(6) sham-activated HL-60 cells, fMLP+vehicle, or vehicle control. Topical application of fMLP-activated HL-60 cells caused a maximum active tension (AT) of 1.13 +/- 0.2 g/cm after 5 min; fMLP-activated neutrophils, sham-activated HL-60 cells, or fMLP+vehicle had no effect. The fMLP-activated HL-60 cells also caused substantial augmentation of tracheal contraction to ACh (P < 0.05 vs. sham-activated cells for all concentrations > 10(-9) mol/cm2). Although fMLP treatment caused 247 +/- 28% increase from baseline level in O2-. production, neither direct contraction nor augmentation of muscarinic stimulation was demonstrated after topical application of 4 x 10(6) neutrophils. In 12 other preparations, fMLP-activated HL-60 cells were pretreated with either 10 microM indomethacin (Indo) or 100 microM A63162, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. Pretreatment with Indo caused complete blockade of direct tracheal contraction and 88 +/- 13% blockade of muscarinic augmentation; there was no effect after A63162.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8460711

  7. Activated human neutrophil response to perfluorocarbon nanobubbles: oxygen-dependent and -independent cytotoxic responses.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Li-Jia; Fang, Jia-You

    2011-06-10

    Nanobubbles, a type of nanoparticles with acoustically active properties, are being utilized as diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles to better understand, detect, and treat human diseases. The objective of this work was to prepare different nanobubble formulations and investigate their physicochemical characteristics and toxic responses to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-activated human neutrophils. The nanobubbles were prepared using perfluoropentane and coconut oil as the respective core and shell, with soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and/or cationic surfactants as the interfacial layers. The cytotoxic effect of the nanobubbles on neutrophils was determined by extracellular O₂(.)⁻ release, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and elastase release. Particle sizes of the nanobubbles with different percentages of perfluorocarbon, oil, and surfactants in ranged 186-432 nm. The nanobubbles were demonstrated to inhibit the generation of superoxide and intracellular ROS. The cytotoxicity of nanobubbles may be mainly associated with membrane damage, as indicated by the high LDH leakage. Systems with Forestall (FE), a cationic surfactant, or higher SPC contents exhibited the greatest LDH release by 3-fold compared to the control. The further addition of an oil component reduced the cytotoxicity induced by the nanobubbles. Exposure to most of the nanobubble formulations upregulated elastase release by activated neutrophils. Contrary to this result, stearylamine (SA)-containing systems slightly but significantly suppressed elastase release. FE and SA in a free form caused stronger responses by neutrophils than when they were incorporated into nanobubbles. In summary, exposure to nanobubbles resulted in a formulation-dependent toxicity toward human neutrophils that was associated with both oxygen-dependent and -independent pathways. Clinicians should therefore exercise caution when using nanobubbles in patients

  8. Human neutrophil migration and activation by BJcuL, a galactose binding lectin purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neutrophil migration to an inflamed site constitutes the first line of the innate immune response against invading microorganisms. Given the crucial role of endogenous lectins in neutrophil mobilization and activation, lectins from exogenous sources have often been considered as putative modulators of leukocyte function. Lectins purified from snake venom have been described as galactoside ligands that induce erythrocyte agglutination and platelet aggregation. This study evaluated human neutrophil migration and activation by C-type lectin BJcuL purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom. Results Utilizing fluorescence microscopy, we observed that biotinylated-BJcuL was evenly distributed on the neutrophil surface, selectively inhibited by D-galactose. Lectin was able to induce modification in the neutrophil morphology in a spherical shape for a polarized observed by optical microscopy and exposure to BJcuL in a Boyden chamber assay resulted in cell migration. After 30 minutes of incubation with BJcuL we found enhanced neutrophil functions, such as respiratory burst, zymozan phagocytosis and an increase in lissosomal volume. In addition, BJcuL delays late apoptosis neutrophils. Conclusion These results demonstrate that BJcuL can be implicated in a wide variety of immunological functions including first-line defense against pathogens, cell trafficking and induction of the innate immune response since lectin was capable of inducing potent neutrophil activation. PMID:21266049

  9. Augmentation of platelet and endothelial cell eNOS activity decreases sepsis-related neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raymond; Kirschenbaum, Linda A; LaRow, Catherine; Berna, Gioiamaria; Griffin, Kelly; Astiz, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    NO is an important mediator of microvascular patency and blood flow. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of enhanced eNOS activity in attenuating sepsis-induced neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions. Microslides coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with plasma from patients with septic shock. Neutrophil and platelets from control subjects were also stimulated with plasma from patients in septic shock and perfused over stimulated endothelial cells. l-Arginine (LA) with and without NG-monomethyl l-arginine (LNMMA), a nonselective NOS inhibitor, and N-(3-(aminomethyl) benzyl acetamide) ethanimidamide dihydrochloride (1400W), a highly selective iNOS inhibitor, were added to the septic plasma. The number of neutrophils adherent to endothelial cells, neutrophil rolling velocity, and the number of neutrophil aggregates were determined. Cell activation and the formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates were assessed by flow cytometry. Separate experiments were done with isolated platelets using platelet aggregometry. l-Arginine significantly decreased sepsis-related neutrophil adhesion and aggregation and increased rolling velocity. The addition of LNMMA to LA and cell suspensions reversed the effects of LA on these parameters, whereas the addition of 1400W had no effect on LA-related changes. Platelet-neutrophil aggregation, platelet aggregation, platelet activation, and neutrophil activation induced by septic plasma were also significantly decreased by LA. Again, the addition of LNMMA reversed the effects of LA on these parameters, whereas 1400W had no effect on LA-related changes. These data suggest that enhancement of platelet and endothelial cell eNOS activity decreases sepsis-induced neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions and may play a role in maintaining microvascular patency in septic shock.

  10. Effects of Docosahexaenoic Supplementation and In Vitro Vitamin C on the Oxidative and Inflammatory Neutrophil Response to Activation

    PubMed Central

    Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Sureda, Antoni; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of diet supplementation with docosahexaenoic (DHA) and in vitro vitamin C (VitC) at physiological concentrations on oxidative and inflammatory neutrophil response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Fifteen male footballers ingested a beverage enriched with DHA or a placebo for 8 weeks in a randomized double-blind study. Neutrophils were isolated from blood samples collected in basal conditions at the end of nutritional intervention. Neutrophils were cultured for 2 hours at 37°C in (a) control media, (b) media with PMA, and (c) media with PMA + VitC. PMA induces neutrophil degranulation with increased extracellular myeloperoxidase and catalase activities, nitric oxide production, expression of the inflammatory genes cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor κβ, interleukin 8 and tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 production. DHA diet supplementation boosts the exit of CAT from neutrophils but moderates the degranulation of myeloperoxidase granules induced by PMA. VitC facilitates azurophilic degranulation of neutrophils and increases gene expression of myeloperoxidase induced by PMA. VitC and DHA diet supplementation prevent PMA effects on inflammatory gene expression, although together they do not produce additional effects. DHA diet supplementation enhances antioxidant defences and anti-inflammatory neutrophil response to in vitro PMA activation. VitC facilitates neutrophil degranulation but prevents an inflammatory response to PMA. PMID:25960826

  11. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid*

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Longhurst, Hilary J.; Warner, Timothy D.; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A.; Lauder, Sarah N.; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W.; Murphy, Robert C.; Thomas, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation. PMID:27129261

  12. Aprotinin inhibits the contact, neutrophil, and platelet activation systems during simulated extracorporeal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kucich, U; Hack, C E; Gluszko, P; Niewiarowski, S; Colman, R W; Edmunds, L H

    1993-07-01

    Aprotinin reduces blood loss after cardiac operations and decreases the bleeding time. The mechanism of action of aprotinin that produces these effects is not clear. During simulated extracorporeal circulation the contact and complement systems, platelets, and neutrophils are activated. We investigated the effect of aprotinin on kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complex and C1-C1-inhibitor complex formation, neutrophil degranulation, and platelet release and aggregation during simulated extracorporeal circulation. Fresh heparinized human blood was recirculated at 37 degrees C for 2 hours in a spiral coil membrane oxygenator-roller pump perfusion circuit. Changes in platelet count, leukocyte count, platelet response to adenosine diphosphate, and plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin, kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes, C1-C1-inhibitor complexes, and neutrophil elastase were measured before and at 5, 30, 60, and 120 minutes of recirculation at 0, 0.015, 0.03, 0.06, and 0.12 mg/ml doses of aprotinin. Platelet counts decreased to 36% +/- 12% of control values at 5 minutes and increased to 56% +/- 13% at 120 minutes without aprotinin. Aprotinin did not affect platelet counts, but it did prevent the decrease in sensitivity of platelets to adenosine diphosphate and it attenuated beta-thromboglobulin release. In the absence of aprotinin, kallikrein-C1-inhibitor and C1-C1-inhibitor complexes increased progressively to 0.53 +/- 0.14 U/ml and 2.38 +/- 0.33 U/ml, respectively, at 120 minutes. Kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes were completely inhibited and C1-C1-inhibitor complexes were partially inhibited at aprotinin concentrations of 0.03 mg/ml or greater. Release of neutrophil elastase was partially but not completely inhibited at the highest dose of aprotinin and was 50% inhibited at a dose of 0.03 mg/ml. Because activation of the fibrinolytic system does not occur in this system, the changes were independent of the inhibition of plasmin. We conclude that aprotinin in high doses

  13. Modified cotton gauze dressings that selectively absorb neutrophil elastase activity in solution.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J V; Yager, D R; Cohen, I K; Diegelmann, R F; Montante, S; Bertoniere, N; Bopp, A F

    2001-01-01

    Dressings for chronic human wounds have been aimed at protection, removal of exudate, and improved appearance. However since the time of ancient Greece wound care and dressing strategies have primarily relied on empiricism. Recent studies have shown that chronic wounds contain high levels of tissue and cytokine destroying proteases including collagenase and neutrophil elastase. Therefore we sought to develop an effective wound dressing that could absorb elastase through affinity sequestration. Cotton gauze was modified by oxidation, phosphorylation, and sulfonation to enhance elastase affinity by ionic or active site uptake. Type VII absorbent cotton gauze was oxidized to dialdehyde cotton which was subsequently converted in part to the bisulfite addition product. Gauze preparations were also phosphorylated and carboxymethylated. Modified cotton gauzes were compared with untreated gauze for reduction of elastase activity in buffered saline. Solutions of elastase that were soaked in oxidized, sulfonated, and phosphorylated cotton gauze showed reduced elastase activity. The initial velocities (v(o)) and turnover rates of elastase showed significant decreases compared with solutions taken from untreated gauze. The reduction in enzyme activity with dialdehyde cotton gauze was confirmed in solution by determining elastase inhibition with dialdehyde starch. The dialdehyde cotton gauze also decreased elastase activity in human wound fluid in a dose response relation based on weight of gauze per volume of wound fluid. Absorbency, pH, air permeability and strength properties of the modified gauze were also compared with untreated cotton gauze. This report shows the effect of reducing elastase activity in solution with cotton containing aldehydic or negatively charged cellulose fibers that may be applicable to treatment modalities in chronic wounds.

  14. Activated prostaglandin D2 receptors on macrophages enhance neutrophil recruitment into the lung

    PubMed Central

    Jandl, Katharina; Stacher, Elvira; Bálint, Zoltán; Sturm, Eva Maria; Maric, Jovana; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Luschnig, Petra; Aringer, Ida; Fauland, Alexander; Konya, Viktoria; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Wheelock, Craig E.; Kratky, Dagmar; Olschewski, Andrea; Marsche, Gunther; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is an early-phase mediator in inflammation, but its action and the roles of the 2 D-type prostanoid receptors (DPs) DP1 and DP2 (also called chemoattractant receptor–homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells) in regulating macrophages have not been elucidated to date. Objective We investigated the role of PGD2 receptors on primary human macrophages, as well as primary murine lung macrophages, and their ability to influence neutrophil action in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro studies, including migration, Ca2+ flux, and cytokine secretion, were conducted with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils and freshly isolated murine alveolar and pulmonary interstitial macrophages. In vivo pulmonary inflammation was assessed in male BALB/c mice. Results Activation of DP1, DP2, or both receptors on human macrophages induced strong intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytokine release, and migration of macrophages. In a murine model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of each PGD2 receptor resulted in aggravated airway neutrophilia, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine contents, and decreased lung compliance. Selective depletion of alveolar macrophages abolished the PGD2-enhanced inflammatory response. Activation of PGD2 receptors on human macrophages enhanced the migratory capacity and prolonged the survival of neutrophils in vitro. In human lung tissue specimens both DP1 and DP2 receptors were located on alveolar macrophages along with hematopoietic PGD synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme of PGD2 synthesis. Conclusion For the first time, our results show that PGD2 markedly augments disease activity through its ability to enhance the proinflammatory actions of macrophages and subsequent neutrophil activation. PMID:26792210

  15. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2alpha are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  16. S. aureus blocks efferocytosis of neutrophils by macrophages through the activity of its virulence factor alpha toxin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor S.; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Hotz, Meghan; Cheng, Lily; Miller, Lloyd S.; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C. Kendall; Sellman, Bret R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia, such as those caused by Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with an influx of inflammatory neutrophils into the lung tissue and airways. Regulation and clearance of recruited neutrophils is essential for preventing tissue damage by “friendly fire”, a responsibility of macrophages in a process called efferocytosis. We hypothesized that S. aureus impairs efferocytosis by alveolar macrophages (AMs) through the activity of the secreted virulence factor alpha toxin (AT), which has been implicated in altering the antimicrobial function of AMs. Infection of mice lacking AMs resulted in significantly increased numbers of neutrophils in the lung, while clearance of neutrophils delivered intranasally into uninfected mice was reduced in AM depleted animals. In vitro, sublytic levels of AT impaired uptake of apoptotic neutrophils by purified AMs. In vivo, the presence of AT reduced uptake of neutrophils by AMs. Differential uptake of neutrophils was not due to changes in either the CD47/CD172 axis or CD36 levels. AT significantly reduced lung expression of CCN1 and altered AM surface localization of DD1α, two proteins known to influence efferocytosis. We conclude that AT may contribute to tissue damage during S. aureus pneumonia by inhibiting the ability of AM to clear neutrophils at the site of infection. PMID:27739519

  17. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos.

    PubMed

    Paris, Daniel H; Stephan, Femke; Bulder, Ingrid; Wouters, Diana; van der Poll, Tom; Newton, Paul N; Day, Nicholas P J; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor), and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA) complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe complications, and

  18. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel H.; Stephan, Femke; Bulder, Ingrid; Wouters, Diana; van der Poll, Tom; Newton, Paul N.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor), and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA) complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe complications, and

  19. Intravenous immunoglobulin preparations induce mild activation of neutrophils in vivo via triggering of macrophages--studies in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Teeling, J L; Bleeker, W K; Rigter, G M; van Rooijen, N; Kuijpers, T W; Hack, C E

    2001-03-01

    Despite widespread use in various immune disorders, the in vivo mechanisms of action of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations are not well known. We previously reported that human neutrophils degranulate after incubation with IVIG in vitro as a result of interaction with FcgammaRII. The purpose of this study was to determine whether IVIG might stimulate neutrophils in vivo. Anaesthetized rats received a bolus intravenous injection of IVIG preparations, containing either high (aged IVIG) or low (fresh IVIG) amounts or IgG dimers at a dose of 250 mg/kg. Administration of aged IVIG induced neutrophil activation in vivo, whereas no effect was observed after infusion of fresh IVIG. Histological examination of lung tissue demonstrated mild influx of neutrophils into the pulmonary tissue after aged IVIG administration, though gross damage did not occur. Macrophage-depleted rats no longer showed activation of neutrophils after infusion of aged IVIG, suggesting that neutrophils become activated via an indirect macrophage dependent way. We conclude that IVIG induces a mild activation of neutrophils in vivo via triggering of macrophages depending on the amount of IgG dimers. For this reason, IVIG preparations with a high content of dimers may not always be as harmless as generally believed and may be responsible for some of the side-effects observed during IVIG infusions.

  20. Administration of C1 inhibitor reduces neutrophil activation in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Caliezi, Christoph; van Mierlo, Gerard; Eerenberg-Belmer, Anke; Sulzer, Irmela; Hack, C Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2003-07-01

    Forty patients with severe sepsis or septic shock recently received C1 inhibitor. In the present study we studied the effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on circulating elastase-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complex (EA) and lactoferrin (LF) levels in these patients to gain further insight about agonists involved in the activation of neutrophils in human sepsis. Elevated levels of EA and LF were found in 65 and 85% of the septic patients, respectively. Patients with elevated EA levels had higher organ dysfunction scores, higher levels of cytokines, and higher levels of complement activation products than patients with normal EA levels. C1 inhibitor therapy reduced EA as well as complement activation and IL-8 release in the patients with elevated EA on admission. We conclude that neutrophil activation in human sepsis correlates with the severity of organ dysfunction and involves complement and interleukin-8 as agonists. The effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on neutrophils may provide an explanation for the beneficial, although mild, effects of this treatment on organ dysfunction in sepsis.

  1. Inactivated pepsin inhibits neutrophil activation by Fcgamma-receptor-dependent and independent stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kustiawan, Iwan; Derksen, Ninotska; Rispens, Theo

    2016-08-01

    Pepsin is widely used to produce F(ab')2 fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG). In many cases, at least part of the pepsin will remain present in the F(ab')2 preparation, albeit in (irreversibly) inactivated form. Here we report on a potent immunomodulatory effect of irreversibly inactivated pepsin on activated human neutrophils. Degranulation, induced by coated IgG or via cytochalasin B/N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, was measured by quantifying elastase release, and was found to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by inactivated pepsin. Since a number of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) products are also treated by limited digestion with pepsin, we investigated if pepsin would be present in quantities large enough to inhibit neutrophil activation. The amounts of pepsin detected in three different pepsin-treated IVIg products were found to be too low to induce an effect, at least in an in vitro setting. PMID:27368805

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to healthy volunteers: analysis of the immediate activating effects on circulating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    de Haas, M; Kerst, J M; van der Schoot, C E; Calafat, J; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Roos, D; van Oers, R H; von dem Borne, A E

    1994-12-01

    In four healthy volunteers, we analyzed in detail the immediate in vivo effects on circulating neutrophils of subcutaneous administration of 300 micrograms of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Neutrophil activation was assessed by measurement of degranulation. Mobilization of secretory vesicles was shown by a decrease in leukocyte alkaline phosphatase content of the circulating neutrophils. Furthermore, shortly postinjection, Fc gamma RIII was found to be upregulated from an intracellular pool that we identified by immunoelectron microscopy as secretory vesicles. Intravascular release of specific granules was shown by increased plasma levels of lactoferrin and by upregulation of the expression of CD66b and CD11b on circulating neutrophils. Moreover, measurement of fourfold elevated plasma levels of elastase, bound to its physiologic inhibitor alpha 1-antitrypsin, indicated mobilization of azurophil granules. However, no expression of CD63, a marker of azurophil granules, was observed on circulating neutrophils. G-CSF--induced mobilization of secretory vesicles and specific granules could be mimicked in whole blood cultures in vitro, in contrast to release of azurophil granules. Therefore, we postulate that the most activated neutrophils leave the circulation, as observed shortly postinjection, and undergo subsequent stimulation in the endothelial microenvironment, resulting in mobilization of azurophil granules. Our data demonstrate that G-CSF should be regarded as a potent immediate activator of neutrophils in vivo.

  3. Protectin DX, a double lipoxygenase product of DHA, inhibits both ROS production in human neutrophils and cyclooxygenase activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Boussetta, Tarek; Makni-Maalej, Karama; Fay, Michèle; Driss, Fathi; El-Benna, Jamel; Lagarde, Michel; Guichardant, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in inflammation by releasing large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidase (NOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). This ROS overproduction is mediated by phosphorylation of the NOX subunits with an uncontrolled manner. Therefore, targeting neutrophil subunits would represent a promising strategy to moderate NOX activity, lower ROS, and other inflammatory agents, such as cytokines and leukotrienes, produced by neutrophils. For this purpose, we investigated the effects of protectin DX (PDX) - a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) di-hydroxylated product which inhibits blood platelet aggregation - on neutrophil activation in vitro. We found that PDX decreases ROS production, inhibits NOX activation and MPO release from neutrophils. We also confirm, that PDX is an anti-aggregatory and anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting both cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and COX-2, E.C. 1.14.99.1) as well as COX-2 in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-treated human neutrophils. However, PDX has no effect on the 5-lipoxygenase pathway that produces the chemotactic agent leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Taken together, our results suggest that PDX could be a protective agent against neutrophil invasion in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24254970

  4. Chronic Inflammation and Neutrophil Activation as Possible Causes of Joint Diseases in Ballet Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Leandro da Silva; Santos, Vinicius Coneglian; de Moura, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Dermargos, Alexandre; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Gorjão, Renata; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina; Hatanaka, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of a ballet class on the kinetic profiles of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, cytokines, complement component 3 (C3), and the concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig), IgA and IgM, in ballerinas. We also verified neutrophil death and ROS release. Blood samples were taken from 13 dancers before, immediately after, and 18 hours after a ballet class. The ballet class increased the plasma activities of CK-total (2.0-fold) immediately after class, while the activities of CK-cardiac muscle (1.0-fold) and LDH (3.0-fold) were observed to increase 18 hours after the class. Levels of the TNF-α, IL-1β, IgG, and IgA were not affected under the study conditions. The exercise was found to induce neutrophil apoptosis (6.0-fold) 18 hours after the ballet class. Additionally, immediately after the ballet class, the neutrophils from the ballerinas were found to be less responsive to PMA stimulus. Conclusion. Ballet class was found to result in inflammation in dancers. The inflammation caused by the ballet class remained for 18 hours after the exercise. These findings are important in preventing the development of chronic lesions that are commonly observed in dancers, such as those with arthritis and synovitis. PMID:24701035

  5. Neutrophil activation by Candida glabrata but not Candida albicans promotes fungal uptake by monocytes.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Seána; Essig, Fabian; Hünniger, Kerstin; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Bauer, Laura; Lehnert, Teresa; Brandes, Susanne; Häder, Antje; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Martin, Ronny; Figge, Marc Thilo; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-09-01

    Candida albicans and Candida glabrata account for the majority of candidiasis cases worldwide. Although both species are in the same genus, they differ in key virulence attributes. Within this work, live cell imaging was used to examine the dynamics of neutrophil activation after confrontation with either C. albicans or C. glabrata. Analyses revealed higher phagocytosis rates of C. albicans than C. glabrata that resulted in stronger PMN (polymorphonuclear cells) activation by C. albicans. Furthermore, we observed differences in the secretion of chemokines, indicating chemotactic differences in PMN signalling towards recruitment of further immune cells upon confrontation with Candida spp. Supernatants from co-incubations of neutrophils with C. glabrata primarily attracted monocytes and increased the phagocytosis of C. glabrata by monocytes. In contrast, PMN activation by C. albicans resulted in recruitment of more neutrophils. Two complex infection models confirmed distinct targeting of immune cell populations by the two Candida spp.: In a human whole blood infection model, C. glabrata was more effectively taken up by monocytes than C. albicans and histopathological analyses of murine model infections confirmed primarily monocytic infiltrates in C. glabrata kidney infection in contrast to PMN-dominated infiltrates in C. albicans infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the human opportunistic fungi C. albicans and C. glabrata are differentially recognized by neutrophils and one outcome of this differential recognition is the preferential uptake of C. glabrata by monocytes.

  6. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation.

  7. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation. PMID:24355223

  8. mTOR and differential activation of mitochondria orchestrate neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yi; Ledderose, Carola; Graf, Amelie F; Brix, Bianca; Birsak, Theresa; Lee, Albert; Zhang, Jingping; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2015-09-28

    Neutrophils use chemotaxis to locate invading bacteria. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and autocrine purinergic signaling via P2Y2 receptors at the front and A2a receptors at the back of cells regulate chemotaxis. Here, we examined the intracellular mechanisms that control these opposing signaling mechanisms. We found that mitochondria deliver ATP that stimulates P2Y2 receptors in response to chemotactic cues, and that P2Y2 receptors promote mTOR signaling, which augments mitochondrial activity near the front of cells. Blocking mTOR signaling with rapamycin or PP242 or mitochondrial ATP production (e.g., with CCCP) reduced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and membrane potential, and impaired cellular ATP release and neutrophil chemotaxis. Autocrine stimulation of A2a receptors causes cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation at the back of cells, which inhibits mTOR signaling and mitochondrial activity, resulting in uropod retraction. We conclude that mitochondrial, purinergic, and mTOR signaling regulates neutrophil chemotaxis and may be a pharmacological target in inflammatory diseases.

  9. mTOR and differential activation of mitochondria orchestrate neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yi; Ledderose, Carola; Graf, Amelie F.; Brix, Bianca; Birsak, Theresa; Lee, Albert; Zhang, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils use chemotaxis to locate invading bacteria. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and autocrine purinergic signaling via P2Y2 receptors at the front and A2a receptors at the back of cells regulate chemotaxis. Here, we examined the intracellular mechanisms that control these opposing signaling mechanisms. We found that mitochondria deliver ATP that stimulates P2Y2 receptors in response to chemotactic cues, and that P2Y2 receptors promote mTOR signaling, which augments mitochondrial activity near the front of cells. Blocking mTOR signaling with rapamycin or PP242 or mitochondrial ATP production (e.g., with CCCP) reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and membrane potential, and impaired cellular ATP release and neutrophil chemotaxis. Autocrine stimulation of A2a receptors causes cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation at the back of cells, which inhibits mTOR signaling and mitochondrial activity, resulting in uropod retraction. We conclude that mitochondrial, purinergic, and mTOR signaling regulates neutrophil chemotaxis and may be a pharmacological target in inflammatory diseases. PMID:26416965

  10. PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes activate neutrophils to increase production of hypochlorous acid, the oxidant capable of degrading nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasova, Irina I.; Vakhrusheva, Tatyana V.; Sokolov, Alexey V.; Kostevich, Valeria A.; Gusev, Alexandr A.; Gusev, Sergey A.; Melnikova, Viktoriya I.; Lobach, Anatolii S.

    2012-10-01

    Perspectives for the use of carbon nanotubes in biomedical applications depend largely on their ability to degrade in the body into products that can be easily cleared out. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWCNTs) were shown to be degraded by oxidants generated by peroxidases in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study we demonstrated that conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to c-SWCNTs does not interfere with their degradation by peroxidase/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system or by hypochlorite. Comparison of different heme-containing proteins for their ability to degrade PEG-SWCNTs has led us to conclude that the myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is the major oxidant that may be responsible for biodegradation of PEG-SWCNTs in vivo. MPO is secreted mainly by neutrophils upon activation. We hypothesize that SWCNTs may enhance neutrophil activation and therefore stimulate their own biodegradation due to MPO-generated HOCl. PEG-SWCNTs at concentrations similar to those commonly used in in vivo studies were found to activate isolated human neutrophils to produce HOCl. Both PEG-SWCNTs and c-SWCNTs enhanced HOCl generation from isolated neutrophils upon serum-opsonized zymosan stimulation. Both types of nanotubes were also found to activate neutrophils in whole blood samples. Intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of PEG-SWCNTs into mice induced an increase in percentage of circulating neutrophils and activation of neutrophils and macrophages in the peritoneal cavity, suggesting the evolution of an inflammatory response. Activated neutrophils can produce high local concentrations of HOCl, thereby creating the conditions favorable for degradation of the nanotubes. -- Highlights: ► Myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid is able to degrade CNTs. ► PEGylated SWCNTs stimulate isolated neutrophils to produce hypochlorous acid. ► SWCNTs are capable of activating neutrophils in blood samples. ► Activation of

  11. Neutrophil Elastase and Proteinase-3 Trigger G Protein-biased Signaling through Proteinase-activated Receptor-1 (PAR1)*

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Renaux, Bernard; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hollenberg, Morley D.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil proteinases released at sites of inflammation can affect tissue function by either activating or disarming signal transduction mediated by proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). Because PAR1 is expressed at sites where abundant neutrophil infiltration occurs, we hypothesized that neutrophil-derived enzymes might also regulate PAR1 signaling. We report here that both neutrophil elastase and proteinase-3 cleave the human PAR1 N terminus at sites distinct from the thrombin cleavage site. This cleavage results in a disarming of thrombin-activated calcium signaling through PAR1. However, the distinct non-canonical tethered ligands unmasked by neutrophil elastase and proteinase-3, as well as synthetic peptides with sequences derived from these novel exposed tethered ligands, selectively stimulated PAR1-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. This signaling was blocked by pertussis toxin, implicating a Gαi-triggered signal pathway. We conclude that neutrophil proteinases trigger biased PAR1 signaling and we describe a novel set of tethered ligands that are distinct from the classical tethered ligand revealed by thrombin. We further demonstrate the function of this biased signaling in regulating endothelial cell barrier integrity. PMID:24052258

  12. Purified and Recombinant Hemopexin: Protease Activity and Effect on Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tian; Liu, Jialin; Huang, Feng; van Engelen, Tjitske SR; Thundivalappil, Sujatha R; Riley, Frank E; Super, Michael; Watters, Alexander L; Smith, Ann; Brinkman, Nathan; Ingber, Donald E; Warren, H Shaw

    2016-01-01

    Infusion of the heme-binding protein hemopexin has been proposed as a novel approach to decrease heme-induced inflammation in settings of red blood cell breakdown, but questions have been raised as to possible side effects related to protease activity and inhibition of chemotaxis. We evaluated protease activity and effects on chemotaxis of purified plasma hemopexin obtained from multiple sources as well as a novel recombinant fusion protein Fc-hemopexin. Amidolytic assay was performed to measure the protease activity of several plasma-derived hemopexin and recombinant Fc-hemopexin. Hemopexin was added to the human monocyte culture in the presence of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and also injected into mice intravenously (i.v.) 30 min before inducing neutrophil migration via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of thioglycolate. Control groups received the same amount of albumin. Protease activity varied widely between hemopexins. Recombinant Fc-hemopexin bound heme, inhibited the synergy of heme with LPS on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production from monocytes, and had minor but detectable protease activity. There was no effect of any hemopexin preparation on chemotaxis, and purified hemopexin did not alter the migration of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity of mice. Heme and LPS synergistically induced the release of LTB4 from human monocytes, and hemopexin blocked this release, as well as chemotaxis of neutrophils in response to activated monocyte supernatants. These results suggest that hemopexin does not directly affect chemotaxis through protease activity, but may decrease heme-driven chemotaxis and secondary inflammation by attenuating the induction of chemoattractants from monocytes. This property could be beneficial in some settings to control potentially damaging inflammation induced by heme. PMID:26772775

  13. Neutrophil-Derived Proteases in the Microenvironment of Pancreatic Cancer -Active Players in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Klaus; Gaida, Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fibro-inflammatory microenvironment, consisting of activated pancreatic stellate cells, extracellular matrix proteins, and a variety of inflammatory cells, such as T cells, macrophages, or neutrophils. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells, which are found in nearly all cancers, including PDAC, often fail to eliminate the tumor, but conversely can promote its progression by altering the tumor microenvironment. Pancreatic cancer cells are able to attract polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) via tumor secreted chemokines and in human PDAC, PMN infiltrates can be observed in the vicinity of tumor cells and in the desmoplastic tumor stroma, which correlate with undifferentiated tumor growth and poor prognosis. The behavior of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils in the tumor micromilieu is not yet understood at a mechanistic level. It has been shown that PMN have the potential to kill tumor cells, either directly or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, but on the other side various adverse effects of PMN, such as promotion of aggressive tumor growth with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and increased metastatic potential, have been described. Recent therapeutic approaches for PDAC focus not only the tumor cell itself, but also elements of the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, the role of PMN and their derived products (e.g. cytokines, proteases) as a new vein for a therapeutic target should be critically evaluated in this context. This review summarizes the current understanding of the interplay between proteases of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils and pancreatic tumor cells and elements of the desmoplastic stroma. PMID:26929737

  14. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst.

    PubMed

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-10-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (-0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (-0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (-0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to

  15. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S.; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L. Jack

    2013-01-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (−0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (−0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (−0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with

  16. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst.

    PubMed

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-10-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (-0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (-0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (-0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to

  17. Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 are activated during TNF priming of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Seeds, M C; Jones, D F; Chilton, F H; Bass, D A

    1998-01-23

    Cytokines alter neutrophil (PMN) function during inflammation, and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) in vitro primes PMN such that receptor-mediated stimulation causes markedly enhanced release of arachidonic acid. We hypothesized that two Ca(2+)-dependent PLA2's in PMN might be activated during priming of the cell, thus affecting arachidonate release. A low molecular weight, secretory PLA2 was identified by enzymatic activity in the cell free supernates of primed or stimulated PMN, and in PMN disrupted by nitrogen cavitation. The enzymatic activity was calcium-dependent, acid stable, destroyed by dithiothreitol, and blocked by anti-sPLA2 antibodies. TNF caused secretion of sPLA2 and also caused an increase in cell-associated sPLA2 enzymatic activity. Activation and release were maximal with fMLP stimulation of TNF-primed PMN. Neutrophils also contained a cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2) characterized by enzymatic activity which was calcium dependent, enhanced by dithiothreitol, and blocked by anti-cPLA2 antibody. TNF caused a doubling of cPLA2 enzymatic activity which was associated with phosphorylation of the enzyme as judged by a migration shift on Western blots. Thus, TNF priming of human PMN caused marked increase in fMLP stimulated AA release in parallel to enhanced activity of two different PLA2's.

  18. Transient increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Traynor-Kaplan, A E; Thompson, B L; Harris, A L; Taylor, P; Omann, G M; Sklar, L A

    1989-09-15

    We recently showed that phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PIP3) was present in a unique lipid fraction generated in neutrophils during activation. Here, we demonstrate that the band containing this fraction isolated from thin layer chromatography consists primarily of PIP3 and that only small amounts of radiolabeled PIP3 exist prior to activation. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography of deacylated phospholipids from stimulated cells reveals an increase in a fraction eluting ahead of glycerophosphoinositol 4,5-P2. After removal of the glycerol we found that it coeluted with inositol 1,3,4-P3 when resubjected to high performance liquid chromatography. Thus, we have detected a second, novel form of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in activated neutrophils, PI-(3,4)P2. The elevation of PIP3 through the formyl peptide receptor is blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, implicating mediation of the increase in PIP3 by a guanosine triphosphate-binding (G) protein. The rise in PIP3 is not secondary to calcium elevation. Buffering the rise in intracellular calcium did not diminish the increase in PIP3. The elevation of PIP3 appears to occur during activation with physiological agonists, its level varying with the degree of activation. Leukotriene B4, which elicits many of the same responses as stimulation of the formyl peptide receptor but with minimal oxidant production, stimulates a much attenuated rise in PIP3. Isoproterenol, which inhibits oxidant production also reduces the rise in PIP3. Hence formation of PI(3,4)P2 and PIP3 (presumed to be PI(3,4,5)P3) correlates closely with the early events of neutrophil activation. PMID:2549071

  19. Thrombin and human plasma kallikrein inhibition during simulated extracorporeal circulation block platelet and neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kettner, C; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Reilly, T M; Knabb, R M; Kucich, U; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Colman, R W

    1998-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass causes hemorrhagic complications, and initiates a chemical and cellular inflammatory response. Contact of blood with synthetic surfaces leads to qualitative and quantitative alterations in platelets, neutrophils, complement, and contact systems. Despite the fact that cardiopulmonary bypass is carried out in the presence of high doses of heparin, there is significant activation of both platelets and neutrophils. Thrombin is protected on cell and fibrin surfaces from antithrombin, even in the presence of high doses of heparin (approximately 5 U/ml). We therefore studied the effect of a small (Mr = 497), highly effective (Ki = 41 pM), reversible tripeptide inhibitor of thrombin, DUP 714 (1 microM), in a well characterized model of simulated extracorporeal circulation. In the absence of DUP 714, platelet counts decreased by 75% 5 min after the start of extracorporeal bypass and increased to 48% at 120 min of recirculation. DUP 714 significantly preserved platelet counts, decreased plasma levels of platelet beta-thromboglobulin levels, but did not prevent a decrease in sensitivity of platelets to adenosine diphosphate. Kallikrein-C1-inhibitor and C1-C1-inhibitor complexes increased progressively from 0.32 U/ml to 0.67 U/ml and from 4.45 U/ml to 7.25 U/ml, respectively, during 120 min of recirculation without DUP 714. Addition of DUP 714 significantly inhibited kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complex formation but did not affect C1-C1-inhibitor complexes. In the absence of DUP 714, human neutrophil elastase levels rose from a baseline of 0.01 +/- 0.00 microg/ml to 1.18 +/- 0.21 microg/ml during 120 min of recirculation. Human neutrophil elastase release at 120 min was significantly inhibited in the presence of DUP 714 to 37% of the value with heparin alone. These results indicated that addition of this novel thrombin (and kallikrein) inhibitor to heparin preserved platelet counts, decreased platelet secretion, and provided the additional benefit of

  20. Gene Expression during the Generation and Activation of Mouse Neutrophils: Implication of Novel Functional and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Jeffrey A.; Duffau, Pierre; Yasuda, Kei; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Rothamel, Katherine; Rifkin, Ian R.; Monach, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen), gene expression was determined in unstimulated (circulating) mouse neutrophils and three populations of neutrophils activated in vivo, with comparison among these populations and to other leukocytes. Activation conditions included serum-transfer arthritis (mediated by immune complexes), thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, and uric acid-induced peritonitis. Neutrophils expressed fewer genes than any other leukocyte population studied in ImmGen, and down-regulation of genes related to translation was particularly striking. However, genes with expression relatively specific to neutrophils were also identified, particularly three genes of unknown function: Stfa2l1, Mrgpr2a and Mrgpr2b. Comparison of genes up-regulated in activated neutrophils led to several novel findings: increased expression of genes related to synthesis and use of glutathione and of genes related to uptake and metabolism of modified lipoproteins, particularly in neutrophils elicited by thioglycollate; increased expression of genes for transcription factors in the Nr4a family, only in neutrophils elicited by serum-transfer arthritis; and increased expression of genes important in synthesis of prostaglandins and response to leukotrienes, particularly in neutrophils elicited by uric acid. Up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis, response to microbial products, NFkB family members and their regulators, and MHC class II expression was also seen, in agreement with previous studies. A regulatory model developed from the ImmGen data was used to infer regulatory genes involved in the changes in gene expression during neutrophil activation. Among 64, mostly novel, regulatory genes predicted to influence these changes in gene expression, Irf5 was shown to be important for optimal secretion of IL-10, IP-10, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNF-α by mouse neutrophils in vitro after stimulation through TLR9. This data-set and its analysis using the ImmGen regulatory

  1. Mast cell activation and neutrophil recruitment promotes early and robust inflammation in the meninges in EAE.

    PubMed

    Christy, Alison L; Walker, Margaret E; Hessner, Martin J; Brown, Melissa A

    2013-05-01

    The meninges are often considered inert tissues that house the CSF and provide protection for the brain and spinal cord. Yet emerging data demonstrates that they are also active sites of immune responses. Furthermore, the blood-CSF barrier surrounding meningeal blood vessels, together with the blood-brain barrier (BBB), is postulated to serve as a gateway for the pathological infiltration of immune cells into the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous studies using mast cell-deficient (Kit(W/Wv)) mice demonstrated that mast cells resident in the dura mater and pia mater exacerbate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of MS, by facilitating CNS inflammatory cell influx. Here we examined the underlying mechanisms that mediate these effects. We demonstrate that there are dramatic alterations in immune associated gene expression in the meninges in pre-clinical disease, including those associated with mast cell and neutrophil function. Meningeal mast cells are activated within 24 h of disease induction, but do not directly compromise CNS vascular integrity. Rather, through production of TNF, mast cells elicit an early influx of neutrophils, cells known to alter vascular permeability, into the meninges. These data add to the growing evidence that inflammation in the meninges precedes CNS immune cell infiltration and establish that mast cells are among the earliest participants in these disease-initiating events. We hypothesize that mast cell-dependent neutrophil recruitment and activation in the meninges promotes early breakdown of the local BBB and CSF-blood barrier allowing initial immune cell access to the CNS.

  2. One-Step Chromatographic Purification of Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil-Activating Protein Expressed in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Kuo-Shun; Lin, Chih-Chang; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Yang, Yu-Chi; Wang, Chung-An; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), is capable of activating human neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secrete inammatory mediators. HP-NAP is a vaccine candidate, a possible drug target, and a potential in vitro diagnostic marker for H. pylori infection. HP-NAP has also been shown to be a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic asthma and bladder cancer. Hence, an efficient way to obtain pure HP-NAP needs to be developed. In this study, one-step anion-exchange chromatography in negative mode was applied to purify the recombinant HP-NAP expressed in Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). This purification technique was based on the binding of host cell proteins and/or impurities other than HP-NAP to DEAE Sephadex resins. At pH 8.0, almost no other proteins except HP-NAP passed through the DEAE Sephadex column. More than 60% of the total HP-NAP with purity higher than 91% was recovered in the flow-through fraction from this single-step DEAE Sephadex chromatography. The purified recombinant HP-NAP was further demonstrated to be a multimeric protein with a secondary structure of α-helix and capable of activating human neutrophils to stimulate ROS production. Thus, this one-step negative chromatography using DEAE Sephadex resin can efficiently yield functional HP-NAP from B. subtilis in its native form with high purity. HP-NAP purified by this method could be further utilized for the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics for H. pylori infection. PMID:23577158

  3. Plane of nutrition during the preweaning period but not the grower phase influences the neutrophil activity of Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, B S; Cobb, C J; Sellers, M D; Pepper-Yowell, A R; Earleywine, T J; Ballou, M A

    2013-01-01

    .6 kg of DM of the same concentrate per head per day. All calves were fed alfalfa hay (16.2% CP; DM basis) ad libitum. Overall, average daily gain was greater in HPN calves than LPN calves. No differences were noticed for concentrations of plasma urea nitrogen, glucose, neutrophil L-selectin expression, percentage of neutrophils producing OB, and plasma haptoglobin concentration between the 2 planes of nutrition. In summary, intake and performance were improved in calves fed the HPN than calves fed the LPN in both experiments. The neutrophil responses of calves fed an LPN were more active during the preweaning period than calves fed an HPN; however, this response was not observed during the immediate postweaning period or the grower phase. PMID:24035017

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of Perilla frutescens in activated human neutrophils through two independent pathways: Src family kinases and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Yu; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Sung, Wei-Che; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chung, Pei-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Yang, Hsuan-Wu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-01-01

    The leaves of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. have been traditionally used as an herbal medicine in East Asian countries to treat a variety diseases. In this present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of P. frutescens extract (PFE) on N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated human neutrophils and the underlying mechanisms. PFE (1, 3, and 10 μg/ml) inhibited superoxide anion production, elastase release, reactive oxygen species formation, CD11b expression, and cell migration in fMLF-activated human neutrophils in dose-dependent manners. PFE inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of the Src family kinases (SFKs), Src (Tyr416) and Lyn (Tyr396), and reduced their enzymatic activities. Both PFE and PP2 (a selective inhibitor of SFKs) reduced the phosphorylation of Burton’s tyrosine kinases (Tyr223) and Vav (Tyr174) in fMLF-activated human neutrophils. Additionally, PFE decreased intracellular Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i), whereas PP2 prolonged the time required for [Ca2+]i to return to its basal level. Our findings indicated that PFE effectively regulated the inflammatory activities of fMLF-activated human neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effects of PFE on activated human neutrophils were mediated through two independent signaling pathways involving SFKs (Src and Lyn) and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:26659126

  5. Phospholipase A{sub 2} is involved in the mechanism of activation of neutrophils by polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Tithof, P.K.; Schiamberg, E.; Ganey, P.E.; Peters-Golden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Aroclor 1242, a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), activates neutrophils to produce superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by a mechanism that involves phospholipase C-dependent hydrolysis of membrane phosphoinositides; however, subsequent signal transduction mechanisms are unknown. This study determines whether phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachidonic acid is involved in PCB-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production. O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production was measured in vitro in glycogen-elicited, rat neutrophils in the presence and absence of the inhibitors of phospholipase A{sub 2}: quinacrine, 4-bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), and manoalide. All three agents significantly decreased the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} detected during stimulation of neutrophils with Aroclor 1242. Similar inhibition occurred when neutrophils were activated with the classical stimuli, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate. The effects of BPB and manoalide were not a result of cytotoxicity or other nonspecific effects. Significant release of {sup 3}H-arachidonic acid preceded O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production in neutrophils stimulated with Aroclor 1242 or fMLP. Manoalide, at a concentration that abolished O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, also inhibited the release of {sup 3}H-arachidonate. Aspirin, zileuton, or WEB 2086 did not affect Aroclor 1242-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, suggesting that eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor are not needed for neutrophil activation by PCBs. Activation of phos-pholipase A{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production do not appear to involve the Ah receptor. These data suggest that Aroclor 1242 stimulates neutrophils to produce O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} by a mechanism that involves phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachiodonic acid. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Familial autoinflammation with neutrophilic dermatosis reveals a regulatory mechanism of pyrin activation.

    PubMed

    Masters, Seth L; Lagou, Vasiliki; Jéru, Isabelle; Baker, Paul J; Van Eyck, Lien; Parry, David A; Lawless, Dylan; De Nardo, Dominic; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Dagley, Laura F; Holley, Caroline L; Dooley, James; Moghaddas, Fiona; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Sciot, Raf; Lyras, Dena; Webb, Andrew I; Nicholson, Sandra E; De Somer, Lien; van Nieuwenhove, Erika; Ruuth-Praz, Julia; Copin, Bruno; Cochet, Emmanuelle; Medlej-Hashim, Myrna; Megarbane, Andre; Schroder, Kate; Savic, Sinisa; Goris, An; Amselem, Serge; Wouters, Carine; Liston, Adrian

    2016-03-30

    Pyrin responds to pathogen signals and loss of cellular homeostasis by forming an inflammasome complex that drives the cleavage and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Mutations in the B30.2/SPRY domain cause pathogen-independent activation of pyrin and are responsible for the autoinflammatory disease familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). We studied a family with a dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disease, distinct from FMF, characterized by childhood-onset recurrent episodes of neutrophilic dermatosis, fever, elevated acute-phase reactants, arthralgia, and myalgia/myositis. The disease was caused by a mutation in MEFV, the gene encoding pyrin (S242R). The mutation results in the loss of a 14-3-3 binding motif at phosphorylated S242, which was not perturbed by FMF mutations in the B30.2/SPRY domain. However, loss of both S242 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding was observed for bacterial effectors that activate the pyrin inflammasome, such as Clostridium difficile toxin B (TcdB). The S242R mutation thus recapitulated the effect of pathogen sensing, triggering inflammasome activation and IL-1β production. Successful therapy targeting IL-1β has been initiated in one patient, resolving pyrin-associated autoinflammation with neutrophilic dermatosis. This disease provides evidence that a guard-like mechanism of pyrin regulation, originally identified for Nod-like receptors in plant innate immunity, also exists in humans.

  7. Activity of lung neutrophils and matrix metalloproteinases in cyclophosphamide-treated mice with experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Mark; Carmel, Julie; Kaplan, Viktoria; Livne, Erella; Krausz, Michael M

    2004-01-01

    Sepsis in patients receiving chemotherapy may result in acute respiratory distress syndrome, despite decreased number of blood neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)]. In the present study, we investigated the correlation of cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced neutropenia with the destructive potential of lung PMN in respect to formation of septic acute lung injury (ALI). Mice were treated with 250 mg/kg of CY or saline (control) and subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham operation. ALI was verified by histological examination. Lung PMNs and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were assessed by flow cytometry and gelatin zymography. CLP in CY-treated mice induced a typical lung injury. Despite profound neutropenia, CY treatment did not attenuate CLP-induced ALI. This might relate to only a partial suppression of PMN: CY has significantly reduced PMN influx into the lungs (P = 0.008) and suppressed their oxidative metabolism, but had no suppressive effect on degranulation (P = 0.227) and even induced MMP-9 activity (P = 0.0003). In CY-untreated animals, peak of CLP-induced ALI coincided with massive PMN influx (P = 0.013), their maximal degranulation (P = 0.014) and activation of lung MMP-9 (P = 0.002). These findings may indicate an important role of the residual lung PMN and activation of MMP-9 in septic lung injury during CY chemotherapy. PMID:15255968

  8. Adaptation to Resistance Training Is Associated with Higher Phagocytic (but Not Oxidative) Activity in Neutrophils of Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomeu-Neto, João; Brito, Ciro José; Nóbrega, Otávio Toledo; Sousa, Vinícius Carolino; Oliveira Toledo, Juliana; Silva Paula, Roberta; Alves, David Junger Fonseca; Ferreira, Aparecido Pimentel; Franco Moraes, Clayton; Córdova, Cláudio

    2015-01-01

    Failure in antimicrobial activity contributes to high morbidity and mortality in the geriatric population. Little is known about the potential effect of resistance training (RT) on the functional properties of the innate immunity. This study aimed to investigate the influence of long-term RT on the endocytic and oxidative activities of neutrophils and monocytes in healthy older women. Our results indicate that the phagocytosis index (PhI) of neutrophils (but not of monocytes) in the RT-adapted group was significantly higher (P < 0.001; effect size, (d) = 0.90, 95% CI: [0.75–1.04]) compared to that in sedentary subjects. In contrast, the oxidative activity of either neutrophils or monocytes was not significantly influenced by RT. Also, total energy and carbohydrate intake as well as serum IL6 levels had a significant influence on the phagocytic activity of neutrophils (P = 0.04), being considered in the model. Multivariate regression identified the physical condition of the subject (β = 0.425; P = 0.01) as a significant predictor of PhI. In conclusion, circulating neutrophils of older women adapted to a long-term RT program expressed higher phagocytic activity. PMID:26524964

  9. Neutrophil bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus adherent on biological surfaces. Surface-bound extracellular matrix proteins activate intracellular killing by oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, M; Jaconi, M E; Dahlgren, C; Waldvogel, F A; Stendahl, O; Lew, D P

    1990-01-01

    The activation patterns of surface adherent neutrophils are modulated via interaction of extracellular matrix proteins with neutrophil integrins. To evaluate neutrophil bactericidal activity, Staphylococcus aureus adherent to biological surfaces were incubated with neutrophils and serum, and the survival of surface bacteria was determined. When compared to albumin-coated surfaces, the bactericidal activity of neutrophils adherent to purified human extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced (mean survival: 34.2% +/- 9.0% of albumin, P less than 0.0001) despite similar efficient ingestion of extracellular bacteria. Enhancement of killing was observed when surfaces were coated with purified constituents of extracellular matrix, i.e., fibronectin, fibrinogen, laminin, vitronectin, or type IV collagen. In addition to matrix proteins, the tetrapeptide RGDS (the sequence recognized by integrins) crosslinked to surface bound albumin was also active (survival: 74.5% +/- 5.5% of albumin, P less than 0.02), and fibronectin-increased killing was inhibited by soluble RGDS. Chemiluminescence measurements and experiments with CGD neutrophils revealed that both oxygen-dependent and -independent bactericidal mechanisms are involved. In conclusion, matrix proteins enhance intracellular bactericidal activity of adherent neutrophils, presumably by integrin recognition of RGDS-containing ligands. These results indicate a role for extracellular matrix proteins in the enhancement of the host defense against pyogenic infections. Images PMID:2394841

  10. Ascorbic acid supplementation diminishes microparticle elevations and neutrophil activation following SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Barak, Otto F; Dujic, Zeljko; Madden, Dennis; Bhopale, Veena M; Bhullar, Jasjeet; Thom, Stephen R

    2015-08-15

    Predicated on evidence that diving-related microparticle generation is an oxidative stress response, this study investigated the role that oxygen plays in augmenting production of annexin V-positive microparticles associated with open-water SCUBA diving and whether elevations can be abrogated by ascorbic acid. Following a cross-over study design, 14 male subjects ingested placebo and 2-3 wk later ascorbic acid (2 g) daily for 6 days prior to performing either a 47-min dive to 18 m of sea water while breathing air (∼222 kPa N2/59 kPa O2) or breathing a mixture of 60% O2/balance N2 from a tight-fitting face mask at atmospheric pressure for 47 min (∼40 kPa N2/59 kPa O2). Within 30 min after the 18-m dive in the placebo group, neutrophil activation, and platelet-neutrophil interactions occurred, and the total number of microparticles, as well as subgroups bearing CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142 proteins or nitrotyrosine, increased approximately twofold. No significant elevations occurred among divers after ingesting ascorbic acid, nor were elevations identified in either group after breathing 60% O2. Ascorbic acid had no significant effect on post-dive intravascular bubble production quantified by transthoracic echocardiography. We conclude that high-pressure nitrogen plays a key role in neutrophil and microparticle-associated changes with diving and that responses can be abrogated by dietary ascorbic acid supplementation.

  11. Ascorbic acid supplementation diminishes microparticle elevations and neutrophil activation following SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Barak, Otto F; Dujic, Zeljko; Madden, Dennis; Bhopale, Veena M; Bhullar, Jasjeet; Thom, Stephen R

    2015-08-15

    Predicated on evidence that diving-related microparticle generation is an oxidative stress response, this study investigated the role that oxygen plays in augmenting production of annexin V-positive microparticles associated with open-water SCUBA diving and whether elevations can be abrogated by ascorbic acid. Following a cross-over study design, 14 male subjects ingested placebo and 2-3 wk later ascorbic acid (2 g) daily for 6 days prior to performing either a 47-min dive to 18 m of sea water while breathing air (∼222 kPa N2/59 kPa O2) or breathing a mixture of 60% O2/balance N2 from a tight-fitting face mask at atmospheric pressure for 47 min (∼40 kPa N2/59 kPa O2). Within 30 min after the 18-m dive in the placebo group, neutrophil activation, and platelet-neutrophil interactions occurred, and the total number of microparticles, as well as subgroups bearing CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142 proteins or nitrotyrosine, increased approximately twofold. No significant elevations occurred among divers after ingesting ascorbic acid, nor were elevations identified in either group after breathing 60% O2. Ascorbic acid had no significant effect on post-dive intravascular bubble production quantified by transthoracic echocardiography. We conclude that high-pressure nitrogen plays a key role in neutrophil and microparticle-associated changes with diving and that responses can be abrogated by dietary ascorbic acid supplementation. PMID:26084697

  12. Mitochondrial DNA is released by shock and activates neutrophils via p38 map kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Hauser, Carl J

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial DNA (bDNA) can activate an innate-immune stimulatory "danger" response via toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is unique among endogenous molecules in that mitochondria evolved from prokaryotic ancestors. Thus, mtDNA retains molecular motifs similar to bDNA. It is unknown, however, whether mtDNA is released by shock or is capable of eliciting immune responses like bDNA. We hypothesized shock-injured tissues might release mtDNA and that mtDNA might act as a danger-associated molecular pattern (or "alarmin") that can activate neutrophils (PMNs) and contribute to systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Standardized trauma/hemorrhagic shock caused circulation of mtDNA as well as nuclear DNA. Human PMNs were incubated in vitro with purified mtDNA or nuclear DNA, with or without pretreatment by chloroquine (an inhibitor of endosomal receptors like TLR9). Neutrophil activation was assessed as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 8 and MMP-9 release as well as p38 and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Mitochondrial DNA induced PMN MMP-8/MMP-9 release and p38 phosphorylation but did not activate p44/42. Responses were inhibited by chloroquine. Nuclear DNA did not induce PMN activation. Intravenous injection of disrupted mitochondria (mitochondrial debris) into rats induced p38 MAPK activation and IL-6 and TNF-alpha accumulation in the liver. In summary, mtDNA is released into the circulation by shock. Mitochondrial DNA activates PMN p38 MAPK, probably via TLR9, inducing an inflammatory phenotype. Mitochondrial DNA may act as a danger-associated molecular pattern or alarmin after shock, contributing to the initiation of systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

  13. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis Participates in Pathogenesis of Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Neutrophil Activation. Proof of Concept in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Delbosc, Sandrine; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Journe, Clement; Louedec, Liliane; Castier, Yves; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Ruimy, Raymond; Rossignol, Patrick; Bouchard, Philippe; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Background Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs) represent a particular form of atherothrombosis where neutrophil proteolytic activity plays a major role. We postulated that neutrophil recruitment and activation participating in AAA growth may originate in part from repeated episodes of periodontal bacteremia. Methods and Findings Our results show that neutrophil activation in human AAA was associated with Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) formation in the IntraLuminal Thrombus, leading to the release of cell-free DNA. Human AAA samples were shown to contain bacterial DNA with high frequency (11/16), and in particular that of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), the most prevalent pathogen involved in chronic periodontitis, a common form of periodontal disease. Both DNA reflecting the presence of NETs and antibodies to Pg were found to be increased in plasma of patients with AAA. Using a rat model of AAA, we demonstrated that repeated injection of Pg fostered aneurysm development, associated with pathological characteristics similar to those observed in humans, such as the persistence of a neutrophil-rich luminal thrombus, not observed in saline-injected rats in which a healing process was observed. Conclusions Thus, the control of periodontal disease may represent a therapeutic target to limit human AAA progression. PMID:21533243

  15. Are Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Playing a Role in the Parasite Control in Active American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis Lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Fernanda Nazaré; Nascimento, Michelle T. C.; Saraiva, Elvira M.; de Oliveira-Ribeiro, Carla; Madeira, Maria de Fátima; da Costa-Santos, Marcela; Vasconcellos, Erica C. F.; F. Pimentel, Maria Ines; Rosandiski Lyra, Marcelo; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira; Conceição-Silva, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been described as a network of extracellular fibers composed by DNA, histones and various proteins/enzymes. Studies have demonstrated that NETs could be responsible for the trapping and elimination of a variety of infectious agents. In order to verify the presence of NETs in American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) and their relationship with the presence of amastigotes we evaluated active cutaneous lesions of 35 patients before treatment by the detection of parasites, neutrophils (neutrophil elastase) and histones through immunohistochemistry and confocal immunofluorescence. Intact neutrophils could be detected in all ATL lesions. NETs were present in 27 patients (median 1.1; range from 0.1 to 23.5/mm2) with lesion duration ranging from one to seven months. NETs were in close proximity with neutrophils (r = 0.586; p = 0.0001) and amastigotes (r = 0.710; p = 0.0001). Two patterns of NET formation were detected: small homogeneously distributed networks observed in all lesions; and large structures that could be visualized at a lower magnification in lesions presenting at least 20% of neutrophils. Lesions presenting the larger NET formation showed high parasite detection. A correlation between NET size and the number of intact amastigotes was observed (p=0.02). As we detected an association between NET and amastigotes, our results suggest that neutrophil migration and NET formation could be stimulated and maintained by stimuli derived from the parasite burden/parasite antigen in the extracellular environment. The observation of areas containing only antigens not intermingled with NETs (elastase and histone) suggests that the involvement of these structures in the control of parasite burden is a dynamic process in which the formation of NETs is exhausted with the destruction of the parasites. Since NETs were also associated with granulomas, this trapping would favor the activity of macrophages in order to control the parasite

  16. GDF-15 inhibits integrin activation and mouse neutrophil recruitment through the ALK-5/TGF-βRII heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Artz, Annette; Butz, Stefan; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2016-07-28

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is the first cytokine known to counteract chemokine-induced activation of leukocyte integrins. We showed recently that this activity dampens neutrophil recruitment into inflamed tissue and is required for survival of myocardial infarction in mice. The receptor responsible for this GDF-15-triggered anti-inflammatory mechanism on myeloid cells is not known. Here, we identify this receptor as transforming growth factor β receptor I (TGF-βRI) (activin receptor-like kinase 5 [ALK-5]) and TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII). We show that interference with these receptors by small-molecule inhibitors, antibodies, or small interfering RNA, blocked the GDF-15 effect on leukocyte integrin activation. Likewise, gene inactivation of each of the 2 receptors in neutrophils isolated from conditional gene-deficient mice abolished the inhibitory effect of GDF-15 on CXCL1-induced β2-integrin activation and neutrophil diapedesis. Rapid neutrophil arrest induced by CXCL1 in vivo was inhibited by GDF-15 in an ALK-5 and TGF-βRII dependent way. As for GDF-15 gene-deficient mice, we found that extravasation of neutrophils deficient for ALK-5 or TGF-βRII was strongly increased in the interleukin-1β inflamed cremaster. The inhibitory effects of GDF-15 on neutrophil integrin activation and in vivo neutrophil arrest were also found for TGF-β1. Mechanistically, GDF-15 and TGF-β1 interfered with integrin activation by inhibiting the activation of Ras-related protein 1 (Rap-1), an effect that depended on CalDAG- guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1) and cell division control protein 42 homolog. We conclude that both GDF-15 and TGF-β1 counteract chemokine-induced integrin activation on neutrophils via the ALK-5/TGF-βRII heterodimer. This represents a novel, rapid anti-inflammatory activity of the 2 TGF-β receptors and of TGF-β1. PMID:27235139

  17. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  18. Effect of decaglycerol monooleate on phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of human neutrophils: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Suzuki, K; Kudo, S; Yamada, M; Kowatari, K; Umeda, T; Nakaji, S; Sugawara, K

    2000-05-01

    Decaglycerol monooleate (DGMO), a type of polyglycerol esters of fatty acids (PGEF), was evaluated for its in vitro effect on phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of isolated human neutrophils using flow cytometric assay. Opsonized zymosan particles labelled with FITC (FITC-OZ) were employed as an indicator of phagocytosis. Fluorescence of FITC-OZ attached on to the surface of neutrophils was quenched by addition of trypan blue solution. After 10 minutes of incubation with DGMO up to a concentration of 10 mg/ml, neutrophil phagocytosis was not affected markedly. At the same time, the DGMO emulsion left little influence on complement receptor type three (CR3) that is associated with phagocytosis. On the other hand, oxidation of hydroethidine, which was used as an indicator of intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (mainly for superoxide anion), was significantly inhibited by DGMO over 1 mg/ml. However, this phenomenon was not seen in DGMO-treated neutrophils when DGMO was removed after incubation. The present data suggest that DGMO does not affect phagocytosis of human neutrophils but down-regulates respiratory burst activity.

  19. Impaired neutrophil activity and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection in mice lacking glucose-6-phosphatase–β

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yuk Yin; Kim, So Youn; Yiu, Wai Han; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Jun, Hyun-Sik; Ruef, Robert A.; Lee, Eric J.; Westphal, Heiner; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2007-01-01

    Neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are common in many diseases, although their etiology is often unclear. Previous views held that there was a single ER enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatase–α (G6Pase-α), whose activity — limited to the liver, kidney, and intestine — was solely responsible for the final stages of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, in which glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) is hydrolyzed to glucose for release to the blood. Recently, we characterized a second G6Pase activity, that of G6Pase-β (also known as G6PC), which is also capable of hydrolyzing G6P to glucose but is ubiquitously expressed and not implicated in interprandial blood glucose homeostasis. We now report that the absence of G6Pase-β led to neutropenia; defects in neutrophil respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and calcium flux; and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Consistent with this, G6Pase-β–deficient (G6pc3–/–) mice with experimental peritonitis exhibited increased expression of the glucose-regulated proteins upregulated during ER stress in their neutrophils and bone marrow, and the G6pc3–/– neutrophils exhibited an enhanced rate of apoptosis. Our results define a molecular pathway to neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction of previously unknown etiology, providing a potential model for the treatment of these conditions. PMID:17318259

  20. Activation of calpains mediates early lung neutrophilic inflammation in ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dejie; Yan, Zhibo; Minshall, Richard D.; Schwartz, David E.; Chen, Yuguo

    2012-01-01

    Lung inflammatory responses in the absence of infection are considered to be one of primary mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury. Here, we determined the role of calpain in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation attributable to mechanical ventilation. Male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h in the absence and presence of calpain inhibitor I (10 mg/kg). To address the isoform-specific functions of calpain 1 and calpain 2 during mechanical ventilation, we utilized a liposome-based delivery system to introduce small interfering RNAs targeting each isoform in pulmonary vasculature in vivo. Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volume induced rapid (within minutes) and persistent calpain activation and lung inflammation as evidenced by neutrophil recruitment, production of TNF-α and IL-6, pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability, and lung edema formation. Pharmaceutical calpain inhibition significantly attenuated these inflammatory responses caused by lung hyperinflation. Depletion of calpain 1 or calpain 2 had a protective effect against ventilator-induced lung inflammatory responses. Inhibition of calpain activity by means of siRNA silencing or pharmacological inhibition also reduced endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS-3)-mediated NO production and subsequent ICAM-1 phosphorylation following high tidal volume ventilation. These results suggest that calpain activation mediates early lung inflammation during ventilator-induced lung injury via NOS-3/NO-dependent ICAM-1 phosphorylation and neutrophil recruitment. Inhibition of calpain activation may therefore provide a novel and promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:22140070

  1. NADPH Oxidase-dependent Generation of Lysophosphatidylserine Enhances Clearance of Activated and Dying Neutrophils via G2A*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, S. Courtney; Berry, Karin Zemski; Fernandez-Boyanapalli, Ruby; Jin, Hyun-Sun; Leslie, Christina; Henson, Peter M.; Murphy, Robert C.; Bratton, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    Exofacial phosphatidylserine (PS) is an important ligand mediating apoptotic cell clearance by phagocytes. Oxidation of PS fatty acyl groups (oxPS) during apoptosis reportedly mediates recognition through scavenger receptors. Given the oxidative capacity of the neutrophil NADPH oxidase, we sought to identify oxPS signaling species in stimulated neutrophils. Using mass spectrometry analysis, only trace amounts of previously characterized oxPS species were found. Conversely, 18:1 and 18:0 lysophosphatidylserine (lyso-PS), known bioactive signaling phospholipids, were identified as abundant modified PS species following activation of the neutrophil oxidase. NADPH oxidase inhibitors blocked the production of lyso-PS in vitro, and accordingly, its generation in vivo by activated, murine neutrophils during zymosan-induced peritonitis was absent in mice lacking a functional NADPH oxidase (gp91phox-/-). Treatment of macrophages with lyso-PS enhanced the uptake of apoptotic cells in vitro, an effect that was dependent on signaling via the macrophage G2A receptor. Similarly, endogenously produced lyso-PS also enhanced the G2A-mediated uptake of activated PS-exposing (but non-apoptotic) neutrophils, raising the possibility of non-apoptotic mechanisms for removal of inflammatory cells during resolution. Finally, antibody blockade of G2A signaling in vivo prolonged zymosan-induced neutrophilia in wild-type mice, whereas having no effect in gp91phox-/- mice where lyso-PS are not generated. Taken together, we show that lyso-PS are modified PS species generated following activation of the NADPH oxidase and lyso-PS signaling through the macrophage G2A functions to enhance existing receptor/ligand systems for optimal resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:18824544

  2. Blood neutrophil bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Honoré, Stéphanie; Kirsch, Matthias; Plonquet, Anne; Fernandez, Eric; Touqui, Lhousseine; Farcet, Jean-Pierre; Soussy, Claude-James; Loisance, Daniel; Delclaux, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    Whether methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) constitutes per se an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality after surgery as compared with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) remains a subject of debate. The aim of this study was to assess whether innate defenses against MRSA and MSSA strains are similarly impaired after cardiac surgery. Both intracellular (isolated neutrophil functions) and extracellular (plasma) defenses of 12 patients undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery were evaluated preoperatively (day 0) and postoperatively (day 3) against two MSSA strains with a low level of catalase secretion and two MRSA strains with a high level of catalase secretion, inasmuch as SA killing by neutrophils relies on oxygen-dependent mechanisms. After surgery, an increase in plasma concentration of IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine able to inhibit reactive oxygen species secretion and bactericidal activity of neutrophils, was evidenced. Despite the fact that univariate analysis suggested a specific impairment of neutrophil functions against MRSA strains, two-way repeated-measures ANOVA failed to demonstrate that the effect of S. aureus phenotype was significant. On the other hand, an increase in type-II secretory phospholipase A2 activity, a circulating enzyme involved in SA lysis, was evidenced and was associated with an enhancement of extracellular defenses (bactericidal activity of plasma) against MRSA. Overall, cardiac surgery and S. aureus phenotype had a significant effect on plasma bactericidal activity. Cardiac surgery was characterized by enhanced antibacterial defenses of plasma, whereas neutrophil killing properties were reduced. The overall effect of S. aureus phenotype on neutrophil functions did not seem significant.

  3. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response. PMID:25013355

  4. Neutrophil priming occurs in a sequential manner and can be visualized in living animals by monitoring IL-1β promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yi; Matsushima, Hironori; Ohtola, Jennifer A.; Geng, Shuo; Lu, Ran; Takashima, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Rapid enhancement of phagocyte functionality is a hallmark of neutrophil priming. GeneChip analyses unveiled elevated CD54, dectin-2, and IL-1β mRNA expression by neutrophils isolated from inflammatory sites. In fact, CD54 and dectin-2 protein expression was detected on neutrophils recovered from skin, peritoneal and lung inflammation lesions, but not on those in bone marrow or peripheral blood. Neutrophils elevated CD54 and dectin-2 mRNA during migration in Boyden chambers and acquired CD54 and dectin-2 surface expression after subsequent exposure to GM-CSF. Neutrophils purified from IL-1β promoter-driven DsRed transgenic mice acquired DsRed signals during cell migration or exposure to GM-CSF. CD54 and dectin-2 were expressed by DsRed+ (but not DsRed–) neutrophils in GM-CSF-supplemented culture, and neutrophils recovered from inflammatory sites exhibited strong DsRed signals. The dynamic process of neutrophil priming was then studied in chemically induced inflammatory skin lesions by monitoring DsRed expression under confocal microscopy. A majority (>80%) of Ly6G+ neutrophils expressed DsRed, and those DsRed+/Ly6G+ cells exhibited crawling motion with a higher velocity compared to the DsRed–/Ly6G+ counterpart. This is the first report showing motile behaviors of primed neutrophils in living animals. We propose that neutrophil priming occurs in a sequential manner with rapid enhancement of phagocyte functionality followed by CD54 and dectin-2 mRNA and protein expression, IL-1β promoter activation, and accelerated motility. Not only do these findings provide a new conceptual framework for our understanding of the process of neutrophil priming, they also unveil new insights into the pathophysiology of many inflammatory disorders characterized by neutrophil infiltration. PMID:25527787

  5. C5-derived activity is required for complement neutrophil-mediated lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Morganroth, M.L.; Till, G.O.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-03-05

    Cobra venom factor (CVF) derived from the cobra species Naja naja (NN) is a complement activator (cleaves C3, C5 and terminal components) which causes neutrophil dependent acute lung injury and pulmonary hypertension in rats. CVF, derived from the cobra species Naja haje (NH), differs from NN-CVF in that only C3 is cleaved. The authors investigated in isolated blood perfused rat lungs if NH-CVF (n=5), a complement activator which does not generate C5 derived peptides, causes pulmonary hypertension and acute lung injury. NN-CVF (n=5) caused a transient increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure (PA) which returned toward baseline by 30 min (Peak ..delta.. PA = 17 +/- 6 mmHg). Lung injury occurred and was quantitated by the leak of /sup 125/I bovine serum albumin (/sup 125/I-BSA added 30 min post CVF) into lung parenchyma (lung/perfusate /sup 125/I-BSA counts: control = .09 +/- .01, NN-CVF = .48 +/- .11, p < .05). NH-CVF, in an amount which caused equipotent in vitro hemolysis of nonsensitized rabbit erythrocytes, did not cause a PA pressor response (3.5 +/- 1.1 mm Hg, p=NS) or acute lung injury (lung/perfusate /sup 125/I-BSA counts .11 +/- .01, p=NS). Similarly, NH-CVF did not appear to cause lung injury in intact rats (lung perfusate /sup 125/I-BSA counts: control .20 +/- .01, n=3; NH-CVF .25 +/- .05, n=3; NN-CVF .83 +/- .27, n=2). Thus, C3 cleavage alone without the generation of C5 derived peptides is an inadequate stimulus to elicit neutrophil-mediated acute lung injury.

  6. Active Ammonia Oxidizers in an Acidic Soil Are Phylogenetically Closely Related to Neutrophilic Archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baozhan; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Wang, Dongmei; He, Yuanqiu

    2014-01-01

    All cultivated ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the Nitrososphaera cluster (former soil group 1.1b) are neutrophilic. Molecular surveys also indicate the existence of Nitrososphaera-like phylotypes in acidic soil, but their ecological roles are poorly understood. In this study, we present molecular evidence for the chemolithoautotrophic growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in an acidic soil with pH 4.92 using DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Soil microcosm incubations demonstrated that nitrification was stimulated by urea fertilization and accompanied by a significant increase in the abundance of AOA rather than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Real-time PCR analysis of amoA genes as a function of the buoyant density of the DNA gradient following the ultracentrifugation of the total DNA extracted from SIP microcosms indicated a substantial growth of soil AOA during nitrification. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes in the “heavy” DNA fractions suggested that archaeal communities were labeled to a much greater extent than soil AOB. Acetylene inhibition further showed that 13CO2 assimilation by nitrifying communities depended solely on ammonia oxidation activity, suggesting a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analysis of both 13C-labeled amoA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that most of the active AOA were phylogenetically closely related to the neutrophilic strains Nitrososphaera viennensis EN76 and JG1 within the Nitrososphaera cluster. Our results provide strong evidence for the adaptive growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in acidic soil, suggesting a greater metabolic versatility of soil AOA than previously appreciated. PMID:24375137

  7. Changes in diacylglycerol labeling, cell shape, and protein phosphorylation distinguish triggering from activation of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Reibman, J.; Korchak, H.M.; Vosshall, L.B.; Haines, K.A.; Rich, A.M.; Weissmann, G.

    1988-05-05

    Upon activation neutrophils release reactive oxygen intermediates such as superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) which are potent mediators of inflammation. Various agents elicit different responses. In contrast, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 1.6 ..mu..M) acting directly via protein kinase C is a potent stimulus for O/sub 2//sup -/. The authors compared the kinetics of appearance of various second messengers with the capacity of these ligands to elicit O/sub 2//sup -/ generation. Kinetic analysis showed a two-phase response to membrane ligands; both an early (greater than or equal to 15 s) and a late (>15 s) increase in (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)diacylglycerol (DG) was noted in response to fMLP. In contrast, LTB/sub 4/ elicited only a rapid early increase in DG. The rise in DG evoked by PMA was late. Moreover, comparison of increases in (/sup 3/H)DG versus those of (/sup 14/C)DG at early and late time points suggested that DG was not formed exclusively from the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides. Kinetic analysis of protein phosphorylation was compared to the early and late increments of DG labeling. A 47,000 M/sub r/ protein was phosphorylated with kinetics consistent with the production of O/sub 2//sup -/ and DG in response to fMLP and PMA. The temporal pattern of the formation of diacylglycerol and the phosphorylation of proteins describe a dual signal. The data suggest that neutrophils require not only triggering (the rapid generation of a signal) but also activation (the maintenance of a signal) to sustain responses.

  8. Active ammonia oxidizers in an acidic soil are phylogenetically closely related to neutrophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baozhan; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Wang, Dongmei; He, Yuanqiu; Jia, Zhongjun

    2014-03-01

    All cultivated ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the Nitrososphaera cluster (former soil group 1.1b) are neutrophilic. Molecular surveys also indicate the existence of Nitrososphaera-like phylotypes in acidic soil, but their ecological roles are poorly understood. In this study, we present molecular evidence for the chemolithoautotrophic growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in an acidic soil with pH 4.92 using DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Soil microcosm incubations demonstrated that nitrification was stimulated by urea fertilization and accompanied by a significant increase in the abundance of AOA rather than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Real-time PCR analysis of amoA genes as a function of the buoyant density of the DNA gradient following the ultracentrifugation of the total DNA extracted from SIP microcosms indicated a substantial growth of soil AOA during nitrification. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes in the "heavy" DNA fractions suggested that archaeal communities were labeled to a much greater extent than soil AOB. Acetylene inhibition further showed that (13)CO2 assimilation by nitrifying communities depended solely on ammonia oxidation activity, suggesting a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analysis of both (13)C-labeled amoA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that most of the active AOA were phylogenetically closely related to the neutrophilic strains Nitrososphaera viennensis EN76 and JG1 within the Nitrososphaera cluster. Our results provide strong evidence for the adaptive growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in acidic soil, suggesting a greater metabolic versatility of soil AOA than previously appreciated.

  9. Increased cyclooxygenase activity impairs apoptosis of inflammatory neutrophils in mice lacking gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Plytycz, Barbara; Arnold, Bernd; Piccard, Helene; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)/gelatinase B plays an important role in neutrophil infiltration during inflammation and cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and their products are important regulators of inflammation. Recently, we reported that a genetic lack of MMP-9 impairs neutrophil infiltration during early zymosan-induced peritonitis but at later stages (> 24 hr) neutrophils persist in the peritoneal cavity. Here we show that this is the result of impaired apoptosis of MMP-9−/−-derived leucocytes. As enhanced COX-1 expression was reported in MMP-9−/− mice, we evaluated the hypothesis that altered COX expression induced the above phenomenon as COX-dependent prostaglandins can act either anti-apoptotically (PGE2) or pro-apoptotically (PGD2). The current data demonstrate that messenger RNA and protein expression of both COX isoforms and their activities are increased in MMP-9−/− mice during late peritonitis. Application of selective COX inhibitors revealed enhanced COX-1-dependent PGE2 production and impaired COX-2-dependent PGD2 synthesis in MMP-9−/− mice. Most importantly, inhibition of COX-1 abolished prolonged neutrophil accumulation in the peritoneal cavity of MMP-9−/− mice and increased apoptosis of inflammatory leucocytes. Similarly, weaker apoptosis of MMP-9−/− bone marrow neutrophils treated in vitro with zymosan was reversed by COX-1 inhibition. In conclusion, enhanced COX-1 expression is responsible for persistent neutrophil presence in the peritoneum of MMP-9−/− mice because of increased synthesis of anti-apoptotic PGE2. In non-transgenic mice, however, inflammatory leucocytes die apoptotically in the late stages of peritonitis as a result of COX-2-dependent PGD2 activity. Overall, we show a dependence of COX expression on the presence of MMP-9. PMID:19175797

  10. In vitro sensitivity of oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria to the bactericidal activity of human neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I

    1990-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in defending the periodontium against infection by oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria, such as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. We examined the sensitivity of these bacteria to a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and highly purified individual defensin peptides (HNP-1, HNP-2, and HNP-3) isolated from human neutrophils. Whereas the Capnocytophaga spp. strains were killed significantly by the mixed human neutrophil peptides, the A. actinomycetemcomitans and E. corrodens strains were resistant. Killing was attributable to the defensins. The bactericidal activities of purified defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2 were equal, and both of these activities were greater than HNP-3 activity against strains of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. The strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea was more sensitive to defensin-mediated bactericidal activity than either C. sputigena or C. gingivalis was. The three human defensins were equipotent in killing C. ochracea. C. ochracea was killed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and over a broad pH range. Killing was most effective under hypotonic conditions but also occurred at physiologic salt concentrations. We concluded that Capnocytophaga spp. are sensitive to oxygen-independent killing by human defensins. Additional studies will be required to identify other components that may equip human neutrophils to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens, and other oral gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:2254020

  11. Neutrophil extracellular traps that are not degraded in systemic lupus erythematosus activate complement exacerbating the disease.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Jonatan; Martin, Myriam; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Tydén, Helena; Lood, Christian; Truedsson, Lennart; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2012-04-01

    Ongoing inflammation including activation of the complement system is a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Antimicrobial neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are composed of secreted chromatin that may act as a source of autoantigens typical for SLE. In this study, we investigated how complement interacts with NETs and how NET degradation is affected by complement in SLE patients. We found that sera from a subset of patients with active SLE had a reduced ability to degrade in vitro-generated NETs, which was mostly restored when these patients were in remission. Patients that failed to degrade NETs had a more active disease and they also displayed lower levels of complement proteins C4 and C3 in blood. We discovered that NETs activated complement in vitro and that deposited C1q inhibited NET degradation including a direct inhibition of DNase-I by C1q. Complement deposition on NETs may facilitate autoantibody production, and indeed, Abs against NETs and NET epitopes were more pronounced in patients with impaired ability to degrade NETs. NET-bound autoantibodies inhibited degradation but also further increased C1q deposition, potentially exacerbating the disease. Thus, NETs are a potent complement activator, and this interaction may play an important role in SLE. Targeting complement with inhibitors or by removing complement activators such as NETs could be beneficial for patients with SLE.

  12. Evaluation of the Microbicidal Activity and Cytokines/Chemokines Profile Released by Neutrophils from HTLV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Caroline A.; Cardoso, Thiago M.; Giudice, Angela; Porto, Aurélia F.; Santos, Silvane B.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2011-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces activation and spontaneous proliferation of T cells with production of type-1 pro-inflammatory cytokines. It modifies the immune response to other antigens and increases susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, little is known about innate immunity in HTLV-1 infection. HTLV-1-infected individuals have higher spontaneous neutrophil activation than HTLV-1-seronegative individuals, as shown by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This study was conducted to evaluate neutrophil function in HTLV-1-infected individuals. Participants in the study included 18 HTLV-1-infected individuals and 14 HTLV-1-seronegative controls. We evaluated the ability of neutrophils (PMNs) to control a parasite infection, to produce peroxynitrite, cytokines and chemokines and to express activation markers in cultures when stimulated with LPS or infected with Leishmania. When compared with the control group, there was no difference in the percentage of PMNs infected with Leishmania or in the number of amastigotes/100 PMNs in HTLV-1-infected individuals. The microbicidal activity of the PMNs and the levels of CXCL8 and CCL4 released by these cells did not show a difference between HTLV-1-infected individuals and the control group. In both the HTLV-1 group and the control group, infection with Leishmania or stimulation of PMNs led to cellular activation. These observations suggest that neutrophils from HTLV-1-infected individuals have preserved their ability to become activated and to produce chemokines and peroxynitrite after stimulation and that the susceptibility to infection by intracellular Leishmania amazonensis in HTLV-1-infected individuals does not depend on impairment of neutrophil function. PMID:21595736

  13. Single-dose intravenous gammaglobulin can stabilize neutrophil Mac-1 activation in sickle cell pain crisis

    PubMed Central

    Manwani, Deepa; Chen, Grace; Carullo, Veronica; Serban, Stelian; Olowokure, Olugbenga; Jang, Jungeun; Huggins, Matthew; Cohen, Hillel W.; Billett, Henny; Atweh, George F.; Frenette, Paul S.; Shi, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) decreases neutrophil adhesion to endothelium and red blood cell-neutrophil interactions in sickle cell mice undergoing vaso-occlusion. In this Phase I clinical trial of sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients admitted with pain crisis, we evaluated the status of adhesion molecules on neutrophils in control and IVIG-treated subjects pre- and post-infusion up to 800 mg/kg, the same dose used in murine studies. Mac-1 function significantly decreased from baseline in the low-dose IVIG (200–400 mg/kg) cohorts. IVIG-related adverse events may have occurred in the high-dose (600–800 mg/kg) cohorts. There were no significant increases in neutrophil and leukocyte counts, suggesting that IVIG may more selectively inhibit Mac-1 function as opposed to neutrophil adhesion. This study provides the first in-human validation of pre-clinical murine studies that IVIG can decrease Mac-1 function. PMID:25616042

  14. Neutrophil elastase activity in differentiating HL-60 promyelocytes is decreased by culture with ethanol and elastase deficient neutrophils are produced in alcoholics

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, C.; Christianson, R.; Pratt, P.; Lynn, W.

    1987-05-01

    Serum-free culture of HL-60 in the presence of recombinant Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor in four days elicits a five-fold increase in esterolytic neutrophil elastase (NE) like activity measured with methoxy-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-val p-nitroanilide and purified NE standard but does not cause terminal differentiation. Simultaneous exposure to 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6% (vol./vol.) ethanol blocks this increase in NE activity. Exposure to 0.85% ethanol promotes terminal differentiation to elastase-deficient granulocytes which as been described using DMSO. To ascertain if ethanol may have similar effects on granulocytic differentiation in vivo, they compared oxidase and elastase activities of PMN's in male alcoholics on a binge (ethanol > 200 mg/dl.). In 29 patients an average of 872 (+/- 237) (SD) ng./10/sup 6/ PMN's of active NE was found compared to 1571 (+/- 177) in 13 controls. Patients admitted for treatment of alcoholism had similar NE activity in 3-4 days, showed a slight increase in activity within one week and had NE activity comparable to controls within 2-3 weeks. These findings support the previous observation that smoking related emphysema is less prevalent and severe in patients who regularly consume alcohol. They conclude that ethanol may visibly alter responsiveness of promyelocytic precursors to regulatory differentiating factors.

  15. Neutrophil extracellular traps downregulate lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Lorena; Bignon, Alexandre; Gueguen, Claire; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Gorges, Roseline; Sandré, Catherine; Mascarell, Laurent; Balabanian, Karl; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Pallardy, Marc; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) play a central role in inflammation and participate in its control, notably by modulating dendritic cell (DC) functions via soluble mediators or cell-cell contacts. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released by PMN could play a role in this context. To evaluate NET effects on DC maturation, we developed a model based on monocyte-derived DC (moDC) and calibrated NETs isolated from fresh human PMN. We found that isolated NETs alone had no discernable effect on moDC. In contrast, they downregulated LPS-induced moDC maturation, as shown by decreased surface expression of HLA-DR, CD80, CD83, and CD86, and by downregulated cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-23), with no increase in the expression of tolerogenic DC genes. Moreover, the presence of NETs during moDC maturation diminished the capacity of these moDC to induce T lymphocyte proliferation in both autologous and allogeneic conditions, and modulated CD4(+) T lymphocyte polarization by promoting the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) and reducing that of Th1 and Th17 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17). Interestingly, the expression and activities of the lymphoid chemokine receptors CCR7 and CXCR4 on moDC were not altered when moDC matured in the presence of NETs. Together, these findings reveal a new role for NETs in adaptive immune responses, modulating some moDC functions and thereby participating in the control of inflammation.

  16. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated silver nanoparticles: activation of neutrophils and nanotoxicology effects in human hepatocarcinoma and mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Paino, Iêda Maria Martinez; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2015-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNps) have been described as important for their excellent biocompatibility, biomedical applications. Nevertheless, AgNps can interact with the immune system which is essential to analyze human exposure to assess their potential risk to health and environment. In general, the primary site for accumulation of nanoparticles has been demonstrated to be the liver. Furthermore, the direct activation of neutrophils or oxidative burst by a given nanoparticle is poorly documented. In this paper, we investigated the cell uptake, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2), primary normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the direct activation of primary isolated neutrophils through the oxidative burst on exposure to AgNps coated with Polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA). All cell types were incubated in the presence of 1.0 and 50.0 μM of AgNps-PVA for 24h. A significant cyto- and genotoxic-response and the activation of human neutrophils were induced by AgNps-PVA (p<0.05). Our results revealed that AgNps can interact with the normal isolated neutrophils, PBMC and HepG2 cells in vitro, which opens the way for further studies on the toxicological effects of AgNps in the human immune system response and cancer cells. PMID:25681999

  17. Sub-cellular localisation of alkaline phosphatase activity in the cytoplasm of tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) neutrophils and eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Hulme-Moir, K Lisa; Clark, Phillip

    2011-07-15

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) has been used in studies of neutrophil morphology and function as a marker for identifying different granule populations. In human neutrophils, ALP is found within secretory vesicles, a rapidly mobilisable vesicle population important for upregulating membrane receptors during early activation. Intra-cellular ALP activity in the heterophils of rabbits and guinea pigs, in contrast, is found only in secondary granules. The neutrophils and eosinophils of tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) have previously been reported to contain large amounts of ALP activity when stained using routine cytochemical techniques. To define the subcellular location of ALP in this species, cell suspensions were examined using cerium chloride cytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). ALP was found in 2 distinct cytoplasmic compartments. One compartment displayed morphology consistent with a subpopulation of secondary granules while a second tubulo-vesicular population appeared similar to the secretory vesicles of human neutrophils. Thin tubular vesicles containing ALP were also identified within the cytoplasm of tammar wallaby eosinophils. Large numbers of ALP-containing vesicles have not been recognised previously in eosinophils and this may represent a novel cytoplasmic compartment. In both cell types, ALP-containing structures showed alteration in morphology following stimulation with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) and PMA. PMID:21596444

  18. The Neutrophil Nucleus and Its Role in Neutrophilic Function.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo Olivieri; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Neves, Anne Caroline Dias; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-09-01

    The cell nucleus plays a key role in differentiation processes in eukaryotic cells. It is not the nucleus in particular, but the organization of the genes and their remodeling that provides the data for the adjustments to be made according to the medium. The neutrophil nucleus has a different morphology. It is a multi-lobed nucleus where some researchers argue no longer function. However, studies indicate that it is very probable the occurrence of chromatin remodeling during activation steps. It may be that the human neutrophil nucleus also contributes to the mobility of neutrophils through thin tissue spaces. Questions like these will be discussed in this small review. The topics include morphology of human neutrophil nucleus, maturation process and modifications of the neutrophil nucleus, neutrophil activation and chromatin modifications, causes and consequences of multi-lobulated segmented morphology, and importance of the nucleus in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

  19. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS. PMID:27602092

  20. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS.

  1. Modification of cystatin C activity by bacterial proteinases and neutrophil elastase in periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, M; Wikström, M; Potempa, J; Renvert, S; Hall, A

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To study the interaction between the human cysteine proteinase inhibitor, cystatin C, and proteinases of periodontitis associated bacteria. METHODS: Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from discrete periodontitis sites and their cystatin C content was estimated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The interaction between cystatin C and proteolytic enzymes from cultured strains of the gingival bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was studied by measuring inhibition of enzyme activity against peptidyl substrates, by detection of break down patterns of solid phase coupled and soluble cystatin C, and by N-terminal sequence analysis of cystatin C products resulting from the interactions. RESULTS: Gingival crevicular fluid contained cystatin C at a concentration of approximately 15 nM. Cystatin C did not inhibit the principal thiol stimulated proteinase activity of P gingivalis. Instead, strains of P gingivalis and P intermedia, but not A actinomycetemcomitans, released cystatin C modifying proteinases. Extracts of five P gingivalis and five P intermedia strains all hydrolysed bonds in the N-terminal region of cystatin C at physiological pH values. The modified cystatin C resulting from incubation with one P gingivalis strain was isolated and found to lack the eight most N-terminal residues. The affinity of the modified inhibitor for cathepsin B was 20-fold lower (Ki 5 nM) than that of full length cystatin C. A 50 kDa thiol stimulated proteinase, gingipain R, was isolated from P gingivalis and shown to be responsible for the Arg8-bond hydrolysis in cystatin C. The cathepsin B inhibitory activity of cystatin C incubated with gingival crevicular fluid was rapidly abolished after Val10-bond cleavage by elastase from exudate neutrophils, but cleavage at the gingipain specific Arg8-bond was also demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: The physiological control of cathepsin B activity is impeded in

  2. Role of platelet-activating factor in polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment in reperfused ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Montrucchio, G; Alloatti, G; Mariano, F; Comino, A; Cacace, G; Polloni, R; De Filippi, P G; Emanuelli, G; Camussi, G

    1993-02-01

    This study investigated the role of platelet-activating factor in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. The accumulation of PMN was evaluated 2 and 24 hours after removal of 40 minutes of coronary occlusion by morphometric analysis and 111In-labeled PMN infiltration. The administration of two structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonists (SDZ 63-675, 5 mg/kg body weight, and WEB 2170, 5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the accumulation of PMN, as well as the hemodynamic alterations and the size of necrotic area. Two hours after reperfusion, the percentage of increase of 111In-labeled PMN in transmural central ischemic zone was significantly reduced in rabbits pretreated with SDZ 63-675 (51.4 +/- 7.9) or WEB 2170 (32.4 +/- 8.8) with respect to untreated rabbits (107.6 +/- 13.5). The morphometric analysis of myocardial sections confirmed the reduction of PMN infiltration at 2 hours and demonstrated that at 24 hours the phenomenon was even more significant. In addition, SDZ 63-675 and WEB 2170 prevented early transient bradycardia and hypotension and reduced the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, and by histological examination at 24 hours. These results suggest that platelet-activating factor is involved in the accumulation of PMN in the reperfused ischemic myocardium and contributes to the evolution of myocardial injury.

  3. Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Associated Protein Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Is Enhanced in Lupus Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenberg, J. Michelle; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Smith, Carolyne K.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an important defense mechanism against microorganisms. Clearance of NETs is impaired in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), while NETosis is increased in neutrophils and, particularly, in low-density granulocytes derived from lupus patients. NETs are toxic to the endothelium, expose immunostimulatory molecules, activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells and may participate in organ damage through incompletely characterized pathways. In order to better understand the role of NETs in fostering dysregulated inflammation, we examined inflammasome activation in response to NETs or to LL-37, an antibacterial protein externalized on the NETs. Both NETs and LL-37 activate caspase-1, the central enzyme of the inflammasome, in both human and murine macrophages, resulting in release of active IL-1β and IL-18. LL-37 activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome utilizes P2×7 receptor-mediated potassium efflux. NET and LL-37-mediated activation of the inflammasome is enhanced in macrophages derived from lupus patients. In turn, IL-18 is able to stimulate NETosis in human neutrophils. These results suggest that enhanced formation of NETs in lupus patients can lead to increased inflammasome activation in adjacent macrophages. This leads to release of inflammatory cytokines which further stimulate NETosis, resulting in a feed-forward inflammatory loop that could potentially lead to disease flares and/or organ damage. PMID:23267025

  4. Neutrophil extracellular trap-associated protein activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome is enhanced in lupus macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kahlenberg, J Michelle; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Smith, Carolyne K; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2013-02-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an important defense mechanism against microorganisms. Clearance of NETs is impaired in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and NETosis is increased in neutrophils and, particularly, in low-density granulocytes derived from lupus patients. NETs are toxic to the endothelium, expose immunostimulatory molecules, activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and may participate in organ damage through incompletely characterized pathways. To better understand the role of NETs in fostering dysregulated inflammation, we examined inflammasome activation in response to NETs or to LL-37, an antibacterial protein externalized on NETs. Both NETs and LL-37 activate caspase-1, the central enzyme of the inflammasome, in both human and murine macrophages, resulting in release of active IL-1β and IL-18. LL-37 activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome utilizes P2X7 receptor-mediated potassium efflux. NET and LL-37-mediated activation of the inflammasome is enhanced in macrophages derived from lupus patients. In turn, IL-18 is able to stimulate NETosis in human neutrophils. These results suggest that enhanced formation of NETs in lupus patients can lead to increased inflammasome activation in adjacent macrophages. This leads to release of inflammatory cytokines that further stimulate NETosis, resulting in a feed-forward inflammatory loop that could potentially lead to disease flares and/or organ damage.

  5. Cationic additives in nanosystems activate cytotoxicity and inflammatory response of human neutrophils: lipid nanoparticles versus polymeric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    This report compares the effect of lipid and polymeric nanoparticles upon human neutrophils in the presence of cationic surfactants. Nanostructured lipid carriers and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles were manufactured as lipid and polymeric systems, respectively. Some cytotoxic and proinflammatory mediators such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elastase, O2•−, and intracellular Ca2+ were examined. The nanoparticles showed a size of 170–225 nm. Incorporation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate, the cationic surfactant, converted zeta potential from a negative to a positive charge. Nanoparticles without cationic surfactants revealed a negligible change on immune and inflammatory responses. Cationic surfactants in both nanoparticulate and free forms induced cell death and the release of mediators. Lipid nanoparticles generally demonstrated a greater response compared to polymeric nanoparticles. The neutrophil morphology observed by electron microscopy confirmed this trend. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the coating material showed more significant activation of neutrophils than soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate. Confocal microscope imaging displayed a limited internalization of nanoparticles into neutrophils. It is proposed that cationic nanoparticles interact with the cell membrane, triggering membrane disruption and the following Ca2+ influx. The elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induces degranulation and oxidative stress. The consequence of these effects is cytotoxicity and cell death. Caution should be taken when selecting feasible nanoparticulate formulations and cationic additives for consideration of applicability and toxicity. PMID:25609950

  6. The effect of maximal exercise on the activity of neutrophil granulocytes in highly trained athletes in a moderate training period.

    PubMed

    Hack, V; Strobel, G; Rau, J P; Weicker, H

    1992-01-01

    Leucocyte cell counts and the phagocytic and chemotactic activities of neutrophil granulocytes were investigated in highly endurance-trained long-distance runners (n = 10) and triathletes (n = 10) during a moderate training period and compared with untrained subjects (n = 10) before and up to 24 h after a graded exercise to exhaustion on a treadmill. After exercise a leucocytosis was noted with a significant increase in lymphocyte (P < or = 0.01) and neutrophil (P < or = 0.01) counts in all groups. In neutrophils the number of ingested inert latex beads was significantly increased (P < or = 0.01) from 0.21 (SD 0.09) to 0.45 (SD 0.22) in controls, from 0.20 (SD 0.12) to 0.56 (SD 0.16) in long-distance runners and from 0.25 (SD 0.08) to 1.03 (SD 0.42) particles per cell in triathletes 24 h after exercise, compared with resting values. The capability of neutrophils to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species fell (P < or = 0.05) immediately after exercise in all subjects and then increased by 36 (SD 8)%, 31 (SD 6)% and 19 (SD 9)% in controls, runners and triathletes respectively up to 24 h after exercise (P < or = 0.05) compared with pre-start values. With respect to the absolute number of neutrophils, ingestion capacity, production of superoxide anions and chemotactic activity, no significant differences were found between athletes and control subjects at rest and after exercise.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Iron-chelating agent, deferasirox, inhibits neutrophil activation and extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Kono, Mari; Saigo, Katsuyasu; Yamamoto, Shiori; Shirai, Kohei; Iwamoto, Shuta; Uematsu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Takayuki; Imoto, Shion; Hashimoto, Makoto; Minami, Yosuke; Wada, Atsushi; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Kawano, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    Iron-chelating agents, which are frequently prescribed to transfusion-dependent patients, have various useful biological effects in addition to chelation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by neutrophils can cause pulmonary endothelial cell damage, which can lead to acute lung injury (ALI). We previously reported that deferasirox (DFS), an iron-chelating agent, inhibits phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced ROS production in neutrophils, in vitro. Here, we investigate whether DFS inhibits vacuolization in neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. Human neutrophils were incubated with DFS and stimulated with PMA or fMLP. Human neutrophils were separated from heparinized peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation, and subsequently incubated with DFS. After 10 minutes, neutrophils were stimulated by PMA or fMLP. Vacuole formation was observed by electron microscopy. For observing NET formations using microscopes, immunohistological analyses using citrullinated histone H3 and myeloperoxidase antibodies, and SYTOX Green (an impermeable DNA detection dye) staining, were conducted. NET formation was measured as the quantity of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), using the AccuBlue Broad Range dsDNA Quantitation Kit. DFS (50 μmol/L) inhibited vacuole formation in the cytoplasm and NET formation. Additionally, 5-100 μmol/L concentration of DFS inhibited the release of dsDNA in a dose-independent manner. We demonstrate that DFS inhibits not only ROS production but also vacuolization and NET formation in neutrophils. These results suggest the possibility of protective effects of DFS against NET-related adverse effects, including ALI and thrombosis. PMID:27333499

  8. Activation of neutrophils in the microvasculature of the ischaemic and reperfused myocardium.

    PubMed

    Tillmanns, H; Neumann, F J; Tiefenbacher, C; Dorigo, O; Parekh, N; Waas, W; Zimmermann, R; Steinhausen, M; Kuebler, W

    1993-11-01

    In 11 rats, the microcirculation of the repeatedly ischaemic (stunned) left ventricular myocardium was studied using in vivo fluorescence microscopy. Stunning was provoked by six subsequent 10 min ligations of the left anterior descending coronary artery, each of them followed by a 20 min reperfusion period. In the stunned myocardium showing hypokinetic wall motion, myocardial blood flow dropped by 55%; in this region, leukocytes often appeared in slow-flow capillaries plugging capillary branches. Closely linking to leukocyte adherence, a rise of microvascular permeability was documented by extravascular clouds of fluorescent dextran. After nifedipine treatment, in ischaemic regions marked dilatation of larger A1 and A2 arterioles was noted, in addition to the ischaemia-induced dilatation of smaller A3 and A4 arterioles. Furthermore nifedipine and nisoldipine reduced the number of adherent leukocytes in post-capillary venules and capillaries of the repeatedly ischaemic myocardium. In 12 patients with coronary one-vessel disease and without previous transmural myocardial infarction, elective coronary angioplasty (PTCA) was performed (balloon inflation for 2 min). After elective PTCA of the LAD, a significant rise in the proportion of activated neutrophils was noted. After elective 2 min PTCA of the LAD, coronary sinus blood samples showed a marked rise of FMLC stimulated superoxide anion production, whereas passive deformability decreased considerably. Furthermore, an increase in chemotactic activity in coronary sinus blood samples was observed.

  9. Endothelium and the effect of activated neutrophils on arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sotnikova, Ruzena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the involvement of the endothelium in the effects of neutrophils (PMNL) on phenylephrine-precontracted isolated rings of the rat thoracic aorta and to compare their effects with those of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Activated PMNL-induced contraction of the precontracted aorta was prevented by the blockade of NO-synthase and by endothelium removal. In the endothelium-free preparations, the effect of PMNL reappeared in the presence of sodium nitroprusside. The effect of ONOO– and HOCl significantly differed from that of activated PMNL both in the presence and absence of the endothelium. It is therefore likely that neither ONOO– nor HOCl generated by transformation of superoxide anion radical (O2•–) produced by PMNL is involved in their action. Reduction of the relaxant effect of nitric oxide derived from the endothelium by O2•– seems to be the keystone mechanism in generation of PMNL-induced contraction. PMID:27486359

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to HIV-infected subjects augments reduced leukotriene synthesis and anticryptococcal activity in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M J; Phare, S M; George, S; Peters-Golden, M; Kazanjian, P H

    1998-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) dysfunction occurs in HIV infection. Leukotrienes (LT) are mediators derived from the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway that play a role in host defense and are synthesized by PMN. We investigated the synthesis of LT by PMN from HIV-infected subjects. There was a reduction (4.0+/-1.3% of control) in LT synthesis in PMN from HIV-infected compared with normal subjects. This was associated with reduced expression of 5-LO-activating protein (31.2+/-9.6% of normal), but not of 5-LO itself. Since HIV does not directly infect PMN, we considered that these effects were due to reduced release of cytokines, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We examined the effect of G-CSF treatment (300 microgram daily for 5 d) on eight HIV-infected subjects. PMN were studied in vitro before therapy (day 1) and on days 4 and 7. LTB4 synthesis was increased on day 4 of G-CSF treatment, and returned toward day 1 levels on day 7. 5-LO and 5-LO-activating protein expression were increased in parallel. As a functional correlate to this increase in PMN LT synthesis by G-CSF, we examined the effects on killing of Cryptococcus neoformans. Anticryptococcal activity of PMN from HIV-infected subjects was less than that of PMN from normal subjects. G-CSF treatment improved fungistatic activity of PMN. This increase in antifungal activity was attenuated by in vitro treatment with the LT synthesis inhibitor, MK-886. In conclusion, PMN from HIV-infected subjects demonstrate reduced 5-LO metabolism and antifungal activity in vitro, which was reversed by in vivo G-CSF therapy. PMID:9710433

  11. Chemotactic activity from rabbit peritoneal neutrophils. Lack of identity with N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-napthyl esterase.

    PubMed

    Tsung, P K; Showell, H J; Kegeles, S W; Becker, E L

    1976-08-12

    The chemotactic and N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-naphthyl esterase activities of rabbit peritoneal neutrophils are separable from each other by both DEAE cellulose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. Partially purified esterase obtained from DEAE-cellulose chromatography had molecular weight of 70 000. However, the partially purified fraction contained chemotactic activities with major activity in molecular weight of 28000 and minor activities in the molecular weights of 45000, 21900, 14500 and 10500. Esterase activity is inhibited by 10(-7) M p-nitrophenylethyl-5-chloropentylphosphonate but chemotactic activity is not.

  12. CD43 deficiency has no impact in competitive in vivo assays of neutrophil or activated T cell recruitment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Carlow, Douglas A; Ziltener, Hermann J

    2006-11-01

    Using noncompetitive methodologies comparing CD43(+/+) and CD43(-/-) mice, it has been reported that CD43(-/-) leukocytes exhibit reduced recruitment efficiency to sites of inflammation. More recent analyses demonstrate that CD43 on activated T cells can function as an E-selectin ligand (E-SelL) in vitro, suggesting that CD43 might promote rolling interactions during recruitment of leukocytes and account for the reported recruitment deficits in CD43(-/-) T cells and neutrophils in vivo. Internally controlled competitive in vivo methods using fluorescent tracking dyes were applied to compare recruitment efficiency of CD43(+/+) vs CD43(-/-) activated T cells to inflamed skin and of peripheral blood neutrophils to inflamed peritoneum. A simple CFSE perfusion method was developed to distinguish arterial/venous vasculature and confirm appropriate extravasation through venules in a Con A-induced cutaneous inflammation model. In vivo recruitment of peripheral blood neutrophils to inflamed peritoneum was core 2 GlcNAcT-I dependent, but recruitment efficiency was not influenced by absence of CD43. There were also no significant differences in core 2 GlcNAcT-I-dependent, selectin-dependent, cutaneous recruitment of activated T cells from CD43(+/+) and congenic CD43(-/-) mice in either B6 or P-selectin(-/-) recipients despite biochemical confirmation that a CD43-specific E-SelL was present on activated T cells. We conclude that recruitment of neutrophils and activated T cells in these in vivo models is not influenced by CD43 expression and that if CD43 on activated T cells performs an E-SelL function in vivo, it contributes in a limited physiological context.

  13. Autocrine enhancement of leukotriene synthesis by endogenous leukotriene B4 and platelet-activating factor in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, P. P.; McColl, S. R.; Braquet, P.; Borgeat, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), two potent lipid mediators synthesized by activated neutrophils, are known to stimulate several neutrophil functional responses. In this study, we have determined that endogenous LTB4 and PAF exert autocrine effects on LT synthesis, as well as the underlying mechanism involved. 2. Pretreatment of neutrophils with either pertussis toxin (PT), or with receptor antagonists for LTB4 and PAF, resulted in an inhibition of LT synthesis induced by calcium ionophore, A23187. This inhibition was most marked at submaximal (100-300 nM) A23187 concentrations, whilst it was least at ionophore concentrations which induce maximal LT synthesis (1-3 microM). Thus newly-synthesized PAF and LTB4 can enhance LT synthesis induced by A23187 under conditions where the LT-generating system is not fully activated. 3. In recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-primed neutrophils, LT synthesis in response to chemoattractants (fMet-Leu-Phe or rhC5a) was also significantly inhibited by the LTB4 receptor antagonist, and to a lesser extent by PAF receptor antagonists. 4. Further investigation revealed that LTB4 and/or PAF exert their effects on LT synthesis via an effect on arachidonic acid (AA) availability, as opposed to 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation. Indeed, the receptor antagonists, as well as PT, inhibited LT synthesis and AA release to a similar extent, whereas 5-LO activation (assessed with an exogenous 5-LO substrate) was virtually unaffected under the same conditions. Accordingly, we showed that addition of exogenous LTB4 could enhance AA availability in response to chemoattractant challenge in rhGM-CSF-primed cells, without significantly affecting the 5-LO activation status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019762

  14. Nafamostat mesilate, a broad spectrum protease inhibitor, modulates platelet, neutrophil and contact activation in simulated extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, S; Gikakis, N; Hack, C E; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Koneti Rao, A; Sun, L; Cooper, S L; Colman, R W

    1996-01-01

    Activation of humoral and cellular participants in inflammation enhances the risk of postoperative bleeding and multiple organ damage in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We now compare the effects of heparin alone in combination with nafamostat mesilate (NM), a protease inhibitor with specificity of trypsin-like enzymes, in an extracorporeal circuit which simulates CPB. NM significantly inhibits the release of platelet beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) at 60 and 120 min. Platelet counts do not differ. ADP-induced aggregation decreases in circuits with NM, which is due to a direct effect of NM on platelet function. NM prevents any significant release of neutrophil elastase; at 120 min, plasma elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complex is 0.16 micrograms/ml in the NM group and 1.24 micrograms/ml in the control group. NM completely inhibits formation of complexes of C1 inhibitor with kallikrein and FXIIa. NM does not alter markers of complement activation (C1-C1-inhibitor complex and C5b-9), or indicators of thrombin formation (F1.2). However, at 120 min, thrombin activity as measured by release of fibrinopeptide A is significantly decreased. The data indicate that complement activation during CPB correlates poorly with neutrophil activation and that either kallikrein or FXIIa or both may be more important agonists. The ability of NM to inhibit two important contact system proteins and platelet and neutrophil release raises the possibility of suppressing the inflammatory response during clinical CPB.

  15. Formation of the Ca2+-activated photoprotein obelin from apo-obelin and mRNA inside human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, A K; Patel, A K; Razavi, Z S; McCapra, F

    1988-01-01

    1. A method has been developed to incorporate the apoprotein of the Ca2+-activated photoprotein obelin, and mRNA purified from the hydroid Obelia, into the cytoplasm of intact human neutrophils. This was based on internal release from pH-sensitive immunoliposomes taken up initially by phagocytosis. 2. Addition of the prosthetic group of obelin, coelenterazine, to these cells containing apo-obelin or Obelia mRNA resulted in formation of active Ca2+-activated obelin. 3. The obelin formed within the neutrophils responded to the chemotactic peptide N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (1 microM) and to the membrane attack complex of complement (C5B6789n). 4. The formation of the apo-obelin from mRNA within neutrophils was inhibited by over 80% in the absence of added amino acids, and by over 90% by the protein-synthesis inhibitor puromycin (100 micrograms/ml). 5. The translation of Obelia mRNA inside cells provides a method for circumventing consumption of Ca2+-activated photoproteins during cell activation or injury, and for monitoring protein synthesis in living cells. PMID:3421897

  16. Chemotactic and enzyme-releasing activity of amphipathic proteins for neutrophils. A possible role for protease in chemotaxis on substratum-bound protein gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P C; Bradley, G R

    1981-01-01

    The purified amphipathic proteins, alpha s 1-casein, beta-casein, and alkali-denatured serum albumin were studied for chemotactic and enzyme-releasing effects on human neutrophil leucocytes. Evidence for chemotaxis both in fluid-phase gradients and on solid-phase gradients was obtained using visual assays. In fluid-phase gradients, neutrophils showed good orientation to gradient sources of these proteins at concentrations of 10(-4) to 10(-5) M. Solid-phase gradients of casein and of denatured albumin were prepared on glass coverslips, and the locomotion of neutrophils attached to these coverslips was filmed by time-lapse cinematography. Displacement of neutrophils towards the highest concentration of substratum-bound protein was observed, suggesting that neutrophils can show true chemotaxis on a solid-phase gradient. All three proteins induced enzyme release from neutrophils in the absence of cytochalasin B. Lysozyme release was equivalent to that released by stimulation with formyl methionyl peptide in the presence of cytochalasin B, but the proteins stimulated a smaller release of beta-glucuronidase than the peptide. The proteins stimulated release of neutrophil proteases which were able to digest both casein and denatured albumin extracellularly. It is suggested that this proteolytic activity may assist locomotion of neutrophils, especially on solid-phase protein gradients, by cleaving membrane-attached protein, thus both freeing cell-surface receptors and allowing the cell to detach itself from the substratum and continue movement. Images Figure 1 PMID:7016748

  17. Activation of Adenosine 2A receptor inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in an autophagy-dependent manner in mice with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Wuyue; Yang, Ting; Zhao, Li; Ni, Zhenhong; Yang, Nan; He, Fengtian; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an overwhelming whole body inflammation caused by infectious diseases or sterile insults. Neutrophils are the dominant participants during inflammation, and their survival and death determine the initiation as well as resolution of SIRS. Apoptosis and autophagy are two fundamental cellular processes that modulating cell fate, but their correlation and regulators in neutrophils under SIRS condition have not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that high dose of LPS induced both apoptosis and autophagy of neutrophils in a mouse SIRS model and LPS-stimulated neutrophils in vitro. Moreover, we found that the adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR), a known anti-inflammatory G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), could inhibit LPS-induced neutrophil apoptosis by suppressing the LPS-induced autophagy. Activation of A2AR suppressed LPS-induced autophagy by inhibiting the ROS-JNK pathway as well as promoting GPCR βϒ subunit-AKT signaling. The A2AR-inhibited autophagy suppressed apoptosis of neutrophils by blocking caspase8, caspase3 and PARP signaling. These findings not only increase our understandings of neutrophils' fate and function in response to systemic inflammation, but also identify a novel anti-inflammatory role of A2AR in modulating neutrophils' survival during inflammation. PMID:27647162

  18. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Activation of Dendritic Cells and Neutrophils Depends on the Dose and Time of Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shirong; Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Rahmat, Juwita N; Tham, Sin Mun; Bay, Boon Huat; Lee, Yuan Kun; Mahendran, Ratha

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) to activate DC and neutrophils and modulate T cell activation and the impact of bacterial dose on these responses. Murine bone marrow derived DC or neutrophils were stimulated with LGG at ratios of 5 : 1, 10 : 1, and 100 : 1 (LGG : cells) and DC maturation (CD40, CD80, CD86, CD83, and MHC class II) and cytokine production (IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p70) were examined after 2 h and 18 h coculture and compared to the ability of BCG (the present immunotherapeutic agent for bladder cancer) to stimulate these cells. A 2 h exposure to 100 : 1 (high dose) or an 18 h exposure to 5 : 1 or 10 : 1 (low dose), LGG : cells, induced the highest production of IL-12 and upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC II on DC. In DCs stimulated with LGG activated neutrophils IL-12 production decreased with increasing dose. LGG induced 10-fold greater IL-12 production than BCG. T cell IFNγ and IL-2 production was significantly greater when stimulated with DC activated with low dose LGG. In conclusion, DC or DC activated with neutrophils exposed to low dose LGG induced greater Th1 polarization in T cells and this could potentially exert stronger antitumor effects. Thus the dose of LGG used for immunotherapy could determine treatment efficacy. PMID:27525288

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Activation of Dendritic Cells and Neutrophils Depends on the Dose and Time of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Boon Huat

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) to activate DC and neutrophils and modulate T cell activation and the impact of bacterial dose on these responses. Murine bone marrow derived DC or neutrophils were stimulated with LGG at ratios of 5 : 1, 10 : 1, and 100 : 1 (LGG : cells) and DC maturation (CD40, CD80, CD86, CD83, and MHC class II) and cytokine production (IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p70) were examined after 2 h and 18 h coculture and compared to the ability of BCG (the present immunotherapeutic agent for bladder cancer) to stimulate these cells. A 2 h exposure to 100 : 1 (high dose) or an 18 h exposure to 5 : 1 or 10 : 1 (low dose), LGG : cells, induced the highest production of IL-12 and upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC II on DC. In DCs stimulated with LGG activated neutrophils IL-12 production decreased with increasing dose. LGG induced 10-fold greater IL-12 production than BCG. T cell IFNγ and IL-2 production was significantly greater when stimulated with DC activated with low dose LGG. In conclusion, DC or DC activated with neutrophils exposed to low dose LGG induced greater Th1 polarization in T cells and this could potentially exert stronger antitumor effects. Thus the dose of LGG used for immunotherapy could determine treatment efficacy. PMID:27525288

  20. CEACAM1 negatively regulates IL-1β production in LPS activated neutrophils by recruiting SHP-1 to a SYK-TLR4-CEACAM1 complex.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongze; Pan, Hao; Shively, John E

    2012-01-01

    LPS-activated neutrophils secrete IL-1β by activation of TLR-4. Based on studies in macrophages, it is likely that ROS and lysosomal destabilization regulated by Syk activation may also be involved. Since neutrophils have abundant expression of the ITIM-containing co-receptor CEACAM1 and Gram-negative bacteria such as Neisseria utilize CEACAM1 as a receptor that inhibits inflammation, we hypothesized that the overall production of IL-1β in LPS treated neutrophils may be negatively regulated by CEACAM1. We found that LPS treated neutrophils induced phosphorylation of Syk resulting in the formation of a complex including TLR4, p-Syk, and p-CEACAM1, which in turn, recruited the inhibitory phosphatase SHP-1. LPS treatment leads to ROS production, lysosomal damage, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in neutrophils. The absence of this regulation in Ceacam1⁻/⁻ neutrophils led to hyper production of IL-1β in response to LPS. The hyper production of IL-1β was abrogated by in vivo reconstitution of wild type but not ITIM-mutated CEACAM1 bone marrow stem cells. Blocking Syk activation by kinase inhibitors or RNAi reduced Syk phosphorylation, lysosomal destabilization, ROS production, and caspase-1 activation in Ceacam1⁻/⁻ neutrophils. We conclude that LPS treatment of neutrophils triggers formation of a complex of TLR4 with pSyk and pCEACAM1, which upon recruitment of SHP-1 to the ITIMs of pCEACAM1, inhibits IL-1β production by the inflammasome. Thus, CEACAM1 fine-tunes IL-1β production in LPS treated neutrophils, explaining why the additional utilization of CEACAM1 as a pathogen receptor would further inhibit inflammation.

  1. Human neutrophils are activated by a peptide fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin B presumably via formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Goy, Sebastian D; Olling, Alexandra; Neumann, Detlef; Pich, Andreas; Gerhard, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile may induce antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and, in severe cases, pseudomembranous colitis characterized by tremendous neutrophil infiltration. All symptoms are caused by two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. We describe here the activation of isolated human blood neutrophils by TcdB and, moreover, by toxin fragments generated by limited proteolytical digestion. Kinetics and profiles of TcdB-induced rise in intracellular-free Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production were similar to that induced by fMLF, which activates the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) recognizing formylated bacterial peptide sequences. Transfection assays with the FPR-1 isoform hFPR26 in HEK293 cells, heterologous desensitization experiments and FPR inhibition via cyclosporine H strongly suggest activation of cells via FPR-1. Domain analyses revealed that the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain of TcdB is a potent activator of FPR pointing towards an additional mechanism that might contribute to pathogenesis. This pro-inflammatory ligand effect can be triggered even by cleaved and, thus, non-cytotoxic toxin. In summary, we report (i) a ligand effect on neutrophils as completely new molecular mode of action, (ii) pathogenic potential of truncated or proteolytically cleaved 'non-cytotoxic' fragments and (iii) an interaction of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain instead of the C-terminal receptor binding domain of TcdB with target cells. PMID:25529763

  2. Combined anti CXC receptors 1 and 2 therapy is a promising anti-inflammatory treatment for respiratory diseases by reducing neutrophil migration and activation.

    PubMed

    Planagumà, A; Domènech, T; Pont, M; Calama, E; García-González, V; López, R; Aulí, M; López, M; Fonquerna, S; Ramos, I; de Alba, J; Nueda, A; Prats, N; Segarra, V; Miralpeix, M; Lehner, M D

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil infiltration and activation in the lung are important pathophysiological features in COPD, severe asthma and bronchiectasis mostly mediated by CXCL8 and CXCL1 via CXCR1 and CXCR2. No thorough study to date has been performed to compare the anti-inflammatory effect profile of dual CXCR1/2 vs. selective CXCR2 antagonists in relevant human neutrophil assays and pulmonary inflammation models. Dual CXCR1/2 (SCH527123, diaminocyclobutandione-1) and selective CXCR2 (SB265610, thiopyrimidine-1) antagonist activity and receptor residence time were determined by [(35)S]GTPγS binding in human (h)- and guinea pig (gp)-CXCR1 and CXCR2 overexpressing membranes. h-neutrophil chemotaxis, degranulation and ROS production were established using CXCL8 or CXCL1 to evaluate dual CXCR1/2- or selective CXCR2-dependent activities. LPS-induced lung inflammation in gp was selected to assess in vivo potency. Dual CXCR1/2 antagonists blocked both CXCL8 and CXCL1-induced h-neutrophil functions and [(35)S]GTPγS binding. In contrary, selective CXCR2 antagonists displayed significantly reduced potency in CXCL8 -mediated h-neutrophil responses despite being active in CXCR2 assays. Upon LPS challenge in gp, administration of SCH527123 inhibited the increase of neutrophils in BALF, modestly reduced blood neutrophils and induced minor neutrophil accumulation in bone marrow. Differentiation of CXCR1/2 vs. CXCR2 antagonists could not be extended to in vivo due to differences in CXCR1 receptor homology between h and gp. Dual CXCR1/2 therapy may represent a promising anti-inflammatory treatment for respiratory diseases reducing more effectively neutrophil migration and activation in the lung than a CXCR2 selective treatment. However, the in vivo confirmation of this claim is still missing due to species differences in CXCR1.

  3. Role of platelet-activating factor in polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment in reperfused ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; Comino, A.; Cacace, G.; Polloni, R.; De Filippi, P. G.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the role of platelet-activating factor in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. The accumulation of PMN was evaluated 2 and 24 hours after removal of 40 minutes of coronary occlusion by morphometric analysis and 111In-labeled PMN infiltration. The administration of two structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonists (SDZ 63-675, 5 mg/kg body weight, and WEB 2170, 5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the accumulation of PMN, as well as the hemodynamic alterations and the size of necrotic area. Two hours after reperfusion, the percentage of increase of 111In-labeled PMN in transmural central ischemic zone was significantly reduced in rabbits pretreated with SDZ 63-675 (51.4 +/- 7.9) or WEB 2170 (32.4 +/- 8.8) with respect to untreated rabbits (107.6 +/- 13.5). The morphometric analysis of myocardial sections confirmed the reduction of PMN infiltration at 2 hours and demonstrated that at 24 hours the phenomenon was even more significant. In addition, SDZ 63-675 and WEB 2170 prevented early transient bradycardia and hypotension and reduced the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, and by histological examination at 24 hours. These results suggest that platelet-activating factor is involved in the accumulation of PMN in the reperfused ischemic myocardium and contributes to the evolution of myocardial injury. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8434642

  4. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone down-regulates CXC receptors through activation of neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sunil K; Sarkar, Abira; Sreenivasan, Yashin

    2006-03-01

    Considering the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a large number of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, the regulation of IL-8-mediated biological responses is important. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), a tridecapeptide, inhibits most forms of inflammation by an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we have found that alpha-MSH interacts predominantly with melanocortin-1 receptors and inhibits several IL-8-induced biological responses in macrophages and neutrophils. It down-regulated receptors for IL-8 but not for TNF, IL-4, IL-13 or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in neutrophils. It down-regulated CXCR type 1 and 2 but not mRNA levels. alpha-MSH did not inhibit IL-8 binding in purified cell membrane or affinity-purified CXCR. IL-8 or anti-CXCR Ab protected against alpha-MSH-mediated inhibition of IL-8 binding. The level of neutrophil elastase, a specific serine protease, but not cathepsin G or proteinase 3 increased in alpha-MSH-treated cells, and restoration of CXCR by specific neutrophil elastase or serine protease inhibitors indicates the involvement of elastase in alpha-MSH-induced down-regulation of CXCR. These studies suggest that alpha-MSH inhibits IL-8-mediated biological responses by down-regulating CXCR through induction of serine protease and that alpha-MSH acts as a potent immunomodulator in neutrophil-driven inflammatory distress. PMID:16479540

  5. Specific binding, internalization, and degradation of human neutrophil activating factor by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Besemer, J.; Hujber, A.; Kuhn, B. )

    1989-10-15

    The interaction of {sup 125}I-labeled recombinant human neutrophil activating factor (NAF) with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was studied by means of a radioreceptor assay. The binding was characterized by a rapid transition (t1/2 less than or equal to 1 min) from a pH 3-sensitive state at 4{degree}C to pH 3 resistance at 37{degree}C. This was not caused by internalization of NAF since pH 3-resistant bound iodinated NAF could still be exchanged by an excess of nonlabeled NAF, i.e. was dissociable. Internalized iodinated NAF was processed into trichloroacetic acid-soluble forms. Scatchard transformation of binding isotherms at 4 and 37{degree}C led to nonlinear curves, a finding which is consistent with the expression of two receptor populations, one with high (KD = 11-35 pM) and the other with lower affinity (KD = 640-830 pM) at 4 degrees C. Numbers of the low affinity binding sites were approximately 34,000, and those with high affinity were 5,200/PMN when estimated at 4 degrees C. Binding of iodinated NAF to PMN was specific since it could be competed by an excess of nonlabeled NAF but not by two other activators of PMN function, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine or human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In addition to human PMN, NAF also bound specifically to two human monocytic cell lines; however, only the low affinity binding site could be detected on these cells.

  6. Identifying the Critical Domain of LL-37 Involved in Mediating Neutrophil Activation in the Presence of Influenza Virus: Functional and Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Shweta; Wang, Guangshun; White, Mitchell; Rynkiewicz, Michael; Seaton, Barbara; Hartshorn, Kevan

    2015-01-01

    The human cathelicidin LL-37 has been shown to play a role in host defense against influenza A viruses (IAV) through direct antiviral effects and through modulating inflammatory responses to infection. We recently showed that LL-37 increases neutrophil respiratory burst and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) responses to IAV through engaging formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR-2). In this paper we show that a fragment of LL-37, GI-20, which is composed of the central helical segment of the peptide, has similar effects as LL-37 on neutrophil activation. In addition to increasing respiratory burst and NET responses of the cells to IAV through an FPR-2 dependent mechanism, it reduces neutrophil IL-8 production to IAV (also like LL-37). The N-terminal fragment, LL-23, did not have similar effects. Both GI-20 and LL-37 increase neutrophil intracellular calcium levels and their ability to increase neutrophil activation responses was calcium dependent and partially inhibited by pertussis toxin. These studies show that the central helix of LL-37 retains the ability of LL-37 to modulate neutrophil responses through FPR-2. Based on our findings we developed a homology model of FPR-2 and performed docking experiments of LL-37 and GI-20 with the receptor. PMID:26308522

  7. Neutrophils from patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: relationship between impairment of granular contents, complement receptors, functional activities and disease status.

    PubMed

    Moretti, S; Lanza, F; Spisani, S; Latorraca, A; Rigolin, G M; Giuliani, A L; Castoldi, G L; Traniello, S

    1994-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are stem cell disorders of clonal origin in which infections and leukemic transformation are quite frequent. Neutrophils from 28 patients with MDS were analysed by flow cytometry for the expression of the two complement receptors CR1 and CR3, the antigenic reactivity of some granule constituents--myeloperoxidase, lysozyme, elastase, lactoferrin--and functional activities, such as locomotion, respiratory burst and cytotoxicity. The results were correlated with the FAB disease subtypes, grouped as low risk (RA) and high risk patients (RAEB, RAEB-t, CMML) and with 30 healthy subjects. A significant reduction in the percentage of neutrophil CR1, CR3 positivity and chemotaxis induced by endotoxin-activated serum was detected in the high risk group when compared with the low risk group and healthy controls. Furthermore, the high risk group also showed a low amount of myeloperoxidase, elastase, lysozyme and superoxide anion, but both low and high risk groups displayed reduced cellular cytotoxicity in comparison with the control. This work indicates that MDS patients belonging to the more advanced FAB categories frequently show multiple abnormalities in the expression of neutrophil complement receptors, and granular components (> 3), as well as in cell functions, suggesting the possibility of using these phenotypic abnormalities in the monitoring of disease progression. PMID:8069192

  8. Influence of gut microbiota-derived ellagitannins' metabolites urolithins on pro-inflammatory activities of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Piwowarski, Jakub P; Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K

    2014-07-01

    Ellagitannin-rich products exhibit beneficial influence in the case of inflammation-associated diseases. Urolithins, metabolites of ellagitannins produced by gut microbiota, in contrary to high molecular weight hydrophilic parental polyphenols, possess well established bioavailability. Because of the important role of neutrophils in progression of inflammation, the influence of urolithins on their pro-inflammatory functions was tested. Urolithin B at a concentration of 20 µM showed significant inhibition of interleukin 8 and extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme MMP-9 production. It was also significantly active in prevention of cytochalasin A/formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine-triggered selectin CD62L shedding. Urolithin C was the only active compound towards inhibition of elastase release from cytochalasin A/formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils with 39.0 ± 15.9% inhibition at a concentration of 5 µM. Myeloperoxidase release was inhibited by urolithins A and C (at 20 µM by 46.7 ± 16.1 and 63.8 ± 8.6%, respectively). Urolithin A was the most potent reactive oxygen species release inhibitor both in formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine and 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-R13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils. At the concentration of 1 µM, it caused reactive oxygen species level decrease by 42.6 ± 26.6 and 53.7 ± 16.0%, respectively. Urolithins can specifically modulate inflammatory functions of neutrophils, and thus could contribute to the beneficial health effects of ellagitannin-rich medicinal plant materials and food products.

  9. Platelet microparticles are internalized in neutrophils via the concerted activity of 12-lipoxygenase and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA

    PubMed Central

    Duchez, Anne-Claire; Boudreau, Luc H.; Naika, Gajendra S.; Bollinger, James; Belleannée, Clémence; Cloutier, Nathalie; Laffont, Benoit; Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E.; Lévesque, Tania; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Matthieu; Allaeys, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jacques J.; Poubelle, Patrice E.; Lambeau, Gérard; Pouliot, Marc; Provost, Patrick; Soulet, Denis; Gelb, Michael H.; Boilard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are anucleated blood elements highly potent at generating extracellular vesicles (EVs) called microparticles (MPs). Whereas EVs are accepted as an important means of intercellular communication, the mechanisms underlying platelet MP internalization in recipient cells are poorly understood. Our lipidomic analyses identified 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid [12(S)-HETE] as the predominant eicosanoid generated by MPs. Mechanistically, 12(S)-HETE is produced through the concerted activity of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), present in inflammatory fluids, and platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO), expressed by platelet MPs. Platelet MPs convey an elaborate set of transcription factors and nucleic acids, and contain mitochondria. We observed that MPs and their cargo are internalized by activated neutrophils in the endomembrane system via 12(S)-HETE. Platelet MPs are found inside neutrophils isolated from the joints of arthritic patients, and are found in neutrophils only in the presence of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO in an in vivo model of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Using a combination of genetically modified mice, we show that the coordinated action of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO promotes inflammatory arthritis. These findings identify 12(S)-HETE as a trigger of platelet MP internalization by neutrophils, a mechanism highly relevant to inflammatory processes. Because sPLA2-IIA is induced during inflammation, and 12-LO expression is restricted mainly to platelets, these observations demonstrate that platelet MPs promote their internalization in recipient cells through highly regulated mechanisms. PMID:26106157

  10. In Vitro Evaluation of the Link Between Cell Activation State and Its Rheological Impact on the Microscale Flow of Neutrophil Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Akenhead, Michael L; Horrall, Nolan M; Rowe, Dylan; Sethu, Palaniappan; Shin, Hainsworth Y

    2015-09-01

    Activated neutrophils have been reported to affect peripheral resistance, for example, by plugging capillaries or adhering to the microvasculature. In vivo and ex vivo data indicate that activated neutrophils circulating in the blood also influence peripheral resistance. We used viscometry and microvascular mimics for in vitro corroboration. The rheological impact of differentiated neutrophil-like HL-60 promyelocytes (dHL60s) or human neutrophil suspensions stimulated with 10 nM fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP) was quantified using a cone-plate rheometer (450 s(-1) shear rate). To evaluate their impact on microscale flow resistance, we used 10-μm Isopore® membranes to model capillaries as well as single 200 × 50 μm microchannels and networks of twenty 20 × 50 μm microfluidic channels to mimic noncapillary microvasculature. Stimulation of dHL60 and neutrophil populations significantly altered their flow behavior as evidenced by their impact on suspension viscosity. Notably, hematocrit abrogated the impact of leukocyte activation on blood cell suspension viscosity. In micropore filters, activated cell suspensions enhanced flow resistance. This effect was further enhanced by the presence of erythrocytes. The resistance of our noncapillary microvascular mimics to flow of activated neutrophil suspensions was significantly increased only with hematocrit. Notably, it was elevated to a higher extent within the micronetwork chambers compared to the single-channel chambers. Collectively, our findings provide supportive evidence that activated neutrophils passing through the microcirculation may alter hemodynamic resistance due to their altered rheology in the noncapillary microvasculature. This effect is another way neutrophil activation due to chronic inflammation may, at least in part, contribute to the elevated hemodynamic resistance associated with cardiovascular diseases (e.g., hypertension and hypercholesterolemia).

  11. The activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and the complement system during immunotherapy with recombinant interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Baars, J W; Hack, C E; Wagstaff, J; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Wolbink, G J; Thijs, L G; Strack van Schijndel, R J; van der Vall, H L; Pinedo, H M

    1992-01-01

    The toxicity due to interleukin-2 (IL-2) strongly resembles the clinical picture seen during septic shock. In septic shock activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and the complement system contribute significantly to the pathophysiology of the condition. We therefore investigated whether similar events contributed to the toxicity observed with IL-2. Four patients received seven cycles of escalating dose IL-2 (18.0 to 72.0 X 10(6) IU m-2 day-1) and 16 were treated with 20 cycles of fixed dose IL-2 (12.0 or 18.0 X 10(6) IU m-2 day-1). Toxicity, as judged by hypotension (P = less than 0.005) and capillary leakage (fall in serum albumin 18.2 vs 4.0 gm l-1; P = less than 0.0005 and weight gain 4.0 vs 1.2 kg; P = less than 0.025) were worse with the esc. dose protocol. PMN became activated following IL-2 with mean peak elastase/alpha 1-antitrypsin (E alpha 1 A) and lactoferrin values of 212 (SEM = 37) and 534 (SEM = 92) ng ml-1 respectively occurring 6 h after the IL-2. Peak values for the esc. dose IL-2 group being generally higher than 500 ng ml-1. Activation of the complement cascade was evidenced by a dose dependent elevation of peak C3a values (fixed dose 9.1 (SEM = 0.6); esc. dose 25.7 (SEM = 6.33); P = less than 0.005) on day 5 of IL-2. There was a significant correlation between C3a levels and the degree of hypotention during the first 24 h after IL-2 (r = 0.91) and parameters of capillary leakage such as weight gain and fall in serum albumin (r = 0.71). These data suggest that activation of PMN initiates endothelial cell damage which subsequently leads to activation of the complement cascade. This latter system then contributes to the haemodynamic changes and capillary leakage seen in IL-2 treated patients.

  12. Phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C leads to increased formation of diacylglycerol in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faellman, M.; Stendahl, O.; Andersson, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate) responded with an increase in diacylglycerol, considered the natural activator of protein kinase C. The amounts of diacylglycerol formed were considerable, reaching 700-900% of basal after 20 minutes. In contrast, 4-{alpha}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate did not induce any detectable formation of diacylglycerol. Simultaneously, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate exposure caused increased breakdown of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. These results suggest that once activated, protein kinase C can positively modulate its own activity by inducing additional formation of diacylglycerol from at least two different sources.

  13. Inhibition of platelet-activating factor- and zymosan-activated serum-induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils by nedocromil sodium, BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, P. L.; Warringa, R. A.; Kok, P. T.

    1989-01-01

    1. Inflammatory cells such as eosinophils and neutrophils are thought to contribute actively to the pathogenesis of asthma since they infiltrate into the lung tissue. These cells are mobilized by lipid-like and protein-like chemotactic factors. As illustrative examples of both groups, platelet-activating-factor (Paf) and zymosan-activated-serum (ZAS) were used in this study. The inhibitory effects of nedocromil sodium, the Paf antagonist BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate on Paf- and ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were evaluated. 2. All tested drugs inhibited Paf-induced neutrophil chemotaxis with approximately the same potency (IC50 approximately 1 nM). 3. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were equally potent in inhibiting ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (IC50 = 0.1-1 microM), whereas BN 52021 was considerably less potent (IC30 = 10 microM). 4. To find out whether the drugs tested could inhibit early events in cell activation, their capacity to inhibit Paf- and ZAS-induced cytosolic free Ca2+-mobilization was investigated. BN 52021, at a concentration of 100 microM, completely inhibited Paf-induced Ca2+-mobilization and inhibited ZAS-induced Ca2+-mobilization by about 50%. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were ineffective. PMID:2551444

  14. Characterization of a polysaccharide from Rosa davurica and inhibitory activity against neutrophil migration.

    PubMed

    Tong, Haibin; Jiang, Guiquan; Guan, Xingang; Wu, Hong; Song, Kangxing; Cheng, Kuan; Sun, Xin

    2016-08-01

    The rapid recruitment of neutrophils from peripheral blood into infected sites is critical step for inflammatory responses; however, the excessive and improper recruitment can lead to serious tissue damages. Thus, it is a promising strategy to inhibit their excessive recruitment for treating inflammation-related disease. Here, we isolated a polysaccharide (RDPA1) from Rosa davurica, to evaluate its physicochemical property and inhibitory effects on neutrophil migration. RDPA1 was obtained by hot-water extraction, ethanol precipitation, and fractionated by DEAE-cellulose and Sepharose CL-6B columns. RDPA1 significantly inhibited in vitro migration of human neutrophils evaluated by transwell chamber and impacted the migratory behavior observed by time-lapsed microscopy, we found the migrated distance and average velocity of RDPA1-treated cells were greatly reduced. In addition, RDPA1 treatment impaired in vivo neutrophil infiltration in the peritonitis mice. RDPA1 exhibited significant blocking capacity of the interaction between β2 integrins and ICAM-1 evaluated by flow cytometry and in vitro protein binding assay. Together, these results suggest RDPA1 could be considered as a potential candidate for developing a novel anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:27112979

  15. New Insights into the Pro-Inflammatory Activities of Ang1 on Neutrophils: Induction of MIP-1β Synthesis and Release.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Elizabeth; Neagoe, Paul-Eduard; McDonald, Patrick P; White, Michel; Sirois, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    We reported the expression of angiopoietin Tie2 receptor on human neutrophils and the capacity of angiopoietins (Ang1 and Ang2) to induce pro-inflammatory activities, such as platelet-activating factor synthesis, β2-integrin activation and neutrophil migration. Recently, we observed differential effects between both angiopoietins, namely, the capacity of Ang1, but not Ang2, to promote rapid interleukin-8 synthesis and release, as well as neutrophil viability. Herein, we addressed whether Ang1 and/or Ang2 could modulate the synthesis and release of macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) by neutrophils. Neutrophils were isolated from blood of healthy volunteers; intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β protein concentrations were assessed by ELISA. After 24 hours, the basal intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β protein concentrations were ≈500 and 100 pg/106 neutrophils, respectively. Treatment with Ang1 (10 nM) increased neutrophil intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β concentrations by 310 and 388% respectively. Pretreatment with PI3K (LY294002), p38 MAPK (SB203580) and MEK (U0126) inhibitors completely inhibited Ang1-mediated increase of MIP-1β intracellular and extracellular protein levels. Pretreatment with NF-κB complex inhibitors, namely Bay11-7085 and IKK inhibitor VII or with a transcription inhibitor (actinomycin D) and protein synthesis inhibitor (cycloheximide), did also abrogate Ang1-mediated increase of MIP-1β intracellular and extracellular protein levels. We validated by RT-qPCR analyses the effect of Ang1 on the induction of MIP-1β mRNA levels. Our study is the first one to report Ang1 capacity to induce MIP-1β gene expression, protein synthesis and release from neutrophils, and that these effects are mediated by PI3K, p38 MAPK and MEK activation and downstream NF-κB activation.

  16. New Insights into the Pro-Inflammatory Activities of Ang1 on Neutrophils: Induction of MIP-1β Synthesis and Release

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Elizabeth; Neagoe, Paul-Eduard; McDonald, Patrick P.; White, Michel; Sirois, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    We reported the expression of angiopoietin Tie2 receptor on human neutrophils and the capacity of angiopoietins (Ang1 and Ang2) to induce pro-inflammatory activities, such as platelet-activating factor synthesis, β2-integrin activation and neutrophil migration. Recently, we observed differential effects between both angiopoietins, namely, the capacity of Ang1, but not Ang2, to promote rapid interleukin-8 synthesis and release, as well as neutrophil viability. Herein, we addressed whether Ang1 and/or Ang2 could modulate the synthesis and release of macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) by neutrophils. Neutrophils were isolated from blood of healthy volunteers; intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β protein concentrations were assessed by ELISA. After 24 hours, the basal intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β protein concentrations were ≈500 and 100 pg/106 neutrophils, respectively. Treatment with Ang1 (10 nM) increased neutrophil intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β concentrations by 310 and 388% respectively. Pretreatment with PI3K (LY294002), p38 MAPK (SB203580) and MEK (U0126) inhibitors completely inhibited Ang1-mediated increase of MIP-1β intracellular and extracellular protein levels. Pretreatment with NF-κB complex inhibitors, namely Bay11-7085 and IKK inhibitor VII or with a transcription inhibitor (actinomycin D) and protein synthesis inhibitor (cycloheximide), did also abrogate Ang1-mediated increase of MIP-1β intracellular and extracellular protein levels. We validated by RT-qPCR analyses the effect of Ang1 on the induction of MIP-1β mRNA levels. Our study is the first one to report Ang1 capacity to induce MIP-1β gene expression, protein synthesis and release from neutrophils, and that these effects are mediated by PI3K, p38 MAPK and MEK activation and downstream NF-κB activation. PMID:27632174

  17. New Insights into the Pro-Inflammatory Activities of Ang1 on Neutrophils: Induction of MIP-1β Synthesis and Release.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Elizabeth; Neagoe, Paul-Eduard; McDonald, Patrick P; White, Michel; Sirois, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    We reported the expression of angiopoietin Tie2 receptor on human neutrophils and the capacity of angiopoietins (Ang1 and Ang2) to induce pro-inflammatory activities, such as platelet-activating factor synthesis, β2-integrin activation and neutrophil migration. Recently, we observed differential effects between both angiopoietins, namely, the capacity of Ang1, but not Ang2, to promote rapid interleukin-8 synthesis and release, as well as neutrophil viability. Herein, we addressed whether Ang1 and/or Ang2 could modulate the synthesis and release of macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) by neutrophils. Neutrophils were isolated from blood of healthy volunteers; intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β protein concentrations were assessed by ELISA. After 24 hours, the basal intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β protein concentrations were ≈500 and 100 pg/106 neutrophils, respectively. Treatment with Ang1 (10 nM) increased neutrophil intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β concentrations by 310 and 388% respectively. Pretreatment with PI3K (LY294002), p38 MAPK (SB203580) and MEK (U0126) inhibitors completely inhibited Ang1-mediated increase of MIP-1β intracellular and extracellular protein levels. Pretreatment with NF-κB complex inhibitors, namely Bay11-7085 and IKK inhibitor VII or with a transcription inhibitor (actinomycin D) and protein synthesis inhibitor (cycloheximide), did also abrogate Ang1-mediated increase of MIP-1β intracellular and extracellular protein levels. We validated by RT-qPCR analyses the effect of Ang1 on the induction of MIP-1β mRNA levels. Our study is the first one to report Ang1 capacity to induce MIP-1β gene expression, protein synthesis and release from neutrophils, and that these effects are mediated by PI3K, p38 MAPK and MEK activation and downstream NF-κB activation. PMID:27632174

  18. [The phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes in progressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Konopka, T; Zietek, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood and in gingival pocket fluid in patients suffering from rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and postjuvenile periodontitis (PJP). Prior to periodontal treatment the authors evaluated the capacity to phagocytose latex particles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 21 patients with RPP, 51 with PJP and 59 healthy subjects (control group) as well as the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in pocket fluid from 21 patients with RPP, 14 with PJP and from 20 healthy subjects. This phagocytic activity was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. A similar evaluation executed 3 months after treatment revealed normal phagocytosis of blood neutrophils from patients with RPP. In patients receiving complementary pharmacotherapy (spiramycine combined with metronidazol), a better improvement of phagocytosis was noted, than that observed in patients treated only surgically. PMID:7481699

  19. [The phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes in progressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Konopka, T; Zietek, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood and in gingival pocket fluid in patients suffering from rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and postjuvenile periodontitis (PJP). Prior to periodontal treatment the authors evaluated the capacity to phagocytose latex particles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 21 patients with RPP, 51 with PJP and 59 healthy subjects (control group) as well as the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in pocket fluid from 21 patients with RPP, 14 with PJP and from 20 healthy subjects. This phagocytic activity was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. A similar evaluation executed 3 months after treatment revealed normal phagocytosis of blood neutrophils from patients with RPP. In patients receiving complementary pharmacotherapy (spiramycine combined with metronidazol), a better improvement of phagocytosis was noted, than that observed in patients treated only surgically.

  20. Rabbit neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) activates both CXCR1 and CXCR2 and is the functional homologue for human CXCL6.

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Struyf, Sofie; Wuyts, Anja; Weyler, Myke; Loos, Tamara; Gijsbers, Klara; Gouwy, Mieke; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo

    2004-11-15

    Neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) is a rabbit CXC chemokine with activating and chemotactic properties on neutrophilic granulocytes. Although its selective activity on neutrophils is demonstrated, its interactions with specific chemokine receptors are not defined. For further functional characterization, NCP was chemically synthesized and was found to be equipotent as natural NCP in neutrophil chemotaxis. To identify its human homologue, we separately expressed two potential rabbit NCP receptors (CXCR1 and CXCR2) in Jurkat cells. Pure synthetic NCP was equally efficient to promote chemotaxis through either rabbit CXCR1 or CXCR2. Moreover, chemotaxis assays on rabbit CXCR1 and CXCR2 transfectants showed that NCP uses the same receptors as interleukin-8 (IL-8), a major rabbit CXC chemokine, but not rabbit GROalpha, which only recognized CXCR2. In addition, specific inhibitors for CXCR1 or CXCR2 reduced rabbit neutrophil chemotaxis induced by NCP and rabbit IL-8. Furthermore, NCP and the structurally related human CXCR1/CXCR2 agonist CXCL6/GCP-2 (granulocyte chemotactic protein-2) cross-desensitized each other in intracellular calcium release assays on human neutrophils, further indicating that both chemokines share the same receptors. The inflammatory role of NCP was also evidenced by its potent granulocytosis inducing capacity in rabbits upon systemic administration. This study provides in vitro and in vivo evidences that NCP is the functional rabbit homologue for human CXCL6/GCP-2 rather than the most related CXCR2 agonist CXCL5/ENA-78 (epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78). It is concluded that the rabbit is a better model to study human neutrophil activation compared to mice, which lack CXCL8/IL-8.

  1. Microbicidal activity of neutrophils is inhibited by isolates from recurrent vaginal candidiasis (RVVC) caused by Candida albicans through fungal thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Godoy, Janine Silva Ribeiro; de Souza Bonfim Mendonça, Patrícia; Bidóia, Danielle Lazarin; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Lopes Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is characterized by an infection of the vulva and vagina, mainly caused by Candida albicans, a commensal microorganism that inhabits the vaginal, digestive, and respiratory mucosae. Vulvovaginal candidiasis affects approximately 75% of women, and 5% develop the recurrent form (RVVC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether neutrophils microbicidal response is triggered when activated with RVVC isolates caused by C. albicans. Our results showed that RVVC isolates induced neutrophil migration but significantly decrease the microbicidal activity of neutrophils, compared with VVC and ASS isolates. The microbicidal activity of neutrophils is highly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). However, this isolate induced detoxification of ROS/RNS produced by neutrophils, reflected by the high level of thiol groups and by the oxygen consumption. Therefore, RVVC isolates induced biochemical changes in the inflammatory response triggered by neutrophils, and these effects were mainly related to the detoxification of ROS/RNS through the thioredoxin reductase (TR), a key antioxidant enzyme in fungi. This might be one of the resistance mechanisms triggered by RVVC caused by C. albicans. PMID:25497972

  2. JAK/STAT regulation of Aspergillus fumigatus corneal infections and IL-6/23-stimulated neutrophil, IL-17, elastase, and MMP9 activity.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Patricia R; Roy, Sanhita; Meszaros, Evan C; Sun, Yan; Howell, Scott J; Malemud, Charles J; Pearlman, Eric

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 and IL-23 (IL-6/23) induce IL-17A (IL-17) production by a subpopulation of murine and human neutrophils, resulting in autocrine IL-17 activation, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, and increased fungal killing. As IL-6 and IL-23 receptors trigger JAK1, -3/STAT3 and JAK2/STAT3 phosphorylation, respectively, we examined the role of this pathway in a murine model of fungal keratitis and also examined neutrophil elastase and gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase 9) activity by IL-6/23-stimulated human neutrophils in vitro. We found that STAT3 phosphorylation of neutrophils in Aspergillus fumigatus-infected corne as was inhibited by the JAK/STAT inhibitor Ruxolitinib, resulting in impaired fungal killing and decreased matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity. In vitro, we showed that fungal killing by IL-6/23-stimulated human peripheral blood neutrophils was impaired by JAK/STAT inhibitors Ruxolitinib and Stattic, and by the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt inhibitor SR1001. This was also associated with decreased reactive oxygen species, IL-17A production, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt translocation to the nucleus. We also demonstrate that IL-6/23-activated neutrophils exhibit increased elastase and gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase 9) activity, which is inhibited by Ruxolitinib and Stattic but not by SR1001. Taken together, these observations indicate that the regulation of activity of IL-17-producing neutrophils by JAK/STAT inhibitors impairs reactive oxygen species production and fungal killing activity but also blocks elastase and gelatinase activity that can cause tissue damage. PMID:27034404

  3. DAMPs-activated neutrophil extracellular trap exacerbates sterile inflammatory liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Tohme, Samer; Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tai, Sheng; Loughran, Patricia; Chen, Li; Wang, Shu; Kim, Jiyun; Billiar, Timothy; Wang, Yanming; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity plays a crucial role in the response to sterile inflammation such as liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The initiation of liver I/R injury results in the release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which trigger innate immune and inflammatory cascade via pattern recognition receptors. Neutrophils are recruited to the liver after I/R and contribute to the organ damage, innate immune and inflammatory responses. Formation of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) has been recently found in response to various stimuli. However, the role of NETs during liver I/R injury remains unknown. We show that NETs form in the sinusoids of ischemic liver lobes in vivo. This was associated with increased NET markers, serum level of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-DNA complexes and tissue level of citrullinated-histone H3 compared to control mice. Treatment with peptidyl-arginine-deiminase (PAD) 4 inhibitor or DNase I significantly protected hepatocytes and reduced inflammation after liver I/R as evidenced by inhibition of NET formation, indicating the pathophysiological role of NETs in liver I/R injury. In vitro, NETs increase hepatocyte death and induce Kupffer cells to release proinflammatory cytokines. DAMPs, such as HMGB1 and histones, released by injured hepatocytes stimulate NET formation through Toll-like receptor (TLR4)- and TLR9-MyD88 signaling pathways. After neutrophil depletion in mice, the adoptive transfer of TLR4 knockout (KO) or TLR9 KO neutrophils confers significant protection from liver I/R injury with significant decrease in NET formation. In addition, we found inhibition of NET formation by PAD4 inhibitor or DNase I reduces HMGB1 and histone-mediated liver I/R injury. Conclusion DAMPs released during liver I/R promotes NET formation through TLRs signaling pathway. Development of NETs subsequently exacerbates organ damage and initiates inflammatory responses during liver I/R. PMID:25855125

  4. Polyphenol content and modulatory activities of some tropical dietary plant extracts on the oxidant activities of neutrophils and myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Tsumbu, Cesar N; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Tits, Monique; Angenot, Luc; Frederich, Michel; Kohnen, Stephane; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Serteyn, Didier; Franck, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Young leaves of Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae), Abelmoschus esculentus (Malvaceae), Hibiscus acetosella (Malvaceae) and Pteridium aquilinum (Dennstaedtiaceae) are currently consumed as green vegetables by peoples in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, Asia and their migrants living in Western Europe. Sub-Saharan peoples use Manihot, Abelmoschus and Hibiscus also in the folk medicine to alleviate fever and pain, in the treatment of conjunctivitis, rheumatism, hemorrhoid, abscesses, ... The present study investigates the effects of aqueous extracts of those plants on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) by equine neutrophils activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The ROS production was measured by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL), and the release of total MPO by an ELISA method. The study also investigates the effect of the extracts on the activity of MPO by studying its nitration activity on tyrosine and by using a new technique called SIEFED (Specific Immunological Extraction Followed by Enzymatic Detection) that allows studying the direct interaction of compounds with the enzyme. In all experiments, the aqueous extracts of the plants developed concentration-dependent inhibitory effects. A moderate heat treatment did not significantly modify the inhibitory capacity of the extracts in comparison to not heated ones. Total polyphenol and flavonoid contents were determined with an HPLC-UV/DAD analysis and a spectroscopic method using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Some polyphenols with well-known antioxidant activities (caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, hyperoside, rosmarinic acid and rutin) were found in the extracts and may partly explain the inhibitory activities observed. The role of those dietary and medicinal plants in the treatment of ROS-dependent inflammatory diseases could have new considerations for health. PMID:22312276

  5. Staphylococcus aureus agr Genotypes with Enterotoxin Production Capabilities Can Resist Neutrophil Bactericidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mullarky, I. K.; Su, C.; Frieze, N.; Park, Y. H.; Sordillo, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity is mainly due to the production of a number of secreted and cell surface-associated proteins under the regulation of the agr gene. A region of the agr gene was used to subgroup S. aureus strains according to restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Additionally, strains were subtyped according to the coagulase gene in order to strengthen discriminatory power. Virulence capabilities of agr genotype subgroups were evaluated using an in vitro neutrophil bactericidal assay, which showed that prevalent genotypes were significantly better at evading this primary host defense. Multiplex PCR was then used to detect enterotoxin genes among the genotype subgroups in order to determine possible virulence candidates that enable strains to combat neutrophil killing. The prevalent genotype strains were found to possess higher production capabilities for enterotoxin A than did low-prevalence strains. The significance of enterotoxin A production capabilities in affecting pathogenicity of S. aureus strains was evaluated and found to have a profound effect on neutrophil killing abilities. The use of a large epidemiological database as a tool for subgrouping strains with varying degrees of pathogenicity has allowed the identification of relevant and previously undefined virulence factors that affect a pathogen's capability to overcome host immune defenses. PMID:11119487

  6. Assessment of antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts of Psidium guajava leaves by DPPH and chemiluminescence inhibition in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M R V; Azzolini, A E C S; Martinez, M L L; Souza, C R F; Lucisano-Valim, Y M; Oliveira, W P

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β -cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH(•) method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells. PMID:24822200

  7. Assessment of Antioxidant Activity of Spray Dried Extracts of Psidium guajava Leaves by DPPH and Chemiluminescence Inhibition in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M. R. V.; Azzolini, A. E. C. S.; Martinez, M. L. L.; Souza, C. R. F.; Lucisano-Valim, Y. M.; Oliveira, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β-cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH• method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells. PMID:24822200

  8. Activation of Adenosine 2A receptor inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in an autophagy-dependent manner in mice with systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang-Wuyue; Yang, Ting; Zhao, Li; Ni, Zhenhong; Yang, Nan; He, Fengtian; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an overwhelming whole body inflammation caused by infectious diseases or sterile insults. Neutrophils are the dominant participants during inflammation, and their survival and death determine the initiation as well as resolution of SIRS. Apoptosis and autophagy are two fundamental cellular processes that modulating cell fate, but their correlation and regulators in neutrophils under SIRS condition have not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that high dose of LPS induced both apoptosis and autophagy of neutrophils in a mouse SIRS model and LPS-stimulated neutrophils in vitro. Moreover, we found that the adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR), a known anti-inflammatory G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), could inhibit LPS-induced neutrophil apoptosis by suppressing the LPS-induced autophagy. Activation of A2AR suppressed LPS-induced autophagy by inhibiting the ROS-JNK pathway as well as promoting GPCR βϒ subunit–AKT signaling. The A2AR-inhibited autophagy suppressed apoptosis of neutrophils by blocking caspase8, caspase3 and PARP signaling. These findings not only increase our understandings of neutrophils’ fate and function in response to systemic inflammation, but also identify a novel anti-inflammatory role of A2AR in modulating neutrophils’ survival during inflammation. PMID:27647162

  9. Proteolytic Activity Present in House-Dust-Mite Extracts Degrades ENA-78/CXCL5 and Reduces Neutrophil Migration.

    PubMed

    Keglowich, Laura; Tamm, Michael; Zhong, Jun; Miglino, Nicola; Borger, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Background. Bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC) are a major source of proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines and chemokines, including VEGF and CXC-chemokines. CXC-chemokines act primarily on neutrophils, mediating their recruitment to and activation at the site of inflammation. In humans, house-dust mite (HDM) allergens can cause asthmatic exacerbations and trigger an inflammatory response through protease-dependent mechanisms. Objective. We investigated the effect HDM extract on the release of pro-angiogenic and proinflammatory cytokines from BSMC. Methods. Human primary BSMC were stimulated with HDM extract in the absence or presence of fetal calf serum (FCS). Twenty angiogenic cytokines were detected by a specific antibody array and modified protein levels were confirmed by ELISA. Neutrophil migration was measured using a 96-well Boyden chamber. Results. ENA-78/CXCL5 protein levels in conditioned medium of BSMC stimulated with HDM extract were significantly reduced (n = 10, P < 0.05) but restored in the presence of 5% FCS. HDM extracts did not affect ENA-78/CXCL5 mRNA levels. Recombinant ENA-78/CXCL5 was degraded after incubation with HDM extracts (n = 7, P < 0.05) but restored after the addition of the serine protease AEBSF. Neutrophil migration towards recombinant ENA-78/CXCL5 was also reduced in the presence of HDM extract. Conclusion. HDM proteases degrade ENA-78/CXCL5. Thus exposure to HDM allergens may alter ENA-78/CXCL5 levels in the lungs and may affect angiogenesis and the inflammatory response in the airways of asthma patients.

  10. A transcriptomic reporter assay employing neutrophils to measure immunogenic activity of septic patients’ plasma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are diverse molecules present in blood plasma that regulate immune functions and also present a potential source of disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Genome-wide profiling has become a powerful method for assessing immune responses on a systems scale, but technologies that can measure the plasma proteome still face considerable challenges. An alternative approach to direct proteome assessment is to measure transcriptome responses in reporter cells exposed in vitro to plasma. In this report we describe such a “transcriptomic reporter assay” to assess plasma from patients with sepsis, which is a common and severe systemic infectious process for which physicians lack efficient diagnostic or prognostic markers. Methods Plasma samples collected from patients with culture-confirmed bacterial sepsis and uninfected healthy controls were used to stimulate three separate cell types – neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Whole genome microarrays were generated from stimulated cells to assess transcriptional responses. Unsupervised analysis and enriched functional networks were evaluated for each cell type. Principal component analyses were used to assess variability in responses. A random K-nearest neighbor – feature selection algorithm was used to identify markers predictive of sepsis severity, which were then validated in an independent data set. Results Neutrophils demonstrated the most distinct response to plasma from septic patients with 709 genes showing altered expression profiles, many of which are involved in established immunologic pathways. The amplitude of the neutrophil transcriptomic response was shown to be correlated with sepsis severity in two independent sets of patients comprised of 64 total septic patients. A subset of 30 transcripts selected using one set of patients was demonstrated to have a high degree of accuracy (82-90%) in predicting sepsis severity and outcomes in

  11. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates the expression of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of leukotrienes in human blood neutrophils chiefly relies on the activity of two enzymes, phospholipase A2 and 5-lipoxygenase (5- LO). In turn, the activation of the 5-LO requires the participation of a recently characterized membrane-bound protein, the 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP). In this study, we have investigated conditions under which FLAP expression in neutrophils may be modulated. Of several cytokines tested, only granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (and to a lesser extent tumor necrosis factor alpha) significantly increased expression of FLAP. GM-CSF increased FLAP mRNA steady-state levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The stimulatory effect of GM-CSF on FLAP mRNA was inhibited by prior treatment of the cells with the transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D, and pretreatment of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, failed to prevent the increase in FLAP mRNA induced by GM-CSF. The accumulation of newly synthesized FLAP, as determined by immunoprecipitation after incorporation of 35S-labeled amino acids, was also increased after incubation of neutrophils with GM-CSF. In addition, the total level of FLAP protein was increased in GM-CSF- treated neutrophils, as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by Western blot. GM-CSF did not alter the stability of the FLAP protein, indicating that the effect of GM-CSF on FLAP accumulation was the consequence of increased de novo synthesis as opposed to decreased degradation of FLAP. Finally, incubation of neutrophils with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone directly stimulated the upregulation of FLAP mRNA and protein, and enhanced the effect of GM-CSF. Taken together, these data demonstrate that FLAP expression may be upmodulated after appropriate stimulation of neutrophils. The increase in FLAP expression induced by GM-CSF in inflammatory conditions could confer upon neutrophils a prolonged capacity to synthesize

  12. Differential activation of human neutrophil cytosolic phospholipase A2 and secretory phospholipase A2 during priming by 1,2-diacyl- and 1-O-alkyl-2-acylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Seeds, M C; Nixon, A B; Wykle, R L; Bass, D A

    1998-11-01

    We have shown previously that both 1,2-diacylglycerol (AAG) and 1-O-alkyl-2-acylglycerol (EAG) prime neutrophil release of arachidonic acid via uncharacterized phospholipases A2. Therefore, we investigated the actions of EAG and AAG specifically on neutrophil cytosolic (cPLA2) and secretory (sPLA2) phospholipase A2s. We hypothesized that AAG as a protein kinase activator would activate cPLA2 via phosphorylation events. EAG is antagonistic to the AAG activation of PKC, thus it was not expected to act via phosphorylation of cPLA2. Neutrophils were primed with either AAG or EAG and then stimulated with fMLP. When neutrophils were primed with 5-20 microM 1,2-diacylglycerol, a shift was observed in cPLA2 migration on SDS-PAGE gels, consistent with phosphorylation of the protein. This gel shift was not seen after exposure to EAG. AAG also caused a parallel increase in enzymatic activity of cPLA2 that was not seen with EAG. We also investigated whether either diglyceride would cause similar priming or direct secretion of sPLA2. Both AAG and EAG directly caused significant secretion of neutrophil sPLA2. EAG also increased the release of sPLA2 in cells subsequently stimulated with fMLP. Thus, AAG activated cPLA2 and stimulated secretion of sPLA2. In contrast, EAG did not activate cPLA2, but directly activated secretion of sPLA2. We also demonstrated that human synovial fluid sPLA2 increased AA release from resting and fMLP-stimulated neutrophils. Given that diglycerides prime for release of AA, PAF, and LTB4, these current data support the hypothesis that such priming may be mediated by phosphorylation dependent (cPLA2) or phosphorylation independent (e.g. secretion of sPLA2) events.

  13. Fcγ and Complement Receptors and Complement Proteins in Neutrophil Activation in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Contribution to Pathogenesis and Progression and Modulation by Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Paoliello-Paschoalato, Adriana Balbina; Marchi, Larissa Fávaro; de Andrade, Micássio Fernandes; Kabeya, Luciana Mariko; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease that affects all structures of the joint and significantly impacts on morbidity and mortality in RA patients. RA is characterized by persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane lining the joint associated with infiltration of immune cells. Eighty to 90% of the leukocytes infiltrating the synovia are neutrophils. The specific role that neutrophils play in the onset of RA is not clear, but recent studies have evidenced that they have an important participation in joint damage and disease progression through the release of proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytokines, and neutrophil extracellular traps, in particular during frustrated phagocytosis of immune complexes (ICs). In addition, the local and systemic activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of RA and other IC-mediated diseases. This review discusses (i) the participation of Fcγ and complement receptors in mediating the effector functions of neutrophils in RA; (ii) the contribution of the complement system and ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms to joint damage in RA; and (iii) the use of plant extracts, dietary compounds, and isolated natural compounds in the treatment of RA, focusing on modulation of the effector functions of neutrophils and the complement system activity and/or activation. PMID:26346244

  14. Inhibition of human neutrophil activation by the allergic mediator release inhibitor, CI-922: differential inhibition of responses to a variety of stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wright, C D; Hoffman, M D; Thueson, D O; Conroy, M C

    1987-07-01

    The allergic mediator release inhibitor 3,7-dimethoxy-4-phenyl-N-1H-tetrazol-5-yl-4H-furo[3,2-b]indole-2- carboxamide, L-arginate (CI-922) is a potent inhibitor of human neutrophil functions in vitro. Over a concentration range from 1 to 100 mumol CI-922 inhibits the chemotactic response of neutrophils to the synthetic chemotaxin N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). CI-922 also inhibits respiratory and secretory responses of neutrophils in response to agents that stimulate phospholipase C-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis to generate the second messengers inositol 1,4,5, trisphosphate and 1,2 diacylglycerol, including: the plasma membrane receptor-specific ligands FMLP and C5a; serum-opsonized zymosan; concanavalin A; and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein-specific stimulus guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S). CI-922 also inhibits neutrophil functions stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. In contrast, CI-922 does not inhibit neutrophil responses to protein kinase C-specific stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or L-alpha-1,2 dioctanoylglycerol (DiC8). CI-922 also fails to inhibit the synergistic activation of the respiratory burst by suboptimal concentrations of PMA and calcium ionophore A23187. The observation that CI-922 inhibits neutrophil responses to a variety of soluble and particulate stimuli, excluding protein kinase C-specific stimuli, allows us to postulate the site of action of the compound. We propose that CI-922 inhibits neutrophil activation at a site distal to signal transduction through the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein required for second messenger generation but proximal to phosphorylation reactions mediated by protein kinase C and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases.

  15. Increased neutrophil extracellular trap-mediated Staphylococcus aureus clearance through inhibition of nuclease activity by clindamycin and immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Schilcher, Katrin; Andreoni, Federica; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Ogawa, Taiji; Schuepbach, Reto A; Zinkernagel, Annelies S

    2014-08-01

    The Gram-positive human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of human diseases such as skin infections, pneumonia, and endocarditis. The micrococcal nuclease Nuc1 is one of the major S. aureus virulence factors and allows the bacterium to avoid neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-mediated killing. We found that addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin to S. aureus LAC cultures decreased nuc1 transcription and subsequently blunted nuclease activity in a molecular beacon-based fluorescence assay. We also observed reduced NET degradation through Nuc1 inhibition translating into increased NET-mediated clearance. Similarly, pooled human immunoglobulin specifically inhibited nuclease activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of nuclease activity by clindamycin and immunoglobulin enhanced S. aureus clearance and should be considered in the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  16. Oral TNFα Modulation Alters Neutrophil Infiltration, Improves Cognition and Diminishes Tau and Amyloid Pathology in the 3xTgAD Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gabbita, S. Prasad; Johnson, Ming F.; Kobritz, Naomi; Eslami, Pirooz; Poteshkina, Aleksandra; Varadarajan, Sridhar; Turman, John; Zemlan, Frank; Harris-White, Marni E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines such as TNFα can polarize microglia/macrophages into different neuroinflammatory types. Skewing of the phenotype towards a cytotoxic state is thought to impair phagocytosis and has been described in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Neuroinflammation can be perpetuated by a cycle of increasing cytokine production and maintenance of a polarized activation state that contributes to AD progression. In this study, 3xTgAD mice, age 6 months, were treated orally with 3 doses of the TNFα modulating compound isoindolin-1,3 dithione (IDT) for 10 months. We demonstrate that IDT is a TNFα modulating compound both in vitro and in vivo. Following long-term IDT administration, mice were assessed for learning & memory and tissue and serum were collected for analysis. Results demonstrate that IDT is safe for long-term treatment and significantly improves learning and memory in the 3xTgAD mouse model. IDT significantly reduced paired helical filament tau and fibrillar amyloid accumulation. Flow cytometry of brain cell populations revealed that IDT increased the infiltrating neutrophil population while reducing TNFα expression in this population. IDT is a safe and effective TNFα and innate immune system modulator. Thus small molecule, orally bioavailable modulators are promising therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26436670

  17. Structures and metal-binding properties of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Fujii, Satoshi

    2014-06-26

    Helicobacter pylori causes severe diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancers. H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is an iron storage protein that forms a dodecameric shell, promotes the adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells, and induces the production of reactive oxygen radicals. HP-NAP belongs to the DNA-protecting proteins under starved conditions (Dps) family, which has significant structural similarities to the dodecameric ferritin family. The crystal structures of the apo form and metal-ion bound forms, such as iron, zinc, and cadmium, of HP-NAP have been determined. This review focused on the structures and metal-binding properties of HP-NAP. These metal ions bind at the di-nuclear ferroxidase center (FOC) by different coordinating patterns. In comparison with the apo structure, metal loading causes a series of conformational changes in conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins (Trp26, Asp52, and Glu56) at the FOC. HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of pores. Metal ions have been identified around one of the pores; therefore, the negatively-charged pore is suitable for the passage of metal ions.

  18. Attenuated viral hepatitis in Trem1−/− mice is associated with reduced inflammatory activity of neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kozik, Jan-Hendrik; Trautmann, Tanja; Carambia, Antonella; Preti, Max; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Krech, Till; Wiegard, Christiane; Heeren, Joerg; Herkel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    TREM1 (Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1) is a pro-inflammatory receptor expressed by phagocytes, which can also be released as a soluble molecule (sTREM1). The roles of TREM1 and sTREM1 in liver infection and inflammation are not clear. Here we show that patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection manifest elevated serum levels of sTREM1. In mice, experimental viral hepatitis induced by infection with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV)-WE was likewise associated with increased sTREM1 in serum and urine, and with increased TREM1 and its associated adapter molecule DAP12 in the liver. Trem1−/− mice showed accelerated clearance of LCMV-WE and manifested attenuated liver inflammation and injury. TREM1 expression in the liver of wild-type mice was mostly confined to infiltrating neutrophils, which responded to LCMV by secretion of CCL2 and TNF-α, and release of sTREM1. Accordingly, the production of CCL2 and TNF-α was decreased in the livers of LCMV-infected Trem1−/− mice, as compared to LCMV-infected wildtype mice. These findings indicate that TREM1 plays a role in viral hepatitis, in which it seems to aggravate the immunopathology associated with viral clearance, mainly by increasing the inflammatory activity of neutrophils. PMID:27328755

  19. Neutrophil function in healthy aged horses and horses with pituitary dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Dianne; Hill, Kim; Anton, Jason

    2015-06-15

    Immunosuppression leading to opportunist bacterial infection is a well-recognized sequela of equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID). The mechanisms responsible for immune dysfunction in PPID however, are as of yet poorly characterized. Horses with PPID have high concentrations of hormones known to impact immune function including α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and insulin. α-MSH and related melanocortins have been shown in rodents and people to impair neutrophil function by decreasing superoxide production (known as oxidative burst activity), migration and adhesion. The goal of this study was to determine if neutrophil function is impaired in horses with PPID and, if so, to determine if plasma α-MSH or insulin concentration correlated with the severity of neutrophil dysfunction. Specifically, neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst activity, chemotaxis and adhesion were assessed. Results of this study indicate that horses with PPID have reduced neutrophil function, characterized by decreased oxidative burst activity and adhesion. In addition, chemotaxis was greater in healthy aged horses than in young horses or aged horses with PPID. Plasma insulin: α-MSH ratio, but not individual hormone concentration was correlated to neutrophil oxidative burst activity. In summary, neutrophil function is impaired in horses with PPID, likely due to altered hormone concentrations and may contribute to increased risk of opportunistic infections. Whether regulation of hormone concentration profiles in horses with PPID using therapeutic intervention improves neutrophil function and reduces infections needs to be explored.

  20. Chlorination of guanosine and other nucleosides by hypochlorous acid and myeloperoxidase of activated human neutrophils. Catalysis by nicotine and trimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Masuda, M; Suzuki, T; Friesen, M D; Ravanat, J L; Cadet, J; Pignatelli, B; Nishino, H; Ohshima, H

    2001-11-01

    Activated human neutrophils secrete myeloperoxidase, which generates HOCl from H2O2 and Cl(-). We have found that various (2'-deoxy)nucleosides react with HOCl to form chlorinated (2'-deoxy)nucleosides, including novel 8-chloro(2'-deoxy)guanosine, 5-chloro(2'-deoxy)cytidine, and 8-chloro(2'-deoxy)adenosine formed in yields of 1.6, 1.6, and 0.2%, respectively, when 0.5 mM nucleoside reacted with 0.5 mM HOCl at pH 7.4. The relative chlorination, oxidation, and nitration activities of HOCl, myeloperoxidase, and activated human neutrophils in the presence and absence of nitrite were studied by analyzing 8-chloro-, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-, and 8-nitro-guanosine, respectively, using guanosine as a probe. 8-Chloroguanosine was always more easily formed than 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro- or 8-nitro-guanosine. Using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, we show that several chlorinated nucleosides including 8-chloro(2'-deoxy)guanosine are formed following exposure of isolated DNA or RNA to HOCl. Micromolar concentrations of tertiary amines such as nicotine and trimethylamine dramatically enhanced chlorination of free (2'-deoxy)nucleosides and nucleosides in RNA by HOCl. As the G-463A polymorphism of the MPO gene, which strongly reduces myeloperoxidase mRNA expression, is associated with a reduced risk of lung cancer, chlorination damage of DNA /RNA and nucleosides by myeloperoxidase and its enhancement by nicotine may be important in the pathophysiology of human diseases associated with tobacco habits. PMID:11533049

  1. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Src family kinase is required for respiratory burst in rat neutrophils stimulated with artocarpol A.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Lin, Hui-Yi; Huang, Li-Jiau; Tsai, Chi-Ren; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Lin, Chun-Nan; Chang, Ling-Chu; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2006-06-14

    Artocarpol A (ART), a natural product isolated from Artocarpus rigida, stimulated superoxide anion (O2*-) generation, which was inhibited by 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (LY 294002), a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, in rat neutrophils. ART stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) on both T308 and S473 residues, and LY 294002 inhibited these effects. Rat neutrophils expressed both class IA PI3K subunits (p85, p110alpha, p110beta, and p110delta) and a class IB PI3K subunit (p110gamma) as assessed by a combination of Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approaches. Stimulation of neutrophils with ART evoked phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) formation, which reached a maximal level at 2 min and was attenuated by LY 294002, as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry. Detectable membrane-association of class IA PI3Ks, class IB PI3K and Ras was seen as early as 1.5, 0.5 and 1.5 min, respectively, after stimulation with ART. The kinetics of ART-induced Ras activation paralleled the kinetics of class IA PI3Ks recruitment to membrane caused by ART, and the p85 and p110gamma immunoprecipitates contain Ras. ART stimulated Src family kinase activation, which was detectable within 1.5 min of incubation with ART. Both Src kinase activity and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 formation in ART-stimulated neutrophils were inhibited by 4-amino-1-tert-butyl-3-(1'-naphthyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP1 analog). PP1 analog also attenuated the ART-stimulated O2*- generation in rat neutrophils. These results indicate that the stimulation of respiratory burst by ART in neutrophils implicates PI3K signaling.

  2. Nicotine is Chemotactic for Neutrophils and Enhances Neutrophil Responsiveness to Chemotactic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totti, Noel; McCusker, Kevin T.; Campbell, Edward J.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils contribute to chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine was found to be chemotactic for human neutrophils but not monocytes, with a peak activity at ~ 31 micromolar. In lower concentrations (comparable to those in smokers' plasma), nicotine enhanced the response of neutrophils to two chemotactic peptides. In contrast to most other chemoattractants for neutrophils, however, nicotine did not affect degranulation or superoxide production. Nicotine thus may promote inflammation and consequent lung injury in smokers.

  3. Xanthine oxidase, but not neutrophils, contributes to activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia in cats

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    2002-01-01

    Activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia causes angina and induces important cardiovascular reflex responses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important chemical stimuli of cardiac afferents during and after ischaemia. Iron-catalysed Fenton chemistry constitutes one mechanism of production of hydroxyl radicals. Another potential source of these species is xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) also contribute to the production of ROS in some conditions. The present study tested the hypothesis that both xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines and neutrophils provide a source of ROS sufficient to activate cardiac afferents during ischaemia. We recorded single-unit activity of cardiac afferents innervating the ventricles recorded from the left thoracic sympathetic chain (T1-5) of anaesthetized cats to identify the afferents' responses to ischaemia. The role of xanthine oxidase in activation of these afferents was determined by infusion of oxypurinol (10 mg kg−1, i.v.), an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. The importance of neutrophils as a potential source of ROS in the activation of cardiac afferents during ischaemia was assessed by the infusion of a polyclonal antibody (3 mg ml−1 kg−1, i.v.) raised in rabbits immunized with cat PMNs. This antibody decreased the number of circulating PMNs and, to a smaller extent, platelets. Since previous data suggest that platelets release serotonin (5-HT), which activates cardiac afferents through a serotonin receptor (subtype 3,5-HT3 receptor) mechanism, before treatment with the antibody in another group, we blocked 5-HT3 receptors on sensory nerve endings with tropisetron (300 μg kg−1, i.v.). We observed that oxypurinol significantly decreased the activity of cardiac afferents during myocardial ischaemia from 1.5 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 impulses s−1. Similarly, the polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the discharge frequency of

  4. The time-of-day of myocardial infarction onset affects healing through oscillations in cardiac neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Maximilian J; Horckmans, Michael; Nitz, Katrin; Duchene, Johan; Drechsler, Maik; Bidzhekov, Kiril; Scheiermann, Christoph; Weber, Christian; Soehnlein, Oliver; Steffens, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of death in Western countries. Epidemiological studies show acute MI to be more prevalent in the morning and to be associated with a poorer outcome in terms of mortality and recovery. The mechanisms behind this association are not fully understood. Here, we report that circadian oscillations of neutrophil recruitment to the heart determine infarct size, healing, and cardiac function after MI Preferential cardiac neutrophil recruitment during the active phase (Zeitgeber time, ZT13) was paralleled by enhanced myeloid progenitor production, increased circulating numbers of CXCR2(hi) neutrophils as well as upregulated cardiac adhesion molecule and chemokine expression. MI at ZT13 resulted in significantly higher cardiac neutrophil infiltration compared to ZT5, which was inhibited by CXCR2 antagonism or neutrophil-specific CXCR2 knockout. Limiting exaggerated neutrophilic inflammation at this time point significantly reduced the infarct size and improved cardiac function. PMID:27226028

  5. Actin filament barbed-end capping activity in neutrophil lysates: the role of capping protein-beta 2.

    PubMed

    DiNubile, M J; Cassimeris, L; Joyce, M; Zigmond, S H

    1995-12-01

    A barbed-end capping activity was found in high speed supernates of neutrophils lysed in submicromolar calcium. In dilute supernate (> or = 100-fold dilution of cytoplasm), this activity accounted for most of the inhibition of barbed-end elongation of pyrenyl-G-actin from spectrin-F-actin seeds. Pointed-end elongation from gelsolin-capped F-actin seeds was not inhibited at comparable concentrations of supernate, thus excluding actin monomer sequestration as a cause of the observed inhibition. Most of the capping activity was due to capping protein-beta 2 (a homologue of cap Z). Thus, while immunoadsorption of > or = 95% of the gelsolin in the supernate did not decrease capping activity, immunoadsorption of capping protein-beta 2 reduced capping activity proportionally to the amount of capping protein-beta 2 adsorbed. Depletion of > 90% of capping protein-beta 2 from the supernate removed 90% of its capping activity. The functional properties of the capping activity were defined. The dissociation constant for binding to barbed ends (determined by steady state and kinetic analyses) was approximately 1-2 nM; the on-rate of capping was between 7 x 10(5) and 5 x 10(6) M-1 s-1; and the off-rate was approximately 2 x 10(-3) s-1. The concentration of capper free in the intact cell (determined by adsorption of supernate with spectrin-actin seeds) was estimated to be approximately 1-2 microM. Thus, there appeared to be enough high affinity capper to cap all the barbed ends in vivo. Nevertheless, immediately after lysis with detergent, neutrophils contained sites that nucleate barbed-end elongation of pyrenyl-G-actin. These barbed ends subsequently become capped with a time course and concentration dependence similar to that of spectrin-F-actin seeds in high speed supernates. These observations suggest that, despite the excess of high affinity capper, some ends either are not capped in vivo or are transiently uncapped upon lysis and dilution. PMID:8590796

  6. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-04-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ(-/-) leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ(+/+) counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ(-/-) neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus-challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. PMID:26908736

  7. The β-glucan receptor Dectin-1 activates the integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils via Vav protein signaling to promote Candida albicans clearance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xun; Utomo, Ahmad; Cullere, Xavier; Choi, Myunghwan Mark; Milner, Danny A; Venkatesh, Deepak; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Mayadas, Tanya N

    2011-12-15

    Resistance to fungal infections is attributed to engagement of host pattern-recognition receptors, notably the β-glucan receptor Dectin-1 and the integrin Mac-1, which induce phagocytosis and antifungal immunity. However, the mechanisms by which these receptors coordinate fungal clearance are unknown. We show that upon ligand binding, Dectin-1 activates Mac-1 to also recognize fungal components, and this stepwise process is critical for neutrophil cytotoxic responses. Both Mac-1 activation and Dectin-1- and Mac-1-induced neutrophil effector functions require Vav1 and Vav3, exchange factors for RhoGTPases. Mac-1- or Vav1,3-deficient mice have increased susceptibility to systemic candidiasis that is not due to impaired neutrophil recruitment but defective intracellular killing of C. albicans yeast forms, and Mac-1 or Vav1,3 reconstitution in hematopoietic cells restores resistance. Our results demonstrate that antifungal immunity depends on Dectin-1-induced activation of Mac-1 functions that is coordinated by Vav proteins, a pathway that may localize cytotoxic responses of circulating neutrophils to infected tissues.

  8. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA--Ecstasy) decreases neutrophil activity through the glucocorticoid pathway and impairs host resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Ribeiro, A; Souza-Queiroz, J; Pinheiro, M L; Vecina, J F; Souza, D P M; Quinteiro-Filho, W M; Moreau, R L M; Queiroz, M L S; Palermo-Neto, J

    2014-12-01

    Ecstasy is the popular name of the abuse drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) that decreases immunity in animals. The mechanisms that generate such alterations are still controversial. Seven independent pharmacological approaches were performed in mice to identify the possible mechanisms underlying the decrease of neutrophil activity induced by MDMA and the possible effects of MDMA on host resistance to Listeria monocytogenes. Our data showed that MDMA (10 mg kg(-1)) administration decreases NFκB expression in circulating neutrophils. Metyrapone or RU-486 administration prior to MDMA treatment abrogated MDMA effects on neutrophil activity and NFκB expression, while 6-OHDA or ICI-118,551 administration did not. As MDMA treatment increased the plasmatic levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline, propranolol pre-treatment effects were also evaluated. Propranolol suppressed both MDMA-induced increase in corticosterone serum levels and its effects on neutrophil activity. In a L. monocytogenes experimental infection context, we showed that MDMA: induced myelosuppression by decreasing granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitors (CFU-GM) in the bone marrow but increased CFU-GM in the spleen; decreased circulating leukocytes and bone marrow cellularity and increased spleen cellularity; decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-12p70, TNF, IFN-γ, IL-6) and chemokine (MCP-1) production 24 h after the infection; increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines 72 h after infection and decreased IL-10 levels at all time points analyzed. It was proposed that MDMA immunosuppressive effects on neutrophil activity and host resistance to L monocytogenes rely on NFκB signaling, being mediated by HPA axis activity and corticosterone.

  9. Investigation of the role of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP in both the activation and inhibition of human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Wanikiat, P; Woodward, D F; Armstrong, R A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the role of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP in chemotaxis and superoxide anion generation (SAG) by human neutrophils, by use of selective inhibitors of NO and cyclic GMP pathways. In addition, inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by NO releasing compounds and increases in neutrophil nitrate/nitrite and cyclic GMP levels were examined. The ultimate aim of this work was to resolve the paradox that NO both activates and inhibits human neutrophils. A role for NO as a mediator of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced chemotaxis was supported by the finding that the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NMMA (500 μM) inhibited chemotaxis; EC50 for fMLP 28.76±5.62 and 41.13±4.77 pmol/106 cells with and without L-NMMA, respectively. Similarly the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO (100 μM) inhibited chemotaxis; EC50 for fMLP 19.71±4.23 and 31.68±8.50 pmol/106 cells with and without carboxy-PTIO, respectively. A role for cyclic GMP as a mediator of chemotaxis was supported by the finding that the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor LY 83583 (100 μM) completely inhibited chemotaxis and suppressed the maximal response; EC50 for fMLP 32.53±11.18 and 85.21±15.14 pmol/106 cells with and without LY 83583, respectively. The same pattern of inhibition was observed with the G-kinase inhibitor KT 5823 (10 μM); EC50 for fMLP 32.16±11.35 and >135 pmol/106 cells with and without KT 5823, respectively. The phosphatase inhibitor, 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid (DPG) (100 μM) which inhibits phospholipase D, attenuated fMLP-induced chemotaxis; EC50 for fMLP 19.15±4.36 and 61.52±16.2 pmol/106 cells with and without DPG, respectively. Although the NOS inhibitors L-NMMA and L-canavanine (500 μM) failed to inhibit fMLP-induced SAG, carboxy-PTIO caused significant inhibition (EC50 for fMLP 36.15±7.43 and 86.31±14.06 nM and reduced the maximal response from 22.14±1.5 to 9.8±1.6 nmol O2−/106 cells/10 min with and without

  10. Artocarpol A stimulation of superoxide anion generation in neutrophils involved the activation of PLC, PKC and p38 mitogen-activated PK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Lin, Chun-Nan; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2005-06-01

    1 Artocarpol A (ART), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Artocarpus rigida, stimulated a slow onset and long-lasting superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils, whereas only slightly activated the NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system. 2 Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin (1 microg ml(-1)), 50 microM 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone (PD 98059), or 1 microM 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadiene (U0126) had no effect on ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation. ART (30 microM) did not induce extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. 3 4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-1H-imidazole (SB 203580) markedly attenuated the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 4.3+/-0.3 microM). Moreover, ART induced p38 mitogen-activated PK (MAPK) phosphorylation and activation. 4 The superoxide anion generation in response to ART was also substantially inhibited in a Ca2+-free medium, and by pretreatment with 1 microM 1-[6-((17beta-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl)amino)hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U-73122) and 100 microM 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB). ART (30 microM) stimulated the [Ca2+]i elevation in the presence or absence of external Ca2+, and also increased the D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. 5 2-[1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-maleimide (GF 109203X) greatly inhibited the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 7.8+/-1.0 nM). ART increased the recruitment of PKC-alpha, -betaI, and -betaII to the plasma membrane of neutrophils, and stimulated Ca2+-dependent PKC activation in the cytosol preparation. 6 ART induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, which was attenuated by GF 109203X. Moreover, ART evoked the membrane association of p47(phox), which was inhibited by GF 109203X and SB 203580. 7 These results indicate that the ART stimulation of superoxide anion generation involved the activation of p38 MAPK, PLC/Ca2

  11. Tumour Cell Lines HT-29 and FaDu Produce Proinflammatory Cytokines and Activate Neutrophils In Vitro: Possible Applications for Neutrophil-Based Antitumour Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brú, Antonio; Souto, Juan-Carlos; Alcolea, Sonia; Antón, Rosa; Remacha, Angel; Camacho, Mercedes; Soler, Marta; Brú, Isabel; Porres, Amelia; Vila, Luis

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) can exert severe antineoplastic effects. Cross-talk between tumour cells and endothelial cells (ECs) is necessary for the accumulation of PMN around a tumour. This work reports the ability of two PMN-sensitive, human, permanent cell lines—colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) and pharyngeal squamous-cell carcinoma (FaDu) cells—to act as inflammatory foci. PMNs were cytotoxic to both lines, the adhesion of the PMNs to the tumour cells being important in this effect. The tumour cells released appreciable amounts of IL-8 and GROα, and induced the transmigration of PMN through human microvascular-EC monolayers. Conditioning media associated with both lines induced the adhesion of PMN and the surface expression of ICAM-1 in microvascular-EC. In addition, FaDu-conditioning-medium strongly induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines by microvascular-EC. These results support the idea that tumour cells might normally induce a potent acute inflammatory response, leading to their own destruction. PMID:20169105

  12. Complex Networks, Fractals and Topology Trends for Oxidative Activity of DNA in Cells for Populations of Fluorescing Neutrophils in Medical Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galich, N. E.

    A novel nonlinear statistical method of immunofluorescence data analysis is presented. The data of DNA fluorescence due to oxidative activity in neutrophils nuclei of peripheral blood is analyzed. Histograms of photon counts statistics are generated using flow cytometry method. The histograms represent the distributions of fluorescence flash frequency as functions of intensity for large populations∼104-105 of fluorescing cells. We have shown that these experiments present 3D-correlations of oxidative activity of DNA for full chromosomes set in cells with spatial resolution of measurements is about few nanometers in the flow direction the jet of blood. Detailed analysis showed that large-scale correlations in oxidative activity of DNA in cells are described as networks of small- worlds (complex systems with logarithmic scaling) with self own small-world networks for given donor at given time for all states of health. We observed changes in fractal networks of oxidative activity of DNA in neutrophils in vivo and during medical treatments for classification and diagnostics of pathologies for wide spectra of diseases. Our approach based on analysis of changes topology of networks (fractal dimension) at variation the scales of networks. We produce the general estimation of health status of a given donor in a form of yes/no of answers (healthy/sick) in the dependence on the sign of plus/minus in the trends change of fractal dimensions due to decreasing the scale of nets. We had noted the increasing biodiversity of neutrophils and stochastic (Brownian) character of intercellular correlations of different neutrophils in the blood of healthy donor. In the blood of sick people we observed the deterministic cell-cell correlations of neutrophils and decreasing their biodiversity.

  13. Cell wall-anchored nuclease of Streptococcus sanguinis contributes to escape from neutrophil extracellular trap-mediated bacteriocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Morita, Chisato; Sumioka, Ryuichi; Nakata, Masanobu; Okahashi, Nobuo; Wada, Satoshi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Hayashi, Mikako; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a member of the commensal mitis group of streptococci, is a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, and has been implicated in infectious complications including bacteremia and infective endocarditis. During disease progression, S. sanguinis may utilize various cell surface molecules to evade the host immune system to survive in blood. In the present study, we discovered a novel cell surface nuclease with a cell-wall anchor domain, termed SWAN (streptococcal wall-anchored nuclease), and investigated its contribution to bacterial resistance against the bacteriocidal activity of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recombinant SWAN protein (rSWAN) digested multiple forms of DNA including NET DNA and human RNA, which required both Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) for optimum activity. Furthermore, DNase activity of S. sanguinis was detected around growing colonies on agar plates containing DNA. In-frame deletion of the swan gene mostly reduced that activity. These findings indicated that SWAN is a major nuclease displayed on the surface, which was further confirmed by immuno-detection of SWAN in the cell wall fraction. The sensitivity of S. sanguinis to NET killing was reduced by swan gene deletion. Moreover, heterologous expression of the swan gene rendered a Lactococcus lactis strain more resistant to NET killing. Our results suggest that the SWAN nuclease on the bacterial surface contributes to survival in the potential situation of S. sanguinis encountering NETs during the course of disease progression. PMID:25084357

  14. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Extract on Killing Activity of Human Neutrophils and Membrane Integrity of Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Hmoteh, Jutharat; Syed Musthafa, Khadar; Pomwised, Rattanaruji; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2016-05-27

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 is one of the most virulent causative agents of foodborne disease. Use of antibiotics for the treatment against E. coli O157:H7 infection leads to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The present study evaluated the potential of ethanolic leaf extract of a medicinal plant, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa in enhancing the killing activity of human neutrophils against E. coli O157:H7. In addition, the effects of the extract on membrane permeability of the organisms were studied. In the killing assay, percentage survival of the bacterial cells after being exposed to human neutrophils in the presence of various concentrations of the extract were determined. At 45 min, percentage survival of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 after treated with neutrophils in the presence of the extract at 125-250 µg/mL was 58.48%-50.28% and 69.13%-35.35%, respectively. Furthermore, upon treatment with R. tomentosa at 250 µg/mL uptake of crystal violet by E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 was increased to 40.07% and 36.16%, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that the extract exhibited dual effects as immunostimulant and membrane permeabilizing agent perhaps resulted in enhancing the killing activity of neutrophils against the organisms.

  15. NFκB activation by modified vaccinia virus as a novel strategy to enhance neutrophil migration and HIV-specific T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Di Pilato, Mauro; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Zonca, Manuela; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Trakala, Marianna; Nieto, Jacobo; Nájera, José Luis; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Combadière, Christophe; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Planelles, Lourdes; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-03-17

    Neutrophils are antigen-transporting cells that generate vaccinia virus (VACV)-specific T-cell responses, yet how VACV modulates neutrophil recruitment and its significance in the immune response are unknown. We generated an attenuated VACV strain that expresses HIV-1 clade C antigens but lacks three specific viral genes (A52R, K7R, and B15R). We found that these genes act together to inhibit the NFκB signaling pathway. Triple ablation in modified virus restored NFκB function in macrophages. After virus infection of mice, NFκB pathway activation led to expression of several cytokines/chemokines that increased the migration of neutrophil populations (Nα and Nβ) to the infection site. Nβ cells displayed features of antigen-presenting cells and activated virus-specific CD8 T cells. Enhanced neutrophil trafficking to the infection site correlated with an increased T-cell response to HIV vector-delivered antigens. These results identify a mechanism for poxvirus-induced immune response and alternatives for vaccine vector design.

  16. Integrin-dependent homotypic adhesion of neutrophils. Arachidonic acid activates Raf-1/Mek/Erk via a 5-lipoxygenase- dependent pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Capodici, C; Pillinger, M H; Han, G; Philips, M R; Weissmann, G

    1998-01-01

    AA stimulates integrin-dependent neutrophil adhesion, a critical early step in acute inflammation. However, neither the signaling pathway(s) of AA-stimulated adhesion, nor whether AA acts directly or through the generation of active metabolites, has been elucidated. Previously, we have observed a tight association between neutrophil Erk activation and homotypic adhesion in response to chemoattractants acting through G protein-linked receptors. We now report a similar association between homotypic adhesion and Erk activation in response to AA. Erk activation was cyclooxygenase independent and required AA metabolism to 5(S)- hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HpETE) via 5-lipoxygenase, but not the further lipoxygenase-dependent metabolism of 5-HpETE to leukotrienes. AA stimulation of Erk was accompanied by Raf-1 activation and was sensitive to inhibitors of Raf-1 and Mek. Whereas activation of Erk by AA was pertussis toxin sensitive, [3H]-AA binding to neutrophils was not saturable, suggesting that an AA metabolite activates a G protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, Erk activation by 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE; lipoxygenase-independent metabolite of 5-HpETE) was also pertussis toxin sensitive. These data suggest that a 5-lipoxygenase metabolite of AA, e.g., 5-HETE, is released from AA-treated cells to engage a plasma membrane-associated, pertussis toxin-sensitive, G protein-linked receptor, leading to activation of Erk and adhesion via the Raf-1/Mek signal transduction pathway. PMID:9649570

  17. Upregulation of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin by ErbB2 through nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shau-Hsuan; Hawthorne, Valerie S; Neal, Christopher L; Sanghera, Sartaj; Xu, Jia; Yang, Jun; Guo, Hua; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua

    2009-12-15

    ErbB2 (HER2, neu) is a receptor tyrosine kinase overexpressed in about 25% of invasive breast carcinomas. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a secreted glycoprotein expressed in a variety of cancers, including breast carcinomas. NGAL can inhibit erythroid cell production, leading to anemia. Anemia usually occurs in cancer patients and negatively affects quality of life. However, current treatment for cancer-related anemia has potential complications. ErbB2, NGAL, and anemia have all been associated with increased metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients, although the relationship between ErbB2 and NGAL expression is not clear. Here, using breast cancer cell lines in vitro and transgenic mice carrying the activated c-neu oncogene driven by a mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-neu) in vivo, we show that ErbB2 overexpression leads to NGAL upregulation, which is dependent on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity. MMTV-neu transgenic mice developed anemia after tumor onset, and anemia progression could be partially arrested by a NF-kappaB inhibitor and ErbB2-targeted therapy. Taken together, upregulation of NGAL by ErbB2 through NF-kappaB activation is involved in cancer-related anemia, and the ErbB2, NF-kappaB, and NGAL pathways may serve as potential therapeutic targets for cancer-related anemia.

  18. [Survival by a young woman with malnutrition due to alcoholism and eating disorders and with acute respiratory distress syndrome due to severe pneumonia who showed increased serum neutrophil elastase activity].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hirokazu; Sawaguchi, Hirochiyo; Nakajima, Shigenori

    2006-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman with malnutrition due to alcoholism and eating disorders was found to have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis due to severe Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. S. pneumoniae was detected by an in vitro rapid immunochromatographic assay for S. pneumoniae antigen in urine on the day of admission and by blood culture 2 days after admission. Symptoms and laboratory findings improved after treatment with sivelestat sodium hydrate, antibiotics, and mechanical ventilation. Treatment with sivelestat sodium hydrate also decreased serum neutrophil elastase activity. This case demonstrates the usefulness of early treatment with sivelestat sodium hydrate in ARDS due to severe pneumonia.

  19. Comparison of alkylacylglycerol vs. diacylglycerol as activators of mitogen-activated protein kinase and cytosolic phospholipase A2 in human neutrophil priming.

    PubMed

    Nixon, A B; Seeds, M C; Bass, D A; Smitherman, P K; O'Flaherty, J T; Daniel, L W; Wykle, R L

    1997-08-16

    In human neutrophils, the choline-containing phosphoglycerides contain almost equal amounts of alkylacyl- and diacyl-linked subclasses. In contrast to phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis which yields diacylglycerol, hydrolysis of choline-containing phosphoglycerides by phospholipase D coupled with phosphohydrolase yields both alkylacyl- and diacylglycerol. While diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, alkylacylglycerol does not, and its role is unclear. Yet previous studies have shown that exogenous alkylacyl- and diacylglycerols can prime for the release of radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) in intact neutrophils stimulated by formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. We have now examined the effects of both diacylglycerol (1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol; OAG) and alkylacylglycerol (1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetylglycerol; EAG) on the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and the 85-kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in human neutrophils. We observed that while OAG could effectively activate p42 and p44 MAP kinases along with cPLA2 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, EAG could not. A novel p40 MAP kinase isoform is also present and activated in response to OAG treatment; the behavior of this MAP kinase isoform is discussed. The activation of cPLA2 and MAP kinase by 20 microM OAG could be inhibited by pretreatment with 1 microM GF-109203X, a selective inhibitor of protein kinase C. Although only OAG activated cPLA2, both OAG and EAG primed for the release of AA mass as determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The priming of AA release by OAG may be explained by the phosphorylation of cPLA2 through the activation of protein kinase C linked to MAP kinase. However, priming by EAG appears to involve a separate mechanism that is dependent on a different PLA2. Our results support a role for phospholipase D-derived products modulating the activation of cPLA2, further supporting the idea of cross-talk among various phospholipases.

  20. Neutrophil Recruitment and Activation in Decidua with Intra-Amniotic IL-1beta in the Preterm Rhesus Macaque1

    PubMed Central

    Presicce, Pietro; Senthamaraikannan, Paranthaman; Alvarez, Manuel; Rueda, Cesar M.; Cappelletti, Monica; Miller, Lisa A.; Jobe, Alan H.; Chougnet, Claire A.; Kallapur, Suhas G.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chorioamnionitis, an infection/inflammation of the fetomaternal membranes, is frequently associated with preterm delivery. The mechanisms of inflammation in chorioamnionitis are poorly understood. We hypothesized that neutrophils recruited to the decidua would be the major producers of proinflammatory cytokines. We injected intra-amniotic (IA) interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) at ∼80% gestation in rhesus macaque monkeys, Macaca mulatta, delivered the fetuses surgically 24 h or 72 h after IA injections, and investigated the role of immune cells in the chorion-amnion decidua. IA IL-1beta induced a robust infiltration of neutrophils and significant increases of proinflammatory cytokines in the chorioamnion decidua at 24 h after exposure, with a subsequent decrease at 72 h. Neutrophils in the decidua were the major source of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and IL-8. Interestingly, IA IL-1beta also induced a significant increase in anti-inflammatory indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression in the decidua neutrophils. The frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and FOXP3 mRNA expression in the decidua did not change after IA IL-1beta injection. Collectively, our data demonstrate that in this model of sterile chorioamnionitis, the decidua neutrophils cause the inflammation in the gestational tissues but may also act as regulators to dampen the inflammation. These results help to understand the contribution of neutrophils to the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis-induced preterm labor. PMID:25537373

  1. Mitochondrial DAMPs from femoral reamings activate neutrophils via formyl peptide receptors and P44/42 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Carl J.; Sursal, Tolga; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Appleton, Paul T.; Zhang, Qin; Itagaki, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis Fractures and femoral reaming are associated with lung injury. The mechanisms linking fractures and inflammation are unclear; but tissue disruption might release mitochondria. Mitochondria are evolutionarily derived from bacteria and contain “Damage Associated Molecular Patterns” (DAMPs) like formylated peptides that can activate immunocytes. We therefore studied whether fracture reaming releases mitochondrial DAMPs (MTD) and how MTD act on immune cells. Methods Femur fracture reamings (FFx) from 10 patients were spun to remove bone particulates. Supernatants were assayed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mitochondria were isolated from the residual reaming slurry, sonicated and spun at 12,000g. The resultant MTD were assayed for their ability to cause neutrophil (PMN) Ca2+ transient production, p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation, IL-8 release and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) release with and without formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR1) blockade. Rats were injected with MTD and whole lung assayed for p44/42 activation. Results mtDNA appears at many thousand fold normal plasma levels in FFx and at intermediate levels in patients’ plasma, suggesting release from fracture to plasma. FFx MTD caused brisk PMN Ca2+ flux, activated PMN p44/42 MAPK and caused PMN release of IL-8 and MMP9. Responses to MTD were inhibited by FPR1 blockade using Cyclosporin H and anti-FPR1. MTD injection caused P44/42 phosphorylation in rat lung. Conclusions FFx reaming releases mitochondria into the wound and circulation. MTD then activates PMN. Release of damage signals like MTD from FFx may underlie activation of the cytokine cascades known to be associated with facture fixation and lung injury. PMID:20736789

  2. Beta 2 integrin-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the FGR protein tyrosine kinase in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of adherent human neutrophils (PMN) with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) triggers protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Fuortes, M., W. W. Jin, and C. Nathan. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 120:777-784). We investigated the dependence of this response on beta 2 integrins by using PMN isolated from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient, which do not express beta 2 integrins, and by plating PMN on surface bound anti-beta 2 (CD18) antibodies. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in PMN plated on fibrinogen and this phosphorylation was enhanced by TNF. Triggering of protein tyrosine phosphorylation did not occur in LAD PMN plated on fibrinogen either in the absence or the presence of TNF. Surface bound anti-CD18, but not isotype-matched anti- Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens, antibodies triggered tyrosine phosphorylation in normal, but not in LAD PMN. As the major tyrosine phosphorylated proteins we found in our assay conditions migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 56-60 kD, we investigated whether beta 2 integrins are implicated in activation of members of the src family of intracellular protein-tyrosine kinases. We found that the fgr protein-tyrosine kinase (p58fgr) activity, and its extent of phosphorylation in tyrosine, in PMN adherent to fibrinogen, was enhanced by TNF. Activation of p58fgr in response to TNF was evident within 10 min of treatment and increased with times up to 30 min. Also other activators of beta 2 integrins such as phorbol-12- myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced activation of p58fgr kinase activity. Activation of p58fgr kinase activity, and phosphorylation in tyrosine, did not occur in PMN of a LAD patient in response to TNF. Soluble anti-CD18, but not anti-Class I MHC antigens, antibodies inhibited activation of p58fgr kinase activity in PMN adherent to fibrinogen in response to TNF, PMA, and FMLP. These findings demonstrate that, in PMN, beta 2 integrins

  3. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions. PMID:26819959

  4. Mode of renal replacement therapy determines endotoxemia and neutrophil dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lemesch, Sandra; Ribitsch, Werner; Schilcher, Gernot; Spindelböck, Walter; Hafner-Gießauf, Hildegard; Marsche, Gunther; Pasterk, Lisa; Payerl, Doris; Schmerböck, Bianca; Tawdrous, Monika; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Stiegler, Philipp; Kager, Gerd; Hallström, Seth; Oettl, Karl; Eberhard, Katharina; Horvath, Angela; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection and sepsis are common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A vicious cycle of increased gut permeability, endotoxemia, inadequate activation of the innate immune system and resulting innate immune dysfunction is hypothesized. We assessed endotoxemia, neutrophil function and its relation to oxidative stress, inflammation and gut permeability in patients with CKD grade 3–5 without renal replacement therapy (CKD group, n = 57), patients with CKD stage 5 undergoing haemodialysis (HD, n = 32) or peritoneal dialysis (PD, n = 28) and patients after kidney transplantation (KT, n = 67) in a cross-sectional observational study. In HD patients, endotoxin serum levels were elevated and neutrophil phagocytic capacity was decreased compared to all other groups. Patients on HD had a significantly higher mortality, due to infections during follow up, compared to PD (p = 0.022). Oxidative stress, neutrophil energy charge, systemic inflammation and gut permeability could not completely explain these differences. Our findings suggest that dialysis modality and not renal function per se determine the development of neutrophil dysfunction and endotoxemia in CKD-patients. HD patients are particularly prone to neutrophil dysfunction and endotoxemia whereas neutrophil function seems to improve after KT. Multi-target approaches are therefore warranted to improve neutrophil function and potentially reduce the rate of infections with patients undergoing haemodialysis. PMID:27698480

  5. Subcellular localization of the b-cytochrome component of the human neutrophil microbicidal oxidase: translocation during activation

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We describe a new method for subcellular fractionation of human neutrophils. Neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and the nuclei removed by centrifugation. The postnuclear supernatant was applied on top of a discontinuous Percoll density gradient. Centrifugation for 15 min at 48,000 g resulted in complete separation of plasma membranes, azurophil granules, and specific granules. As determined by ultrastructure and the distribution of biochemical markers of these organelles, approximately 90% of the b-cytochrome in unstimulated cells was recovered from the band containing the specific granules and was shown to be in or tightly associated with the membrane. During stimulation of intact neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or the ionophore A23187, we observed translocation of 40-75% of the b-cytochrome to the plasma membrane. The extent of this translocation closely paralleled release of the specific granule marker, vitamin B12-binding protein. These data indicate that the b- cytochrome is in the membrane of the specific granules of unstimulated neutrophils and that stimulus-induced fusion of these granules with the plasma membrane results in a translocation of the cytochrome. Our observations provide a basis for the assembly of the microbicidal oxidase of the human neutrophil. PMID:6408102

  6. Cross-linking of IgGs bound on circulating neutrophils leads to an activation of endothelial cells: possible role of rheumatoid factors in rheumatoid arthritis-associated vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by the presence of circulating auto-antibodies, including rheumatoid factors, which recognize the Fc portion of IgGs. The neutrophil is the most abundant circulating leukocyte and it expresses high levels of FcγRs on its surface. The aim of the present study was to examine the capacity of circulating human neutrophils to be activated by rheumatoid factors and the consequences of these events on endothelium. Methods Neutrophil-bound IgGs were cross-linked with anti-human IgGs to mimick the presence of circulating rheumatoid factors and FcγRs-dependent signalling events and functions were examined. The IgG and IgM composition of rheumatoid factors isolated from the serum of RA patients was characterized. Adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells was quantified in response to the addition of rheumatoid factors. Results Cross-linking of IgGs bound on neutrophils leads to FcγRs-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation, mobilisation of intracellular calcium and the extracellular release of superoxide anions and lysozyme. Incubation of endothelial cells with the supernatant of activated neutrophils increases ICAM-1 expression and IL-8 production by endothelial cells. Finally, rheumatoid factors enhance neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. Conclusions Our results show that activation of neutrophils’ FcγRs by rheumatoid factors could participate in rheumatoid arthritis-associated vascular damage. PMID:23902799

  7. CXC chemokines connective tissue activating peptide-III and neutrophil activating peptide-2 are heparin/heparan sulfate-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hoogewerf, A J; Leone, J W; Reardon, I M; Howe, W J; Asa, D; Heinrikson, R L; Ledbetter, S R

    1995-02-17

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans at cell surfaces or in extracellular matrices bind diverse molecules, including growth factors and cytokines, and it is believed that the activities of these molecules may be regulated by the metabolism of heparan sulfate. In this study, purification of a heparan sulfate-degrading enzyme from human platelets led to the discovery that the enzymatic activity residues in at least two members of the platelet basic protein (PBP) family known as connective tissue activating peptide-III (CTAP-III) and neutrophil activating peptide-2. PBP and its N-truncated derivatives, CTAP-III and neutrophil activating peptide-2, are CXC chemokines, a group of molecules involved in inflammation and wound healing. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the purified heparanase resulted in a single broad band at 8-10 kDa, the known molecular weight of PBP and its truncated derivatives. Gel filtration chromatography of heparanase resulted in peaks of activity corresponding to monomers, dimers, and tetramers; these higher order aggregates are known to form among the chemokines. N-terminal sequence analysis of the same preparation indicated that only PBP and truncated derivatives were present, and commercial CTAP-III from three suppliers had heparanase activity. Antisera produced in animals immunized with a C-terminal synthetic peptide of PBP inhibited heparanase activity by 95%, compared with activity of the purified enzyme in the presence of the preimmune sera. The synthetic peptide also inhibited heparanase by 95% at 250 microM, compared to the 33% inhibition of heparanase activity by two other peptides. The enzyme was determined to be an endoglucosaminidase, and it degraded both heparin and heparan sulfate with optimal activity at pH 5.8. Chromatofocusing of the purified heparanase resulted in two protein peaks: an inactive peak at pI7.3, and an active peak at pI 4.8-5.1. Sequence analysis showed that the two peaks contained identical protein

  8. Effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the production of reactive oxygen species by activated rat neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Paino, I M M; Ximenes, V F; Fonseca, L M da; Kanegae, M P P; Khalil, N M; Brunetti, I L

    2005-04-01

    The release of reactive oxygen specie (ROS) by activated neutrophil is involved in both the antimicrobial and deleterious effects in chronic inflammation. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the production of ROS by stimulated rat neutrophils. Diclofenac (3.6 microM), indomethacin (12 microM), naproxen (160 microM), piroxicam (13 microM), and tenoxicam (30 microM) were incubated at 37 masculineC in PBS (10 mM), pH 7.4, for 30 min with rat neutrophils (1 x 10(6) cells/ml) stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (100 nM). The ROS production was measured by luminol and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. Except for naproxen, NSAIDs reduced ROS production: 58 +/- 2% diclofenac, 90 +/- 2% indomethacin, 33 +/- 3% piroxicam, and 45 +/- 6% tenoxicam (N = 6). For the lucigenin assay, naproxen, piroxicam and tenoxicam were ineffective. For indomethacin the inhibition was 52 +/- 5% and diclofenac showed amplification in the light emission of 181 +/- 60% (N = 6). Using the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H2O2/luminol system, the effects of NSAIDs on MPO activity were also screened. We found that NSAIDs inhibited both the peroxidation and chlorinating activity of MPO as follows: diclofenac (36 +/- 10, 45 +/- 3%), indomethacin (97 +/- 2, 100 +/- 1%), naproxen (56 +/- 8, 76 +/- 3%), piroxicam (77 +/- 5, 99 +/- 1%), and tenoxicam (90 +/- 2, 100 +/- 1%), respectively (N = 3). These results show that therapeutic levels of NSAIDs are able to suppress the oxygen-dependent antimicrobial or oxidative functions of neutrophils by inhibiting the generation of hypochlorous acid.

  9. Characterization of cytolytic neutrophil activation in vitro by amorphous hydrated calcium phosphate as a model of biomaterial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Felicity C; Taheri, Amir; Dann, Sophie C; Dye, Julian F

    2011-03-01

    Calcium ions are utilized in biomolecular biomaterial design for osteomimetic scaffolds and as divalent cross-linking agents, typically for gelation of alginates, stabilisation of protein structure (e.g., fibrinogen) and enzyme activation (e.g., thrombin). Biological interactions with defined calcium phosphates (e.g., hydroxyapatite) are exploited for osteogenesis, although crystalline calcium phosphates (e.g., calcium pyrophosphate) stimulate inflammation. We found that the calcium concentration used in the manufacture of prototype dermal scaffolds made from fibrin/alginate composite was related to the inflammatory infiltration during in vivo integration. In investigating a cause for this inflammatory response, we have identified and characterized a cytolytic inflammatory effect of amorphous calcium phosphate (CaP) formed in physiological solutions, relevant to biomaterial biocompatibility. Isolated human neutrophils (Nφ) were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline with CaCl(2) ranging 2.5-20 mM total calcium. Nφ activation was assessed by morphology and integrin-β2 (CD18a) expression. Mediator release (Nφ-elastase, IL-8, and TNFα) was measured from both Nφ and whole blood cultures plus CaCl(2). CaP exposure increased CD18a expression over 1 h (maximal at 10 mM calcium/ phosphate) with concurrent phagocytosis, cytolysis, and Nφ-elastase release. CaCl(2) induced expression of IL-8 and TNFα in whole blood cultures. These results suggest that CaP formed from the resorption of calcium-containing biomaterials could induce inflammation and accelerate biomaterial degradation, driving further CaP release. This demonstrates a novel mechanism for biomaterial-induced inflammation. The in vitro system described could aid preclinical evaluation of novel biomaterial inflammatory potential. PMID:21254387

  10. Selectin blocking activity of a fucosylated chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan from sea cucumber. Effect on tumor metastasis and neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Borsig, Lubor; Wang, Lianchun; Cavalcante, Moises C M; Cardilo-Reis, Larissa; Ferreira, Paola L; Mourão, Paulo A S; Esko, Jeffrey D; Pavão, Mauro S G

    2007-05-18

    Heparin is an excellent inhibitor of P- and L-selectin binding to the carbohydrate determinant, sialyl Lewis(x). As a consequence of its anti-selectin activity, heparin attenuates metastasis and inflammation. Here we show that fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS), a polysaccharide isolated from sea cucumber composed of a chondroitin sulfate backbone substituted at the 3-position of the beta-D-glucuronic acid residues with 2,4-disulfated alpha-L-fucopyranosyl branches, is a potent inhibitor of P- and L-selectin binding to immobilized sialyl Lewis(x) and LS180 carcinoma cell attachment to immobilized P- and L-selectins. Inhibition occurs in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, FucCS was 4-8-fold more potent than heparin in the inhibition of the P- and L-selectin-sialyl Lewis(x) interactions. No inhibition of E-selectin was observed. FucCS also inhibited lung colonization by adenocarcinoma MC-38 cells in an experimental metastasis model in mice, as well as neutrophil recruitment in two models of inflammation (thioglycollate-induced peritonitis and lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation). Inhibition occurred at a dose that produces no significant change in plasma activated partial thromboplastin time. Removal of the sulfated fucose branches on the FucCS abolished the inhibitory effect in vitro and in vivo. Overall, the results suggest that invertebrate FucCS may be a potential alternative to heparin for blocking metastasis and inflammatory reactions without the undesirable side effects of anticoagulant heparin.

  11. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  12. Crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center in a zinc or cadmium-bound form

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Tsuruta, Osamu; Akao, Naoya; Fujii, Satoshi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures of a metal-bound Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two zinc ions were tetrahedrally coordinated by ferroxidase center (FOC) residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cadmium ions were coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and octahedral manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second metal ion was more weakly coordinated than the first at the FOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zinc ion was found in one negatively-charged pore suitable as an ion path. -- Abstract: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a Dps-like iron storage protein forming a dodecameric shell, and promotes adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. The crystal structure of HP-NAP in a Zn{sup 2+}- or Cd{sup 2+}-bound form reveals the binding of two zinc or two cadmium ions and their bridged water molecule at the ferroxidase center (FOC). The two zinc ions are coordinated in a tetrahedral manner to the conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins. The two cadmium ions are coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and distorted octahedral manner. In both structures, the second ion is more weakly coordinated than the first. Another zinc ion is found inside of the negatively-charged threefold-related pore, which is suitable for metal ions to pass through.

  13. Gonococcal interactions with polymorphonuclear neutrophils: importance of the phagosome for bactericidal activity.

    PubMed Central

    Densen, P; Mandell, G L

    1978-01-01

    Gonococci are capable of attaching to the surface of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In this location they resist phagocytosis and are not killed by PMN. To delineate the factors involved in the survival of these gonococci, we investigated the interaction of virulent gonococci, which adhere to cells and resist phagocytosis, and avirulent gonococci, which are phagocytized and killed by PMN. In the presence of serum, both virulent and avirulent gonococci associate equally well with PMN and stimulate increases in oxidative metabolism. In the absence of serum virulent gonococci attached to PMN and stimulated PMN oxidative metabolism to a greater extent than avirulent gonococci which did not attach to PMN (P = 0.0009). Therefore, the survival of virulent gonococci attached to the PMN surface is not a result of failure to activate oxidative and bactericidal mechanisms. Both virulent and avirulent gonococci stimulated equivalent PMN specific granule release as measured by the appearance of lactoferrin in the media. Phagocytosis of avirulent gonococci stimulated significantly greater beta-glucuronidase release (P = 0.01) and myeloperoxidase-mediated iodination of protein (P = 0.001) by PMN than attachment of virulent gonococci. In the absence of serum neither type of gonococci stimulated beta-glocuronidase release or protein iodination by PMN. Thus, virulent gonococci fail to stimulate primary granule release by PMN. To further assess the role of attachment versus ingestion on the survival of gonococci, PMN were treated with cytochalasin B to block ingestion. Cytochalasin B-treated PMN were unable to kill either virulent or avirulent gonococci despite normal degranulation stimulated by the latter. The failure of PMN to kill surface-attached gonococci appears to be a consequence of the failure of PMN to enclose the virulent gonococci within a phagosome. The phagocytic vacuole thus plays a critical role in normal PMN bactericidal activity by providing a closed space in

  14. Vaccination against canine leishmaniosis increases the phagocytic activity, nitric oxide production and expression of cell activation/migration molecules in neutrophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Marcela L; Costa-Pereira, Christiane; Alves, Marina Luiza Rodrigues; Marteleto, Bruno H; Ribeiro, Vitor M; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo C; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Araújo, Márcio S S

    2016-04-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is transmitted by phlebotomine sandfly vectors and domestic dogs serve as a reservoir. The elimination of seropositive dogs has been a recommended strategy for managing the disease in Brazil. A protective canine vaccine would be an important tool for controlling the disease, reducing the parasites available to sandfly vectors and, consequently, reducing the number of human VL cases. Leishmune(®) is an anti-canine Leishmaniosis (VL Canine) vaccine produced by Zoetis (Pfizer, Brazil) that was commercially available in Brazil until 2014. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the protective immunological events induced by vaccination with Leishmune(®) in the time frame of one year. Healthy, non-vaccinated dogs and dogs of 1, 6 and 10 months post-vaccination were evaluated. Results showed that Leishmune(®) induced an increase in phagocytic activity of neutrophils and monocytes and also increased NO production. Immunological events were correlated with functional responses, as high levels of IgG and an increase of the receptor Fcγ were detected. Vaccination induced an increased expression of TLR (2, 4, 5, 9), integrin (CD29, CD49f), activation (MHCII) and co-stimulatory (CD80, CD81) molecules by neutrophils and monocytes. Vaccination led to decrease of IL-4 and an increase of IL-8 production by monocytes and higher IFN-γ and IL-17 production by T-cells. The results suggested that Leishmune(®) was able to induce a long-lasting change in immune response, mediated by supportive immunological events that may be participating in protective immunity against CL.

  15. Neutrophils in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Xiao, Yang; Xu, Aimin; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. It occurs as the consequence of destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells triggered by genetic and environmental factors. The initiation and progression of the disease involves a complicated interaction between β-cells and immune cells of both innate and adaptive systems. Immune cells, such as T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, have been well documented to play crucial roles in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. However, the particular actions of neutrophils, which are the most plentiful immune cell type and the first immune cells responding to inflammation, in the etiology of this disease might indeed be unfairly ignored. Progress over the past decades shows that neutrophils might have essential effects on the onset and perpetuation of type 1 diabetes. Neutrophil-derived cytotoxic substances, including degranulation products, cytokines, reactive oxygen species and extracellular traps that are released during the process of neutrophil maturation or activation, could cause destruction to islet cells. In addition, these cells can initiate diabetogenic T cell response and promote type 1 diabetes development through cell-cell interactions with other immune and non-immune cells. Furthermore, relevant antineutrophil therapies have been shown to delay and dampen the progression of insulitis and autoimmune diabetes. Here, we discuss the relationship between neutrophils and autoimmune type 1 diabetes from the aforementioned aspects to better understand the roles of these cells in the initiation and development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27181374

  16. Differential effects of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein on bovine neutrophil respiratory burst activity and IL-8 production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During bacterial-mediated diseases of dairy cows, such as mastitis, neutrophils (PMN’s) play a critical role in defending the host against invading pathogens. To carry out this role, PMN’s travel from the blood to the mammary gland in response to a variety of inflammatory mediators, including cytok...

  17. Critical role of the C5a-activated neutrophils in high-fat diet-induced vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Osaka, Mizuko; Ito, Shunsuke; Honda, Masaki; Inomata, Yukihiro; Egashira, Kensuke; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Exceed and chronic high-fat diet (HFD) contributes to the diagnosis and development of atherosclerosis, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. However, the key molecular component(s) triggered by HFD responsible for initiating vascular inflammation remain unknown. We observed that feeding HFD for 4 weeks is sufficient to induce leukocyte recruitment in the femoral artery of wild-type mice. Neutrophil- and monocyte-depletion analyses confirmed the preferential recruitment of neutrophils in these mice. Protein analysis of sera from HFD-fed mice revealed a marked elevation of complement component C5a levels. Exogenous C5a alone induced leukocyte recruitment, which was abolished by a C5a-receptor antagonist. We also examined the role of neutrophil-derived MCP-1 in accumulation of leukocytes in the artery. These results demonstrated a previously unrecognized role for C5a and neutrophils in the early onset of HFD-induced vascular inflammation. Further study may help in elucidating a novel regulatory pathway to control diet-induced inflammation such as that in case of atherosclerosis. PMID:26893238

  18. Motor activity improves temporal expectancy.

    PubMed

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  19. Motor activity improves temporal expectancy.

    PubMed

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments.

  20. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  1. Myocellular enzyme leakage, polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Croisier, J L; Camus, G; Deby-Dupont, G; Bertrand, F; Lhermerout, C; Crielaard, J M; Juchmès-Ferir, A; Deby, C; Albert, A; Lamy, M

    1996-01-01

    To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). 10 healthy male subjects were submitted to eccentric and concentric isokinetic exercises on a Kin Trex device at 60 degrees/s angular velocity. Exercise consisted of 8 stages of 5 maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases. There was an interval of at least 30 days between eccentric and concentric testing, and the order of the two exercise sessions was randomly assigned. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, immediately, following 24 h and 48 h after each test. Five blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein: at rest before exercise, immediately after, after 30 min recovery, 24 h and 48 h after the tests. The magnitude of the acute inflammatory response to exercise was assessed by measuring plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase ([EL]), myeloperoxidase ([MPO]) and PGE2 ([PGE2]). Using two way analysis of variance, it appeared that only eccentric exercise significantly increased [EL] and DOMS, especially of the hamstring muscles. Furthermore, a significant decrease in eccentric peak torque of this muscle group only was observed on day 2 after eccentric work (- 21%; P < 0.002). Serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly 24 and 48 h after both exercise tests. However, these variables reached significantly higher values following eccentric contractions 48 h after exercise. Mean [PGE2] in the two exercise modes remained unchanged over time and were practically equal at each time point. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the magnitude of polymorphonuclear (PMN) activation, muscle damage, and DOMS are greater after eccentric than after concentric muscle

  2. How neutrophils kill fungi.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the prevention of invasive fungal infections. Whereas mouse studies have demonstrated the role of various neutrophil pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), signal transduction pathways, and cytotoxicity in the murine antifungal immune response, much less is known about the killing of fungi by human neutrophils. Recently, novel primary immunodeficiencies have been identified in patients with a susceptibility to fungal infections. These human 'knock-out' neutrophils expand our knowledge to understand the role of PRRs and signaling in human fungal killing. From the studies with these patients it is becoming clear that neutrophils employ fundamentally distinct mechanisms to kill Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:27558342

  3. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. PMID:27036091

  4. Neutrophil elastase cleavage of human factor IX generates an activated factor IX-like product devoid of coagulant function.

    PubMed

    Samis, J A; Kam, E; Nesheim, M E; Giles, A R

    1998-08-15

    In preliminary studies, the generation of thrombin in vivo was found to induce a 92% loss of functional activity of factor IX (F.IX) despite the detection by Western blotting of a product resembling activated F.IX (F.IXa) and a 25% increase in F.IX antigen levels (Hoogendoorn et al, Thromb Haemost 69:1127, 1993 [abstr]). These changes were associated with evidence of increased elastase availability. To study the possibility that these two observations were related, a detailed physical and functional characterization of the hydrolysis of purified human F.IX by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) was performed in vitro. An activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) clotting assay demonstrated that, although HNE eliminated the potential of F.IX to be activated, it only marginally reduced the F.IXa activity. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that HNE treatment of F.IX generated cleavage products of 30 and 20 kD that could not be distinguished from the respective heavy and light chain peptides that were identified in parallel studies when F.IX was activated by activated bovine F.XI (F.XIa), one of its physiological activators. In addition, nonreducing SDS-PAGE demonstrated that HNE-treated F.IX formed no complexes with antithrombin III (ATIII) in the presence of heparin. Furthermore, HNE-treated F.IX was unable to (1) bind the active site probe p-aminobenzamidine; (2) hydrolyze the synthetic peptide substrate CH3SO2-Leu-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide; and (3) activate human factor X (F.X). In contrast to dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (dEGR)-inactivated F.IXa, HNE-treated F.IX (0.01 to 10,000 pmol/L) failed to inhibit the clotting activity of F.IXa (10 pmol/L) in the aPTT. NH2-terminal sequencing indicated that HNE cleaved human F.IX at Thr140, Thr144, Ile164, Thr172, and Val181. The cleavages at Thr140/Thr144 and at Thr172/Val181 are both very close to the normal F.XIa alpha-(Arg145) and beta-(Arg180) cleavage sites

  5. Measurement of endotoxin activity in critically ill patients using whole blood neutrophil dependent chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, John C; Walker, Paul M; Foster, Debra M; Harris, David; Ribeiro, Melanie; Paice, Jeff; Romaschin, Alexander D; Derzko, Anastasia N

    2002-01-01

    Background Lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) from the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria is a potent trigger for the release of host-derived inflammatory mediators. The relationship between endotoxaemia, Gram-negative infection and the clinical syndrome of sepsis has been difficult to establish, in part because of the limitations of available endotoxin assays. Methods We performed an observational cohort study in critically ill patients in the medical/surgical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. Whole blood endotoxin levels on the day of ICU admission were measured using a novel chemiluminescent assay – the endotoxin activity assay (EAA) – and the chromogenic modification of the limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. Results We studied 74 consecutive admissions. Endotoxin levels were higher in patients with a diagnosis of sepsis (470 ± 57 pg/ml) than in patients admitted with a diagnosis other than sepsis (157 ± 140 pg/ml; P < 0.001). Endotoxaemia was significantly associated with Gram-negative infection (P < 0.05); no patient with a Gram-negative infection had an endotoxin level below 50 pg/ml. White blood cell counts of patients with EAA-detected endotoxaemia were significantly higher (15.7 ± 9.1 × 109 cells/l for endotoxaemic patients versus 10.8 ± 6.2 × 109 cells/l for patients without endotoxaemia; P < 0.05). Conclusion Endotoxaemia is associated with Gram-negative infection from any source, and with a diagnosis of sepsis and leukocytosis. These correlations were not apparent using the LAL method. The EAA may be a useful diagnostic tool for the investigation of invasive Gram-negative infection and incipient sepsis. PMID:12225611

  6. Decreased apoptosis of beta 2- integrin-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Teraoka, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kenji; Takahashi, Kensi; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Inanami, Osamu; Kuwabara, Mikwori

    2004-02-01

    Stimulant-induced viability of neutrophils, nuclear-fragmentation, increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), expression of annexin V on neutrophils and proteolysis of a fluorogenic peptide substrate Ac-DEVD-MCA (acetyl Asp-Glu-Val-Asp alpha-[4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide]) by neutrophil lysates from five normal calves and three calves with leucocyte adhesion deficiency were determined to evaluate the apoptosis of normal and CD18-deficient neutrophils. Viability was markedly decreased in control neutrophils stimulated with opsonized zymosan (OPZ), compared to CD18-deficient neutrophils at 37 degrees C after incubation periods of 6 and 24 hours. The rate of apoptosis of control neutrophils stimulated with OPZ increased significantly depending on the incubation time, whereas no apparent increase in apoptosis was found in CD18-deficient neutrophils under the same conditions. Aggregated bovine (Agg) IgG-induced apoptosis of control neutrophils was not significantly different from that of CD18-deficient neutrophils. The expression of annexin V on OPZ-stimulated control neutrophils was greater than that of unstimulated ones 6 h after stimulation. No apparent increase in annexin V expression on CD18-deficient neutrophils was found with OPZ stimulation. A delay in apoptosis was demonstrated in CD18-deficient bovine neutrophils and this appeared to be closely associated with lowered signalling via [Ca2+]i, diminished annexin V expression on the cell surface, and decreased caspase 3 activity in lysates. PMID:14984592

  7. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in WIL2-NS cells: a sensitive system to detect chromosomal damage induced by reactive oxygen species and activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Umegaki, K; Fenech, M

    2000-05-01

    We have developed a method that can detect the DNA-damaging and cytotoxic effects of physiological levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activated human neutrophils. This was achieved using WIL2-NS cells, a human B lymphoblastoid cell line, as target cells and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. With this method, we observed a 4- and a 30-fold increase in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNed BNC) when cells were exposed to 10 and 30 microM hydrogen peroxide, for 1 h, respectively. A dose-dependent increase in the frequency of MNed BNC was also detected when cells were exposed to hypoxanthine (HX)/xanthine oxidase (XO), a superoxide generating system: a 50-fold increase in the frequency of MNed BNC was observed at the highest XO dose (12.5 mU/ml). In this CBMN assay, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in BNC and necrotic cells were also readily detected, especially at the higher exposure doses of hydrogen peroxide or HX/XO. When WIL2-NS cells were exposed to neutrophils stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA) for 1 h, the frequencies of MNed BNC in WIL2-NS cells increased in a dose-dependent manner (30-fold increase at 100 nM PMA) and with an increasing neutrophil:WIL2-NS co-culture ratio. The frequencies of MNed BNC were closely related to the production of ROS, especially hydrogen peroxide, by the neutrophils. Differentiated HL60 cells (DMSO-treated HL60) also produced ROS in response to PMA. In this case, we used a 'Transwell' system to expose WIL2-NS cells to DMSO-treated HL60 cells, because direct contact with DMSO-treated HL60 cells impaired cell division in WIL2-NS target cells. Exposure to PMA-stimulated DMSO-treated HL60 cells resulted in a PMA dose-dependent increase in the frequency of MNed BNC in WIL2-NS cells. MNed BNC frequencies were positively correlated with NPB (r = 0.61-0.93) and necrosis (r = 0.55-0.86) and negatively correlated with nuclear division index (r = -0.72 to -0. 91) in all of the above

  8. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  9. Type 2 Interleukin-4 Receptor Signaling in Neutrophils Antagonizes Their Expansion and Migration during Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Woytschak, Janine; Keller, Nadia; Krieg, Carsten; Impellizzieri, Daniela; Thompson, Robert W; Wynn, Thomas A; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Boyman, Onur

    2016-07-19

    Neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of inflammation and infection. However, patients with allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis show a paucity of skin neutrophils and are prone to bacterial skin infections, suggesting that allergic inflammation curtails neutrophil responses. Here we have shown that the type 2 cell signature cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4) hampers neutrophil expansion and migration by antagonizing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and chemokine receptor-mediated signals. Cutaneous bacterial infection in mice was exacerbated by IL-4 signaling and improved with IL-4 inhibition, each outcome inversely correlating with neutrophil migration to skin. Likewise, systemic bacterial infection was worsened by heightened IL-4 activity, with IL-4 restricting G-CSF-induced neutrophil expansion and migration to tissues by affecting CXCR2-CXCR4 chemokine signaling in neutrophils. These effects were dependent on IL-4 acting through type 2 IL-4 receptors on neutrophils. Thus, targeting IL-4 might be beneficial in neutropenic conditions with increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. PMID:27438770

  10. Neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.C.; Eschete, M.L.; Cox, M.E.; King, J.W.

    1987-10-01

    We studied human neutrophils for uptake of vaccinia virus. Uptake was determined radiometrically and by electron microscopy. Vaccinia virus was labeled with /sup 14/C or /sup 3/H, incubated with neutrophils, and quantified in neutrophil pellets in a new radiometric phagocytosis assay. Better results were obtained from assays of (/sup 3/H)thymidine-labeled virus; uptake increased through 1 hr and then plateaued. Phagocytosis of 3H-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was normal. Uptake of virus was serum dependent. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was measured by two methods. No /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from (/sup 14/C)1-glucose accompanied uptake of vaccinia virus, in contrast to the respiratory burst accompanying bacterial phagocytosis. Electron microscopy showed intact to slightly digested intraphagolysosomal vaccinia virus. Pock reduction assay showed a decrease in viral content due to neutrophils until 6 hr of incubation, when a modest but significant increase was observed. Thus, neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus is distinguished from bacterial phagocytosis.

  11. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Josefine

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown. PMID:25523872

  12. Genetically determined resistance to listeriosis is associated with increased accumulation of inflammatory neutrophils and macrophages which have enhanced listericidal activity.

    PubMed Central

    Czuprynski, C J; Canono, B P; Henson, P M; Campbell, P A

    1985-01-01

    The C57BL/6 and A/J inbred strains of mice differ markedly in their resistance to the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. One possible explanation for this genetically determined resistance is that phagocytes from Listeria-resistant strains of mice can kill L. monocytogenes more effectively than phagocytes from Listeria-susceptible strains of mice. We report here that inflammatory neutrophils and macrophages from Listeria-resistant mice (C57BL/6) exhibit a slight but significantly enhanced ability to kill L. monocytogenes in vitro as compared to inflammatory phagocytes from Listeria-susceptible mice (A/J). More importantly, however, Listeria-resistant mice recruited more inflammatory neutrophils and macrophages to the peritoneal cavity in response to i.p. injection of heat-killed Listeria than did Listeria-susceptible mice. These data suggest that genetically determined resistance to listeriosis is dependent on the enhanced inflammatory responsiveness of Listeria-resistant mice. Further support for this hypothesis was provided by experiments in which the passive transfer to A/J mice (C5-deficient) of plasma from C57BL/6 mice (C5-sufficient) enhanced the ability of the recipient A/J mice both to recruit inflammatory neutrophils to the peritoneal cavity in response to i.p. injection of heat-killed Listeria, and to clear L. monocytogenes from the spleen after a sublethal challenge of viable Listeria. PMID:4018836

  13. C1P Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Preventing NF-κB Activation in Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Baudiß, Kristin; de Paula Vieira, Rodolfo; Cicko, Sanja; Ayata, Korcan; Hossfeld, Madelon; Ehrat, Nicolas; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Eltzschig, Holger K; Idzko, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Recently, ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) has been shown to modulate acute inflammatory events. Acute lung injury (Arnalich et al. 2000. Infect. Immun. 68: 1942-1945) is characterized by rapid alveolar injury, lung inflammation, induced cytokine production, neutrophil accumulation, and vascular leakage leading to lung edema. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of C1P during LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. To evaluate the effect of C1P, we used a prophylactic and therapeutic LPS-induced ALI model in C57BL/6 male mice. Our studies revealed that intrapulmonary application of C1P before (prophylactic) or 24 h after (therapeutic) LPS instillation decreased neutrophil trafficking to the lung, proinflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, and alveolar capillary leakage. Mechanistically, C1P inhibited the LPS-triggered NF-κB levels in lung tissue in vivo. In addition, ex vivo experiments revealed that C1P also attenuates LPS-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and IL-8 production in human neutrophils. These results indicate C1P playing a role in dampening LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and suggest that C1P could be a valuable candidate for treatment of ALI. PMID:26800872

  14. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) stimulates the PAF-synthesizing enzyme acetyl-CoA:1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine O2-acetyltransferase and PAF synthesis in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Doebber, T W; Wu, M S

    1987-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; PAF) induced in isolated rat peritoneal and human peripheral neutrophils a rapid and potent activation of the PAF biosynthetic enzyme acetyl-CoA:1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine O2-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67). The PAF-induced activation of the neutrophil acetyltransferase (8-10 times basal neutrophil activity) was maximal within 30 sec after PAF addition, as was the PAF-stimulated degranulation. After 1 min of PAF stimulation, the elevated acetyltransferase activity steadily decreased. Within 2 min of stimulation of neutrophils with 10(-6) M PAF, the 7-fold increase in acetyltransferase activity was coincident with substantial PAF synthesis (as measured by [3H]acetate incorporation into PAF), which was 14% of the PAF synthesis induced by the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 at 10(-5) M. PAF activation of the acetyltransferase and PAF synthesis required intact neutrophils as they did not occur in cells broken by sonication. The neutrophil acetyltransferase was 10-30 times more sensitive to activation by PAF than was degranulation as the acetyltransferase activation was evident with 10(-9) M PAF and was about maximal with 3 x 10(-8) M PAF. The unstimulated and PAF-induced acetyltransferase exhibited the same Km for acetyl-CoA (67 microM), but the Vmax for the PAF-induced enzyme (1667 pmol/min per 10(7) cells) was 10 times that of the unstimulated enzyme (175 pmol/min per 10(7) cells). The PAF induction of the acetyltransferase was less sensitive to inhibition by the specific PAF receptor antagonist L-652,731 than was PAF-induced degranulation. This, along with the differing sensitivities to PAF, suggests that acetyltransferase activation and degranulation induced by PAF either involve two different PAF receptors or involve one receptor type with different receptor occupancy requirements. Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase, which greatly decreased the activity of the acetyltransferase in spleen

  15. Neutrophil lymphocyte ratio can be a valuable marker in defining disease activity in patients who have started anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) drugs for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Coşkun, Belkıs Nihan; Öksüz, Mustafa Ferhat; Ermurat, Selime; Tufan, Ayşe Nur; Oruçoğlu, Nurdan; Doğan, Akif; Dalkılıç, Ediz; Pehlivan, Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has emerged as a valuable and reliable method for follow-up of systemic inflammatory disease. We herein aimed to evaluate the role of NLR in the clinical follow-up of inflammation and also to compare its relationship with other measures, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Material and Methods A total of 35 active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 38 healthy volunteers were included in the study. The patient group was enrolled for treatment with one anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) drug. Total blood count, ESR, CRP, and BASDAI score were obtained before and 3 months following the treatment. NLR was found with a mathematical calculation of the ratio of neutrophils with lymphocytes. Results The mean NLR value of the control group and patients was 1.90±0.89 and 2.67±1.17, respectively (p<0.05). After a 3-month course of treatment, the patient group had a mean NLR value of 1.8±0.7, which was significantly lower than pretreatment values (p<0.001). The post-treatment mean ESR, CRP, and BASDAI scores were significantly lower than mean baseline scores (p<0.001, p=0.007, p<0.001, respectively). Also, NLR was found to be correlated with BASDAI, ESR, and CRP (r=0.388, p<0.001; r=0.455, p<0.0001; and r=0.3389, p<0.005, respectively). Conclusion Neutrophil lymphocyte ratio could be a reliable and easily accessible method for follow-up of patients with AS. PMID:27708888

  16. Role of proteinase-activated receptor-2 in anti-bacterial and immunomodulatory effects of interferon-γ on human neutrophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Shpacovitch, Victoria M; Feld, Micha; Holzinger, Dirk; Kido, Makiko; Hollenberg, Morley D; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Ludwig, Stephan; Roth, Johannes; Luger, Thomas; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies show that proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) contributes to the development of inflammatory responses. However, investigations into the precise role of PAR(2) activation in the anti-microbial defence of human leucocytes are just beginning. We therefore evaluated the contribution of PAR(2) to the anti-microbial response of isolated human innate immune cells. We found that PAR(2) agonist, acting alone, enhances phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus and killing of Escherichia coli by human leucocytes, and that the magnitude of the effect is similar to that of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). However, co-application of PAR(2) -cAP and IFN-γ did not enhance the phagocytic and bacteria-killing activity of leucocytes beyond that triggered by either agonist alone. On the other hand, IFN-γ enhances PAR(2) agonist-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) secretion by human neutrophils and monocytes. Furthermore, phosphoinositide-3 kinase and janus kinase molecules are involved in the synergistic effect of PAR(2) agonist and IFN-γ on MCP-1 secretion. Our findings suggest a potentially protective role of PAR(2) agonists in the anti-microbial defence established by human monocytes and neutrophils.

  17. Neutrophil extracellular traps: Their role in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Swarna, Chakrapani; Devulapalli, Narasimha Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of innate immune defense against infectious diseases. Since their discovery, they have always been considered tissue-destructive cells responsible for inflammatory tissue damage occurring during infections. Extensive research in the field of neutrophil cell biology and their role skewing the immune response in various infections or inflammatory disorders revealed their importance in the regulation of immune response. Neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) for the containment of infection and inflammation along with other antimicrobial molecules. Activated neutrophils provide signals for the activation and maturation of macrophages as well as dendritic cells. Neutrophils are also involved in the regulation of T-cell immune response against various pathogens and tumor antigens. Thus, the present review is intended to highlight the emerging role of neutrophil extracellular trap production in the regulation of immune response and its role in periodontal disease. PMID:25624623

  18. Neutrophil extracellular traps: Their role in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Swarna, Chakrapani; Devulapalli, Narasimha Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of innate immune defense against infectious diseases. Since their discovery, they have always been considered tissue-destructive cells responsible for inflammatory tissue damage occurring during infections. Extensive research in the field of neutrophil cell biology and their role skewing the immune response in various infections or inflammatory disorders revealed their importance in the regulation of immune response. Neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) for the containment of infection and inflammation along with other antimicrobial molecules. Activated neutrophils provide signals for the activation and maturation of macrophages as well as dendritic cells. Neutrophils are also involved in the regulation of T-cell immune response against various pathogens and tumor antigens. Thus, the present review is intended to highlight the emerging role of neutrophil extracellular trap production in the regulation of immune response and its role in periodontal disease. PMID:25624623

  19. Chloride channels activated by swell can regulate the NADPH oxidase generated membrane depolarisation in activated human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-01-11

    Chloride channels activated by swell have important functions in many physiological processes. The phagocyte NADPH oxidase is essential for host defence and it generates superoxide by transferring electrons from the donor NADPH to the acceptor O{sub 2}. This electron current, induces a depolarisation of the plasma membrane. In this study, I report that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the depolarisation induced by the NADPH oxidase. When a chloride conductance was activated by swelling, its inhibition by either 50 {mu}M NPPB or removing external chloride, depolarised the plasma membrane potential to +26 mV {+-} 3.1 (n = 4) and +40 {+-} 1 mV (n = 4), respectively. These channels were partially inhibited by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor AEBSF (1 mM) and potently inhibited by ZnCl{sub 2} (3 mM). These currents were not activated by a phosphorylation step and elevations in intracellular calcium did not appear to activate chloride currents similar to those activated by swell.

  20. [Ultrastructural location of enzymes in peripheral blood neutrophils and in cerebrospinal fluid neutrophils in neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, B

    1993-01-01

    Using cytochemical methods the location and activity were determined of alkaline phosphatase, ATP-ase and succinate dehydrogenase as representative enzymes for the metabolic processes in neutrophils isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with meningococcal meningoencephalitis as compared with peripheral blood neutrophils in a control group. The study showed presence of phosphatase on the membranes of many intracellular structures. The activity of the enzymes was higher than in the control group in the membranes of neutrophils in blood and CSF. This is explained as an effect of action of the chemotactic factor on the cell membrane and activation of the cell to movements and phagocytosis. ATP-ase activity in peripheral blood neutrophils in controls was found in all membranous structures in the cell. However, in peripheral blood neutrophils and CSF neutrophils in the acute stage of the disease the active enzyme was noted, in the first place, in cell membranes and digesting vacuoles, which reflected probably the direction of metabolic processes for phagocytosis and destroying of bacteria. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was found in mitochondrial membranes. Peripheral blood and CSF neutrophils showed a high activity of the enzyme. In the CSF cells in acute phase atypical sites of succinate dehydrogenase activity were noted, which was explained as a sign of cell destruction.

  1. Distinct Oral Neutrophil Subsets Define Health and Periodontal Disease States.

    PubMed

    Fine, N; Hassanpour, S; Borenstein, A; Sima, C; Oveisi, M; Scholey, J; Cherney, D; Glogauer, M

    2016-07-01

    Neutrophils exit the vasculature and swarm to sites of inflammation and infection. However, these cells are abundant in the healthy, inflammation-free human oral environment, suggesting a unique immune surveillance role within the periodontium. We hypothesize that neutrophils in the healthy oral cavity occur in an intermediary parainflammatory state that allows them to interact with and contain the oral microflora without eliciting a marked inflammatory response. Based on a high-throughput screen of neutrophil CD (cluster of differentiation) marker expression and a thorough literature review, we developed multicolor flow cytometry panels to determine the surface marker signatures of oral neutrophil subsets in periodontal health and disease. We define here 3 distinct neutrophil subsets: resting/naive circulatory neutrophils, parainflammatory neutrophils found in the healthy oral cavity, and proinflammatory neutrophils found in the oral cavity during chronic periodontal disease. Furthermore, parainflammatory neutrophils manifest as 2 distinct subpopulations-based on size, granularity, and expression of specific CD markers-and exhibit intermediate levels of activation as compared with the proinflammatory oral neutrophils. These intermediately activated parainflammatory populations occur in equal proportions in the healthy oral cavity, with a shift to one highly activated proinflammatory neutrophil population in chronic periodontal disease. This work is the first to identify and characterize oral parainflammatory neutrophils that interact with commensal biofilms without inducing an inflammatory response, thereby demonstrating that not all neutrophils trafficking through periodontal tissues are fully activated. In addition to establishing possible diagnostic and treatment monitoring biomarkers, this oral neutrophil phenotype model builds on existing literature suggesting that the healthy periodontium may be in a parainflammatory state. PMID:27270666

  2. Platelet–neutrophil interactions under thromboinflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Kim, Kyungho; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Platelets primarily mediate hemostasis and thrombosis, whereas leukocytes are responsible for immune responses. Since platelets interact with leukocytes at the site of vascular injury, thrombosis and vascular inflammation are closely intertwined and occur consecutively. Recent studies using real-time imaging technology demonstrated that platelet–neutrophil interactions on the activated endothelium are an important determinant of microvascular occlusion during thromboinflammatory disease in which inflammation is coupled to thrombosis. Although the major receptors and counter receptors have been identified, it remains poorly understood how heterotypic platelet–neutrophil interactions are regulated under disease conditions. This review discusses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of platelet– neutrophil interactions in thromboinflammatory disease. PMID:25650236

  3. Inhibition by polyphenolic phytochemicals and sulfurous compounds of the formation of 8-chloroguanosine mediated by hypochlorous acid, human myeloperoxidase, and activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiki; Masuda, Mitsuharu; Suzuki, Toshinori; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) of activated neutrophils can react with nucleic acid bases to form chlorinated nucleosides such as 8-chloroguanosine (Cl-Guo). Chlorination is enhanced by nicotine. We investigated the effects of various natural antioxidants including polyphenolic phytochemicals on the formation of Cl-Guo by HOCl in the presence and the absence of nicotine. Polyphenols, including catechins, curcumin, resveratrol, silibinin, and sulfurous compound α-lipoic acid, were found to inhibit both HOCl- and human MPO-induced Cl-Guo formation dose-dependently. Among the test compounds, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) showed the strongest inhibitory effect. Cl-Guo formation, mediated by activated human neutrophils in the presence of nicotine, was inhibited by EGCG, silibinin, and α-lipoic acid. These results suggest that polyphenols and sulfurous compounds have the potential to inhibit the induction of nucleobase damage mediated by chlorination, with possible application to reducing DNA damage associated with inflammation and cigarette-smoke inhalation. PMID:23221717

  4. Inhibition of factor XII in septic baboons attenuates the activation of complement and fibrinolytic systems and reduces the release of interleukin-6 and neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P M; Pixley, R A; Brouwer, M; de Jong, I W; Chang, A C; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B; Colman, R W

    1996-03-15

    In previous studies, we have shown that administration of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) C6B7 against human factor XII to baboons challenged with a lethal dose of Escherichia coli abrogates activation of the contact system and modulates secondary hypotension. To evaluate the contribution of activated contact proteases to the appearance of other inflammatory mediators in this experimental model of sepsis, we studied the effect of administration of MoAb C6B7 on activation of complement and fibrinolytic cascades, stimulation of neutrophil degranulation, and release of the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Activation of the complement system, as reflected by circulating C3b/c and C4b/c levels, was significantly reduced in five animals that had received MoAb C6B7 before a lethal dose of E coli as compared with five control animals that had been given a lethal challenge only. Inhibition of contact activation also modulated the fibrinolytic response, since the release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and the appearance of plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin (PAP) complexes into the circulation was significantly attenuated upon pretreatment with anti-factor XII MoAb. In contrast, plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) were modestly enhanced in the treatment group. Degranulation of neutrophils, as assessed by circulating elastase-alpha1-protease inhibitor complexes, and release of IL-6 but not of TNF-alpha was decreased in anti-factor XII-treated animals. Observed differences in the inflammatory response between treatment and control groups were not likely due to different challenges, since the number of E coli that had been infused, as well as circulating levels of endotoxin after the challenge, were similar for both groups. These data suggest that activation of the contact system modulates directly or indirectly various mediator systems involved in the inflammatory response during severe sepsis in

  5. Analysis of the contribution of the hinge region of human neutrophil collagenase (HNC, MMP-8) to stability and collagenolytic activity by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Knäuper, V; Docherty, A J; Smith, B; Tschesche, H; Murphy, G

    1997-03-17

    Analysis of the hinge region of neutrophil collagenase by alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed that this sequence motif has a pronounced effect on the stability and collagenolytic activity of the active enzyme. The mutagenesis of the amino acid residues in the P1' position of the two autoproteolytically cleaved peptide bonds (Leu243 and Ile248) to Ala showed that the mutant enzymes were more resistant to autoproteolysis. However, these mutants were not completely stable and autoproteolysis occurred mainly at the Ala239-Ile240 peptide bond and the half-life of the active enzyme was increased by 50%. In contrast, mutagenesis of Pro247 --> Ala (P1 of the minor cleavage site Pro247-Ile248) lead to increased susceptibility of the enzyme to autoproteolysis. However, when the other P1 position Gly242 was altered to Ala no effect on stability was observed. The analysis of the ability of the mutant active enzymes to hydrolyse 14C-type I collagen was assessed and our results demonstrate that the hinge sequence motif of neutrophil collagenase is important for collagenolytic activity. The alteration of the Gly242-Leu-Ser-Ser-Asn-Pro-Ile-Gln-Pro247 sequence motif to Gly242-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala-Ala-Pro247 showed that the collagenolytic activity was reduced by 68.4%. In addition, mutagenesis of the downstream sequence motif Pro247-Thr-Gly-Pro-Ser-Thr-Pro-Lys-Pro258 to Pro247-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala-Pro258 had an even more marked effect on the collagenolytic activity, which was reduced by 87.4%. When the Pro residues in the hinge motif (Pro247, Pro250, Pro253 and Pro256) were altered to Ala the collagenolytic activity dropped to 1.5% of the value observed for wild-type enzyme.

  6. Effects of exogenous arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids on the generation of 5-lipoxygenase pathway products by ionophore-activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T H; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Shih, C; Corey, E J; Lewis, R A; Austen, K F

    1984-01-01

    Exogenous eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DCHA) have been compared with exogenous arachidonic acid for their capacity to modulate the oxidative metabolism of membrane-derived arachidonic acid by the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in ionophore-activated human neutrophils and for their suitability as parallel substrates in this pathway. The products from specific 14C- or 3H-labeled substrates were isolated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and were identified by elution of radiolabel at the retention times of the appropriate synthetic standards. Each product was also characterized by its ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrum, and 7-hydroxy-DCHA was defined in addition by analysis of its mass spectrum. The metabolites, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 6-trans-LTB4 diastereoisomers, 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid, 6-trans-leukotriene B5 diastereoisomers, leukotriene B5 (LTB5), and 7-hydroxy-DCHA were quantitated by integrated UV absorbance during resolution by RP-HPLC. LTB4 and LTB5 were also quantitated by radioimmunoassay of the eluate fractions, and leukotrienes C4 and C5 (LTC4 and LTC5, respectively) were quantitated by radioimmunoassay alone. None of the unlabeled exogenous fatty acids (5-40 micrograms/ml) altered the release of radioactivity from [14C]arachidonic acid-labeled, ionophore-activated neutrophils. The metabolism of 5 and 10 micrograms/ml of exogenous EPA by ionophore-activated, [14C]arachidonic acid-labeled neutrophils not only generated 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid, 6-trans-LTB5, LTB5, and LTC5, but also stimulated the formation of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 6-trans-LTB4 diastereoisomers, and LTC4 from membrane-derived arachidonic acid. In contrast, LTB4 production was diminished throughout the EPA dose-response, beginning at 5 micrograms/ml EPA and reaching 50% suppression at 10 micrograms/ml and 84% suppression at 40 micrograms/ml. The selective decrease in extracellular LTB4

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Neutrophils with Anti-Tumor Properties.

    PubMed

    Sionov, Ronit Vogt; Assi, Simaan; Gershkovitz, Maya; Sagiv, Jitka Y; Polyansky, Lola; Mishalian, Inbal; Fridlender, Zvi G; Granot, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant of all white blood cells in the human circulation, play an important role in the host defense against invading microorganisms. In addition, neutrophils play a central role in the immune surveillance of tumor cells. They have the ability to recognize tumor cells and induce tumor cell death either through a cell contact-dependent mechanism involving hydrogen peroxide or through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Neutrophils with anti-tumor activity can be isolated from peripheral blood of cancer patients and of tumor-bearing mice. These neutrophils are termed tumor-entrained neutrophils (TEN) to distinguish them from neutrophils of healthy subjects or naïve mice that show no significant tumor cytotoxic activity. Compared with other white blood cells, neutrophils show different buoyancy making it feasible to obtain a > 98% pure neutrophil population when subjected to a density gradient. However, in addition to the normal high-density neutrophil population (HDN), in cancer patients, in tumor-bearing mice, as well as under chronic inflammatory conditions, distinct low-density neutrophil populations (LDN) appear in the circulation. LDN co-purify with the mononuclear fraction and can be separated from mononuclear cells using either positive or negative selection strategies. Once the purity of the isolated neutrophils is determined by flow cytometry, they can be used for in vitro and in vivo functional assays. We describe techniques for monitoring the anti-tumor activity of neutrophils, their ability to migrate and to produce reactive oxygen species, as well as monitoring their phagocytic capacity ex vivo. We further describe techniques to label the neutrophils for in vivo tracking, and to determine their anti-metastatic capacity in vivo. All these techniques are essential for understanding how to obtain and characterize neutrophils with anti-tumor function. PMID:26132785

  8. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    PubMed

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  9. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc; Glenthøj, Andreas; Borregaard, Niels; Urban, Constantin F

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpretation of in vivo results.

  10. Neutrophil Elastase Activates Protease-activated Receptor-2 (PAR2) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) to Cause Inflammation and Pain*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peishen; Lieu, TinaMarie; Barlow, Nicholas; Sostegni, Silvia; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N.; Vanner, Stephen J.; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases that cleave protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) at Arg36↓Ser37 reveal a tethered ligand that binds to the cleaved receptor. PAR2 activates transient receptor potential (TRP) channels of nociceptive neurons to induce neurogenic inflammation and pain. Although proteases that cleave PAR2 at non-canonical sites can trigger distinct signaling cascades, the functional importance of the PAR2-biased agonism is uncertain. We investigated whether neutrophil elastase, a biased agonist of PAR2, causes inflammation and pain by activating PAR2 and TRP vanilloid 4 (TRPV4). Elastase cleaved human PAR2 at Ala66↓Ser67 and Ser67↓Val68. Elastase stimulated PAR2-dependent cAMP accumulation and ERK1/2 activation, but not Ca2+ mobilization, in KNRK cells. Elastase induced PAR2 coupling to Gαs but not Gαq in HEK293 cells. Although elastase did not promote recruitment of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) or β-arrestin to PAR2, consistent with its inability to promote receptor endocytosis, elastase did stimulate GRK6 recruitment. Elastase caused PAR2-dependent sensitization of TRPV4 currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes by adenylyl cyclase- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent mechanisms. Elastase stimulated PAR2-dependent cAMP formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and a PAR2- and TRPV4-mediated influx of extracellular Ca2+ in mouse nociceptors. Adenylyl cyclase and PKA-mediated elastase-induced activation of TRPV4 and hyperexcitability of nociceptors. Intraplantar injection of elastase to mice caused edema and mechanical hyperalgesia by PAR2- and TRPV4-mediated mechanisms. Thus, the elastase-biased agonism of PAR2 causes Gαs-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase and PKA, which activates TRPV4 and sensitizes nociceptors to cause inflammation and pain. Our results identify a novel mechanism of elastase-induced activation of TRPV4 and expand the role of PAR2 as a mediator of protease-driven inflammation and pain. PMID:25878251

  11. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  12. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks 'outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  13. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif phosphorylation during engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by the neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d) receptor.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Schneider, Jutta; Liao, Edward H; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2003-08-01

    Gonorrhea is characterized by a purulent urethral or cervical discharge consisting primarily of neutrophils associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These interactions are facilitated by gonococcal colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein binding to host cellular CEACAM receptors. Of these, CEACAM3 is restricted to neutrophils and contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) reminiscent of that found within certain phagocytic Fc receptors. CEACAM3 was tyrosine phosphorylated by a Src family kinase-dependent process upon infection by gonococci expressing CEACAM-specific Opa proteins. This phosphorylation was necessary for efficient bacterial uptake; however, a less efficient uptake process became evident when kinase inhibitors or mutagenesis of the ITAM were used to prevent phosphorylation. Ligated CEACAM3 was recruited to a cytoskeleton-containing fraction, intense foci of polymerized actin were evident where bacteria attached to HeLa-CEACAM3, and disruption of polymerized actin by cytochalasin D blocked all bacterial uptake by these cells. These data support a model whereby CEACAM3 can mediate the Opa-dependent uptake of N. gonorrhoeae via either an efficient, ITAM phosphorylation-dependent process that resembles phagocytosis or a less efficient, tyrosine phosphorylation-independent mechanism. PMID:12864848

  14. Neutrophils in asthma--a review.

    PubMed

    Ciepiela, Olga; Ostafin, Magdalena; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, with an array of cells involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The role of neutrophils in the development of bronchial asthma is found to be complex, as they may trigger activation of immunocompetent cells and are a potent source of free oxygen radicals and enzymes participating in airway remodeling. The review highlights the role of neutrophils in bronchial asthma.

  15. Neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular traps orchestrate initiation and resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Jonas; Knopf, Jasmin; Maueröder, Christian; Kienhöfer, Deborah; Leppkes, Moritz; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant leukocytes in the human body, are considered to be the first line of defense in the fight against microorganisms. In this fight neutrophils employ weaponry such as reactive oxygen species produced via the NADPH oxidase complex 2 together with the release of intracellular granules containing antimicrobial agents. The discovery that activated neutrophils release decondensed chromatin as DNase-sensitive neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) lead to a renewed interest in these leukocytes and the function of NETs in vivo. In this review, we will focus on desirable as well as detrimental features of NETs by the example of gout and pancreatitis. In our models we observed that neutrophils drive the initiation of inflammation and are required for the resolution of inflammation. PMID:27586795

  16. [Influence of UV-light and dexamethasone on functional properties of lymphocytes and neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Artiukhov, V G; Basharina, O V; Lialina, I E; Maslov, O V

    2005-01-01

    UV-light and dexamethasone influence on functional properties of lymphocytes and neutrophils of peripherical donors' blood was studied. An increase of phagocytic activity of neutrophils was observed after their incubation with photomodified lymphocytes. It was found that UV-irradiation of lymphocytes activated synthesis of interleukines 1beta and 2. Dexamethasone presence in lymphocyte suspension inhibited the synthesis of the studied cytokines, especially by the incubation with photomodified cells. It was shown by the method of fluorescent labels that UV-irradiation improved interaction between dexamethasone and cell membrane.

  17. Interaction of CD44 and hyaluronan is the dominant mechanism for neutrophil sequestration in inflamed liver sinusoids

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Braedon; McAvoy, Erin F.; Lam, Florence; Gill, Varinder; de la Motte, Carol; Savani, Rashmin C.; Kubes, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion molecules known to be important for neutrophil recruitment in many other organs are not involved in recruitment of neutrophils into the sinusoids of the liver. The prevailing view is that neutrophils become physically trapped in inflamed liver sinusoids. In this study, we used a biopanning approach to identify hyaluronan (HA) as disproportionately expressed in the liver versus other organs under both basal and inflammatory conditions. Spinning disk intravital microscopy revealed that constitutive HA expression was restricted to liver sinusoids. Blocking CD44–HA interactions reduced neutrophil adhesion in the sinusoids of endotoxemic mice, with no effect on rolling or adhesion in postsinusoidal venules. Neutrophil but not endothelial CD44 was required for adhesion in sinusoids, yet neutrophil CD44 avidity for HA did not increase significantly in endotoxemia. Instead, activation of CD44–HA engagement via qualitative modification of HA was demonstrated by a dramatic induction of serum-derived HA-associated protein in sinusoids in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS-induced hepatic injury was significantly reduced by blocking CD44–HA interactions. Administration of anti-CD44 antibody 4 hours after LPS rapidly detached adherent neutrophils in sinusoids and improved sinusoidal perfusion in endotoxemic mice, revealing CD44 as a potential therapeutic target in systemic inflammatory responses involving the liver. PMID:18362172

  18. Neutrophil-Related Gene Expression And Low-Density Granulocytes Associated with Disease Activity and Response to Treatment in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Peter C.; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Xu, Lijing; Lim, Noha; Gao, Zhong; Asare, Adam L.; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H.; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert F.; Langford, Carol A.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.; St Clair, E. William; Tchao, Nadia K.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Phippard, Deborah J.; Merkel, Peter A.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Monach, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To discover biomarkers involved in the pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and determine if low-density granulocytes (LDGs) contribute to gene expression signatures in AAV. Methods The source of clinical data and linked biospecimens was a randomized controlled treatment trial in AAV. RNA-sequencing of whole blood from patients with AAV was performed during active disease at the baseline visit (BL) and during remission 6 months later (6M). Gene expression was compared between patients who met versus did not meet the primary trial outcome of clinical remission at 6M (responders vs. nonresponders). Measurement of neutrophil-related gene expression was confirmed in PBMCs to validate findings in whole blood. A negative selection strategy isolated LDGs from PBMC fractions. Results Differential expression between responders (n=77) and nonresponders (n=35) was detected in 2,346 transcripts at BL visit (p<0.05). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated a cluster of granulocyte-related genes, including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3). A granulocyte multi-gene composite score was significantly higher in nonresponders than responders (p<0.01) and during active disease compared to remission (p<0.01). This signature strongly overlapped an LDG signature identified previously in lupus (FDRGSEA<0.01). Transcription of PR3 measured in PBMCs was associated with active disease and treatment response (p<0.01). LDGs isolated from patients with AAV spontaneously formed neutrophil extracellular traps containing PR3 and MPO. Conclusions In AAV an increased expression of a granulocyte gene signature is associated with disease activity and decreased response to treatment. The source of this signature is likely LDGs, a potentially pathogenic cell type in AAV. PMID:25891759

  19. Store-operated calcium signaling in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Regina A; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-10-01

    Calcium signals in neutrophils are initiated by a variety of cell-surface receptors, including formyl peptide and other GPCRs, FcRs, and integrins. The predominant pathway by which calcium enters immune cells is termed SOCE, whereby plasma membrane CRAC channels allow influx of extracellular calcium into the cytoplasm when intracellular ER stores are depleted. The identification of 2 key families of SOCE regulators, STIM calcium "sensors" and ORAI calcium channels, has allowed for genetic manipulation of SOCE pathways and provided valuable insight into the molecular mechanism of calcium signaling in immune cells, including neutrophils. This review focuses on our current knowledge of the molecules involved in neutrophil SOCE and how study of these molecules has further informed our understanding of the role of calcium signaling in neutrophil activation.

  20. Novel human neutrophil agonistic properties of arsenic trioxide: involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and/or c-jun NH2-terminal MAPK but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Girard, Denis

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and for inducing apoptosis and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in promyelocytes and cancer cells. We recently reported that ATO induces neutrophil apoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not ATO recruits MAPKs in neutrophils, as well as to further investigate its agonistic properties. We found that ATO activates p38 and that, unlike H2O2, this response was not inhibited by exogenous catalase. Also, we demonstrated that ATO-induced p38 activation occurs before H2O2 generation and without a calcium burst. We next established that ATO recruits c-jun NH2-terminal (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk-1/2). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we found that the proapoptotic activity of ATO occurs by a MAPK-independent mechanism. In contrast, the ability of ATO to enhance adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, release, and activity of gelatinase and degranulation of secretory, specific, and gelatinase, but not azurophilic granules, is dependent upon activation of p38 and/or JNK. This is the first study establishing that ATO possesses important agonistic properties in human neutrophils. Given the central role of neutrophils in various inflammatory disorders, we propose that ATO might have broader therapeutic implications in clinics, especially for regulating inflammation.

  1. Acetaminophen prevents oxidative burst and delays apoptosis in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Costa, Vera M; Ribeiro, Daniela; Couto, Diana; Porto, Graça; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2013-05-23

    Acetaminophen is a frequently prescribed over-the-counter drug to reduce fever and pain in the event of inflammatory process. As neutrophils are relevant cells in inflammatory processes, the putative interaction of acetaminophen with these cells, if present, would be of paramount importance. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of acetaminophen in human neutrophils' oxidative burst and lifespan in vitro. The obtained results demonstrate that acetaminophen efficiently modulates neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner, at in vivo relevant concentrations. It was clearly demonstrated that acetaminophen is a strong scavenger of HOCl and H2O2, which probably contributed to the effect observed in neutrophils. Acetaminophen also induced the depletion of glutathione in stimulated neutrophils, suggesting its transformation into a reactive intermediate. Obtained results further revealed that acetaminophen affects programmed cell death of human neutrophils, resulting in a delay of previously stimulated neutrophils-mediated apoptosis. Overall, our data suggested that acetaminophen has considerable potential to be included in anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies, by preventing biological damage induced by an excessive production of reactive species generated in activated neutrophils and by extending the lifespan of neutrophils, favoring the elimination of pathogens, thus contributing to tissue healing and resolution of inflammation. PMID:23518321

  2. How Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Become Visible

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been identified as a fundamental innate immune defense mechanism against different pathogens. NETs are characterized as released nuclear DNA associated with histones and granule proteins, which form an extracellular web-like structure that is able to entrap and occasionally kill certain microbes. Furthermore, NETs have been shown to contribute to several noninfectious disease conditions when released by activated neutrophils during inflammation. The identification of NETs has mainly been succeeded by various microscopy techniques, for example, immunofluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Since the last years the development and improvement of new immunofluorescence-based techniques enabled optimized visualization and quantification of NETs. On the one hand in vitro live-cell imaging led to profound new ideas about the mechanisms involved in the formation and functionality of NETs. On the other hand different intravital, in vivo, and in situ microscopy techniques led to deeper insights into the role of NET formation during health and disease. This paper presents an overview of the main used microscopy techniques to visualize NETs and describes their advantages as well as disadvantages. PMID:27294157

  3. The lymph node neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Henry R; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs provide a specialized microenvironment tailored to foster communication between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. These interactions allow immune cells to coordinate multilayered defense against pathogens. Until recently dendritic cells and macrophages were thought to comprise the main innate immune cell subsets responsible for delivering signals that drive the adaptive immune response, while the function of neutrophils was largely confined to the innate immune system. However, the discovery of neutrophils in lymph nodes has raised the question of whether neutrophils might play a more extensive role not only in innate immunity per se, but also in coordinating the interactions between innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review we discuss the mechanisms and consequences of neutrophil recruitment to lymph nodes and how this recruitment influences subsequent immune responses both in situ and at distant sites. PMID:27025975

  4. Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Increase Survival and Decrease Bacterial Load during Septic Staphylococcus aureus Infection and Improve Neutrophil Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Grahnemo, Louise; Pálsdóttir, Vilborg; Nookaew, Intawat; Wendt, Karl; Gabrielsson, Britt; Schéle, Erik; Benrick, Anna; Andersson, Niklas; Nilsson, Staffan; Jansson, John-Olov

    2014-01-01

    Severe infection, including sepsis, is an increasing clinical problem that causes prolonged morbidity and substantial mortality. At present, antibiotics are essentially the only pharmacological treatment for sepsis. The incidence of resistance to antibiotics is increasing; therefore, it is critical to find new therapies for sepsis. Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of septic mortality. Neutrophils play an important role in the defense against bacterial infections. We have shown that a diet with high levels of dietary saturated fatty acids decreases survival in septic mice, but the mechanisms behind this remain elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the differences in dietary fat composition affect survival and bacterial load after experimental septic infection and neutrophil function in uninfected mice. We found that, after S. aureus infection, mice fed a polyunsaturated high-fat diet (HFD-P) for 8 weeks had increased survival and decreased bacterial load during sepsis compared with mice fed a saturated high-fat diet (HFD-S), similar to mice fed a low-fat diet (LFD). Uninfected mice fed HFD-P had a higher frequency of neutrophils in bone marrow than mice fed HFD-S. In addition, mice fed HFD-P had a higher frequency of neutrophils recruited to the site of inflammation in response to peritoneal injection of thioglycolate than mice fed HFD-S. Differences between the proportion of dietary protein and carbohydrate did not affect septic survival at all. In conclusion, polyunsaturated dietary fat increased both survival and efficiency of bacterial clearance during septic S. aureus infection. Moreover, this diet increased the frequency and chemotaxis of neutrophils, key components of the immune response to S. aureus infections. PMID:25404025

  5. Nonpeptidic inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. 7. Design, synthesis, and in vitro activity of a series of pyridopyrimidine trifluoromethyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Andisik, D W; Strimpler, A M; Gomes, B; Tuthill, P A

    1996-03-01

    Using molecular modeling and the information derived from X-ray crystal structures of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) complexed to peptidic ligands, we have developed a new series of nonpeptidic inhibitors of HNE, the pyridopyrimidine trifluoromethyl ketones (TFMKs). These bicyclic inhibitors were designed to extend the concept of the related pyridone trifluoromethyl ketones by incorporating a rigidly positioned carbonyl group to participate in a hydrogen bonding interaction with the backbone NH groups of Gly-218 and Gly-219 of the enzyme. In addition, the pyrimidine ring serves as a scaffold to vector substituents toward the S5-S4 subsites of the enzyme's extended binding pocket. Furthermore, the heteroatoms of the pyrimidine ring generally increase the aqueous solubility of the pyridopyrimidines relative to pyridone TFMKs. Pyridopyrimidine TFMKs containing a 6-phenyl substituent afforded potent inhibitors of elastase, and several inhibitors from this class of compounds possessed aqueous solubilities of > 0.1 mg/mL and Ki values of < or = 10 nM.

  6. Role of Bcr1-activated genes Hwp1 and Hyr1 in Candida albicans oral mucosal biofilms and neutrophil evasion.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Prabhat; Thompson, Angela; Xie, Zhihong; Kashleva, Helena; Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2011-01-25

    Candida albicans triggers recurrent infections of the oropharyngeal mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Prior studies have indicated that the transcription factor Bcr1 regulates biofilm formation in a catheter model, both in vitro and in vivo. We thus hypothesized that Bcr1 plays similar roles in the formation of oral mucosal biofilms and tested this hypothesis in a mouse model of oral infection. We found that a bcr1/bcr1 mutant did not form significant biofilm on the tongues of immunocompromised mice, in contrast to reference and reconstituted strains that formed pseudomembranes covering most of the tongue dorsal surface. Overexpression of HWP1, which specifies an epithelial adhesin that is under the transcriptional control of Bcr1, partly but significantly rescued the bcr1/bcr1 biofilm phenotype in vivo. Since HWP1 overexpression only partly reversed the biofilm phenotype, we investigated whether additional mechanisms, besides adhesin down-regulation, were responsible for the reduced virulence of this mutant. We discovered that the bcr1/bcr1 mutant was more susceptible to damage by human leukocytes when grown on plastic or on the surface of a human oral mucosa tissue analogue. Overexpression of HYR1, but not HWP1, significantly rescued this phenotype. Furthermore a hyr1/hyr1 mutant had significantly attenuated virulence in the mouse oral biofilm model of infection. These discoveries show that Bcr1 is critical for mucosal biofilm infection via regulation of epithelial cell adhesin and neutrophil function.

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Standardized Extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and Phyllanthus urinaria and Their Marker Compounds on Phagocytic Activity of Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Yuandani; Ilangkovan, Menaga; Mohamad, Hazni Falina; Husain, Khairana; Abdul Razak, Amirul Faiz

    2013-01-01

    The standardized methanol extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and P. urinaria, collected from Malaysia and Indonesia, and their isolated chemical markers, phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin, were evaluated for their effects on the chemotaxis, phagocytosis and chemiluminescence of human phagocytes. All the plant extracts strongly inhibited the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) with the Malaysian P. amarus showing the strongest inhibitory activity (IC50 value, 1.1 µg/mL). There was moderate inhibition by the extracts of the bacteria engulfment by the phagocytes with the Malaysian P. amarus exhibiting the highest inhibition (50.8% of phagocytizing cells). The Malaysian P. amarus and P. urinaria showed strong reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitory activity, with both extracts exhibiting IC50 value of 0.7 µg/mL. Phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin exhibited relatively strong activity against PMNs chemotaxis, with IC50 values slightly lower than that of ibuprofen (1.4 µg/mL). Phyllanthin exhibited strong inhibitory activity on the oxidative burst with an IC50 value comparable to that of aspirin (1.9 µg/mL). Phyllanthin exhibited strong engulfment inhibitory activity with percentage of phagocytizing cells of 14.2 and 27.1% for neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. The strong inhibitory activity of the extracts was due to the presence of high amounts of phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin although other constituents may also contribute. PMID:23737840

  8. Effect of oral glutamine supplementation on human neutrophil lipopolysaccharide-stimulated degranulation following prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Walsh, N P; Blannin, A K; Bishop, N C; Robson, P J; Gleeson, M

    2000-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that neutrophils can utilize glutamine and that glutamine supplementation can improve neutrophil function in postoperative and burn patients. The present study investigated the influence of oral glutamine supplementation on stimulated neutrophil degranulation and oxidative burst activity following prolonged exercise. Subjects, 7 well-trained men, reported to the laboratory following an overnight fast and cycled for 2 hrs at 60% VO2max on two occasions a week apart. They were randomly assigned to either a glutamine or placebo treatment. For both trials, subjects consumed a sugar-free lemon drink at 15-min intervals until 90 minutes, then a lemon flavored glutamine drink (GLN) or sugar-free lemon drink (PLA) was consumed at 15-min intervals for the remaining exercise and the 2-hr recovery period. Venous blood samples were taken pre-, during, and postexercise. Glutamine supplementation had no effect on the magnitude of postexercise leukocytosis, the plasma elastase concentration following exercise (which increased in both trials), or the plasma elastase release in response to bacterial stimulation (which fell in both trials). Neutrophil function assessed by oxidative burst activity of isolated cells did not change following exercise in either trial. These findings therefore suggest that the fall in plasma glutamine concentration does not account for the decrease in neutrophil function (degranulation response) following prolonged exercise.

  9. Demonstration of calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 activity in membrane preparation of rabbit neutrophils. Absence of activation by fMet-Leu-Phe, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and A-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, T; Tao, W; Sha'afi, R I

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity in rabbit neutrophil membrane preparation that is able to release [1-14C]oleic acid from labelled Escherichia coli has been demonstrated. The activity is critically dependent on the free calcium concentration and marginally stimulated by GTP gamma S. More than 80% of maximal activity is reached at 10 microM-Ca2+. The chemotactic factor, fMet-Leu-Phe, does not stimulate the PLA2 activity in this membrane preparation. Pretreatment of the membrane preparation, under various experimental conditions, or intact cells, before isolation of the membrane with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), does not affect PLA2 activity. Addition of the catalytic unit of cyclic AMP-dependent kinase to membrane preparation has no effect on PLA2 activity. Pretreatment of the intact neutrophil with dibutyryl-cAMP before isolation of the membrane produces a small but consistent increase in PLA2 activity. The activity of PLA2 in membrane isolated from cells treated with the protein kinase inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride (H-7) is significantly decreased. Furthermore, although the addition of PMA to intact rabbit neutrophils has no effect on the release of [3H]arachidonic acid from prelabelled cells, it potentiates significantly the release produced by the calcium ionophore A23187. This potentiation is not due to an inhibition of the acyltransferase activity. H-7 inhibits the basal release of arachidonic acid but does not inhibit the potentiation by PMA. These results suggest several points. (1) fMet-Leu-Phe does not stimulate PLA2 directly, and its ability to release arachidonic acid in intact neutrophils is mediated through its action on phospholipase C. (2) The potentiating effect of PMA on A23187-induced arachidonic acid release is most likely due to PMA affecting either the environment of PLA2 and/or altering the organization of membrane phospholipids in such a way as to increase their

  10. Neutrophil swarming: an essential process of the neutrophil tissue response.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Korbinian; Lämmermann, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil infiltration into inflamed and infected tissues is a fundamental process of the innate immune response. While neutrophil interactions with the blood vessel wall have been intensely studied over the last decades, neutrophil dynamics beyond the vasculature have for a long time remained poorly investigated. Recent intravital microscopy studies of neutrophil populations directly at the site of tissue damage or microbial invasion have changed our perspective on neutrophil responses within tissues. Swarm-like migration patterns of neutrophils, referred to as 'neutrophil swarming', have been detected in diverse tissues under conditions of sterile inflammation and infection with various pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Current work has begun to unravel the molecular pathways choreographing the sequential phases of highly coordinated chemotaxis followed by neutrophil accumulation and the formation of substantial neutrophil clusters. It is now clear that intercellular communication among neutrophils amplifies their recruitment in a feed-forward manner, which provides them with a level of self-organization during neutrophil swarming. This review will summarize recent developments and current concepts on neutrophil swarming, an important process of the neutrophil tissue response with a critical role in maintaining the balance between host protection and inflammation-driven tissue destruction. PMID:27558329

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide down-regulates neutrophil recruitment on inflamed endothelium by reducing cell deformability and resistance to detachment force

    PubMed Central

    Morikis, Vasilios A.; Radecke, Chris; Jiang, Yanyan; Heinrich, Volkmar; Curry, Fitz-Roy; Simon, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recombinant atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is administered in patients with acute heart failure in Japan to improve renal function and hemodynamics, but its anti-inflammatory effect on activated leukocytes may also contribute to its therapeutic efficacy. OBJECTIVE Examine unconventional role of ANP in neutrophil adhesion to inflamed endothelium. METHODS Human neutrophils were perfused over endothelial monolayers in a microfluidic lab-chip assay. Cell rheology was assessed by micropipette aspiration to assess changes in cortical tension and viscosity. Fluorescence microscopy was applied to measure adhesive contact area and β2-integrin focal bond formation. RESULTS ANP inhibited neutrophil rolling and firm adhesion without influencing the upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules on endothelium or the regulation of high affinity CD18 and shedding of L-selectin during neutrophil activation. Exposed to fluid shear, integrin mediated arrest was disrupted with ANP treatment, which elicited formation of long tethers and diminished cell spreading and contact. This correlated with a ~40% increase in neutrophil viscosity and a reduction in the adhesive footprint. CONCLUSIONS A decrease in cell deformation and neutrophil flattening with ANP results in fewer integrin bond clusters, which translates to higher tensile forces and impaired adhesion strengthening and cell detachment. PMID:26639357

  12. Transforming Growth Factor-β-Activated Kinase 1 Is Required for Human FcγRIIIb-Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation.

    PubMed

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrates from the circulation to sites of infection where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN uses phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. Several stimuli, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and some pharmacological compounds, such as Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. Recently, it was reported that FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. Direct cross-linking of FcγRIIA or integrins did not promote NET formation. FcγRIIIb-induced NET formation presented different kinetics from PMA-induced NET formation, suggesting differences in signaling. Because FcγRIIIb also induces a strong activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor Elk-1, and the transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) has recently been implicated in ERK signaling, in the present report, we explored the role of TAK1 in the signaling pathway activated by FcγRIIIb leading to NET formation. FcγRIIIb was stimulated by specific monoclonal antibodies, and NET formation was evaluated in the presence or absence of pharmacological inhibitors. The antibiotic LL Z1640-2, a selective inhibitor of TAK1 prevented FcγRIIIb-induced, but not PMA-induced NET formation. Both PMA and FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced phosphorylation of ERK. But, LL Z1640-2 only inhibited the FcγRIIIb-mediated activation of ERK. Also, only FcγRIIIb, similarly to transforming growth factor-β-induced TAK1 phosphorylation. A MEK (ERK kinase)-specific inhibitor was able to prevent ERK phosphorylation induced by both PMA and FcγRIIIb. These data show for the first time that FcγRIIIb cross-linking activates TAK1, and that this kinase is required for triggering the MEK/ERK signaling pathway to NETosis

  13. Transforming Growth Factor-β-Activated Kinase 1 Is Required for Human FcγRIIIb-Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrates from the circulation to sites of infection where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN uses phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. Several stimuli, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and some pharmacological compounds, such as Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen–antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. Recently, it was reported that FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. Direct cross-linking of FcγRIIA or integrins did not promote NET formation. FcγRIIIb-induced NET formation presented different kinetics from PMA-induced NET formation, suggesting differences in signaling. Because FcγRIIIb also induces a strong activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor Elk-1, and the transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) has recently been implicated in ERK signaling, in the present report, we explored the role of TAK1 in the signaling pathway activated by FcγRIIIb leading to NET formation. FcγRIIIb was stimulated by specific monoclonal antibodies, and NET formation was evaluated in the presence or absence of pharmacological inhibitors. The antibiotic LL Z1640-2, a selective inhibitor of TAK1 prevented FcγRIIIb-induced, but not PMA-induced NET formation. Both PMA and FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced phosphorylation of ERK. But, LL Z1640-2 only inhibited the FcγRIIIb-mediated activation of ERK. Also, only FcγRIIIb, similarly to transforming growth factor-β-induced TAK1 phosphorylation. A MEK (ERK kinase)-specific inhibitor was able to prevent ERK phosphorylation induced by both PMA and FcγRIIIb. These data show for the first time that FcγRIIIb cross-linking activates TAK1, and that this kinase is required for triggering the MEK/ERK signaling pathway to

  14. Activation of progelatinase A (MMP-2) by neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3: a role for inflammatory cells in tumor invasion and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shamamian, P; Schwartz, J D; Pocock, B J; Monea, S; Whiting, D; Marcus, S G; Mignatti, P

    2001-11-01

    Gelatinase A (MMP-2), a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) involved in tumor invasion and angiogenesis, is secreted as an inactive zymogen (proMMP-2) and activated by proteolytic cleavage. Here we report that polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-derived elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 activate proMMP-2 through a mechanism that requires membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) expression. Immunoprecipitation of human PMN-conditioned medium with a mixture of antibodies to elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 abolished proMMP-2 activation, whereas individual antibodies were ineffective. Incubation of HT1080 cells with either purified PMN elastase or cathepsin G or proteinase-3 resulted in dose-and time-dependent proMMP-2 activation. Addition of PMN-conditioned medium to MT1-MMP expressing cells resulted in increased proMMP-2 activation and in vitro invasion of extracellular matrix (ECM), but had no effect with cells that express no MT1-MMP. MMP-2 activation by PMN-conditioned medium or purified elastase was blocked by the elastase inhibitor alpha(1)-antitrypsin but not by Batimastat, an MMP inhibitor, showing that elastase activation of MMP-2 is not mediated by MMP activities. The PMN-conditioned medium-induced increase in cell invasion was blocked by Batimastat as well as by alpha(1)-antitrypsin, showing that PMN serine proteinases trigger a proteinase cascade that entails proMMP-2 activation: this gelatinase is the downstream effector of the proinvasive activity of PMN proteinases. These findings indicate a novel role for PMN-mediated inflammation in a variety of tissue remodeling processes including tumor invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:11598905

  15. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and the role of platelets in infection.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robert K; Arthur, Jane F; Gardiner, Elizabeth E

    2014-10-01

    In addition to playing a central role in normal haemostasis, platelets make important contributions to host inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Under pathophysiological conditions where platelet function is not tightly controlled, platelets also play critical roles in pathogenic processes underlying cardiovascular disease, uncontrolled inflammation, coagulopathy and in tumour metastasis. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are webs of histone-modified nuclear material extruded from activated neutrophils during inflammatory responses and these degranulation events can be directly triggered by platelet/neutrophil engagement. Emerging research describes how NETs influence platelet function, particularly in the setting of infection and inflammation. Especially intriguing is the potential for platelet-driven coagulation to be modulated by NETs in plasma and interstitial spaces. These findings also reveal new perspectives related to improved therapy for venous thrombosis.

  16. Evidence that a neutrophil-keratinocyte crosstalk is an early target of IL-17A inhibition in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Reich, Kristian; Papp, Kim A; Matheson, Robert T; Tu, John H; Bissonnette, Robert; Bourcier, Marc; Gratton, David; Kunynetz, Rodion A; Poulin, Yves; Rosoph, Les A; Stingl, Georg; Bauer, Wolfgang M; Salter, Janeen M; Falk, Thomas M; Blödorn-Schlicht, Norbert A; Hueber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Ulrike; Schumacher, Martin M; Peters, Thomas; Kriehuber, Ernst; Lee, David M; Wieczorek, Grazyna A; Kolbinger, Frank; Bleul, Conrad C

    2015-07-01

    The response of psoriasis to antibodies targeting the interleukin (IL)-23/IL-17A pathway suggests a prominent role of T-helper type-17 (Th17) cells in this disease. We examined the clinical and immunological response patterns of 100 subjects with moderate-to-severe psoriasis receiving 3 different intravenous dosing regimens of the anti-IL-17A antibody secukinumab (1 × 3 mg/kg or 1 × 10 mg/kg on Day 1, or 3 × 10 mg/kg on Days 1, 15 and 29) or placebo in a phase 2 trial. Baseline biopsies revealed typical features of active psoriasis, including epidermal accumulation of neutrophils and formation of microabscesses in >60% of cases. Neutrophils were the numerically largest fraction of infiltrating cells containing IL-17 and may store the cytokine preformed, as IL-17A mRNA was not detectable in neutrophils isolated from active plaques. Significant clinical responses to secukinumab were observed 2 weeks after a single infusion, associated with extensive clearance of cutaneous neutrophils parallel to the normalization of keratinocyte abnormalities and reduction of IL-17-inducible neutrophil chemoattractants (e.g. CXCL1, CXCL8); effects on numbers of T cells and CD11c-positive dendritic cells were more delayed. Histological and immunological improvements were generally dose dependent and not observed in the placebo group. In the lowest-dose group, a recurrence of neutrophils was seen in some subjects at Week 12; these subjects relapsed faster than those without microabscesses. Our findings are indicative of a neutrophil-keratinocyte axis in psoriasis that may involve neutrophil-derived IL-17 and is an early target of IL-17A-directed therapies such as secukinumab.

  17. Neutrophilic Skin Lesions in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Estelle; Vignon Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Battistella, Maxime; Saussine, Anne; Bergis, Maud; Cavelier-Balloy, Benedicte; Janier, Michel; Cordoliani, Florence; Bagot, Martine; Rybojad, Michel; Bouaziz, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) and autoimmune connective tissue diseases (AICTDs) is incompletely understood. The association between NDs and AICTDs is rare; recently, however, a distinctive subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE, the prototypical AICTD) with neutrophilic histological features has been proposed to be included in the spectrum of lupus. The aim of our study was to test the validity of such a classification. We conducted a monocentric retrospective study of 7028 AICTDs patients. Among these 7028 patients, a skin biopsy was performed in 932 cases with mainly neutrophilic infiltrate on histology in 9 cases. Combining our 9 cases and an exhaustive literature review, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet syndrome (n = 49), Sweet-like ND (n = 13), neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (n = 6), palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (n = 12), and histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatitis (n = 2) were likely to occur both in AICTDs and autoinflammatory diseases. Other NDs were specifically encountered in AICTDs: bullous LE (n = 71), amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (n = 28), autoimmunity-related ND (n = 24), ND resembling erythema gyratum repens (n = 1), and neutrophilic annular erythema (n = 1). The improvement of AICTDS neutrophilic lesions under neutrophil targeting therapy suggests possible common physiopathological pathways between NDs and AICTDs. PMID:25546688

  18. Platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Duerschmied, Daniel; Suidan, Georgette L; Demers, Melanie; Herr, Nadine; Carbo, Carla; Brill, Alexander; Cifuni, Stephen M; Mauler, Maximilian; Cicko, Sanja; Bader, Michael; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph; Wagner, Denisa D

    2013-02-01

    The majority of peripheral serotonin is stored in platelets, which secrete it on activation. Serotonin releases Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) and we asked whether absence of platelet serotonin affects neutrophil recruitment in inflammatory responses. Tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)1–deficient mice, lacking non-neuronal serotonin, showed mild leukocytosis compared with wild-type (WT), primarily driven by an elevated neutrophil count. Despite this, 50% fewer leukocytes rolled on unstimulated mesenteric venous endothelium of Tph1(-/-) mice. The velocity of rolling leukocytes was higher in Tph1(-/-) mice, indicating fewer selectin-mediated interactions with endothelium. Stimulation of endothelium with histamine, a secretagogue of WPBs, or injection of serotonin normalized the rolling in Tph1(-/-) mice. Diminished rolling in Tph1(-/-) mice resulted in reduced firm adhesion of leukocytes after lipopolysaccharide treatment. Blocking platelet serotonin uptake with fluoxetine in WT mice reduced serum serotonin by > 80% and similarly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Four hours after inflammatory stimulation, neutrophil extravasation into lung, peritoneum, and skin wounds was reduced in Tph1(-/-) mice, whereas in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis was independent of serotonin. Survival of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock was improved in Tph1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils in acute inflammation, supporting an important role for platelet serotonin in innate immunity. PMID:23243271

  19. Phagocytic and bactericidal activity of blood and milk-resident neutrophils against Staphylococcus aureus in primiparous and multiparous cows during early lactation.

    PubMed

    Mehrzad, J; Duchateau, L; Burvenich, C

    2009-02-16

    To examine the effect of parity on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) function, phagocytic and bactericidal activity of the PMN isolated from blood and milk against Staphylococcus aureus was compared between groups of 6 primiparous and 6 multiparous healthy dairy cows during early lactation using bacteriological and PMN-pathogen interaction assays. Latex-stimulated luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL) and viability of these PMN were also investigated. The phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by blood were remarkably higher than those of milk PMN. Similarly, the CL and viability in blood PMN were markedly higher than in milk PMN. Both in blood and in milk the phagocytosis of S. aureus by PMN in primiparous cows was substantially higher than in multiparous cows. The killing activity of blood PMN against S. aureus was 42.3+/-3.4% and 23.2+/-1.7% in primiparous and multiparous, respectively. Milk PMN killed only 20.7+/-2% S. aureus in primiparous and 10.2+/-1.3% in multiparous cows. Blood and milk PMN CL and milk PMN viability were significantly higher in primiparous cows. The pronounced reduction in phagocytic and bactericidal activity in blood and milk-resident PMN from multiparous cows, in part, resulted from the pronounced decrease of PMN viability and free radicals production capacity; this suggests that heifers' udders could be more protected against S. aureus, which remains to be tested in the field.

  20. Green tea catechins alone or in combination alter functional parameters of human neutrophils via suppressing the activation of TLR-4/NFκB p65 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Marinovic, M P; Morandi, A C; Otton, R

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a mixture containing the four main catechins found in green tea, as well it separately, as modulators of the functional parameters of human neutrophils. The cells were obtained from peripheral blood of healthy individuals isolated and cultured with a mix: 30 μM of EGCG, 3 μM of EGC, 2 μM of ECG and 1.4 μM of EC, as well as each one alone. We evaluated the cytotoxicity of catechins, production of several reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GPx and GR), Nrf2, TLR4/IKK/NFκB, CD11b mRNA levels, intracellular calcium release, chemotactic and phagocytic capacity, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and G6PDH activities, hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and pro-inflammatory cytokines release, protein levels of TLR4, p38 MAPK, iNOS and p-65 NFκB. The actions of the catechins were evidenced by the reduction in inflammatory parameters, including the suppression of TLR4, NFκB and iNOS protein expression, decreased release of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, migration capacity, MPO activity and HOCl production and the suppression of ROS, nitric oxide and peroxynitrite production, while inducing antioxidant enzyme activities and Nrf2 mRNA levels, phagocytic capacity and calcium release. Our results demonstrate that catechins present marked immunomodulatory actions, either alone or in combination.

  1. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Methyl Gallate on Experimental Arthritis: Inhibition of Neutrophil Recruitment, Production of Inflammatory Mediators, and Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luana Barbosa; Pádua, Tatiana Almeida; Seito, Leonardo Noboru; Costa, Thadeu Estevam Moreira Maramaldo; Silva, Magaiver Andrade; Candéa, André Luis Peixoto; Rosas, Elaine Cruz; Henriques, Maria G

    2016-06-24

    Methyl gallate (MG) is a prevalent phenolic acid in the plant kingdom, and its presence in herbal medicines might be related to its remarkable biological effects, such as its antioxidant, antitumor, and antimicrobial activities. Although some indirect evidence suggests anti-inflammatory activity for MG, there are no studies demonstrating this effect in animal models. Herein, we demonstrated that MG (0.7-70 mg/kg) inhibited zymosan-induced experimental arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. The oral administration of MG (7 mg/kg) attenuates arthritis induced by zymosan, affecting edema formation, leukocyte migration, and the production of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL-1, LTB4, and PGE2). Pretreatment with MG inhibited in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis elicited by CXCL-1, as well as the adhesion of these cells to TNF-α-primed endothelial cells. MG also impaired zymosan-stimulated macrophages by inhibiting IL-6 and NO production, COX-2 and iNOS expression, and intracellular calcium mobilization. Thus, MG is likely to present an anti-inflammatory effect by targeting multiple cellular events such as the production of various inflammatory mediators, as well as leukocyte activation and migration. PMID:27227459

  2. Inhibition by recombinant SLPI and half-SLPI (Asn55-Ala107) of elastase and cathepsin G activities: consequence for neutrophil-platelet cooperation.

    PubMed Central

    Renesto, P.; Balloy, V.; Kamimura, T.; Masuda, K.; Imaizumi, A.; Chignard, M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The capacity of recombinant human secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) to inhibit human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and cathepsin G (Cat G) was investigated and compared with a recombinant truncated form (carboxyl-terminal domain, Asn55-Ala107) called 1/2 SLPI. 2. Both compounds were efficient when tested against enzymatic activities of purified HLE and Cat G indicating that the HLE- and Cat G-inhibitory sites were preserved in the truncated form. SLPI and 1/2 SLPI also affected platelet activation induced by 0.2 microM Cat G (IC50 = 112 +/- 13 nM for SLPI and 280 +/- 12 nM for 1/2 SLPI). 3. The effects of SLPI and 1/2 SLPI were then tested against polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-mediated platelet activation, a cell-to-cell interaction mediated by HLE and Cat G released from PMN. In this experimental system, addition of SLPI or 1/2 SLPI before N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) led to the inhibition of the resulting platelet activation. As was the case for Cat G enzymatic activity and Cat G-induced platelet activation, SLPI was more efficient than 1/2 SLPI (IC50 = 676 +/- 69 nM vs 1121 +/- 150 nM). 4. The ratio of the IC50 against PMN-mediated platelet activation compared to purified Cat G-mediated platelet activation was 6.03 for SLPI and 4.32 for 1/2 SLPI. This difference may be due to the smaller size of the truncated form which could allow this molecule to diffuse more easily between PMN and platelets.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8097952

  3. Gnb isoforms control a signaling pathway comprising Rac1, Plcβ2, and Plcβ3 leading to LFA-1 activation and neutrophil arrest in vivo.

    PubMed

    Block, Helena; Stadtmann, Anika; Riad, Daniel; Rossaint, Jan; Sohlbach, Charlotte; Germena, Giulia; Wu, Dianqing; Simon, Scott I; Ley, Klaus; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-01-21

    Chemokines are required for leukocyte recruitment and appropriate host defense and act through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which induce downstream signaling leading to integrin activation. Although the α and β subunits of the GPCRs are the first intracellular molecules that transduce signals after ligand binding and are therefore indispensable for downstream signaling, relatively little is known about their contribution to lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) activation and leukocyte recruitment. We used knockout mice and short hairpin RNA to knock down guanine nucleotide binding protein (GNB) isoforms (GNB1, GNB2, GNB4, and GNB5) in HL60 cells and primary murine hematopoietic cells. Neutrophil function was assessed by using intravital microscopy, flow chamber assays, and chemotaxis and biochemistry studies. We unexpectedly discovered that all expressed GNB isoforms are required for LFA-1 activation. Their downregulation led to a significant impairment of LFA-1 activation, which was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that GPCR activation leads to Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)-dependent activation of both phospholipase C β2 (Plcβ2) and Plcβ3. They act nonredundantly to produce inositol triphosphate-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) flux and LFA-1 activation that support chemokine-induced arrest in vivo. In a complex inflammatory disease model, Plcβ2-, Plcβ3-, or Rac1-deficient mice were protected from lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury. Taken together, we demonstrated that all Gnb isoforms are required for chemokine-induced downstream signaling, and Rac1, Plcβ2, and Plcβ3 are critically involved in integrin activation and leukocyte arrest. PMID:26468229

  4. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  5. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  6. Mediators of neutrophil recruitment in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Houard, Xavier; Touat, Ziad; Ollivier, Véronique; Louedec, Liliane; Philippe, Monique; Sebbag, Uriel; Meilhac, Olivier; Rossignol, Patrick; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2009-01-01

    Aims Neutrophils/platelet interactions are involved in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The intraluminal thrombus (ILT) is a human model of platelet/neutrophil interactions. The present study focused on mediators involved in neutrophil recruitment in AAA. Methods and results Conditioned media from luminal, intermediate, and abluminal layers of 29 human ILTs were analysed for neutrophil markers [elastase/α1-antitrypsin and MMP9/NGAL complexes, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and α-defensin peptides], RANTES, platelet factor 4 (PF4), and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Their time-dependent release into serum from clots generated in vitro and their plasma concentrations in AAA patients and controls were determined. Immunohistochemistry for neutrophils, platelets, IL-8, PF4, and RANTES on AAA sections was performed; and molecules involved in ILT neutrophil chemotactic function were analysed in vitro. Neutrophils and platelets colocalized in the luminal layer of the thrombus. Consistently, neutrophil markers and platelet-derived RANTES and PF4 were released predominantly by the luminal thrombus pole, where their concentrations were significantly correlated. The luminal ILT layer was also the main source of IL-8, whose immunostaining colocalized with neutrophils. All were also released time dependently from clots and were increased in plasma of AAA patients. Luminal ILT layers displayed potent neutrophil chemotactic activity in vitro, which was inhibited by RANTES- and IL-8-blocking antibodies as well as by reparixin, an antagonist of the IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that platelet-derived RANTES and neutrophil-derived IL-8 are involved in attracting neutrophils to the luminal layer of AAA ILT. PMID:19201759

  7. False-positive myeloperoxidase binding activity due to DNA/anti-DNA antibody complexes: a source for analytical error in serologic evaluation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Jethwa, H S; Nachman, P H; Falk, R J; Jennette, J C

    2000-09-01

    Anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies (anti-MPO) are a major type of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). While evaluating anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies from SCG/Kj mice, we observed several hybridomas that appeared to react with both MPO and DNA. Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) also react with MPO and DNA. We hypothesized that the MPO binding activity is a false-positive result due to the binding of DNA, contained within the antigen binding site of anti-DNA antibodies, to the cationic MPO. Antibodies from tissue culture supernatants from 'dual reactive' hybridomas were purified under high-salt conditions (3 M NaCl) to remove any antigen bound to antibody. The MPO and DNA binding activity were measured by ELISA. The MPO binding activity was completely abrogated while the DNA binding activity remained. The MPO binding activity was restored, in a dose-dependent manner, by the addition of increasing amount of calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) to the purified antibody. Sera from six patients with SLE that reacted with both MPO and DNA were treated with DNase and showed a decrease in MPO binding activity compared with untreated samples. MPO binding activity was observed when CT-DNA was added to sera from SLE patients that initially reacted with DNA but not with MPO. These results suggest that the DNA contained within the antigen binding site of anti-DNA antibodies could bind to the highly cationic MPO used as substrate antigen in immunoassays, resulting in a false-positive test.

  8. Neutrophil responsiveness to IgG, as determined by fixed ratios of mRNA levels for activating and inhibitory FcgammaRII (CD32), is stable over time and unaffected by cytokines.

    PubMed

    van Mirre, Edwin; Breunis, Willemijn B; Geissler, Judy; Hack, C Erik; de Boer, Martin; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2006-07-15

    We tested the hypothesis that the ratio between the activating and inhibitory Fcgamma receptor type II (FcgammaRII) in neutrophils determines their responsiveness to immune complexes. We measured mRNA levels of FcgammaRII isoforms and observed differences in the ratio of FcgammaRIIa to FcgammaRIIb2 mRNA in granulocytes of 50 white and 10 black healthy volunteers, and found 4 discrete groups of ratios (ie, 4:1; 3:1, 2:1, or 1:1). The response to either dimeric IgG or aggregated IgG (aIgG) was assessed. Up-regulation of CD11b on the surface as well as the elastase release was significantly more pronounced in neutrophils with a high FcgammaRIIa/FcgammaRIIb2 mRNA ratio of 4:1 compared with a 2:1 or 1:1 ratio. Individual ratios as well as the functional responsiveness of neutrophils were constant over time, as was tested over 12 months. Neutrophil stimulation with various agents in vitro did not alter the FcgammaRIIa/FcgammaRIIb2 mRNA ratio in the neutrophils of these donors, in clear contrast to the findings in their mononuclear cells. We found a strong association between the 2B.4 haplotype of the FCGR2B promoter with increased transcriptional activity in individuals with 1:1 ratios and the more common low-expression 2B.1 haplotype in individuals with FcgammaRIIa/FcgammaRIIb2 mRNA ratios of 2:1, 3:1, or 4:1.

  9. Effects of pentoxifylline on equine neutrophil function and flow properties.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D J; Geor, R J; Burris, S M; Smith, C M

    1992-01-01

    Pentoxifylline has been reported to improve peripheral vascular circulation by altering the flow properties of blood. To determine if the hemorrheological effects of pentoxifylline were mediated by alterations in neutrophil function and/or flow properties, we evaluated the drug's effects on equine neutrophils in vitro. Pentoxifylline, at a concentration of 1 x 10(-1) M, but not at concentrations of 1 x 10(-6) M to 1 x 10(-2) M, markedly suppressed neutrophil superoxide production, zymosan phagocytosis and adherence to nylon wool. Pentoxifylline failed to improve neutrophil filterability through 3 mu polycarbonate filters at any concentration tested. We conclude that equine neutrophil function and flow properties are unlikely to be affected by pentoxifylline concentrations achievable in vivo. PMID:1335832

  10. Citrate-Linked Keto- and Aldo-Hexose Monosaccharide Cellulose Conjugates Demonstrate Selective Human Neutrophil Elastase-Lowering Activity in Cotton Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Judson V.; Caston-Pierre, Sonya

    2013-01-01

    Sequestration of harmful proteases as human neutrophil elastase (HNE) from the chronic wound environment is an important goal of wound dressing design and function. Monosaccharides attached to cellulose conjugates as ester-appended aldohexoses and ketohexoses were prepared on cotton gauze as monosccharide-citrate-cellulose-esters for HNE sequestration. The monosaccharide-cellulose analogs demonstrated selective binding when the derivatized cotton dressings were measured for sequestration of HNE. Each monosaccharide-cellulose conjugate was prepared as a cellulose citrate-linked monosaccharide ester on the cotton wound dressing, and assayed under wound exudate-mimicked conditions for elastase sequestration activity. A series of three aldohexose and four ketohexose ester cellulose conjugates were prepared on cotton gauze through citric acid-cellulose cross linking esterification. The monosaccharide portion of the conjugate was characterized by hydrolysis of the citrate-monosaccharide ester bond, and subsequent analysis of the free monosaccharide with high performance anion exchange chromatography. The ketohexose and aldohexose conjugate levels on cotton were quantified on cotton using chromatography and found to be present in milligram/gram amounts. The citrate-cellulose ester bonds were characterized with FTIR. Ketohexose-citrate-cellulose conjugates sequestered more elastase activity than aldohexose-citrate-cellulose conjugates. The monosaccharide cellulose conjugate families each gave distinctive profiles in elastase-lowering effects. Possible mechanisms of elastase binding to the monosaccharide-cellulose conjugates are discussed. PMID:24955952

  11. Intracellular shunting of O2− contributes to charge compensation and preservation of neutrophil respiratory burst in the absence of voltage-gated proton channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Decleva, Eva; Menegazzi, Renzo; Fasolo, Alba; Defendi, Federica; Sebastianutto, Michele; Dri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Proton efflux via voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is considered to mediate the charge compensation necessary to preserve NADPH oxidase activity during the respiratory burst. Using the Hv1 inhibitor Zn2+, we found that the PMA-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils is inhibited when assessed as extracellular production of O2− and H2O2, in accordance with literature studies, but, surprisingly, unaffected when measured as oxygen consumption or total (extracellular plus intracellular) H2O2 production. Furthermore, we show that inhibiting Hv1 with Zn2+ results in an increased production of intracellular ROS. Similar results, i.e. decreased extracellular and increased intracellular ROS production, were obtained using a human granulocyte-like cell line with severely impaired Hv1 expression. Acidic extracellular pH, which dampens proton efflux, also augmented intracellular production of H2O2. Zinc caused an increase in the rate but not in the extent of depolarization and cytosolic acidification indicating that mechanisms other than proton efflux take part in charge compensation. Our results suggest a hitherto unpredicted mechanism of charge compensation whereby, in the absence of proton efflux, part of O2− generated within gp91phox in the plasma membrane is shunted intracellularly down electrochemical gradient to dampen excessive depolarization. This would preserve NADPH oxidase activity under conditions such as the inflammatory exudate in which the acidic pH hinders charge compensation by proton efflux. PMID:23578765

  12. Methoxatin (PQQ) in guinea-pig neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bishop, A; Paz, M A; Gallop, P M; Karnovsky, M L

    1994-10-01

    PQQ, also called methoxatin, has been isolated from guinea-pig neutrophils. The organic cations diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and diphenyliodonium (BPI) and the aromatic o-diamine 4,5-dimethylphenylenediamine (DIMPDA) sequester synthetic PQQ and inhibit its redox-cycling activity in a model system. Standards were made of adducts of tritiated PQQ with unlabeled DIMPDA and of unlabeled PQQ with tritiated DPI or DIMPDA. PQQ adducts were isolated from guinea-pig neutrophils with each of the tritiated inhibitors. They were separated and defined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Tiron, a disodium benzene disulphonic acid, broke the DPI-PQQ adduct isolated from neutrophils and released free PQQ. Both DPI and DIMPDA, as well as BPI, blocked O2.- release by stimulated neutrophils. The blockade exerted by these inhibitors was released by the addition of PQQ to the cell suspensions. The data demonstrate the presence of PQQ in guinea-pig neutrophils and suggest that it has a possible role, direct or indirect, in the O2.(-)-producing respiratory burst.

  13. Evaluation of Antiradical and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Ethyl Acetate and Butanolic Subfractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius (DC.) Polhill & Wiens (Loranthaceae) Using Equine Myeloperoxidase and Both PMA-Activated Neutrophils and HL-60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boly, Rainatou; Franck, Thierry; Kohnen, Stephan; Lompo, Marius; Guissou, Innocent Pierre; Dubois, Jacques; Serteyn, Didier; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange

    2015-01-01

    The ethyl acetate and n-butanolic subfractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius were investigated for their antioxidant and antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) activities. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and dichlorofluorescein- (DCF-) induced fluorescence techniques from phorbol myristate acetate- (PMA-) stimulated equine neutrophils and human myeloid cell line HL-60, respectively. In parallel, the effects of the tested subfractions were evaluated on the total MPO release by stimulated neutrophils and on the specific MPO activity by means of immunological assays. The results showed the potent activity of the butanolic subfraction, at least in respect of the chemiluminescence test (IC50 = 0.3 ± 0.1 µg/mL) and the ELISA and SIEFED assays (IC50 = 2.8 ± 1.2 µg/mL and 1.3 ± 1.0 µg/mL), respectively. However, the ethyl acetate subfraction was found to be the most potent in the DCF assay as at the highest concentration, DCF fluorescence intensity decreases of about 50%. Moreover, we demonstrated that the ethyl acetate subfraction was rich in catechin (16.51%) while it was not easy to identify the main compounds in the butanolic subfraction using the UPLC-MS/MS technique. Nevertheless, taken together, our results provide evidence that Agelanthus dodoneifolius subfractions may represent potential sources of natural antioxidants and of antimyeloperoxidase compounds. PMID:25821497

  14. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; Simon, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation were measured in real time by flow cytometry. P-selectin was upregulated to the platelet surface in response to shear and was the primary factor mediating neutrophil-platelet adhesion. The extent of neutrophil aggregation increased linearly with platelet adhesion to neutrophils. Blocking either P-selectin, its glycoprotein ligand PSGL-1, or both simultaneously by preincubation with a monoclonal antibody resulted in equivalent inhibition of neutrophil-platelet adhesion (approximately 30%) and neutrophil aggregation (approximately 70%). The residual amount of neutrophil adhesion was blocked with anti-CD11b/CD18. Treatment of blood with prostacyclin analogue ZK36374, which raises cAMP levels in platelets, blocked P-selectin upregulation and neutrophil aggregation to baseline. Complete abrogation of platelet-neutrophil adhesion required both ZK36374 and anti-CD18. Electron microscopic observations of fixed blood specimens revealed that platelets augmented neutrophil aggregation both by forming bridges between neutrophils and through contact-mediated activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with a model in which venous levels of shear support platelet adherence to neutrophils via P-selectin binding PSGL-1. This interaction alone is sufficient to mediate neutrophil aggregation. Abrogation of platelet adhesion and aggregation requires blocking Mac-1 in addition to PSGL-1 or P-selectin. The described mechanisms are likely of key importance in the pathogenesis and progression of thrombotic disorders that are exacerbated by leukocyte-platelet aggregation.

  15. Exosomes Mediate LTB4 Release during Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Tavakoli Tameh, Aidin; Parent, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is secreted by chemotactic neutrophils, forming a secondary gradient that amplifies the reach of primary chemoattractants. This strategy increases the recruitment range for neutrophils and is important during inflammation. Here, we show that LTB4 and its synthesizing enzymes localize to intracellular multivesicular bodies that, upon stimulation, release their content as exosomes. Purified exosomes can activate resting neutrophils and elicit chemotactic activity in a LTB4 receptor-dependent manner. Inhibition of exosome release leads to loss of directional motility with concomitant loss of LTB4 release. Our findings establish that the exosomal pool of LTB4 acts in an autocrine fashion to sensitize neutrophils towards the primary chemoattractant, and in a paracrine fashion to mediate the recruitment of neighboring neutrophils in trans. We envision that this mechanism is used by other signals to foster communication between cells in harsh extracellular environments. PMID:26741884

  16. Defective neutrophil chemotaxis in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R A; Page, R C; Wilde, G

    1977-01-01

    Neutrophil chemotaxis was evaluated in nine patients with juvenile periodontitis, with normal subjects and patients with the adult form of periodontitis as controls. Defective chemotactic responses were observed in neutrophils from seven of nine juvenile patients, and a reduced level of complement-derived chemotactic activity was demonstrated in serum from four patients. These determinations were normal in all the patients with adult periodontitis. Serum from five of the juvenile patients contained a heat-stable, non-dialyzable factor that markedly inhibited the chemotaxis of normal neutrophils. Thus the characteristic tissue destruction seen in juvenile periodontitis may be, at least in part, a consequence of a failure of host defense mechanisms. PMID:591063

  17. Transdifferentiation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to dendritic-like cells at the site of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis: evidence for activation by T cells

    PubMed Central

    Iking-Konert, C; Ostendorf, B; Sander, O; Jost, M; Wagner, C; Joosten, L; Schneider, M; Hansch, G

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate infiltrated cells in the synovial fluid (SF) of inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with special reference to polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and their interaction with T cells. Methods: Expression on PMN of activation associated receptors CD14, CD64, CD83, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II was examined in the SF of 15 patients with RA, as were the infiltrated T cells. SF cytokines were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To mimic the in vivo situation, co-culture experiments were carried out using PMN and T cells of healthy donors. Results: The SF contained activated T lymphocytes and abundant PMN. SF PMN expression of CD14 and CD64 was enhanced compared with peripheral blood. Of special interest was the observation that only the SF PMN expressed MHC class II antigens and CD83. Exposure to SF, which contained considerable amounts of cytokines (for example, interferon γ (IFNγ), tumour necrosis factor α, and interleukin 2), induced a similar receptor pattern on blood derived PMN of healthy donors. Furthermore, PMN acquired MHC class II and CD83 within 24 to 48 hours, when co-cultured with autologous T cells or T cell lines. This effect was also achieved by T cell supernatants, was dependent on protein synthesis, and could be inhibited by antibodies against IFNγ. Conclusions: SF PMN from patients with RA undergo major alterations, including transdifferentiation to cells with dendritic-like characteristics, probably induced by T cell derived cytokines. Because MHC class II positive PMN are known to activate T cells, the mutual activation of PMN and T cells might contribute to the perpetuation of the local inflammatory process, and eventually to the destructive process in RA. PMID:15778239

  18. ATF3 is a novel regulator of mouse neutrophil migration

    PubMed Central

    Boespflug, Nicholas D.; Kumar, Sachin; McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Phelan, James D.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Hoebe, Kasper; Hai, Tsonwin; Karp, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) gene is induced by Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. In turn, ATF3 protein inhibits the expression of various TLR-driven proinflammatory genes. Given its counter-regulatory role in diverse innate immune responses, we defined the effects of ATF3 on neutrophilic airway inflammation in mice. ATF3 deletion was associated with increased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-driven airway epithelia production of CXCL1, but not CXCL2, findings concordant with a consensus ATF3-binding site identified solely in the Cxcl1 promoter. Unexpectedly, ATF3-deficient mice did not exhibit increased airway neutrophilia after LPS challenge. Bone marrow chimeras revealed a specific reduction in ATF3−/− neutrophil recruitment to wild-type lungs. In vitro, ATF3−/− neutrophils exhibited a profound chemotaxis defect. Global gene expression analysis identified ablated Tiam2 expression in ATF3−/− neutrophils. TIAM2 regulates cellular motility by activating Rac1-mediated focal adhesion disassembly. Notably, ATF3−/− and ATF3-sufficient TIAM2 knockdown neutrophils, both lacking TIAM2, exhibited increased focal complex area, along with excessive CD11b-mediated F-actin polymerization. Together, our data describe a dichotomous role for ATF3-mediated regulation of neutrophilic responses: inhibition of neutrophil chemokine production but promotion of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:24470589

  19. The Lipidated Peptidomimetic Lau-((S)-Aoc)-(Lys-βNphe)6-NH2 Is a Novel Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 Agonist That Activates Both Human and Mouse Neutrophil NADPH Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Holdfeldt, André; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael; Nielsen, Christina; Perez-Gassol, Iris; Larsen, Camilla Josephine; Wang, Ji Ming; Karlsson, Anna; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-09-16

    Neutrophils expressing formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) play key roles in host defense, immune regulation, and resolution of inflammation. Consequently, the search for FPR2-specific modulators has attracted much attention due to its therapeutic potential. Earlier described agonists for this receptor display potent activity for the human receptor (FPR2) but low activity for the mouse receptor orthologue (Fpr2), rendering them inapplicable in murine models of human disease. Here we describe a novel FPR2 agonist, the proteolytically stable α-peptide/β-peptoid hybrid Lau-((S)-Aoc)-(Lys-βNphe)6-NH2 (F2M2), showing comparable potency in activating human and mouse neutrophils by inducing a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and assembly of the superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase. This FPR2/Fpr2 agonist contains a headgroup consisting of a 2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) residue acylated with lauric acid (C12 fatty acid), which is linked to a peptide/peptoid repeat ((Lys-βNphe)6-NH2). Both the fatty acid moiety and the (S)-Aoc residue were required for FPR2/Fpr2 activation. This type of proteolytically stable FPR2-specific peptidomimetics may serve as valuable tools for future analysis of FPR2 signaling as well as for development of prophylactic immunomodulatory therapy. This novel class of cross-species FPR2/Fpr2 agonists should enable translation of results obtained with mouse neutrophils (and disease models) into enhanced understanding of human inflammatory and immune diseases. PMID:27422818

  20. The role of neutrophils in the immune system: an overview.

    PubMed

    Malech, Harry L; Deleo, Frank R; Quinn, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils, also known as polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), have long been considered as the short-lived, nonspecific white cells that form pus-and also happen to kill invading microbes. Indeed, neutrophils were often neglected (and largely not considered) as immune cells. This historic view of neutrophils has changed considerably over the past several decades, and we know now that, in addition to playing the predominant role in the clearance of bacteria and fungi, they play a major role in shaping the host response to infection and immune system homeostasis. The change in our view of the role of neutrophils in the immune system has been due in large part to the study of these cells in vitro. Such work has been made possible by new and/or improved methods and approaches used to investigate neutrophils. These methods are the focus of this volume.

  1. Azithromycin Enhances Phagocytic Killing of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Schibler, Mark R.; Walters, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans resists killing by neutrophils and is inhibited by azithromycin (AZM) and amoxicillin (AMX). AZM actively concentrates inside host cells, whereas AMX enters by diffusion. The present study is conducted to determine whether AZM is more effective than AMX at enhancing phagocytic killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by neutrophils. Methods Killing assays were conducted in the presence of either 2 μg/mL AZM or 16 μg/mL AMX (equipotent against A. actinomycetemcomitans). Neutrophils were loaded by incubation with the appropriate antibiotic. Opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 was incubated with the indicated antibiotic alone, with loaded neutrophils and antibiotic, or with control neutrophils (without antibiotic) at multiplicities of infection (MOIs) of 30 and 90 bacteria per neutrophil. Results Neutrophil incubation with 2 μg/mL AZM yielded an intracellular concentration of 10 μg/mL. At an MOI of 30, neutrophils loaded with AZM failed to kill significantly more bacteria than control neutrophils during the 60- and 90-minute assay periods. At an MOI of 90, neutrophils loaded with AZM killed significantly more bacteria than either AZM alone or control neutrophils during 60- and 90-minute incubations (P <0.05), and killed significantly more bacteria after 90 minutes than the sum of the killing produced by AZM alone or neutrophils alone. Neutrophils incubated with AMX under identical conditions also killed significantly more bacteria than either AMX alone or control neutrophils, but there was no evidence of synergism between AMX and neutrophils. Conclusions Neutrophils possess a concentrative transport system for AZM that may enhance killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its effects are most pronounced when neutrophils are greatly outnumbered by bacteria. PMID:25186779

  2. In vitro effects of very low levels of aflatoxin B₁ on free radicals production and bactericidal activity of bovine blood neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Mehrzad, J; Klein, G; Kamphues, J; Wolf, P; Grabowski, N; Schuberth, H J

    2011-05-15

    As one of the most potent and hazardous feed/food-originated mycotoxins, aflatoxin (AF) B₁ is regarded as a potent immunosuppressor in dairy cows. Neutrophils (PMN), as key effector cells against pathogens, have a high potential to kill engulfed microbes. To investigate the in vitro effects of very low doses of AFB₁ on blood PMN functions, we examined the effects of biologically relevant concentrations of AFB₁ on the phagocytosis and non-phagocytosis dependent luminol, representative of mainly intracellular free radicals, and isoluminol, representative of mainly extracellular free radicals, chemiluminescence (CL), necrosis and apoptosis of PMN. Isolated blood PMN from healthy dairy cows (n=12) were exposed to 0, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.5 ng/ml of AFB₁ for 0.5 and 18 h depending on the assay. Further, blood PMN of healthy dairy cows (n=8) were exposed to 0.5 ng/ml of AFB₁ for 3h and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, superoxide anion (O₂⁻) production, phagocytosis and killing activities against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Escherichia (E.) coli, were examined. Though the effect of extremely low doses of AFB₁ were less pronounced, at 0.5 ng/ml the production of free radicals was greatly enhanced, especially extracellularly. In contrast to isoluminol CL, the AFB₁-treated PMN showed a remarkably impaired phagocytosis-depended luminol CL. PMN necrosis and apoptosis were not affected by AFB₁. MPO activity, O₂⁻ production, phagocytosis rates and killing of E. coli and S. aureus by AFB₁-treated PMN were significantly lower than those of non-treated ones. Our results show the extracellularly pro-oxidant and antiphagocytic properties of very low doses of AFB₁ for bovine PMN. The scope of the suppressive effects of the in vitro AFB₁ levels on cellular innate immune functions should be considered for high yielding dairy cows.

  3. Membrane Transfer from Mononuclear Cells to Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Transduces Cell Survival and Activation Signals in the Recipient Cells via Anti-Extrinsic Apoptotic and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Shen, Chieh-Yu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Hsieh, Song-Chou

    2016-01-01

    The biological significance of membrane transfer (trogocytosis) between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) remains unclear. We investigated the biological/immunological effects and molecular basis of trogocytosis among various immune cells in healthy individuals and patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). By flow cytometry, we determined that molecules in the immunological synapse, including HLA class-I and-II, CD11b and LFA-1, along with CXCR1, are exchanged among autologous PMNs, CD4+ T cells, and U937 cells (monocytes) after cell-cell contact. Small interfering RNA knockdown of the integrin adhesion molecule CD11a in U937 unexpectedly enhanced the level of total membrane transfer from U937 to PMN cells. Functionally, phagocytosis and IL-8 production by PMNs were enhanced after co-culture with T cells. Total membrane transfer from CD4+ T to PMNs delayed PMN apoptosis by suppressing the extrinsic apoptotic molecules, BAX, MYC and caspase 8. This enhancement of activities of PMNs by T cells was found to be mediated via p38- and P44/42-Akt-MAP kinase pathways and inhibited by the actin-polymerization inhibitor, latrunculin B, the clathrin inhibitor, Pitstop-2, and human immunoglobulin G, but not by the caveolin inhibitor, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, membrane transfer from PMNs enhanced IL-2 production by recipient anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activated MNCs, and this was suppressed by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (PD98059) and protein kinase C (Rottlerin). Of clinical significance, decreased total membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs in patients with active SLE suppressed mononuclear IL-2 production. In conclusion, membrane transfer from MNCs to PMNs, mainly at the immunological synapse, transduces survival and activation signals to enhance PMN functions and is dependent on actin polymerization, clathrin activation, and Fcγ receptors, while membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs depends on MAP kinase and

  4. Neutrophil haptotaxis induced by the lectin KM+.

    PubMed

    Ganiko, L; Martins, A R; Espreáfico, E M; Roque-Barreira, M C

    1998-05-01

    KM+ is a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia that induces neutrophil migration in vitro and in vivo. This attractant activity was shown to be caused by haptotaxis rather than chemotaxis. The inhibition by D-mannose of the neutrophil attraction exerted by KM+, both in vitro and in vivo, supports the idea that haptotaxis is triggered in vivo by the sugar binding sites interacting with glycoconjugates located on the neutrophil surface and in the extracellular matrix. In the present study an in vivo haptotaxis assay was performed by intradermally (i.d.) injecting 125I-KM+ (200 ng), which led to a selective staining of loose connective tissue and vascular endothelium. The radiolabelled area exhibited a maximum increase (five-fold) in neutrophil infiltration 3 h after injection, relative to i.d. 200 ng 125I-BSA. We characterized the ex vivo binding of KM+ to tissue elements by immunohistochemistry, using paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded, untreated rat skin. Bound KM+ was detected with an affinity-purified rabbit IgG anti-KM+ and visualized with an alkaline phosphatase based system. KM+ binding to connective tissue and vascular endothelium was inhibited by preincubating KM+ with 0.4 mM D-mannose and was potentiated by heparan sulfate (100 microg ml(-1)). An in vitro assay carried out in a Boyden microchamber showed that heparan sulfate potentiated the attractant effect of 10 microg KM+ by 34%. The present data suggest that KM+ induces neutrophil migration in vivo by haptotaxis and that the haptotactic gradient could be provided by the interaction of the KM+ carbohydrate recognition site(s) with mannose-containing glycoconjugate(s) in vascular endothelium and connective tissue. Heparan sulfate would act as an accessory molecule, enhancing the KM+ tissue binding and potentiating the induced neutrophil haptotaxis.

  5. Capsular polysaccharides from Cryptococcus neoformans modulate production of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana D B; Nascimento, Michelle T C; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Côrte-Real, Suzana; Morrot, Alexandre; Heise, Norton; Nunes, Marise P; Previato, José Osvaldo; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; DosReis, George A; Saraiva, Elvira M; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we characterized the in vitro modulation of NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps) induced in human neutrophils by the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, evaluating the participation of capsular polysaccharides glucuronoxylomanan (GXM) and glucuronoxylomannogalactan (GXMGal) in this phenomenon. The mutant acapsular strain CAP67 and the capsular polysaccharide GXMGal induced NET production. In contrast, the wild-type strain and the major polysaccharide GXM did not induce NET release. In addition, C. neoformans and the capsular polysaccharide GXM inhibited PMA-induced NET release. Additionally, we observed that the NET-enriched supernatants induced through CAP67 yeasts showed fungicidal activity on the capsular strain, and neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, collagenase and histones were the key components for the induction of NET fungicidal activity. The signaling pathways associated with NET induction through the CAP67 strain were dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peptidylarginine deiminase-4 (PAD-4). Neither polysaccharide induced ROS production however both molecules blocked the production of ROS through PMA-activated neutrophils. Taken together, the results demonstrate that C. neoformans and the capsular component GXM inhibit the production of NETs in human neutrophils. This mechanism indicates a potentially new and important modulation factor for this fungal pathogen. PMID:25620354

  6. TLR9 activation induces normal neutrophil responses in a child with IRAK-4 deficiency: involvement of the direct PI3K pathway.

    PubMed

    Hoarau, Cyrille; Gérard, Bénédicte; Lescanne, Emmanuel; Henry, Dominique; François, Stéphanie; Lacapère, Jean-Jacques; El Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan; Grandchamp, Bernard; Lebranchu, Yvon; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Elbim, Carole

    2007-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) play a key role in innate immunity. Their activation and survival are tightly regulated by microbial products via pattern recognition receptors such as TLRs, which mediate recruitment of the IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) complex. We describe a new inherited IRAK-4 deficiency in a child with recurrent pyogenic bacterial infections. Analysis of the IRAK4 gene showed compound heterozygosity with two mutations: a missense mutation in the death domain of the protein (pArg12Cys) associated in cis-with a predicted benign variant (pArg391His); and a splice site mutation in intron 7 that led to the skipping of exon 7. A nontruncated IRAK-4 protein was detected by Western blotting. The patient's functional deficiency of IRAK-4 protein was confirmed by the absence of IRAK-1 phosphorylation after stimulation with all TLR agonists tested. The patient's PMNs showed strongly impaired responses (L-selectin and CD11b expression, oxidative burst, cytokine production, cell survival) to TLR agonists which engage TLR1/2, TLR2/6, TLR4, and TLR7/8; in contrast, the patient's PMN responses to CpG-DNA (TLR9) were normal, except for cytokine production. The surprisingly normal effect of CpG-DNA on PMN functions and apoptosis disappeared after pretreatment with PI3K inhibitors. Together, these results suggest the existence of an IRAK-4-independent TLR9-induced transduction pathway leading to PI3K activation. This alternative pathway may play a key role in PMN control of infections by microorganisms other than pyogenic bacteria in inherited IRAK-4 deficiency.

  7. miR-21-mediated decreased neutrophil apoptosis is a determinant of impaired coronary collateral growth in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Rebecca; Terry, Russell; Hutcheson, Brenda; Jadhav, Rashmi; Chaplin, Jennifer; Smith, Erika; Barrington, Robert; Proctor, Spencer D; Rocic, Petra

    2015-06-01

    Coronary collateral growth (CCG) is impaired in metabolic syndrome. microRNA-21 (miR-21) is a proproliferative and antiapoptotic miR, which we showed to be elevated in metabolic syndrome. Here we investigate whether impaired CCG in metabolic syndrome involved miR-21-mediated aberrant apoptosis. Normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) and metabolic syndrome [J. C. Russel (JCR)] rats underwent transient, repetitive coronary artery occlusion [repetitive ischemia (RI)]. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2, phospho-Bad, and Bcl-2/Bax dimers were increased on days 6 and 9 RI, and proapoptotic Bax and Bax/Bax dimers and cytochrome-c release concurrently decreased in JCR versus SD rats. Active caspases were decreased in JCR versus SD rats (~50%). Neutrophils increased transiently on day 3 RI in the collateral-dependent zone of SD rats but remained elevated in JCR rats, paralleling miR-21 expression. miR-21 downregulation by anti-miR-21 induced neutrophil apoptosis and decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-2/Bax dimers (~75%) while increasing Bax/Bax dimers, cytochrome-c release, and caspase activation (~70, 400, and 400%). Anti-miR-21 also improved CCG in JCR rats (~60%). Preventing neutrophil infiltration with blocking antibodies resulted in equivalent CCG recovery, confirming a major role for deregulated neutrophil apoptosis in CCG impairment. Neutrophil and miR-21-dependent CCG inhibition was in significant part mediated by increased oxidative stress. We conclude that neutrophil apoptosis is integral to normal CCG and that inappropriate prolonged miR-21-mediated survival of neutrophils plays a major role in impaired CCG, in part via oxidative stress generation.

  8. Digitoxin Analogues with Improved Anticytomegalovirus Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides are potent inhibitors of cancer cell growth and possess antiviral activities at nanomolar concentrations. In this study we evaluated the anticytomegalovirus (CMV) activity of digitoxin and several of its analogues. We show that sugar type and sugar length attached to the steroid core structure affects its anticytomegalovirus activity. Structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies identified the l-sugar containing cardiac glycosides as having improved anti-CMV activity and may lead to better understanding of how these compounds inhibit CMV replication. PMID:24900847

  9. Alterations of neutrophil functions in foundry and pottery workers.

    PubMed

    Başaran, N; Undeğer, U; Shubair, M

    2002-11-01

    To assess the immune competence of workers occupationally exposed to mainly silica, neutrophil functions such as the chemotactic and oxidative burst activity in foundry and pottery workers were evaluated. The chemotactic activity was examined in 22 foundry and 10 pottery workers and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils were determined in 22 foundry and 6 pottery workers. Healthy subjects of comparable age, sex, and smoking habits and with no history of silica exposure were used as the control groups. Chemotaxis was carried out in Boyden chambers using Zymosan activated serum as chemotactic stimulus. Oxidative burst activity was measured using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) dye reduction test. Both neutrophil functions were significantly reduced in silica-exposed foundry and pottery workers (p < 0.001) compared to controls suggesting that human chronic exposure mainly to silica and other chemicals originated from foundry and pottery settings may diminish neutrophil functions in humans. PMID:12510795

  10. Alterations of neutrophil functions in foundry and pottery workers.

    PubMed

    Başaran, N; Undeğer, U; Shubair, M

    2002-11-01

    To assess the immune competence of workers occupationally exposed to mainly silica, neutrophil functions such as the chemotactic and oxidative burst activity in foundry and pottery workers were evaluated. The chemotactic activity was examined in 22 foundry and 10 pottery workers and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils were determined in 22 foundry and 6 pottery workers. Healthy subjects of comparable age, sex, and smoking habits and with no history of silica exposure were used as the control groups. Chemotaxis was carried out in Boyden chambers using Zymosan activated serum as chemotactic stimulus. Oxidative burst activity was measured using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) dye reduction test. Both neutrophil functions were significantly reduced in silica-exposed foundry and pottery workers (p < 0.001) compared to controls suggesting that human chronic exposure mainly to silica and other chemicals originated from foundry and pottery settings may diminish neutrophil functions in humans.

  11. Rac1 signaling regulates neutrophil-dependent tissue damage in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Zhang, Su; Song, Lei; Wang, Yusheng; Hwaiz, Rundk; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-10-15

    Excessive neutrophil recruitment in the colon is a major feature in acute colitis although the signaling mechanisms behind colonic recruitment of neutrophils remain elusive. Herein, we hypothesized that Rac1 activity might play an important role in neutrophil infiltration in the inflamed colon. Female Balb/c mice were treated with the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (0.5 and 5mg/kg) before and daily after administration of 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Colonic tissue was collected for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and CXC chemokine formation as well as histological damage score five days after challenge with DSS. Rac1 activity was determined by western blot and Mac-1 expression by flow cytometry in neutrophils. Administration of NSC23766 decreased DSS-induced neutrophil recruitment and tissue damage in the colon. Rac1 inhibition decreased colonic formation of IL-6 and CXC chemokines in experimental colitis. Chemokine challenge increased Rac1 activity in neutrophils and NSC23766 markedly reduced this neutrophil activity of Rac1. Inhibition of Rac1 abolished CXC chemokine-induced neutrophil chemotaxis and up-regulation of Mac-1 in vitro. Taken together, Rac1 signaling plays a significant role in controlling accumulation of neutrophils and tissue injury in experimental colitis. Thus, our novel results suggest that targeting Rac1 signaling might be a useful way to protect against neutrophil-mediated tissue injury in acute colitis.

  12. Neutrophil kinetics in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Deubelbeiss, K A; Dancey, J T; Harker, L A; Finch, C A

    1975-01-01

    The production of neutrophils in dogs has been estimated from the number of postmitotic neutrophils in the marrow and the transit time of a [3H]-thymidine pulse. The number of postmitotic neutrophils was derived from the erythron iron turnover measurement of erythroid number and the neutrophil-erythroid ratio in bone marrow sections. The mean value for marrow postmitotic neutrophils in dogs was 5.61 plus or minus 0.56 times 10-9 cells/kg. The mean transit time of these neutrophils was calculated to be 82.1 h. A marrow production of 1.65 times 10-9 neutrophils/kg/day was calculated from these data. The turnover of circulating neutrophils was measured by [3H]thymidine and [32P]diisopropylphospho-fluoridate (DF32P) labeling of blood neutrophils. [3H]-Thymidine labeling gave a calculated recovery of 65 per cent, a t1/2 disappearance time of 6.7 h, and a calculated turnover of 1.66 times 10-9 cells/kg/day. Corresponding results with DF32P tagging were 51 per cent, 5.4 h, and 2.89 times 10-9 cells/kg/day. The discrepancy between these two tags persisted in doubly tagged cells and was considered to be due to elution of DF32P. PMID:1120785

  13. Expression and role of adhesion molecule CD18 on bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Nochi, H; Tamoto, K; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1995-01-01

    Expression of CD18 on bovine neutrophils in response to stimulation by zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the effects of monoclonal antibodies (MAB) recognizing CD18 or bovine neutrophil surface antigens (S2G8 and S5F8G10) on adherence, chemotactic responses and phagocytosis of bovine neutrophils were evaluated. CD18 expression of neutrophils was increased after ZAS and PMA treatment by 12.2 and 54.2% respectively, and were significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) different from those of untreated neutrophils. CD18 expression by neutrophils from a Holstein-Friesian heifer affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency was within negative controls when stimulated by ZAS and PMA. Adherence, chemotactic responses, and phagocytosis were significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in neutrophils continuously treated with anti-CD18 MAB (MHM 23). Adherence was also significantly decreased in anti-CD18 pretreated neutrophils. Significant (p < 0.01) differences of chemotactic responses and phagocytosis of neutrophils were found between neutrophils pretreated and continuously treated with anti-CD18 MAB (MHM 23). Monoclonal antibodies to other surface antigens did not significantly alter neutrophil adherence, chemotaxis or phagocytosis. This study demonstrated that CD18 expression on bovine neutrophils is increased significantly by stimulation with ZAS and PMA and that the adhesion molecule CD18 plays an important role in adhesion-related functions. PMID:7704836

  14. Neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment: trying to heal the wound that cannot heal.

    PubMed

    Singel, Kelly L; Segal, Brahm H

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils are the first responders to infection and injury and are critical for antimicrobial host defense. Through the generation of reactive oxidants, activation of granular constituents and neutrophil extracellular traps, neutrophils target microbes and prevent their dissemination. While these pathways are beneficial in the context of trauma and infection, their off-target effects in the context of tumor are variable. Tumor-derived factors have been shown to reprogram the marrow, skewing toward the expansion of myelopoiesis. This can result in stimulation of both neutrophilic leukocytosis and the release of immature granulocytic populations that accumulate in circulation and in the tumor microenvironment. While activated neutrophils have been shown to kill tumor cells, there is growing evidence for neutrophil activation driving tumor progression and metastasis through a number of pathways, including stimulation of thrombosis and angiogenesis, stromal remodeling, and impairment of T cell-dependent anti-tumor immunity. There is also growing appreciation of neutrophil heterogeneity in cancer, with distinct neutrophil populations promoting cancer control or progression. In addition to the effects of tumor on neutrophil responses, anti-neoplastic treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy, and growth factors, can influence neutrophil responses. Future directions for research are expected to result in more mechanistic knowledge of neutrophil biology in the tumor microenvironment that may be exploited as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27558344

  15. Software Engineering Improvement Activities/Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    bd Systems personnel accomplished the technical responsibilities for this reporting period, as planned. A close working relationship was maintained with personnel of the MSFC Avionics Department Software Group (ED14). Work accomplishments included development, evaluation, and enhancement of a software cost model, performing literature search and evaluation of software tools available for code analysis and requirements analysis, and participating in other relevant software engineering activities. Monthly reports were submitted. This support was provided to the Flight Software Group/ED 1 4 in accomplishing the software engineering improvement engineering activities of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Software Engineering Improvement Plan.

  16. Constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazil, Timothy J.; Dixon, Padraic M.; Haslett, Christopher; Murray, Joanna; McGorum, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils, including assessment of factors that potentially modulate neutrophil survival through alteration of the rate of constitutive apoptosis. Cells underwent spontaneous time-dependent constitutive apoptosis when aged in culture for up to 36 h, developing the structural and functional features of apoptosis observed in many cell types, including human neutrophils. Neutrophils undergoing apoptosis also had diminished zymosan activated serum (ZAS)-stimulated chemiluminescence, but maintained responsiveness to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The constitutive rate of equine neutrophil apoptosis was promoted by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor α and phagocytosis of opsonised ovine erythrocytes, while it was inhibited by dexamethasone and ZAS (a source of C5a). Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, platelet activating factor and PMA had no demonstrable effect on equine neutrophil apoptosis. There was a difference between equine and human neutrophil apoptosis in response to LPS and the time-dependence of the response to dexamethasone. PMID:25239298

  17. Review of the neutrophil response to Bordetella pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Eby, Joshua C; Hoffman, Casandra L; Gonyar, Laura A; Hewlett, Erik L

    2015-12-01

    The nature and timing of the neutrophil response to infection with Bordetella pertussis is influenced by multiple virulence factors expressed by the bacterium. After inoculation of the host airway, the recruitment of neutrophils signaled by B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is suppressed by pertussis toxin (PTX). Over the next week, the combined activities of PTX, LOS and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) result in production of cytokines that generate an IL-17 response, promoting neutrophil recruitment which peaks at 10-14 days after inoculation in mice. Arriving at the site of infection, neutrophils encounter the powerful local inhibitory activity of ACT, in conjunction with filamentous hemagglutinin. With the help of antibodies, neutrophils contribute to clearance of B. pertussis, but only after 28-35 days in a naïve mouse. Studies of the lasting, antigen-specific IL-17 response to infection in mice and baboons has led to progress in vaccine development and understanding of pathogenesis. Questions remain about the mediators that coordinate neutrophil recruitment and the mechanisms by which neutrophils overcome B. pertussis virulence factors.

  18. Intracellular demonstration of active TGFbeta1 in B cells and plasma cells of autoimmune mice. IgG-bound TGFbeta1 suppresses neutrophil function and host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Caver, T E; O'Sullivan, F X; Gold, L I; Gresham, H D

    1996-01-01

    Infection remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with SLE. To investigate this, previously we assessed the host defense status of autoimmune MRL/lpr mice and found that elaboration of active TGFbeta suppressed neutrophil function and decreased survival in response to Staphylococcus aureus infection. The purpose of the present work was to elucidate the molecular form and the cellular source of the active TGFbeta involved. Here, we report for the first time that TGFbeta1 is found in the active form inside B cells and plasma cells and that it circulates in the plasma complexed with IgG in two murine models of systemic autoimmunity and in some patients with SLE. IgG-bound active TGFbeta1 is many times more potent than uncomplexed active TGFbeta1 for suppression of neutrophil function in vitro and host defense against S. aureus infection in vivo. These data indicate that TGFbeta1 is in the active form inside B cells and plasma cells, that the formation of a complex of IgG and active TGFbeta1 is greatly accelerated in autoimmunity, and that this complex is extremely potent for suppression of PMN function and host defense against bacterial infection. PMID:8958212

  19. Evaluating SPP/APR Improvement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to assist State Education Agency (SEA) and Lead Agency (LA) staff and technical assistance providers in designing a meaningful evaluation for the State Performance Plan (SPP)/Annual Performance Report (APR) improvement activities. It provides: (1) information about the relevance of evaluation in the context of improvement…

  20. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  1. Activation of superoxide formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils by the synthetic lipopeptide Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4. Involvement of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins and synergism with chemotactic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, R; Schultz, G; Richter-Freund, M; Metzger, J; Wiesmüller, K H; Jung, G; Bessler, W G; Hauschildt, S

    1990-01-01

    Upon exposure to the bacterial chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe, human neutrophils release lysozyme and generate superoxide anions (O2.-). The synthetic lipoamino acid N-palmitoyl-S-[2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl]-(R)-cysteine (Pam3Cys), which is derived from the N-terminus of bacterial lipoprotein, when attached to Ser-(Lys)4 [giving Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4], activated O2.- formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils with an effectiveness amounting to about 15% of that of fMet-Leu-Phe. Palmitic acid, muramyl dipeptide, lipopolysaccharide and the lipopeptides Pam3Cys-Ala-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser, Pam3Cys-OMe and Pam3Cys-OH did not activate O2.- formation. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) and functionally uncouples formyl peptide receptors from G-proteins, prevented activation of O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and inhibited Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4-induced O2.- formation by 85%. Lipopeptide-induced exocytosis was pertussis-toxin-insensitive. O2.- formation induced by Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 and fMet-Leu-Phe was enhanced by cytochalasin B, by a phorbol ester and by a diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor. Addition of activators of adenylate cyclase and removal of extracellular Ca2+ inhibited O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 to different extents. Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 synergistically enhanced fMet-Leu-Phe-induced O2.- formation and primed neutrophils to respond to the chemotactic peptide at non-stimulatory concentrations. Our data suggest the following. (1) Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 activates neutrophils through G-proteins, involving pertussis-toxin-sensitive and -insensitive processes. (2) The signal transduction pathways activated by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 are similar but not identical. (3) In inflammatory processes, bacterial lipoproteins and chemotactic peptides may interact synergistically to activate O2.- formation, leading to enhanced bactericidal activity. PMID:2160237

  2. NKT cells mediate the recruitment of neutrophils by stimulating epithelial chemokine secretion during colitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyu; Liu, Ronghua; Lu, Zhou; Liu, Jiajing; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-05-27

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a kind of inflammatory bowel diseases characterized by chronic inflammation and ulcer in colon, and UC patients have increased risk of getting colorectal cancer. NKT cells are cells that express both NK cell markers and semi-invariant CD1d-restricted TCRs, can regulate immune responses via secreting a variety of cytokines upon activation. In our research, we found that the NKT cell-deficient CD1d(-/-) mice had relieved colitis in the DSS-induced colitis model. Further investigations revealed that the colon of CD1d(-/-) mice expressed less neutrophil-attracting chemokine CXCL 1, 2 and 3, and had decreased neutrophil infiltration. Infiltrated neutrophils also produced less reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TNF-α, indicating they may cause less epithelial damage. In addition, colitis-associated colorectal cancer was also relieved in CD1d(-/-) mice. During colitis, NKT cells strongly expressed TNF-α, which could stimulate CXCL 1, 2, 3 expressions by the epithelium. In conclusion, NKT cells can regulate colitis via the NKT cell-epithelium-neutrophil axis. Targeting this mechanism may help to improve the therapy of UC and prevent colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27063801

  3. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase destruction by ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanker, J.; Giammara, B.; Strauss, G.

    1988-01-01

    The peroxidase activity of enriched leukocyte preparations on coverslips was determined cytochemically with a newly developed method. The techniques utilizes diaminobenzidine medium and cupric nitrate intensification and is suitable for analysis with light microscopy, SEM, and TEM. Blood specimens from control individuals were studied with and without in vitro UV irradiation and compared with those from psoriasis patients exposed therapeutically to various types of UV in phototherapy. All UV irradiated samples showed diminished neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MP) activity although that of the principal eosinophil peroxidase was unaffected. The SEMs supported the contention that decreased neutrophil MP activity might be related to UV induced degranulation. It is believed to be possible, eventually, to equate the observed MP degranulation effect after UV irradiation with diminished ability to fight bacterial infections.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects.

    PubMed

    Mariano, F S; Campanelli, A P; Nociti Jr, F H; Mattos-Graner, R O; Gonçalves, R B

    2012-11-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS), Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS). qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  5. Defensins Impair Phagocytic Killing by Neutrophils in Biomaterial-Related Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S. S.; Heine, R. P.; Simmons, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    The implantation of foreign material carries a risk of infection which frequently is resistant to all treatment short of removing the implant. We have previously shown that these materials activate neutrophils by contact, leading to production of oxygen free radicals accompanied by release of granule products. Such activation further results in depletion of local host defenses, including the capacity of biomaterial-activated neutrophils to kill bacteria. Among the granule products released from neutrophils are small cationic antibacterial peptides (human neutrophil peptides [HNP]) known as defensins. Here we tested the hypothesis that defensins, released from activated neutrophils onto the surface of biomaterials, might play a role in the deactivation of subsequent neutrophil populations. Incubation of neutrophils with purified HNP resulted in a dose-related impairment of stimulus-induced oxygen radical production and of phagocytic killing. Furthermore, fresh neutrophils added to biomaterial-associated neutrophils exhibited impaired phagocytic killing. This impairment could be abrogated by antibody to HNP but not by an irrelevant antibody. Taken together, these observations support the idea that neutrophils activated at a material surface can create, by means of HNP release, an environment hostile to their microbicidal function and that of their infiltrating brethren. PMID:10084997

  6. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein induces release of histamine and interleukin-6 through G protein-mediated MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways in HMC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Che; Kuo, Ting-Yu; Hong, Zhi-Wei; Yeh, Ying-Chieh; Shih, Kuo-Shun; Du, Shin-Yi; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) activates several innate leukocytes including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells. It has been reported that HP-NAP induces degranulation and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion of rat peritoneal mast cells. However, the molecular mechanism is not very clear. Here, we show that HP-NAP activates human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1) cells to secrete histamine and IL-6. The secretion depends on pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive heterotrimeric G proteins but not on Toll-like receptor 2. Moreover, HP-NAP induces PTX-sensitive G protein-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and Akt in HMC-1 cells. Inhibition of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) suppresses HP-NAP-induced release of histamine and IL-6 from HMC-1 cells. Thus, the activation of HMC-1 cells by HP-NAP is through Gi-linked G protein-coupled receptor-mediated MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  7. Functional heterogeneity and differential priming of circulating neutrophils in human experimental endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Janesh; Ramakers, Bart P; Kamp, Vera M; Loi, Adele Lo Tam; Lam, Siu W; Hietbrink, Falco; Leenen, Luke P; Tool, Anton T; Pickkers, Peter; Koenderman, Leo

    2010-07-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in host defense. However, deregulation of neutrophils contributes to tissue damage in severe systemic inflammation. In contrast to complications mediated by an overactive neutrophil compartment, severe systemic inflammation is a risk factor for development of immune suppression and as a result, infectious complications. The role of neutrophils in this clinical paradox is poorly understood, and in this study, we tested whether this paradox could be explained by distinct neutrophil subsets and their functionality. We studied the circulating neutrophil compartment immediately after induction of systemic inflammation by administering 2 ng/kg Escherichia coli LPS i.v. to healthy volunteers. Neutrophils were phenotyped by expression of membrane receptors visualized by flow cytometry, capacity to interact with fluorescently labeled microbes, and activation of the NADPH-oxidase by oxidation of Amplex Red and dihydrorhodamine. After induction of systemic inflammation, expression of membrane receptors on neutrophils, such as CXCR1 and -2 (IL-8Rs), C5aR, FcgammaRII, and TLR4, was decreased. Neutrophils were also refractory to fMLF-induced up-regulation of membrane receptors, and suppression of antimicrobial function was shown by decreased interaction with Staphylococcus epidermis. Simultaneously, activation of circulating neutrophils was demonstrated by a threefold increase in release of ROS. The paradoxical phenotype can be explained by the selective priming of the respiratory burst. In contrast, newly released, CD16(dim) banded neutrophils display decreased antimicrobial function. We conclude that systemic inflammation leads to a functionally heterogeneous neutrophil compartment, in which newly released refractory neutrophils can cause susceptibility to infections, and activated, differentiated neutrophils can mediate tissue damage. PMID:20400675

  8. Neutrophil function in an experimental model of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vedanarayanan, V V; Kaplan, B S; Fong, J S

    1987-03-01

    To understand the role of neutrophil leukocytosis in hemolytic uremic syndrome, we studied the changes in neutrophil function in the modified generalized Shwartzman reaction in rabbits. This model resembles hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with endotoxemia. At the end of an endotoxin infusion, we observed leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and a decrease in hematocrit associated with schistocytosis. Plasma B-glucuronidase levels increased and this was associated with a decrease in neutrophil content of the enzyme. The chemotactic index and neutrophil aggregation to zymosan-activated serum were impaired compared to controls. The neutrophil procoagulant content increased after endotoxin infusion. The serum creatinine concentration and proteinuria increased in the endotoxin-treated animals. The changes returned to normal by 48 h. Renal cortical malondialdehyde, a reflection of lipid peroxidation, was higher in the endotoxin-treated animals than in the controls. We have shown enzyme release by neutrophils, impairment of chemotaxis and aggregation, increased procoagulant content in neutrophils, and evidence of lipid peroxidation in renal cortical tissue in this model. These observations raise the possibility that leukocytes may have a role in the pathogenesis of the hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:3550673

  9. Cutting Edge: Developmental Regulation of IFN-γ Production by Mouse Neutrophil Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Sturge, Carolyn R; Burger, Elise; Raetz, Megan; Hooper, Lora V; Yarovinsky, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophils are an emerging cellular source of IFN-γ, a key cytokine that mediates host defense to intracellular pathogens. Production of IFN-γ by neutrophils, in contrast to lymphoid cells, is TLR- and IL-12-independent and the events associated with IFN-γ production by neutrophils are not understood. In this study, we show that mouse neutrophils express IFN-γ during their lineage development in the bone marrow niche at the promyelocyte stage independently of microbes. IFN-γ accumulates in primary neutrophilic granules and is released upon induction of degranulation. The developmental mechanism of IFN-γ production in neutrophils arms the innate immune cells prior to infection and assures the potential for rapid release of IFN-γ upon neutrophil activation, the first step during responses to many microbial infections. PMID:26026057

  10. Increased neutrophil adherence and adhesion molecule mRNA expression in endothelial cells during selenium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maddox, J F; Aherne, K M; Reddy, C C; Sordillo, L M

    1999-05-01

    Leukocyte aggregation and activation on endothelial cells (EC) are important preliminary events in leukocyte migration into tissue and subsequent inflammation. Thus, an increase in leukocyte adherence has the potential to affect inflammatory disease outcome. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and plays an important role in the maintenance of the redox state of a cell. Se supplementation in the bovine has been shown to improve the outcome of acute mastitis caused by coliform bacteria, in part by enhancing the speed of neutrophil migration into the affected mammary gland. However, the mechanisms by which Se modulates neutrophil migration have not been elucidated. Therefore, an in vitro model of Se deficiency in primary bovine mammary artery EC was used to examine the impact of Se status on the adhesive properties of EC. The effect of Se on functional activities was examined by measuring neutrophil adherence to Se-deficient and Se-supplemented EC. Se-deficient EC showed significantly enhanced neutrophil adherence when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) for 4 or 24 h, interleukin-1 for 12 h, or H2O2 for 20 min (P < 0.05). To determine the mechanisms underlying these changes in neutrophil adherence, the expression of EC adhesion molecules, ICAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin were examined at the molecular level by a competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results revealed higher mRNA expression for E-selectin and ICAM-1 in Se-deficient EC stimulated with TNF-alpha for 3 and 6 h, and greater expression of P-selectin mRNA in Se-supplemented EC with 3-h TNF-alpha stimulation. These studies provide new information to establish the role of Se nutrition in the initiation of leukocyte adherence to endothelium. PMID:10331495

  11. Fatty acids as modulators of neutrophil recruitment, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Hosana G; Takeo Sato, Fabio; Curi, Rui; Vinolo, Marco A R

    2016-08-15

    Neutrophils are well-known to act in the destruction of invading microorganisms. They have also been implicated in the activation of other immune cells including B- and T-lymphocytes and in the resolution of inflammation and tissue regeneration. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the circulation from where they migrate to tissues to perform their effector functions. Neutrophils are in constant contact with fatty acids that can modulate their function, activation and fate (survival or cell death) through different mechanisms. In this review, the effects of fatty acids pertaining to five classes, namely, long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs), short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and omega-3 (n-3), omega-6 (n-6) and omega-9 (n-9) unsaturated fatty acids, on neutrophils and the relevance of these effects for disease development are discussed.

  12. Platelet-neutrophil interactions during hemodialysis: a proposed biocompatibility approach.

    PubMed

    Stuard, S; Bonomini, M; Settefrati, N; Albertazzi, A

    1998-02-01

    membrane, ROS production by CD62P- neutrophils showed no significant change at any time point during HD. The results of the present study indicate that interactions between platelets and neutrophils can mediate some pathophysiological abnormalities associated with hemodialysis treatment. Our data show that cellulose diacetate, a modified cellulosic membrane, exhibits a biocompatibility profile in terms of platelet-neutrophil interactions improved as compared to the parent cellulose membrane and comparable to that of some synthetic membranes. Our data also show that there is considerable variability in the biocompatibility of synthetic membranes. Though cellulosic membranes are generally considered as being less biocompatible than synthetic membranes, our results indicate that classification of membranes by biocompatibility is more complex than a simple division into cellulosic and synthetic membranes, especially with the advent of modified cellulosic membranes.

  13. Cytokine-induced neutrophil-derived interleukin-8.

    PubMed Central

    Strieter, R. M.; Kasahara, K.; Allen, R. M.; Standiford, T. J.; Rolfe, M. W.; Becker, F. S.; Chensue, S. W.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    During acute inflammation, the first line of cellular response for host defense is the neutrophil. In addition to the historic role of the neutrophil as a phagocyte, recent studies have identified this cell as an important source of a number of cytokines. In this study, we provide evidence that the neutrophil is a significant source of interleukin-8 (IL-8). Neutrophils freshly isolated from whole blood were not found to constitutively express IL-8 mRNA. In contrast, when these leukocytes were cultured on plastic they were activated, leading to the significant expression of de novo steady-state levels of IL-8 mRNA. In addition, when neutrophils were treated with cycloheximide, there was evidence for "superinduction" of steady-state levels of IL-8 mRNA and inhibition of antigenic IL-8 production. Neutrophils were subsequently stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or interleukin-1-beta and were found to express IL-8 mRNA and antigen in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, neutrophils stimulated with traditional chemotactic/activating factors, such as the split product of the fifth component of complement (C5a), formylmethionyleucylphenylalanine (fMLP), and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in a dose-dependent manner did not produce significant antigenic IL-8, as compared with unstimulated controls. In contrast, when neutrophils were exposed to either of these neutrophil agonists in the presence of LPS, the production of antigenic IL-8 was significantly elevated, as compared with either of the stimuli alone, suggesting a synergistic response. These data would suggest that the neutrophil can no longer be viewed as only a phagocyte or warehouse for proteolytic enzymes, but is a pivotal effector cell that is able to respond to mediators in its environment and generate cytokines. This latter neutrophil response may be important for either the elicitation of additional neutrophils or to orchestrate the conventional immune response at

  14. Neutrophil recruitment to lymph nodes limits local humoral response to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kamenyeva, Olena; Boularan, Cedric; Kabat, Juraj; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Cicala, Claudia; Yeh, Anthony J; Chan, June L; Periasamy, Saravanan; Otto, Michael; Kehrl, John H

    2015-04-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of host defense against bacterial pathogens. They are rapidly mobilized to sites of infection where they help marshal host defenses and remove bacteria by phagocytosis. While splenic neutrophils promote marginal zone B cell antibody production in response to administered T cell independent antigens, whether neutrophils shape humoral immunity in other lymphoid organs is controversial. Here we investigate the neutrophil influx following the local injection of Staphylococcus aureus adjacent to the inguinal lymph node and determine neutrophil impact on the lymph node humoral response. Using intravital microscopy we show that local immunization or infection recruits neutrophils from the blood to lymph nodes in waves. The second wave occurs temporally with neutrophils mobilized from the bone marrow. Within lymph nodes neutrophils infiltrate the medulla and interfollicular areas, but avoid crossing follicle borders. In vivo neutrophils form transient and long-lived interactions with B cells and plasma cells, and their depletion augments production of antigen-specific IgG and IgM in the lymph node. In vitro activated neutrophils establish synapse- and nanotube-like interactions with B cells and reduce B cell IgM production in a TGF-β1 dependent manner. Our data reveal that neutrophils mobilized from the bone marrow in response to a local bacterial challenge dampen the early humoral response in the lymph node. PMID:25884622

  15. Neutrophil secondary necrosis is induced by LL-37 derived from cathelicidin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifang; Cherryholmes, Gregory; Shively, John E

    2008-09-01

    Neutrophils represent the most common granulocyte subtype present in blood. The short half-life of circulating neutrophils is regulated by spontaneous apoptosis, and tissue infiltrating neutrophils die by apoptosis and secondary necrosis. The mechanism of neutrophil apoptosis has been the subject of many studies; however, the mechanism of neutrophil secondary necrosis is less clear. Human cathelicidin cationic peptide 18, proteolytically processed to its active form, LL-37, is secreted by neutrophils and epithelial cells and shown to have effects in addition to bacterial lysis. We demonstrate here that LL-37 affects neutrophil lifespan by the pathway of secondary necrosis, rapidly converting annexin V-positive (AV(+)), propidium iodide-negative (PI(-); apoptotic) cells into PI(+) (necrotic) cells with the release of IL-8, IL-1R antagonist, ATP, and intact granules. The effects of LL-37 on apoptotic neutrophils are neither energy-dependent nor affected by pretreatment with G-CSF, GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, and LPS and are partially inhibited by human serum. Moreover, LL-37 decreases CXCR2 expression of AV(-)PI(-) (live) neutrophils, suggesting an effect on the neutrophil response to its chemotactic factors, including IL-8. Thus, the lifespan and inflammatory functions of neutrophils are directly affected by LL-37.

  16. Heterogeneity in Neutrophil Microparticles Reveals Distinct Proteome and Functional Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Norling, Lucy V; Yin, Xiaoke; Hinds, Charles; Haskard, Dorian; Mayr, Manuel; Perretti, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Altered plasma neutrophil microparticle levels have recently been implicated in a number of vascular and inflammatory diseases, yet our understanding of their actions is very limited. Herein, we investigate the proteome of neutrophil microparticles in order to shed light on their biological actions. Stimulation of human neutrophils, either in suspension or adherent to an endothelial monolayer, led to the production of microparticles containing >400 distinct proteins with only 223 being shared by the two subsets. For instance, postadherent microparticles were enriched in alpha-2 macroglobulin and ceruloplasmin, whereas microparticles produced by neutrophils in suspension were abundant in heat shock 70 kDa protein 1. Annexin A1 and lactotransferrin were expressed in both microparticle subsets. We next determined relative abundance of these proteins in three types of human microparticle samples: healthy volunteer plasma, plasma of septic patients and skin blister exudates finding that these proteins were differentially expressed on neutrophil microparticles from these samples reflecting in part the expression profiles we found in vitro. Functional assessment of the neutrophil microparticles subsets demonstrated that in response to direct stimulation neutrophil microparticles produced reactive oxygen species and leukotriene B4 as well as locomoted toward a chemotactic gradient. Finally, we investigated the actions of the two neutrophil microparticles subsets described herein on target cell responses. Microarray analysis with human primary endothelial cells incubated with either microparticle subset revealed a discrete modulation of endothelial cell gene expression profile. These findings demonstrate that neutrophil microparticles are heterogenous and can deliver packaged information propagating the activation status of the parent cell, potentially exerting novel and fundamental roles both under homeostatic and disease conditions. PMID:23660474

  17. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannat, Risat A.; Robbins, Gregory P.; Ricart, Brendon G.; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2010-05-01

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micromachined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the KD of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against β2-integrins leads to a significant reduction, but not an elimination, of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation.

  18. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Jannat, Risat A.; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micro-machined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the KD of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against β2-integrins leads to a significant reduction but not an elimination of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation. PMID:20473350

  19. Neutrophil localization in acute and chronic experimental abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, D.M.; Bettin, K.M.; Gerding, D.N.

    1987-04-01

    Abdominal abscesses are associated with a high mortality, and usually require surgical drainage for cure. A potential mechanism explaining the inability of the host to clear this infection may be in part a result of the inability of the neutrophil to localize at the site of an established infection. To study this question, either acute (4 hours old) or chronic (2 weeks old) abscesses caused by Staphylococcus aureus were created in perforated capsules implanted in the peritoneal cavity of rabbits. Homologous neutrophils were obtained from donor rabbits 4 hours after peritoneal glycogen stimulation and labeled with indium 111 oxine. Only 0.71% of injected /sup 111/In-labeled neutrophils localized in the chronic abscesses, compared with 1.77% in acute abscesses (P less than or equal to 0.01). Animals with chronic infections had a lower intravascular recovery of injected neutrophils (P less than 0.002). Failure of neutrophil localization was not associated with less chemotactic activity within the abscess, as measured by a chemotaxis-under-agarose assay, or caused by a barrier surrounding the abscess as detected by radionuclide imaging. Only 0.07% of injected neutrophils localized into acute abdominal abscesses in animals with a concomitant chronic subcutaneous abscess. These chronically infected animals also demonstrated a low peak intravascular recovery of injected neutrophils when compared with animals with only an acute infection (P less than 0.002). These data reveal that neutrophils localize to abscesses poorly in animals with chronic infections. The mechanism is possibly related to a systemic factor(s) associated with a lower intravascular recovery of injected neutrophils in chronically infected animals.

  20. STK11/LKB1 Deficiency Promotes Neutrophil Recruitment and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production to Suppress T-cell Activity in the Lung Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Aref, Amir R; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Liu, Yan; Awad, Mark M; Denning, Warren L; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin R; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Soucheray, Margaret; Thai, Tran; Asahina, Hajime; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Altabef, Abigail; Cavanaugh, Jillian D; Rhee, Kevin; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Haikuo; Fecci, Peter E; Shimamura, Takeshi; Hellmann, Matthew D; Heymach, John V; Hodi, F Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J; Barbie, David A; Dranoff, Glenn; Hammerman, Peter S; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-03-01

    STK11/LKB1 is among the most commonly inactivated tumor suppressors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in tumors harboring KRAS mutations. Many oncogenes promote immune escape, undermining the effectiveness of immunotherapies, but it is unclear whether the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, such as STK11/LKB1, exerts similar effects. In this study, we investigated the consequences of STK11/LKB1 loss on the immune microenvironment in a mouse model of KRAS-driven NSCLC. Genetic ablation of STK11/LKB1 resulted in accumulation of neutrophils with T-cell-suppressive effects, along with a corresponding increase in the expression of T-cell exhaustion markers and tumor-promoting cytokines. The number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was also reduced in LKB1-deficient mouse and human tumors. Furthermore, STK11/LKB1-inactivating mutations were associated with reduced expression of PD-1 ligand PD-L1 in mouse and patient tumors as well as in tumor-derived cell lines. Consistent with these results, PD-1-targeting antibodies were ineffective against Lkb1-deficient tumors. In contrast, treating Lkb1-deficient mice with an IL6-neutralizing antibody or a neutrophil-depleting antibody yielded therapeutic benefits associated with reduced neutrophil accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Our findings illustrate how tumor suppressor mutations can modulate the immune milieu of the tumor microenvironment, and they offer specific implications for addressing STK11/LKB1-mutated tumors with PD-1-targeting antibody therapies. PMID:26833127

  1. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Vieyra, Ricarda; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque) creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:27019855

  2. Intramuscular administration of a synthetic CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide modulates functional responses of neutrophils of neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Noah D; Bourquin, Jessica R; Bordin, Angela I; Kuskie, Kyle R; Brake, Courtney N; Weaver, Kaytee B; Liu, Mei; Felippe, M Julia B; Kogut, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in protecting against infection. Foals have age-dependent deficiencies in neutrophil function that may contribute to their predisposition to infection. Thus, we investigated the ability of a CpG-ODN formulated with Emulsigen to modulate functional responses of neutrophils in neonatal foals. Eighteen foals were randomly assigned to receive either a CpG-ODN with Emulsigen (N = 9) or saline intramuscularly at ages 1 and 7 days. At ages 1, 3, 9, 14, and 28, blood was collected and neutrophils were isolated from each foal. Neutrophils were assessed for basal and Rhodococcus equi-stimulated mRNA expression of the cytokines interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, and IL-8 using real-time PCR, degranulation by quantifying the amount of β-D glucuronidase activity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation using flow cytometry. In vivo administration of the CpG-ODN formulation on days 1 and 7 resulted in significantly (P<0.05) increased IFN-γ mRNA expression by foal neutrophils on days 3, 9, and 14. Degranulation was significantly (P<0.05) lower for foals in the CpG-ODN-treated group than the control group at days 3 and 14, but not at other days. No effect of treatment on ROS generation was detected. These results indicate that CpG-ODN administration to foals might improve innate and adaptive immune responses that could protect foals against infectious diseases and possibly improve responses to vaccination. PMID:25333660

  3. Intramuscular Administration of a Synthetic CpG-Oligodeoxynucleotide Modulates Functional Responses of Neutrophils of Neonatal Foals

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Noah D.; Bourquin, Jessica R.; Bordin, Angela I.; Kuskie, Kyle R.; Brake, Courtney N.; Weaver, Kaytee B.; Liu, Mei; Felippe, M. Julia B.; Kogut, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in protecting against infection. Foals have age-dependent deficiencies in neutrophil function that may contribute to their predisposition to infection. Thus, we investigated the ability of a CpG-ODN formulated with Emulsigen to modulate functional responses of neutrophils in neonatal foals. Eighteen foals were randomly assigned to receive either a CpG-ODN with Emulsigen (N = 9) or saline intramuscularly at ages 1 and 7 days. At ages 1, 3, 9, 14, and 28, blood was collected and neutrophils were isolated from each foal. Neutrophils were assessed for basal and Rhodococcus equi-stimulated mRNA expression of the cytokines interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, and IL-8 using real-time PCR, degranulation by quantifying the amount of β-D glucuronidase activity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation using flow cytometry. In vivo administration of the CpG-ODN formulation on days 1 and 7 resulted in significantly (P<0.05) increased IFN-γ mRNA expression by foal neutrophils on days 3, 9, and 14. Degranulation was significantly (P<0.05) lower for foals in the CpG-ODN-treated group than the control group at days 3 and 14, but not at other days. No effect of treatment on ROS generation was detected. These results indicate that CpG-ODN administration to foals might improve innate and adaptive immune responses that could protect foals against infectious diseases and possibly improve responses to vaccination. PMID:25333660

  4. Neutrophils promote Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and cognitive decline via LFA-1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Zenaro, Elena; Pietronigro, Enrica; Della Bianca, Vittorina; Piacentino, Gennj; Marongiu, Laura; Budui, Simona; Turano, Ermanna; Rossi, Barbara; Angiari, Stefano; Dusi, Silvia; Montresor, Alessio; Carlucci, Tommaso; Nanì, Sara; Tosadori, Gabriele; Calciano, Lucia; Catalucci, Daniele; Berton, Giorgio; Bonetti, Bruno; Constantin, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, and innate immune cells have been shown to contribute to disease pathogenesis. In two transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease (5xFAD and 3xTg-AD mice), neutrophils extravasated and were present in areas with amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits, where they released neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and IL-17. Aβ42 peptide triggered the LFA-1 integrin high-affinity state and rapid neutrophil adhesion to integrin ligands. In vivo, LFA-1 integrin controlled neutrophil extravasation into the CNS and intraparenchymal motility. In transgenic Alzheimer's disease models, neutrophil depletion or inhibition of neutrophil trafficking via LFA-1 blockade reduced Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology and improved memory in mice already showing cognitive dysfunction. Temporary depletion of neutrophils for 1 month at early stages of disease led to sustained improvements in memory. Transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice lacking LFA-1 were protected from cognitive decline and had reduced gliosis. In humans with Alzheimer's disease, neutrophils adhered to and spread inside brain venules and were present in the parenchyma, along with NETs. Our results demonstrate that neutrophils contribute to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and cognitive impairment and suggest that the inhibition of neutrophil trafficking may be beneficial in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Neutrophils Interact with Adenovirus Vectors via Fc Receptors and Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Matthew J.; Zaiss, Anne K.; Muruve, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophils are effectors of the innate immune response to adenovirus vectors. Following the systemic administration of Cy2-labeled AdLuc in mice, flow cytometry and PCR analysis of liver leukocytes revealed that 25% of recruited neutrophils interacted with adenovirus vectors. In vitro, flow cytometry of human neutrophils incubated with Cy2-labeled AdLuc also demonstrated a significant interaction with adenovirus vectors. Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed vector internalization by neutrophils. The AdLuc-neutrophil interaction reduced vector transduction efficiency by more than 50% in coincubation assays in epithelium-derived cells. Adenovirus vector uptake by neutrophils occurred independently of coxsackievirus adenovirus receptor (CAR) and capsid RGD motifs, since neutrophils do not express CAR and uptake of the RGD-deleted vector AdL.PB* was similar to that of AdLuc. Furthermore, both AdLuc and AdL.PB* activated neutrophils and induced similar degrees of L-selectin shedding. Neutrophil uptake of AdLuc was dependent on the presence of complement and antibodies, since the interaction between AdLuc and neutrophils was significantly reduced when they were incubated in immunoglobulin G-depleted or heat-inactivated human serum. Blocking of complement receptor 1 (CD35) but not complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18) significantly reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc. Blocking of FcγRI (CD64), FcγRII (CD32), and FcγRIII (CD16) individually or together also reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc, although less than blocking of CD35 alone. Combined CR1 and Fc receptor blockade synergistically inhibited neutrophil-AdLuc interactions close to baseline. These results demonstrate opsonin-dependent adenovirus vector interactions with neutrophils and their corresponding receptors. PMID:16282462

  6. Granzyme B-expressing neutrophils correlate with bacterial load in granulomas from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Joshua T.; Maiello, Pauline; Sun, Tao; Via, Laura E.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The role of neutrophils in tuberculosis (TB), and whether neutrophils express granzyme B (grzB), a pro-apoptotic enzyme associated with cytotoxic T cells, is controversial. We examined neutrophils in peripheral blood (PB) and lung granulomas of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cynomolgus macaques and humans to determine whether mycobacterial products or pro-inflammatory factors induce neutrophil grzB expression. We found large numbers of grzB-expressing neutrophils in macaque and human granulomas and these cells contained more grzB+ granules than T cells. Higher neutrophil, but not T cell, grzB expression correlated with increased bacterial load. Although unstimulated PB neutrophils lacked grzB expression, grzB expression increased upon exposure to M. tuberculosis bacilli, M. tuberculosis culture filtrate protein or lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli. Perforin is required for granzyme-mediated cytotoxicity by T cells, but was not observed in PB or granuloma neutrophils. Nonetheless, stimulated PB neutrophils secreted grzB as determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assays. Purified grzB was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic, suggesting secreted neutrophil grzB acts on extracellular targets, potentially enhancing neutrophil migration through extracellular matrix and regulating apoptosis or activation in other cell types. These data indicate mycobacterial products and the pro-inflammatory environment of granulomas up-regulates neutrophil grzB expression and suggests a previously unappreciated aspect of neutrophil biology in TB. PMID:25653138

  7. Trans-basement membrane migration of eosinophils induced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils from human peripheral blood in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Fuyumi; Kobayashi, Takehito; Noguchi, Toru; Araki, Ryuichiro; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Soma, Tomoyuki; Nagata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    In the airways of severe asthmatics, an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils is often observed despite high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We previously reported that interleukin-8-stimulated neutrophils induced trans-basement membrane migration (TBM) of eosinophils, suggesting the link between neutrophils and eosinophils. Concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the airway increase in severe asthma. As neutrophils express Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and can release chemoattractants for eosinophils, we investigated whether LPS-stimulated neutrophils modify eosinophil TBM. Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and severe asthmatics. Eosinophil TBM was examined using a modified Boyden's chamber technique. Eosinophils were added to the upper compartment, and neutrophils and LPS were added to the lower compartment. Migrated eosinophils were measured by eosinophil peroxidase assays. LPS-stimulated neutrophils induced eosinophil TBM (about 10-fold increase), although LPS or neutrophils alone did not. A leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist, a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist or an anti-TLR4 antibody decreased eosinophil TBM enhanced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils by almost half. Neutrophils from severe asthmatics induced eosinophil TBM and lower concentrations of LPS augmented neutrophil-induced eosinophil TBM. These results suggest that the combination of neutrophils and LPS leads eosinophils to accumulate in the airways, possibly involved the pathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:27730145

  8. Immunofluorescence and Confocal Microscopy of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Lee-Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid recruitment of neutrophils to sites of infection and their ability to phagocytose and kill microbes is an important aspect of the innate immune response. Challenges associated with imaging of these cells include their short lifespan and small size and the fact that unstimulated cells are nonadherent. In addition, although cytoplasmic granules are plentiful, the abundance of many other organelles is diminished. Here we reprise methods for analysis of resting and activated cells using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, including kinetic analysis of phagosome maturation and degranulation, and detection of intraphagosomal superoxide accumulation. We describe approaches for rapid cell fixation and permeabilization that maximize antigen detection and discuss other variables that also affect data interpretation and image quality (such as cell spreading, degranulation, and phagocytosis). Finally, we show that these methods are also applicable to studies of neutrophil interactions with the extracellular matrix. PMID:24504957

  9. Technical advance: autofluorescence-based sorting: rapid and nonperturbing isolation of ultrapure neutrophils to determine cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Dorward, David A; Lucas, Christopher D; Alessandri, Ana L; Marwick, John A; Rossi, Fiona; Dransfield, Ian; Haslett, Christopher; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Rossi, Adriano G

    2013-07-01

    The technical limitations of isolating neutrophils without contaminating leukocytes, while concurrently minimizing neutrophil activation, is a barrier to determining specific neutrophil functions. We aimed to assess the use of FACS for generating highly pure quiescent neutrophil populations in an antibody-free environment. Peripheral blood human granulocytes and murine bone marrow-derived neutrophils were isolated by discontinuous Percoll gradient and flow-sorted using FSC/SSC profiles and differences in autofluorescence. Postsort purity was assessed by morphological analysis and flow cytometry. Neutrophil activation was measured in unstimulated-unsorted and sorted cells and in response to fMLF, LTB4, and PAF by measuring shape change, CD62L, and CD11b expression; intracellular calcium flux; and chemotaxis. Cytokine production by human neutrophils was also determined. Postsort human neutrophil purity was 99.95% (sem=0.03; n=11; morphological analysis), and 99.68% were CD16(+ve) (sem=0.06; n=11), with similar results achieved for murine neutrophils. Flow sorting did not alter neutrophil activation or chemotaxis, relative to presorted cells, and no differences in response to agonists were observed. Stimulated neutrophils produced IL-1β, although to a lesser degree than CXCL8/IL-8. The exploitation of the difference in autofluorescence between neutrophils and eosinophils by FACS is a quick and effective method for generating highly purified populations for subsequent in vitro study.

  10. Stimulus specific effect of ibuprofen on chemiluminescence of sheep neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tahamont, M.V.; Margiotta, M.; Gee, M.H.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have shown that pretreatment with ibuprofen inhibits free radical release from complement stimulated neutrophils. To further examine the effect of ibuprofen on neutrophil free radical release, they stimulated neutrophils with the synthetic peptide, FMLP, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), or zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP). Pure (>95%), viable (>95%) sheep neutrophils (2 x 10/sup 6/) were placed in HEPES buffer, luminol, drug or vehicle and stimulated in the luminometer with one of the stimuli. The chemiluminescence (CL) response was recorded and the drug treated samples were compared to vehicle treated controls. Ibuprofen had a dose dependent effect on CL in ZAP stimulated neutrophils. At the highest dose (10/sup -2/M) these cells produced only 37 +/- 7% of the CL response observed in the control cells. In contrast, at the same dose, ibuprofen did not significantly attenuate CL seen in FMLP stimulated cells, with these cells producing 79 +/- 7% of the control cells; nor did ibuprofen effect PMA stimulated CL, as these cells produced a CL response that was 85 +/- 8% of the control cells. Ibuprofen appears to have a stimulus specific effect on free radical release in activated neutrophils. It is also apparent that ibuprofen inhibits complement stimulated free radical release by some mechanism independent of its cyclooxygenase inhibitory effect.

  11. [Does temperature in extracorporeal circulation affect neutrophil-endothelium interactions?].

    PubMed

    Menasché, P; Peynet, J; Le Deist, F; Carreno, M P; Haeffner-Cavaillon, N; Dillisse, V; Larivière, J; Piwnica, A; Bloch, G; Tedgui, A

    1995-10-01

    The increasing interest in "warm" aerobic cardioplegia requires a critical reevaluation of the systemic effects of the associated normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). As activated neutrophils seem to be essential mediators of the inflammatory response to CPB via the cytotoxicity of the products that are released during their adhesion to endothelial cells, the authors undertook a study of the influence of temperature on the interaction between the neutrophils and the endothelium in 95 patients undergoing warm (31-33.5 degrees C, n = 49) and cold (26-27 degrees C, n = 46) CPB surgery. Blood sampling was performed before, during and after CPB. The following markers of neutrophil-endocardium interaction were analysed: complement activation (C3a), cytokine production (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukines 1, 6 and 8, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist); endothelial expression of cytokine-dependent [intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)] and cytokine-independent (P-selectin) adhesion molecules (P-selectin); expression of cytokine molecules on the surface of polynuclear neutrophils (CD11a, CD11b, CD11c); and finally, endothelial adhesion and transendothelial migration of neutrophils (interleukin 8 and elastase). The results showed that, irrespective of temperature, CPB was associated with changes strongly suggestive of phenomena of transendothelial adhesion and migration. Moreover, normothermia increased the intensity of the inflammatory response as shown by increased cytokine production, earlier expression of neutrophil adhesion molecules and increased elastase production.

  12. P-selectin promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Martinod, Kimberly; Wong, Siu Ling; Cifuni, Stephen M; Schattner, Mirta; Wagner, Denisa D

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) can be released in the vasculature. In addition to trapping microbes, they promote inflammatory and thrombotic diseases. Considering that P-selectin induces prothrombotic and proinflammatory signaling, we studied the role of this selectin in NET formation. NET formation (NETosis) was induced by thrombin-activated platelets rosetting with neutrophils and was inhibited by anti-P-selectin aptamer or anti-P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) inhibitory antibody but was not induced by platelets from P-selectin(-/-) mice. Moreover, NETosis was also promoted by P-selectin-immunoglobulin fusion protein but not by control immunoglobulin. We isolated neutrophils from mice engineered to overproduce soluble P-selectin (P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) mice). Although the levels of circulating DNA and nucleosomes (indicative of spontaneous NETosis) were normal in these mice, basal neutrophil histone citrullination and presence of P-selectin on circulating neutrophils were elevated. NET formation after stimulation with platelet activating factor, ionomycin, or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was significantly enhanced, indicating that the P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) neutrophils were primed for NETosis. In summary, P-selectin, cellular or soluble, through binding to PSGL-1, promotes NETosis, suggesting that this pathway is a potential therapeutic target for NET-related diseases.

  13. Resistance to P. brasiliensis Experimental Infection of Inbred Mice Is Associated with an Efficient Neutrophil Mobilization and Activation by Mediators of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Felipe Fornias; Fernandes, Gisele Pesquero; Mendes, Ana Carolina Silvério Cerqueira; Bani, Giulia Maria de Alencar Castro; Calich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Burger, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic fungal infection, endemic in Brazil, that leads to severe morbidity and even mortality if not correctly treated. Patients may respond differently to PCM depending on the pattern of the acquired immune response developed. The onset of protective immune response is notably mediated by neutrophils (PMN) that play an important role through directly killing the fungi and also by interacting with other cell types to modulate the acquired protective immune response that may follow. In that way, this study aimed to present and compare different experimental models of PCM (intraperitoneal and subcutaneous) regarding PMN production and maturation inside femoral bone marrow and also PMN infiltration in peritoneal and subcutaneous exudates of resistant and susceptible mice. We also assessed the fungal colony forming units and the levels of soluble inflammatory mediators (LTB4, KC, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-10) inside subcutaneous air-pouches to compare the efficiency of the PMN present at this site in relation to the two main neutrophil functions: initial lysis of the invading pathogen and modulation of the acquired immune response. P. brasiliensis inoculated intraperitoneally was able to disseminate to the bone marrow of susceptible mice, causing a more marked alteration of PMN production and maturation than that observed after resistant mice infection by the same route. Subcutaneous air-pouch inoculation of P. brasiliensis elicited a controlled and limited infection that produced a PMN-rich exudate, thus favoring the study of the interaction between the fungus and the neutrophils. Susceptible mice produced higher numbers of PMN; however, these cells were less effective in killing the fungi. Inflammatory cytokines were more pronounced in resistant mice, which supports their PCM raised resistance. PMID:26819497

  14. Resistance to P. brasiliensis Experimental Infection of Inbred Mice Is Associated with an Efficient Neutrophil Mobilization and Activation by Mediators of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Felipe Fornias; Fernandes, Gisele Pesquero; Mendes, Ana Carolina Silvério Cerqueira; Bani, Giulia Maria de Alencar Castro; Calich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Burger, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic fungal infection, endemic in Brazil, that leads to severe morbidity and even mortality if not correctly treated. Patients may respond differently to PCM depending on the pattern of the acquired immune response developed. The onset of protective immune response is notably mediated by neutrophils (PMN) that play an important role through directly killing the fungi and also by interacting with other cell types to modulate the acquired protective immune response that may follow. In that way, this study aimed to present and compare different experimental models of PCM (intraperitoneal and subcutaneous) regarding PMN production and maturation inside femoral bone marrow and also PMN infiltration in peritoneal and subcutaneous exudates of resistant and susceptible mice. We also assessed the fungal colony forming units and the levels of soluble inflammatory mediators (LTB4, KC, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-10) inside subcutaneous air-pouches to compare the efficiency of the PMN present at this site in relation to the two main neutrophil functions: initial lysis of the invading pathogen and modulation of the acquired immune response. P. brasiliensis inoculated intraperitoneally was able to disseminate to the bone marrow of susceptible mice, causing a more marked alteration of PMN production and maturation than that observed after resistant mice infection by the same route. Subcutaneous air-pouch inoculation of P. brasiliensis elicited a controlled and limited infection that produced a PMN-rich exudate, thus favoring the study of the interaction between the fungus and the neutrophils. Susceptible mice produced higher numbers of PMN; however, these cells were less effective in killing the fungi. Inflammatory cytokines were more pronounced in resistant mice, which supports their PCM raised resistance. PMID:26819497

  15. Clinical evaluation of proinflammatory cytokine inhibitors (sTNFR I, sTNFR II, IL-1 ra), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-13) and activation of neutrophils after burn-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sikora, J P; Chlebna-Sokół, D; Andrzejewska, E; Chrul, S; Polakowska, E; Wysocka, A; Sikora, A

    2008-08-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the involvement of sTNFR I, sTNFR II, IL-1 ra, IL-10, IL-13 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) development in severely burned children and at assessing the prognostic value of the immunological markers studied. The study comprised 37 patients (17 burned children and 20 controls). Serum levels of the markers determined by means of ELISA and respiratory burst of neutrophils as well as p55 and p75 tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) receptor expression using flow cytometry were evaluated twice. The burned children presented significantly higher levels of IL-10 and cytokine inhibitors within the first 6-24 h after injury compared with controls (P < 0.05). The decreased oxygen metabolism of neutrophils and increased TNF-alpha receptor expression were found on admission. Moreover, a significant decrease in initially high sTNFR I, sTNFR II, IL-1 ra, IL-10, IL-13 concentrations (P < 0.05) and reduced expression of TNF-alpha receptors (P < 0.05) were observed after burn therapy, whereas ROS generation evidently augmented (P < 0.05). Four of our children who developed hypovolaemic shock revealed a significantly lower ROS generation and higher concentrations of soluble TNF-alpha receptors and IL-1 ra together with IL-10, IL-13 compared with children with good outcome (P < 0.05). Our results revealed the involvement of both ROS, soluble TNF-alpha receptors and IL-1 ra in the development of SIRS in burned children; their monitoring allows for an assessment of the systemic inflammatory reaction activity. The neutrophil BURSTTEST and IL-1 ra might have been clinically helpful markers of SIRS prognosis.

  16. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Jacilara; Davis, Richard; Carneiro, Pedro Paulo; Giudice, Angela; Muniz, Aline C; Wilson, Mary E; Carvalho, Edgar M; Bacellar, Olívia

    2016-05-01

    Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS). Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects.

  17. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    Conceição, Jacilara; Davis, Richard; Carneiro, Pedro Paulo; Giudice, Angela; Muniz, Aline C.; Wilson, Mary E.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2016-01-01

    Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS). Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects. PMID:27167379

  18. A thermonuclease of Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances bacterial escape from killing by neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Juneau, Richard A; Stevens, Jacqueline S; Apicella, Michael A; Criss, Alison K

    2015-07-15

    Acute gonorrhea is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation that is insufficient to clear Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Activated neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs), which are composed of chromatin and decorated with antimicrobial proteins. The N. gonorrhoeae NG0969 open reading frame contains a gene (nuc) that encodes a putatively secreted thermonuclease (Nuc) that contributes to biofilm remodeling. Here, we report that Nuc degrades NETs to help N. gonorrhoeae resist killing by neutrophils. Primary human neutrophils released NETs after exposure to N. gonorrhoeae, but NET integrity declined over time with Nuc-containing bacteria. Recombinant Nuc and conditioned medium from Nuc-containing N. gonorrhoeae degraded human neutrophil DNA and NETs. NETs were found to have antimicrobial activity against N. gonorrhoeae, and Nuc expression enhanced N. gonorrhoeae survival in the presence of neutrophils that released NETs. We propose that Nuc enables N. gonorrhoeae to escape trapping and killing by NETs during symptomatic infection, highlighting Nuc as a multifunctional virulence factor for N. gonorrhoeae.

  19. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors. PMID:27246030

  20. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors.

  1. CD14 Mediates Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Endocytosis and Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) and Interferon Regulatory Transcription Factor 3 (IRF3) Activation in Epithelial Cells and Impairs Neutrophil Infiltration and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Killing in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sanhita; Karmakar, Mausita; Pearlman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the role of CD14 in regulating LPS activation of corneal epithelial cells and Pseudomonas aeruginosa corneal infection. Our findings demonstrate that LPS induces Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) internalization in corneal epithelial cells and that blocking with anti-CD14 selectively inhibits TLR4 endocytosis, spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and IRF3 phosphorylation, and production of CCL5/RANTES and IFN-β, but not IL-8. Using a murine model of P. aeruginosa corneal infection, we show that although infected CD14−/− corneas produce less CCL5, they exhibit significantly increased CXC chemokine production, neutrophil recruitment to the corneal stroma, and bacterial clearance than C57BL/6 mice. We conclude that CD14 has a critical role in mediating TLR4 signaling through IRF3 in resident corneal epithelial cells and macrophages and thereby modulates TLR4 cell surface activation of the MyD88/NF-κB/AP-1 pathway and production of CXC chemokines and neutrophil infiltration to infected tissues. PMID:24275652

  2. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  3. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  4. Differential Use of Human Neutrophil Fcγ Receptors for Inducing Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrate from the circulation to sites of infection, where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN use phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. NETs are fibers composed of chromatin and neutrophil-granule proteins. Several pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and also some pharmacological stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)