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Sample records for nevoid basal-cell carcinoma

  1. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation. Exposure to radiation can lead to skin cancers. ... DG, Farndon PA. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. 2002 Jun 20 ... al. eds. Cancer of the Skin. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  2. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karthiga, Kannan S; Sivapatha Sundharam, B; Manikandan, R

    2006-01-01

    Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS). NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  3. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy. PMID:26971503

  4. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome).

    PubMed

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies). Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm) are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull) are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5-10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling). Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome). Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser ablation, photodynamic

  5. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies). Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm) are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull) are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling). Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome). Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser ablation, photodynamic

  6. Fetal rhabdomyoma and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    DiSanto, S; Abt, A B; Boal, D K; Krummel, T M

    1992-01-01

    A 6-year-old white female presented with a fetal rhabdomyoma of the posterior mediastinum and retroperitoneum. Radiologic evaluation and family history revealed features of the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBS). Literature review disclosed two other children with NBS and fetal rhabdomyoma, which should be regarded as one of the soft tissue tumors associated with NBS.

  7. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, N. K.; Tilak Raj, T. N.; Mukunda, K. S.; Rajashekar Reddy, V.

    2012-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the odontogenic keratocysts are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This case report presents a patient diagnosed as NBCCS by clinical, radiographic and histological findings in a 13-year-old boy. This paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis of NBCCS which can help in preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient. PMID:23633824

  8. Multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash; Sapdhare, Swati; Pujar, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is of particular interest because its recurrence rate is high and its behavior is aggressive. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), which is also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and with a predisposition to neoplasms. These multiple KCOTs have warranted an aggressive treatment at the earliest because of the damage and possible complications. Recurrence of these lesions is a characteristic feature that has to be considered while explaining the prognosis to the patient. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old boy with clinical features of basal cell nevus syndrome and multiple KCOTs. In addition to the other common features, congenitally missing third molars in all the four quadrants is a feature which has not been previously reported in association with NBCCS in Indian patients. PMID:26981489

  9. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: review of the literature and report of a case.

    PubMed

    Olson, R A; Stroncek, G G; Scully, J R; Govin, L

    1981-04-01

    Any patient who has multiple cystic lesions of the jaws should be evaluated for the presence of other signs of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The workup should include consultations with specialists in neurology, radiology, dermatology, medical genetics, and any other specialty areas where signs of symptoms may appear. It is not unusual for the oral surgeon to be the first practitioner to see such a patient, because initial complaints often refer to pain and swelling for an infected jaw cyst. The workup of this case and its treatment are typical for a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

  10. Urticaria after methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy in a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Christopher M; Green, W Harris; Hatfield, H Keith; Cognetta, Armand B

    2012-11-01

    Methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) is utilized in several countries for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma, but allergic sensitization has been reported by the manufacturer. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of urticaria following MAL-PDT in a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Prophylactic use of antihistamines may allow continued use of MAL-PDT in this setting.

  11. Gorlin's syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, P. J.; Thompson, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    Gorlin's syndrome is a condition inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. It involves many organs, but principally affects the skin, skeleton, and endocrine and nervous systems. The most common features are multiple nervi and basal cell carcinomas of the skin, benign jaw cysts, dyskeratotic pits in the palms and soles, rib and vertebral abnormalities, brachymetacarpalism, and calcification of the falx cerebri. In 14 patients, 4 of whom belonged to one family, the age at the time of diagnosis ranged from 11 to 63 years. Ten patients are alive, but five are severely disfigured by carcinomas. Two patients died of complications resulting from uncontrolled tumours, and two died of other cancers. New skin tumours constantly develop; small ones can be excised, but large ones require extensive surgery with or without radiotherapy. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 FIG. 11 PMID:7116263

  12. Decreased UV-induced DNA repair synthesis in peripheral leukocytes from patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ringborg, U.; Lambert, B.; Landergen, J.; Lewensohn, R.

    1981-04-01

    The uv-induced DNA repair synthesis in peripheral leukocytes from 7 patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome was compared to that in peripheral leukocytes from 5 patients with basal cell carcinomas and 39 healthy subjects. A dose response curve was established for each individual, and maximum DNA repair synthesis was used as a measure of the capacity for DNA repair. The patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome had about 25% lower level of maximum DNA repair synthesis as compared to the patients with basal cell carcinomas and control individuals. The possibility that DNA repair mechanisms may be involved in the etiology to the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is discussed.

  13. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome - Clinical and Radiological Findings of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ibrahim K; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Salve, Prashant; Goyal, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by skeletal anomalies and multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws. The skeletal anomalies of this syndrome are mandibular prognathism, bossing of frontal and parietal bones, high-arched palate, and bifid rib. We report three cases with NBCCS, emphasizing the clinical and radiographic findings, the importance of the early diagnosis of NBCCS, and a preventive multidisciplinary approach in the management of NBCCS.

  14. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome - Clinical and Radiological Findings of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ibrahim K; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Salve, Prashant; Goyal, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by skeletal anomalies and multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws. The skeletal anomalies of this syndrome are mandibular prognathism, bossing of frontal and parietal bones, high-arched palate, and bifid rib. We report three cases with NBCCS, emphasizing the clinical and radiographic findings, the importance of the early diagnosis of NBCCS, and a preventive multidisciplinary approach in the management of NBCCS. PMID:27630800

  15. [Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with corpus callosum agenesis, PTCH1 mutation and absence of basal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Mazzuoccolo, Luis D; Martínez, María Florencia; Muchnik, Carolina; Azurmendi, Pablo J; Stengel, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, mainly due to PTCH1 gene mutations, that comprises a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. The presence of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) is a cardinal sign in NBCCS, therefore cases in which BCCs are absent entails a delay in the diagnosis.We present a 14 years old boy with a clinical diagnosis of NBCCS by the presence of odontogenic cysts, hypertelorism, macrocephaly, and corpus callosum agenesia, but with absence of skin lesions. His 43 years old mother has NBCCS diagnosis and no history of BCCs. For a deeper study, PTCH1 mutation screening from peripheral blood samples were performed by both bidirectional sequencing and multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) techniques. The proband and his mother carry 25 pb duplication in exon 10 (c.1375dupl25bp) that causes a reading frameshift with a premature stop codon. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that this mutation results in a truncated protein shorter than normal. Our results suggest that complete clinical and genealogical studies accompanied by genetic analysis are essential in the early detection of the NBCCS cases such the one presented here. PMID:25188659

  16. Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, S; Yamamoto, M; Nomiyama, T; Kawa, K; Takenaka, H; Tukitani, K

    2001-01-01

    This study reports on the clinical and light microscopic features of a nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with the complication of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of such an association, which is possibly due to immune dysregulation. Moreover, the patient experienced remission of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis after removal of the jaw cyst. One possible explanation for the remission is that a long-lasting TH, type inflammatory response as a result of the bone defect produces effective cytokines such as interferon-gamma.

  17. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome). Case report

    PubMed Central

    FINI, G.; BELLI, E.; MICI, E.; VIRCIGLIO, P.; MORICCA, L.M.; D’ITRI, L.; LEONARDI, A.; MALAVENDA, M.S.; KRIZZUK, D.; MEROLA, R.; MATURO, A.; PASTA, V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) comprises multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocysts of the jaw, palmar/plantar pits, spine and rib anomalies, calcifications of the falx cerebri etc. The diagnosis is made according to clinical criteria (Kimonis Criteria) and genetic ones. We studied one family where father and then his sun resulted affected by each syndrome. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare disease diagnosed according to clinical criteria sometimes difficult to integrate. The family case we presented shows how you can get diagnosis even in older age and after numerous surgeries. Patients should be given special attention and therefore should be monitorized and need multidisciplinary treatments continued in time, even a trivial change of signs and symptoms may be an important indicator of a precipitating event which puts the patient’s life under threat. PMID:23837959

  18. Gorlin syndrome (nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome): update and literature review.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2014-10-01

    Gorlin syndrome, also called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disease characterized by developmental anomalies such as palmar pits and rib anomaly, and tumorigenesis such as medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. This syndrome is mainly caused by a mutation of PTCH1, a human homologue of Drosophila patched, including frameshift, missense, or nonsense mutations. Genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established. PTCH1 is a member of hedgehog signaling, which is a highly conserved pathway in vertebrates, composed of hedgehog, SMO, and GLI proteins as well as PTCH1. Given that hedgehog signaling regulates cell growth and development, disorder of this pathway gives rise to not only developmental anomalies but also diverse tumors such as those seen in Gorlin syndrome. We recently reported, for the first time, a nationwide survey of Gorlin syndrome in Japan, noting that the frequency was 1/235,800 in the Japanese population, and that the frequency of basal cell carcinomas was significantly lower in Japan than in the USA and Europe, suggesting that ethnicity and genetic background contribute to these differences. Given that many clinical trials using newly discovered molecular inhibitors are still ongoing, these agents should become the new therapeutic options for hedgehog pathway-dependent tumors in patients with or without Gorlin syndrome. PMID:25131638

  19. Novel patched 1 mutations in patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome--case report.

    PubMed

    Škodrić-Trifunović, Vesna; Stjepanović, Mihailo; Savić, Živorad; Ilić, Miroslav; Kavečan, Ivana; Jovanović Privrodski, Jadranka; Spasovski, Vesna; Stojiljković, Maja; Pavlović, Sonja

    2015-02-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws, and diverse developmental defects. This disorder is associated with mutations in tumor suppressor gene Patched 1 (PTCH1). We present two patients with Gorlin syndrome, one sporadic and one familial. Clinical examination, radiological and CT imaging, and mutation screening of PTCH1 gene were performed. Family members, as well as eleven healthy controls were included in the study. Both patients fulfilled the specific criteria for diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome. Molecular analysis of the first patient showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 6 of PTCH1gene (c.903delT). Additionally, a somatic frameshift mutation in exon 21 (c.3524delT) along with germline mutation in exon 6 was detected in tumor-derived tissue sample of this patient. Analysis of the second patient, as well as two affected family members, revealed a novel nonsense germline mutation in exon 8 (c.1148 C>A). PMID:25727044

  20. Novel Patched 1 mutations in patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome – case report

    PubMed Central

    Škodrić-Trifunović, Vesna; Stjepanović, Mihailo; Savić, Živorad; Ilić, Miroslav; Kavečan, Ivana; Jovanović Privrodski, Jadranka; Spasovski, Vesna; Stojiljković, Maja; Pavlović, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws, and diverse developmental defects. This disorder is associated with mutations in tumor suppressor gene Patched 1 (PTCH1). We present two patients with Gorlin syndrome, one sporadic and one familial. Clinical examination, radiological, and CT imaging, and mutation screening of PTCH1 gene were performed. Family members, as well as eleven healthy controls were included in the study. Both patients fulfilled the specific criteria for diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome. Molecular analysis of the first patient showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 6 of PTCH1gene (c.903delT). Additionally, a somatic frameshift mutation in exon 21 (c.3524delT) along with germline mutation in exon 6 was detected in tumor-derived tissue sample of this patient. Analysis of the second patient, as well as two affected family members, revealed a novel nonsense germline mutation in exon 8 (c.1148 C>A). PMID:25727044

  1. A candidate region for Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome defined by genetic and physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Wainwright, B.; Negus, K.; Berkman, J.

    1994-09-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS, or Gorlin`s syndrome) is a cancer predisposition syndrome charcterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and diverse developmental defects. The gene responsible for NBCCS, which is most likely to be a tumor suppressor gene, has previously been mapped to 9q22.3-q31 in a 12 cM interval between the microsatellite marker loci D9S12 and D9S109. Combined multipoint and haplotype analyses of Australian pedigrees has further refined the localization to a 2 cM interval between markers D9S196 and D9S180. Our loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies from sporadic (n= 58) and familial (n=41) BCCs indicate that 50% have deletions within the NBCCS candidate region. All LOH is consistent with the genetic mapping of the NBCCS locus. Additionally, one sporadic tumor indicates that the smallest region of overlap in the deletions is within the interval D9S287 (proximal) and D9S180 (distal). A series of YAC clones from within this region has been mapped by FISH to examine chimerism. These clones, which have been mapped with respect to one another, form a contig which encompasses the candidate region from D9S196 to D9S180.

  2. Localization of the gene for the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, A. M.; Stewart, C.; Bale, A. E.; Bale, S. J.; Dean, M.

    1994-01-01

    The nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCC) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, pits of the palms and/or soles, ectopic calcification, and skeletal malformations. The NBCC gene has recently been mapped to chromosome 9q22.3-9q31. In order to further define the region containing the NBCC gene, we have analyzed 137 individuals from eight families for linkage, using 11 markers from the region. Eight markers showed statistically significant evidence for linkage to NBCC. Three markers (D9S180, ALDOB, and D9S173) showed no definite recombination with the disease locus. All families showed some evidence for linkage to markers in this region. On the basis of the inspection of individual recombinants and previously published information about map location, we suggest the following order for the markers: D9S119-D9S12-D9S197-D9S196-(NBCC,D9S180 -D9S173,ALDOB)-D9S109- D9S127-(D9S53,D9S29). We are currently developing YAC contigs for the most closely linked markers, to further refine the location of the NBCC gene. PMID:7909984

  3. Clinical manifestations in 105 persons with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kimonis, V.E.; Yang, M.L.; Bale, S.J.

    1997-03-31

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCC; Gorlin syndrome), an autosomal dominant disorder linked to 9q22.3-q31, and caused by mutations in PTC, the human homologue of the Drosophila patched gene, comprises multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocysts of the jaw, palmar/plantar pits, spine and rib anomalies and calcification of the falx cerebri. We reviewed the findings on 105 affected individuals examined at the NIH since 1985. The data included 48 males and 57 females ranging in age from 4 months to 87 years. Eighty percent of whites (71/90) and 38% (5/13) of African-Americans had at least one basal cell carcinoma (BCC), with the first tumor occurring at a mean age of 23 (median 20) years and 21 (median 20) years, respectively. Excluding individuals exposed to radiation therapy, the number of BCCs ranged from 1 to >1,000 (median 8) and 1 to 3 (median 2), respectively, in the 2 groups. Jaw cysts occurred in 78/105 (74%) with the first tumor occurring in 80% by the age of 20 years. The number of total jaw cysts ranged from 1 to 28 (median 3). Palmar pits and plantar pits were seen in 87%. Ovarian fibromas were diagnosed by ultrasound in 9/52 (17%) at a mean age of 30 years. Medulloblastoma occurred in 4 patients at a mean age of 2.3 years. Three patients had cleft lip or palate. Physical findings include {open_quotes}coarse face{close_quotes} in 54%, relative macrocephaly in 50%, hypertelorism in 42%, frontal bossing in 27%, pectus deformity in 13%, and Sprengel deformity in 11%. This study delineates the frequency of the clinical and radiological anomalies in NBCC in a large population of US patients and discusses guidelines for diagnosis and management. 48 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. A novel germline mutation in a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome showing cystic lesion in the lung.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Ryo; Kurosawa, Manabu; Sato, Masaaki; Kono, Tomoya; Takubo, Yasutaka; Okai, Shinsaku; Yamada, Keisuke; Shinkura, Reiko; Date, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2015-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) manifests multiple defects involving the skin, endocrine and nervous systems, eyes and bones. Mutations in the patched homologue 1 (PTCH1) gene are the underlying causes of NBCCS, leading to aberrant cell proliferation through constitutive activation of the hedgehog signaling pathway. We identified a novel frameshift mutation (c.1207dupT) of PTCH1 in a NBCCS patient, which might explain multiple cystic lesions and neoplastic growth in the patient. PMID:27081528

  5. Frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene can cause nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Maiko; Hatsuse, Hiromi; Shiohama, Tadashi; Uchikawa, Hideki; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by developmental defects and tumorigenesis. The gene responsible for NBCCS is PTCH1, encoding a receptor for the secreted protein, sonic hedgehog. Recently, a Chinese family with NBCCS carrying a missense mutation in PTCH2, a close homolog of PTCH1, was reported. However, the pathological significance of missense mutations should be discussed cautiously. Here, we report a 13-year-old girl diagnosed with NBCCS based on multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors and rib anomalies carrying a frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene (c.1172_1173delCT). Considering the deleterious nature of the frameshift mutation, our study further confirmed a causative role for the PTCH2 mutation in NBCCS. The absence of typical phenotypes in this case such as palmar/plantar pits, macrocephaly, falx calcification, hypertelorism and coarse face, together with previously reported cases, suggested that individuals with NBCCS carrying a PTCH2 mutation may have a milder phenotype than those with a PTCH1 mutation.

  6. Novel PTCH1 Mutations in Patients with Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors Screened for Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma (NBCC) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Lorenza; Pollio, Annamaria; Pellacani, Giovanni; Guarneri, Carmelo; Ghiorzo, Paola; Longo, Caterina; Bruno, William; Giusti, Francesca; Bassoli, Sara; Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna; Ruini, Cristel; Seidenari, Stefania; Tomasi, Aldo; Ponti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic tumors that arise sporadically or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease mainly characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, KCOTs of the jaws and a variety of other tumors. PTCH1 mutation can be found both in sporadic or NBCCS associated KCOTs. The aim of the current study was to assess whether a combined clinical and bio-molecular approach could be suitable for the detection of NBCCS among patients with a diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs). The authors collected keratocystic odontogenic tumors recorded in the database of the Pathology Department of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia during the period 1991–2011. Through interviews and examinations, family pedigrees were drawn for all patients affected by these odontogenic lesions. We found out that 18 of the 70 patients with KCOTs and/or multiple basal cell carcinomas actually met the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of NBCCS. A wide inter- and intra-familial phenotypic variability was evident in the families. Ameloblastomas (AMLs) were reported in two probands that are also carriers of the PCTH1 germline mutations. Nine germline mutations in the PTCH1 gene, 5 of them novel, were evident in 14 tested probands. The clinical evaluation of the keratocystic odontogenic tumors can be used as screening for the detection of families at risk of NBCCS. Keratocystic odontogenic lesions are uncommon, and their discovery deserves the search for associated cutaneous basal cell carcinomas and other benign and malignant tumors related to NBCCS. PMID:22952776

  7. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients. PMID:25117323

  8. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  9. Perigestational dietary folic acid deficiency protects against medulloblastoma formation in a mouse model of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Been, Raha A; Ross, Julie A; Nagel, Christian W; Hooten, Anthony J; Langer, Erica K; DeCoursin, Krista J; Marek, Courtney A; Janik, Callie L; Linden, Michael A; Reed, Robyn C; Schutten, Melissa M; Largaespada, David A; Johnson, Kimberly J

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is caused by PTCH1 gene mutations that result in diverse neoplasms including medulloblastoma (MB). Epidemiological studies report reduced pediatric brain tumor risks associated with maternal intake of prenatal vitamins containing folic acid (FA) and FA supplements specifically. We hypothesized that low maternal FA intake during the perigestational period would increase MB incidence in a transgenic NBCCS mouse model, which carries an autosomal dominant mutation in the Ptch1 gene. Female wild-type C57BL/6 mice (n = 126) were randomized to 1 of 3 diets with differing FA amounts: 0.3 mg/kg (low), 2.0 mg/kg (control), and 8.0 mg/kg (high) 1 mo prior to mating with Ptch1 (+/-) C57BL/6 males. Females were maintained on the diet until pup weaning; the pups were then aged for tumor development. Compared to the control group, offspring MB incidence was significantly lower in the low FA group (Hazard Ratio = 0.47; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.80) at 1 yr. No significant difference in incidence was observed between the control and high FA groups. Low maternal perigestational FA levels may decrease MB incidence in mice genetically predisposed to tumor development. Our results could have implications for prenatal FA intake recommendations in the presence of cancer syndromes. PMID:23909730

  10. Diagnostic and pathogenetic role of café-au-lait macules in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Pastorino, Lorenza; Ruini, Cristel; Guarneri, Carmelo; Mandel, Victor Desmond; Seidenari, Stefania; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2012-10-29

    Café au lait spots (CALS) are common dermatologic findings that can at the same time arise in a variety of pathologic conditions such as Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), together with numerous hereditary syndromes for which they represent either diagnostic criteria or associated elements (McCune Albright, Silver-Russell, LEOPARD, Ataxia-Telangiectasia). A review of the literature also revealed two cases of association with NBCCS. We report here the case of a female proband with CALS associated to Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) with known PTCH1 germline mutation (C.1348-2A>G) who had been misdiagnosed with NF1 in her childhood because of 5 CALS and cutaneous nodules. The patient presented a giant cell tumor of the skin, palmar and calcaneal epidermoidal cystic nodules, odontogenic keratocystic tumors and deformity of the jaw profile. Her family history brought both her brother and father to our attention because of the presence of KCOTs diagnosed at early age: after genetic testing, the same PTCH1 germline mutation was identified in the three family members. Clinical criteria are used for discerning NF1 diagnosis (size, number and onset age), while there are no definite guidelines concerning CALS except for their presence. In our experience, we have noted an association of CALS with NBCCS; this seems interesting because we already know clinical criteria are a dynamic entity and can be modified by epidemiologic evidences.

  11. Sensitivity of cultured lymphocytes from patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome to ultraviolet light and phytohemagglutinin stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, P.; Celotti, L.; Furlan, D.; Pattarello, I.; Peserico, A. )

    1990-01-01

    DNA repair and replication after in vitro UV irradiation were determined in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from 6 patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) and from a group of control donors. DNA repair synthesis (UDS) was measured in unstimulated lymphocytes by incubation with 3H-TdR in the presence of hydroxyurea for 3 and 6 h after UV irradiation (6-48 J/m2). DNA replication was measured in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, UV-irradiated or mock-irradiated, by incubation with 3H-TdR for 24 h. The effect of the mitogen was followed during 5 days after stimulation by determining the incorporation of 3H-TdR, the increase of cell number, and the mitotic index. NBCCS and control lymphocytes showed equal sensitivity to UV light in terms of UDS and reduced response to PHA. On the contrary, the mitotic index and the number of cells in stimulated cultures were significantly lower in the affected subjects. These data suggest an altered progression along the cell cycle, which could be characteristic of stimulated NBCCS lymphocytes.

  12. Microscopically controlled surgical excision combined with ultrapulse CO2 vaporization in the management of a patient with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krunic, A L; Viehman, G E; Madani, S; Clark, R E

    1998-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, skeletal abnormalities and sometimes mental retardation. The large number of tumors, which are often disfiguring, presents extreme difficulties in the treatment of these patients. Microscopically controlled excision, compared to other modalities (radiation therapy, photodynamic therapy, intralesional interferon alpha-2b) offers the highest cure rate. However, because of the large size and involvement of wide areas of the skin, this approach is sometimes impractical. The ultrapulse CO2 laser with high energy and short pulses achieves char-free ablation of the tumors, bloodless surgical field, minimal nonspecific thermal damage, rapid healing and diminished postoperative pain. Also, a number of lesions can be removed in a single session. We present a 48-year-old man with a 6.5 x 4.5 cm large basal cell carcinoma involving the anterior abdomen and navel area. The central thick portion of the tumor was resected by microscopically controlled excision with 3 stages, and wide thinner peripheral crescentic plaque vaporized with ultrapulse CO2 laser. The laser settings were 300 mJ energy/pulse and 100 W average power, which corresponds to the fluence of 7.5 J/cm2. Computerized pattern generator (ultrascan handpiece) was adjusted to patterns of 3 (circle) and 1 (square) with sizes varying from 5 to 7, and density of 9 (60% overlapping). The tumor was vaporized with 6 passes, all the way to deep reticular dermis. A fifteen month-follow up disclosed no recurrent disease. Subsequent biopsies revealed only a scar with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. Our experience indicates that combined treatment with microscopically controlled excision and ultrapulse CO2 laser ablation is a suitable modality for the large tumor plaques involving concave and convex areas of the skin respectively. Microscopically controlled excision of thicker, concave portions of basal

  13. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive than other types of basal ... to treat them early and with slightly more aggressive techniques. Excision – The basal cell carcinoma is cut ...

  14. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with medulloblastoma in an African-American boy: A rare case illustrating gene-environment interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Korczak, J.F.; Goldstein, A.M.; Kase, R.G.

    1997-03-31

    We present an 8-year-old African-American boy with medulloblastoma and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) who exhibited the radiosensitive response of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) formation in the area irradiated for medulloblastoma. Such a response is well-documented in Caucasian NBCCS patients with medulloblastoma. The propositus was diagnosed with medulloblastoma at the age of 2 years and underwent surgery, chemotherapy, and craniospinal irradiation. At the age of 6 years, he was diagnosed with NBCCS following his presentation with a large odontogenic keratocyst of the mandible, pits of the palms and soles and numerous BCCs in the area of the back and neck that had been irradiated previously for medulloblastoma. Examination of other relatives showed that the propositus mother also had NBCCS but was more mildly affected; in particular, she had no BCCs. This case illustrates complex gene-environment interaction, in that increased skin pigmentation in African-Americans is presumably protective against ultraviolet, but not ionizing, radiation. This case and other similar cases in the literature show the importance of considering NBCCS in the differential diagnosis of any patient who presents with a medulloblastoma, especially before the age of 5 years, and of examining other close relatives for signs of NBCCS to determine the patient`s at-risk status. Finally, for individuals who are radiosensitive, protocols that utilize chemotherapy in lieu of radiotherapy should be considered. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly occurring cancer in the world and overall incidence is still on the rise. While typically a slow-growing tumor for which metastases is rare, basal cell carcinoma can be locally destructive and disfiguring. Given the vast prevalence of this disease, there is a significant overall burden on patient well-being and quality of life. The current mainstay of basal cell carcinoma treatment involves surgical modalities, such as electrodessication and curettage, excision, cryosurgery, and Mohs micrographic surgery. Such methods are typically reserved for localized basal cell carcinoma and offer high five-year cure rates, but come with the risk of functional impairment, disfigurement, and scarring. Here, the authors review the evidence and indications for nonsurgical treatment modalities in cases where surgery is impractical, contraindicated, or simply not desired by the patient. PMID:27386043

  16. Heterozygous PTCH1 Mutations Impact the Bone Metabolism in Patients With Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Likely by Regulating SPARC Expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yingying; Zhang, Jianyun; Zhang, Heyu; Li, Xuefen; Qu, Jiafei; Zhai, Jiemei; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Feng; Li, Tiejun

    2016-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bone and skin abnormalities and a predisposition to various tumors. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), which are common tumors of the jaw that cause extensive damage to the jawbone, are usually accompanied with NBCCS. Germline PTCH1 mutations in NBCCS tumorigenesis have been frequently studied; however, little is known regarding the pathogenesis of bone abnormalities in this disease. This study sought to investigate the mechanism underlying heterozygous PTCH1 mutation-mediated abnormal bone metabolism in patients with NBCCS. Stromal cells were isolated from the fibrous capsules of patients with NBCCS-associated or non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors and non-syndromic tumor stromal cells without PTCH1 mutations served as controls. Germline PTCH1 heterozygous mutations were confirmed in all NBCCS samples and differential protein expression was identified using tandem mass tag-labeled proteomics analysis. Our findings revealed that osteonectin/SPARC expression was significantly downregulated in syndromic stromal cells compared with non-syndromic stromal cells. SPARC expression was even lower in stromal cells carrying PTCH1 protein truncation mutations. PTCH1 siRNA transfection demonstrated that SPARC downregulation correlates with decreased PTCH1 expression. Furthermore, exogenous SPARC promoted osteogenic differentiation of syndromic stromal cells with enhanced development of calcium nodules. In addition, bone mineral density tests showed that patients with NBCCS exhibit weak bone mass compared with sex- and age-matched controls. This study indicates that germline PTCH1 heterozygous mutations play a major role in bone metabolism in patients with NBCCS, in particular in those with PTCH1 protein truncation mutations. SPARC may represent an important downstream modulator of PTCH1 mediation of bone metabolism. Thus, bone mineral density monitoring is critical

  17. Characterisation of the Nevoid basal cell carcinoma (Gorlin`s) syndrome (NBCCS) gene region on chromosome 9q22-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.J.; Digweed, M.; Sperling, K.

    1994-09-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited malignancy-associated disease of unknown etiology. The gene has been mapped to chromosome 9q22-q31 by us and other groups, using linkage analysis and loss of heterozygosity studies. Subsequent linkage and haplotype analyses from 133 meioses in NBCCS families has refined the position of the gene between D9S12 and D9S287. Since the gene for Fanconi`s Anaemia type C (FAAC) has been assigned to the same 9q region, we have performed linkage analysis between FACC and NBCCCS in NBCCS families. No recombination has been observed between NBCCS and FACC and maximum lod scores of 34.98 and 11.94 occur for both diseases at the markers D9S196/D9S197. Southern blot analysis using an FACC cDNA probe has revealed no detectable rearrangements in our NBCCS patients. We have established a YAC contig spanning the region from D9S12 to D9S176 and STS content mapping in 22 YACs has allowed the ordering of 12 loci in the region, including the xeroderma pigmentosum type A (XPAC) gene, as follows: D9S151/D9S12P1 - D9S12P2 - D9S197 - D9S196 - D9S280 - FACC - D9S287/XPAC - D9S180 - D9S6 - D9S176. Using the contig we have been able to eliminate the {alpha}1 type XV collagen gene and the markers D9S119 and D9S297 from the NBCCS candidate region. Twelve YACs have been used to screen a chromosome 9 cosmid library and more than 1000 cosmids from the region have been identified to be used for the construction of a cosmid contig. A selection of these cosmids will be used for the isolation of coding sequencing from the region.

  18. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask your doctor or visit these websites: National Society of Genetic Counselors www.nsgc.org National Cancer ... timely, comprehensive, oncologist-approved information from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), with support from the ...

  19. Basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer, predominantly affecting the head and neck, and can be diagnosed clinically in most cases. Metastasis of BCC is rare, but localised tissue invasion and destruction can lead to morbidity. Incidence of BCC increases markedly after the age of 40 years, but incidence in younger people is rising, possibly as a result of increased sun exposure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions on treatment response/recurrence (within 1 year of therapy) in people with basal cell carcinoma? What are the effects of interventions on long-term recurrence (a minimum of 2 years after treatment) in people with basal cell carcinoma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 16 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cryotherapy/cryosurgery, curettage and cautery/electrodesiccation, fluorouracil, imiquimod 5% cream, photodynamic therapy, and surgery (conventional or Mohs' micrographic surgery). PMID:21718567

  20. Perianal Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bulur, Isil; Boyuk, Emine; Saracoglu, Zeynep Nurhan; Arik, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common non-melanoma skin cancer. Exposure to ultraviolet light is an important risk factor for BCC development and the disorder therefore develops commonly on body areas that are more exposed to sunlight, such as the face and neck. It is uncommon in the closed area of the body and quite rare in the perianal and genital regions. Herein, we report a 34-year-old patient with perianal BCC who had no additional risk factors. PMID:25848349

  1. Analysis of 133 meioses places the genes for nevoid basal cell carcinoma (gorlin) syndrome and fanconi anemia group C in a 2.6-cM interval and contributes to the fine map of 9q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Farndon, P.A.; Hardy, C.; Kilpatrick, M.W.

    1994-09-15

    Four disease genes (NBCCS, ESS1, XPAC, FACC) map to 9q22.3-q31. A fine map of this region was produced by linkage and haplotype analysis using 12 DNA markers. The gene for nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, Gorlin) has an important role in congenital malformations and carcinogenesis. Phase-known recombinants in a study of 133 meioses place NBCCS between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S176. Haplotype analysis in a two-generation family suggests that NBCCS lies in a smaller interval of 2.6 cM centromeric to D9S287. These flanking markers will be useful clinically for gene tracking. Recombinants also map FACC (Fanconi anemia, group C) to the same region, between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S287. The recombination rate between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S53 in males is 8.3% and 13.2% in females, giving a sex-specific male:female ratio of 1:1.6 and a sex-averaged map distance of 10.4 cM. No double recombinants were detected, in agreement with the apparently complete level of interference predicted from the male chiasmata map. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  3. "Basal Cell Blanche": A Diagnostic Maneuver to Increase Early Detection of Basal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Quach, Olivia Leigh; Barry, Megan; Roberts Cruse, Allison; Wilson, Barbara B

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas represent one of the most common skin cancers and often present initially in the primary care setting. Subtle basal cell carcinomas may be difficult to detect, and early detection of these carcinomas remains important in limiting patient morbidity. In this article, we present a simple diagnostic maneuver, "basal cell blanche," to increase early detection of basal cell carcinomas. PMID:27170799

  4. Advanced Treatment for Basal Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are very common epithelial cancers that depend on the Hedgehog pathway for tumor growth. Traditional therapies such as surgical excision are effective for most patients with sporadic BCC; however, better treatment options are needed for cosmetically sensitive or advanced and metastatic BCC. The first approved Hedgehog antagonist targeting the membrane receptor Smoothened, vismodegib, shows remarkable effectiveness on both syndromic and nonsyndromic BCCs. However, drug-resistant tumors frequently develop, illustrating the need for the development of next-generation Hedgehog antagonists targeting pathway components downstream from Smoothened. In this article, we will summarize available BCC treatment options and discuss the development of next-generation antagonists. PMID:24985127

  5. Basal cell carcinomas: attack of the hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Ervin H

    2008-10-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were essentially a molecular 'black box' until some 12 years ago, when identification of a genetic flaw in a rare subset of patients who have a great propensity to develop BCCs pointed to aberrant Hedgehog signalling as the pivotal defect leading to formation of these tumours. This discovery has facilitated a remarkable increase in our understanding of BCC carcinogenesis and has highlighted the carcinogenic role of this developmental pathway when aberrantly activated in adulthood. Importantly, a phase 1 first-in-human trial of a Hedgehog inhibitor has shown real progress in halting and even reversing the growth of these tumours.

  6. Basal Cell Carcinoma. Part 1: Basal Cell Carcinoma Has Come of Age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Min; Marsch, Amanda F; Petronic-Rosic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Almost 2 centuries after its recognition, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) remains the most common cancer worldwide, with a 30% overall lifetime risk in the United States and an incidence that continues to increase annually. The increasing incidence of BCC is multifactorial and likely correlates to multiple risk factors, including exposure to both ionizing and UV radiation. Despite its relatively indolent growth, what was once referred to as a rodent ulcer or basal cell epithelioma is now identified as a full-fledged malignancy. The authors describe the societal burden of this disease and characterize its malignant potential, emphasizing associated clinical and histopathologic prognostic features. PMID:26380507

  7. The dermatoscopic universe of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lallas, Aimilios; Apalla, Zoe; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina; Moscarella, Elvira; Specchio, Francesca; Raucci, Margaritha; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Following the first descriptions of the dermatoscopic pattern of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that go back to the very early years of dermatoscopy, the list of dermatoscopic criteria associated with BCC has been several times updated and renewed. Up to date, dermatoscopy has been shown to enhance BCC detection, by facilitating its discrimination from other skin tumors and inflammatory skin diseases. Furthermore, upcoming evidence suggests that the method is also useful for the management of the tumor, since it provides valuable information about the histopathologic subtype, the presence of clinically undetectable pigmentation, the expansion of the tumor beyond clinically visible margins and the response to non-ablative treatments. In the current article, we provide a summary of the traditional and latest knowledge on the value of dermatoscopy for the diagnosis and management of BCC. PMID:25126452

  8. A Prognostic Dilemma of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Intravascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Castley, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy; however, it very rarely metastasizes. Despite the low mortality caused by this cancer, once it spreads, it has dim prognosis. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma with rare intravascular invasion and review the literature for risk factors and management of metastasis.

  9. Multiple basal cell carcinomas arising in port-wine haemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Magaña-García, M; Magaña-Lozano, M

    1988-09-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old man, who had had two port-wine stains from birth, in which many basal cell carcinomas developed during his forties. The appearance of multiple basal cell carcinomas in port-wine stains has not been reported previously to our knowledge and may represent a new syndrome.

  10. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  11. Novel investigational drugs for basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jean Y; Epstein, Ervin H

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field In the United States, the annual incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is close to 1 million. Ultraviolet radiation exposure is the main risk factor; however, the availability of ever more potent sunscreens and education have not prevented the rise in BCC incidence. Therefore, concerted effects to identify novel preventive and therapeutic strategies are necessary. Areas covered in this review This article summarizes our current understanding of the etiology and molecular mechanisms of BCC tumorigenesis and discusses the preclinical and clinical studies to identify agents with anti-BCC efficacy. What the reader will gain The discovery that hyperactive Hh pathway signaling causes several cancers, including BCC, has spawned the development of many pharmacologic inhibitors of Hh signaling. Early clinical testing of the most advanced, GDC-0449, demonstrated impressive efficacy in patients with advanced BCC. Other promising anti-BCC chemopreventive strategies include drugs that are already FDA-approved for treating other diseases. Take home message Preclinical and clinical trials with pre-existing FDA-approved drugs suggest novel uses for BCC chemoprevention and treatment. Also, new chemical entities that inhibit the Hh pathway show promise, and in combination with other drugs may provide a nonsurgical cure for this most common cancer. PMID:20662553

  12. Basal cell epithelioma (carcinoma) in children and teenagers

    SciTech Connect

    Rahbari, H.; Mehregan, A.H.

    1982-01-15

    Among over 390,000 routine dermatopathologic specimens there were 85 cases diagnosed as basal cell epithelioma (carcinoma) (BCE) in persons 19 years old or younger. This number was refined to 40 cases de novo BCE in children and teenagers. Basal cell epithelioma unrelated to other conditions is rare in the young and it should be differentiated from similar fibroepithelial growths.

  13. Photodynamic therapy as adjunctive therapy for morpheaform basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Torres, T; Fernandes, I; Costa, V; Selores, M

    2011-01-01

    The authors decided to evaluate the possible use of methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) as adjunctive therapy for morpheaform basal cell carcinoma prior to standard surgical excision in order to reduce tumor size and volume and to facilitate surgical treatment. It was observed that MAL-PDT may be an option as an adjunctive therapy prior to standard surgical excision of morpheaform basal cell carcinoma, leading to less invasive surgery.

  14. [Basal cell carcinoma. Molecular genetics and unusual clinical features].

    PubMed

    Reifenberger, J

    2007-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common human cancer. Its incidence is steadily increasing. The development of basal cell carcinoma is linked to genetic factors, including the individual skin phototype, as well as the cumulative exposure to UVB. The vast majority of basal cell carcinomas are sporadic tumors, while familial cases associated with certain hereditary syndromes are less common. At the molecular level, basal cell carcinomas are characterized by aberrant activation of sonic hedgehog signaling, usually due to mutations either in the ptch or smoh genes. In addition, about half of the cases carry mutations in the tp53 tumor suppressor gene, which are often UVB-associated C-->T transition mutations. Clinically, basal cell carcinomas may show a high degree of phenotypical variability. In particular, tumors occurring in atypical locations, showing an unusual clinical appearance, or imitating other skin diseases may cause diagnostic problems. This review article summarizes the current state of the art concerning the etiology, predisposition and molecular genetics of basal cell carcinoma. In addition, examples of unusual clinical manifestations are illustrated. PMID:17440702

  15. New therapeutic options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sligh, James E

    2014-06-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common premalignant skin lesion that is frequently treated by cryosurgery. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy of man, and early-stage lesions are usually cured via surgery. Advanced basal cell carcinoma may require more extensive surgery resulting in deformity, and many advanced lesions cannot be treated surgically. Several recent developments have improved therapeutic options for both conditions. Cryosurgery is still a mainstay of treatment for AK, but the introduction of effective topical agents, imiquimod cream and ingenol mebutate, has provided alternatives to cryosurgery. For advanced basal cell carcinoma, the small-molecule inhibitor vismodegib has proven to be an effective therapy for lesions that are not amenable to surgery and has demonstrated ability to achieve dramatic improvement in advanced, potentially disfiguring cancer. PMID:25268601

  16. Basal cell carcinoma masquerading as a hallux valgus

    PubMed Central

    Hallock, Geoffrey G; Bulatao, Imelda S

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of primary skin cancers of the foot is exceedingly low; conversely, problems associated with a hallux valgus are common. A nonhealing ulcer overlying a hallux valgus managed conservatively with ointments and orthotic adjustments, and even with skin grafts, did not resolve over a period of 10 years. Ultimately, a shave biopsy revealed that the lesion was a basal cell carcinoma. Wide local excision and another skin graft resulted in tumour eradication and, finally, healing. Basal cell carcinoma associated with a hallux valgus has not been previously reported, and this reinforces the concept that malignant degeneration as the cause of any chronic ulceration should not be overlooked. PMID:19554132

  17. Basal Cell Carcinoma Developing from Trichoepithelioma: Review of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, M. Ananta; Aryasomayajula, Sirish; Krishna, B.A. Rama

    2016-01-01

    Trichoepitheliomas (TE) are benign tumours but occasionally can undergo transformation to malignant neoplasms more commonly as Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC). The correct diagnosis between these tumours is very important because basal cell carcinoma is locally aggressive neoplasm and requires total surgical excision with wide healthy margins while trichoepithelioma needs simple excision. We describe three patients who developed basal cell carcinoma with facial trichoepitheliomas. The only clinical feature that distinguished the carcinomas from the trichoepitheliomas was their larger size, in all three patients, one patient with recurrent, hyper pigmented swelling with surface ulceration and in another patient there are multiple trichoepitheliomas, and other family members are also affected. The history, clinical features and histopathological findings were suggestive of the evolution of basal cell carcinoma directly from trichoepithelioma in our first two cases, but in the third case TE and BCC were separate lesions on face and we are uncertain about whether the BCC developed independently or by transformation from a trichoepithelioma. Based on our clinicopathological observations in the three patients and reports in the recent literature, BCC with follicular differentiation and trichoepithelioma are considered to be highly related. PMID:27134936

  18. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA OF THE NOSE—Treatment with Chemosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Beirne, Gilbert A.; Beirne, Clinton G.

    1956-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas of the nose probably originate from embryologic cell rests left between cartilages and bones in the fusion and migration of the nasal precursors. Some carcinomas have been found to invade to the mucosal surface between subcutaneous structures or around the alar margins. Recurrences are particularly likely to develop deep extensions due to overlying scar tissue. In many cases, chemosurgical removal has disclosed unsuspected deep and lateral extensions. It is the treatment method of choice for many such lesions. PMID:13276824

  19. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Umbilicus: A Comprehensive Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) typically occurs in sun-exposed sites. Only 16 individuals with umbilical BCC have been described in the literature, and the characteristics of patients with umbilical BCC are summarized. PubMed was used to search the following terms: abdomen, basal cell carcinoma, basal cell nevus syndrome, and umbilicus. Papers with these terms and references cited within these papers were reviewed. BCC of the umbilicus has been reported in five men and 11 women; one man had two tumors. Two patients had basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS). Other risk factors for BCC were absent. The tumor most commonly demonstrated nodular histology (64%, 9/14); superficial and fibroepithelioma of Pinkus variants were noted in three and two patients, respectively. The tumor was pigmented in eight individuals. Treatment was conventional surgical excision (87%, 13/15) or Mohs micrographic surgery (13%, 2/15); either adjuvant laser ablation or radiotherapy was performed in two patients. The prognosis after treatment was excellent with no recurrence or metastasis (100%, 16/16). In conclusion, BCC of the umbilicus is rare. It usually presents as a tumor with a non-aggressive histologic subtype in an individual with no risk factors for this malignancy. There has been no recurrence or metastasis following excision of the cancer. PMID:27738570

  20. Carcinoma in basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Nagao, T; Sugano, I; Ishida, Y; Matsuzaki, O; Konno, A; Kondo, Y; Nagao, K

    1997-01-01

    Malignant transformation of basal cell adenoma (BCA) of the parotid gland is rarely reported, and when occurred, may principally become manifest as a malignant basaloid tumor, i.e. basal cell adenocarcinoma or adenoid cystic carcinoma. We describe herein three cases of non-basaloid carcinoma arising in BCA. The incidence of this malignant tumor was 0.2% of all parotid gland tumors and 4.3% of BCAs in our series. One case was salivary duct carcinoma showing histologic evidence of transition between malignant and benign elements. The remaining two cases were well-encapsulated parotid gland tumors, which were composed of BCA and scattered foci of malignant transformation. Malignant components were adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified (NOS), and sometimes intermixed with neoplastic myoepithelial cells included BCA cells. These two cases were regarded to be intracapsular carcinoma in BCA. BCA components showed solid, tubular and trabecular arrangements. The patients' prognosis was quite variable among these three cases; the first case died of disease after 27 months, whereas the latter two cases are alive and well for 4 and 10 years after surgery. Ki-67 labeling index indicated that cell proliferative activity was at least five times higher in carcinomas than BCAs. Non-basaloid carcinomas such as salivary duct carcinoma or adenocarcinoma, NOS, do develop in BCAs as in the case of a pleomorphic adenoma with malignant transformation, though the incidence may be extremely rare.

  1. Expression of stromelysin 3 in basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cribier, B; Noacco, G; Peltre, B; Grosshans, E

    2001-01-01

    Stromelysin 3 is a member of the metalloproteinase family, which is expressed in various remodelling processes. The prognosis of breast cancers and squamous cell carcinomas is correlated to the level of expression of this protein. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the expression of stromelysin 3 in the major types of basal cell carcinomas. We selected cases of primary tumours that were fully excised, without previous biopsy: 40 Pinkus tumors, 40 superficial, 40 nodular, 38 morpheiform basal cell carcinomas and 10 cases showing deep subcutaneous or muscular invasion. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using monoclonal anti-ST3 antibodies (MC Rio, IGBMC Strasbourg), and evaluated on a semi-quantitative scale from 0 to 3. Positively stained cells were restricted to the periphery of the epithelial cells, which, by contrast, never expressed stromelysin 3. The global rate of expression was 27% in Pinkus tumors, 65% in superficial, 72.5% in nodular, 87% in morpheiform and 100% in deeply invasive carcinomas. The rates of tumours showing the highest number of positively stained cells (class 2 or 3) were respectively 7.5%, 20%, 45%, 63% and 100%. This systematic study of stromelysin3 expression in basal cell carcinomas confirms that it is a marker of poor prognosis, because the rate of positive tumours was much higher in aggressive carcinomas. Moreover, the majority of tumours showing an intense expression (i.e. the highest number of positively stained cells in their stroma) were of the morpheiform and deeply invasive types, which are of poor prognosis. Altogether, the studies performed on cutaneous tumours are consistent with the theory of stromelysin 3 playing an active role in tumour progression.

  2. Basal Cell Carcinoma in Gorlin’s Patients: a Matter of Fibroblasts-Led Protumoral Microenvironment?

    PubMed Central

    Gache, Yannick; Brellier, Florence; Rouanet, Sophie; Al-Qaraghuli, Sahar; Goncalves-Maia, Maria; Burty-Valin, Elodie; Barnay, Stéphanie; Scarzello, Sabine; Ruat, Martial; Sevenet, Nicolas; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the commonest tumor in human. About 70% sporadic BCCs bear somatic mutations in the PATCHED1 tumor suppressor gene which encodes the receptor for the Sonic Hedgehog morphogen (SHH). PATCHED1 germinal mutations are associated with the dominant Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS), a major hallmark of which is a high susceptibility to BCCs. Although the vast majority of sporadic BCCs arises exclusively in sun exposed skin areas, 40 to 50% BCCs from NBCCS patients develop in non photo-exposed skin. Since overwhelming evidences indicate that microenvironment may both be modified by- and influence the- epithelial tumor, we hypothesized that NBCCS fibroblasts could contribute to BCCs in NBCCS patients, notably those developing in non photo-exposed skin areas. The functional impact of NBCCS fibroblasts was then assessed in organotypic skin cultures with control keratinocytes. Onset of epidermal differentiation was delayed in the presence of primary NBCCS fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, keratinocyte proliferation was severely reduced and showed high levels of nuclear P53 in both organotypic skin cultures and in fibroblast-led conditioning experiments. However, in spite of increased levels of senescence associated β-galactosidase activity in keratinocytes cultured in the presence of medium conditioned by NBCCS fibroblasts, we failed to observe activation of P16 and P21 and then of bona fide features of senescence. Constitutive extinction of P53 in WT keratinocytes resulted in an invasive phenotype in the presence of NBCCS fibroblasts. Finally, we found that expression of SHH was limited to fibroblasts but was dependent on the presence of keratinocytes. Inhibition of SHH binding resulted in improved epidermal morphogenesis. Altogether, these data suggest that the repertoire of diffusible factors (including SHH) expressed by primary NBCCS fibroblasts generate a stress affecting keratinocytes behavior and epidermal homeostasis. Our findings

  3. Basal cell carcinoma — molecular biology and potential new therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Maria; Jaks, Viljar; Hohl, Daniel; Toftgård, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin, the most common malignancy in individuals of mixed European descent, is increasing in incidence due to an aging population and sun exposure habits. The realization that aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling is a pathognomonic feature of BCC development has opened the way for exciting progress toward understanding BCC biology and translation of this knowledge to the clinic. Genetic mouse models closely mimicking human BCCs have provided answers about the tumor cell of origin, and inhibition of Hedgehog signaling is emerging as a potentially useful targeted therapy for patients with advanced or multiple BCCs that have hitherto lacked effective treatment. PMID:22293184

  4. Expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Almeida, Maria Carolina Leal; Costa, Alessandra Scorse; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Serrano, Rodrigo Lorenzetti; Machado Filho, Carlos D'Apparecida Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background Heparanase is an enzyme that cleaves heparan sulfate chains. Oligosaccharides generated by heparanase induce tumor progression. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma comprise types of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Objectives Evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and expression of heparanase in two human cell lines established in culture, immortalized skin keratinocyte (HaCaT) and squamous cell carcinoma (A431) and also investigate the expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and eyelid skin of individuals not affected by the disease (control). Methods Glycosaminoglycans were quantified by electrophoresis and indirect ELISA method. The heparanase expression was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRTPCR). Results The A431 strain showed significant increase in the sulfated glycosaminoglycans, increased heparanase expression and decreased hyaluronic acid, comparing to the HaCaT lineage. The mRNA expression of heparanase was significantly higher in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma compared with control skin samples. It was also observed increased heparanase expression in squamous cell carcinoma compared to the Basal cell carcinoma. Conclusion The glycosaminoglycans profile, as well as heparanase expression are different between HaCaT and A431 cell lines. The increased expression of heparanase in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma suggests that this enzyme could be a marker for the diagnosis of such types of non-melanoma cancers, and may be useful as a target molecule for future alternative treatment.

  5. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matei, C; Tampa, M; Poteca, T; Panea-Paunica, G; Georgescu, SR; Ion, RM; Popescu, SM; Giurcaneanu, C

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a medical procedure based on the activation of the molecules of various exogenous or endogenous chemical substances called photosensitizers by a light source emitting radiation of an adequate wavelength, usually situated in the visible spectrum; photosensitizers are chemical compounds bearing the capacity to selectively concentrate in the neoplastic cells. The energy captured by the molecules of these substances pervaded in the tumor cells is subsequently discharged in the surrounding tissue, triggering certain photodynamic reactions that result in the destruction of the tumor. The procedure is applicable in numerous medical fields. Skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most frequent type of cancer of the human species, is a cutaneous tumor that responds very well to this innovative treatment method. By reviewing numerous recent studies in the field, this article aims to present the role and the indications of photodynamic therapy in the management of basal cell carcinoma, as well as the most important results achieved so far by this therapy in the field of dermato-oncology. PMID:23599819

  6. Giant Cornu Cutaneum Superimposed on Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Agirgol, S; Mansur, A T; Bozkurt, K; Azakli, H N; Babacan, A; Dikmen, A

    2015-09-01

    Cornu cutaneum (CC) is a clinical term that describes the horn-like keratotic lesions extending vertically from the skin. Benign, premalignant or malignant lesions may be present at the base of CC. Seborrhoeic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most commonly reported benign and malignant forms, respectively. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) at the base is rare. Here, we report on an 85-year old female patient having multiple CC lesions, one being giant on her face and two of the lesions diagnosed with BCC at the base. This case is of significance due to the presence of giant and multiple CC and detection of BCC at the base of more than one lesion. This present case indicates the need for the treatment of possible malignant lesions underlying CC in the elderly by total surgical excision.

  7. Giant Cornu Cutaneum Superimposed on Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Agirgol, S; Mansur, AT; Bozkurt, K; Azakli, HN; Babacan, A; Dikmen, A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cornu cutaneum (CC) is a clinical term that describes the horn-like keratotic lesions extending vertically from the skin. Benign, premalignant or malignant lesions may be present at the base of CC. Seborrhoeic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most commonly reported benign and malignant forms, respectively. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) at the base is rare. Here, we report on an 85-year old female patient having multiple CC lesions, one being giant on her face and two of the lesions diagnosed with BCC at the base. This case is of significance due to the presence of giant and multiple CC and detection of BCC at the base of more than one lesion. This present case indicates the need for the treatment of possible malignant lesions underlying CC in the elderly by total surgical excision. PMID:26624603

  8. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma of the head and face.

    PubMed

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Kramer, B; Altini, M; Lemmer, J

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) is an important risk factor for cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma of the skin. These cancers most commonly affect persons with fair skin and blue eyes who sunburn rather than suntan. However, each of these cancers appears to be associated with a different pattern of UV exposure and to be mediated by different intracellular molecular pathways.Some melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants play a direct role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma apart from their role in determining a cancer-prone pigmentory phenotype (fair skin, red hair, blue eyes) through their interactions with other genes regulating immuno-inflammatory responses, DNA repair or apoptosis.In this short review we focus on the aetiological role of UV in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma of the skin, and on some associated biopathological events. PMID:26850723

  9. UV-specific mutations of the human patched gene in basal cell carcinomas from normal individuals and xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    PubMed

    Daya-Grosjean, L; Sarasin, A

    2000-05-30

    Germline mutations of the human patched gene, PTCH, are responsible for the nevoid basal cell carcinoma (NBCC) syndrome or Gorlin's syndrome, characterized by multiple skin cancers, internal cancers and severe developmental abnormalities. The patched gene codes for a developmental regulator protein implicated in the sonic hedgehog (SHH) signalling pathway which plays an important role in oncogenic transformation. Patched exhibits tumor suppression function and has been shown to be mutated in skin cancers isolated from DNA repair-proficient patients or from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a DNA repair-deficient syndrome. We have reviewed and analyzed in detail the different mutation spectra found on the PTCH gene in these various models. The type and distribution of mutations are quite different between germline, sporadic and XP cancers. Among the germline alterations, there is a preponderance (70%) of rearrangements compared to other tumour types analysed where less than 30% of rearrangements is observed. Typical UV-induced mutations of the patched gene are found prominently in XP basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and in particular, a significantly higher level (63%) of the UV signature tandem mutations is found compared to sporadic BCC (11%). The location of mutations along the PTCH protein delineates several important functional domains implicated in the biology of this transmembrane receptor. PMID:10838143

  10. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jean Y. So, P.-L.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2007-11-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overview of what is known about the mechanisms by which activation of Hedgehog signaling leads to the development of BCCs and will review two recent papers suggesting that agents that modulate sterol levels might influence the Hh pathway. Thus, sterols may be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of BCCs, and readily available agents such as statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) or vitamin D might be helpful in reducing BCC incidence.

  11. Advances in the management of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Carucci, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a malignant neoplasm derived from non-keratinizing cells that originate in the basal layer of the epidermis, is the most common cancer in humans. Several factors such as anatomic location, histologic features, primary or recurrent tumors, and patient characteristics influence the choice of treatment modality for BCC. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) facilitates optimal margin control and conservation of normal tissue for the management of BCC; however, other treatment modalities may also be implemented in the correct clinical scenario. Other treatment modalities that will be reviewed include simple excision, electrodesiccation and curettage, cryotherapy, topical immunotherapy and chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and radiation therapy. In addition, targeted molecular therapeutic options for the treatment of advanced or metastatic BCC will be discussed in this informal review based on recent literature obtained by using PubMed with relevant search terms. PMID:26097726

  12. Management of periorbital basal cell carcinoma with orbital invasion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Michelle T; Wu, Albert; Figueira, Edwin; Huilgol, Shyamala; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common eyelid malignancy; however, orbital invasion by periocular BCC is rare, and management remains challenging. Established risk factors for orbital invasion by BCC include male gender, advanced age, medial canthal location, previous recurrences, large tumor size, aggressive histologic subtype and perineural invasion. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach with orbital exenteration remaining the treatment of choice. Globe-sparing treatment may be appropriate in selected patients and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are often used as adjuvant therapies for advanced or inoperable cases, although the evidence remains limited. We aim to summarize the presentation and treatment of BCC with orbital invasion to better guide the management of this complex condition. PMID:26437207

  13. Basal cell hyperplasia and basal cell carcinoma of the prostate: a comprehensive review and discussion of a case with c-erbB-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Montironi, R; Mazzucchelli, R; Stramazzotti, D; Scarpelli, M; López Beltran, A; Bostwick, D G

    2005-01-01

    Prostatic basal cell proliferations range from ordinary basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) to florid basal cell hyperplasia to basal cell carcinoma. The distinction between these forms of BCH, including the variant with prominent nucleoli (formerly called atypical BCH), and basal cell carcinoma depends on morphological and immunohistochemical criteria and, in particular, on the degree of cell proliferation. In florid BCH, the proliferation index is intermediate between ordinary BCH and basal cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry is also useful for identifying the cell composition of the basal cell proliferations, including the basal cell nature of the cells, their myoepithelial differentiation, and c-erbB-2 oncoprotein expression. Based on the information derived from the literature and on the appearance and follow up of the case presented here, florid BCH might represent a lesion with an intermediate position between ordinary BCH and basal cell carcinoma. However, criteria useful for the identification of those cases with a true precursor nature are not available. In general, basal cell carcinoma is seen as a low grade carcinoma. The immunohistochemical expression of the c-erbB-2 oncoprotein, similar to that seen in breast cancer, might have therapeutic importance. PMID:15735163

  14. [Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and premalignant skin lesions--how to treat?].

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Sari; Jeskanen, Leila; Ylitalo, Leea

    2014-01-01

    Increasing exposure to UV radiation is considered the most important etiologic factor of nonmelanoma skin cancers. Consequently, exposed areas such as the scalp and face, are the primary areas for developing non-melanoma skin cancers. Once a patient has presented with one tumor, additional lesions are common. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical picture and biopsy or excision for histopathological analysis. Various non-surgical treatment options have been established. Superficial basal cell carcinoma, superficial carcinoma in situ and all actinic keratoses are preferentially treated non-surgically. Most other basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas should be surgically removed. PMID:24724463

  15. Clinical outcome of surgical treatment for periorbital basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kakudo, Natsuko; Ogawa, Yutaka; Suzuki, Kenji; Kushida, Satoshi; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2009-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has a predilection for the periorbital region, which is a special, prominent, cosmetic, functional area to protect the eyeball. For squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, extensive resection with reconstruction is performed. In contrast, for BCC, resection is often confined to a small to medium-sized area, necessitating higher-quality reconstructive surgery. We analyze the surgical outcomes of treatment for periorbital BCC, and evaluate reconstruction method after resection. Forty-nine patients with periorbital BCC had surgery in our hospital over 20 years. Age, gender of the patients, and size, localization, and histology of the tumor, and surgical procedures, and their early and late complications were analyzed retrospectively. BCC was most frequently occurred in the lower lid (55%), followed by inner canthus (19%), upper lid (17%), and outer canthus (9%). The histologic classifications were solid (80%), morphea (7%), mix (7%), superficial (2%), keratotic (2%), and adenoid (2%). Recurrence of the tumor was observed in 2 advanced cases in patients treated with resection of the tumor including surrounding tissue 5 mm from the margin. A rotation advancement cheek flap procedure was most frequently applied. Horizontal shift of the skin was most effective to prevent postoperative lagophthalmos. BCC occurred most frequently in the lower lid within the periorbital area. Rotation advancement of cheek flap with horizontal shift of the skin is most effective procedure in both appearance and function of the eyelid. PMID:19801921

  16. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Soriano, Virtudes; Juberias, Pablo; Saez, Berta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Grasa, Matilde; Höiom, Veronica; Lindblom, Annika; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; van Rossum, Michelle M; Aben, Katja K H; de Vries, Esther; Santinami, Mario; Di Mauro, Maria G; Maurichi, Andrea; Wendt, Judith; Hochleitner, Pia; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gudmundsson, Julius; Magnusdottir, Droplaug N; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Holm, Hilma; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Frigge, Michael L; Blondal, Thorarinn; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Bjarnason, Hjördis; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Okamoto, Ichiro; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hansson, Johan; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I; Kumar, Rajiv; Karagas, Margaret R; Nelson, Heather H; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Olafsson, Jon H; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-08-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 x 10(-9)), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 x 10(-10)). The effect of rs157935[T] is dependent on the parental origin of the risk allele. None of these variants were found to be associated with melanoma or fair-pigmentation traits. A melanoma- and pigmentation-associated variant in the SLC45A2 gene, L374F, is associated with risk of both BCC and squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we report conclusive evidence that rs401681[C] in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus confers susceptibility to BCC but protects against melanoma. PMID:19578363

  17. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma--comparing the diagnostic methods of SIAscopy and dermoscopy.

    PubMed

    Terstappen, Karin; Larkö, Olle; Wennberg, Ann-Marie

    2007-01-01

    Pigmented basal cell carcinomas can be difficult to distinguish clinically from melanoma. Dermoscopy has proven to be useful in the differential diagnosis of the two tumour types. SIAscopy (Spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis) is a fairly new technique of imaging pigmented skin lesions that has been presented previously as a useful tool in diagnosing melanoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SIAscopy can be useful in diagnosing pigmented basal cell carcinomas. Twenty-one pigmented basal cell carcinomas were analysed, comparing dermoscopic and SIAscopic findings. The results, in this limited setting, show that SIAscopy has no advantages over dermoscopy when diagnosing pigmented basal cell carcinomas. On the contrary, pigmented basal cell carcinomas show, in SIAscopy, similar features to those previously reported for melanoma.

  18. [From gene to disease: basal cell naevus syndrome].

    PubMed

    de Meij, T G J; Baars, M J H; Gille, J J P; Hack, W W M; Haasnoot, K; van Hagen, J M

    2005-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, basal cell naevus syndrome, Gorlin syndrome) is an autosomal dominant disorder, caused by mutations in the PTCH gene mapped to chromosome 9q22.3. It is characterised by multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocysts of the jaws, palmar and plantar pits, cerebral ectopic calcification and several skeletal anomalies. Occasionally, patients with NBCCS develop other neoplasms, particularly medulloblastomas and ovarian fibromas, indicating that the PTCH gene is a tumor-suppressor gene. Early recognition and careful follow-up are needed. Guidelines for managing these patients are presented.

  19. Basal cell carcinoma develops in contact with the epidermal basal cell layer - a three-dimensional morphological study.

    PubMed

    Pirici, Ionica; Ciurea, Marius Eugen; Mîndrilă, Ion; Avrămoiu, Ioan; Pirici, Alexandru; Nicola, Monica Georgiana; Rogoveanu, Otilia Constantina

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor of the skin, and it develops most frequently on the areas of the body that make its treatment and care extremely difficult, especially in cases of neglecting or aggressive growth and invasion. Both typical mild cases as well as locally aggressive tumor types do not tend to metastasize, and it has been postulated that they should share some common biological and morphological features that might explain this behavior. In this study, we have utilized a high-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction technique on pathological samples from 15 cases of common aggressive (fibrosing and adenoid types) and mild (superficial type) basal cell carcinomas, and showed that all these types shared contact points and bridges with the underlying basal cell layer of the epidermis or with the outmost layer of the hair follicle. The connections found had in fact the highest number for fibrosing type (100%), compared to the superficial (85.71%) and adenoid (55%) types. The morphology of the connection bridges was also different, adjacent moderate to abundant inflammatory infiltrate seeming to lead to a loss of basaloid features in these areas. For the adenoid type, tumor islands seemed to be connected also to each other more strongly, forming a common "tumor lace", and while it has been showed that superficial and fibrosing types have higher recurrence risks, all together these data might iterate a connection between the number of bridging points and the biological and clinical manifestation of this skin tumor. PMID:27151694

  20. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of basal cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, R.; Sestini, S.; De Giorgi, V.; Stambouli, D.; Carli, P.; Massi, D.; Pavone, F. S.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated human cutaneous basal cell carcinoma ex-vivo samples by combined time resolved two photon intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy. Morphological and spectroscopic differences were found between malignant skin and corresponding healthy skin tissues. In comparison with normal healthy skin, cancer tissue showed a different morphology and a mean fluorescence lifetime distribution slightly shifted towards higher values. Topical application of delta-aminolevulinic acid to the lesion four hours before excision resulted in an enhancement of the fluorescence signal arising from malignant tissue, due to the accumulation of protoporphyrines inside tumor cells. Contrast enhancement was prevalent at tumor borders by both two photon fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging. Fluorescence-based images showed a good correlation with conventional histopathological analysis, thereby supporting the diagnostic accuracy of this novel method. Combined morphological and lifetime analysis in the study of ex-vivo skin samples discriminated benign from malignant tissues, thus offering a reliable, non-invasive tool for the in-vivo analysis of inflammatory and neoplastic skin lesions.

  1. Morphological Spectrum of Basal Cell Carcinoma in Southern Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Flora Dorothy; Naik, Ramdas; Khadilkar, Urmila Niranjan; Kini, Hema; Kini, Ullal Anand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer worldwide, which appears over sun-exposed skin as slow-growing, locally invasive lesion that rarely metastasizes. Many phenotypic presentations are possible. BCCs are more common in males and tend to occur in older people. Majority is found on the head and neck. Many histopathological subtypes have been defined including nodular, micronodular, cystic, superficial, pigmented, adenoid, infiltrating, sclerosing, keratotic, infundibulocystic, metatypical, basosquamous and fibroepitheliomatous. Mixed patterns are common. Aim The aim was to study morphological spectrum of BCC in a tertiary care hospital in southern Karnataka. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 100 cases of BCCs reported in the Department of Pathology over a 9-year period from 2006 to 2014. Results The mean age of presentation was 62 years. There was slight female preponderance (56%). The most common location was face (65%) and the most common presentation was ulceration (45%). Of the 100 BCCs, 50% were nodular, 13% infiltrating, 6% basosquamous, 4% superficial, 3% keratotic, 3% multinodular and 1% mixed. Conclusion BCC, besides being the commonest cutaneous cancer, is also known for its numerous histological patterns which are shown to have prognostic implications. This study reveals the frequency of the various histological patterns of BCC in southern Karnataka, where it has been rarely studied before. PMID:27504291

  2. Sonidegib phosphate: new approval for basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tibes, R

    2016-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), although mostly locally confined, is the most common cancer. Most BCCs harbor inactivating mutations in the membrane receptor/gene Ptch, thereby activating the Hedgehog signaling pathway (Hh) via the essential signaling molecule Smoothened (SMO). Novel small-molecule inhibitors or antagonists of SMO have shown excellent response rates in patients with locally advanced, unresectable and metastatic BCC in roughly 35-60% of patients, with disease control rates and clinical benefit being even higher. Sonidegib is the second-in-class SMO inhibitor approved for locally advanced, unresectable and metastatic BCC. Sonidegib is given once daily continuously, with specific side effects as listed in the label indication. Resistance develops over time and knowledge gleaned from other SMO inhibitors indicates that SMO mutations preventing drug binding as well as mechanisms activating the Hh pathway downstream of SMO are responsible, ultimately reactivating Hh pathway signaling. The next challenge will be to define novel salvage and SMO combination strategies for BCC and other tumors. PMID:27376162

  3. Treatment of Facial Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Vanessa; Walton, Shernaz

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are locally destructive malignancies of the skin. They are the most common type of cancer in the western world. The lifetime incidence may be up to 39%. UV exposure is the most common risk factor. The majority of these tumours occur on the head and neck. Despite BCCs being relatively indolent the high incidence means that their treatment now contributes a significant and increasing workload for the health service. A good understanding of the options available is important. Management decisions may be influenced by various factors including the patient's age and comorbidities and the lesion subtype and location. Due to the importance of a good cosmetic and curative outcome for facial BCCs treatment decisions may differ significantly to those that would be made for BCCs arising elsewhere. There is little good randomized controlled data available comparing treatment modalities. Although traditionally standard excision has been the treatment of choice various other options are available including: Mohs micrographic surgery, curettage and cautery, cryosurgery, radiotherapy, topical imiquimod, photodynamic therapy and topical 5-fluorouracil. We discuss and review the literature and evidence base for the treatment options that are currently available for facial BCCs. PMID:21773034

  4. Neglected Basal Cell Carcinomas in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Erika; Korom, Irma; Raskó, Zoltán; Kis, Erika; Varga, János; Oláh, Judit; Kemény, Lajos

    2011-01-01

    Although tumors on the surface of the skin are considered to be easily recognizable, neglected advanced skin neoplasms are encountered even in the 21st century. There can be numerous causes of the delay in the diagnosis: fear of the diagnosis and the treatment, becoming accustomed to a slowly growing tumor, old age, a low social milieu, and an inadequate hygienic culture are among the factors leading some people not to seek medical advice. The treatment of such advanced neoplasms is usually challenging. The therapy of neglected cases demands an individual multidisciplinary approach and teamwork. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common cutaneous tumor, usually develops in the elderly, grows slowly, and has an extremely low metastatic potential; these factors are suggesting that BCCs might well be the “ideal candidates” for neglected tumors. Five neglected advanced cases of BCC were diagnosed in our dermatological institute between 2000 and 2009. The clinical characteristics and treatment modalities of these neoplasms are discussed, together with the possible causes of the neglect. PMID:21151693

  5. Ionizing Radiation Exposure and Basal Cell Carcinoma Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changzhao; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    This commentary summarizes studies showing risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) development in relationship to environmental, occupational and therapeutic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). BCC, the most common type of human cancer, is driven by the aberrant activation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a tumor suppressor gene of Hh signaling pathway, and Smoothened play a key role in the development of radiation-induced BCCs in animal models. Epidemiological studies provide evidence that humans exposed to radiation as observed among the long-term, large scale cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, bone marrow transplant recipients, patients with tinea capitis and radiologic workers enhances risk of BCCs. Overall, this risk is higher in Caucasians than other races. People who were exposed early in life develop more BCCs. The enhanced IR correlation with BCC and not other common cutaneous malignancies is intriguing. The mechanism underlying these observations remains undefined. Understanding interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways and those which drive BCC development may be important in unraveling the mechanism associated with this enhanced risk. Recent studies showed that Vismodegib, a Smoothened inhibitor, is effective in treating radiation-induced BCCs in humans, suggesting that common strategies are required for the intervention of BCCs development irrespective of their etiology.

  6. Ionizing Radiation Exposure and Basal Cell Carcinoma Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changzhao; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    This commentary summarizes studies showing risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) development in relationship to environmental, occupational and therapeutic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). BCC, the most common type of human cancer, is driven by the aberrant activation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a tumor suppressor gene of Hh signaling pathway, and Smoothened play a key role in the development of radiation-induced BCCs in animal models. Epidemiological studies provide evidence that humans exposed to radiation as observed among the long-term, large scale cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, bone marrow transplant recipients, patients with tinea capitis and radiologic workers enhances risk of BCCs. Overall, this risk is higher in Caucasians than other races. People who were exposed early in life develop more BCCs. The enhanced IR correlation with BCC and not other common cutaneous malignancies is intriguing. The mechanism underlying these observations remains undefined. Understanding interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways and those which drive BCC development may be important in unraveling the mechanism associated with this enhanced risk. Recent studies showed that Vismodegib, a Smoothened inhibitor, is effective in treating radiation-induced BCCs in humans, suggesting that common strategies are required for the intervention of BCCs development irrespective of their etiology. PMID:26930381

  7. Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma in the United Kingdom: incidence, lifestyle factors, and comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Reinau, D; Surber, C; Jick, S S; Meier, C R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Methods: Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, we calculated annual incidence rates. In a case–control analysis, we examined lifestyle factors and comorbidities. Results: Incidence rose significantly between 2000 and 2011. Basal cell carcinoma risk was increased in alcohol drinkers (slightly) and immunocompromised patients, but reduced in smokers and individuals with abnormal weight. Conclusions: Basal cell carcinoma places a growing public health burden. Lifestyle factors do not play a major role in pathogenesis, but immunosuppression is important. PMID:24874476

  8. Facial dermis grafts after removal of basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Kyu; Yoon, Won-Young; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2012-11-01

    Selecting a proper reconstruction method is the key to success in skin cancer management, especially for lesions involving the face. Using a skin graft is usually straightforward when covering a skin defect; however, major concerns in skin grafting include a poor color match in the recipient-site and donor-site morbidity. To overcome these limitations, the authors have developed a dermis graft, which utilizes a de-epithelialized split-thickness skin graft method. The purpose of this retrospective study was to report reliability of dermis grafts after removal of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) on the face by presenting our clinical experience with them. This study included 38 patients who were treated for facial defects created by resection of BCCs. The locations of the defects were as follows: nose (n = 17), orbital area (n = 14), cheek (n = 4), temple area (n = 2), and forehead (n = 1). The defects ranged in size from 3.3 to 6.5 cm. Functional and cosmetic outcomes, postoperative complications, and patient satisfaction were assessed. The patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months. The entire dermis graft re-epithelialized after grafting within 17 to 27 days. Most of the patients had satisfactory results in both functional and cosmetic matters with high-quality skin characteristics. There were no significant complications and no recurrences were observed during the follow-up period. Patient satisfaction with the dermis graft was also excellent. The dermis graft may be used reliably for covering defects after removal of BCCs on the face. PMID:23172436

  9. Laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas guided by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Heidy; Cordova, Miguel; Nehal, Kishwer; Rossi, Anthony; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Laser ablation offers precise and fast removal of superficial and early nodular types of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Nevertheless, the lack of histological confirmation has been a limitation. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging combined with a contrast agent can offer cellular-level histology-like feedback to detect the presence (or absence) of residual BCC directly on the patient. We conducted an ex vivo bench-top study to provide a set of effective ablation parameters (fluence, number of passes) to remove superficial BCCs while also controlling thermal coagulation post-ablation to allow uptake of contrast agent. The results for an Er:YAG laser (2.9 um and pulse duration 250us) show that with 6 passes of 25 J/cm2, thermal coagulation can be effectively controlled, to allow both the uptake of acetic acid (contrast agent) and detection of residual (or absence) BCCs. Confirmation was provided with histological examination. An initial in vivo study on 35 patients shows that the uptake of contrast agent aluminum chloride) and imaging quality is similar to that observed in the ex vivo study. The detection of the presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was confirmed in 10 wounds with (additional) histology and in 25 lesions with follow-up imaging. Our results indicate that resolution is sufficient but further development and use of appropriate contrast agent are necessary to improve sensitivity and specificity. Advances in RCM technology for imaging of lateral and deep margins directly on the patient may provide less invasive, faster and less expensive image-guided approaches for treatment of BCCs.

  10. In Vivo Multiphoton Microscopy of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Mihaela; Zachary, Christopher B.; Harris, Ronald M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Kelly, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are diagnosed by clinical evaluation, which can include dermoscopic evaluation, biopsy, and histopathologic examination. Recent translation of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to clinical practice raises the possibility of noninvasive, label-free in vivo imaging of BCCs that could reduce the time from consultation to treatment. Objectives To demonstrate the capability of MPM to image in vivo BCC lesions in human skin, and to evaluate if histopathologic criteria can be identified in MPM images. Design, Setting, and Participants Imaging in patients with BCC was performed at the University of California–Irvine Health Beckman Laser Institute & Medical Clinic, Irvine, between September 2012 and April 2014, with a clinical MPM-based tomograph. Ten BCC lesions were imaged in vivo in 9 patients prior to biopsy. The MPM images were compared with histopathologic findings. Main Outcomes and Measures MPM imaging identified in vivo and noninvasively the main histopathologic feature of BCC lesions: nests of basaloid cells showing palisading in the peripheral cell layer at the dermoepidermal junction and/or in the dermis. Results The main MPM feature associated with the BCC lesions involved nests of basaloid cells present in the papillary and reticular dermis. This feature correlated well with histopathologic examination. Other MPM features included elongated tumor cells in the epidermis aligned in 1 direction and parallel collagen and elastin bundles surrounding the tumors. Conclusions and Relevance This study demonstrates, in a limited patient population, that noninvasive in vivo MPM imaging can provide label-free contrast that reveals several characteristic features of BCC lesions. Future studies are needed to validate the technique and correlate MPM performance with histopathologic examination. PMID:25909650

  11. Pigmentation in basal cell carcinoma involves enhanced endothelin-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Lan, Cheng-Che E; Wu, Ching-Shuang; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2005-07-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most prevalent malignant skin tumor. In Asian patients, marked pigmentation in BCC lesions is often observed. Recently, endothelins (ETs) have been implicated to participate in the pigmentation process of BCC. Therefore, we set out to investigate the involvement of ET in the pigmentation process of BCC and the potential regulators in the pigmentation pathway. We explored the effects of an established BCC cell line on melanocytes. The growth factor profiles of BCC culture supernatant and effects of supernatant on melanocytes were documented. Potential regulators involved in the pigmentation pathway were also studied. The immunohistochemical staining of pigmented and non-pigmented BCC specimens was performed to confirm our in vitro findings. Our results showed that BCC supernatant contained significant amount of ET-1, basic fibroblast growth factor, and nerve growth factor. Furthermore, BCC supernatant stimulated melanin formation of cultured melanocytes. Addition of ET-receptor antagonist abrogated the melanogenic effect of BCC supernatant on melanocytes. Introduction of UVB irradiation decreased the ET-1 secretion by BCC cells. Immunohistochemical staining of the pigmented facial BCC specimens showed prominent expression of ET-1 on pigmented BCC, while the non-pigmented facial BCC specimens showed little ET-1 reactivity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) staining showed little expression on BCC specimens, regardless of pigmentation status. In summary, our results indicate that enhanced ET-1 expression in pigmented BCC plays an important role in the hyperpigmentation of this tumor. Moreover, this enhanced ET-1 cascade showed little correlation with UV irradiation and TNF-alpha expression in our study.

  12. Familial Multiple Basal Cell Carcinoma (Gorlin's Syndrome): A Case Report of a Father and Son

    PubMed Central

    Nikam, Balkrishna; Kshirsagar, Ashok; Shivhare, Pratik; Garg, Amitoj

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin syndrome is a rare familial disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas along with facial and skeletal findings. Here, we report a father and son case, presented with features of Gorlin syndrome. PMID:24249904

  13. Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review of Existing and Emerging Nonsurgical Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly occurring cancer in the world and overall incidence is still on the rise. While typically a slow-growing tumor for which metastases is rare, basal cell carcinoma can be locally destructive and disfiguring. Given the vast prevalence of this disease, there is a significant overall burden on patient well-being and quality of life. The current mainstay of basal cell carcinoma treatment involves surgical modalities, such as electrodessication and curettage, excision, cryosurgery, and Mohs micrographic surgery. Such methods are typically reserved for localized basal cell carcinoma and offer high five-year cure rates, but come with the risk of functional impairment, disfigurement, and scarring. Here, the authors review the evidence and indications for nonsurgical treatment modalities in cases where surgery is impractical, contraindicated, or simply not desired by the patient. PMID:27386043

  14. Hedgehog- and mTOR-targeted therapies for advanced basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Paquet, Philippe; Herfs, Michael; Delvenne, Philippe; Piérard, Gérald E

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are the most frequent human cancer. Over 90% of all BCCs have a mutation in PTCH1 or smoothened, two conducting proteins of the Hedgehog pathway. They rarely progress deeply and metastasize; however, if they do, these advanced basal cell carcinoma become amenable to treatment by inhibiting the Hedgehog and the P13K-mTOR pathways. Such innovative drugs include vismodegib, cyclopamine, itraconazole, everolimus and a few other agents that are in early clinical development. PMID:26437034

  15. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising on a Verrucous Epidermal Nevus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Analia; Aguinaga, Felipe; Marinho, Flauberto; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of basal cell carcinoma that appeared from an epidermal verrucous nevus in a 61-year-old patient. The onset of basal cell carcinoma in sebaceous nevi, basal cell nevi and dysplastic nevi is relatively common, but it is rarely associated with epidermal verrucous nevi. There is no consensus on whether the two lesions have a common cellular origin or whether they merely represent a collision of two distinct tumors. Since this association – as with other malignant tumors – is rare, there is no need for prophylactic removal of epidermal verrucous nevi. PMID:25848348

  16. [Basal cell carcinoma of prostate: a report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Ma, L L; Zhang, S D; Lu, M; Tian, Y; He, Q; Jin, J

    2016-02-18

    To explore the clinical pathological characteristics and improve the recognition in the diagnosis and treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of prostate. Three cases of BCC of prostate were reported and the relevant literature was reviewed to investigate the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We analyzed three cases of prostatic BCC. Their ages were within a range of 57 to 83 years. One of them complained of hematuria and two complained of dysuria. All of them presented with prostatic hyperplasia. Two of them presented with high prostate specific antigen (PSA) and one with normal PSA. Case 1 had prostate cancer invasion of bladder, rectal fascia, with lymph node metastasis, bone metastasis and lung metastases. The patient received bladder resection+bilateral ureteral cutaneous ureterostomy+lymph node dissection on November 2, 2014 . Postoperative pathological diagnosis showed BCC. Reexamination of pelvic enhanced MRI in January 8, 2015 suggested pelvic recurrence. Abdominal enhanced CT showed multiple liver metastases and pancreatic metastasis on July 11, 2015. Prostate cancer specific death occurred in October 2015. Case 2 was diagnosed as BCC in prostate biopsy on March 27, 2015. Positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) showed pulmonary metastasis and bone metastasis. Then the patient received chemotherapy, endocrine therapy and local radiation therapy. Reexamination of PET-CT on January 11, 2016 showed that the lung metastase tumors and bone metastase tumors were larger than before. Up to January 10, 2016, the patient was still alive. Postoperative pathological changes of transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) in case 3 showed BCC might be considered. The PET-CT suggested residual prostate cancer, which might be associated with bilateral pelvic lymph node metastasis. In April 20, 2016, the review of PET-CT showed pelvic huge irregular hybrid density shadow, about 14.5 cm×10.0 cm×12.9 cm in size, and tumor recurrence was

  17. [Basal cell carcinoma of prostate: a report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Ma, L L; Zhang, S D; Lu, M; Tian, Y; He, Q; Jin, J

    2016-02-18

    To explore the clinical pathological characteristics and improve the recognition in the diagnosis and treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of prostate. Three cases of BCC of prostate were reported and the relevant literature was reviewed to investigate the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We analyzed three cases of prostatic BCC. Their ages were within a range of 57 to 83 years. One of them complained of hematuria and two complained of dysuria. All of them presented with prostatic hyperplasia. Two of them presented with high prostate specific antigen (PSA) and one with normal PSA. Case 1 had prostate cancer invasion of bladder, rectal fascia, with lymph node metastasis, bone metastasis and lung metastases. The patient received bladder resection+bilateral ureteral cutaneous ureterostomy+lymph node dissection on November 2, 2014 . Postoperative pathological diagnosis showed BCC. Reexamination of pelvic enhanced MRI in January 8, 2015 suggested pelvic recurrence. Abdominal enhanced CT showed multiple liver metastases and pancreatic metastasis on July 11, 2015. Prostate cancer specific death occurred in October 2015. Case 2 was diagnosed as BCC in prostate biopsy on March 27, 2015. Positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) showed pulmonary metastasis and bone metastasis. Then the patient received chemotherapy, endocrine therapy and local radiation therapy. Reexamination of PET-CT on January 11, 2016 showed that the lung metastase tumors and bone metastase tumors were larger than before. Up to January 10, 2016, the patient was still alive. Postoperative pathological changes of transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) in case 3 showed BCC might be considered. The PET-CT suggested residual prostate cancer, which might be associated with bilateral pelvic lymph node metastasis. In April 20, 2016, the review of PET-CT showed pelvic huge irregular hybrid density shadow, about 14.5 cm×10.0 cm×12.9 cm in size, and tumor recurrence was

  18. Photodynamic therapy with 5-aminoolevulinic acid-induced porphyrins and DMSO/EDTA for basal cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warloe, Trond; Peng, Qian; Heyerdahl, Helen; Moan, Johan; Steen, Harald B.; Giercksky, Karl-Erik

    1995-03-01

    Seven hundred sixty three basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) in 122 patients were treated by photodynamic therapy by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in cream topically applied, either alone, in combination with dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA), or with DMSO as a pretreatment. After 3 hours cream exposure 40 - 200 Joules/cm2 of 630 nm laser light was given. Fluorescence imaging of biopsies showed highly improved ALA penetration depth and doubled ALA-induced porphyrin production using DMSO/EDTA. Treatment response was recorded after 3 months. After a single treatment 90% of 393 superficial lesions responded completely, independent of using DMSO/EDTA. In 363 nodulo-ulcerative lesions the complete response rate increased from 67% to above 90% with DMSO/EDTA for lesions less than 2 mm thickness and from 34% to about 50% for lesions thicker than 2 mm. Recurrence rate observed during a follow-up period longer than 12 months was 2 - 5%. PDT of superficial thin BCCs with ALA-induced porphyrins and DMSO/EDTA equals surgery and radiotherapy with respect to cure rate and recurrence. Cosmetic results of ALA-based PDT seemed to be better than those after other therapies. In patients with the nevoid BCC syndrome the complete response rate after PDT was far lower.

  19. Basal cell carcinoma in a blue-fronted amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Tell, L A; Woods, L; Mathews, K G

    1997-01-01

    Tumors of the integumentary system are relatively common in companion birds. Dermal tumors in pet birds can be epithelial, mesenchymal, or vascular in origin. Basal cell carcinomas appear to be extremely rare in birds. An adult female blue-fronted Amazon parrot was examined because it exhibited bilateral cervical masses that extended from the base of the skull to the ingluvial region. The tumors were removed by surgical excision. Microscopic examination of the masses revealed neoplastic epithelial cells that extended to all borders of the sections; scattered vessels with neoplastic cells within their lumens were also found. The histopathologic diagnosis was basal cell carcinoma. Six weeks postoperatively, the masses recurred and the bird was euthanatized. This report suggests that basal cell carcinomas should be considered as a differential for avian dermal tumors. This neoplastic condition can be aggressive and has the potential to metastasize.

  20. A Case of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Outer Hair Follicle Sheath Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Masazumi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Fumihiko; Akasaka, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old Japanese man presented at our hospital with an asymptomatic, blackish, irregularly shaped plaque with a gray nodule in the periphery on his left lower leg. The lesion had been present for 10 years and had recently enlarged, associated with bleeding. Histopathologically, the tumor consisted of three distinct parts: The first part showed massive aggregation of basophilic basaloid cells with peripheral palisading and abundant melanin granules, and was diagnosed as solid-type basal cell carcinoma. The second part showed aggregation of clear cells with squamous eddies, and was diagnosed as proliferating trichilemmal tumor. The third part showed reticular aggregation of basaloid cells with infundibular cysts in the papillary dermis, and was diagnosed as infundibulocystic basal cell carcinoma. We diagnosed this tumor as basal cell carcinoma with various forms of hair follicle differentiation, including differentiation into the outer root sheath. PMID:26955331

  1. [Exclusive radiotherapy for a facial basal cell carcinoma with trigeminal ganglion involvement].

    PubMed

    Longeac, M; Lapeyre, M; Delbet Dupas, C; Barthélémy, I; Pham Dang, N

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell carcinomas with symptomatic perineural invasion are rare entities. We report the case of a 60year-old man (with a grafted kidney), surgically treated in 2007 for a sclerodermiform basal cell carcinoma infiltrating the left nostril. Five years later, a painful left hemifacial hypoesthesia associated with an ulcus rodens of the nasolabial fold appeared. A biopsy confirmed a recurrence. MRI showed an enhancement of the trigeminal ganglion. The patient had a trigeminal perineural invasion secondary to a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma. He received a local intensity-modulated radiotherapy alone (70Gy in 33 sessions), administered from the skin tumour to the skull base. Three years after the end of treatment, the patient is in radiological and clinical remission, with partial recovery of the hypoesthesia. Evolution was marked by iterative corneal ulcers and decreased visual acuity. Modalities of treatment by surgery and/or radiation therapy and complications are poorly described in the literature. PMID:27105681

  2. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Silapunt, Sirunya; Chen, Leon; Migden, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (laBCCs) with large, aggressive, destructive, and disfiguring tumors, or metastatic disease is challenging. Dysregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified in the vast majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). There are two United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)-approved Hh pathway inhibitors (HPIs) that exhibit antitumor activity in advanced BCC with an acceptable safety profile. Common adverse effects include muscle spasms, dysgeusia, alopecia, fatigue, nausea and weight loss. PMID:27583029

  3. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Silapunt, Sirunya; Chen, Leon; Migden, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (laBCCs) with large, aggressive, destructive, and disfiguring tumors, or metastatic disease is challenging. Dysregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified in the vast majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). There are two United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)-approved Hh pathway inhibitors (HPIs) that exhibit antitumor activity in advanced BCC with an acceptable safety profile. Common adverse effects include muscle spasms, dysgeusia, alopecia, fatigue, nausea and weight loss. PMID:27583029

  4. [Risk factors for basal cell carcinoma. Case-control study in Cordoba].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Lascano, Alejandro; Kuznitzky, Raquel; Garay, Iliana; Ducasse, Cristina; Albertini, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is undoubtedly a complex disease. Its etiology is still unclear and despite its frequency, there is a paucity of data on its risk factors. We assessed potential risk factors for basal cell carcinoma in a population from Córdoba (Argentina). This case-control study involved 88 newly diagnosed cases and 88 controls, matched by age and sex. The following risk factors were significant in the multivariate analysis: skin type I-II-III, high recreational sun exposure after 20 years of age, high sun exposure for beach holidays and actinic keratosis.

  5. Neural variant of fetal rhabdomyoma and naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hardisson, D; Jimenez-Heffernan, J A; Nistal, M; Picazo, M L; Tovar, J A; Contreras, F

    1996-09-01

    A 15-year-old boy with the characteristic features of the naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome presented with a retroperitoneal mass. The tumour showed morphological features of a still ill-defined variant of fetal rhabdomyoma, characterized by well-differentiated nerve fibres admixed with immature striated muscle cells, similar to neuromuscular choristoma. Four cases of fetal rhabdomyoma and naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome have been previously reported. The behaviour of this tumour has been benign, although a complete excision was impossible due to its close relation with abdominal vascular trunks.

  6. Basal cell carcinoma and breast carcinoma following repeated fluoroscopic examinations of the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Myskowski, P.L.; Gumpertz, E.; Safai, B.

    1985-03-01

    A 69-year-old white Italian woman was first seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1981 concerning several skin growths on her back. The patient had had several basal cell carcinomas surgically removed from her back during the preceding 5 years. There was no history of arsenic ingestion or prolonged sun exposure and her family history was negative for skin cancer. The patient had developed pulmonary tuberculosis in 1938 and was treated with pneumothorax therapy. She had had more than 50 fluoroscopic examinations of the chest following this therapy, as well as multiple diagnostic x-ray films since that time. On the back, clustered in the interscapular region, were multiple scars and nine erythematous nodules with pearly borders, telangiectasia, and translucent surfaces. Within several nodules there were areas of light and dark brown pigmentation. Biopsy of all lesions revealed basal cell carcinoma, some of which were pigmented, without evidence of chronic radiodermatitis. All lesions were treated with curettage and electrodesiccation three times with good cosmetic results.

  7. Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus in continuity with nodular basal cell carcinoma: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dongre, Atul M.; Khopkar, Uday S.; Kalyanpad, Yogesh N.; Gole, Prachi V.

    2016-01-01

    Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus and nodular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are different morphological variants of BCC. It is very rare to see both the variants together in a single lesion. Here we report a case of a 56-year-old female who presented with a nodule on the trunk, which on biopsy showed features of both nodular BCC and fibroepithelioma of Pinkus. PMID:27559504

  8. Skin cancer: Basal cell carcinoma--pay your money, take your choice.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Ervin H

    2013-09-01

    Superficial basal cell carcinomas are a common challenge in clinical dermatology because they are frequent and surgical approaches tend to scar. A large randomized trial comparing three nonsurgical approaches has shown that all had similar clinical outcomes - so, you pay your money and take your choice.

  9. Acitretin systemic and retinoic acid 0.1% cream supression of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Bao; Zhang, San-Quan; Li, Chang-Xing; Huang, Zhen-Ming; Luo, Yu-Wu

    2010-01-01

    Retinoids have been used for years as monotherapy and/or in combination for treatment and suppression of cutaneous malignancies in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We report 4 cases with BCC confirmed by histopathology who were treated by short-term systemic acitretin combined with retinoic acid 0.1% cream. The 4 cases with BCC showed good response to the treatment without severe adverse effects during treatment and follow-up. The finding suggests that acitretin may be an appropriate treatment option for elderly patients who require less invasive treatment for BCC. PMID:25386240

  10. Basal cell carcinoma and the carcinogenic role of aberrant Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Saran, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequent cancer in the white population and its incidence appears to be increasing worldwide. While the majority of BCCs arise sporadically, many cases are attributable to basal cell nevus syndrome, or Gorlin syndrome, an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by the occurrence of multiple BCCs and by extracutaneous tumors. Genetic studies on patients with basal cell nevus syndrome indicate deregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in epidermal keratinocytes as the primary event in the pathogenesis of BCC. This article summarizes the recent progress in understanding Hh-dependent BCC tumorigenesis, as well as evidence for deregulation of other molecular pathways, primarily the Wnt developmental pathway. Understanding the molecular genetics of BCC development has provided new opportunities for molecular therapy of this cancer by targeting Hh and other signaling pathways. PMID:20528237

  11. A subset of prostatic basal cell carcinomas harbor the MYB rearrangement of adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Yonescu, Raluca; Epstein, Jonathan I; Westra, William H

    2015-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a basaloid tumor consisting of myoepithelial and ductal cells typically arranged in a cribriform pattern. Adenoid cystic carcinoma is generally regarded as a form of salivary gland carcinoma, but it can arise from sites unassociated with salivary tissue. A rare form of prostate carcinoma exhibits ACC-like features; it is no longer regarded as a true ACC but rather as prostatic basal cell carcinoma (PBCC) and within the spectrum of basaloid prostatic proliferations. True ACCs often harbor MYB translocations resulting in the MYB-NFIB fusion protein. MYB analysis could clarify the true nature of prostatic carcinomas that exhibit ACC features and thus help refine the classification of prostatic basaloid proliferations. Twelve PBCCs were identified from the pathology consultation files of Johns Hopkins Hospital. The histopathologic features were reviewed, and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization for MYB was performed. All 12 cases exhibited prominent basaloid histology. Four were purely solid, 7 exhibited a cribriform pattern reminiscent of salivary ACC, and 1 had a mixed pattern. The MYB rearrangement was detected in 2 (29%) of 7 ACC-like carcinomas but in none (0%) of the 5 PBCCs with a prominent solid pattern. True ACCs can arise in the prostate as is evidenced by the presence of the characteristic MYB rearrangement. When dealing with malignant basaloid proliferations in the prostate, recommendations to consolidate ACCs with other tumor types may need to be reassessed, particularly in light of the rapidly advancing field of biologic therapy where the identification of tumor-specific genetic alterations presents novel therapeutic targets.

  12. Photodynamic therapy by topical meso-tetraphenylporphinesulfonate tetrasodium salt administration in superficial basal cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, O.; Bandieramonte, G.; Melloni, E.; Marchesini, R.; Zunino, F.; Lepera, P.; De Palo, G. )

    1990-08-01

    The efficacy of an originally developed photodynamic approach, using topical administration of tetraphenylporphinesulfonate as the photosensitizer, was evaluated in a series of 292 basal cell carcinoma lesions (less than 2-mm thick) in 50 treated patients. The lack of indication for conventional therapies was the main selection criterion. The photosensitizing agent (2% solution) was topically applied at 0.1 ml/cm2, followed by light irradiation with a dye laser emitting at 645 nm (120 or 150 J/cm2). After initial treatment, all lesions responded, with 273 (93.5%) complete responses. Recurrences were observed in 29 (10.6%). A second application of photoradiation was performed in 15 persistent lesions and 11 relapsed lesions, producing 19/26 complete responses. Our results suggest that this technique can be considered a promising alternative treatment modality in selected cases of superficial basal cell carcinomas.

  13. Review of photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Marica B; Wennberg, Ann-Marie; Larkö, Olle

    2008-01-01

    The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide, and so also the demand for effective treatment modalities. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) using aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester has recently become good treatment options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma; especielly when treating large areas and areas with field cancerization. The cure rates are usually good, and the cosmetic outcomes excellent. The only major side effect reported is the pain experienced by the patients during treatment. This review covers the fundamental aspects of topical PDT and its application for treatment of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. Both potentials and limitations will be reviewed, as well as some recent development within the field. PMID:18728698

  14. Complications of the naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: results of a population based study.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Ladusans, E J; Rimmer, S; Burnell, L D; Thakker, N; Farndon, P A

    1993-01-01

    There are many potential complications which have been reported in association with the naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. We have been able to show the relative frequencies of these problems in a population based study of 84 cases in the north west of England. The major complications of basal cell carcinomas and jaw cysts occur in over 90% of patients by 40 years of age, but may both occur before 10 years of age. Less well described complications are ovarian calcification or fibroma (24%), medulloblastoma (5%), cardiac fibroma (3%), cleft palate (5%), and ophthalmic abnormalities such as squint or cataract (26%). This study more clearly defines the possible complications of the syndrome and gives clearer guidelines for counselling and screening affected and at risk persons. Images PMID:8326488

  15. Radiotherapy of periocular basal cell carcinomas: recurrence rates and treatment with special attention to the medical canthus.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Sains, R. S.; Robins, P.; Smith, B.; Bosniak, S. L.

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas of the eyelids, especially those in the medial canthal area, may cause extensive local destruction. Recurrent tumours are more aggressive and become progressively more difficult to treat; this is especially true for postirradiated recurrent, medial canthal, basal cell carcinomas. Tumours in this area should thus be treated by a technique which allows tissue sampling in order to gauge the adequacy of the treatment, with the goal being complete extirpation of the tumour. Excision monitored by frozen section control or Mohs' surgery is our recommendation based on a retrospective analyses of 631 eyelid basal cell carcinomas, half of which were primary tumours and half recurrent. Images PMID:2894839

  16. Basal Cell Carcinoma: Pathogenesis, Epidemiology, Clinical Features, Diagnosis, Histopathology, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Marzuka, Alexander G.; Book, Samuel E.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignancy. Exposure to sunlight is the most important risk factor. Most, if not all, cases of BCC demonstrate overactive Hedgehog signaling. A variety of treatment modalities exist and are selected based on recurrence risk, importance of tissue preservation, patient preference, and extent of disease. The pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, histopathology, and management of BCC will be discussed in this review. PMID:26029015

  17. 980nm laser for difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derjabo, A. D.; Cema, I.; Lihacova, I.; Derjabo, L.

    2013-06-01

    Begin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is most common skin cancer over the world. There are around 20 modalities for BCC treatment. Laser surgery is uncommon option. We demonstrate our long term follow up results. Aim: To evaluate long term efficacy of a 980nm diode laser for the difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods: 167 patients with 173 basal cell carcinoma on the nose were treated with a 980 nm diode laser from May 1999 till May 2005 at Latvian Oncology center. All tumors were morphologically confirmed. 156 patients were followed for more than 5 years. Results: The lowest recurrence rate was observed in cases of superficial BCC, diameter<6mm bet the highest recurrence rate was in cases of infiltrative BCC and nodular recurrent BCC. Conclusions: 980 nm diode laser is useful tool in dermatology with high long term efficacy, good acceptance by the patients and good cosmetics results.

  18. Obligate basal cell component in salivary oncocytoma facilitates distinction from acinic cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Christoph; Reu, Simone; Zengel, Pamela; Kirchner, Thomas; Ihrler, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between benign salivary oncocytoma (ONC) and low-grade malignant acinic cell carcinoma (ACC) can be difficult due to a significant histomorphological overlap of the structural and cytological presentation of both tumor types. To the best of our knowledge a comprehensive study comparing (immuno-)histological markers in cases of difficult differential diagnosis between ONC and ACC has not yet been performed. We investigated a panel of different immunohistochemical (CK5/6, CK14, CK7, CK18, p63 and Ki67) and histochemical (PAS, alpha-amylase) markers in 12 cases of ONC and 19 cases of ACC. The statistically significant stronger expression of CK7 in ONC and stronger expression of PAS and alpha-amylase in ACC in routine practice each is hampered by a pronounced overlap between both tumor groups. The obligate presence of an additional small basal cell component in all cases of ONC, demonstrable with p63 and CK5/6, enables a straightforward distinction from ACC, being constantly devoid of a basal cell component. Unexpectedly, CK14 is not a suitable marker for a reliable proof of these basal cells. The detection of this basal cell component in ONC in routine Hematoxylin-eosin stain is difficult and in some cases not possible; therefore, immunohistochemistry with p63 or CK5/6 is recommended for selected cases.

  19. Citrus consumption and risk of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Cho, Eunyoung; Feskanich, Diane; Li, Wen-Qing; Sun, Qi; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-10-01

    Animal experiments have demonstrated the photocarcinogenic properties of furocoumarins, a group of naturally occurring chemicals that are rich in citrus products. We conducted a prospective study for citrus consumption and risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin based on data from 41530 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2010) and 63759 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2010) who were free of cancers at baseline. Over 24-26 years of follow-up, we documented 20840 incident BCCs and 3544 incident SCCs. Compared to those who consumed citrus products less than twice per week, the pooled multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 1.03 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.99-1.08] for BCC and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.00-1.30) for SCC for those who consumed two to four times per week, 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01-1.11) for BCC and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.02-1.28) for SCC for five to six times per week, 1.11 (95% CI: 1.06-1.16) for BCC and 1.22 (95% CI: 1.08-1.37) for SCC for once to 1.4 times per day and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.09-1.23) for BCC and 1.21 (95% Cl: 1.06-1.38) for SCC for 1.5 times per day or more (P trend = 0.001 for BCC and 0.04 for SCC). In contrast, consumption of non-citrus fruit and juice appeared to be inversely associated with risk of BCC and SCC. Our findings support positive associations between citrus consumption and risk of cutaneous BCC and SCC in two cohorts of men and women, and call for further investigations to better understand the potential photocarcinogenesis associated with dietary intakes. PMID:26224304

  20. Citrus consumption and risk of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Cho, Eunyoung; Feskanich, Diane; Li, Wen-Qing; Sun, Qi; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-10-01

    Animal experiments have demonstrated the photocarcinogenic properties of furocoumarins, a group of naturally occurring chemicals that are rich in citrus products. We conducted a prospective study for citrus consumption and risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin based on data from 41530 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2010) and 63759 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2010) who were free of cancers at baseline. Over 24-26 years of follow-up, we documented 20840 incident BCCs and 3544 incident SCCs. Compared to those who consumed citrus products less than twice per week, the pooled multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 1.03 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.99-1.08] for BCC and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.00-1.30) for SCC for those who consumed two to four times per week, 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01-1.11) for BCC and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.02-1.28) for SCC for five to six times per week, 1.11 (95% CI: 1.06-1.16) for BCC and 1.22 (95% CI: 1.08-1.37) for SCC for once to 1.4 times per day and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.09-1.23) for BCC and 1.21 (95% Cl: 1.06-1.38) for SCC for 1.5 times per day or more (P trend = 0.001 for BCC and 0.04 for SCC). In contrast, consumption of non-citrus fruit and juice appeared to be inversely associated with risk of BCC and SCC. Our findings support positive associations between citrus consumption and risk of cutaneous BCC and SCC in two cohorts of men and women, and call for further investigations to better understand the potential photocarcinogenesis associated with dietary intakes.

  1. Facial Basal Cell Carcinoma Treated with Topical 5% Imiquimod Cream with Dermoscopic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Singal, Archana; Daulatabad, Deepashree; Pandhi, Deepika; Arora, V K

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer worldwide. Surgical excision is considered to be the primary therapeutic modality wherever possible. For inoperable cases, 5% imiquimod seems to be a good alternative. We present two cases of nodular pigmented BCCs on the face in elderly women successfully treated with 5% imiquimod cream application resulting in complete clinical clearance of lesion as well as on histology and dermatoscopy. There was no recurrence of the lesion on 2 years follow-up for the first and 1.5 years for the second patient. PMID:27398014

  2. Facial Basal Cell Carcinoma Treated with Topical 5% Imiquimod Cream with Dermoscopic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Archana; Daulatabad, Deepashree; Pandhi, Deepika; Arora, VK

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer worldwide. Surgical excision is considered to be the primary therapeutic modality wherever possible. For inoperable cases, 5% imiquimod seems to be a good alternative. We present two cases of nodular pigmented BCCs on the face in elderly women successfully treated with 5% imiquimod cream application resulting in complete clinical clearance of lesion as well as on histology and dermatoscopy. There was no recurrence of the lesion on 2 years follow-up for the first and 1.5 years for the second patient. PMID:27398014

  3. Sonidegib, a novel smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Hung Q; Silapunt, Sirunya; Migden, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. If left untreated, BCCs can become locally aggressive or even metastasize. Currently available treatments include local destruction, surgery, and radiation. Systemic options for advanced disease are limited. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is aberrantly activated in a majority of BCCs and in other cancers. Hh pathway inhibitors are targeted agents that inhibit the aberrant activation of the Hh pathway, with smoothened being a targeted component. Sonidegib is a novel smoothened inhibitor that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on BCC pathogenesis and the clinical efficacy of sonidegib for the treatment of advanced BCC. PMID:27695345

  4. Sonidegib, a novel smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Hung Q; Silapunt, Sirunya; Migden, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. If left untreated, BCCs can become locally aggressive or even metastasize. Currently available treatments include local destruction, surgery, and radiation. Systemic options for advanced disease are limited. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is aberrantly activated in a majority of BCCs and in other cancers. Hh pathway inhibitors are targeted agents that inhibit the aberrant activation of the Hh pathway, with smoothened being a targeted component. Sonidegib is a novel smoothened inhibitor that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on BCC pathogenesis and the clinical efficacy of sonidegib for the treatment of advanced BCC.

  5. Analysis and diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) via infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Sahagun, J. H.; Vargas, J. V. C.; Mulinari-Brenner, F. A.

    2011-09-01

    In this work, a structured methodology is proposed and tested through infrared imaging temperature measurements of a healthy control group to establish expected normality ranges and of basal cell carcinoma patients (a type of skin cancer) previously diagnosed through biopsies of the affected regions. A method of conjugated gradients is proposed to compare measured dimensionless temperature difference values (Δ θ) between two symmetric regions of the patient's body, that takes into account the skin, the surrounding ambient and the individual core temperatures and doing so, the limitation of the results interpretation for different individuals become simple and nonsubjective. The range of normal temperatures in different regions of the body for seven healthy individuals was determined, and admitting that the human skin exhibits a unimodal normal distribution, the normal range for each region was considered to be the mean dimensionless temperature difference plus/minus twice the standard deviation of the measurements (Δθ±2σ) in order to represent 95% of the population. Eleven patients with previously diagnosed basal cell carcinoma through biopsies were examined with the method, which was capable of detecting skin abnormalities in all cases. Therefore, the conjugated gradients method was considered effective in the identification of the basal cell carcinoma through infrared imaging even with the use of a low optical resolution camera (160 × 120 pixels) and a thermal resolution of 0.1 °C. The method could also be used to scan a larger area around the lesion in order to detect the presence of other lesions still not perceptible in the clinical exam. However, it is necessary that a temperature differences mesh-like mapping of the healthy human body skin is produced, so that the comparison of the patient Δ θ could be made with the exact region of such mapping in order to possibly make a more effective diagnosis. Finally, the infrared image analyzed through the

  6. Citrus consumption and risk of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaowei; Cho, Eunyoung; Feskanich, Diane; Li, Wen-Qing; Sun, Qi; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2015-01-01

    Animal experiments have demonstrated the photocarcinogenic properties of furocoumarins, a group of naturally occurring chemicals that are rich in citrus products. We conducted a prospective study for citrus consumption and risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin based on data from 41530 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986–2010) and 63759 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (1984–2010) who were free of cancers at baseline. Over 24–26 years of follow-up, we documented 20840 incident BCCs and 3544 incident SCCs. Compared to those who consumed citrus products less than twice per week, the pooled multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 1.03 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.99–1.08] for BCC and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.00–1.30) for SCC for those who consumed two to four times per week, 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01–1.11) for BCC and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.02–1.28) for SCC for five to six times per week, 1.11 (95% CI: 1.06–1.16) for BCC and 1.22 (95% CI: 1.08–1.37) for SCC for once to 1.4 times per day and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.09–1.23) for BCC and 1.21 (95% Cl: 1.06–1.38) for SCC for 1.5 times per day or more (P trend = 0.001 for BCC and 0.04 for SCC). In contrast, consumption of non-citrus fruit and juice appeared to be inversely associated with risk of BCC and SCC. Our findings support positive associations between citrus consumption and risk of cutaneous BCC and SCC in two cohorts of men and women, and call for further investigations to better understand the potential photocarcinogenesis associated with dietary intakes. PMID:26224304

  7. Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelids and solar ultraviolet radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, G.; Diffey, B.; Larko, O.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To compare the distribution of eyelid basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with the relative ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure to different sites on the eyelids.
METHODS—The location of BCC on the eyelids was allocated to one of seven regions. The UVR exposure was recorded with a polymer film attached to the eyelids at seven sites in a manikin and in human subjects.
RESULTS—Localisation of the 329 tumours was mainly on the lower eyelids (225 tumours), and the medial canthal regions (87 tumours). There was no association between UVR doses at the seven sites of the eyelids and the location of BCCs. The UVR exposure was similar on the upper and lower eyelids, while the number of tumours on the lower eyelids outnumbered the upper lids by a factor of 13 (17 upper, 225 lower)
CONCLUSION—UVR exposure only partially explains the aetiology of periorbital BCC.

 Keywords: polysulphone film; basal cell carcinoma; ultraviolet radiation; eyelid PMID:9930273

  8. A Case of Orbital Myiasis in Recurrent Eyelid Basal Cell Carcinoma Invasive into the Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gulshan Bahadur; (Sitaula), Ranju Kharel; Shah, Dev Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Orbital myiasis is the infestation of the orbital tissues by fly larvae or maggots. Compromise of periorbital tissues by malignant disease, surgery, ischemia, or infection may predispose the patient to orbital myiasis. Case Report. A 73-year-old male patient with neglected recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid invasive into the orbit presented with complaints of intense itching and crawling sensation with maggots wriggling and falling from the wound of left orbit. The patient improved following manual removal of the maggots along with oral Ivermectin treatment. Recurrence of the basal cell carcinoma was confirmed by punch biopsy from the wound and extended exenteration of the orbit followed by reconstructive surgery was done. Conclusion. Orbital myiasis is a rare and preventable ocular morbidity that can complicate the malignancies resulting in widespread tissue destruction. The broad spectrum antiparasitic agent, Ivermectin, can be used as noninvasive means to treat orbital myiasis. In massive orbital myiasis and those associated with malignancies, exenteration of the orbit must be seriously considered.

  9. A Case of Orbital Myiasis in Recurrent Eyelid Basal Cell Carcinoma Invasive into the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Triptesh Raj; Shrestha, Gulshan Bahadur; Sitaula, Ranju Kharel; Shah, Dev Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Orbital myiasis is the infestation of the orbital tissues by fly larvae or maggots. Compromise of periorbital tissues by malignant disease, surgery, ischemia, or infection may predispose the patient to orbital myiasis. Case Report. A 73-year-old male patient with neglected recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid invasive into the orbit presented with complaints of intense itching and crawling sensation with maggots wriggling and falling from the wound of left orbit. The patient improved following manual removal of the maggots along with oral Ivermectin treatment. Recurrence of the basal cell carcinoma was confirmed by punch biopsy from the wound and extended exenteration of the orbit followed by reconstructive surgery was done. Conclusion. Orbital myiasis is a rare and preventable ocular morbidity that can complicate the malignancies resulting in widespread tissue destruction. The broad spectrum antiparasitic agent, Ivermectin, can be used as noninvasive means to treat orbital myiasis. In massive orbital myiasis and those associated with malignancies, exenteration of the orbit must be seriously considered. PMID:27595028

  10. A Case of Orbital Myiasis in Recurrent Eyelid Basal Cell Carcinoma Invasive into the Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gulshan Bahadur; (Sitaula), Ranju Kharel; Shah, Dev Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Orbital myiasis is the infestation of the orbital tissues by fly larvae or maggots. Compromise of periorbital tissues by malignant disease, surgery, ischemia, or infection may predispose the patient to orbital myiasis. Case Report. A 73-year-old male patient with neglected recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid invasive into the orbit presented with complaints of intense itching and crawling sensation with maggots wriggling and falling from the wound of left orbit. The patient improved following manual removal of the maggots along with oral Ivermectin treatment. Recurrence of the basal cell carcinoma was confirmed by punch biopsy from the wound and extended exenteration of the orbit followed by reconstructive surgery was done. Conclusion. Orbital myiasis is a rare and preventable ocular morbidity that can complicate the malignancies resulting in widespread tissue destruction. The broad spectrum antiparasitic agent, Ivermectin, can be used as noninvasive means to treat orbital myiasis. In massive orbital myiasis and those associated with malignancies, exenteration of the orbit must be seriously considered. PMID:27595028

  11. Detection of Basal Cell Carcinoma Using Color and Histogram Measures of Semitranslucent Areas

    PubMed Central

    Stoecker, William V.; Gupta, Kapil; Shrestha, Bijaya; Wronkiewiecz, Mark; Chowdhury, Raeed; Stanley, R. Joe; Xu, Jin; Moss, Randy H.; Celebi, M. Emre; Rabinovitz, Harold S.; Oliviero, Margaret; Malters, Joseph M.; Kolm, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Background Semitranslucency, defined as a smooth, jelly-like area with varied, near-skin-tone color, can indicate a diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with high specificity. This study sought to analyze potential areas of semitranslucency with histogram-derived texture and color measures to discriminate BCC from non-semitranslucent areas in non-BCC skin lesions. Methods For 210 dermoscopy images, the areas of semitranslucency in 42 BCCs and comparable areas of smoothness and color in 168 non-BCCs were selected manually. Six color measures and six texture measures were applied to the semitranslucent areas of the BCC and the comparable areas in the non-BCC images. Results Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that the texture measures alone provided greater separation of BCC from non-BCC than the color measures alone. Statistical analysis showed that the four most important measures of semitranslucency are three histogram measures: contrast, smoothness, and entropy, and one color measure: blue chromaticity. Smoothness is the single most important measure. The combined 12 measures achieved a diagnostic accuracy of 95.05% based on area under the ROC curve. Conclusion Texture and color analysis measures, especially smoothness, may afford automatic detection of basal cell carcinoma images with semitranslucency. PMID:19624424

  12. Trichoepithelioma and Basal Cell Carcinoma with Squamous Differentiation: Is it Causal or Coincidental?

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Palak; Agarwal, Charu; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Ahuja, Arvind; Rani, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Trichoepitheliomas (TEs) are benign cutaneous tumors that occur either as solitary non-familial or multiple familial. We report a case of multiple familial trichoepithelioma (MFT) in a 55-year-old female patient and her son who came with complaints of single ulcerated mass involving the left nasolabial fold and cheek. She had multiple papules and nodules all over the face and neck since 25 years. Histopathological examination of an ulcerated lesion revealed features of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with squamous differentiation, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A skin biopsy obtained from the papule on neck showed features of TE. However, whether BCC developed independently or by transformation from TE was uncertain. Her 36-year-old son presented with similar lesions on the face and a skin biopsy showed features of TE. Though malignant transformation of TE is quite rare, awareness of the potential for evolution of carcinoma in patients with MFT is important for management of these patients. PMID:26288412

  13. Comparison between mALA- and ALA-PDT in the treatment of basal cell carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleier, Peter; Zenk, Witold; Hyckel, Peter; Berndt, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    Introduction: The external application of aminoleavulinic acid (ALA), which is a substrate of physiologic cell metabolism, represents a possible treatment option in superficial basal cell carcinomas (BCC). The development of new ALA-esters (mALA) with potential for higher penetration depths promises higher therapeutic success. This research aimed to prove the following hypothesis: The cytotoxic effect of the mALA- photodynamic therapy (mALA-PDT), when compared to the ALA-PDT, leads to a higher clinical success rate. Material and Methods: 24 patients with multiple facial tumors, after having received several local surgical excisions with known histology, were treated with either ALA- or mALA-PDT, during the past two years. In total, 89 basal cell carcinoma, 45 actinic keratoses, 6 keratoacanthoma, and 2 squamous cell carcinomas were treated. ALA-PDT: A thermo gel with 40 % mALA or ALA was applied from a cooled syringe. Three to five hours after gel application the skin was cleaned from any gel residues. Irradiation was done with a diode laser and was performed in two sessions, each 10 min long. After intervals of 2, 4 and 12 weeks, the patients were recalled to assess therapeutic efficacy. This was followed by photographic documentation. Results: More than 80% of the tumors treated primarily were resolved successfully. A recurrence rate of approximately 15% was observed. Three per cent of the tumors showed no reaction to therapy. There were no statistically significant differences between the two therapeutic groups. Discussion: The advantage of the use of ALA lies foremost in the fast metabolic use of the body's own photosensitizer PpIX. There are no known side effects of this therapy. Moreover, external application is superior to systemic application with regard to patient management. The method can be combined with other therapies. Although the mALA should have a better penetration in tumor tissue, the therapeutic outcome is similar to the use of ALA.

  14. Loss of Blm enhances basal cell carcinoma and rhabdomyosarcoma tumorigenesis in Ptch1+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Davari, Parastoo; Hebert, Jennifer L; Albertson, Donna G; Huey, Bing; Roy, Ritu; Mancianti, Maria L; Horvai, Andrew E; McDaniel, Lisa D; Schultz, Roger A; Epstein, Ervin H

    2010-06-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) have relative genomic stability and relatively benign clinical behavior but whether these two are related causally is unknown. To investigate the effects of introducing genomic instability into murine BCCs, we have compared ionizing radiation-induced tumorigenesis in Ptch1(+/-) mice versus that in Ptch1(+/-) mice carrying mutant Blm alleles. We found that BCCs in Ptch1(+/-) Blm(tm3Brd/tm3Brd) mice had a trend toward greater genomic instability as measured by array comprehensive genomic hybridization and that these mice developed significantly more microscopic BCCs than did Ptch1(+/-) Blm(+/tm3Brd) or Ptch1(+/-) Blm(+/+) mice. The mutant Blm alleles also markedly enhanced the formation of rhabdomyosarcomas (RMSs), another cancer to which Ptch1(+/)(-) mice and PTCH1(+/)(-) (basal cell nevus syndrome) patients are susceptible. Highly recurrent but different copy number changes were associated with the two tumor types and included losses of chromosomes 4 and 10 in all BCCs and gain of chromosome 10 in 80% of RMSs. Loss of chromosome 11 and 13, including the Trp53 and Ptch1 loci, respectively, occurred frequently in BCCs, suggesting tissue-specific selection for genes or pathways that collaborate with Ptch deficiency in tumorigenesis. Despite the quantitative differences, there was no dramatic qualititative difference in the BCC or RMS tumors associated with the mutant Blm genotype.

  15. Tazarotene: randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, and open-label concurrent trials for basal cell carcinoma prevention and therapy in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jean Y; Chiou, Albert S; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian M; Aszterbaum, Michelle; Chanana, Anita M; Lee, Wayne; Lindgren, Joselyn A; Raphael, Maria Acosta; Thompson, Bobbye J; Bickers, David R; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-03-01

    Sporadic human basal cell carcinomas (BCC) are generally well managed with current surgical modalities. However, in the subset of high-risk patients predisposed to developing large numbers of BCCs, there is an unmet need for effective, low-morbidity chemoprevention. This population includes fair-skinned patients with extensive sun exposure and those with genodermatoses such as the basal cell nevus (Gorlin) syndrome (BCNS). Tazarotene (Tazorac, Allergan) is a topical retinoid with relative specificity for RAR-β and RAR-γ receptors. We previously demonstrated tazarotene's robust anti-BCC efficacy in Ptch1(+/-) mice, a murine equivalent of BCNS, and others have found it to have some efficacy against sporadic human BCCs. We report here results of a randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study in patients with BCNS evaluating the efficacy of topically applied tazarotene for BCC chemoprevention (N = 34 subjects), along with an open-label trial evaluating tazarotene's efficacy for chemotherapy of BCC lesions (N = 36 subjects) for a maximum follow-up period of 3 years. We found that only 6% of patients had a chemopreventive response and that only 6% of treated BCC target lesions were clinically cured. Our studies provide no evidence for either chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic effect of tazarotene against BCCs in patients with BCNS. PMID:24441673

  16. Tazarotene: randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, and open-label concurrent trials for basal cell carcinoma prevention and therapy in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jean Y; Chiou, Albert S; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian M; Aszterbaum, Michelle; Chanana, Anita M; Lee, Wayne; Lindgren, Joselyn A; Raphael, Maria Acosta; Thompson, Bobbye J; Bickers, David R; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-03-01

    Sporadic human basal cell carcinomas (BCC) are generally well managed with current surgical modalities. However, in the subset of high-risk patients predisposed to developing large numbers of BCCs, there is an unmet need for effective, low-morbidity chemoprevention. This population includes fair-skinned patients with extensive sun exposure and those with genodermatoses such as the basal cell nevus (Gorlin) syndrome (BCNS). Tazarotene (Tazorac, Allergan) is a topical retinoid with relative specificity for RAR-β and RAR-γ receptors. We previously demonstrated tazarotene's robust anti-BCC efficacy in Ptch1(+/-) mice, a murine equivalent of BCNS, and others have found it to have some efficacy against sporadic human BCCs. We report here results of a randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study in patients with BCNS evaluating the efficacy of topically applied tazarotene for BCC chemoprevention (N = 34 subjects), along with an open-label trial evaluating tazarotene's efficacy for chemotherapy of BCC lesions (N = 36 subjects) for a maximum follow-up period of 3 years. We found that only 6% of patients had a chemopreventive response and that only 6% of treated BCC target lesions were clinically cured. Our studies provide no evidence for either chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic effect of tazarotene against BCCs in patients with BCNS.

  17. Multiple facial basal cell carcinomas in xeroderma pigmentosum treated with topical imiquimod 5% cream.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Xian-Yu; Engle, Michelle Yixiao; Wang, Jian-You

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by solar sensitivity, photophobia, early onset of freckling, and solar-induced cutaneous neoplastic changes. Management of patients with XP is a therapeutic challenge as they usually develop multiple cutaneous malignancies, making surgical therapy difficult, and continue to form skin malignancies at a high rate. We describe a 30-year-old Chinese man with XP who had been previously treated with excision and dermatoplasty. Upon recurrence of multiple superficial, ulcerative, and pigmented lesions, imiquimod 5% cream was recommended for 4 months. His multiple facial lesions demonstrated an excellent response to topical imiquimod 5% cream with minor side effects. This favorable response indicates that topical application of imiquimod 5% cream is an effective means of treating multiple basal cell carcinomas in XP. PMID:25754701

  18. The spectrum of patched mutations in a collection of Australian basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Evans, T; Boonchai, W; Shanley, S; Smyth, I; Gillies, S; Georgas, K; Wainwright, B; Chenevix-Trench, G; Wicking, C

    2000-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in the human patched (PTCH) gene have been identified in both familial and sporadic basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). In some tumors mutations have been detected in both alleles thereby supporting the role of PTCH as a tumor suppressor gene. We have analyzed 22/23 coding exons of PTCH for mutations in 44 sporadic BCCs, and detected 10 novel mutations in nine tumors. In two of the mutant tumors the remaining allele was inactivated by loss of heterozygosity. Five novel PTCH polymorphisms were also identified. Most of the variations found were C>T substitutions at dipyrimidine sites, supporting previous studies which indicate a role for ultraviolet-B in the genesis of sporadic BCCs.

  19. Basal cell carcinoma preferentially arises from stem cells within hair follicle and mechanosensory niches.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Shelby C; Eberl, Markus; Vagnozzi, Alicia N; Belkadi, Abdelmadjid; Veniaminova, Natalia A; Verhaegen, Monique E; Bichakjian, Christopher K; Ward, Nicole L; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Wong, Sunny Y

    2015-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is characterized by frequent loss of PTCH1, leading to constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Although the requirement for Hedgehog in BCC is well established, the identity of disease-initiating cells and the compartments in which they reside remain controversial. By using several inducible Cre drivers to delete Ptch1 in different cell compartments in mice, we show here that multiple hair follicle stem cell populations readily develop BCC-like tumors. In contrast, stem cells within the interfollicular epidermis do not efficiently form tumors. Notably, we observed that innervated Gli1-expressing progenitors within mechanosensory touch dome epithelia are highly tumorigenic. Sensory nerves activate Hedgehog signaling in normal touch domes, while denervation attenuates touch dome-derived tumors. Together, our studies identify varying tumor susceptibilities among different stem cell populations in the skin, highlight touch dome epithelia as "hot spots" for tumor formation, and implicate cutaneous nerves as mediators of tumorigenesis.

  20. Basal cell carcinoma preferentially arises from stem cells within hair follicle and mechanosensory niches.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Shelby C; Eberl, Markus; Vagnozzi, Alicia N; Belkadi, Abdelmadjid; Veniaminova, Natalia A; Verhaegen, Monique E; Bichakjian, Christopher K; Ward, Nicole L; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Wong, Sunny Y

    2015-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is characterized by frequent loss of PTCH1, leading to constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Although the requirement for Hedgehog in BCC is well established, the identity of disease-initiating cells and the compartments in which they reside remain controversial. By using several inducible Cre drivers to delete Ptch1 in different cell compartments in mice, we show here that multiple hair follicle stem cell populations readily develop BCC-like tumors. In contrast, stem cells within the interfollicular epidermis do not efficiently form tumors. Notably, we observed that innervated Gli1-expressing progenitors within mechanosensory touch dome epithelia are highly tumorigenic. Sensory nerves activate Hedgehog signaling in normal touch domes, while denervation attenuates touch dome-derived tumors. Together, our studies identify varying tumor susceptibilities among different stem cell populations in the skin, highlight touch dome epithelia as "hot spots" for tumor formation, and implicate cutaneous nerves as mediators of tumorigenesis. PMID:25842978

  1. Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma arising within a keloid scar: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Goder, Maya; Kornhaber, Rachel; Bordoni, Daniele; Winkler, Eyal; Haik, Josef; Tessone, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are one of the most frequent cutaneous malignancies. The majority of BCCs are reported to occur on the auricular helix and periauricular region due to ultraviolet light exposure. Despite the frequency of BCCs, those that develop within scar tissue are rare, and the phenomenon of keloid BCCs has rarely been reported in the literature. Keloid collagen within BCCs is associated with morphoeiform characteristics, ulceration, or necrosis. Extensive keloid collagen is often seen in BCCs of the ear region, a site prone to keloid scarring. This article presents a rare case of a secondary tumor (BCC) which arose on top of a primary tumor (keloid scar) on the right auricle region in a healthy 23-year-old female after an ear piercing 2 years prior. To our knowledge, the tumor described in this case, in contrast to keloidal BCCs, has never been reported in the literature. PMID:27536142

  2. Superficial Type of Multiple Basal Cell Carcinomas: Detailed Comparative Study of Its Dermoscopic and Histopathological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hirofuji, Akiko; Takiguchi, Kojiro; Nakamura, Koichiro; Kuramochi, Akira; Tsuchida, Tetsuya; Arai, Eiichi; Shimizu, Michio

    2011-01-01

    We investigated in detail the dermoscopic and histopathological findings in a case of a superficial type of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). These multiple lesions (occurring in the chest, neck, and back) showed three different findings, respectively. Dermoscopy of the erythematous and brown-colored patch on the anterior chest showed spoke wheel areas, and the histopathological cross-section revealed vertical spoke wheel structures. In the black- and brown-colored patch at the neck, the dermatoscopy showed a maple leaf-like structure, which was in accordance with the strengthening of the histological lateral connection of the lesion. The brown-colored patch of the lateral back histologically showed irregularly enlarged spoke wheel-like areas with peripheral increased melanin pigments, which correlated with the dark black color of dermoscopic maple leaf-like areas. The vertical spoke wheel areas by dermatoscopy revealed a horizontal spoke wheel structure by histopathology. PMID:21151508

  3. Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma arising within a keloid scar: a case report.

    PubMed

    Goder, Maya; Kornhaber, Rachel; Bordoni, Daniele; Winkler, Eyal; Haik, Josef; Tessone, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are one of the most frequent cutaneous malignancies. The majority of BCCs are reported to occur on the auricular helix and periauricular region due to ultraviolet light exposure. Despite the frequency of BCCs, those that develop within scar tissue are rare, and the phenomenon of keloid BCCs has rarely been reported in the literature. Keloid collagen within BCCs is associated with morphoeiform characteristics, ulceration, or necrosis. Extensive keloid collagen is often seen in BCCs of the ear region, a site prone to keloid scarring. This article presents a rare case of a secondary tumor (BCC) which arose on top of a primary tumor (keloid scar) on the right auricle region in a healthy 23-year-old female after an ear piercing 2 years prior. To our knowledge, the tumor described in this case, in contrast to keloidal BCCs, has never been reported in the literature. PMID:27536142

  4. Basal Cell Carcinoma and Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum Arising in Nevus Sebaceous on Face—A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn is a congenital cutaneous hamartoma comprising of multiple skin structures. It has the potential to develop into variety of neoplasms of various epidermal adnexal origins. While multiple tumors may occasionally arise, it is unusual to develop two different types of tumor, benign and malignant, to arise simultaneously within a single sebaceus nevus. Here in, we report a case of a 27-year-old male with two neoplastic proliferations including a syringocystadenoma papilliferum a benign tumor and basal cell carcinoma a malignant tumor arising in a long-standing nevus sebaceus on the face. Neoplastic changes are common in nevus sebaceous present on scalp but our case is unique due to the presence of two different types of neoplasm in a nevus sebaceous which was present on face. PMID:26677302

  5. Basal Cell Carcinoma: From the Molecular Understanding of the Pathogenesis to Targeted Therapy of Progressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Göppner, Daniela; Leverkus, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Due to intensified research over the past decade, the Hedgehog (HH) pathway has been identified as a pivotal defect implicated in roughly 25% of all cancers. As one of the most frequent cancer worldwide, the development of Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) due to activation of the HH pathway has been convincingly demonstrated. Thus the discovery of this central tumor-promoting signalling pathway has not only revolutionized the understanding of BCC carcinogenesis but has also enabled the development of a completely novel therapeutic approach. Targeting just a few of several potential mutations, HH inhibitors such as GDC-0449 achieved already the first promising results in metastatic or locally advanced BCC. This paper summarizes the current understanding of BCC carcinogenesis and describes the current “mechanism-based” therapeutic strategies. PMID:21253551

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies 14 novel risk alleles associated with basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Wu, Wenting; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Yang, Lingyao; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Lin, Yuan; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Hinds, David A.; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of 2.8 million cases in the United States alone. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between 21 distinct genetic loci and BCC risk. Here, we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of BCC, totalling 17,187 cases and 287,054 controls. We confirm 17 previously reported loci and identify 14 new susceptibility loci reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8, logistic regression). These newly associated SNPs lie within predicted keratinocyte regulatory elements and in expression quantitative trait loci; furthermore, we identify candidate genes and non-coding RNAs involved in telomere maintenance, immune regulation and tumour progression, providing deeper insight into the pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:27539887

  7. Basal cell carcinomas arise from hair follicle stem cells in Ptch1(+/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Grace Ying; Wang, Joy; Mancianti, Maria-Laura; Epstein, Ervin H

    2011-01-18

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are hedgehog-driven tumors that resemble follicular and interfollicular epidermal basal keratinocytes and hence long have been thought to arise from these cells. However, the actual cell of origin is unknown. Using cell fate tracking of X-ray induced BCCs in Ptch1(+/-) mice, we found their essentially exclusive origin to be keratin 15-expressing stem cells of the follicular bulge. However, conditional loss of p53 not only enhanced BCC carcinogenesis from the bulge but also produced BCCs from the interfollicular epidermis, at least in part by enhancing Smo expression. This latter finding is consistent with the lack of visible tumors on ears and tail, sites lacking Smo expression, in Ptch1(+/-) mice.

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies 14 novel risk alleles associated with basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Harvind S; Wu, Wenting; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Yang, Lingyao; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Lin, Yuan; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Hinds, David A; Tang, Jean Y; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of 2.8 million cases in the United States alone. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between 21 distinct genetic loci and BCC risk. Here, we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of BCC, totalling 17,187 cases and 287,054 controls. We confirm 17 previously reported loci and identify 14 new susceptibility loci reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8), logistic regression). These newly associated SNPs lie within predicted keratinocyte regulatory elements and in expression quantitative trait loci; furthermore, we identify candidate genes and non-coding RNAs involved in telomere maintenance, immune regulation and tumour progression, providing deeper insight into the pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:27539887

  9. Principal components analysis of FT-Raman spectra of ex vivo basal cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Airton A.; Bitar Carter, Renata A.; de Oliveira Nunes, Lilian; Loschiavo Arisawa, Emilia A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2004-07-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy is a modern analytical tool and it is believed that its use for skin cancer diagnosis will lead to several advantages for patients, e.g., faster results and a minimization of invasivity. This article reports results of an ex Vivo study of the FT-Raman spectra regarding differentiation between non-diseased and malignant human skin lesions, Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC). A Nd: YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman, RFS 100/S Spectrometer, Bruker. Thirty-nine sets of human skin samples, 18 histopathologically diagnosed as non-diseased, and 21 as BCC, were obtained during routine therapeutic procedures required by the primary disease. No sample preparation was needed to promote the FT-Raman spectra collection. The main spectral features, which may differentiate the sample, were found in the shift region of Amide I (1640 to 1680 cm-1), Amide III (1220 to 1330cm-1), proteins and lipids (1400 to 1500 cm-1), amino acids (939 to 940 cm-1) and deoxyribonucleic acid (1600 to 1620cm-1). Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was applied to FT-Raman spectra of Basal Cell Carcinoma. Analysis was performed on mean-normalized and mean-centered data of the non-diseased skin and BCC spectra. The dynamic loading of PCA was expanded into 2D contour by calculating a variance-covariance matrix. PCA was used to verify the statistical differences in the sample. This technique applied over all samples identified tissue type within 83% of sensitivity and 100% specificity. The PCA technique proved efficient for analysis in skin tissue ex vivo, results were significant and coherent.

  10. Anthropometric measures in relation to Basal Cell Carcinoma: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Catherine M; Hughes, Maria Celia; Pandeya, Nirmala; Green, Adèle C

    2006-01-01

    Background The relationship between anthropometric indices and risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is largely unknown. We aimed to examine the association between anthropometric measures and development of BCC and to demonstrate whether adherence to World Health Organisation guidelines for body mass index, waist circumference, and waist/hip ratio was associated with risk of BCC, independent of sun exposure. Methods Study participants were participants in a community-based skin cancer prevention trial in Nambour, a town in southeast Queensland (latitude 26°S). In 1992, height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences were measured for all 1621 participants and weight was remeasured at the end of the trial in 1996. Prevalence proportion ratios were calculated using a log-binomial model to estimate the risk of BCC prior to or prevalent in 1992, while Poisson regression with robust error variances was used to estimate the relative risk of BCC during the follow-up period. Results At baseline, 94 participants had a current BCC, and 202 had a history of BCC. During the 5-year follow-up period, 179 participants developed one or more new BCCs. We found no significant association between any of the anthropometric measures or indices and risk of BCC after controlling for potential confounding factors including sun exposure. There was a suggestion that short-term weight gain may increase the risk of developing BCC for women only. Conclusion Adherence to World Health Organisation guidelines for body mass index, waist circumference and waist/hip ratio is not significantly associated with occurrence of basal cell carcinomas of the skin. PMID:16566838

  11. Long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy of vismodegib in two patients with metastatic basal cell carcinoma and basal cell nevus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Glen J.; Tibes, Raoul; Blaydorn, Lisa; Jameson, Gayle; Downhour, Molly; White, Erica; Caro, Ivor; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor responses in advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) have been observed in clinical trials with vismodegib, a SMO antagonist. The result of SMO antagonism is inhibition Hedgehog Signaling Pathway (HHSP) downstream target genes. HHSP inhibition has been shown to affect stem cells responsible for blood, mammary, and neural development. We report on our experience of treating two patients with advanced BCC participating. These two patients have had no new BCCs develop for at least 2.25 years. Both patients have been receiving ongoing daily treatment with vismodegib for greater than 2.75 years without experiencing any significant side effects. After prolonged continuous daily dosing with a SMO antagonist, we have not observed a significant alteration in hematologic parameters or physical abnormalities of the pectoral regions of two patients with advanced BCC. PMID:25386306

  12. Pharmacologic retinoid signaling and physiologic retinoic acid receptor signaling inhibit basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    So, Po-Lin; Fujimoto, Michele A; Epstein, Ervin H

    2008-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. Patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) are highly susceptible to developing many BCCs as a result of a constitutive inactivating mutation in one allele of PATCHED 1, which encodes a tumor suppressor that is a major inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling. Dysregulated Hedgehog signaling is a common feature of both hereditary and sporadic BCCs. Recently, we showed remarkable anti-BCC chemopreventive efficacy of tazarotene, a retinoid with retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta/gamma specificity, in Ptch1+/- mice when treatment was commenced before carcinogenic insults. In this study, we assessed whether the effect of tazarotene against BCC carcinogenesis is sustained after its withdrawal and whether tazarotene is effective against preexisting microscopic BCC lesions. We found that BCCs did not reappear for at least 5 months after topical drug treatment was stopped and that already developed, microscopic BCCs were susceptible to tazarotene inhibition. In vitro, tazarotene inhibited a murine BCC keratinocyte cell line, ASZ001, suggesting that its effect in vivo is by direct action on the actual tumor cells. Down-regulation of Gli1, a target gene of Hedgehog signaling and up-regulation of CRABPII, a target gene of retinoid signaling, were observed with tazarotene treatment. Finally, we investigated the effects of topical applications of other retinoid-related compounds on BCC tumorigenesis in vivo. Tazarotene was the most effective of the preparations studied, and its effect most likely was mediated by RARgamma activation. Furthermore, inhibition of basal RAR signaling in the skin promoted BCC carcinogenesis, suggesting that endogenous RAR signaling restrains BCC growth.

  13. Tazarotene: Randomized, Double-Blind, Vehicle-Controlled and Open-Label Concurrent Trials for Basal Cell Carcinoma Prevention and Therapy in Patients with Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jean Y.; Chiou, Albert S.; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian M.; Aszterbaum, Michelle; Chanana, Anita M.; Lee, Wayne; Lindgren, Joselyn A.; Raphael, Maria Acosta; Thompson, Bobbye J.; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic human basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are generally well managed with current surgical modalities. However in the subset of high-risk patients predisposed to developing large numbers of BCCs, there is an unmet need for effective, low morbidity chemoprevention. This population includes fair-skinned patients with extensive sun exposure and those with genodermatoses such as the basal cell nevus (Gorlin) syndrome (BCNS). Tazarotene (Tazorac, Allergan) is a topical retinoid with relative specificity for RAR-β and RAR-γ receptors. We previously demonstrated tazarotene’s robust anti-BCC efficacy in Ptch1+/- mice, a murine equivalent of BCNS, and others have found it to have some efficacy against sporadic human BCCs. We report here results of a randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study in BCNS patients evaluating the efficacy of topically applied tazarotene for BCC chemoprevention (N=34 subjects), along with an open-label trial evaluating tazarotene’s efficacy for chemotherapy of BCC lesions (N=36 subjects) for a maximum follow-up period of 3 years. We found that only 6% of patients had a chemopreventive response and that only 6% of treated BCC target lesions were clinically cured. Our studies provide no evidence for either chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic effect of tazarotene against BCCs in patients with BCNS. We hypothesize that the discrepancy between the efficacy seen in Ptch1+/- mice as compared to that seen in PTCH1+/-, BCNS patients, may relate to the superior barrier function of human skin and the greater depth of human BCCs. PMID:24441673

  14. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure rate of more than 95%, but regular examination ...

  15. Effect of methylene blue-mediated photodynamic therapy for treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Samy, Nevien A; Salah, Manal M; Ali, Maha F; Sadek, Ahmed M

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is regarded as a treatment option for basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of methylene blue (MB)-based PDT in patients suffering from nodular or ulcerative BCCs. This study is a prospective clinical trial with a 6-months follow-up. The study setting is at the Dermatology Clinic at NILES, Cairo University, Egypt. Seventeen patients complaining of nodular BCC (nBCC) and three patients complaining of ulcerative BCC (uBCC) were taken as samples. Methylene blue, the photosensitizer, was prepared in two different formulas: liposomal-loaded MB (LMB) was prepared and formulated in hydrogel (MB 0.2%) to be used topically alone for treating BCCs <2 cm in diameter or to be combined with intralesional injection (ILI) of free MB 2% aqueous solution for treating BCCs ≥2 cm in diameter. A session was performed every 2 weeks until complete response (CR) of the lesion or for a maximum of six sessions. Clinical assessments of clinical improvement, dermatological photography, monthly follow-up visits for 6 months, and skin biopsy after 3 months of follow-up to confirm the response, recurrence, or both in cases in which the clinical evaluation was ambiguous. Seventeen patients of the 20 completed the study, 11 patients achieved CR with very good cosmetic outcome, photosensitizer tolerance, and minimal reported side effects. MB is a cheap promising alternative photosensitizer for PDT of nBCC.

  16. Genomic analysis identifies new drivers and progression pathways in skin basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ximena; Parmentier, Laurent; King, Bryan; Bezrukov, Fedor; Kaya, Gürkan; Zoete, Vincent; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B; Sharpe, Hayley J; McKee, Thomas; Letourneau, Audrey; Ribaux, Pascale G; Popadin, Konstantin; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Ben Chaabene, Rouaa; Santoni, Federico A; Andrianova, Maria A; Guipponi, Michel; Garieri, Marco; Verdan, Carole; Grosdemange, Kerstin; Sumara, Olga; Eilers, Martin; Aifantis, Iannis; Michielin, Olivier; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Nikolaev, Sergey I

    2016-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common malignant neoplasm in humans. BCC is primarily driven by the Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. However, its phenotypic variation remains unexplained. Our genetic profiling of 293 BCCs found the highest mutation rate in cancer (65 mutations/Mb). Eighty-five percent of the BCCs harbored mutations in Hh pathway genes (PTCH1, 73% or SMO, 20% (P = 6.6 × 10(-8)) and SUFU, 8%) and in TP53 (61%). However, 85% of the BCCs also harbored additional driver mutations in other cancer-related genes. We observed recurrent mutations in MYCN (30%), PPP6C (15%), STK19 (10%), LATS1 (8%), ERBB2 (4%), PIK3CA (2%), and NRAS, KRAS or HRAS (2%), and loss-of-function and deleterious missense mutations were present in PTPN14 (23%), RB1 (8%) and FBXW7 (5%). Consistent with the mutational profiles, N-Myc and Hippo-YAP pathway target genes were upregulated. Functional analysis of the mutations in MYCN, PTPN14 and LATS1 suggested their potential relevance in BCC tumorigenesis. PMID:26950094

  17. Basal cell carcinoma preferentially arises from stem cells within hair follicle and mechanosensory niches

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Shelby C.; Eberl, Markus; Vagnozzi, Alicia N.; Belkadi, Abdelmadjid; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Verhaegen, Monique E.; Bichakjian, Christopher K.; Ward, Nicole L.; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.; Wong, Sunny Y.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is characterized by frequent loss of PTCH1, leading to constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Although the requirement for Hedgehog in BCC is well-established, the identity of disease-initiating cells and the compartments in which they reside remain controversial. By using several inducible Cre drivers to delete Ptch1 in different cell compartments in mice, we show here that multiple hair follicle stem cell populations readily develop BCC-like tumors. In contrast, stem cells within the interfollicular epidermis do not efficiently form tumors. Notably, we observed that innervated Gli1-expressing progenitors within mechanosensory touch dome epithelia are highly tumorigenic. Sensory nerves activate Hedgehog signaling in normal touch domes, while denervation attenuates touch dome-derived tumors. Together, our studies identify varying tumor susceptibilities among different stem cell populations in the skin, highlight touch dome epithelia as “hot spots” for tumor formation, and implicate cutaneous nerves as mediators of tumorigenesis. PMID:25842978

  18. Photodynamic therapy combined with cryotherapy for the treatment of nodular basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KIM, SUNG AE; LEE, KYU SUK; CHO, JAE-WE

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser ablation in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT) has previously been successfully used to treat superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). However, the efficacy of this treatment modality is limited in the treatment of deeper lesions and the more aggressive subtypes of BCC. In order to improve the outcome of PDT, 8 BCC lesions of variable depths (4 lesions ≤2 mm and 4 lesions >2 mm) and subtypes (1 superficial, 6 nodular and 1 infiltrative) were treated with CO2 laser ablation in combination with PDT, followed by modified cryotherapy. The mean number of treatment sessions was 1.5 and the follow-up period was 22 months. All of the patients demonstrated a complete response and no recurrence of disease, while the majority of patients were satisfied with the cosmetic results upon follow-up examination. The combination therapy of CO2 laser ablation with PDT followed by modified cryotherapy demonstrated a good efficacy and satisfactory cosmetic outcomes in the treatment of nodular BCC. PMID:24137440

  19. Marking sutures to orientate specimens of basal cell carcinoma: do they really make a difference?

    PubMed

    Tullett, M; Whittaker, M; Walsh, S

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, marking sutures have been used to orientate specimens of non-melanomatous skin cancers, and they provide an identifiable point as a reference for monitoring and further treatment. For histopathological purposes, the orientated specimen is marked with different inks, which enables measurement to the nearest lateral and deep margins, and if invaded, guides further excision. We retrospectively analysed 688 specimens of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) from the head and neck from two separate years: 2010 and 2012. Marking sutures were used in 663 (96%) cases. There were 21 invaded margins (3%), 17 (81%) at the lateral margin and 4 (19%) at the deep margin. Of the 17 with invaded lateral margins, 10 were from the nose, and the remaining 7 from other sites including the ear (n=2), and neck, forehead, temple, eyelid, and cheek (n=1 each). Of the 663 marked specimens, the marking stitch was useful in only one patient who needed another operation (0.2%). We suggest that routine orientation of BCC, even from high risk areas, is not necessary. If the operating surgeon questions the size of the margin when a lesion is ill-defined or of a high-risk histological subtype, then excision with monitored en-face margins should be considered with traditional Mohs surgery or a reliable modified version. PMID:27126978

  20. Combination Trimodality Therapy Using Vismodegib for Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Face.

    PubMed

    Block, Alec M; Alite, Fiori; Diaz, Aidnag Z; Borrowdale, Richard W; Clark, Joseph I; Choi, Mehee

    2015-01-01

    Background. For large basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) of the head and neck, definitive surgery often requires extensive resection and reconstruction that may result in prolonged recovery and limited cosmesis. Vismodegib, a small-molecule inhibitor of the hedgehog pathway, is approved for advanced and metastatic BCCs. We present a case of advanced BCC treated with combination of vismodegib, radiotherapy, and local excision resulting in excellent response and cosmesis. Case Presentation. A 64-year-old gentleman presented with a 5-year history of a 7 cm enlarging right cheek mass, with extensive vascularization, central ulceration, and skin, soft tissue, and buccal mucosa involvement. Biopsy revealed BCC, nodular type. Up-front surgical option involved a large resection and reconstruction. After multidisciplinary discussion, we recommended and he opted for combined modality of vismodegib, radiotherapy, and local excision. The patient tolerated vismodegib well and his right cheek lesion decreased significantly in size. He was then treated with radiotherapy followed by local excision that revealed only focal residual BCC. Currently, he is without evidence of disease and has excellent cosmesis. Conclusions. We report a case of locally advanced BCC treated with trimodality therapy with vismodegib, radiotherapy, and local excision, resulting in excellent outcome and facial cosmesis, without requiring extensive resection or reconstructive surgery. PMID:26504605

  1. Region growing by sector analysis for detection of blue-gray ovoids in basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guvenc, S. Pelin; Leander, Robert W.; Kefel, Serkan; Rader, Ryan K.; Hinton, Kristen A.; Stricklin, Sherea M.; Stoecker, William V.

    2014-01-01

    Blue-gray ovoids (B-GOs) are critical dermoscopic structures in basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) that pose a challenge for automatic detection. Due to variation in size and color, B-GOs can be easily mistaken for similar structures in benign lesions. Analysis of these structures could help further accomplish the goal of automatic BCC detection. This study introduces an efficient sector-based method for segmenting B-GOs. Four modifications of conventional region-growing techniques are presented: (i) employing a seed area rather than a seed point, (ii) utilizing fixed control limits determined from the seed area to eliminate re-calculations of previously-added regions, (iii) determining region growing criteria using logistic regression, and (iv) area analysis and expansion by sectors. Contact dermoscopy images of 68 confirmed BCCs having B-GOs were obtained. A total of 24 color features were analyzed for all B-GO seed areas. Logistic regression analysis determined blue chromaticity, followed by red variance, were the best features for discriminating B-GO edges from surrounding areas. Segmentation of malignant structures obtained an average Pratt's figure of merit of 0.397. The techniques presented here provide a non-recursive, sector-based, region-growing method applicable to any colored structure appearing in digital images. Further research using these techniques could lead to automatic detection of B-GOs in BCCs. PMID:23724851

  2. Treatment of Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma with 3 mm Surgical Margin in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Wen; Ho, Ji-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background. In Asians, most basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are pigmented with clear borders. The consensus of 4 mm surgical margin for BCC largely depends on studies in nonpigmented BCCs in Caucasians. However, little is known about recurrences of pigmented BCCs with a narrower surgical margin. We aimed to investigate 5-year recurrence of BCCs, either pigmented or nonpigmented, in Taiwanese with 3 mm surgical margin. Materials and Methods. 143 patients with BCC (M/F = 66/77, average 64 years) were confirmed pathologically from 2002 to 2013. Based on the pathological margin (>1 mm, ≤1 mm, and involved), patients were categorized into the complete excision group (n = 77), histology with close proximity group (n = 43), and unclear surgical margin group (n = 23). Results. Among 143 cases, 105 were pigmented. With standard 3 mm excision, there were 7 recurrences, with 6 of them from nonpigmented BCC group. Logistic regression showed that pigmentation was associated with lower recurrence. Interestingly, 5-year recurrence of completely excised and histology with close proximity BCC (0/77 versus 1/43) was not different statistically. Conclusions. A 3 mm surgical margin is adequate for pigmented BCC. A “wait and see” approach rather than further wide excision is appropriate for BCC with <1 mm free margin. PMID:27652267

  3. Treatment of Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma with 3 mm Surgical Margin in Asians.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shang-Hung; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Yang, Yi-Chien; Ho, Ji-Chen; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Background. In Asians, most basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are pigmented with clear borders. The consensus of 4 mm surgical margin for BCC largely depends on studies in nonpigmented BCCs in Caucasians. However, little is known about recurrences of pigmented BCCs with a narrower surgical margin. We aimed to investigate 5-year recurrence of BCCs, either pigmented or nonpigmented, in Taiwanese with 3 mm surgical margin. Materials and Methods. 143 patients with BCC (M/F = 66/77, average 64 years) were confirmed pathologically from 2002 to 2013. Based on the pathological margin (>1 mm, ≤1 mm, and involved), patients were categorized into the complete excision group (n = 77), histology with close proximity group (n = 43), and unclear surgical margin group (n = 23). Results. Among 143 cases, 105 were pigmented. With standard 3 mm excision, there were 7 recurrences, with 6 of them from nonpigmented BCC group. Logistic regression showed that pigmentation was associated with lower recurrence. Interestingly, 5-year recurrence of completely excised and histology with close proximity BCC (0/77 versus 1/43) was not different statistically. Conclusions. A 3 mm surgical margin is adequate for pigmented BCC. A "wait and see" approach rather than further wide excision is appropriate for BCC with <1 mm free margin. PMID:27652267

  4. Vismodegib: A smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aditya, Suruchi; Rattan, Aditya

    2013-10-01

    Incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common skin cancer in humans, is rising. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment but there is no standard of care for locally advanced or metastatic disease. Hedgehog signaling proteins are critical for cell growth and differentiation during embryogenesis; Hh pathway is silenced in adults. Dysregulated or aberrant Hh signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of BCC. This hyperactive pathway can be inhibited by use of smoothened inhibitors such as vismodegib. Food and drug administration approved this oral, once-daily medication in 2012 to treat adults with metastatic BCC or locally advanced, recurrent BCC after surgery and also for patients with locally advanced BCC who are not candidates for surgery or radiation treatment. Clinical studies have shown it to be highly efficacious and the most common adverse effects include, muscle spasms, alopecia and dysgeusia. Use of targeted biologic modifiers, exemplified by Hh directed therapeutics offer a new hope to patients with high-surgical morbidity or inoperable tumors.

  5. The garlic-derived organosulfur component ajoene decreases basal cell carcinoma tumor size by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tilli, C M L J; Stavast-Kooy, A J W; Vuerstaek, J D D; Thissen, M R T M; Krekels, G A M; Ramaekers, F C S; Neumann, H A M

    2003-07-01

    Although the therapeutic role of ajoene, an organosulfur compound of garlic, in cardiovascular diseases and mycology has been established, its usefulness in cancer treatment has only recently been suggested. We applied ajoene topically to the tumors of 21 patients with either nodular or superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). A reduction in tumor size was seen in 17 patients. Immunohistochemical assays for Bcl-2 expression in a selection of these tumors before and after treatment showed a significant decrease in this apoptosis-suppressing protein. On average, the percentage of tumor cells expressing the proliferation marker Ki-67 was not decreased, which suggests that the action of ajoene is not explained by a cytostatic effect. To obtain further insight into the mode of action of ajoene, the BCC cell line TE354T and a short-term primary culture of BCC were analyzed for apoptosis induction after treatment with the drug. Apoptosis was detected by morphology of the cells and by flow cytometry. Ajoene induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in these cultures. Taking together the results of the in vivo and in vitro studies, we conclude that ajoene can reduce BCC tumor size, mainly by inducing the mitochondria-dependent route of apoptosis.

  6. Development of Raman microspectroscopy for automated detection and imaging of basal cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larraona-Puy, Marta; Ghita, Adrian; Zoladek, Alina; Perkins, William; Varma, Sandeep; Leach, Iain H.; Koloydenko, Alexey A.; Williams, Hywel; Notingher, Ioan

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the potential of Raman microspectroscopy (RMS) for automated evaluation of excised skin tissue during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The main aim is to develop an automated method for imaging and diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) regions. Selected Raman bands responsible for the largest spectral differences between BCC and normal skin regions and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) are used to build a multivariate supervised classification model. The model is based on 329 Raman spectra measured on skin tissue obtained from 20 patients. BCC is discriminated from healthy tissue with 90+/-9% sensitivity and 85+/-9% specificity in a 70% to 30% split cross-validation algorithm. This multivariate model is then applied on tissue sections from new patients to image tumor regions. The RMS images show excellent correlation with the gold standard of histopathology sections, BCC being detected in all positive sections. We demonstrate the potential of RMS as an automated objective method for tumor evaluation during MMS. The replacement of current histopathology during MMS by a ``generalization'' of the proposed technique may improve the feasibility and efficacy of MMS, leading to a wider use according to clinical need.

  7. Dermatoscopic features of pigmented and non-pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kiladze, N; Shulaia, T; Bulinska, A; Abrahamovych, L

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors, which accounts for about 75% of all skin cancers, its early diagnosis is crucial for proper treatment. In recent years, an increasingly important role in the early and differential diagnosis of skin tumors plays dermatoscopy, making possible to improve the diagnosis of pigmented and nonpigmented skin lesions, especially in the early stages of development. The aim of this work is to study the dermatoscopic criteria for pigmented and nonpigmented BCC using the algorithm of H. Kittler. Were studied 78 cases of different clinical types of BCC, diagnosis was based on clinical and dermatoscopic picture with further confirmation by cytology. The obtained data show that for pigmented BCC are characteristic five major signs of dermatoscopy - lines, dots, clods, circles and pseudopodia, whereas for non-pigmented form - pattern of blood vessels and, as an additional feature, structureless areas. Further studies are needed to evaluate specific dermoscopic hallmarks regarding different categories of BCC and sensitivity of these dermatoscopic features. PMID:25693214

  8. Ambient temperature and risk of first primary basal cell carcinoma: A nationwide United States cohort study.

    PubMed

    Michal Freedman, D; Kitahara, Cari M; Linet, Martha S; Alexander, Bruce H; Neta, Gila; Little, Mark P; Cahoon, Elizabeth K

    2015-07-01

    The Earth's surface is warming and animal studies have shown higher temperatures promote ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin carcinogenesis. There are, however, no population studies of long-term temperature exposure and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk. We linked average lifetime summer ambient temperatures (based on weather station data) and satellite-based UVR estimates to self-reported lifetime residences in the U.S. Radiologic Technologists' cohort. We assessed the relationship between time-dependent average lifetime summer ambient temperature (20-year lag) in quintiles and BCC in whites, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Risks were adjusted for time-dependent lagged average lifetime UVR and time outdoors, body mass index, eye color, and sex (baseline hazard stratified on birth cohort). During a median 19.4 years follow-up, we identified 3556 BCC cases. There was no significant trend in risk between temperature and BCC. However, BCC risk was highest in the fourth quintile of temperature (Q4 vs. Q1; hazards ratio (HR)=1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.06-1.31, p-trend=0.09). BCC risk was strongly related to average lifetime ambient UVR exposure (Q5 vs. Q1; HR=1.54 (95% CI=1.35-1.75, p-trend=<0.001)). Future studies of temperature and BCC risk should include a broad range of UVR and temperature values, along with improved indicators of exposure to temperatures and UVR.

  9. Nanostructured lipid carrier in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of basal-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qidwai, Afreen; Khan, Saba; Md, Shadab; Fazil, Mohammad; Baboota, Sanjula; Narang, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2016-05-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative for malignant skin diseases such as basal-cell carcinoma (BCC), due to its simplicity, enhanced patient compliance, and localization of the residual photosensitivity to the site of application. However, insufficient photosensitizer penetration into the skin is the major issue of concern with topical PDT. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to enable penetration of photosensitizer to the different strata of the skin using a lipid nanocarrier system. We have attempted to develop a nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) for the topical delivery of second-generation photosensitizer, 5-amino levulinic acid (5-ALA), whose hydrophilicity and charge characteristic limit its percutaneous absorption. The microemulsion technique was used for preparing 5-ALA-loaded NLC. The mean particle size, polydispersity index, and entrapment efficiency of the optimized NLC of 5-ALA were found to be 185.2 ± 1.20, 0.156 ± 0.02, and 76.8 ± 2.58%, respectively. The results of in vitro release and in vitro skin permeation studies showed controlled drug release and enhanced penetration into the skin, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and cell line studies respectively demonstrated that encapsulation of 5-ALA in NLC enhanced its ability to reach deeper skin layers and consequently, increased cytotoxicity. PMID:26978275

  10. Gene Expression and Proteome Analysis as Sources of Biomarkers in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, Mihaela Adriana; Voiculescu, Suzana; Rosca, Adrian E.; Moraru, Liliana; Greabu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the world's leading skin cancer in terms of frequency at the moment and its incidence continues to rise each year, leading to profound negative psychosocial and economic consequences. UV exposure is the most important environmental factor in the development of BCC in genetically predisposed individuals, this being reflected by the anatomical distribution of lesions mainly on sun-exposed skin areas. Early diagnosis and prompt management are of crucial importance in order to prevent local tissue destruction and subsequent disfigurement. Although various noninvasive or minimal invasive techniques have demonstrated their utility in increasing diagnostic accuracy of BCC and progress has been made in its treatment options, recurrent, aggressive, and metastatic variants of BCC still pose significant challenge for the healthcare system. Analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiling of tumor cells and of tumoral microenvironment in various tissues strongly suggests that certain molecules involved in skin cancer pathogenic pathways might represent novel predictive and prognostic biomarkers in BCC. PMID:27578920

  11. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by two photon excited fluorescence combined with lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shunping; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Liu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Yuan; Qu, Junle

    2014-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human skin cancer. The traditional diagnostic procedure of BCC is histological examination with haematoxylin and eosin staining of the tissue biopsy. In order to reduce complexity of the diagnosis procedure, a number of noninvasive optical methods have been applied in skin examination, for example, multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this study, we explored two-photon optical tomography of human skin specimens using two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging and FLIM. There are a number of naturally endogenous fluorophores in skin sample, such as keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin, flavin and porphyrin. Confocal microscopy was used to obtain structures of the sample. Properties of epidermic and cancer cells were characterized by fluorescence emission spectra, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging. Our results show that two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging can provide accurate optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and is potentially a quantitative optical diagnostic method in skin cancer diagnosis.

  12. Advanced basal cell carcinoma, the hedgehog pathway, and treatment options – role of smoothened inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, Leslie A; Sharfman, William H

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer and its incidence is rising worldwide. Ultraviolet radiation exposure, including tanning bed use, as well as host factors play a role in its development. The majority of cases are treated and cured with local therapies including surgery. Yet, the health care costs of diagnosis and treatment of BCCs in the US is substantial. In the United States, the cost of nonmelanoma skin cancer care in the Medicare population is estimated to be US$426 million per year. While rare, locally advanced BCCs that can no longer be controlled with surgery and/or radiation, and metastatic BCCs do occur and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Vismodegib (GDC-0449), a smoothened inhibitor targeted at the hedgehog pathway, is the first US Food and Drug Association (FDA)-approved agent in the treatment of locally advanced, unresectable, and metastatic BCCs. This class of agents appears to be changing the survival rates in advanced BCC patients, but appropriate patient selection and monitoring are important. Multidisciplinary assessments are essential for the optimal care and management of these patients. For some patients with locally advanced BCC, treatment with a hedgehog inhibitor may eliminate the need for an excessively disfiguring or morbid surgery. PMID:26604681

  13. Ambient temperature and risk of first primary basal cell carcinoma: a nationwide United States cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, D. Michal; Kitahara, Cari M.; Linet, Martha S.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Neta, Gila; Little, Mark; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's surface is warming and animal studies have shown higher temperatures promote ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin carcinogenesis. There are, however, no population studies of long-term temperature exposure and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk. We linked average lifetime summer ambient temperatures (based on weather station data) and satellite-based UVR estimates to self-reported lifetime residences in the U.S. Radiologic Technologists' cohort. We assessed the relationship between time-dependent average lifetime summer ambient temperature (20-year lag) in quintiles and BCC in whites, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Risks were adjusted for time-dependent lagged average lifetime UVR and time outdoors, body mass index, eye color, and sex (baseline hazard stratified on birth cohort). During a median 19.4 years follow-up, we identified 3,556 BCC cases. There was no significant trend in risk between temperature and BCC. However, BCC risk was highest in the fourth quintile of temperature (Q4 vs. Q1; hazards ratio (HR)=1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06–1.31, p-trend =0.09). BCC risk was strongly related to average lifetime ambient UVR exposure (Q5 vs. Q1; HR = 1.54 (95% CI = 1.35–1.75, p-trend= <0.001)). Future studies of temperature and BCC risk should include a broad range of UVR and temperature values, along with improved indicators of exposure to temperatures and UVR. PMID:25996074

  14. Patient Preferences for Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma: Importance of Cure and Cosmetic Outcome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Isabelle; Schaarschmidt, Marthe-Lisa; Glocker, Anne; Herr, Raphael; Schmieder, Astrid; Goerdt, Sergij; Peitsch, Wiebke K

    2016-03-01

    Treatment options for localized resectable basal cell carcinoma (BCC) include micrographically controlled surgery, simple excision, curettage, laser ablation, cryosurgery, imiquimod, 5-fluorouracil, photodynamic therapy and radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to assess the preferences of patients with BCC for outcome (cure and recurrence rate, cosmetic outcome, risk of temporary and permanent complications) and process attributes (type of therapy, treatment location, anaesthesia, method of wound closure, duration of wound healing, out-of-pocket costs) of these treatments with conjoint analysis. Participants (n = 124) attached greatest importance to recurrence rate (relative importance score (RIS) = 17.28), followed by cosmetic outcome (RIS = 16.90) and cure rate (RIS = 15.02). Participants with BCC on the head or neck were particularly interested in cosmetic outcome. Those with a recurrence were willing to trade risk of recurrence, treatment location and duration of wound healing for a better cosmetic result. In summary, participants particularly valued cure and cosmetic outcome, although preferences varied with individual and tumour-associated characteristics.

  15. Master/slave optical coherence tomography imaging of eyelid basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chin, Catherine; Bradu, Adrian; Lim, Rongxuan; Khandwala, Mona; Schofield, John; Leick, Lasse; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-09-10

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is fast emerging as an additional non-interventional modality for skin tumor detection and diagnosis. A master/slave flying spot OCT configuration was assembled to detect periocular basal cell carcinomas (BCC). A swept source at 1300 nm and sweeping speed of 50 kHz were used. A three-step process was involved. First, 384 channeled spectra using a mirror were stored for 384 optical path differences at the master stage. Then, the stored channeled spectra (masks) were correlated with the channeled spectrum from the BCC tissue to produce 384 en face OCT images (200×200 pixels) for the optical path difference values used to acquire the masks. Finally, these en face slices were stacked to form a volume to cross-reference BCC tumor margins in the orthogonal plane. Per each eyelid sample, several en face images of 200×200 lateral pixels are produced in the time to scan laterally a complete raster of 1.6 s. Combination of the en face views with the cross-sectioning views allow for better discrimination of BCCs comparable to using cross-sectional imaging alone, as previously reported using the conventional fast-Fourier-transform-based OCT techniques. PMID:27661377

  16. Usefulness of Photodynamic Therapy as a Possible Therapeutic Alternative in the Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Deboli, Tommaso; Previgliano, Alberto; Broganelli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in individuals with fair skin type (I–II) and steadily increasing in incidence (70% of skin malignancy). It is locally invasive but metastasis is usually very rare, with an estimated incidence of 0.0028%–0.55%. Conventional therapy is surgery, especially for the H region of the face and infiltrative lesions; in case of inoperable tumors, radiotherapy is a valid option. Recently, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an effective treatment in the management of superficial and small nodular BCC. PDT is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the administration of a photo-sensibilizing agent followed by irradiation at a pre-defined wavelength; this determines the creation of reactive oxygen species that specifically destroy target cells. The only major side effect is pain, reported by some patients during the irradiation. The high cure rate and excellent cosmetic outcome requires considering this possibility for the management of patients with both sporadic and hereditary BCC. In this article, an extensive review of the recent literature was made, in order to clarify the role of PDT as a possible alternative therapeutic option in the treatment of BCC. PMID:26426005

  17. Gene Expression and Proteome Analysis as Sources of Biomarkers in Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Mihai; Caruntu, Constantin; Ghita, Mihaela Adriana; Voiculescu, Vlad; Voiculescu, Suzana; Rosca, Adrian E; Caruntu, Ana; Moraru, Liliana; Popa, Iris Maria; Calenic, Bogdan; Greabu, Maria; Costea, Daniela Elena

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the world's leading skin cancer in terms of frequency at the moment and its incidence continues to rise each year, leading to profound negative psychosocial and economic consequences. UV exposure is the most important environmental factor in the development of BCC in genetically predisposed individuals, this being reflected by the anatomical distribution of lesions mainly on sun-exposed skin areas. Early diagnosis and prompt management are of crucial importance in order to prevent local tissue destruction and subsequent disfigurement. Although various noninvasive or minimal invasive techniques have demonstrated their utility in increasing diagnostic accuracy of BCC and progress has been made in its treatment options, recurrent, aggressive, and metastatic variants of BCC still pose significant challenge for the healthcare system. Analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiling of tumor cells and of tumoral microenvironment in various tissues strongly suggests that certain molecules involved in skin cancer pathogenic pathways might represent novel predictive and prognostic biomarkers in BCC. PMID:27578920

  18. Master/slave optical coherence tomography imaging of eyelid basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chin, Catherine; Bradu, Adrian; Lim, Rongxuan; Khandwala, Mona; Schofield, John; Leick, Lasse; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-09-10

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is fast emerging as an additional non-interventional modality for skin tumor detection and diagnosis. A master/slave flying spot OCT configuration was assembled to detect periocular basal cell carcinomas (BCC). A swept source at 1300 nm and sweeping speed of 50 kHz were used. A three-step process was involved. First, 384 channeled spectra using a mirror were stored for 384 optical path differences at the master stage. Then, the stored channeled spectra (masks) were correlated with the channeled spectrum from the BCC tissue to produce 384 en face OCT images (200×200 pixels) for the optical path difference values used to acquire the masks. Finally, these en face slices were stacked to form a volume to cross-reference BCC tumor margins in the orthogonal plane. Per each eyelid sample, several en face images of 200×200 lateral pixels are produced in the time to scan laterally a complete raster of 1.6 s. Combination of the en face views with the cross-sectioning views allow for better discrimination of BCCs comparable to using cross-sectional imaging alone, as previously reported using the conventional fast-Fourier-transform-based OCT techniques.

  19. In vivo confocal microscopy of basal cell carcinoma: a systematic review of diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kadouch, D J; Schram, M E; Leeflang, M M; Limpens, J; Spuls, P I; de Rie, M A

    2015-10-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most prevalent type of skin cancer. Histologic analysis of punch biopsy or direct excision specimen is used to confirm clinical diagnosis. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive imaging modality that could facilitate early diagnosis and minimize unnecessary invasive procedures. We systematically reviewed diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of RCM in diagnosing primary BCCs to judge its usefulness. Eligible studies were reviewed for methodological quality using the QUADAS-2 tool. We used the bivariate random-effects model to calculate summary estimates of sensitivity and specificity. Six studies met the selection criteria and were included for analysis. The meta-analysis showed a summary estimate of sensitivity 0.97 (95% CI, 0.90-0.99) and specificity 0.93 (95% CI, 0.88-0.96). All but one of the QUADAS-2 items showed a high or unclear risk of bias with regards to patient selection. RCM may be a promising diagnostic tool, but the limited number of available studies and potential risk of bias of included studies do not allow us to draw firm conclusions. Future accuracy studies should take these limitations into account. PMID:26290493

  20. Confocal Microscopy–Guided Laser Ablation for Superficial and Early Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Sierra, Heidy; Cordova, Miguel; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Importance Laser ablation is a rapid and minimally invasive approach for the treatment of superficial skin cancers, but efficacy and reliability vary owing to lack of histologic margin control. High-resolution reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may offer a means for examining margins directly on the patient. Observations We report successful elimination of superficial and early nodular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in 2 cases-, using RCM imaging to guide Er-:YAG laser ablation. Three-dimensional (3-D) mapping is feasible with RCM-, to delineate the lateral border and thickness of the tumor. Thus, the surgeon may deliver laser fluence and passes with localized control—ie, by varying the ablation parameters in sub-lesional areas with specificity that is governed by the 3-D topography of the BCC. We further demonstrate intra-operative detection of residual BCC after initial laser ablation and complete removal of remaining tumor by additional passes. Both RCM imaging and histologic sections confirm the final clearance of BCC. Conclusions and Relevance Confocal microscopy may enhance the efficacy and reliability of laser tumor ablation. This report represents a new translational application for RCM imaging, which, when combined with an ablative laser, may one day provide an efficient and cost-effective treatment for BCC. PMID:24827701

  1. Distribution of protoporphyrin IX in Bowen's disease and basal cell carcinomas treated with topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David J.; Stables, G. I.; Ash, D. V.; Brown, Stanley B.

    1995-03-01

    We have used ultra-low light level fluorescence microscopy to examine the suggestion that the relatively poor response of human basal cell carcinomas (BCC) to topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) arises from limited drug penetration into the lesion. The distribution of ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in human BCC and Bowen's disease was examined and, in almost all cases, was found to be most intense in those regions of tumor immediately adjacent to the dermis. This distribution was independent of tumor type, and did not appear to be affected by tumor depth in the skin. It is suggested that ALA penetration may not limit the efficacy of ALA-PDT in the treatment of BCC. Failure of superficial ALA-based PDT in basal cell carcinoma may, instead, be related to the histological structure of this type of lesion.

  2. Basal-cell adenoma of the salivary gland: a benign adenoma that cytologically mimics adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stanley, M W; Horwitz, C A; Henry, M J; Burton, L G; Lowhagen, T

    1988-01-01

    We describe the fine-needle aspiration cytology of two cases of basal-cell adenoma (BCA) of the parotid gland. Both consisted of groups of small uniform cells with scant cytoplasm and occasional single cells. Small amounts of metachromatic stroma were present in smears from one case. The cytologic and histologic similarities between (BCA) and the solid type of adenoid cystic carcinoma are emphasized. Unequivocal distinction between these two entities may not be possible by cytologic criteria alone.

  3. Evaluation of the ‘Hedgehog’ signaling pathways in squamous and basal cell carcinomas of the eyelids and conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    CELEBI, ALI RIZA CENK; KIRATLI, HAYYAM; SOYLEMEZOGLU, FIGEN

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the role of hedgehog signaling pathway in the carcinogenesis of eyelid skin and conjunctival epithelial malignant tumors. The study was conducted on specimens from 41 patients with cutaneous eyelid basal cell carcinoma, 22 with bulbar conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma, 12 with bulbar conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia. Major molecules of Hedgehog signaling pathway (Sonic Hedgehog [Shh] and Patched-1 [Ptch-1] and Glioma-associated oncogene [Gli-1]) were evaluated in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens using immunohistochemical staining. For each specimen, the percentage (<10%, 10–50%, >50%) and the intensity of the immunohistochemical staining (graded from 0 to 3) were calculated and the scores obtained by multiplication of two values were analyzed using the Kruskall-Wallis test. Shh and Ptch-1 expression levels were statistically significantly lower in the basal cell carcinoma group compared with the squamous cell carcinoma group (P=0.043 for Shh; P=0.030 for Ptch-1). In the conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma group, the Ptch-1 score was 0 in ~25% of specimens and the Gli-1 score was ≤2 in ~45% of cases. In the conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia group, the Ptch-1 score was ≥2 in 66% of specimens, the Gli-1 score was ≤2 in ~92% of cases. Ptch-1 mutations contribute to the development of cutaneous eyelid basal cell carcinoma. The present study provides evidence that alterations in hedgehog signaling pathways may lead to transformation of the conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia into invasive squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27347166

  4. Smoothened (SMO) receptor mutations dictate resistance to vismodegib in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pricl, Sabrina; Cortelazzi, Barbara; Dal Col, Valentina; Marson, Domenico; Laurini, Erik; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana; Bossi, Paolo; Perrone, Federica

    2015-02-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and a subset of medulloblastomas are characterized by loss-of-function mutations in the tumor suppressor gene, PTCH1. PTCH1 normally functions by repressing the activity of the Smoothened (SMO) receptor. Inactivating PTCH1 mutations result in constitutive Hedgehog pathway activity through uncontrolled SMO signaling. Targeting this pathway with vismodegib, a novel SMO inhibitor, results in impressive tumor regression in patients harboring genetic defects in this pathway. However, a secondary mutation in SMO has been reported in medulloblastoma patients following relapse on vismodegib to date. This mutation preserves pathway activity, but appears to confer resistance by interfering with drug binding. Here we report for the first time on the molecular mechanisms of resistance to vismodegib in two BCC cases. The first case, showing progression after 2 months of continuous vismodegib (primary resistance), exhibited the new SMO G497W mutation. The second case, showing a complete clinical response after 5 months of treatment and a subsequent progression after 11 months on vismodegib (secondary resistance), exhibited a PTCH1 nonsense mutation in both the pre- and the post-treatment specimens, and the SMO D473Y mutation in the post-treatment specimens only. In silico analysis demonstrated that SMO(G497W) undergoes a conformational rearrangement resulting in a partial obstruction of the protein drug entry site, whereas the SMO D473Y mutation induces a direct effect on the binding site geometry leading to a total disruption of a stabilizing hydrogen bond network. Thus, the G497W and D473Y SMO mutations may represent two different mechanisms leading to primary and secondary resistance to vismodegib, respectively. PMID:25306392

  5. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor α and interleukin-2 serum levels in patients with basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Ewa; Zablotna, Monika; Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Malgorzata; Sikorska, Monika; Lange, Magdalena; Nowicki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an immunogenic neoplasm and the imbalance in Th1/Th2 cytokines expression seems to play the major role in pathogenesis and clinical behaviour of the tumour. Aim To investigate the association of soluble interleukin 2α receptor (sIL-2Rα) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) serum concentrations with BCC. Material and methods The study involved 110 individuals with BCC and 60 healthy age- and sex-matched volunteers. Serum levels of sIL-2Rα and IL-2 were measured using ELISA test. Results We found significantly (p = 0.027) increased sIL-2Rα serum levels in BCC patients, in comparison to healthy controls. Statistically (p = 0.04) higher sIL-2Rα levels were observed in patients with more advanced tumours. Serum levels of sIL-2Rα showed a significant linear (r = 0.24, p = 0.018) correlation with tumour size. The average IL-2 serum levels in BCC patients were statistically (p = 0.039) decreased compared to controls. Significantly (p = 0.0454) lower median IL-2 levels were observed in patients with more advanced tumours. A negative correlation between sIL-2Rα and IL-2 serum concentrations was revealed (r = –0.22; p = 0.027). Conclusions Our results testify to the importance of the IL-2/sIL-2Rα signalling pathway in pathogenesis of BCC, suggesting that IL-2 and sIL-2Rα might be considered as potential markers of disease and targets for immunotherapy in BCC patients. PMID:27605896

  6. Efficacy of low-dose mTHPC-PDT for the treatment of basal cell carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Christian S.; Rauschning, Winrich; Stranadko, Evgueni P.; Riabov, Mikhail V.; Albrecht, Volker; Nifantiev, Nikolay E.; Hopper, Colin

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are the most common skin cancers, and incidence rates are still rising. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) with mTHPC (Foscan®) has shown to be a promising alternative to other treatments with good cosmetic results. This study was performed to determine optimal treatment parameters for this indication. Methods: 117 patients with a total of 460 BCCs received mTHPC-PDT. The treatment parameters were varied as follows: Foscan® dose 0.03 - 0.15 mg/kg, drug-light interval (DLI) 1 - 96 hours, total energy density 20 - 120 J/cm2. The clinical outcomes were assessed 8 weeks after PDT following WHO guidelines. Results: The rate of complete remissions (CR) was 96.7% and the general cosmetic outcome rated very good. In the largest subgroup (n=80) with low-dose mTHPC (0.05 mg/kg mTHPC; 48 hours DLI; 50 J/cm2 total energy density), a CR rate of 100% was accomplished. Minor changes of the parameters (0.04 mg/kg mTHPC or 24 hours DLI) yielded similar results. Side effects were encountered in 52 out of 133 PDT sessions. They were more common in patients who had received high drug doses (0.06 - 0.15 mg/kg) and comprised pain and phototoxic reactions. 3 patients developed severe sunburns with subsequent scarring at the injection site following sunlight exposure 2-3 weeks after mTHPC administration. Conclusions: The data suggests that low-dose mTHPC-PDT is an effective treatment option for BCCs. If sensibly applied, it is well tolerated and provides mostly excellent cosmetic results. The evaluation of long term results is still to be undertaken.

  7. Female Estrogen-Related Factors and Incidence of Basal Cell Carcinoma in a Nationwide US Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Ntowe, Estelle; Bowen, Emily M.; Doody, Michele M.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Lee, Terrence; Little, Mark P.; Linet, Martha S.; Freedman, D. Michal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose UV radiation exposure is the primary risk factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common human malignancy. Although the photosensitizing properties of estrogens have been recognized for decades, few studies have examined the relationship between reproductive factors or exogenous estrogen use and BCC. Methods Using data from the US Radiologic Technologists Study, a large, nationwide, prospective cohort, we assessed the relationship between reproductive factors, exogenous estrogen use, and first primary BCC while accounting for sun exposure, personal sun sensitivity, and lifestyle factors for geographically dispersed women exposed to a wide range of ambient UV radiation. Results Elevated risk of BCC was associated with late age at natural menopause (hazard ratio [HR] for ≥ 55 years v 50 to 54 years, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.17) and any use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT; HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.30; P for trend for duration = .001). BCC risk was most increased among women reporting natural menopause who used MHT for 10 or more years versus women who never used MHT (HR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.35 to 2.87). Risk of BCC was not associated with age at menarche, parity, age at first birth, infertility, use of diethylstilbestrol by participant's mother, age at hysterectomy, or use of oral contraceptives. Conclusion These analyses confirm a previous finding of increased risk of BCC associated with MHT. Novel findings of increased BCC risk associated with MHT in women experiencing natural menopause and for late age at natural menopause warrant further investigation. Users of MHT may constitute an additional high-risk group in need of more frequent skin cancer screening. PMID:26527779

  8. Radiation-Related Risk of Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignancy in the United States. Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor in certain populations, including cancer survivors. We quantified the association between ionizing radiation dose and the risk of BCC in childhood cancer survivors. Methods Participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study who reported a BCC (case subjects, n = 199) were matched on age and length of follow-up to three study participants who had not developed a BCC (control subjects, n = 597). The radiation-absorbed dose (in Gy) to the BCC location was calculated based on individual radiotherapy records using a custom-designed dosimetry program. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between demographic and treatment factors, therapeutic radiation dose, and surrogate markers of sun sensitivity (skin and hair color) and the risk of BCC. A linear dose–response model was fitted to evaluate the excess odds ratio per Gy of radiation dose. Results Among case subjects, 83% developed BCC between the ages of 20 and 39 years. Radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, was associated with an increased risk of BCC compared with no chemotherapy or radiation. The odds ratio for subjects who received 35 Gy or more to the skin site vs no radiation therapy was 39.8 (95% CI = 8.6 to 185). Results were consistent with a linear dose–response relationship, with an excess odds ratio per Gy of 1.09 (95% CI = 0.49 to 2.64). No other treatment variables were statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of BCC. Conclusions Radiation doses to the skin of more than 1 Gy are associated with an increased risk of BCC. PMID:22835387

  9. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor α and interleukin-2 serum levels in patients with basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Ewa; Zablotna, Monika; Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Malgorzata; Sikorska, Monika; Lange, Magdalena; Nowicki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an immunogenic neoplasm and the imbalance in Th1/Th2 cytokines expression seems to play the major role in pathogenesis and clinical behaviour of the tumour. Aim To investigate the association of soluble interleukin 2α receptor (sIL-2Rα) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) serum concentrations with BCC. Material and methods The study involved 110 individuals with BCC and 60 healthy age- and sex-matched volunteers. Serum levels of sIL-2Rα and IL-2 were measured using ELISA test. Results We found significantly (p = 0.027) increased sIL-2Rα serum levels in BCC patients, in comparison to healthy controls. Statistically (p = 0.04) higher sIL-2Rα levels were observed in patients with more advanced tumours. Serum levels of sIL-2Rα showed a significant linear (r = 0.24, p = 0.018) correlation with tumour size. The average IL-2 serum levels in BCC patients were statistically (p = 0.039) decreased compared to controls. Significantly (p = 0.0454) lower median IL-2 levels were observed in patients with more advanced tumours. A negative correlation between sIL-2Rα and IL-2 serum concentrations was revealed (r = –0.22; p = 0.027). Conclusions Our results testify to the importance of the IL-2/sIL-2Rα signalling pathway in pathogenesis of BCC, suggesting that IL-2 and sIL-2Rα might be considered as potential markers of disease and targets for immunotherapy in BCC patients.

  10. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Outer Nose: Overview on Surgical Techniques and Analysis of 312 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Bennewitz, Annett; Langner, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma of the nose is common, with a potential of local recurrence and high-risk features. Materials and Methods: We provide a review on anatomy of the nose, tumour surgery and defect closure on the nose. We analysed our own patients with nasal BCC of a 24 months period. Results: We identified 321 patients with nasal BCC. There was a predominance of female patients of 1.2 to 1. The mean age was 74.8 years. Slow Mohs technique was employed for all tumours until 3D tumour-free margins were achieved. That resulted on average in 1.8 ± 0.7 Mohs stages. The most common histologic types were solitary (n = 182), morpheic (79), and micronodular (20), Perineural infiltration was evident in 56 tumours. Primary closure after mobilisation of soft tissue was possible in 105 BCCs. Advancement flaps were used in 91 tumours, rotation flaps in 47, transposition flaps in 34 tumours, and combined procedures in 6 cases. In 36 patients full-thickness skin grafting was performed. In two patients healing by second intention was preferred. Partial flap loss was seen in four patients (1.4%). All of them had significant underlying pathologies. None of the tumours treated showed a relapse during the observation time. However, this is a limitation of the present study since follow-up was on average only 10 months. Conclusions: BCCs of the nose are common. Only 3D-controlled micrographic surgery (Mohs or slow Mohs) guarantee a high rate of complete tumour removal and a very low risk of recurrence. PMID:25538434

  11. Vitamin D3 Inhibits Hedgehog Signaling and Proliferation in Murine Basal Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jean Y.; Xiao, Tony Zheng; Oda, Yuko; Chang, Kris S.; Shpall, Elana; Wu, Angela; So, Po-Lin; Hebert, Jennifer; Bikle, Daniel; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive Hedgehog (HH) signaling underlies several human tumors, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Recently, Bijlsma et al (Bijlsma MF, et al. (2006) PLoS Biol 4: 1397–1410) reported a new biologic function for vitamin D3 in suppressing HH signaling in an in vitro model system. Based on that work, we have assessed effects of vitamin D3 on HH signaling and proliferation of murine BCCs in vitro and in vivo. We find that indeed in BCC cells, vitamin D3 blocks both proliferation and HH signaling as assessed by mRNA expression of the HH target gene Gli1. These effects of vitamin D3 on Gli1 expression and on BCC cell proliferation are comparable to the effects of cyclopamine, a known inhibitor of the HH pathway. These results are specific for vitamin D3, since the precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol and the downstream products 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 [25(OH)D] and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D] are considerably less effective in reducing either Gli1 mRNA or cellular proliferation. Moreover, these effects seem to be independent of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) since shRNA knock down of VDR does not abrogate the anti HH effects of D3 despite reducing expression of the VDR target gene 24-hydroxylase. Finally, topical vitamin D3 treatment of existing murine BCC tumors significantly decreases Gli1 and Ki67 staining. Thus, topical vitamin D3 acting via its HH inhibiting effect may hold promise as an effective anti-BCC agent. PMID:21436386

  12. Multistep carcinogenesis in the formation of basal cell carcinoma of the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Gailani, M.; Leffell, D.; Ziegler, A.

    1994-09-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the skin (BCC) is the most common cancer in humans, a slow growing tumor whose incidence strongly correlates with exposure to UV light. Although the molecular basis of BCC formation is not well understood, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers on chromosome 9q in 70% of BCCs suggests that inactivation of a tumor suppressor on 9q22 is an important early step. UV induced mutations in the p53 gene have also been found in over 50% of sporadic BCCs. We analyzed 18 sporadic BCCs for allelic loss on chromosome 9 and point mutations in the p53 gene and attempted to correlate genetic alteration with pathological subtype and relative UV light exposure. Eight of eighteen tumors (45%) showed LOH on chromosome 9 as well as point mutation of the p53 gene, three of eighteen tumors (17%) showed mutation of the p53 gene without LOH on chromosome 9, five of eighteen tumors (27%) showed LOH for chromosome 9 without evidence of mutation in the p53 gene, and two of eighteen tumors (11%) showed neither LOH on chromosome 9 nor mutation in the p53 gene. Tumor pathology showed no obvious correlation between mutation and tumor aggressiveness. However, one tumor of a unique, aggressive growth subtype had no genetic alteration suggesting a different genetic mechanism in this particular subgroup. 38% of tumors from areas of greatest sun-exposure showed both mutations. The data suggests a strong correlation between inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 9 and mutation in the p53 gene though the sequence of events cannot be determined. Because carcinogenesis is a multistep process and genetic injury from UV light is only one factor, further correlation with degree of tumor differentiation may clarify the genetic process in BCCs.

  13. Infiltrating basal cell carcinoma in the setting of a venous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lutz, M E; Davis, M D; Otley, C C

    2000-07-01

    A 77-year-old man was referred with a 5-year history of an intermittently painful, nonhealing right medial ankle ulcer. The ulcer had not responded to multiple treatment modalities, including Unna boots, compression therapy, sclerotherapy, and split-thickness skin grafting. The past medical history was significant for a deep venous thrombosis in the right leg 30 years earlier (treated with warfarin for 3 months) and a history of greater saphenous vein harvesting for coronary bypass grafting 28 years previously. After the vein stripping, the patient had suffered from increasing right leg edema and stasis changes in the right leg. His history was also remarkable for coronary artery disease, dyslipidemia, and lymphoma treated with chemotherapy 8 years before presentation, with no evidence of recurrence. He had stopped smoking approximately 20 years earlier. Medications included atenolol, simvastatin, nicardipine, nitroglycerin, and aspirin. Skin examination revealed a 3.0 x 3.5-cm ulcer adjacent to the medial malleolus. The edges of the ulcer appeared raised and rolled (Fig. 1). Centrally, there was granulation tissue, which appeared healthy. There were surrounding dermatitic changes. Dorsalis pedis and the posterior tibial pulses were normal. Noninvasive vascular studies revealed severe venous incompetence of the right popliteal and superficial veins. Arterial studies and transcutaneous oximetry were normal. Computed tomographic scan of the pelvis did not reveal any adenopathy, and radiographic imaging did not reveal any bony changes suggestive of osteomyelitis. Biopsy of the ulcer edge and base showed infiltrating basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 2). Mohs' micrographic surgery required three layers; the final extent of the ulcer was 7.8 x 6.9 cm. A split-thickness skin graft was placed.

  14. Basal cell carcinoma with thickened basement membrane: a variant that resembles some benign adnexal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, L; LeBoit, P E

    1997-12-01

    Because cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is such a common malignancy, its unusual histologic manifestations are important. We identified a variant of BCC in which thickened basement membranes surround aggregations of neoplastic epithelial cells. Thickened basement membranes of similar appearance have previously been observed in benign cutaneous adnexal neoplasms, in basaloid monomorphic adenomas of the salivary gland and in other benign conditions, such as folliculocentric basaloid proliferation. We identified nine BCCs that otherwise met standard criteria, but which also had thick basement membranes surrounding some of the aggregations, and examined them by routine and histochemical staining. The cases included BCC with nodular, micronodular, and infiltrating patterns. Two neoplasms were composed largely of clear cells, suggesting, together with the thickened membranes, outer root sheath differentiation. CD34, which labels keratinocytes of the outer root sheath, marked only the epithelial cells of one of these cases. The thickened membranes were stained by periodic-acid Schiff with and without diastase (PAS-D) and by antibodies to type IV collagen and laminin, with slightly different staining patterns. Intraepithelial droplets within aggregations stained with PAS-D and type IV collagen antibodies. Thickened basement membranes therefore can occur in most of the common growth patterns of BCC. The absence of CD34 staining of epithelial cells in most cases makes it problematic at this time to prove that the thickened membranes indicate trichilemmal differentiation. BCC with thick basement membranes can closely mimic benign neoplasms, such as cylindroma and trichilemmoma, from which they can be distinguished in routinely stained sections. The presence of a continuous thick basement membrane around aggregates of epithelial cells does not in and of itself distinguish between benign and malignant cutaneous epithelial neoplasms.

  15. Basal cell (monomorphic) and minimally pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands. Distinction from the solid (anaplastic) type of adenoid cystic carcinoma in fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Stanley, M W; Horwitz, C A; Rollins, S D; Powers, C N; Bardales, R H; Korourain, S; Stern, S J

    1996-07-01

    Cytologic features of the cell-stroma interface are useful in distinguishing between monomorphic adenomas of the basal cell type and adenoid cystic carcinoma. In basal cell adenomas, the collagenous stroma interdigitates with adjacent cells, whereas in adenoid cystic carcinoma, the two are separated by a sharp smooth border. Furthermore, the stroma of basal cell adenomas can contain rare spindle cells or capillaries, but the cylinders of adenoid cystic carcinoma are acellular. The authors review their experience with five cases of basal cell adenoma, and three cases that were designated "minimally pleomorphic adenomas." The latter group showed the small blue cell pattern of basal cell adenoma at the time of fine-needle aspiration, and histology revealed only small foci of typical pleomorphic adenoma. With the exception of one cystic case, the cell-stroma interface of basal cell adenoma was observed in all eight cases. These cases are contrasted with three adenoid cystic carcinomas with extensive solid (anaplastic) areas. All showed the small blue cell pattern and cell-stroma interface features of basal cell adenoma. Neither showed the smooth-bordered cylinders of adenoid cystic carcinoma. Two of these three were incorrectly interpreted as benign at the time of fine-needle aspiration. The authors suggest that the stroma aspirated from solid adenoid cystic carcinoma represents desmoplastic tumor stroma that mimics the pattern of basal cell adenoma in smear material. Distinction between basal cell adenoma and the solid type of adenoid cystic carcinoma at the time of fine-needle aspiration remains a very difficult problem.

  16. Association of Shiny White Blotches and Strands With Nonpigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete-Dechent, Cristián; Bajaj, Shirin; Marchetti, Michael A.; Rabinovitz, Harold; Dusza, Stephen W.; Marghoob, Ashfaq A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer and is usually nonpigmented. Shiny white structures (SWSs) are frequently present in BCC. OBJECTIVE To determine the diagnostic accuracy of various morphologies of SWSs for diagnosis of nonpigmented BCC. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Nonpigmented skin tumors, determined clinically and dermoscopically, were identified from a database of lesions consecutively biopsied over a 3-year period (January 2, 2009, to December 31, 2012) from a single dermatology practice. Data analysis was conducted from October 9, 2014, to November 15, 2015. Investigators blinded to histopathologic diagnosis evaluated the polarized dermoscopic images for the presence of SWSs, which were categorized as blotches, strands, short white lines, and rosettes. Measures of diagnostic accuracy for BCC were estimated. Participants included 2375 patients from a dermatologic clinic in Plantation, Florida. Review of the medical records identified 2891 biopsied skin lesions; 457 of these were nonpigmented neoplasms. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Diagnosis of BCC with dermoscopy compared with all other diagnoses combined was the primary outcome; the secondary outcome was diagnosis of BCC compared with amelanotic melanoma. We calculated diagnostic accuracy measured as odds ratios (ORs), sensitivity, and specificity of shiny white blotches and/or strands for the diagnosis of BCC. RESULTS Of the 457 nonpigmented neoplasms evaluated, 287 (62.8%) were BCCs, 106 (23.2%) were squamous cell carcinoma, 39 (8.5%) were lichen planus–like keratosis, 21 (4.6%) were melanomas, and 4 (0.9%) were nevi. The prevalence of SWSs was 49.0% (n = 224). In multivariate analysis (reported as OR [95% CI]) controlling for age, sex, and anatomical location, the presence of any SWS was associated with a diagnosis of BCC (2.3 [1.5–3.6]; P < .001). Blotches (6.3 [3.6–10.9]; P < .001), strands (4.9 [2.9–8.4]; P < .001), and blotches and strands together

  17. Benign hair-follicle derived tumours in the differential diagnosis of basal-cell carcinoma of the eyelids: a clinicopathological comparison.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, W; Garner, A; Collin, J R

    1989-01-01

    Benign eyelid tumours derived from hair follicles are rare and frequently misdiagnosed as basal-cell carcinoma when evaluation is based on clinical evidence alone. They include trichoepithelioma, trichofolliculoma, trichilemmoma, and pilomatrixoma. We reviewed 117 such tumours received in the Department of Pathology, Institute of Ophthalmology, London, in the last 30 years, a number which compared with 2447 basal-cell carcinomas seen over the same period. The hair follicle tumours may be safely excised with a narrow margin of clearance, whereas a macroscopic clearance of 3 to 5 mm or surgery with frozen section histological control is desirable for excision of basal-cell carcinoma. Therefore confirmation by incisional biopsy of the nature of any large lesion suspected of being a basal-cell carcinoma is essential in order to avoid performing an unnecessarily extensive or time consuming excision. Images PMID:2730855

  18. Treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma with ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Miriam S

    2016-01-01

    Background Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in Caucasians. Surgical approaches are the most widely used and effective treatment strategies for well-defined BCC. However, for patients with low-risk, superficial BCCs (sBCCs), medical therapy may be a treatment option. In this small case series, we describe our experience in using topical treatment with ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%, for patients who refused surgical treatment for sBCC. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of seven patients from our community dermatology practice for whom sBCC was treated with ingenol mebutate. The chart review extracted information on demography, dermatologic history, and prior treatment for actinic keratosis or skin cancer. Summary of the treatment outcome with ingenol mebutate included the size and location of the sBCCs, description of administration, local skin reactions, adverse events, and efficacy. Results Histopathologic analysis of a shave biopsy sample of suspicious lesions on the trunk confirmed nine sBCCs: a single sBCC in five patients and two well-separated lesions in each of the other two patients. Patients were treated at 10 to 14 days after shave biopsy; biopsy sites were not required to be fully healed. Lesions were either occluded using a standard adhesive bandage (n=6) or not occluded (n=3). All patients experienced local skin reactions that began on day 1 or 2 of treatment, peaked on days 2 to 7, and were largely resolved at 2 weeks. All sBCCs were clinically resolved on short-term follow-up at 2 to 4 weeks. Repeat biopsy of six lesion sites in four patients at 3 or 4 months confirmed histologic clearance. There were no clinically suspicious lesions in any patients at subsequent follow-up evaluations at 3-month intervals. The longest follow-up to date has been 14 months. Conclusion Ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%, was efficacious and well tolerated for the treatment of biopsy-confirmed sBCCs on the trunk in seven patients. PMID:27574458

  19. Combined reflectance confocal microscopy-optical coherence tomography for delineation of basal cell carcinoma margins: an ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftimia, Nicusor; Peterson, Gary; Chang, Ernest W.; Maguluri, Gopi; Fox, William; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) approach, integrated within a single optical layout, for diagnosis of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and delineation of margins. While RCM imaging detects BCC presence (diagnoses) and its lateral spreading (margins) with measured resolution of ˜1 μm, OCT imaging delineates BCC depth spreading (margins) with resolution of ˜7 μm. When delineating margins in 20 specimens of superficial and nodular BCCs, depth could be reliably determined down to ˜600 μm, and agreement with histology was within about ±50 μm.

  20. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA IN THE AREA OF CHRONIC RADIODERMATITIS - 3 CASE REPORTS WITH LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U

    2016-05-01

    Chronic radiodermatitis is a delayed response of skin and underlying soft tissues after exposure to the ionizing radiation. It bears a risk of secondary tumors, in particular non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). We present 3 case reports of the patients with the development of BCC's ≥40 years after radiation of either childhood hemangioma or basal cell carcinoma. Patients with chronic radiodermatitis need a life-long dermatologic follow-up for early detection of NMSC and its consequent removal by Mohs surgery. PMID:27348159

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies novel alleles associated with risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Hongmei; Xu, Mousheng; Kraft, Peter; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Chen, Constance; Guo, Qun; Hu, Frank B.; Curhan, Gary; Amos, Christopher I.; Wang, Li-E.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wei, Qingyi; Hunter, David J.; Han, Jiali

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study on cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) among 2045 cases and 6013 controls of European ancestry, with follow-up replication in 1426 cases and 4845 controls. A non-synonymous SNP in the MC1R gene (rs1805007 encoding Arg151Cys substitution), a previously well-documented pigmentation gene, showed the strongest association with BCC risk in the discovery set (rs1805007[T]: OR (95% CI) for combined discovery set and replication set [1.55 (1.45–1.66); P= 4.3 × 10−17]. We identified that an SNP rs12210050 at 6p25 near the EXOC2 gene was associated with an increased risk of BCC [rs12210050[T]: combined OR (95% CI), 1.24 (1.17–1.31); P= 9.9 × 10−10]. In the locus on 13q32 near the UBAC2 gene encoding ubiquitin-associated domain-containing protein 2, we also identified a variant conferring susceptibility to BCC [rs7335046 [G]; combined OR (95% CI), 1.26 (1.18–1.34); P= 2.9 × 10−8]. We further evaluated the associations of these two novel SNPs (rs12210050 and rs7335046) with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) risk as well as melanoma risk. We found that both variants, rs12210050[T] [OR (95% CI), 1.35 (1.16–1.57); P= 7.6 × 10−5] and rs7335046 [G] [OR (95% CI), 1.21 (1.02–1.44); P= 0.03], were associated with an increased risk of SCC. These two variants were not associated with melanoma risk. We conclude that 6p25 and 13q32 are novel loci conferring susceptibility to non-melanoma skin cancer. PMID:21700618

  2. Reflectance confocal microscopy and dermoscopy for in vivo, non-invasive skin imaging of superficial basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GHITA, MIHAELA A.; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; ROSCA, ADRIAN E.; KALESHI, HARILLAQ; CARUNTU, ANA; MORARU, LILIANA; DOCEA, ANCA OANA; ZURAC, SABINA; BODA, DANIEL; NEAGU, MONICA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) is the second most frequent histological type of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), usually requiring a skin biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. It usually appears on the upper trunk and shoulders as erythematous and squamous lesions. Although it has a slow growth and seldom metastasizes, early diagnosis and management are of crucial importance in preventing local invasion and subsequent disfigurement. Dermoscopy is nowadays an indispensable tool for the dermatologist when evaluating skin tumors. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a novel imaging technique that allows the non-invasive, in vivo quasi-microscopic morphological and dynamic assessment of superficial skin tumors. Moreover, it offers the advantage of performing infinite repeatable determinations to monitor disease progression and non-surgical treatment for sBCC. Herein, we present three lesions of sBCC evaluated using in vivo and non-invasive imaging techniques, emphasizing the usefulness of combining RCM with dermoscopy for increasing the diagnostic accuracy of sBCC. PMID:27123056

  3. Basal Cell Carcinoma Chemoprevention with Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Genetically Predisposed PTCH1+/− Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jean Y.; Aszterbaum, Michelle; Athar, Mohammad; Barsanti, Franco; Cappola, Carol; Estevez, Nini; Hebert, Jennifer; Hwang, Jimmy; Khaimskiy, Yefim; Kim, Arianna; Lu, Ying; So, Po-Lin; Tang, Xiuwei; Kohn, Michael A.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro and epidemiologic studies favor the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in preventing skin squamous photocarcinogenesis, but there has been relatively little study of their efficacy in preventing the more common skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) carcinogenesis. We first compared the relative anti-BCC effects of genetic deletion and NSAID pharmacologic inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes in the skin of Ptch1+/− mice. We then assessed the effects of celecoxib on the development of BCCs in a 3-year, double-blinded, randomized clinical trial in 60 (PTCH1+/−) patients with the basal cell nevus syndrome. In Ptch1+/− mice, genetic deletion of COX1 or COX2 robustly decreased (75%; P < 0.05) microscopic BCC tumor burden, but pharmacologic inhibition with celecoxib reduced microscopic BCCs less efficaciously (35%; P < 0.05). In the human trial, we detected a trend for oral celecoxib reducing BCC burden in all subjects (P = 0.069). Considering only the 60% of patients with less severe disease (<15 BCCs at study entry), celecoxib significantly reduced BCC number and burden: subjects receiving placebo had a 50% increase in BCC burden per year, whereas subjects in the celecoxib group had a 20% increase (Pdifference = 0.024). Oral celecoxib treatment inhibited BCC carcinogenesis in PTCH1+/− mice and had a significant anti-BCC effect in humans with less severe disease. PMID:20051370

  4. Imiquimod 5% cream as an adjuvant pre-operative treatment for basal cell carcinoma of the periocular area.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Rosa; Solebo, Ameenat L; Khandwala, Mona A; Jones, Carole A

    2014-12-01

    Despite national guidelines in the UK, patients with low-grade periocular malignancies frequently wait a period of months for their surgery. We have devised a protocol of pre-treatment with an immune modulator in an attempt to reduce the tumour size whilst patients await surgery. We present a case series of 5 patients who used Imiquimod 5% cream (Aldara) for 4 weeks as an adjuvant treatment prior to the excision of periocular nodular basal cell carcinomas. We also assessed tolerability of the cream using a visual analogue scale and recorded adverse events. Our patients had an average 22% reduction in tumour area (range 3.31%-39.64%) whilst awaiting surgery. The medication had a good tolerability profile and there were no ocular adverse events. Due to the promising results, this pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and value of a planned multicentre, prospective research project to further explore these initial findings. PMID:25255050

  5. Polarimetry based partial least square classification of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma human skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ikram, Masroor

    2016-06-01

    Optical polarimetry was employed for assessment of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissue samples from human skin. Polarimetric analyses revealed that depolarization and retardance for healthy tissue group were significantly higher (p<0.001) compared to BCC tissue group. Histopathology indicated that these differences partially arise from BCC-related characteristic changes in tissue morphology. Wilks lambda statistics demonstrated the potential of all investigated polarimetric properties for computer assisted classification of the two tissue groups. Based on differences in polarimetric properties, partial least square (PLS) regression classified the samples with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. These findings indicate that optical polarimetry together with PLS statistics hold promise for automated pathology classification. PMID:27083851

  6. Confocal microscopy to guide erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser ablation of basal cell carcinoma: an ex vivo feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Heidy; Larson, Bjorg A; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2013-09-01

    For the removal of superficial and nodular basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), laser ablation provides certain advantages relative to other treatment modalities. However, efficacy and reliability tend to be variable because tissue is vaporized such that none is available for subsequent histopathological examination for residual BCC (and to confirm complete removal of tumor). Intra-operative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may provide a means to detect residual tumor directly on the patient and guide ablation. However, optimization of ablation parameters will be necessary to control collateral thermal damage and preserve sufficient viability in the underlying layer of tissue, so as to subsequently allow labeling of nuclear morphology with a contrast agent and imaging of residual BCC. We report the results of a preliminary study of two key parameters (fluence, number of passes) vis-à-vis the feasibility of labeling and RCM imaging in human skin ex vivo, following ablation with an erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser.

  7. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy Features of Focal Dermal Mucinosis Differ from Those Described for Basal Cell Carcinoma: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Fraga-Braghiroli, Naiara Abreu; Merati, Miesha; Rabinovitz, Harold; Swanson, David; Scope, Alon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) features of focal dermal mucinosis (FDM). The entity clinically and dermatoscopically mimics other diagnostic entities, most notably nonpigmented basal cell carcinoma. We describe two cases that highlight the dermatoscopic, RCM and histopathological attributes of FDM. RCM features such as dermal foci of dense collagen bundles oriented in the same direction, foci of haphazardly oriented thin collagen fibers separated by dark structureless areas and the absence of dark silhouettes and tumor islands are clues for FDM diagnosis. The FDM cases described here present consistent and particular RCM findings that appear to correlate well with the histopathological features of FDM. Therefore, RCM is a promising technology in diagnosing skin lesions and it use can avoid invasive procedures. PMID:26302951

  8. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Study of 4-ATP on Gold Nanoparticles for Basal Cell Carcinoma Fingerprint Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quynh, Luu Manh; Nam, Nguyen Hoang; Kong, K.; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Notingher, I.; Henini, M.; Luong, Nguyen Hoang

    2016-05-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman signals of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) attached to the surface of colloidal gold nanoparticles with size distribution of 2 to 5 nm were used as a labeling agent to detect basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin. The enhanced Raman band at 1075 cm-1 corresponding to the C-S stretching vibration in 4-ATP was observed during attachment to the surface of the gold nanoparticles. The frequency and intensity of this band did not change when the colloids were conjugated with BerEP4 antibody, which specifically binds to BCC. We show the feasibility of imaging BCC by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, scanning the 1075 cm-1 band to detect the distribution of 4-ATP-coated gold nanoparticles attached to skin tissue ex vivo.

  9. Electronic brachytherapy for superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma: a report of two prospective pilot trials using different doses

    PubMed Central

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Candela-Juan, Cristian; Celada-Álvarez, Francisco Javier; Barker, Christopher A.; Tormo-Micó, Alejandro; Pérez-Calatayud, Jose; Botella-Estrada, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a very common cancer in the Caucasian population. Treatment aims to eradicate the tumor with the lowest possible functional and aesthetic impact. Electronic brachytherapy (EBT) is a treatment technique currently emerging. This study aims to show the outcomes of two consecutive prospective pilot clinical trials using different radiation doses of EBT with Esteya® EB system for the treatment of superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma. Material and methods Two prospective, single-center, non-randomized, pilot studies were conducted. Twenty patients were treated in each study with different doses. The first group (1) was treated with 36.6 Gy in 6 fractions of 6.1 Gy, and the second group (2) with 42 Gy in 6 fractions of 7 Gy. Cure rate, acute toxicity, and late toxicity related to cosmesis were analyzed in the two treatment groups. Results In group 1, a complete response in 90% of cases was observed at the first year of follow-up, whereas in group 2, the complete response was 95%. The differences with reference to acute toxicity and the cosmetic results between the two treatment groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions Our initial experience with Esteya® EB system to treat superficial and nodular BCC shows that a dose of 36.6 Gy and 42 Gy delivered in 6 fraction of 7 Gy achieves a 90% and 95% clinical cure rate at 1 year, respectively. Both groups had a tolerable toxicity and a very good cosmesis. The role of EBT in the treatment of BCC is still to be defined. It will probably become an established option for selected patients in the near future. PMID:26985197

  10. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Mohammad; Li, Changzhao; Kim, Arianna L.; Spiegelman, Vladimir S; Bickers, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is considered to be a major signal transduction pathway during embryonic development but it usually shuts down after birth. Aberrant Shh activation during adulthood leads to neoplastic growth. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is driven by this pathway. Here, we summarize information related to the pathogenesis of this neoplasm, discuss pathways that crosstalk with Shh signaling and the importance of the primary cilium in this neoplastic process. The identification of the basic/translational components of Shh signaling has led to the discovery of potential mechanism-driven druggable targets and subsequent clinical trials have confirmed their remarkable efficacy in treating BCCs particularly in patients with Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS), an autosomal dominant disorder in which patients inherit a germline mutation in the tumor suppressor gene Patched (Ptch). Patients with NBCCS develop dozens to hundreds of BCCs due to de-repression of the downstream G-protein coupled receptor Smoothened (SMO). Ptch mutations permit transposition of SMO to the primary cilium followed by enhanced expression of transcription factors Glis that drive cell proliferation and tumor growth. Clinical trials with the SMO inhibitor, vismodegib, in patients with NBCCS showing remarkable efficacy finally led to its FDA approval in 2012. PMID:25172843

  11. [Basal cell carcinoma of the skin--biological behaviour of the tumor and a review of the most important molecular predictors of disease progression in pathological practice].

    PubMed

    Bartos, V; Adamicová, K; Kullová, M; Péc, M

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the skin is currently the most frequent malignancy in human population. Basal cell carcinoma represents a heterogeneous group of tumors with a variable clinical and morphological picture. Based on its biological behaviour, we generally differentiate between indolent (superficial and nodular) and aggressive type (infiltrative, micronodular, and metatypical) of basal cell carcinoma. Because of the different biological characteristics of these tumors, it is questionable whether they are a part of a continuous spectrum of carcinogenesis, starting with indolent and ending with aggressive forms, or they represent separate developmental lines. In the current clinical practice, there is an increasing demand for identification of tumors that are prognostically more adverse and their impact on the overall health status of patients is more serious. Recent advances in pathology and molecular medicine allow identification of various biomarkers from tumor tissue that are significantly involved in the mechanisms of malignant cell transformation. Detection of these biomarkers is of great importance in predicting further clinical behaviour of the cancer. The authors of the paper present basic information about biological behaviour of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and provide an overview of the most important biomarkers that influence the clinical outcome and disease progression and are detectable through a routine biopsy tissue examination. It is now necessary to search for novel histological and molecular parameters that, in the future, could have a prognostic value in diagnostic and therapeutic process of this disorder. PMID:21542271

  12. Discrimination between basal cell carcinoma and hair follicles in skin tissue sections by Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larraona-Puy, M.; Ghita, A.; Zoladek, A.; Perkins, W.; Varma, S.; Leach, I. H.; Koloydenko, A. A.; Williams, H.; Notingher, I.

    2011-05-01

    Skin cancer is the most common human malignancy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represents approximately 80% of the non-melanoma cases. Current methods of treatment require histopathological evaluation of the tissues by qualified personnel. However, this method is subjective and in some cases BCC can be confused with other structures in healthy skin, including hair follicles. In this preliminary study, we investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) to discriminate between hair follicles and BCC in skin tissue sections excised during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). Imaging and diagnosis of skin sections was automatically generated using ' a priori'-built spectral model based on LDA. This model had 90 ± 9% sensitivity and 85 ± 9% specificity for discrimination of BCC from dermis and epidermis. The model used selected Raman bands corresponding to the largest spectral differences between the Raman spectra of BCC and the normal skin regions, associated mainly with nucleic acids and collagen type I. Raman spectra corresponding to the epidermis regions of the hair follicles were found to be closer to those of healthy epidermis rather than BCC. Comparison between Raman spectral images and the gold standard haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology diagnosis showed good agreement. Some hair follicle regions were misclassified as BCC; regions corresponded mainly to the outermost layer of hair follicle (basal cells) which are expected to have higher nucleic acid concentration. This preliminary study shows the ability of RMS to distinguish between BCC and other tissue structures associated to healthy skin which can be confused with BCC due to their similar morphology.

  13. Evaluation of Optical Coherence Tomography as a Means of Identifying Earlier Stage Basal Cell Carcinomas while Reducing the Use of Diagnostic Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michelle; Feldman, Eleanor; Bienenfeld, Amanda; Bieber, Amy K.; Ellis, Jeffery; Alapati, Usha; Lebwohl, Mark; Siegel, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of optical coherence tomography for basal cell carcinoma and the proportion of biopsies that could be avoided if optical coherence tomography is used to rule-in surgery. Design: Multicenter, prospective, observational study. Setting: Dermatology clinics. Participants: Consecutive patients with clinically challenging pink lesions suspicious for basal cell carcinoma. Measurements: Clinical, dermoscopic, and optical coherence tomography images were obtained for all subjects. At each stage, the clinician made a diagnosis (pathology + subtype if applicable), and assessed his/her own confidence in the diagnosis. Results: Optical coherence tomography significantly (p<0.01) improved sensitivity and specificity over clinical or dermoscopic evaluation. The percentage of correct diagnoses was 57.4 percent (clinical), 69.6 percent (dermoscopy), and 87.8 percent (optical coherence tomography). Optical coherence tomography significantly increased the certainty of diagnosis; clinicians indicated they were certain (>95% confident) in 17 percent of lesions examined clinically, in 38.6 percent examined with dermoscopy, and in 70 percent examined with optical coherence tomography. With the use of optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma, more than 1 in 3 patients could avoid a diagnostic biopsy. Conclusion: In a population of clinically challenging lesions, optical coherence tomography improved diagnostic certainty by a factor of four over clinical examination alone and improved diagnostic accuracy by 50 percent (57-88%). The addition of optical coherence tomography to other standard assessments can improve the false-positive rate and give a high degree of certainty for ruling in a positive diagnosis for basal cell carcinoma. A reduction of 36 percent in overall biopsies could be achieved by sending high certainty basal cell carcinoma positive optical coherence tomography diagnoses straight to surgery. PMID

  14. Arecoline decreases interleukin-6 production and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human basal cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-Wen; Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Hu, Yu-Chen; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Chang, Kee-Lung

    2012-01-15

    Arecoline, the most abundant areca alkaloid, has been reported to decrease interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in epithelial cancer cells. Since IL-6 overexpression contributes to the tumorigenic potency of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), this study was designed to investigate whether arecoline altered IL-6 expression and its downstream regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle in cultured BCC-1/KMC cells. BCC-1/KMC cells and a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, were treated with arecoline at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 μg/ml, then IL-6 production and expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle progress-related factors were examined. After 24 h exposure, arecoline inhibited BCC-1/KMC cell growth and decreased IL-6 production in terms of mRNA expression and protein secretion, but had no effect on HaCaT cells. Analysis of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation showed that arecoline induced apoptosis of BCC-1/KMC cells in a dose-dependent manner, activated caspase-3, and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, arecoline induced progressive and sustained accumulation of BCC-1/KMC cells in G2/M phase as a result of reducing checkpoint Cdc2 activity by decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase levels and increasing p53 levels. Furthermore, subcutaneous injection of arecoline led to decreased BCC-1/KMC tumor growth in BALB/c mice by inducing apoptosis. This study demonstrates that arecoline has potential for preventing BCC tumorigenesis by reducing levels of the tumor cell survival factor IL-6, increasing levels of the tumor suppressor factor p53, and eliciting cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis. Highlights: ► Arecoline has potential to prevent against basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis. ► It has more effectiveness on BCC as compared with a human keratinocyte cell line. ► Mechanisms involved including reducing tumor cells’ survival factor IL-6, ► Decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase, enhancing tumor suppressor factor p53, ► Eliciting G2/M

  15. LGR5 expression is controled by IKKα in basal cell carcinoma through activating STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Deshen; Lai, Weiwei; Pan, Yu; Jiang, Yiqun; Chen, Ling; Mao, Chao; Zhou, Jian; Xi, Sichuan; Cao, Ya; Liu, Shuang; Tao, Yongguang

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) of the skin are the most common of human cancers. The noncanonical NF-κB pathway is dependent on IKKα. However, the role of IKKα in BCC has not been elucidated. We show here that IKKα is expressed in the nucleus in BCC and non-malignant diseases. Nuclear IKKα could directly bind to the promoters of inflammation factors and LGR5, a stem cell marker, in turn, upregulating LGR5 expression through activation of STAT3 signaling pathway during cancer progression. Activation of STAT3 signaling pathway contributes LGR5 expression in dependent of IKKα after the interplay between STAT3 and IKKα. Meanwhile knockdown of IKKα inhibits tumor growth and transition of epithelial stage to mescheme stage. Taken together, we demonstrate that IKKα functions as a bone fide chromatin regulator in BCC, whose promoted expression contributes to oncogenic transformation via promoting expression stemness- and inflammatory- related genes. Our finding reveals a novel viewpoint for how IKKα may involve in BCCs tumor progression in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27049829

  16. Discriminating model for diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma and melanoma in vitro based on the Raman spectra of selected biochemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Landulfo; Silveira, Fabrício Luiz; Bodanese, Benito; Zângaro, Renato Amaro; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T.

    2012-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to identify differences in the biochemical constitution of malignant [basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and melanoma (MEL)] cells compared to normal skin tissues, with the goal of skin cancer diagnosis. We collected Raman spectra from compounds such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which are expected to be represented in human skin spectra, and developed a linear least-squares fitting model to estimate the contributions of these compounds to the tissue spectra. We used a set of 145 spectra from biopsy fragments of normal (30 spectra), BCC (96 spectra), and MEL (19 spectra) skin tissues, collected using a near-infrared Raman spectrometer (830 nm, 50 to 200 mW, and 20 s exposure time) coupled to a Raman probe. We applied the best-fitting model to the spectra of biochemicals and tissues, hypothesizing that the relative spectral contribution of each compound to the tissue Raman spectrum changes according to the disease. We verified that actin, collagen, elastin, and triolein were the most important biochemicals representing the spectral features of skin tissues. A classification model applied to the relative contribution of collagen III, elastin, and melanin using Euclidean distance as a discriminator could differentiate normal from BCC and MEL.

  17. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  18. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  19. Protein kinase A activation inhibits oncogenic Sonic hedgehog signalling and suppresses basal cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Makinodan, Eri; Marneros, Alexander G

    2012-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the skin (BCC) is caused by constitutive activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway, mainly through mutations either in the Shh receptor Patched (PTCH) or in its co-receptor Smoothened (Smo). Inhibitors of this pathway that are currently in clinical trials inhibit Smo. However, mutations in Smo can result in resistance to these inhibitors. To target most BCCs and avoid acquired resistance because of Smo mutations, inhibiting the Shh-pathway downstream of Smo is critical. Attractive downstream targets would be at the level of Gli proteins, the transcriptional activators of this pathway in BCCs. Previously it has been shown that Gli1 and Gli2, when phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA), are targeted for proteosomal degradation. Here we show that PKA activation via the cAMP agonist forskolin is sufficient to completely abolish oncogenic Smo activity in vitro. In an inducible BCC mouse model due to a Smo mutation that confers resistance to current Smo inhibitors, topical forskolin treatment significantly reduced Gli1 mRNA levels and resulted in strongly suppressed BCC tumor growth. Our data show that forskolin inhibits the growth of even those BCCs that are resistant to Smo inhibitors and provide a proof-of-principle framework for the development of topically applied human skin-permeable novel pharmacologic inhibitors of oncogenic Shh-signaling through PKA activation. PMID:23163650

  20. Confocal mosaicing microscopy of basal-cell carcinomas ex vivo: progress in digital staining to simulate histology-like appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Jason; Spain, James; Nehal, Kishwer; Hazelwood, Vikki; DiMarzio, Charles; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2011-03-01

    Confocal mosaicing microscopy enables rapid imaging of large areas of fresh tissue, without the processing that is necessary for conventional histology. Using acridine orange (1 milliMolar, 20 seconds) to stain nuclei, basal cell carcinomas were detected in fluorescence confocal mosaics of Mohs surgical excisions with sensitivity of 96.6% and specificity of 89.2%. A possible barrier toward clinical acceptance is that confocal mosaics are based on a single mode of contrast and appear in grayscale, whereas histology is based on two (hematoxylin for nuclei, eosin for cellular cytoplasm and dermis) and appears purple-and-pink. Toward addressing this barrier, we report progress in developing a multispectral analytical model for digital staining: fluorescence confocal mosaics, which show only nuclei, are digitally stained purple and overlaid on reflectance confocal mosaics, which show only cellular cytoplasm and dermis, and digitally stained pink, to mimic the appearance of histology. Comparison of digitally stained confocal mosaics by our Mohs surgeon to the corresponding Mohs histology shows good correlation for normal and tumor detail. Digitally stained confocal mosaicing microscopy may allow direct examination of freshly excised tissue and serve as an adjunct for rapid pathology at-the-bedside.

  1. Aminolevulinic Acid-Photodynamic Therapy of Basal Cell Carcinoma and Factors Affecting the Response to Treatment: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tehranchinia, Zohreh; Rahimi, Hoda; Ahadi, Mahsa Seyed; Ahadi, Maral Seyed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer in humans. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive therapeutic modality that may be considered as a valuable treatment option for BCC. This study was designed with the aim of evaluating the efficacy of PDT in treatment of BCC and factors that may affect the response rate. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 12 patients (28 BCC lesions) who were treated with aminulevulinic acid (ALA)-PDT, monthly, up to 6 sessions and the clinical response, cosmetic results, and possible side effects were evaluated. Results: The study was performed on 28 BCC lesions from 12 patients. Complete response was achieved in 9 (32.1%) lesions. Complete response rate was higher in younger patients (P < 0.01) and those with smaller lesions (P < 0.001). Superficial type also had significant higher response rate (P < 0.05). Patients with history of radiotherapy for the treatment of tinea capitis in childhood showed less response (P < 0.05). Cosmetic results were excellent or good in 77.5% cases. After 6 months of follow-up, none of the resolved lesions recurred. Conclusion: PDT would be a good therapeutic option in treatment of BCC with acceptable efficacy and low side effects. Younger patients, superficial BCCs, and smaller lesions show better response to ALA-PDT. History of radiotherapy may be associated with a lower response rate. PMID:23919025

  2. Vismodegib, itraconazole and sonidegib as hedgehog pathway inhibitors and their relative competencies in the treatment of basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Mohd; Jawed, Arshad; Mandal, Raju K; Dar, Sajad A; Khan, Saif; Akhter, Naseem; Haque, Shafiul

    2016-02-01

    The advent of more sophisticated studies published has clarified the understating of the root cause of various skin cancers or basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). The remarkable role is played by the comprehensive work done on unraveling the mechanism controlling the function of hedgehog (Hh) pathway. The defective Hh pathway has been found as the major cause for BCCs as activated Hh signaling within primary cilia plays a key role in the pathogenesis of BCCs. The BCC accounts for up to 40% of all cancers in the US, with growing incidences in other countries as well. Thus, it is considered to be utmost important by the researchers all over the world developing drugs for the treatment of skin cancers targeting Hh pathway. Fewer drugs like vismodegib, itraconazole and sonidegib have shown promising results inhibiting the awry function of Hh pathway resulting in treatment of different forms of skin cancers. These drugs have shown positive results but failed to prove their potential as expected. Vismodegib and sonidegib are better but fail in case of resistant tumors. This review article describes the mechanism of actions of these Hh pathway inhibitors and provides the rationale for their effectiveness/non-effectiveness for the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced BCC. PMID:26614022

  3. Fluorescein as a contrast agent for confocal intra-operative imaging of basal cell carcinomas: a preliminary ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Heidy; Qi, Qiaochu; Jiang, Angela; Taskar, Nikash; Rossi, Anthony; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-03-01

    When used for intra-operative imaging of residual basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is limited to detection of relatively large tumors. Small tumors remain hidden in the surrounding bright dermis. Fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) may improve the sensitivity for detecting small tumors. Fluorescein enhances cell cytoplasm contrast in fluorescence confocal images, but has had limited clinical impact on imaging BCCs in vivo because there is a lack of a well-defined protocol (concentration and application time) that can be effectively used for intraoperative imaging. We conducted an ex vivo study, using discarded tissue from Mohs surgery and a benchtop FCM with 488nm wavelength for excitation and 521nm detection for imaging Concentrations of 6, 0.6 and 0.6 mM with immersion times of 5, 15, 30, and 60 seconds were repeatedly tested (total of 76 specimens).. The 0.6 mM and immersion time of 60 seconds showed that cellular cytoplasm can be labeled with controlled saturation and without leaving the yellow color on the surface of the tissue. Initial results show that, fluorescein may enhance cellular structures contrast relative to other normal dermal structures, improving the detection of small BCCs. This study provide an optimized set of parameters for subsequently testing of topical application in vivo for intraopertive imaging of BCCs.

  4. Fluorescence confocal mosaicing microscopy of basal cell carcinomas ex vivo: demonstration of rapid surgical pathology with high sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Karen, Julie K.; Dusza, Stephen W.; Tudisco, Marie; Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2009-02-01

    Mohs surgery, for the precise removal of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), consists of a series of excisions guided by the surgeon's examination of the frozen histology of the previous excision. The histology reveals atypical nuclear morphology, identifying cancer. The preparation of frozen histology is accurate but labor-intensive and slow. Nuclear pathology can be achieved by staining with acridine orange (1 mM, 20 s) BCCs in Mohs surgical skin excisions within 5-9 minutes, compared to 20-45 for frozen histology. For clinical utility, images must have high contrast and high resolution. We report tumor contrast of 10-100 fold over the background dermis and submicron (diffraction limited) resolution over a cm field of view. BCCs were detected with an overall sensitivity of 96.6%, specificity of 89.2%, positive predictive value of 93.0% and negative predictive value of 94.7%. The technique was therefore accurate for normal tissue as well as tumor. We conclude that fluorescence confocal mosaicing serves as a sensitive and rapid pathological tool. Beyond Mohs surgery, this technology may be extended to suit other pathological needs with the development of new contrast agents. The technique reported here accurately detects all subtypes of BCC in skin excisions, including the large nodular, small micronodular, and tiny sclerodermaform tumors. However, this technique may be applicable to imaging tissue that is larger, more irregular and of various mechanical compliances with further engineering of the tissue mounting and staging mechanisms.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence made simple: implications for the diagnosis and follow-up monitoring of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Drakaki, Eleni; Dessinioti, Clio; Stratigos, Alexander J; Salavastru, Carmen; Antoniou, Christina

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive treatments are increasingly being used for the management of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the predominant type of nonmelanoma skin cancer, making the development of noninvasive diagnostic technologies highly relevant for clinical practice. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy emerges as an attractive diagnostic technique for the diagnosis and demarcation of BCC due to its noninvasiveness, high sensitivity, real-time measurements, and user-friendly methodology. LIF relies on the principle of differential fluorescence emission between abnormal and normal skin tissues (ex vivo and in vivo) in response to excitation by a specific wavelength of light. Fluorescence originates either from endogenous fluorophores (autofluorescence) or from exogenously administered fluorophores (photosensitizers). The measured optical properties and fluorophore contributions of normal skin and BCC are significantly different from each other and correlate well with tissue histology. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the visualization of a fluorophore, with the ability to accumulate in tumor tissue, by the use of fluorescence imaging. PDD may be used for detecting subclinical disease, determining surgical margins, and following-up patients for residual tumor or BCC relapse. In this review, we will present the basic principles of LIF and discuss its uses for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of BCC.

  6. Early and explosive development of nodular basal cell carcinoma and multiple keratoacanthomas in psoriasis patients treated with cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Lain, Edward L; Markus, Ramsey F

    2004-01-01

    The use of cyclosporine to treat psoriasis has been widely adopted since 1997, when the microemulsion form (Neoral) became available. While the causal relationship between cyclosporine and the development of malignant neoplasms has been well described in the transplant literature, it is difficult to apply this relationship to cyclosporine-treated psoriasis, since lower dosages are used (3-5 mg/kg/d vs. 7-15mg/kg/d) for a shorter duration. Current literature suggests that cancer risk is not increased when cyclosporine is used in dermatologic doses for less than 2 years in healthy patients who are not on other immunosuppressants. We report two patients with explosive basal cell carcinoma and keratoacanthoma development, respectively, within 3 months of initiation of cyclosporine. Neither patient had a history of skin cancer, had received PUVA therapy, or was on additional immunosuppressive therapy. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of the development of similar lesions in cyclosporine-treated psoriatic patients within such a short timeframe. The results of these patients may herald the need for increased awareness by dermatologists for explosively-growing neoplasms in the setting of cyclosporine-treated psoriasis.

  7. Nonlinear spectral imaging of human normal skin, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, S. Y.; Yang, J. G.; Zhuang, J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we use nonlinear spectral imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for analyzing the morphology of collagen and elastin and their biochemical variations in basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin tissue. It was found in this work that there existed apparent differences among BCC, SCC and normal skin in terms of their thickness of the keratin and epithelial layers, their size of elastic fibers, as well as their distribution and spectral characteristics of collagen. These differences can potentially be used to distinguish BCC and SCC from normal skin, and to discriminate between BCC and SCC, as well as to evaluate treatment responses.

  8. Endoscopic findings using narrow-band imaging to distinguish between basal cell hyperplasia and carcinoma of the pharynx.

    PubMed

    Yagishita, Atsushi; Fujii, Satoshi; Yano, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2014-07-01

    Narrow-band imaging (NBI) has been reported to be useful for detecting superficial-type esophageal or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and in the present study we have used NBI to detect non-carcinomatous lesions, such as basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) accompanied by microvascular irregularities; these non-carcinomatous lesions were pathologically discriminated from squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx. The aim of the present study was to clarify the endoscopic characteristics of BCH that contribute to the discrimination of superficial-type head and neck SCC (HNSCC). We examined the key endoscopic findings capable of distinguishing BCH from SCC using 26 BCH and 37 superficial-type SCC of the pharynx that had been pathologically diagnosed at our institution between January 2008 and July 2012. The clinicopathological factors were also compared. The size of the BCH lesions was significantly smaller (P < 0.001), and their intervascular transparency was more clearly observed (P < 0.001). Intra-epithelial papillary capillary loop (IPCL) shapes were less variable and monotonous (P < 0.001), and the distribution of the IPCL was more regular with an interval comparable to that of SCC (P < 0.001), although no significant differences in the sharpness of the lesion border, dilatation of IPCL and tortuosity of the IPCL were seen between the BCH and SCC lesions. This study revealed that BCH was an independent entity in terms of not only pathological findings, but also endoscopic findings observed using NBI, such as the regular distribution of IPCL and the preserved intervascular transparency.

  9. Association between Toll-like receptor 7 Gln11Leu single-nucleotide polymorphism and basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    RUSSO, IRENE; CONA, CAMILLA; SAPONERI, ANDREA; BASSETTO, FRANCO; BALDO, VINCENZO; ALAIBAC, MAURO

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common form of human skin cancer. The majority of NMSC are basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with a BCC:SCC incidence ratio of 4:1 in immunocompetent patients. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane glycoproteins that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and damage-associated molecular patterns, against which they activate the innate immune response and initiate the adaptive immune response. Genetic variations of these receptors can alter the immune system and are involved in evolution and susceptibility of various diseases, including cancer. Imiquimod, an agonist of TLR7, is applied topically in the treatment of premalignant and malignant skin disorders, in particular BCC. The high efficacy of this TLR7 agonist toward BCC supports a possible role of this receptor in the induction of BCC and, consequently, polymorphisms of this receptor could be responsible for a greater or lesser susceptibility to BCC. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the presence of the functional TLR7 rs179008/Gln11Leu promoter polymorphism conferred an increased susceptibility to BCC. A case-control study with 177 BCC cases and 158 controls was performed to highlight the possible association between this polymorphism and the susceptibility to BCC. As the TLR7 gene is localized on chromosome X, the allelic frequency of this polymorphism was analyzed separately in males and females. The analysis of the distribution of frequencies of wild-type TLR7 and variant TLR7 carrying the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs179008 in patients with BCC and healthy subjects did not reveal any statistically significant difference between cases and controls. This study does not suggest the involvement of the SNP rs179008 of TLR7 in the susceptibility to BCC, but cannot exclude a role for TLR7 in BCC carcinogenesis considering the high efficacy of the TLR7 agonist, imiquimod, in the treatment of this

  10. Pulsed dye laser does not seem as effective as red light in Basal cell carcinoma mal-pdt: a small pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guarino, M; Harto, A; Jaén, P

    2012-01-01

    Multiple light sources can be used for photodynamic therapy (PDT) with good results, but there are few comparative studies. This study compares the efficacy of treatment of basal cell carcinoma with PDT and two light sources, the non-coherent red light and pulsed dye laser 595 nm. In this small pilot study red light is more effective, but many more studies are needed to draw definitive conclusions.

  11. Pulsed Dye Laser Does Not Seem as Effective as Red Light in Basal Cell Carcinoma Mal-Pdt: A Small Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Guarino, M.; Harto, A.; Jaén, P.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple light sources can be used for photodynamic therapy (PDT) with good results, but there are few comparative studies. This study compares the efficacy of treatment of basal cell carcinoma with PDT and two light sources, the non-coherent red light and pulsed dye laser 595 nm. In this small pilot study red light is more effective, but many more studies are needed to draw definitive conclusions. PMID:23209908

  12. MK-4101, a Potent Inhibitor of the Hedgehog Pathway, Is Highly Active against Medulloblastoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Filocamo, Gessica; Brunetti, Mirko; Colaceci, Fabrizio; Sasso, Romina; Tanori, Mirella; Pasquali, Emanuela; Alfonsi, Romina; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Saran, Anna; Lahm, Armin; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Steinkühler, Christian; Pazzaglia, Simonetta

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of many cancers, including medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In this study, using neonatally irradiated Ptch1(+/-) mice as a model of Hh-dependent tumors, we investigated the in vivo effects of MK-4101, a novel SMO antagonist, for the treatment of medulloblastoma and BCC. Results clearly demonstrated a robust antitumor activity of MK-4101, achieved through the inhibition of proliferation and induction of extensive apoptosis in tumor cells. Of note, beside antitumor activity on transplanted tumors, MK-4101 was highly efficacious against primary medulloblastoma and BCC developing in the cerebellum and skin of Ptch1(+/-) mice. By identifying the changes induced by MK-4101 in gene expression profiles in tumors, we also elucidated the mechanism of action of this novel, orally administrable compound. MK-4101 targets the Hh pathway in tumor cells, showing the maximum inhibitory effect on Gli1 MK-4101 also induced deregulation of cell cycle and block of DNA replication in tumors. Members of the IGF and Wnt signaling pathways were among the most highly deregulated genes by MK-4101, suggesting that the interplay among Hh, IGF, and Wnt is crucial in Hh-dependent tumorigenesis. Altogether, the results of this preclinical study support a therapeutic opportunity for MK-4101 in the treatment of Hh-driven cancers, also providing useful information for combination therapy with drugs targeting pathways cooperating with Hh oncogenic activity. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1177-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26960983

  13. The effect of pulsed dye laser on high-risk basal cell carcinomas with response control by Mohs micrographic surgery.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Castro, Leticia; Ríos-Buceta, Luis; Boixeda, Pablo; Paoli, John; Moreno, Carmen; Jaén, Pedro

    2015-09-01

    Several reports have shown the effectiveness of pulsed dye laser (PDL) for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Most studies have focused on low-risk BCCs, but an important limitation has been the lack of histologic confirmation of the treatment results. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of PDL in high-risk BCCs with complete histologic evaluation with Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). Seven patients with high-risk BCCs located on the face were included. All tumors were treated with three sessions of PDL (595 nm) at 4-week intervals. The tumor and 4 mm of peripheral skin were treated with two stacked pulses with a 1-s delay, a fluence of 15 J/cm(2), a pulse duration of 2 ms, and a spot size of 7 mm. MMS was performed at least 1 month after the last PDL session including excisional tumor debulking prior to the first stage of MMS for standard histologic evaluation. Apparent complete clinical response was achieved in five of seven patients. MMS was finally performed in six patients, and clear margins were achieved after one stage of MMS. The histologic evaluation of the tumor debulking specimens showed complete clearance in four of six cases. One patient who did not undergo MMS showed a recurrence after 14 months. This is the first pilot study that demonstrates that PDL can be effective for the treatment of high-risk BCCs. Until further scientific evidence is available, treatment of high-risk BCCs should include histologic confirmation of clearance.

  14. Diagnosis of Basal Cell Carcinoma by Reflectance Confocal Microscopy: Study Design and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Alkemade, Hans A.C; Maessen-Visch, Birgitte; Hendriks, Jan C.M; van Erp, Piet E.J; Adang, Eddy M.M; Gerritsen, Marie-Jeanne P

    2016-01-01

    Background Skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), has become a major health care problem. The limitations of a punch biopsy (at present the gold standard) as diagnostic method together with the increasing incidence of skin cancer point out the need for more accurate, cost-effective, and patient friendly diagnostic tools. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a noninvasive imaging technique that has great potential for skin cancer diagnosis. Objective To investigate whether in vivo RCM can correctly identify the subtype of BCC and to determine the cost-effectiveness of RCM compared with punch biopsy (usual care). Study design: Randomized controlled multicenter trial. Methods On the basis of 80% power and an alpha of 0.05, 329 patients with lesions clinically suspicious for BCC will be included in this study. Patients will be randomized for RCM or for a punch biopsy (usual care). When a BCC is diagnosed, surgical excision will follow and a follow-up visit will be planned 3 months later. Several questionnaires will be filled in (EQ-5D, EQ-5D VAS, iMTA PCQ, and TSQM-9). We will perform statistical analysis, cost-effectiveness, and patient outcome analysis after data collection. Results This research started in January 2016 and is ethically approved. We expect to finish this study at the end of 2018. Conclusions In this study, we will investigate whether RCM is at least as good in identifying BCC subtypes as conventional pathological investigation of skin biopsies. Anticipating that RCM is found to be a cost-effective alternative, it saves on direct medical consumption like labor of the pathologist and other medical personnel as well as materials related to treatment failure with at least equal effectiveness. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02623101; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02623101 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6id54WQa2) PMID:27363577

  15. Polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XPD: correlations with risk and age at onset of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dybdahl, M; Vogel, U; Frentz, G; Wallin, H; Nexø, B A

    1999-01-01

    The XPD protein has a dual function, both in nucleotide excision repair and in basal transcription. We have studied the role of two nucleotide substitutions in the XPD gene, one in exon 23 leading to an amino acid substitution (Lys751Gln) and one silent in exon 6 in relation to basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Both are two-allele polymorphisms, with the nucleobases A and C at the given positions. We genotyped psoriasis patients with and without BCC and nonpsoriatic persons with and without BCC (4 x 20 persons). The choice to study psoriasis patients was motivated by their high genotoxic exposure via treatment and their high relative rate of early BCC. Subjects carrying two A alleles (AA genotype) in exon 23 were at 4.3-fold higher risk of BCC than subjects with two C alleles (95% CI, 0.79-23.57). In addition, the mean age at first skin tumor for BCC cases with the AA genotype was significantly lower than the mean age for BCC cases with the AC or CC genotype (P = 0.012). Thus, the variant C-allele of exon 23 may be protective. The exon 6 genotype was associated with the risk of BCC among the psoriasis patients; psoriatics carrying two A alleles in exon 6 were at 5.3-fold higher risk of BCC than psoriatics with two C alleles (95% CI, 0.78-36.31). For the psoriatics, the mean age at onset of BCC for cases with the AA genotype was marginally lower than the mean age for cases with genotype AC or CC (P = 0.060). Our results raise the possibility that the polymorphisms in the XPD gene may be contributing factors in the risk of BCC development. They are, therefore, important candidates for future studies in susceptibility to cancer.

  16. Inorganic Arsenic and Basal Cell Carcinoma in Areas of Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Giovanni; Vahter, Marie; Clemens, Felicity; Goessler, Walter; Gurzau, Eugen; Hemminki, Kari; Hough, Rupert; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Kumar, Rajiv; Rudnai, Peter; Surdu, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a potent carcinogen, but there is a lack of information about cancer risk for concentrations < 100 μg/L in drinking water. Objectives: We aimed to quantify skin cancer relative risks in relation to iAs exposure < 100 μg/L and the modifying effects of iAs metabolism. Methods: The Arsenic Health Risk Assessment and Molecular Epidemiology (ASHRAM) study, a case–control study, was conducted in areas of Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia with reported presence of iAs in groundwater. Consecutively diagnosed cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin were histologically confirmed; controls were general surgery, orthopedic, and trauma patients who were frequency matched to cases by age, sex, and area of residence. Exposure indices were constructed based on information on iAs intake over the lifetime of participants. iAs metabolism status was classified based on urinary concentrations of methylarsonic acid (MA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Associations were estimated by multivariable logistic regression. Results: A total of 529 cases with BCC and 540 controls were recruited for the study. BCC was positively associated with three indices of iAs exposure: peak daily iAs dose rate, cumulative iAs dose, and lifetime average water iAs concentration. The adjusted odds ratio per 10-μg/L increase in average lifetime water iAs concentration was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.08, 1.28). The estimated effect of iAs on cancer was stronger in participants with urinary markers indicating incomplete metabolism of iAs: higher percentage of MA in urine or a lower percentage of DMA. Conclusion: We found a positive association between BCC and exposure to iAs through drinking water with concentrations < 100 μg/L. PMID:22436128

  17. Automated registration of optical coherence tomography and dermoscopy in the assessment of sub-clinical spread in basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Penney, G. P.; Richardson, T. J.; Guyot, A.; Choi, M. J.; Sheth, N.; Craythorne, E.; Robson, A.; Mallipeddi, R.

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been shown to be of clinical value in imaging basal cell carcinoma (BCC). A novel dual OCT-video imaging system, providing automated registration of OCT and dermoscopy, has been developed to assess the potential of OCT in measuring the degree of sub-clinical spread of BCC. Seventeen patients selected for Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for BCC were recruited to the study. The extent of BCC infiltration beyond a segment of the clinically assessed pre-surgical border was evaluated using OCT. Sufficiently accurate (<0.5 mm) registration of OCT and dermoscopy images was achieved in 9 patients. The location of the OCT-assessed BCC border was also compared with that of the final surgical defect. Infiltration of BCC across the clinical border ranged from 0 mm to >2.5 mm. In addition, the OCT border lay between 0.5 mm and 2.0 mm inside the final MMS defect in those cases where this could be assessed. In one case, where the final MMS defect was over 17 mm from the clinical border, OCT showed >2.5 mm infiltration across the clinical border at the FOV limit. These results provide evidence that OCT allows more accurate assessment of sub-clinical spread of BCC than clinical observation alone. Such a capability may have clinical value in reducing the number of surgical stages in MMS for BCC. There may also be a role for OCT in aiding the selection of patients most suitable for MMS. PMID:24784842

  18. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... measures Outcomes in Dermatology Pilot Affinity partner programs Education Online Learning Center MOC MOC overview Component parts Meeting your requirements MOC costs MOC webinars and videos FAQs MOC resources Recognized ...

  19. XRCC3 C18067T Polymorphism Contributes a Decreased Risk to Both Basal Cell Carcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Yang, Zheng; Qin, Lingyan; Mo, Wuning

    2014-01-01

    Background The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) in homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway plays a very important role in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Variations in the XRCC3 gene might lead to altered protein structure or function which may change DSBR efficiency and result in cancer. The XRCC3 C18067T polymorphism has been reported to be associated with skin cancer susceptibility, yet the results of these previous results have been inconsistent or controversial. To derive a more precise estimation of the association, we conducted a meta-analysis. Methods The quality of the studies was assessed according to a predefined scale. The association between the XRCC3 C18067T polymorphism and skin cancer risk was assessed by odds ratios (ORs) together with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Overall, no significant association was observed between XRCC3 C18067T polymorphism and skin cancer risk in any genetic model. Stratified analyses according to tumor type, significant association was found in the relationship between XRCC3 C18067T polymorphism and nonmelanoma skin cancer risk (homozygote comparison TT versus CC: OR = 0.74, 95%CI = 0.61–0.90, P = 0.003; recessive model TT versus TC/CC: OR = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.68–0.95, P = 0.01). Furthermore, significant association was also observed in XRCC3 C18067T polymorphism with both basal cell carcinoma risk (homozygote comparison TT versus CC: OR = 0.70, 95%CI = 0.53–0.92, P = 0.011; recessive model TT versus. TC/CC: OR = 0.74, 95%CI = 0.60–0.92, P = 0.007) and squamous cell carcinoma risk (heterozygote comparison TT versus .CC: OR = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.67–0.99, P = 0.04; dominant model TT/TC versus .CC: OR = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.68–0.98, P = 0.029). Conclusion The present meta-analysis demonstrates that XRCC3 C18067T polymorphism was not associated with risk of cutaneous melanoma but contributed a decreased risk to

  20. SOX10-positive salivary gland tumors: a growing list, including mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of the salivary gland, sialoblastoma, low-grade salivary duct carcinoma, basal cell adenoma/adenocarcinoma, and a subgroup of mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Shu; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Chang, Yih-Leong

    2016-10-01

    Transcription factor SRY-related HMG-box 10 (SOX10) is an important marker for melanocytic, schwannian, myoepithelial, and some salivary gland tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate SOX10 expression more thoroughly in the salivary gland neoplasms, including mammary analogue secretory carcinoma and hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma harboring specific genetic rearrangements. A new rabbit monoclonal anti-SOX10 antibody (clone EP268) was used to examine SOX10 expression in 14 different types of salivary gland tumors. We found that acinic cell carcinoma (AciCC), adenoid cystic carcinoma, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC), epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, low-grade salivary duct carcinoma, sialoblastoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, basal cell adenoma, and pleomorphic adenoma were SOX10 positive. Salivary duct carcinoma, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma, and oncocytoma were SOX10 negative. Earlier, mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) was considered a SOX10-negative tumor. This study identified a subgroup of SOX10-positive MEC cases with characteristic polygonal epithelial cells, pale-to-eosinophilic cytoplasm, and colloid-like dense eosinophilic material. Our data show SOX10 expression can be observed in salivary gland tumors with either one of the 4 cell types: acinic cells, cuboidal ductal cells with low-grade cytologic features, basaloid cells, and myoepithelial cells. In this article we thoroughly evaluated SOX10 expression in salivary gland tumors. SOX10 is useful in the differential diagnosis between myoepithelial carcinoma with clear cell features and hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma. It can also be used to discriminate low-grade salivary duct carcinoma from high-grade ones. Pathologists should be cautious with the interpretation of SOX10 positivity in salivary gland tumors, and correlation with histologic feature is mandatory.

  1. SOX10-positive salivary gland tumors: a growing list, including mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of the salivary gland, sialoblastoma, low-grade salivary duct carcinoma, basal cell adenoma/adenocarcinoma, and a subgroup of mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Shu; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Chang, Yih-Leong

    2016-10-01

    Transcription factor SRY-related HMG-box 10 (SOX10) is an important marker for melanocytic, schwannian, myoepithelial, and some salivary gland tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate SOX10 expression more thoroughly in the salivary gland neoplasms, including mammary analogue secretory carcinoma and hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma harboring specific genetic rearrangements. A new rabbit monoclonal anti-SOX10 antibody (clone EP268) was used to examine SOX10 expression in 14 different types of salivary gland tumors. We found that acinic cell carcinoma (AciCC), adenoid cystic carcinoma, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC), epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, low-grade salivary duct carcinoma, sialoblastoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, basal cell adenoma, and pleomorphic adenoma were SOX10 positive. Salivary duct carcinoma, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma, and oncocytoma were SOX10 negative. Earlier, mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) was considered a SOX10-negative tumor. This study identified a subgroup of SOX10-positive MEC cases with characteristic polygonal epithelial cells, pale-to-eosinophilic cytoplasm, and colloid-like dense eosinophilic material. Our data show SOX10 expression can be observed in salivary gland tumors with either one of the 4 cell types: acinic cells, cuboidal ductal cells with low-grade cytologic features, basaloid cells, and myoepithelial cells. In this article we thoroughly evaluated SOX10 expression in salivary gland tumors. SOX10 is useful in the differential diagnosis between myoepithelial carcinoma with clear cell features and hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma. It can also be used to discriminate low-grade salivary duct carcinoma from high-grade ones. Pathologists should be cautious with the interpretation of SOX10 positivity in salivary gland tumors, and correlation with histologic feature is mandatory. PMID:27327192

  2. Irradiance-dependent photobleaching and pain in δ-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy of superficial basal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, W.J.; Paquette, A.D.; Keymel, K.R.; Foster, T.H.; Oseroff, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In superficial basal cell carcinomas (sBCC) treated with photodynamic therapy with topical δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-PDT) we examined effects of light irradiance on photodynamic efficiency and pain. The rate of singlet oxygen production depends on the product of irradiance and photosensitizer and oxygen concentrations. High irradiance and/or photosensitizer levels cause inefficient treatment from oxygen depletion in preclinical models. Experimental Design Self-sensitized photobleaching of PpIX fluorescence was used as a surrogate metric for photodynamic dose. We developed instrumentation measuring fluorescence and reflectance from lesions and margins during treatment at 633nm with various irradiances. When PpIX was 90% bleached, irradiance was increased to 150 mW cm−2 until 200 J cm−2 were delivered. Pain was monitored. Results In 33 sBCC in 26 patients, photobleaching efficiency decreased with increasing irradiance above 20 mW cm−2, consistent with oxygen depletion. Fluences bleaching PpIX fluorescence 80% (D80) were 5.7±1.6, 4.5±0.3, 7.5±0.8, 7.4±0.3, 12.4±0.3 and 28.7±7.1 J cm−2, respectively, at 10, 20, 40, 50, 60 and 150 mW cm−2. At 20–150 mW cm−2, D80 doses required 2.5–3.5 min; times for the total 200 J cm−2 were 22.2–25.3 min. No significant pain occurred up to 50 mW cm−2; pain was not significant when irradiance then increased. Clinical responses were comparable to continuous150 mW cm−2 treatment. Conclusions ALA-PDT using ~40 mW cm−2 at 633nm is photodynamically efficient with minimum pain. Once PpIX is largely photobleached, higher irradiances allow efficient, rapid delivery of additional light. Optimal fluence at a single low irradiance is yet to be determined. PMID:18628462

  3. Classification of basal cell carcinoma in human skin using machine learning and quantitative features captured by polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Marvdashti, Tahereh; Duan, Lian; Aasi, Sumaira Z.; Tang, Jean Y.; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first fully automated detection of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most commonly occurring type of skin cancer, in human skin using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Our proposed automated procedure entails building a machine-learning based classifier by extracting image features from the two complementary image contrasts offered by PS-OCT, intensity and phase retardation (PR), and selecting a subset of features that yields a classifier with the highest accuracy. Our classifier achieved 95.4% sensitivity and specificity, validated by leave-one-patient-out cross validation (LOPOCV), in detecting BCC in human skin samples collected from 42 patients. Moreover, we show the superiority of our classifier over the best possible classifier based on features extracted from intensity-only data, which demonstrates the significance of PR data in detecting BCC.

  4. Classification of basal cell carcinoma in human skin using machine learning and quantitative features captured by polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Marvdashti, Tahereh; Duan, Lian; Aasi, Sumaira Z.; Tang, Jean Y.; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first fully automated detection of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most commonly occurring type of skin cancer, in human skin using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Our proposed automated procedure entails building a machine-learning based classifier by extracting image features from the two complementary image contrasts offered by PS-OCT, intensity and phase retardation (PR), and selecting a subset of features that yields a classifier with the highest accuracy. Our classifier achieved 95.4% sensitivity and specificity, validated by leave-one-patient-out cross validation (LOPOCV), in detecting BCC in human skin samples collected from 42 patients. Moreover, we show the superiority of our classifier over the best possible classifier based on features extracted from intensity-only data, which demonstrates the significance of PR data in detecting BCC. PMID:27699133

  5. The Use of Noninvasive Optical Coherence Tomography to Monitor the Treatment Progress of Vismodegib and Imiquimod 5% Cream in a Transplant Patient with Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Nose.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Orit; Schwartz, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    Immunosuppressed transplant recipients have increased risk for the development of basal cell carcinoma skin cancers. While oral vismodegib therapy has been successful in treating locally advanced basal cell tumors, few studies document its use and efficacy in organ transplant patients. In this immunocompromised population, topical imiquimod 5% cream has been shown to be an effective and well-tolerated option for superficial and nodular basal cell carcinomas. To the authors' knowledge, no data documents the use of optical coherence tomography, a noninvasive imaging technique, to monitor progress of such combined therapies on in vivo skin. The authors report the successful treatment of an extensive basal cell carcinoma on the nose of an immunosuppressed 54-year-old Caucasian man with a history of kidney and pancreas transplantations. By combining continuous noninvasive lesion monitoring with vismodegib 150mg/d therapy and adjuvant imiquimod 5% topical cream, the patient showed complete disease clearance on clinical, optical coherence tomography, and histological evaluation. This report supports the feasibility and efficacy of nonsurgical treatment of basal cell lesions in complicated transplant patients and the need for individualized treatment plans. A noninvasive follow-up tool, especially during nonsurgical therapy, is of critical value to ensure the best possible treatment outcome for the patient. PMID:27672417

  6. The Use of Noninvasive Optical Coherence Tomography to Monitor the Treatment Progress of Vismodegib and Imiquimod 5% Cream in a Transplant Patient with Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Nose

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Orit; Schwartz, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressed transplant recipients have increased risk for the development of basal cell carcinoma skin cancers. While oral vismodegib therapy has been successful in treating locally advanced basal cell tumors, few studies document its use and efficacy in organ transplant patients. In this immunocompromised population, topical imiquimod 5% cream has been shown to be an effective and well-tolerated option for superficial and nodular basal cell carcinomas. To the authors’ knowledge, no data documents the use of optical coherence tomography, a noninvasive imaging technique, to monitor progress of such combined therapies on in vivo skin. The authors report the successful treatment of an extensive basal cell carcinoma on the nose of an immunosuppressed 54-year-old Caucasian man with a history of kidney and pancreas transplantations. By combining continuous noninvasive lesion monitoring with vismodegib 150mg/d therapy and adjuvant imiquimod 5% topical cream, the patient showed complete disease clearance on clinical, optical coherence tomography, and histological evaluation. This report supports the feasibility and efficacy of nonsurgical treatment of basal cell lesions in complicated transplant patients and the need for individualized treatment plans. A noninvasive follow-up tool, especially during nonsurgical therapy, is of critical value to ensure the best possible treatment outcome for the patient. PMID:27672417

  7. The Use of Noninvasive Optical Coherence Tomography to Monitor the Treatment Progress of Vismodegib and Imiquimod 5% Cream in a Transplant Patient with Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Nose

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Orit; Schwartz, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressed transplant recipients have increased risk for the development of basal cell carcinoma skin cancers. While oral vismodegib therapy has been successful in treating locally advanced basal cell tumors, few studies document its use and efficacy in organ transplant patients. In this immunocompromised population, topical imiquimod 5% cream has been shown to be an effective and well-tolerated option for superficial and nodular basal cell carcinomas. To the authors’ knowledge, no data documents the use of optical coherence tomography, a noninvasive imaging technique, to monitor progress of such combined therapies on in vivo skin. The authors report the successful treatment of an extensive basal cell carcinoma on the nose of an immunosuppressed 54-year-old Caucasian man with a history of kidney and pancreas transplantations. By combining continuous noninvasive lesion monitoring with vismodegib 150mg/d therapy and adjuvant imiquimod 5% topical cream, the patient showed complete disease clearance on clinical, optical coherence tomography, and histological evaluation. This report supports the feasibility and efficacy of nonsurgical treatment of basal cell lesions in complicated transplant patients and the need for individualized treatment plans. A noninvasive follow-up tool, especially during nonsurgical therapy, is of critical value to ensure the best possible treatment outcome for the patient.

  8. Use of Drawing Lithography-Fabricated Polyglycolic Acid Microneedles for Transdermal Delivery of Itraconazole to a Human Basal Cell Carcinoma Model Regenerated on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jennifer; Wang, Yan; Jin, Jane Y.; Degan, Simone; Hall, Russell P.; Boehm, Ryan D.; Jaipan, Panupong; Narayan, Roger J.

    2016-04-01

    Itraconazole is a triazole agent that is routinely used for treatment of nail infections and other fungal infections. Recent studies indicate that itraconazole can also inhibit the growth of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) through suppression of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway. In this study, polyglycolic acid microneedle arrays and stainless steel microneedle arrays were used for transdermal delivery of itraconazole to a human BCC model which was regenerated on mice. One-by-four arrays of 642- μm-long polyglycolic acid microneedles with sharp tips were prepared using injection molding and drawing lithography. Arrays of 85 stainless steel 800- μm-tall microneedles attached to syringes were obtained for comparison purposes. Skin grafts containing devitalized split-thickness human dermis that had been seeded with human keratinocytes transduced to express human SHH protein were sutured to the skin of immunodeficient mice. Mice with this human BCC model were treated daily for 2 weeks with itraconazole dissolved in 60% dimethylsulfoxane and 40% polyethylene glycol-400 solution; transdermal administration of the itraconazole solution was facilitated by either four 1 × 4 polyglycolic acid microneedle arrays or stainless steel microneedle arrays. The epidermal tissues treated with polyglycolic acid microneedles or stainless steel microneedles were markedly thinner than that of the control (untreated) graft tissue. These preliminary results indicate that microneedles may be used to facilitate transdermal delivery of itraconazole for localized treatment of BCC.

  9. Post-occlusive reactive hyperemia in basal cell carcinoma and its potential application to improve the efficacy of solid tumor therapies.

    PubMed

    Reyal, Julien; Lebas, Nicolas; Fourme, Emmanuelle; Guihard, Thierry; Vilmer, Catherine; Le Masurier, Périg

    2012-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of malignant tumors, and is a major factor in the resistance to anti-cancer therapies, particularly radiotherapy. Indeed, tumor blood flow often fluctuates, and thus the oxygen supply is often reduced, thereby inducing tumor hypoxia. We decided to explore whether post-occlusive reactive hyperemia, a physiological reaction known to occur in normal tissues, could be induced through a malignant tumor, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), in which angiogenesis occurs, as in all malignant tumors. Skin blood flow was measured in twelve patients with BCC, using Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging to determine BCC perfusion after three minutes of vascular occlusion, induced by limb tourniquet for limb tumors (4 BCC), and/or by clamping the pedicle of a skin flap with the BCC at its center, for other tumor locations (12 BCC). We demonstrated for the first time that post-occlusive reactive hyperemia occurs in malignant tumors in humans. BCC perfusion curves were similar to those of healthy skin, characterized by a peak of hyperemia after reperfusion followed by a progressive return to the pre-occlusion perfusion level. Induction of post-occlusive reactive hyperemia in malignant tumors is therefore a novel investigational approach that could lead to a new adjuvant tool to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, respectively through the synchronized temporary increase of tumor perfusion and oxygenation.

  10. Photodynamic therapy of superficial basal cell carcinoma with 5-aminolevulinic acid with dimethylsulfoxide and ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid: a comparison of two light sources.

    PubMed

    Soler, A M; Angell-Petersen, E; Warloe, T; Tausjø, J; Steen, H B; Moan, J; Giercksky, K E

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized study was to compare the clinical and cosmetic outcome of superficial basal cell carcinomas (BCC), using either laser or broadband halogen light, in photodynamic therapy with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). A total of 83 patients with 245 superficial BCC were included in the study. Standard treatment involved 15 min of local pretreatment with 99% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) before topical application of 20% ALA with DMSO (2%) and ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid (2%) as cofactors for 3 h before light exposure with either laser or a broadband lamp (BL). A complete response was achieved in 95 lesions (86%) in the laser group and 110 lesions (82%) in the BL group 6 months after treatment. Of these, 80 lesions (84%) in the laser group and 101 lesions (92%) in the lamp group were independently evaluated to have an excellent or good cosmetic post-treatment score. No serious adverse events were reported. This study shows that there is no statistical significant difference in cure the rate (P = 0.49) and the cosmetic outcome (P = 0.075) with topical application of a modified ALA-cream between light exposure from a simple BL with continuous spectrum (570-740 nm) or from a red-light laser (monochromatic 630 nm). Cost and safety are further elements in favor of the BL in this setting.

  11. Is There a Relationship between the Stratum Corneum Thickness and That of the Viable Parts of Tumour Cells in Basal Cell Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Olav A.; Mjønes, Patricia; Fismen, Silje; Christensen, Eidi

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an invasive epithelial skin tumour. The thickness of the outermost epidermal layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), influences drug uptake and penetration into tumour and may thereby affect the response of BCC to topical treatment. The aim was to investigate a possible relationship between the thickness of the SC and that of the viable part of BCC. Histopathological evaluations of the corresponding SC and viable tumour thickness measurements of individual BCCs of different subtypes were explored. A total of 53 BCCs from 46 patients were studied. The median tumour thickness was 1.7 mm (0.8–3.0 mm), with a significant difference between subtypes (p < 0.001). The SC had a median thickness of 0.3 mm (0.2–0.4 mm), with no difference between tumour subtypes (p = 0.415). Additionally, no significant association between the thickness of the SC and that of the viable part of the tumour was demonstrated (p = 0.381). In conclusion our results indicate that SC thickness is relatively constant in BCC. PMID:26942011

  12. No-Needle Jet Intradermal Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy for Recurrent Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Nose: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Barolet, Daniel; Boucher, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to treat nodular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been shown to be beneficial. The success rate of ALA-PDT in the treatment of nodular BCC is dependent on optimal penetration of the photosensitizing agent and subsequent PpIX production. To enhance topical delivery of drugs intradermally, a needleless jet injection (NLJI), which employs a high-speed jet to puncture the skin without the side effects of needles, was used in one patient with recurrent BCC of the nose. Photoactivation was then performed using red light emitting diode [CW @ λ 630 nm, irradiance 50 mW/cm2, total fluence 51 J/cm2] for 17 minutes. Excellent cosmesis was obtained. Aside from mild crusting present for six days, no other adverse signs were noted. Clinically, there was no recurrent lesion up two years postintervention. Additional studies in larger samples of subjects are needed to further evaluate this promising technique. PMID:21188233

  13. In vivo assessment of optical properties of basal cell carcinoma and differentiation of BCC subtypes by high-definition optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Marc; Suppa, Mariano; Miyamoto, Makiko; Marneffe, Alice; Jemec, Gregor; Del Marmol, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) features of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) have recently been defined. We assessed in vivo optical properties (IV-OP) of BCC, by HD-OCT. Moreover their critical values for BCC subtype differentiation were determined. The technique of semi-log plot whereby an exponential function becomes linear has been implemented on HD-OCT signals. The relative attenuation factor (µraf) at different skin layers could be assessed.. IV-OP of superficial BCC with high diagnostic accuracy (DA) and high negative predictive values (NPV) were (i) decreased µraf in lower part of epidermis and (ii) increased epidermal thickness (E-T). IV-OP of nodular BCC with good to high DA and NPV were (i) less negative µraf in papillary dermis compared to normal adjacent skin and (ii) significantly decreased E-T and papillary dermal thickness (PD-T). In infiltrative BCC (i) high µraf in reticular dermis compared to normal adjacent skin and (ii) presence of peaks and falls in reticular dermis had good DA and high NPV. HD-OCT seems to enable the combination of in vivo morphological analysis of cellular and 3-D micro-architectural structures with IV-OP analysis of BCC. This permits BCC sub-differentiation with higher accuracy than in vivo HD-OCT analysis of morphology alone. PMID:27375943

  14. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 19q13.2-13.3: linkage disequilibria and associations with basal cell carcinoma in Danish psoriatic patients.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jiaoyang; Vogel, Ulla; Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Dybdahl, Marianne; Bolund, Lars; Nexø, Bjørn Andersen

    2003-02-01

    The genetic susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma (BCC) among Danish psoriatic patients was investigated in association studies with 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 19q13.2-3. The results show a significant association between BCC and the A-allele of a polymorphism in ERCCI exon4 (Odds ratio 12;95% Confidence Interval 1.17-124; p(chi2, two-side) = 0.019) and to a lesser extent with XPD exon6 (p = 0.06). This is in accordance with recent studies of a different group of BCC cases (Rockenbauer et al. (in press) Carcinogenesis; Yin et al. (manuscript submitted for publication). Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev), which places two highly influential markers between these two genes. The analysis also confirmed that considerable linkage disequilibrium exists between SNPs both within genes and between genes in this region. The combined studies suggest that genetic variation in nucleotide excision repair is of importance for the development of BCC.

  15. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy in the Short and Medium Term in the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Acne Vulgaris and Photoaging: Results from Four Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Carpio, PA; Alcolea-López, JM; Vélez, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical efficacy of methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL)-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) in the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), acne vulgaris (AV) and photoaging (PA), in the short and medium term. Subjects and methods: Four separate prospective studies were designed on patients with AK (n=25), BCC (n=20), AV (n=20) and PA (n=25). Two PDT protocols were applied, and different clinical efficacy criteria were established, including lesion count and size. Two semi-quantitative and four analogue visual scales were completed for the evaluation of results according to the therapist, the patient and two independent experts. Results: In the AK and BCC studies, full clinical remission was observed in 84.7% and 75.7% of lesions, respectively. In the AV study, the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions fell significantly (p<0.001, p<0.05). In the PA study a reduction in Dover scale scores (3.19 vs. 2.14, p<0.001) was proven. The percentages of satisfied or very satisfied patients were: AK=88%, BCC=90%, AV=89% and PA=80%. A year later, none of the AK or BCC lesions had reappeared, and the cases of AV and PA remained stable, with a tendency towards improvement. Conclusion: the MAL-PDT procedures used produced efficacious, safe and satisfactory results in KA, BCC, AV and PA in the short and medium term. PMID:24511190

  16. Motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping in basal cell carcinoma using optical imaging modalities: initial feasibility study using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, M.; Richardson, T. J.; Craythorne, E.; Mallipeddi, R.; Coleman, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    A system has been developed to assess the feasibility of using motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the clinic using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system consists of a commercial OCT imaging system (the VivoSight 1500, MDL Ltd., Orpington, UK), which has been adapted to incorporate a webcam and a single-sensor electromagnetic positional tracking module (the Flock of Birds, Ascension Technology Corp, Vermont, USA). A supporting software interface has also been developed which allows positional data to be captured and projected onto a 2D dermoscopic image in real-time. Initial results using a stationary test phantom are encouraging, with maximum errors in the projected map in the order of 1-2mm. Initial clinical results were poor due to motion artefact, despite attempts to stabilise the patient. However, the authors present several suggested modifications that are expected to reduce the effects of motion artefact and improve the overall accuracy and clinical usability of the system.

  17. Influence of glutathione‐S‐transferase (GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1) and cytochrome p450 (CYP1A1, CYP2D6) polymorphisms on numbers of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) in families with the naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X (R); Pfeiffer, R M; Goldstein, A M

    2006-01-01

    Background The naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder with variable expression. NBCCS patients have variable susceptibility to development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Previous studies have shown that polymorphisms of some metabolic genes encoding the cytochrome p450 (CYP) and glutathione‐S‐transferase (GST) enzymes influenced the numbers of BCCs in sporadic BCC cases. Objective To determine whether allelic variants of these genes contribute to the variation in numbers of BCCs observed in NBCCS families. Methods Genotyping and analysis was carried out in 152 members (69 affected and 83 unaffected) of 13 families with NBCCS for seven polymorphisms in five metabolic genes including CYP1A1, CYP2D6, GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTT1. Results GSTP1 Val105 and GSTP1 Val114 alleles were significantly associated with fewer BCC numbers (odds ratio (OR)105 = 0.55 (95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.88); OR114 = 0.20 (0.05 to 0.88)). The Val105 allele showed a dose dependent effect (ORIle/Val = 0.58 (0.34 to 0.88); ORVal/Val = 0.34 (0.14 to 0.78)). In addition, fewer jaw cysts were observed in carriers of the three p450 polymorphisms (CYP1A1m1, CYP1A1m2, and CYP2D6*4) (ORCYP1A1m1 = 0.27 (0.12 to 0.58); ORCYP1A1m2 = 0.25 (0.08 to 0.78); ORCYP2D6*4 = 0.33 (0.18 to 0.60)). Conclusions Genetic variants might contribute to the variation in numbers of BCCs and jaw cysts observed in NBCCS families. PMID:16582078

  18. Photodynamic therapy for difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinomas: Do poorly responding BCCs lack accumulation of protoporphyrin IX after ALA/MAL application?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Carin; Paoli, John; Halldin, Christina B.; Gillstedt, Martin; Larkö, Olle; Wennberg, Ann-Marie; Ericson, Marica B.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using topical application of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and methylaminolevulinate (MAL) has become a popular therapeutic method for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers such as basal cell carcinomas (BCCs); however, the treatment response varies. An important question is if BCCs which respond poorly to PDT lack accumulation of protoporhyrin IX (PpIX) after ALA/MAL application. In connection to PDT, fluorescence diagnostics (FD) can be performed to detect PpIX within human skin. We investigated fluorescence images from 22 patients with 35 BCCs. They were evaluated with respect to the fluorescence contrast based on image analysis, which was considered to be a tool to non-invasively measure the PpIX-concentration. As expected the fluorescence contrast between tumor and normal skin was elevated after MAL-application; although no correlation between low fluorescence contrast and lack of treatment response could be observed. In a former study, we have also investigated the transdermal penetration of ALA and MAL in 27 BCCs in vivo using a microdialysis technique. In 15 of 16 BCCs in which the microdialysis catheter was located superficially (i.e. at a depth of less than 1 mm), therapeutic drug concentrations were detected;.however, in the 11 lesions with a deeper catheter location (below 1 mm) drug concentrations above the detection limit of the system were only obtained in 6 lesions (p=0.026). No difference between the transdermal penetration of MAL and ALA could be seen. Conclusions: Lack of PpIX fluorescence cannot entirely explain why some BCCs don't respond to PDT, but inadecuate concentrations within the full thickness of the tumor may play a role as microdialysis has shown.

  19. Sunlight-induced basal cell carcinoma tumor cells and ultraviolet-B-irradiated psoriatic plaques express Fas ligand (CD95L).

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Steil, C; Wrone-Smith, T; Sun, X; Krueger, J G; Coven, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1998-01-01

    The skin is constantly exposed to sunlight and frequently develops sun-induced skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma (BCC). These epidermal-derived tumors escape local immune surveillance and infiltrate the dermis, requiring surgical removal. We report here that in contrast to keratinocytes in normal skin (n = 4), BCC tumor cells (n = 6) strongly and diffusely express Fas ligand (CD95L), but not Fas antigen (CD95). This CD95L expression in vivo by BCC tumor cells is associated with peritumoral T lymphocytes that are undergoing apoptosis. Moreover, CD95L can be induced on normal cultured keratinocytes after exposure to ultraviolet-B light (UV-B) irradiation. This induction of CD95L was confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels using multipassaged human keratinocytes and a keratinocyte cell line. Keratinocytes induced to express CD95L acquired the functional capacity to kill a CD95-positive lymphocyte cell line. Whereas hyperplastic keratinocytes in untreated psoriatic plaques do not express CD95L on their plasma membrane, after UV-B treatment there is strong and diffuse keratinocyte CD95L expression that coincided in a temporal fashion with depletion of intraepidermal T cells in all five patients studied. Our data suggest a novel molecular pathway by which UV light can contribute to the ability of a skin cancer to escape from immune attack by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and a previously unrecognized therapeutic mechanism of action for UV-B light in psoriasis via keratinocyte CD95L expression. Such immunological events involving CD95L provide new insight and opportunity for novel treatment approaches not only for cutaneous neoplasms but also for various T cell-mediated dermatoses such as psoriasis. PMID:9421463

  20. Focus on Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Venura; Madan, Vishal; Lear, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), which include basal and squamous cell cancers are the most common human cancers. BCCs have a relatively low metastatic rate and slow growth and are frequently underreported. Whilst there is a definite role of sunexposure in the pathogenesis of BCC, several additional complex genotypic, phenotypic and environmental factors are contributory. The high prevalence and the frequent occurrence of multiple primary BCC in affected individuals make them an important public health problem. This has led to a substantial increase in search for newer noninvasive treatments for BCC. Surgical excision with predetermined margins remains the mainstay treatment for most BCC. Of the newer non-invasive treatments only photodynamic therapy and topical imiquimod have become established in the treatment of certain BCC subtypes, while the search for other more effective and tissue salvaging therapies continues. This paper focuses on the pathogenesis and management of BCC. PMID:21152128

  1. The -1154 G/A VEGF gene polymorphism is associated with the incidence of basal cell carcinoma in patients from northern Poland.

    PubMed

    Sobjanek, Michał; Zabłotna, Monika; Lesiak, Aleksandra; Michajłowski, Igor; Szczerkowska-Dobosz, Aneta; Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Małgorzata; Nowicki, Roman

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is believed to play a crucial role in neoplastic angiogenesis. Although the genetic background of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been analyzed in some papers, the mechanism of BCC pathogenesis is not fully understood. To the best of our knowledge, VEGF gene polymorphisms have not yet been explored. The aim of the study was to asses the frequency of three polymorphisms in the VEGF gene (-1154 G/A, -460 T/C and +405 G/C) in patients of Polish origin with BCC and control group. In addition, VEGF serum levels of patients with BCC and controls were measured. The study involved 180 patients (96 women, 84 men) with BCC and a mean age of 68.9 ± 11.8, and 215 healthy age- and sex-matched volunteers. The VEGF polymorphisms at positions -1154 and +405 were analyzed using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method. To assess the VEGF gene polymorphism at position -460, we used the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Serum levels of VEGF protein were measured using the ELISA test. The presence of the G allele (GA or GG) in the -1154 VEGF polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of BCC development (OR = 7.28, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the carriers of the AA genotype in -1154 VEGF polymorphism showed significantly reduced risks of BCC (OR = 0.14, p < 0.0001). It was also shown that the GTC haplotype of VEGF predisposes to BCC development (OR = 1.69, p = 0.013), while the presence of the ATG haplotype significantly reduces this risk (OR = 0.17, p = 0.00001). We have found significantly increased VEGF serum levels among BCC patients, in comparison with the healthy controls (mean 596.7 ± 393.5 pg/ml; range 60.1-931.4 vs. 255.9 ± 174.6 pg/ml; range 42.2-553.0 pg/ml; p < 0.0004). The serum levels of VEGF significantly correlated with tumor size: r = 0.41, p < 0.0001. Our results testify to the importance of -1154 G/A VEGF gene polymorphisms in altering the

  2. The time-dependent accumulation of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in nodular basal cell carcinoma following application of methyl aminolevulinate with an oxygen pressure injection device.

    PubMed

    Blake, E; Campbell, S; Allen, J; Mathew, J; Helliwell, P; Curnow, A

    2012-12-01

    Topical protoporphyrin (PpIX)-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) relies on the penetration of the prodrug into the skin lesion and subsequent accumulation of the photosensitizer. Methyl aminolevulinate (MAL)-PDT is an established treatment for thinner and superficial non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) but for the treatment of the thicker nodular basal cell carcinoma (nBCC) enhanced penetration of the prodrug is required. This study employed a new higher pressure, oxygen pressure injection (OPI) device, at the time of Metvix® application with a view to enhancing the penetration of MAL into the tumors. Each patient had Metvix® applied to a single nBCC followed by application of a higher pressure OPI device. Following different time intervals (0, 30, 60, 120 or 180 min) the tumors were excised. The maximum depth and area of MAL penetration achieved in each lesion was measured using PpIX fluorescence microscopy. As expected, an increase in the depth of MAL-induced PpIX accumulation and area of tumor sensitized was observed over time; when the Metvix® cream was applied for 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min the median depth of PpIX fluorescence was 0%, 21%, 26.5%, 75.5% and 90%, respectively and the median area of tumor sensitized was 0%, 4%, 6%, 19% and 60%, respectively. As the investigation presented here did not include a control arm, the relative depths of fluorescence observed in this study were statistically compared (using the non-parametric Mann Whitney U test) with the results of our previous study where patients had Metvix® cream applied either with or without the standard pressure OPI device. When the higher pressure OPI device was employed compared to without OPI this increase was observed to be greater following 30, 120, and 180 min although overall not significantly (p=0.835). In addition, no significant difference between the higher pressure OPI device employed here and the previously investigated standard pressure OPI device was observed (p=0.403). However

  3. Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma Using a One-Stop-Shop With Reflectance Confocal Microscopy: Study Design and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Elshot, Yannick; Zupan-Kajcovski, Biljana; Crijns, Marianne B; Starink, Markus V; Bekkenk, Marcel W; van der Wal, Allard C; Spuls, Phyllis I; de Rie, Menno A

    2015-01-01

    Background Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer diagnosed in white populations worldwide. The rising incidence of BCC is becoming a major worldwide public health problem. Therefore, there is a need for more efficient management. Objective The aim of this research is to assess the efficacy and safety of a one-stop-shop (OSS) concept, using real-time in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) (Vivascope 1500; Lucid Technologies, Henrietta, NY, USA) as a diagnostic tool, prior to surgical management of new primary BCCs. Methods This is a prospective non-inferiority multi-center RCT designed to compare the “OSS concept using RCM” to current standards of care in diagnosing and treating clinically suspected BCC. Patients ≥ 18 years attending our outpatient clinic at the Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, and the Department of Dermatology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) with a clinically suspected new primary BCC lesion will be considered for enrollment using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, and will be randomly allocated to the experimental or control group. The main outcome parameter is the assessment of incomplete surgical excision margins on the final pathology report of confirmed BCC lesions (either by punch biopsy or RCM imaging). Other outcome measures include diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of RCM for diagnosing BCC and dividing between subtypes, and throughput time. Patient satisfaction data will be collected postoperatively after 3 months during routine follow-up. Results This research is investigator-initiated and received ethics approval. Patient recruitment started in February 2015, and we expect all study-related activities to be completed by fall 2015. Conclusions This RCT is the first to examine an OSS concept using RCM for diagnosing and treating clinically suspected BCC lesions. Results of this

  4. Three-Year Follow-Up Results of Photodynamic Therapy vs. Imiquimod vs. Fluorouracil for Treatment of Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Single-Blind, Noninferiority, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Roozeboom, Marieke H; Arits, Aimee H M M; Mosterd, Klara; Sommer, Anja; Essers, Brigitte A B; de Rooij, Michette J M; Quaedvlieg, Patricia J F; Steijlen, Peter M; Nelemans, Patty J; Kelleners-Smeets, Nicole W J

    2016-08-01

    A randomized controlled trial including 601 patients previously showed that the effectiveness of imiquimod and fluorouracil cream were not inferior to methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) in patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma after 1 year of follow-up. We now present the 3-year follow-up results. The probability of tumor-free survival at 3 years post-treatment was 58.0% for MAL-PDT (95% confidence interval [CI] = 47.8-66.9), 79.7% for imiquimod (95% CI = 71.6-85.7), and 68.2% for fluorouracil (95% CI = 58.1-76.3). The hazard ratio for treatment failure comparing imiquimod with MAL-PDT was 0.50 (95% CI = 0.33-0.76, P = 0.001). Comparison of fluorouracil with MAL-PDT and fluorouracil with imiquimod showed hazard ratios of 0.73 (95% CI = 0.51-1.05, P = 0.092) and 0.68 (95% CI = 0.44-1.06, P = 0.091), respectively. Subgroup analysis showed a higher probability of treatment success for imiquimod versus MAL-PDT in all subgroups with the exception of elderly patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma on the lower extremities. In this subgroup, the risk difference in tumor-free survival was 57.6% in favor of MAL-PDT. In conclusion, according to results at 3 years post-treatment, imiquimod is superior and fluorouracil not inferior to MAL-PDT in treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma.

  5. [Extensive basal cell cancer of the scalp - case reports].

    PubMed

    Olędzki, Szymon; Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Department Of Surgery And Emergency Nursing Pomeranian Medical University In Szczecin Poland, Ryszard

    2016-07-01

    Basal-cell canceris a slow growing, rarely metastasizes, locally malignant skin cancer. Patients with this neoplasm usually have excellent prognosis. Potentially, in some cases, a good prognosis cause a delay in therapy. Delay or withdrawal from treatment might lead to higher local extension of tumour with the destruction of the surrounding tissue. In this article we are presenting two patients with extensive basal cell cancer. The first patient underwent plastic surgery for extensive basal-cell carcinoma located in the parietal and temporal area. The second patient was observed due to recurrence of extensive basal cell carcinoma in the parietal region. Local advancement of the primary tumor could be a reason for the lack of radicality of surgery. Such advancement is rarely seen nowadays. The cases demonstrate the need for awareness about the possible severe course of the disease. PMID:27590651

  6. [Extensive basal cell cancer of the scalp - case reports].

    PubMed

    Olędzki, Szymon; Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Department Of Surgery And Emergency Nursing Pomeranian Medical University In Szczecin Poland, Ryszard

    2016-08-01

    Basal-cell canceris a slow growing, rarely metastasizes, locally malignant skin cancer. Patients with this neoplasm usually have excellent prognosis. Potentially, in some cases, a good prognosis cause a delay in therapy. Delay or withdrawal from treatment might lead to higher local extension of tumour with the destruction of the surrounding tissue. In this article we are presenting two patients with extensive basal cell cancer. The first patient underwent plastic surgery for extensive basal-cell carcinoma located in the parietal and temporal area. The second patient was observed due to recurrence of extensive basal cell carcinoma in the parietal region. Local advancement of the primary tumor could be a reason for the lack of radicality of surgery. Such advancement is rarely seen nowadays. The cases demonstrate the need for awareness about the possible severe course of the disease. PMID:27591446

  7. The intraoral basal cell adenoma.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M A

    1987-12-01

    The histological and clinical behaviour of nine intraoral salivary basal cell adenomas is described. Despite problems in classification, this study confirms the impression that these are all benign salivary gland tumours which respond well to localized excision only.

  8. Basal cell ameloblastoma–review of literature with report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Giraddi, Girish B; Anusha, AJ Sai

    2012-01-01

    The ameloblastoma is the most common epithelial odontogenic tumor of the jaw with several histologic variants viz. follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, desmoplastic, and granular cell and basal cell types. The basal cell ameloblastoma is a rare histological variant which tends to demonstrate microscopic features similar to cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. In the current article we report three cases and review the literature of this rare tumor PMID:25756034

  9. Inhibiting the Hedgehog Pathway in Patients with the Basal-Cell Nevus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jean Y.; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian M.; Aszterbaum, Michelle; Yauch, Robert L.; Lindgren, Joselyn; Chang, Kris; Coppola, Carol; Chanana, Anita M.; Marji, Jackleen; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dysregulated hedgehog signaling is the pivotal molecular abnormality underlying basal-cell carcinomas. Vismodegib is a new orally administered hedgehog-pathway inhibitor that produces objective responses in locally advanced and metastatic basal-cell carcinomas. METHODS We tested the anti–basal-cell carcinoma efficacy of vismodegib in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with the basal-cell nevus syndrome at three clinical centers from September 2009 through January 2011. The primary end point was reduction in the incidence of new basal-cell carcinomas that were eligible for surgical resection (surgically eligible) with vismodegib versus placebo after 3 months; secondary end points included reduction in the size of existing basal-cell carcinomas. RESULTS In 41 patients followed for a mean of 8 months (range, 1 to 15) after enrollment, the per-patient rate of new surgically eligible basal-cell carcinomas was lower with vismodegib than with placebo (2 vs. 29 cases per group per year, P<0.001), as was the size (percent change from baseline in the sum of the longest diameter) of existing clinically significant basal-cell carcinomas (−65% vs. −11%, P = 0.003). In some patients, all basal-cell carcinomas clinically regressed. No tumors progressed during treatment with vismodegib. Patients receiving vismodegib routinely had grade 1 or 2 adverse events of loss of taste, muscle cramps, hair loss, and weight loss. Overall, 54% of patients (14 of 26) receiving vismodegib discontinued drug treatment owing to adverse events. At 1 month, vismodegib use had reduced the hedgehog target-gene expression by basal-cell carcinoma by 90% (P<0.001) and diminished tumor-cell proliferation, but apoptosis was not affected. No residual basal-cell carcinoma was detectable in 83% of biopsy samples taken from sites of clinically regressed basal-cell carcinomas. CONCLUSIONS Vismodegib reduces the basal-cell carcinoma tumor burden and blocks growth of

  10. Basal cell adenoma: a diagnostic dilemma on fine needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nalini; Bal, Amanjit; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Rajwanshi, Arvind

    2011-12-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare neoplasm which is one of the basaloid tumors of salivary gland. Basaloid tumors are the most difficult problem in salivary gland fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). There are various benign and malignant tumors such as; cellular pleomorphic adenoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, metastatic basal cell carcinoma, metastatic basaloid squamous carcinoma and small cell carcinoma in differential diagnosis. We present a case of BCA, membranous type in a 39-year-old female with right submandibular swelling misinterpreted as adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) on FNAC.

  11. Basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thalakoti, Srikanth; Geller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) or Gorlin syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome sometimes known as the fifth phacomatosis, inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Gorlin syndrome is characterized by development of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, calcification of falx cerebri, various developmental skeletal abnormalities such as bifid rib, hemi- or bifid vertebra and predisposition to the development of various tumors. BCNS is caused by a mutation in the PTCH1 gene localized to 9q22.3. Its estimated prevalence varies between 1/55600 and 1/256000 with an equal male to female ratio. The medulloblastoma variant seen in Gorlin syndrome patients is of the desmoplastic type, characteristically presenting during the first 3 years of life. Therefore, children with desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be carefully screened for other features of BCNS. Radiation therapy for desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be avoided in BCNS patients as it may induce development of invasive BCCs and other tumors in the skin area exposed to radiation. This syndrome is a multisystem disorder so involvement of multiple specialists with a multimodal approach to detect and treat various manifestations at early stages will reduce the long-term sequelae and severity of the condition. Life expectancy is not significantly altered but morbidity from complications and cosmetic scarring can be substantial. PMID:26564075

  12. Pre-Treatment Deep Curettage Can Significantly Reduce Tumour Thickness in Thick Basal Cell Carcinoma While Maintaining a Favourable Cosmetic Outcome When Used in Combination with Topical Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Eidi; Mørk, Cato; Foss, Olav Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has limitations in the treatment of thick skin tumours. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pre-PDT deep curettage on tumour thickness in thick (≥2 mm) basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Additionally, 3-month treatment outcome and change of tumour thickness from diagnosis to treatment were investigated. At diagnosis, mean tumour thickness was 2.3 mm (range 2.0–4.0). Pre- and post-curettage biopsies were taken from each tumour prior to PDT. Of 32 verified BCCs, tumour thickness was reduced by 50% after deep curettage (P ≤ 0.001). Mean tumour thickness was also reduced from diagnosis to treatment. At 3-month followup, complete tumour response was found in 93% and the cosmetic outcome was rated excellent or good in 100% of cases. In conclusion, deep curettage significantly reduces BCC thickness and may with topical PDT provide a favourable clinical and cosmetic short-term outcome. PMID:22191035

  13. Real-life practice study of the clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness of photodynamic therapy using methyl aminolevulinate (MAL-PDT) in the management of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Annemans, Lieven; Caekelbergh, Karin; Roelandts, Rik; Boonen, Hugo; Leys, Christoph; Nikkels, Arjen F; van Den Haute, V; van Quickenborne, L; Verhaeghe, Evelien; Leroy, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Clinical trials have shown that photodynamic therapy using methyl aminolevulinate (MAL-PDT) is an effective treatment for actinic keratosis (AK), and nodular and superficial basal cell carcinoma (nBCC and sBCC) unsuitable for other available therapies. Economic evaluation models have shown that it is a cost effective intervention as well. The objectives of this prospective, observational, one arm study were (i) to verify in a real-life practice study the results obtained in previous clinical trials with MAL-PDT in the treatment of AK, nBCC and sBCC; (ii) to calculate the real-life cost of treatment and validate predictions from an economic evaluation model. Patients with AK and/or BCC were selected according to Belgian reimbursement criteria for treatment with MAL-PDT. Clinical response, cosmetic outcome and tolerability were assessed. MAL-PDT cost was calculated and compared to published model cost data. Data were collected from 247 patients (117 AK, 130 BCC). A complete clinical response was obtained for 83% of AK (85/102) and BCC (97/116) patients. A good or excellent cosmetic outcome was obtained for 95% of AK patients and 93% of BCC patients. Tolerability was good: only 2 patients withdrew for adverse events. Clinical results were similar to previous studies. Total cost of care per patient was euro 381 for AK, euro 318 for nBCC, and euro 298 for sBCC. Total cost per lesion was euro 58 for AK (identical to model prediction), euro 316 for nBCC and euro 178 for sBCC (both within 20% of model prediction). The clinical results of MAL-PDT in this real-life practice study confirm those demonstrated in previous clinical trials. Costs calculated from this study confirm predicted cost-effectiveness in the original model for MAL-PDT in the management of AK and BCC.

  14. Basal cell adenoma of maxillary sinus mimicking ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bhagde, Priya Anil; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Humbe, Jayanti G

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare basaloid tumor, with only 20% of cases occurring in minor salivary glands. Histologically, BCA is characterized by the presence of basaloid cells and may frequently be mistaken with canalicular adenoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry may aid in arriving at a final diagnosis as in the present case. Reported here is a case of locally aggressive BCA. Histologically, the lesion mimicked ameloblastoma and other entities which posed a diagnostic challenge. There are no reports of BCA presenting as an aggressive lesion available in English literature so far; moreover, merely a single case of BCA of maxillary sinus has been previously reported to the best of our cognition. This case report highlights the rarity of this tumor with regards to its site of origin, clinical behavior and histopathological mimics. PMID:27194878

  15. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  16. Basal cell naevus syndrome: an update on genetics and treatment.

    PubMed

    John, A M; Schwartz, R A

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell naevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder that stems from mutations in multiple genes, most commonly patched 1 (PTCH1). The classic triad of symptoms consists of basal cell carcinomas, jaw keratocysts and cerebral calcifications, although there are many other systemic manifestations. Because of the broad range of symptoms and development of several types of tumours, early diagnosis and close monitoring are essential to preserve quality of life. Targeting treatment is often difficult because of tumour prevalence. Newer inhibitors of the hedgehog signalling pathway and proteins involved in proliferative growth have shown therapeutic promise. In addition, preventive medications are being devised. We propose a method for determining appropriate treatment for cutaneous tumours. PMID:26409035

  17. Conjunctival ganglioglioma as a feature of basal cell nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Arnaud; Blavin, Julie; Lhermitte, Benoit; Speeg-Schatz, Claude

    2011-08-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (MIM #109400), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts of the mandible, postnatal tumors, and multiple basal cell carcinomas. Mutations in the PTCH1 gene (a tumor suppressor gene) or, more rarely, the NBCCS or the TRPC1 genes are responsible for the development of many postnatal tumors. We present a case of Gorlin syndrome presenting as a conjunctival ganglioglioma in a 13-year-old girl. While cases of cerebral ganglioglioma have been described in association with Gorlin syndrome, conjunctival ganglioglioma has not, to the best of our knowledge, been reported. PMID:21907124

  18. [Basal cell adenomas of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Kozlovskiĭ, O M

    1975-01-01

    The author presents data on morphology and clinical features of basal-cell adenomas of the salivary gland (10 cases). Singling out this neoplasm into independent onconosological group seems reasonable since basal-cell adenoma not infrequently is erroneously diagnosed as cylindroma or mixed tumour of the salivary gland, which may lead to a wrong clinical prognosis and inadequate therapeutic measures. The clinical course of this tumour is benign. The main morphological feature of the tumour is a monomorphic character of cell elements, their palisade-like distribution over the periphery of individual tumour structures and a clear-cut delimination of the parenchyma from the stroma.

  19. Basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    González-García, Raúl; Nam-Cha, Syong H; Muñoz-Guerra, Mario F; Gamallo-Amat, C

    2006-03-01

    Basal cell adenoma of the salivary glands is an uncommon type of monomorphous adenoma. Its most frequent location is the parotid gland. It usually appears as a firm and mobile slow-growing mass. Histologically, isomorphic cells in nests and interlaced trabecules with a prominent basal membrane are observed. It is also characterized by the presence of a slack and hyaline stroma and the absence of myxoid or condroid stroma. In contrast to pleomorphic adenoma, it tends to be multiple and its recurrence rate after surgical excision is high. Due to prognostic implications, differential diagnosis with basal cell adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is mandatory. We describe a case of basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland. We also review the literature and discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare entity.

  20. [Basal cell epithelioma of the vulva in chronic endemic regional arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Cabrera, H N; Cuda, G; López, M; Costa, J A

    1984-01-01

    A 65 years old patient with vulvar basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous manifestations of chronic arsenicism is reported; by its endemic origin is considered as hidroarsenicism ( ERCHA = endemic regional chronic hidroarsenicism ). The unusual presentation of this type of cancer is resalted , and it's attributed to its general disease . The principal characteristics of arsenical skin cancer are considered.

  1. Basal cell adenoma of the sublingual gland.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Ching; Chien, Chih-Yen; Huang, Shun-Chen; Su, Chih-Ying

    2003-12-01

    Salivary gland tumors constitute about 3% to 4% of all head and neck neoplasms. Approximately 80% originate in the parotid gland, and they rarely present in the sublingual gland; however, a disproportionately large majority of sublingual gland tumors are malignant. Basal cell adenoma is a benign epithelial salivary gland tumor that appears to have unique histologic characteristics, different from those of mixed tumors, and has a predilection for development in the parotid and minor salivary glands. No case has ever been reported as arising from the sublingual gland in the otolaryngology literature. We report here a case of a middle-aged woman with basal cell adenoma of the sublingual gland. The clinical presentation, pathological features, differential diagnosis, and treatment options for this relatively rare tumor are discussed.

  2. Basal cell nevus syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ocholla, T J; Guthua, S W; Kimaro, S S

    1994-11-01

    A case is reported of a 13 year old Kenyan girl who presented at the Kenyatta National Hospital Dental Clinic with multiple mandibular and maxillary cysts, cutaneous lesions and mandibular prognathism. This combination of clinical and radiographic features led to a diagnosis of basal cell nevus syndrome. This paper is the first reported case of the syndrome in Kenya. The significance of thorough clinical inspection and radiographic screening of suspected cases is discussed. PMID:7859664

  3. Dermatocosmetologic aspects of treatment of basal-cell skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geinitz, A. V.; Stranadko, Ye. F.; Yusupova, Zh. M.; Tkachenko, S. B.

    2005-08-01

    The obtained clinical findings demonstrate excellent results after surgical MSC treatment with the application of modem laser surgical technologies. All the operated patients were under oncologist"s control during 1.5-2.5 years. In 6 cases we observed topical recurrences which needed a repeated intervention. Thus, our experience of applying LPh for surgical treatment of basal-cell carcinomas of the head and neck dem- onstrate that in the analysed cases it is more reasonable to use two models of laser devices different in their physical parameters. These devices are used at different surgical stages so as to provide a precise effect in laser tumour va- porization within the borders of the healthy tissue, to make better vascular coagulation and laser smoothing of wound surface. Immediate, direct and long-term results of modern surgical lasers" application for treating skin BSC almost in all cases give good and excellent cosmetic effect after such intenventions.

  4. Basal cell adenocarcinoma of minor salivary and seromucous glands of the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, I; Soares, J

    1996-05-01

    Basal cell adenocarcinoma of salivary glands is an uncommon and recently described entity occurring almost exclusively at the major salivary glands. This report provides an overview of the clinicopathologic profile of this neoplasm by including the personal experience on the clinical features, microscopic and ultrastructural characteristics, proliferation activity, and DNA tumor patterns of 12 lesions occurring at the minor salivary glands of the head and neck region, where basal cell adenocarcinoma is probably an underecognized entity, previously reported under different designations. Basal cell adenocarcinoma predominates at the seventh decade without sex preference. The tumors affecting the minor salivary glands occur most frequently at the oral cavity (jugal mucosa, palate) and the upper respiratory tract. The prevalent histologic tumor pattern is represented by solid neoplastic aggregates with a peripheral cell palisading arrangement frequently delineated by basement membrane-like material. The neoplastic clusters are formed by two cell populations: the small dark cell type (that predominates) and a large cell type. Necrosis, either of the comedo or the apoptotic type, is a frequent finding. Perineural growth occurs in 50% of the cases and vascular permeation in 25%. Immunohistochemistry identifies a dual differentiation with a reactivity pattern indicative of ductal epithelial and myoepithelial differentiation, which can be confirmed by electron microscopy. The differential diagnosis of the neoplasm includes its benign counterpart, the basal cell adenoma, solid variant of adenoid cystic carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, and basaloid squamous carcinoma. The tumors recur more frequently than lesions originating in major salivary glands. Mortality is associated with the anatomic site of the lesion, advanced stage, residual neoplasia at surgery, and tumor recurrence. The importance of recognizing basal cell adenocarcinoma outside major salivary glands is

  5. Basal Cell Adenoma of Parotid Gland: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Kanaujia, S K; Singh, Ashutosh; Nautiyal, Shivani; Ashutosh, Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) of the salivary gland is a rare neoplasm consists of a monomorphic population of basaloid epithelial cells, and it accounts for approximately 1-2 % of all salivary gland tumors. Its most frequent location is the parotid gland. It usually appears as a firm and mobile slow-growing mass. Histologically, isomorphic cells in nests and interlaced trabecules with a prominent basal membrane are observed. In contrast to pleomorphic adenoma, it tends to be multiple and its recurrence rate after surgical excision is high. Due to prognostic implications, differential diagnosis with basal cell adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is mandatory. We report a case of BCA of the parotid gland. We also review the literature and discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare entity. PMID:26693465

  6. Basal cell adenocarcinoma and Basal cell adenoma of the salivary glands: a clinicopathological review of seventy tumors with comparison of morphologic features and growth control indices.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas C; Robinson, Robert A

    2015-06-01

    Basal cell adenoma and basal cell adenocarcinoma represent uncommon basaloid salivary gland neoplasms that show marked morphologic similarity. We wished to compare clinical outcome and morphologic features as well as growth and proliferation associated markers for both neoplasms. We reviewed the pathologic features of 70 neoplasms diagnosed as basal cell adenoma or basal cell adenocarcinoma. Observations included maximum mitotic activity and presence or absence of invasion into surrounding normal tissues as well as immunohistochemical studies for Ki-67, caspase 3, p53, and bcl-2. Establishing malignancy on the basis of invasion into surrounding benign tissues, 41 basal cell adenomas and 29 basal cell adenocarcinomas were identified. For tumors with follow-up, recurrence rates were 6.7 % for basal cell adenoma and 16.7 % for basal cell adenocarcinoma. One patient with basal cell adenocarcinoma had distant metastases and died of disease. Overall basal cell adenocarcinomas showed significantly higher values for growth and proliferation markers compared to basal cell adenomas. Salivary gland basal cell adenoma and basal cell adenocarcinoma show morphologic similarity. Basal cell adenocarcinoma can exhibit a locally aggressive behavior and has potential metastatic behavior. The overall mitotic rate and Ki-67 expression were higher in basal cell adenocarcinoma compared to basal cell adenoma, but overlap between the results of these observations in each tumor did not allow for accurate diagnosis or prediction of outcome in individual cases. We conclude that morphologic observation of local tissue invasion is the best marker for separating basal cell adenoma from basal cell adenocarcinoma.

  7. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Basal Cell Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shanley, Susan; McCormack, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in Caucasians worldwide and its incidence is rising. It is generally considered a sporadic tumour, most likely to affect fair-skinned individuals exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This chapter focusses on the approach to recognising the relatively few individuals in whom a high-risk hereditary susceptibility may be present. Gorlin syndrome is the main consideration and the gene most commonly mutated is PTCH1, a key regulator of the Hedgehog developmental pathway. Recently, loss of function of another gene in the same pathway, SUFU, has been found to explain a subset of families. Understanding the pathogenesis of familial BCCs has advanced the understanding of the biology of sporadic tumours and led to targeted therapy trials. The management of familial BCCs remains a challenge due to significant unmet needs for non-surgical treatments and a high burden of disease for the individual. Together with the prospect of advances in gene discovery and translation, these challenges highlight the need for ongoing review of at-risk and affected individuals by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:27075355

  8. Gorlin syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS): A case report.

    PubMed

    Shivaswamy, K N; Sumathy, T K; Shyamprasad, A L; Ranganathan, C

    2010-01-01

    Gorlin syndrome, also known as Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome (BCNS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. This syndrome is characterized by developmental anomalies, such as odentogenic keratocysts of the mandible and postnatal tumors, especially multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). The prevalence of this syndrome is variously estimated to be 1 in 60,000 to 1 in 120,000 persons. Mutation in a tumor suppressor, the PTCH1 gene residing on long arm of Ch 9, is responsible for the development of many postnatal tumors. Patients with Gorlin syndrome show multiple abnormalities, none of which is unique to this condition. Our case had almost all the features of this rare syndrome. PMID:20875327

  9. [Patients with basal cell naevus syndrome should be offered an early multidisciplinary follow-up and treatment].

    PubMed

    Bay, Christiane; Ousager, Lilan Bomme; Jelsig, Anne Marie

    2015-07-13

    Basal cell naevus syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome) is a rare, autosomal dominantly inherited condition with a wide range of developmental and multiple organ-related anomalies. Cardinal features include multiple basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmoplantar pits and calcification of the falx cerebri. Other important clinical features are skeletal abnormalities and facial dysmorphism including macrocephaly. Germ-line mutations are found in PTCH1. Management of the syndrome requires a multidisciplinary approach, and in this article management guidelines are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26239960

  10. [Basal cell adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland: a rare tumor entity. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Franzen, A; Koegel, K; Knieriem, H J; Pfaltz, M

    1998-09-01

    Basal cell adenocarcinoma is a rare entity that was first defined as a malignant salivary gland tumor in 1991. We present another case report and discuss pathology, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, therapy and prognosis on the basis of currently available literature. Although histomorphologic features of the tumors are similar to basal cell adenomas, proof of an infiltrative and destructive growth is essential for diagnosis. Adenoid cystic carcinoma and basaloid squamous carcinoma must also be considered in any differential diagnosis. Tumor development within a pre-existing basal cell adenoma and de novo development are discussed. Most of the tumors appear to be benign clinically. Facial pain is rare and facial nerve palsy was noted in only one case. Metastases have occurred in less than 10% of patients, with only one involving the lung. Due to their biologic behavior and prognosis, basal cell adenocarcinomas should be classified as low-grade carcinomas. The therapy of choice is parotidectomy with preservation of the facial nerve. Neck dissection has to be added in cases with cervical metastases. Radiation is advisable in patients with recurrent disease. Since there is a nearly 30% local recurrence rate, intensive follow-up is necessary.

  11. Unilateral nevoid acanthosis nigricans: Uncommon variant of a common disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Bhattacharya, Sabari; Kumar, Piyush; Gayen, Tirthankar; Roy, Kunal; Das, Nilay K.; Gharami, Ramesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a fairly common dermatosis characterized by hyperpigmented velvety plaques, having a predilection for the intertriginous areas. We herein present a case of unilateral nevoid acanthosis nigricans over the left lateral chest, in an adult male. The rarity of documentation of this entity in the world literature prompted us to report the case. PMID:25506563

  12. Morphologic changes in basal cells during repair of tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. Z.; Evans, M. J.; Cox, R. A.; Burke, A. S.; Zhu, Q.; Herndon, D. N.; Barrow, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Basal cells are differentiated with respect to junctional adhesion mechanisms and play a role in attachment of columnar epithelium to the basal lamina. Although much is known about nonciliated and ciliated cell differentiation during the repair process after injury, little is known about the basal cell. We studied the morphology of basal cells and quantitated junctional adhesion structures during repair of tracheal epithelium exposed to toxic cotton smoke. Ten adult ewes were given a smoke injury to a portion of the upper cervical trachea and were killed at 4, 6, 8, 10, and 18 days after injury for morphometric studies. At 4 days, there was a stratified reparative epithelium over the basal lamina, which was two to four cells in depth. The basal cells were identified by their hemidesmosome (HD) attachment to the basal lamina. Basal cells were about 69% larger than controls and flattened rather than columnar. The amount of HD attachment was 192% greater than controls. In contrast, volume density of cytokeratin filaments had decreased about 47%. Basal cells had returned to normal numbers and size and a columnar shape by day 18. The amount of desmosome (D) and HD attachment and volume density of cytokeratins had also reached control levels by day 18. These data indicate that morphology of basal cells changes during the initial stages of reparative regeneration but returns to normal by 18 days. Morphologic changes appear to reflect changes in size of the cell associated with cell division rather than differentiation of recently divided basal cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1381564

  13. Basal cell adenocarcinomas of the major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Ellis, G L; Wiscovitch, J G

    1990-04-01

    Basal cell adenoma of salivary gland has become an established variant of monomorphic adenoma since its segregation from pleomorphic adenoma in 1967. Although there have been many comprehensive reports about benign basal cell adenomas, only rare case reports of malignant basal cell type neoplasms have appeared in the literature. Described in this report are the clinicopathologic features of 29 cases labeled basal cell adenocarcinomas that had morphologic characteristics of basal cell adenomas but infiltrative, perineural, and intravascular growth features that indicated a malignant potential. With limited follow-up, seven tumors are known to have recurred, and three of these metastasized to lymph nodes and lung. One patient died with extensive local spread of the tumor. All patients were adults. The peak incidence was in the sixth decade of life, and there was no gender predilection. The parotid gland was the predominant site. A solid type growth configuration was most frequent; membranous, trabecular, and tubular types were less frequent, in that order. Three patients also had dermal cylindromas, perhaps indicative of a salivary gland-skin adnexal diathesis that has been previously reported.

  14. Cutaneous basal cell carcinosarcomas: evidence of clonality and recurrent chromosomal losses.

    PubMed

    Harms, Paul W; Fullen, Douglas R; Patel, Rajiv M; Chang, Dannie; Shalin, Sara C; Ma, Linglei; Wood, Benjamin; Beer, Trevor W; Siddiqui, Javed; Carskadon, Shannon; Wang, Min; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Fisher, Gary J; Andea, Aleodor

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous carcinosarcomas are heterogeneous group of tumors composed of malignant epithelial and mesenchymal components. Although mutation analyses have identified clonal changes between these morphologically disparate components in some subtypes of cutaneous carcinosarcoma, few cases have been analyzed thus far. To our knowledge, copy number variations (CNVs) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) have not been investigated in cutaneous carcinosarcomas. We analyzed 4 carcinosarcomas with basal cell carcinoma and osteosarcomatous components for CNVs/CN-LOH by comparative genomic hybridization/single-nucleotide polymorphism array, TP53 hot spot mutations by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing, and TP53 genomic rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization. All tumors displayed multiple CNV/CN-LOH events (median, 7.5 per tumor). Three of 4 tumors displayed similar CNV/CN-LOH patterns between the epithelial and mesenchymal components within each tumor, supporting a common clonal origin. Recurrent changes included allelic loss at 9p21 (CDKN2A), 9q (PTCH1), and 17p (TP53). Allelic losses of chromosome 16 including CDH1 (E-cadherin) were present in 2 tumors and were restricted to the sarcomatous component. TP53 mutation analysis revealed an R248L mutation in both epithelial and mesenchymal components of 1 tumor. No TP53 rearrangements were identified. Our findings indicate that basal cell carcinosarcomas harbor CNV/CN-LOH changes similar to conventional basal cell carcinoma, with additional changes including recurrent 9p21 losses and a relatively high burden of copy number changes. In addition, most cutaneous carcinosarcomas show evidence of clonality between epithelial and mesenchymal components. PMID:25704628

  15. A man with nevoid hyperkeratosis of the areola.

    PubMed

    English, J C; Coots, N V

    1996-05-01

    Nevoid hyperkeratosis of the nipple and areola is a unique clinical entity and a diagnosis of exclusion. The patient presenting with nipple/areolar hyperkeratosis must be examined carefully for other underlying cutaneous diseases such as epidermal nevi, ichthyosis, acanthosis nigricans, Darier's disease, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and other chronic skin dermatitides that may be responsible for the changes. If no other clinical findings are evident, the diagnosis can be made. Although the disorder is more common in women of childbearing age, men may show nevoid changes after estrogen therapy or idiopathically. The use of topical 12 percent lactic acid lotion (Lac-Hydrin) resolves the skin changes over a six-month period.

  16. [Research progress of corneal epithelial basal cells and basement membrane].

    PubMed

    Qu, J H; Sun, X G

    2016-09-11

    The cylinder cells at the bottom of corneal epithelial cells are basal cells. Their cytoplasm contains keratin intermediate filament which is important in secretion of basement membrane. Corneal epithelial dysfunction due to diabetes or ocular surgery is intimately related with basal cell abnormality. Corneal epithelial basement membrane is a highly specific extracellular matrix which is made up of lamina lucida and lamina densa. It plays an extremely important role in renewal and restoration. Many ocular abnormalities and diseases have been described to relate to the corneal epithelial basement membrane, such as traumatic recurrent corneal erosion, corneal dystrophy and keratoconus. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 703-707). PMID:27647251

  17. Familial papular epidermal nevus with "skyline" basal cell layer.

    PubMed

    Brena, Michela; Besagni, Francesca; Boneschi, Vinicio; Tadini, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Papular epidermal nevus with "skyline" basal cell layer (PENS), a novel keratinocytic nevus, has recently been described as a mosaic condition with varying presentations. We herein describe typical PENS lesions, which usually occur sporadically, affecting two members of the same family. The concept of paradominant inheritance is proposed to explain the paradox of occasional transmission of normally sporadically occurring traits.

  18. Recurrent peripheral odontogenic fibroma associated with basal cell budding.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C; Vezhavendan, N; Shabana, F; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Arunakiry, N

    2014-07-01

    Peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm. It represents the soft tissue counterpart of central odontogenic fibroma. The embryonic source of POdF has been suggested by many as arising from the rest of dental lamina that has persisted in the gingiva following its disintegration. It presents clinically as a firm, slow growing and sessile gingival mass, which is difficult to distinguish with more common inflammatory lesions. Very few cases of recurrence have been documented. It has been stated that histological budding of basal cell layer of the surface squamous epithelium is associated with higher recurrence and the presence of calcification in direct apposition to the epithelial rest is associated with lower recurrence. Hereby, we present a case which histologically exhibited budding of the basal cell layer, which could have been the reason for its recurrence. PMID:25210375

  19. Recurrent peripheral odontogenic fibroma associated with basal cell budding

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Vezhavendan, N.; Shabana, F.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Arunakiry, N.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm. It represents the soft tissue counterpart of central odontogenic fibroma. The embryonic source of POdF has been suggested by many as arising from the rest of dental lamina that has persisted in the gingiva following its disintegration. It presents clinically as a firm, slow growing and sessile gingival mass, which is difficult to distinguish with more common inflammatory lesions. Very few cases of recurrence have been documented. It has been stated that histological budding of basal cell layer of the surface squamous epithelium is associated with higher recurrence and the presence of calcification in direct apposition to the epithelial rest is associated with lower recurrence. Hereby, we present a case which histologically exhibited budding of the basal cell layer, which could have been the reason for its recurrence. PMID:25210375

  20. Segmental basal cell naevus syndrome caused by an activating mutation in smoothened.

    PubMed

    Khamaysi, Z; Bochner, R; Indelman, M; Magal, L; Avitan-Hersh, E; Sarig, O; Sprecher, E; Bergman, R

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant sonic hedgehog signalling, mostly due to PTCH1 mutations, has been shown to play a central role in the pathogenesis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), as well as in basal cell naevus syndrome (BCNS). Mutations in smoothened (SMO) encoding a receptor for sonic hedgehog have been reported in sporadic BCCs but not in BCNS. We report a case with multiple BCCs, pits and comedones in a segmental distribution over the upper part of the body, along with other findings compatible with BCNS. Histopathologically, there were different types of BCC. A heterozygous mutation (c.1234C>T, p.L412F) in SMO was detected in three BCCs but not in peripheral blood lymphocytes or the uninvolved skin. These were compatible with the type 1 mosaic form of BCNS. The p.L412F mutation was found experimentally to result in increased SMO transactivating activity, and the patient responded to vismodegib therapy. Activating mutations in SMO may cause BCNS. The identification of a gain-of-function mutation in SMO causing a type 1 mosaic form of BCNS further expands our understanding of the pathogenesis of BCC, with implications for the treatment of these tumours, whether sporadic or inherited. PMID:26822128

  1. Germline PTCH1 mutations in Japanese basal cell nevus syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Chiaki; Kanazawa, Nozomi; Yoshikawa, Yoshie; Yoshikawa, Reigetsu; Saitoh, Yuko; Chiyo, Hideaki; Tanizawa, Takakuni; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko; Nakano, Yoshiro

    2009-07-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS or Gorlin syndrome, OMIM: 109400) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance. It is characterized by developmental anomalies and predisposition to tumors (for example, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma). PTCH1, the human homolog of the Drosophila patched gene, was identified as a gene responsible for BCNS. The PTCH1 protein is a Hedgehog (Hh) protein receptor and is pivotal for early development, stem cell maintenance and/or differentiation. We analyzed the six Japanese families with BCNS and identified six germline mutations in the PTCH1 gene. One family had a nonsense mutation (c.1196G>A), one had a 1-bp deletion (c.2029delA), two had 2-bp deletions (c.239_240delGA and c.1670_1671delCA) and one had a 58-bp duplication (c.1138_1195dup). They caused premature termination, resulting in the truncation of the PTCH1 protein. Analysis of a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping array showed a large approximately 1.2-Mb deletion, including the PTCH1 gene in one allele, in a family in which PTCH1 mutations were not identified at the sequence level. These data indicated that all the six families who were diagnosed with BCNS had mutations in the PTCH1 gene and that a single copy of a PTCH1 mutation causes BCNS. PMID:19557015

  2. A Case of Basal Cell Adenoma of the Upper Lip

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yuriko; Omura, Ken; Ishii, Yoshimasa

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma is a rare type of benign salivary gland tumor found most commonly in the parotid gland. We present a rare case of basal cell adenoma arising in the minor salivary gland of the upper lip. The patient was a 59-year-old Japanese man who visited our department in December 2012 with a chief complaint of a mass in the upper lip, which had increased in size over several years. A mobile, elastic, and relatively soft mass without tenderness was palpable in the upper lip region. The mucosa of the upper lip covering the mass was normal. Tumor extirpation was performed under local anesthesia. Histologically, the tumor had a capsule and was composed of islands of relatively uniform, monotonous cells. Immunohistochemically, the inner tumor comprised tubuloductal structures that showed strong staining for CK7, while the outer tumor showed weak staining for CK7. The outer tumor cells also stained positively for CD10 and p63. The MIB-1 (Ki-67) labeling index was extremely low. Basal cell adenoma was diagnosed based on these results. The postoperative course was uneventful 12 months after surgery and there has been no recurrence. PMID:24711821

  3. Basal Cell Adenoma with Perplexity in Diagnosis - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kardam, Priyanka; Rehani, Shweta; Mathias, Yulia; Wadhwa, Manish

    2016-03-01

    Every salivary gland tumour irrespective of its benign or malignant nature or occurrence, exhibits certain unique and overlapping histopathologic features. Basal Cell Adenoma (BCA) is a rare salivary gland tumour and hence it becomes our responsibility to report every case with unique histopathologic features so that it can add to our present knowledge of this lesion. Often, the pathologists experience difficulty while diagnosing lesions like BCA which contain basaloid cells due to its similarity with other lesions of similar histological appearance. Hence, this paper discusses a case of BCA with rare histopathologic features along with the possible differential diagnosis.

  4. Neurocutaneous syndromes and retroperitoneal tumors.

    PubMed

    Rossi, R; Libertino, J A; Dowd, J B; Braasch, J W

    1979-03-01

    A patient with multiple basal cell carcinoma syndrome, a symptom complex characteristized by nevoid basal cell carcinomas of the skin, jaw cysts, skeletal abnormalities, and hyporesponsiveness to parathormone is presented. In addition, the patient had a retroperitoneal lymphagiomyoma, a hamartomatous lesion, causing ureteral obstruction. The association of neuroectodermic syndromes and retroperitoneal and intra-abdominal tumors is reviewed.

  5. Multiple malignant cylindromas of skin in association with basal cell adenocarcinoma with adenoid cystic features of minor salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Antonescu, C R; Terzakis, J A

    1997-08-01

    This unusual case is that of a middle-aged man exhibiting a tumor diathesis including a basal cell adenocarcinoma with features of adenoid cystic carcinoma arising in minor salivary gland of lip in association with multiple primary malignant cylindromas of skin. The labial lesion showed invasive tubules, solid epithelial sheets and cribriform structures. It did not exhibit PAS positive juxta-tubular basement membrane material. The skin lesions all showed features of a highly infiltrative cylindromatous carcinoma with two cell types, peripheral palisading and prominent PAS positive juxta-tubular basement membrane material. Immunocytochemical studies of the lip lesion and one of the skin lesions showed similarities, including positive staining for high and low molecular weight keratins and S-100 with negative staining for CEA. The precious descriptions of tumor diatheses involving dermal cylindromas and dermal analogue tumors of salivary glands and the distinctions with the present study are noted. If benign and even malignant cylindromas were described in the literature to be associated with basal cell adenocarcinoma of the major salivary glands, our case is unique by its association with this rare malignant tumor in a minor salivary gland.

  6. Unilateral parotid gland involvement with synchronous multiple Basal cell adenomas.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Cengiz; Apa, Duygu Düsmez; Vayisoglu, Yusuf; Görür, Kemal

    2007-11-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare benign epithelial tumor of the salivary gland. BCA is seen most frequently in the parotid gland and less commonly in the submandibular gland and minor glands of the upper lips, oral cavity, and hard palate. Salivary gland tumors are observed as single tumors in one salivary gland. Double or multiple tumors of the salivary gland tumors are unusual and metachronous or bilateral salivary gland tumors are more observed than synchronous or unilateral tumors. The most commonly seen multiple tumor unilaterally or bilaterally is the Warthin's tumor. A 65-year-old woman with a painful, slowly enlarging mass in front of the left ear, which was present for 6 months, was evaluated. Physical examination revealed two solid and well-delineated masses in the preauricular region, which were 1.5 x 1 cm in diameter and in the tail of the parotid gland, which is 2.5 x 2 cm in diameter. Excision of the superficial lobe of the parotid gland was performed. The macroscopic examination of the specimen showed the two discrete nodular masses. Histologic examination of the two nodular solid lesions was reported as BCA. Multiple synchronous nonmembranous-type BCAs of the unilateral parotid gland is a rare entity. More extensive excision of the parotid gland tumor, careful macroscopic perioperative examination of the surgical specimen, and histologic evaluation of all surgical specimens might be necessary for reducing revision operations and surgical complications.

  7. Basal cell adenoma of nasal septum: report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinying; Chen, Haihong; Wang, Shenqing

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma is an uncommon benign salivary gland neoplasm, presenting isomorphic basaloid cells with a prominent basal cell layer. Basal cell adenoma arising from the nasal septum is exceptionally rare. Reports on positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-fluorine-18-fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG-PET) imaging for basal cell adenoma are limited. Here, we present the case of a 49-year-old man who had the symptoms of intermittent repeated bleeding from the left nose for half a year. 18FDG-PET scanning showed increased accumulation of 18FDG with its characteristic benign pathology has a potential to malignancy. After removal of the mass, the patient became symptom free. Pathology showed basal cell adenoma. The evidence of active and growing cells was present in the specimen.

  8. Airway basal cells. The "smoking gun" of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-12-15

    The earliest abnormality in the lung associated with smoking is hyperplasia of airway basal cells, the stem/progenitor cells of the ciliated and secretory cells that are central to pulmonary host defense. Using cell biology and 'omics technologies to assess basal cells isolated from bronchoscopic brushings of nonsmokers, smokers, and smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), compelling evidence has been provided in support of the concept that airway basal cells are central to the pathogenesis of smoking-associated lung diseases. When confronted by the chronic stress of smoking, airway basal cells become disorderly, regress to a more primitive state, behave as dictated by their inheritance, are susceptible to acquired changes in their genome, lose the capacity to regenerate the epithelium, are responsible for the major changes in the airway that characterize COPD, and, with persistent stress, can undergo malignant transformation. Together, these observations led to the conclusion that accelerated loss of lung function in susceptible individuals begins with disordered airway basal cell biology (i.e., that airway basal cells are the "smoking gun" of COPD, a potential target for the development of therapies to prevent smoking-related lung disorders).

  9. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  10. Dual SMAD Signaling Inhibition Enables Long-Term Expansion of Diverse Epithelial Basal Cells.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Tata, Purushothama Rao; Brazauskas, Karissa; Choi, Soon H; Crooke, Adrianne K; Zhang, Bing; Solomon, George M; Turner, Brett; Bihler, Hermann; Harrington, Jan; Lapey, Allen; Channick, Colleen; Keyes, Colleen; Freund, Adam; Artandi, Steven; Mense, Martin; Rowe, Steven; Engelhardt, John F; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2016-08-01

    Functional modeling of many adult epithelia is limited by the difficulty in maintaining relevant stem cell populations in culture. Here, we show that dual inhibition of SMAD signaling pathways enables robust expansion of primary epithelial basal cell populations. We find that TGFβ/BMP/SMAD pathway signaling is strongly activated in luminal and suprabasal cells of several epithelia, but suppressed in p63+ basal cells. In airway epithelium, SMAD signaling promotes differentiation, and its inhibition leads to stem cell hyperplasia. Using dual SMAD signaling inhibition in a feeder-free culture system, we have been able to expand airway basal stem cells from multiple species. Expanded cells can produce functional airway epithelium physiologically responsive to clinically relevant drugs, such as CFTR modulators. This approach is effective for the clonal expansion of single human cells and for basal cell populations from epithelial tissues from all three germ layers and therefore may be broadly applicable for modeling of epithelia. PMID:27320041

  11. Luminal epithelial cells within the mammary gland can produce basal cells upon oncogenic stress.

    PubMed

    Hein, S M; Haricharan, S; Johnston, A N; Toneff, M J; Reddy, J P; Dong, J; Bu, W; Li, Y

    2016-03-17

    In the normal mammary gland, the basal epithelium is known to be bipotent and can generate either basal or luminal cells, whereas the luminal epithelium has not been demonstrated to contribute to the basal compartment in an intact and normally developed mammary gland. It is not clear whether cellular heterogeneity within a breast tumor results from transformation of bipotent basal cells or from transformation and subsequent basal conversion of the more differentiated luminal cells. Here we used a retroviral vector to express an oncogene specifically in a small number of the mammary luminal epithelial cells and tested their potential to produce basal cells during tumorigenesis. This in-vivo lineage-tracing work demonstrates that luminal cells are capable of producing basal cells on activation of either polyoma middle T antigen or ErbB2 signaling. These findings reveal the plasticity of the luminal compartment during tumorigenesis and provide an explanation for cellular heterogeneity within a cancer.

  12. Jaw cyst-Basal cell nevus-Bifid rib syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rai, S; Gauba, K

    2007-01-01

    Jaw cyst-Basal cell nevus-Bifid rib syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome involves multiple organ system. The most common findings include multiple odontogenic keratocysts in the jaws and basal cell nevus on the skin that have an early age onset. These multiple odontogenic keratocysts warrant aggressive treatment at the earliest because of the damage and possible complications associated with them. Recurrence in these lesions is the most characteristic feature that has to be taken in consideration while explaining the prognosis to the patient. A case report of a child affected with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome diagnosed, treated and followed at this hospital is presented here.

  13. Effect of Photofrin on skin reflection of basal cell nevus syndrome patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossweiner, Leonard I.; Jones, Linda R.; Koehler, Irmgard K.; Bilgin, Mehmet D.

    1996-04-01

    Skin reflection spectra were measured before and 24 hours after administration of Photofrin (Reg. TM) to basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) patients. The drug reduced the reflectivity of uninvolved BCNS skin and increased the reflectivity of basal cell cancers. Photofrin (Reg. TM) absorption in normal rat skin and uninvolved BCNS skin was resolved by the diffusion approximation. Optical constants calculated with a two-layer skin model indicate that the drug increased light scattering in tumor tissues. The possible use of reflection spectra for PDT light dosimetry is discussed.

  14. Basal cell adenoma in the parotid gland: CT and MR findings.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mijung; Park, Dongwoo; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Youngsun; Kim, Yongsoo; Park, Choong Ki; Tae, Kyung; Park, Moon Hyang; Park, Yong Wook

    2004-04-01

    Basal cell adenoma is a rare benign salivary gland epithelial tumor, usually involving the parotid gland. We report CT and MR findings of three cases with basal cell adenoma occurring in the parotid gland. The three cases presented here demonstrate a well-circumscribed tumor, which showed a cystic and solid, or the pure solid mass. They were well enhanced after contrast matter injection. The solid portion of the mass was isoattenuated at CT, with intermediate signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR images. Its cystic portion was hyperintense on both T1- and T2-weighted MR images. It had a hypointense rim on T2-weighted image.

  15. Immunohistochemical aspects of basal cell adenoma and canalicular adenoma of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Machado de Sousa, S O; Soares de Araújo, N; Corrêa, L; Pires Soubhia, A M; Cavalcanti de Araújo, V

    2001-06-01

    Basal cell adenoma is a benign epithelial neoplasm with a uniform histologic appearance dominated by basaloid cells. Those cells may be distributed in various arrangements as solid, trabecular, tubular and membranous. Canalicular adenoma is also a benign neoplasm composed by columnar cells arranged in branching and interconnecting cords of single or double cell thick rows. There is some disagreement among investigators about whether canalicular adenoma should be included within the basal cell adenoma histologic spectrum. In the present study we compared the expression of cytokeratins (CK), vimentin and muscle-specific actin, utilizing immunohistochemical technique, in three cases diagnosed as basal cell adenomas predominantly of the solid type, and three cases of canalicular adenomas. The results obtained showed a distinct immunoprofile for both neoplasms. Solid areas of basal cell adenomas did not stain for any of the tested antibodies; only when there was tubular differentiation, those structures expressed CKs 7, 8, 14, and 19 in luminal cells and vimentin in non-luminal cells. On the other hand, canalicular adenomas strongly expressed CKs 7 and 13. The panel of antibodies utilized supports the separation of the two entities.

  16. MicroRaman Spectroscopy and Raman Imaging of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, M. A.; Zeng, H.; Lui, H.

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the Raman spectra of normal and cancerous skin tissues using a confocal microRaman spectrograph with a sub-micron spatial resolution. We found that the Raman spectrum of a cell nucleolus is different from the spectra measured outside the nucleolus and considerably different from those measured outside the nucleus. In addition, we found significant spectroscopic differences between normal and cancer-bearing sites in the dermis region. In order to utilize these differences for non-invasive skin cancer diagnosis, we have developed a Raman imaging system that clearly demonstrates the structure, location and distribution of cells in unstained skin biopsy samples. Our method is expected to be useful for the detection and characterization of skin cancer based on the known distinct cellular differences between normal and malignant skin.

  17. PI3K-AKT signaling is a downstream effector of retinoid prevention of murine basal cell carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    So, Po-Lin; Wang, Grace Y.; Wang, Kevin; Chuang, Mindy; Calinisan Chiueh, Venice; Kenny, Paraic A.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. We have demonstrated previously that topical application of the retinoid prodrug tazarotene profoundly inhibits murine BCC carcinogenesis via RARγ-mediated regulation of tumor cell transcription. Since topical retinoids can cause adverse cutaneous effects and since tumors can develop resistance to retinoids, we have investigated mechanisms downstream of tazarotene’s anti-tumor effect in this model. Specifically we have used (i) global expression profiling to identify and (ii) functional cell-based assays to validate the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway as a downstream target pathway of tazarotene’s action. Crucially, we have demonstrated that pharmacologic inhibition of this downstream pathway profoundly reduces murine BCC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These data identify PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling as a highly attractive target for BCC chemoprevention and indicate more generally that this pathway may be, in some contexts, an important mediator of retinoid anti-cancer effects. PMID:24449057

  18. PI3K-AKT signaling is a downstream effector of retinoid prevention of murine basal cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    So, Po-Lin; Wang, Grace Y; Wang, Kevin; Chuang, Mindy; Chiueh, Venice Calinisan; Kenny, Paraic A; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. We have demonstrated previously that topical application of the retinoid prodrug tazarotene profoundly inhibits murine BCC carcinogenesis via retinoic acid receptor γ-mediated regulation of tumor cell transcription. Because topical retinoids can cause adverse cutaneous effects and because tumors can develop resistance to retinoids, we have investigated mechanisms downstream of tazarotene's antitumor effect in this model. Specifically we have used (i) global expression profiling to identify and (ii) functional cell-based assays to validate the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway as a downstream target pathway of tazarotene's action. Crucially, we have demonstrated that pharmacologic inhibition of this downstream pathway profoundly reduces murine BCC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These data identify PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling as a highly attractive target for BCC chemoprevention and indicate more generally that this pathway may be, in some contexts, an important mediator of retinoid anticancer effects.

  19. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Satyaki; Jaykar, Kranti C; Kumar, Rajesh; Jha, Abhijeet Kumar; Banerjee, PK

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is characterized by multiple basocellular epitheliomas, keratocysts in the jaws, bifid ribs, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. We describe a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome illustrating the importance of a thorough examination including the examination of palms and soles and detailed investigations in a patient having lesions suggestive of basal cell carcinoma and multiple naevi. PMID:25814758

  20. Pitfalls of fine-needle aspiration cytology of parotid membranous basal cell adenoma-A review of pitfalls in FNA cytology of salivary gland neoplasms with basaloid cell features.

    PubMed

    Jurczyk, Matthew; Peevey, Joseph F; Vande Haar, Mark A; Lin, Xiaoqi

    2015-05-01

    Membranous basal cell adenoma (MBCA) is a rare benign salivary gland neoplasm. It is difficult to diagnose MBCA based on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology due to rare reporting of its FNA cytology and overlapping of its FNA cytologic features with some benign and malignant entities. We present a case of MBCA in a 67-year-old female that was originally misinterpreted as adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) on FNA cytology. The FNA smears showed numerous uniform small basaloid epithelial cells with round or oval nuclei and inconspicuous nucleoli, and scant cytoplasm. The basaloid cells surround acellular, dense, homogenous material or are surrounded by acellular or paucicellular dense homogeneous material possibly containing bland spindle cells. The basaloid cells are present in variably sized three-dimensional clusters, acini, or sheets with variable cohesion. The dense homogenous material surrounded by basaloid cells may be interconnected. High power magnification reveals the homogeneous material to have a fibrillar texture. The edges of dense homogenous materials were well-demarcated. We describe the diagnostic pitfalls of FNA for MBCA, particularly versus ACC, basal cell adenoma, cellular pleomorphic adenoma, myoepithelioma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma in hope of improving clinical management and patient treatment.

  1. Tyrosine kinase-mediated axial motility of basal cells revealed by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jeremy; Kim, Bongki; Hill, Eric; Visconti, Pablo; Krapf, Dario; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are generally considered to be static relative to their neighbours. Basal cells in pseudostratified epithelia display a single long cytoplasmic process that can cross the tight junction barrier to reach the lumen. Using in vivo microscopy to visualize the epididymis, a model system for the study of pseudostratified epithelia, we report here the surprising discovery that these basal cell projections—which we call axiopodia—periodically extend and retract over time. We found that axiopodia extensions and retractions follow an oscillatory pattern. This movement, which we refer to as periodic axial motility (PAM), is controlled by c-Src and MEK1/2–ERK1/2. Therapeutic inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity induces a retraction of these projections. Such unexpected cell motility may reflect a novel mechanism by which specialized epithelial cells sample the luminal environment. PMID:26868824

  2. Basal Cell Adenoma of Palate, a Rare Occurrence with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Achla Bharti; Narwal, Anjali; Devi, Anju; Kumar, Sanjay; Yadav, Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma is an uncommon benign epithelial neoplasm of salivary gland which derives its name from the basaloid appearance of tumor cells and accounting for 1-2 % of all salivary gland epithelial tumors. This tumor usually arises in the major salivary glands, with the parotid being the most frequent site of occurrence, followed by the upper lip; while it is very rare in the minor salivary glands. Microscopically, it is composed of isomorphic cells similar to basal cells with nuclear palisading. We report a case of BCA presenting as an asymptomatic swelling over the right side of palate of 55-year-old female patient. A follow-up of 1 year revealed no recurrence. This report emphasizes the rare site of occurrence of this tumor and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:26535412

  3. Basal Cell Adenoma of Palate, a Rare Occurrence with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Achla Bharti; Narwal, Anjali; Devi, Anju; Kumar, Sanjay; Yadav, Sumit Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Basal cell adenoma is an uncommon benign epithelial neoplasm of salivary gland which derives its name from the basaloid appearance of tumor cells and accounting for 1-2 % of all salivary gland epithelial tumors. This tumor usually arises in the major salivary glands, with the parotid being the most frequent site of occurrence, followed by the upper lip; while it is very rare in the minor salivary glands. Microscopically, it is composed of isomorphic cells similar to basal cells with nuclear palisading. We report a case of BCA presenting as an asymptomatic swelling over the right side of palate of 55-year-old female patient. A follow-up of 1 year revealed no recurrence. This report emphasizes the rare site of occurrence of this tumor and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:26535412

  4. Basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland: Cytological diagnosis of an uncommon tumor.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Amoolya; Rao, Madhuri; Geethamani, V; Shetty, Archana C

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare benign epithelial tumor of the salivary gland, displaying monomorphic basaloid cells without a myxochondroid component, representing 1-3% of all salivary gland neoplasms seen predominantly in women over 50 years of age. It is uncommon in young adults. Cytodiagnosis of basaloid tumors chiefly basal cell adenoma of the salivary gland, is extremely challenging. The cytological differential diagnoses range from benign to malignant, neoplastic to non- neoplastic lesions. Histopathological examination is a must for definitive diagnosis, as these entities differ in prognosis and therapeutic aspects. We present a 22-years-old male with this uncommon diagnosis with a discussion on the role of cytological diagnosis. Fine needle aspiration cytology is a simple, minimally invasive method for the preoperative diagnosis of various types of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions. The knowledge of its pitfalls and limitations contributes to a more effective approach to treatment.

  5. Basal Cell Adenoma of Palate, a Rare Occurrence with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Achla Bharti; Narwal, Anjali; Devi, Anju; Kumar, Sanjay; Yadav, Sumit Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Basal cell adenoma is an uncommon benign epithelial neoplasm of salivary gland which derives its name from the basaloid appearance of tumor cells and accounting for 1-2 % of all salivary gland epithelial tumors. This tumor usually arises in the major salivary glands, with the parotid being the most frequent site of occurrence, followed by the upper lip; while it is very rare in the minor salivary glands. Microscopically, it is composed of isomorphic cells similar to basal cells with nuclear palisading. We report a case of BCA presenting as an asymptomatic swelling over the right side of palate of 55-year-old female patient. A follow-up of 1 year revealed no recurrence. This report emphasizes the rare site of occurrence of this tumor and briefly reviews the literature.

  6. Hypersensitivity of skin fibroblasts from basal cell nevus syndrome patients to killing by ultraviolet B but not by ultraviolet C radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, L.A.; Goldberg, L.H.; Ley, R.D.; Ananthaswamy, H.N. )

    1990-02-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder in which the afflicted individuals are extremely susceptible to sunlight-induced skin cancers, particularly basal cell carcinomas. However, the cellular and molecular basis for BCNS is unknown. To ascertain whether there is any relationship between genetic predisposition to skin cancer and increased sensitivity of somatic cells from BCNS patients to killing by UV radiation, we exposed skin fibroblasts established from unexposed skin biopsies of several BCNS and age- and sex-matched normal individuals to either UV-B (280-320 nm) or UV-C (254 nm) radiation and determined their survival. The results indicated that skin fibroblasts from BCNS patients were hypersensitive to killing by UV-B but not UV-C radiation as compared to skin fibroblasts from normal individuals. DNA repair studies indicated that the increased sensitivity of BCNS skin fibroblasts to killing by UV-B radiation was not due to a defect in the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that there is an association between hypersensitivity of somatic cells to killing by UV-B radiation and the genetic predisposition to skin cancer in BCNS patients. In addition, these results suggest that DNA lesions (and repair processes) other than the pyrimidine dimer are also involved in the pathogenesis of sunlight-induced skin cancers in BCNS patients. More important, the UV-B sensitivity assay described here may be used as a diagnostic tool to identify presymptomatic individuals with BCNS.

  7. Basal cell adenoma with extensive squamous metaplasia and cellular atypia: a case report with cytohistopathological correlation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Paker, Irem; Yilmazer, Demet; Arikok, Ata Turker; Saylam, Guleser; Hucumenoglu, Sema

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare benign basaloid neoplasm of the salivary gland. There are four histopathological types of BCA: solid, tubular, trabecular, and membranous. It is known that focal squamous metaplasia may be seen in some BCAs, but it is rare to see extensive squamous metaplasia, especially with cellular atypia. Here, a 25-year-old male with right parotid swelling is presented. Ultrasonography revealed a 2-cm well defined mass in his parotid gland. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA), performed prior to surgical excision, showed a highly cellular tumor composed of basaloid cells, forming small duct-like or tubular structures containing basement membrane-like material, as well as squamous cells with hyperchromatic, enlarged, pleomorphic, and bizzare nuclei. We made a cytopathological diagnosis of "basaloid neoplasm" and also reported that the differential diagnosis included BCA, cellular pleomorphic adenoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, and carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma. The patient underwent total parotidectomy. Both frozen and permanent sections showed a BCA with membranous, tubulotrabecular pattern, and extensive squamous metaplasia. Some of the squamous cells showed significant nuclear hyperchromasia, enlargement, and pleomorphism. As far as we know, this is the first case of BCA with extensive squamous metaplasia and prominent cellular atypia. This case has been presented to show that squamous metaplastic cells with hyperchromatic, enlarged, bizarre, and pleomorphic nuclei can be seen on FNA smears of a benign tumor like BCA. Also, the differential diagnosis of BCA of the salivary gland is discussed here.

  8. Origin of Ameloblastoma From Basal Cells of the Oral Epithelium- Establishing the Relation Using Neuroectodermal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Suneela, S; Narayan, T V; Shreedhar, Balasundari; Mohanty, Leeky; Shenoy, Sadhana; Swaminathan, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Basal cell layer of the oral epithelium has been rightfully regarded as a potential source of odontogenic tumours and cysts, but, without substantial evidence. Also, whether the basal cell layer retains within it, some properties of ectomesenchyme, which was imbibed during the early embryogenesis and hence its neuroectodermal relation, is not known. Here, an attempt is made to establish the hidden neuroectodermal potential of the oral epithelium, especially the basal layer, by observing the expression of known neuroectodermal markers, NSE (Neuron Specific Enolase), Synaptophysin and CD99. The expression of the same markers has also been studied in Ameloblastoma, connecting it with oral epithelium, in turn establishing basal cell layer as a potential source of Ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: Sections of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue samples of 20 cases of Ameloblastoma and 10 cases of Normal Retromolar mucosa, were stained immunohistochemically with NSE, Synaptophysin, CD99 and also with CK-19 and evaluated for positive expression. Results: Positive reaction was obtained in all the cases of Ameloblastoma and NRM (Normal Retromolar mucosa) with NSE, all the cases of Ameloblastoma and eight cases of NRM with Synaptophysin and in six cases of Ameloblastoma and NRM with CD99. The staining was diffuse and more marked in case of NSE than Synaptophysin and CD99. CK19 staining done to assure that the tissue antigenicity was maintained was positive in all the samples. Interpretation and Conclusion: A strong relationship between the neuroectoderm, Ameloblastoma and the basal layer of the oral epithelium is established by the study. It favours the hypothesis that the basal cell layer of oral mucosa may be the sought out culprit in most cases of the Ameloblastomas, especially those occurring in the non-tooth bearing area. This would call for the need to incorporate additional therapy in the form of mucosal striping along with the

  9. Cerebral gigantism associated with jaw cyst basal cell naevoid syndrome in two families.

    PubMed

    Cramer, H; Niederdellmann, H

    1983-01-01

    We report 9 subjects from 2 families with the syndrome of cerebral gigantism, seven of the patients also had jaw cyst basal cell naevoid syndrome. Neurological, radiological, somatic and biochemical features of this hitherto unreported association are described. Neurological symptoms included mild hydrocephalus, ventricular malformation, cerebellar syndrome, intracranial calcification, oculomotor disturbances, EEG abnormalities and rarely, mild peripheral nervous disorders. A disturbance of calcium metabolism appears to be a prominent feature of the genetically determined nonprogressive syndrome.

  10. Basal cell adenoma of the major salivary glands. Report of a case with facial nerve encroachment.

    PubMed

    Strauss, M; Abt, A; Mahataphongse, V P; Conner, G H

    1981-02-01

    Basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland showed histopathologic evidence of facial nerve encroachment. A review of the pertinent literature and a discussion of current concepts of histogenesis of the tumor indicate that a spectrum of benign to malignant forms of this unusual tumor may exist. The sparsely reported association of this tumor and its malignant variants to facial nerve pathology is discussed, and recommendations for treatment are made.

  11. Luminal Epithelial Cells within the Mammary Gland Can Produce Basal Cells upon Oncogenic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Sarah M.; Haricharan, Svasti; Johnston, Alyssa N.; Toneff, Michael J.; Reddy, Jay P.; Dong, Jie; Bu, Wen; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    In the normal mammary gland, the basal epithelium is known to be bi-potent and can generate either basal or luminal cells, whereas the luminal epithelium has not been demonstrated to contribute to the basal compartment in an intact and normally developed mammary gland. It is not clear whether cellular heterogeneity within a breast tumor results from transformation of bi-potent basal cells or from transformation and subsequent basal conversion of the more differentiated luminal cells. Here, we used a retroviral vector to express an oncogene specifically in a small number of the mammary luminal epithelial cells and tested their potential to produce basal cells during tumorigenesis. This in vivo lineage tracing work demonstrates that luminal cells are capable of producing basal cells upon activation of either Polyoma Middle T antigen (PyMT) or ErbB2 signaling. These findings reveal the plasticity of the luminal compartment during tumorigenesis and provide an explanation for cellular heterogeneity within a cancer. PMID:26096929

  12. Inverting adherent cells for visualizing ECM interactions at the basal cell side.

    PubMed

    Gudzenko, Tetyana; Franz, Clemens M

    2013-05-01

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) govern a wide range of cellular functions, including survival, migration and invasion. However, in adherent cells these interactions occur primarily on the basal cell side, making them inaccessible to high-resolution, surface-scanning imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Here we describe a fast and reliable method for inverting adherent cells, exposing the basal cell membrane for direct analysis by AFM or SEM in combination with fluorescence microscopy. Cells including their matrix adhesion sites remain intact during the inversion process and are transferred together with the complete array of basally associated ECM proteins. Molecular features of ECM proteins, such as the characteristic 67 nm collagen D-periodicity, are well preserved after inversion. To demonstrate the versatility of the method, we compared basal interactions of fibroblasts with fibrillar collagen I and fibronectin matrices. While fibroblasts remodel the fibronectin layer exclusively from above, they actively invade even thin collagen layers by contacting individual collagen nanofibrils both basally and apically through a network of cellular extensions. Cell-matrix entanglement coincides with enhanced cell spreading and flattening, indicating that nanoscale ECM interactions govern macroscopic changes in cell morphology. The presented cell inversion technique can thus provide novel insight into nanoscale cell-matrix interactions at the basal cell side.

  13. An unusual case report of basal cell adenoma: A Diagnostic Enchanter

    PubMed Central

    Rehani, Shweta; Mehendiratta, Monica; Kumra, Madhumani; Gupta, Ramakant; Jain, Kanu

    2014-01-01

    Oral lesions show a wide range of biologic behaviours. There are various lesions which may mimic others and present in such an unusual manner thus making them very difficult to diagnose clinico-pathologically. An accurate diagnosis is not only important for correct treatment planning but also for determination of prognosis. Thus, it is very important for a surgical pathologist to be aware of the various atypical presentations of the lesions. The present unusual case report of basal cell adenoma occurring on upper lip with frank areas of calcifications and abundant inspissated mucoid secretions is an example of one such case. BCA is an uncommon benign epithelial salivary gland neoplasm. It is one of the nine subcategories of salivary gland epithelial tumours according to WHO 2005 classification of salivary gland tumors. It is composed of basaloid cells organized with a prominent basal cell layer and distinct basement membrane-like structure and no myxochondroid stromal component as seen in pleomorphic adenomas. To our best knowledge, no case in English literature has been reported BCA with exuberant inspissated mucoid secretions and frank areas of calcifications to such a large extent and this is the first case to report the same. Key words: Basal cell adenoma, calcifications, diagnosis, inspissated mucoid secretions, surgical pathologist. PMID:25674334

  14. Repression of Igf1 expression by Ezh2 prevents basal cell differentiation in the developing lung

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Laura A.; Holik, Aliaksei Z.; Short, Kieran M.; Pasquet, Julie; Lun, Aaron T. L.; Blewitt, Marnie E.; Smyth, Ian M.; Ritchie, Matthew E.; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the establishment of lung epithelial cell lineage identities during development are largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of the histone methyltransferase Ezh2 during lung lineage determination. Loss of Ezh2 in the lung epithelium leads to defective lung formation and perinatal mortality. We show that Ezh2 is crucial for airway lineage specification and alveolarization. Using optical projection tomography imaging, we found that branching morphogenesis is affected in Ezh2 conditional knockout mice and the remaining bronchioles are abnormal, lacking terminally differentiated secretory club cells. Remarkably, RNA-seq analysis revealed the upregulation of basal genes in Ezh2-deficient epithelium. Three-dimensional imaging for keratin 5 further showed the unexpected presence of a layer of basal cells from the proximal airways to the distal bronchioles in E16.5 embryos. ChIP-seq analysis indicated the presence of Ezh2-mediated repressive marks on the genomic loci of some but not all basal genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of action of Ezh2. We found that loss of Ezh2 de-represses insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) expression and that modulation of IGF1 signaling ex vivo in wild-type lungs could induce basal cell differentiation. Altogether, our work reveals an unexpected role for Ezh2 in controlling basal cell fate determination in the embryonic lung endoderm, mediated in part by repression of Igf1 expression. PMID:25790853

  15. An unusual case report of basal cell adenoma: A Diagnostic Enchanter.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Swati; Rehani, Shweta; Mehendiratta, Monica; Kumra, Madhumani; Gupta, Ramakant; Jain, Kanu

    2014-12-01

    Oral lesions show a wide range of biologic behaviours. There are various lesions which may mimic others and present in such an unusual manner thus making them very difficult to diagnose clinico-pathologically. An accurate diagnosis is not only important for correct treatment planning but also for determination of prognosis. Thus, it is very important for a surgical pathologist to be aware of the various atypical presentations of the lesions. The present unusual case report of basal cell adenoma occurring on upper lip with frank areas of calcifications and abundant inspissated mucoid secretions is an example of one such case. BCA is an uncommon benign epithelial salivary gland neoplasm. It is one of the nine subcategories of salivary gland epithelial tumours according to WHO 2005 classification of salivary gland tumors. It is composed of basaloid cells organized with a prominent basal cell layer and distinct basement membrane-like structure and no myxochondroid stromal component as seen in pleomorphic adenomas. To our best knowledge, no case in English literature has been reported BCA with exuberant inspissated mucoid secretions and frank areas of calcifications to such a large extent and this is the first case to report the same. Key words: Basal cell adenoma, calcifications, diagnosis, inspissated mucoid secretions, surgical pathologist.

  16. Unusual neck mass in an adolescent: benign basal cell adenoma of the minor salivary glands of the piriform sinus.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Koretz, K; Verse, T

    2001-05-11

    With an incidence of less than 3%, salivary gland tumors are rare in the head and neck. The percentage of basal cell adenomas within the group of salivary gland tumors is even less (0.2-2%). Salivary gland tumors occur very rarely in adolescents. The basal cell adenoma commonly affects older persons and occurs most frequently in the major salivary glands. We present the unusual case of a benign basal cell adenoma of the minor salivary glands of the piriform sinus in a 14 year old male patient. Unusual are the age of the patient, the histological type, size and localisation of the tumor.

  17. Heterogeneity of basal keratinocytes: nonrandom distribution of thymidine-labeled basal cells in confluent cultures is not a technical artifact

    SciTech Connect

    Milstone, L.M.; LaVigne, J.F.

    1985-06-01

    Basal surface autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)dThd-labeled, confluent, keratinocyte cultures reveals that proliferating cells have a nonrandom, patterned distribution. Unlabeled cells, likewise, appear nonrandomly in clusters. The authors show here that failure to detect DNA synthesis in some basal cells in culture is not an artifact caused either by physical separation of the labeled nuclei from the radiographic emulsion or by a diffusion barrier that would prevent (/sup 3/H)dThd from reaching basal cells.

  18. Primary Cilia on Horizontal Basal Cells Regulate Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Ariell M.; Green, Warren W.; McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is one of the few tissues to undergo constitutive neurogenesis throughout the mammalian lifespan. It is composed of multiple cell types including olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that are readily replaced by two populations of basal stem cells, frequently dividing globose basal cells and quiescent horizontal basal cells (HBCs). However, the precise mechanisms by which these cells mediate OE regeneration are unclear. Here, we show for the first time that the HBC subpopulation of basal stem cells uniquely possesses primary cilia that are aligned in an apical orientation in direct apposition to sustentacular cell end feet. The positioning of these cilia suggests that they function in the detection of growth signals and/or differentiation cues. To test this idea, we generated an inducible, cell type-specific Ift88 knock-out mouse line (K5rtTA;tetOCre;Ift88fl/fl) to disrupt cilia formation and maintenance specifically in HBCs. Surprisingly, the loss of HBC cilia did not affect the maintenance of the adult OE but dramatically impaired the regeneration of OSNs following lesion. Furthermore, the loss of cilia during development resulted in a region-specific decrease in neurogenesis, implicating HBCs in the establishment of the OE. Together, these results suggest a novel role for primary cilia in HBC activation, proliferation, and differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show for the first time the presence of primary cilia on a quiescent population of basal stem cells, the horizontal basal cells (HBCs), in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Importantly, our data demonstrate that cilia on HBCs are necessary for regeneration of the OE following injury. Moreover, the disruption of HBC cilia alters neurogenesis during the development of the OE, providing evidence that HBCs participate in the establishment of this tissue. These data suggest that the mechanisms of penetrance for ciliopathies in the OE extend beyond that of defects in olfactory sensory

  19. Basal Cell Adenoma with Perplexity in Diagnosis – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rehani, Shweta; Mathias, Yulia; Wadhwa, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Every salivary gland tumour irrespective of its benign or malignant nature or occurrence, exhibits certain unique and overlapping histopathologic features. Basal Cell Adenoma (BCA) is a rare salivary gland tumour and hence it becomes our responsibility to report every case with unique histopathologic features so that it can add to our present knowledge of this lesion. Often, the pathologists experience difficulty while diagnosing lesions like BCA which contain basaloid cells due to its similarity with other lesions of similar histological appearance. Hence, this paper discusses a case of BCA with rare histopathologic features along with the possible differential diagnosis. PMID:27135016

  20. Syndrome in question: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Pauline Lyrio; de Souza Filho, João Basílio; de Abreu, Karina Demoner; Brezinscki, Marisa Simon; Pignaton, Christine Chambo

    2016-01-01

    The Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an uncommon disorder caused by a mutation in Patched, tumor suppressor gene. It is mainly characterized by numerous early onset basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic cysts of jaw and skeletal abnormalities. Due to the wide clinical spectrum, treatment and management of its modalities are not standardized and should be individualized and monitored by a multidisciplinary team. We report a typical case in a 30-year-old man with multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratotic pits of palmar creases and bifid ribs, with a history of several corrective surgeries for keratocystic odontogenic tumors, among other lesions characteristic of the syndrome. PMID:27579759

  1. Linear and whorled nevoid hypermelanosis complicated with inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus and ichthyosis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Zhu, Wen-Yuan

    2007-11-01

    We report a 17-year-old girl who presented with linear and whorled melanosis following Blaschko lines mainly on her trunk. Ichthyosiform lesions and linear scaling erythemas were observed respectively on her lower limbs and the dorsa of her hands, left knee, ankle and foot. No abnormality was found in systemic examination and blood tests. A biopsy specimen of pigmentation of her back showed there was increased pigmentation within the basal keratinocytes, with focal incontinentia pigmenti. Notable lymphangiectasis could also be seen in the mid part of dermis, which had never previously been described. The biopsy of scaling erythemas of her hand showed dominant hyperkeratosis with focal parakeratosis, acanthosis and papillomatous hyperplasia in the epidermis. The diagnosis of linear and whorled nevoid hypermelanosis (LWNH) complicated with inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus and ichthyosis vulgaris was made in accordance with clinical and pathological manifestations. LWNH ought to be differentiated from incontinentia pigmenti and hypomelanosis of Ito.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Gorlin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndrome Life Support Network Gorlin Syndrome Group National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) GeneReviews (1 link) Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Gorlin syndrome Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  3. KRT14 marks a subpopulation of bladder basal cells with pivotal role in regeneration and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Papafotiou, George; Paraskevopoulou, Varvara; Vasilaki, Eleni; Kanaki, Zoi; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Klinakis, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The urothelium is a specialized epithelium that lines the urinary tract. It consists of three different cell types, namely, basal, intermediate and superficial cells arranged in relatively distinct cell layers. Normally, quiescent, it regenerates fast upon injury, but the regeneration process is not fully understood. Although several reports have indicated the existence of progenitors, their identity and exact topology, as well as their role in key processes such as tissue regeneration and carcinogenesis have not been clarified. Here we show that a minor subpopulation of basal cells, characterized by the expression of keratin 14, possesses self-renewal capacity and also gives rise to all cell types of the urothelium during natural and injury-induced regeneration. Moreover, these cells represent cells of origin of urothelial cancer. Our findings support the hypothesis of basally located progenitors with profound roles in urothelial homoeostasis. PMID:27320313

  4. Basal cell adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland with rare scalp metastasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Ahmet; Cuce, Ferhat; Simsek, Hakan; Topuz, Ali Kıvanc; Duz, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland tumors constitute 3% of tumors in the body. Salivary gland tumors constitute 4% to 10.80% of all tumors in the head and neck tumors and most of them originate from the parotid gland. Most salivary gland tumors are benign. Basal cell adenocarcinoma is a rare salivary gland tumour. Most appear to be benign clinically. Metastases have occurred in less than 10% of patients. A 58-year-old female patient was admitted with the complaint of a growing mass at the top of her head. She was operated for parotid adenocarcinoma two years ago. Computed Tomography (CT) was performed to clarify the relationship between the mass with the calvarium and intracranial region. There is a risk of malignancy in scalp and calvarium lesions. Patients must be subjected to preoperative radiological evaluations.

  5. Label-Retaining, Quiescent Globose Basal Cells Are Found in the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Woochan; Chen, Xueyan; Flis, Daniel; Harris, Margaret; Schwob, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate olfactory epithelium (OE) is known for its ability to renew itself throughout life as well as to reconstitute after injury. Although this remarkable capacity demonstrates the persistence of stem cells and multipotent progenitor cells, their nature in the OE remains undefined and controversial, as both horizontal basal cells (HBCs) and globose basal cells (GBCs) have features in common with each other and with stem cells in other tissues. Here, we investigate whether some among the population of GBCs satisfy a key feature of stem cells, i.e., mitotic quiescence with retention of thymidine analogue label and activation by injury. Accordingly, we demonstrate that some GBCs express p27Kip1, a member of the Kip/Cip family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. In addition, some GBCs retain bromodeoxyuridine or ethynyldeoxyuridine for an extended period when the pulse is administered in neonates followed by a 1-month chase. Their identity as GBCs was confirmed by electron microscopy. All spared GBCs express Ki-67 in the methyl bromide (MeBr)-lesioned OE initially after lesion, indicating that the label-retaining (LR) GBCs are activated in response to injury. LR-GBCs reappear during the acute recovery period following MeBr exposure, as demonstrated with 2- or 4-week chase periods after labeling. Taken together, our data demonstrate the existence of LR-GBCs that are seemingly activated in response to epithelial injury and then re-established after the initial phase of recovery is completed. In this regard, some among the GBCs satisfy a common criterion for functioning like stem cells. PMID:24122672

  6. The use of the terms monomorphic adenoma, basal cell adenoma, and canalicular adenoma as applied to salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D G; Daley, T D

    1983-12-01

    There is considerable confusion in the literature concerning the terms monomorphic adenoma, basal cell adenoma, and canalicular adenoma. This article traces the history of these terms as applied to the pathology of salivary gland tumors and attempts to clarify their usage. It is recommended (1) that monomorphic adenoma be used, as it was originally intended, as a nosologic grouping for all benign epithelial salivary gland tumors that are not pleomorphic adenomas, (2) that basal cell adenoma be used to identify a specific entity that is one component of the monomorphic adenoma group and exhibits a number of histologic subtypes, and (3) that canalicular adenoma be used to describe another entity, distinct from basal cell adenomas but also belonging to the monomorphic adenoma group.

  7. Merkel cell carcinoma and chronic arsenicism.

    PubMed

    Lien, H C; Tsai, T F; Lee, Y Y; Hsiao, C H

    1999-10-01

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen. Bowen's disease, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma are the most common skin cancers found in patients exposed to arsenic over the long term. Merkel cell carcinoma has been documented in Taiwanese patients who resided in an endemic area of black foot disease, another condition found in patients with chronic arsenicism. We collected all cases of Merkel cell carcinoma diagnosed at two medical centers in Taiwan (N = 11) to find a possible association between chronic arsenicism and Merkel cell carcinoma. In our study 6 of the 11 patients were residents of the endemic areas for chronic arsenicism.

  8. The metaplastic effects of estrogen on mouse prostate epithelium: proliferation of cells with basal cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Risbridger, G P; Wang, H; Frydenberg, M; Cunha, G

    2001-06-01

    The exogenous administration of estrogens to male mice alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and reduces androgen levels, leading to a regression of the prostatic epithelium. As well, a specific direct response to estrogens is the induction of epithelial squamous metaplasia. The aims of this study were to identify the process by which the prostatic epithelium is transformed in intact adult male mice using the synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol. A comparison of the effects of diethylstilbestrol in the three lobes revealed a hierarchy of response, with the anterior lobe being the most responsive, the dorsolateral lobe less responsive, and the ventral lobe the least responsive. The effect of castration was used to distinguish between the epithelial responses to estrogen administration and androgen deprivation. The results demonstrate that transformation of the epithelium involved proliferation of cells with a basal cell phenotype, the onset of cytokeratin 10 expression, up-regulation of progesterone receptor expression, and loss of the cell cycle inhibitor, p27(Kip1) expression; none of these changes was observed after castration. Mice lacking functional estrogen receptor alpha failed to respond, demonstrating a requirement for estrogen receptor alpha in the epithelium and/or stroma to mediate the proliferative response to estrogen in the prostate gland.

  9. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients With Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jean Y.; Wu, Angela; Linos, Eleni; Parimi, Neeta; Lee, Wayne; Aszterbaum, Michelle; Asgari, Maryam M.; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate vitamin D status in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) who practice photo-protection because of their genetic predisposition to skin cancer and to determine risk factors for deficiency. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Academic medical centers. Patients Forty-one ambulatory patients with BCNS who participated in a 2-year chemoprevention clinical trial. Population-based controls (n=360) were selected and matched by age, sex, Fitzpatrick skin type, and season/geography. Main Outcome Measures Levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25[OH]D) and vitamin D deficiency (defined as a 25[OH]D level of ≤20 ng/mL). Results Twenty-three patients with BCNS (56%) were vitamin D deficient. Patients with BCNS had mean 25(OH)D levels below those of the general population (−3 ng/mL; P=.02) and were 3 times more likely to be vitamin D deficient (56% vs 18%; P<.001). Levels of 25(OH)D were lower in patients who were overweight (−3.0 ng/mL; P=.04) and who had blood collected in the winter compared with the summer (−7.1 ng/mL; P<.001). Conclusion Patients with BCNS may be at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency, depending on their adherence to photoprotection practices. PMID:20956641

  10. The use of vismodegib to shrink keratocystic odontogenic tumors in basal cell nevus syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Mina S.; Tang, Jean Y.; Joseph, Timmy; Thompson, Bobbye; Lindgren, Joselyn; Raphael, Maria Acosta; Ulerio, Grace; Chanana, Anita M.; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian M.; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-01-01

    Importance Keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaw (KCOTs) affect more than 65% of patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS). Surgery frequently causes facial disfigurement and is not always curative. Most BCNS-related and some sporadic KCOTs have malignant activation of the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway. Observations We examined the effect of vismodegib (an oral HH-pathway inhibitor) on KCOT size in BCNS patients enrolled in a clinical trial testing vismodegib for BCC prevention (NCT00957229), using pre and post-treatment MRIs. Four men and 2 women had pretreatment KCOTs, mean longest diameter 2.0cm (range: 0.7–3.3cm), occurring primarily in the mandible. Subjects were treated with vismodegib (150mg/day) for a mean 18 months (SD: 4.8, range: 11–24). Four subjects experienced a size reduction and 2 had no change. Vismodegib reduced the mean longest diameter of KCOTs in all subjects by 1.0cm (95% CI: 0.03, 1.94, p= 0.02) or 50% from baseline. We observed no enlargement of existing KCOTs or new KCOT development. Conclusions and relevance Vismodegib shrinks some KCOTs in BCNS patients and may offer an alternative to surgical therapy. These effects were maintained for at least 9 months after drug cessation in 1 patient. Further studies assessing long-term efficacy and optimal maintenance regimens should be performed. PMID:24623282

  11. Patched homologue 1 mutations in four Japanese families with basal cell nevus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, N; Nagao, T; Shimozato, K; Niikawa, N; Yoshiura, K‐i

    2006-01-01

    Aim To search for patched homologue 1 (PTCH1) mutations in four families with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS). Methods Mutation analysis of PTCH1 in unrelated Japanese families affected with BCNS was carried out by direct sequencing. Results Six novel PTCH1 mutations, 833G→A in exon 6, 1415C→A and 1451G→T in exon 10, 2798delC in exon 17, 2918–2925dupAGTTCCCT in exon 18 and 3956C→A in exon 23, were identified. Conclusions Among the six PTCH1 mutations, two frameshift mutations (2798delC and 2918–2925dupAGTTCCCT) and one nonsense mutation (833G→A) are predicted to lead to premature termination of PTCH1 protein translation. Three simultaneous mutations, 1415C→A (A472D) and 1451G→T (G484V) in exon 10, and 3956G→A (R1319H) in exon 23, were found on one allele in only affected members in one family and none of them were found among 90 unrelated healthy Japanese. The three mutations on one chromosome may have resulted from errors in the recombinational repair process and this is the first report on the PTCH1 mutations due to such a mechanism. PMID:17021131

  12. Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule accelerates progression of crescentic glomerulonephritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Filipe, Anne; Rahuel, Cécile; Bonnin, Philippe; Mesnard, Laurent; Guérin, Coralie; Wang, Yu; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Colin, Yves; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Migration of circulating leukocytes from the vasculature into the surrounding tissue is an important component of the inflammatory response. Among the cell surface molecules identified as contributing to leukocyte extravasation is VCAM-1, expressed on activated vascular endothelium, which participates in all stages of leukocyte–endothelial interaction by binding to leukocyte surface expressed integrin VLA-4. However, not all VLA-4-mediated events can be linked to VCAM-1. A novel interaction between VLA-4 and endothelial Lutheran (Lu) blood group antigens and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) proteins has been recently shown, suggesting that Lu/BCAM may have a role in leukocyte recruitments in inflamed tissues. Here, we assessed the participation of Lu/BCAM in the immunopathogenesis of crescentic glomerulonephritis. High expression of Lu/BCAM in glomeruli of mice with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis suggests a potential role for the local expression of Lu/BCAM in nephritogenic recruitment of leukocytes. Genetic deficiency of Lu/BCAM attenuated glomerular accumulation of T cells and macrophages, crescent formation, and proteinuria, correlating with reduced fibrin and platelet deposition in glomeruli. Furthermore, we found a pro-adhesive interaction between human monocyte α4β1 integrin and Lu/BCAM proteins. Thus, Lu/BCAM may have a critical role in facilitating the accumulation of monocytes and macrophages, thereby exacerbating renal injury. PMID:24429403

  13. AmotL2 disrupts apical-basal cell polarity and promotes tumour invasion.

    PubMed

    Mojallal, Mahdi; Zheng, Yujuan; Hultin, Sara; Audebert, Stéphane; van Harn, Tanja; Johnsson, Per; Lenander, Claes; Fritz, Nicolas; Mieth, Christin; Corcoran, Martin; Lembo, Frédérique; Hallström, Marja; Hartman, Johan; Mazure, Nathalie M; Weide, Thomas; Grandér, Dan; Borg, Jean-Paul; Uhlén, Per; Holmgren, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity is essential for the functionality of glandular epithelia. Cell polarity is often lost in advanced tumours correlating with acquisition of invasive and malignant properties. Despite extensive knowledge regarding the formation and maintenance of polarity, the mechanisms that deregulate polarity in metastasizing cells remain to be fully characterized. Here we show that AmotL2 expression correlates with loss of tissue architecture in tumours from human breast and colon cancer patients. We further show that hypoxic stress results in activation of c-Fos-dependent expression of AmotL2 leading to loss of polarity. c-Fos/hypoxia-induced p60 AmotL2 interacts with the Crb3 and Par3 polarity complexes retaining them in large vesicles and preventing them from reaching the apical membrane. The resulting loss of polarity potentiates the response to invasive cues in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data provide a molecular mechanism how hypoxic stress deregulates cell polarity during tumour progression. PMID:25080976

  14. Tubular-trabecular type Basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland: a patient report.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Motoki; Shomori, Kohei; Kiya, Shuichi; Shiomi, Tatsushi; Nosaka, Kanae; Ito, Hisao

    2010-09-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is an uncommon benign salivary gland neoplasm that includes isomorphic basaloid cells. We report on a female patient with BCA that developed in the right parotid gland in her 50s. The present patient demonstrated a few tumor nests in the fibrous capsule, and her tumor was larger than usual. These facts made us suspect of malignancy. Histopathologically, the tumor was characterized by multiple duct-like structures and tubular-trabecular masses composed of small isomorphic cells with hyperchromatic, round nuclei and an eosinophilic cytoplasm. It was difficult to determine whether the ductal structures noted in the tumor capsule were invasive. By immunohistochemistry, tumor cells of the tubular nests were positive for cytokeratin 7 and that the outer cells of tubular nests were positive for alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and calponin. Tumor cells were immuno-negative for S-100 protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein. The Ki-67 labeling scores of the cells were extremely low (< 1%). We could achieve an accurate diagnosis of BCA by immunohistochemistry with MIB-1 and other markers.

  15. Focal degeneration of basal cells and the resultant auto-immunoreactions: a novel mechanism for prostate tumor progression and invasion.

    PubMed

    Man, Yan-Gao; Gardner, William A

    2008-01-01

    The development of human prostate cancer is believed to be a multistep process, progressing sequentially from normal, to hyperplasia, to prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and to invasive and metastatic lesions. High grade PIN has been generally considered as the direct precursor of invasive lesions, and the progression of PIN is believed to be triggered primarily, if not solely, by the overproduction of proteolytic enzymes predominately by cancer cells, which result in the degradation of the basement membrane. These theories, however, are hard to reconcile with two main facts: (1) only about 30% untreated PIN progress to invasive stage, while none of the current approaches could accurately identify the specific PIN or individuals at greater risk for progression, and (2) results from recent world-wide clinical trials with a wide variety of proteolytic enzyme inhibitors have been very disappointing, casting doubt on the validity of the proteolytic enzyme theory. Since over 90% of prostate cancer-related deaths result from invasion-related illness and the incidence of PIN could be up to 16.5-25% in routine or ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, there is an urgent need to uncover the intrinsic mechanism of prostate tumor invasion. Promoted by the facts that the basal cell population is the source of several tumor suppressors and the absence of the basal cell layer is the most distinct feature of invasive lesions, our recent studies have intended to identify the early alterations of basal cell layers and their impact on tumor invasion using multidisciplinary approaches. Our studies revealed that a subset of pre-invasive tumors contained focal disruptions (the absence of basal cells resulting in a gap greater than the combined size of at least three epithelial cells) in surrounding basal cell layers. Compared to their non-disrupted counterparts, focally disrupted basal cell layers had several unique features: (1) significantly lower proliferation; (2

  16. Spiradenocarcinoma with low-grade basal cell adenocarcinoma pattern: report of a case with varied morphology and wild type TP53.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Fredrik; Nga, Min En

    2012-03-01

    We present a patient with a 2-cm spiradenocarcinoma of the left arm resembling low-grade salivary gland basal cell adenocarcinoma. In addition to showing attributes of conventional spiradenoma, the benign component showed prominent areas of cystic change with focal apocrine differentiation, glands with and without mucinous differentiation, clear cell change and focal adenoid cystic carcinoma-like areas. The malignant component was composed of nodules of basaloid cells arranged in sheets with variable tendency to luminal differentiation. The nuclear atypia was low-grade, and the mitotic index was high in the malignant component (to 8/10 high power fields). Immunohistochemically, there was diffuse but variable positivity for cytokeratin 7 in both the benign and malignant components. Epithelial membrane antigen was focally positive, highlighting cells with ductal (luminal) differentiation. Expression of p63 was observed in 50 and 80% of the cells in the benign and malignant components, respectively. Calponin was negative. The proliferative index (MIB-1/Ki-67) was <3% in the benign component and up to 10% in the malignant component. Although the malignant component displayed patchy areas with nuclear p53 immunoreactivity with variable intensity, no mutation in the TP53 gene was identified.

  17. Global expression profiling of globose basal cells and neurogenic progression within the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Krolewski, Richard C; Packard, Adam; Schwob, James E

    2013-03-01

    Ongoing, lifelong neurogenesis maintains the neuronal population of the olfactory epithelium in the face of piecemeal neuronal turnover and restores it following wholesale loss. The molecular phenotypes corresponding to different stages along the progression from multipotent globose basal cell (GBC) progenitor to differentiated olfactory sensory neuron are poorly characterized. We used the transgenic expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and cell surface markers to FACS-isolate ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs, Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs and immature neurons, and ΔOMP-eGFP(+) mature neurons from normal adult mice. In addition, the latter two populations were also collected 3 weeks after olfactory bulb ablation, a lesion that results in persistently elevated neurogenesis. Global profiling of mRNA from the populations indicates that all stages of neurogenesis share a cohort of >2,100 genes that are upregulated compared to sustentacular cells. A further cohort of >1,200 genes are specifically upregulated in GBCs as compared to sustentacular cells and differentiated neurons. The increased rate of neurogenesis caused by olfactory bulbectomy had little effect on the transcriptional profile of the Neurog1-eGFP(+) population. In contrast, the abbreviated lifespan of ΔOMP-eGFP(+) neurons born in the absence of the bulb correlated with substantial differences in gene expression as compared to the mature neurons of the normal epithelium. Detailed examination of the specific genes upregulated in the different progenitor populations revealed that the chromatin modifying complex proteins LSD1 and coREST were expressed sequentially in upstream ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs and Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs/immature neurons. The expression patterns of these proteins are dynamically regulated after activation of the epithelium by methyl bromide lesion.

  18. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical–basal cell polarity modules

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K.; Moya, Ivan M.; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B.; Halder, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical–basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non–cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non–cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation. PMID:25624491

  19. Human tracheobronchial basal cells. Normal versus remodeling/repairing phenotypes in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Ahmad, Shama; Jian, Abhilasha; Li, Bilan; Smith, Russell W; Helm, Karen M; Seibold, Max A; Groshong, Steven D; White, Carl W; Reynolds, Susan D

    2013-12-01

    Human tracheobronchial epithelial (TBE) basal cells (BCs) function as progenitors in normal tissue. However, mechanistic studies are typically performed in vitro and frequently use BCs recovered from patients who die of nonrespiratory disease. It is not known whether the cadaveric epithelium (1) is undergoing homeostatic remodeling and/or repair, or (2) yields BC clones that represent homeostatic processes identified in tissue. We sought to compare the phenotype of TBE-BCs with that of BCs cultured under optimal clone-forming conditions. TBE pathology was evaluated using quantitative histomorphometry. The cultured BC phenotype was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. Clone organization and cell phenotype were determined by immunostaining. The cadaveric TBE is 20% normal. In these regions, BCs are keratin (K)-5(+) and tetraspanin CD151(+), and demonstrate a low mitotic index. In contrast, 80% of the cadaveric TBE exhibits homeostatic remodeling/repair processes. In these regions, BCs are K5(+)/K14(+), and a subset expresses tissue factor (TF). Passage 1 TBE cells are BCs that are K5(+)/TF(+), and half coexpress CD151. Optimal clone formation conditions use an irradiated NIH3T3 fibroblast feeder layer (American Type Culture Collection, Frederick, MD) and serum-supplemented Epicult-B medium (Stemcell Technologies, La Jolla, CA). The TF(+)/CD151(-) BC subpopulation is the most clonogenic BC subtype, and is enriched with K14(+) cells. TF(+)/CD151(-) BCs generate clones containing BCs that are K5(+)/Trp63(+), but K14(-)/CD151(-). TF(+) cells are limited to the clone edge. In conclusion, clonogenic human TBE BCs (1) exhibit a molecular phenotype that is a composite of the normal and remodeling/reparative BC phenotypes observed in tissue, and (2) generate organoid clones that contain phenotypically distinct BC subpopulations.

  20. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical-basal cell polarity modules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K; Moya, Ivan M; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B; Halder, Georg

    2015-02-10

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non-cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation.

  1. Global expression profiling of globose basal cells and neurogenic progression within the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Krolewski, Richard C; Packard, Adam; Schwob, James E

    2013-03-01

    Ongoing, lifelong neurogenesis maintains the neuronal population of the olfactory epithelium in the face of piecemeal neuronal turnover and restores it following wholesale loss. The molecular phenotypes corresponding to different stages along the progression from multipotent globose basal cell (GBC) progenitor to differentiated olfactory sensory neuron are poorly characterized. We used the transgenic expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and cell surface markers to FACS-isolate ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs, Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs and immature neurons, and ΔOMP-eGFP(+) mature neurons from normal adult mice. In addition, the latter two populations were also collected 3 weeks after olfactory bulb ablation, a lesion that results in persistently elevated neurogenesis. Global profiling of mRNA from the populations indicates that all stages of neurogenesis share a cohort of >2,100 genes that are upregulated compared to sustentacular cells. A further cohort of >1,200 genes are specifically upregulated in GBCs as compared to sustentacular cells and differentiated neurons. The increased rate of neurogenesis caused by olfactory bulbectomy had little effect on the transcriptional profile of the Neurog1-eGFP(+) population. In contrast, the abbreviated lifespan of ΔOMP-eGFP(+) neurons born in the absence of the bulb correlated with substantial differences in gene expression as compared to the mature neurons of the normal epithelium. Detailed examination of the specific genes upregulated in the different progenitor populations revealed that the chromatin modifying complex proteins LSD1 and coREST were expressed sequentially in upstream ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs and Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs/immature neurons. The expression patterns of these proteins are dynamically regulated after activation of the epithelium by methyl bromide lesion. PMID:22847514

  2. Role of Testicular Luminal Factors on Basal Cell Elongation and Proliferation in the Mouse Epididymis1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bongki; Roy, Jeremy; Shum, Winnie W.C.; Da Silva, Nicolas; Breton, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A subset of basal cells (BCs) in the initial segment (IS) of the mouse epididymis has a slender body projection between adjacent epithelial cells. We show here that these projections occasionally cross the apical tight junctions and are in contact with the luminal environment. Luminal testicular factors are critical for the establishment of the IS epithelium, and we investigated their role in the regulation of this luminal sensing property. Efferent duct ligation (EDL) was performed to block luminal flow from the testis without affecting blood flow. Cytokeratin 5 (KRT5) labeling showed a time-dependent reduction of the percentage of BCs with intercellular projections from 1 to 5 days after EDL, compared to controls. Double labeling for caspase-3 and KRT5 showed that a subset of BCs undergoes apoptosis 1 day after EDL. Ki67/KRT5 double labeling showed a low rate of BC proliferation under basal conditions. However, EDL induced a marked increase in the proliferation rate of a subset of BCs 2 days after EDL. A 2-wk treatment with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide did not affect the number of BCs with intercellular projections, but reduced BC proliferation. Flutamide treatment also reduced the increase in BC proliferation induced 2 days after EDL. We conclude that, in the adult mouse IS, 1) luminal testicular factors play an important role in the ability of BCs to extend their body projection towards the lumen, and are essential for the survival of a subset of BCs; 2) androgens play an important role in the proliferation of some of the BCs that survive the initial insult induced by EDL; and 3) the formation and elongation of BC intercellular projections do not depend on androgens. PMID:25411392

  3. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of terminal duct carcinoma of minor salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Frierson, H F; Covell, J L; Mills, S E

    1987-06-01

    The cytologic features of terminal duct carcinoma of the palate, as observed in a fine-needle aspiration specimen, are described and contrasted with the cytologic features reported for benign mixed tumor, basal-cell adenoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma. Terminal duct carcinoma, at times, may be difficult, if not impossible, to distinguish from adenoid cystic carcinoma in fine-needle aspiration specimens. In most instances, this distinction may not be important.

  4. Computer vision approach to morphometric feature analysis of basal cell nuclei for evaluating malignant potentiality of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Muthu Rama Krishnan, M; Pal, Mousumi; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Chakraborty, Chandan; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy; Ray, Ajoy K

    2012-06-01

    This research work presents a quantitative approach for analysis of histomorphometric features of the basal cell nuclei in respect to their size, shape and intensity of staining, from surface epithelium of Oral Submucous Fibrosis showing dysplasia (OSFD) to that of the Normal Oral Mucosa (NOM). For all biological activity, the basal cells of the surface epithelium form the proliferative compartment and therefore their morphometric changes will spell the intricate biological behavior pertaining to normal cellular functions as well as in premalignant and malignant status. In view of this, the changes in shape, size and intensity of staining of the nuclei in the basal cell layer of the NOM and OSFD have been studied. Geometric, Zernike moments and Fourier descriptor (FD) based as well as intensity based features are extracted for histomorphometric pattern analysis of the nuclei. All these features are statistically analyzed along with 3D visualization in order to discriminate the groups. Results showed increase in the dimensions (area and perimeter), shape parameters and decreasing mean nuclei intensity of the nuclei in OSFD in respect to NOM. Further, the selected features are fed to the Bayesian classifier to discriminate normal and OSFD. The morphometric and intensity features provide a good sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 98.53% and positive predicative accuracy of 97.35%. This comparative quantitative characterization of basal cell nuclei will be of immense help for oral onco-pathologists, researchers and clinicians to assess the biological behavior of OSFD, specially relating to their premalignant and malignant potentiality. As a future direction more extensive study involving more number of disease subjects is observed.

  5. Basal cell carcinoma of the head and neck region: a retrospective analysis of completely excised 331 cases.

    PubMed

    Demirseren, Duriye Deniz; Ceran, Candemir; Aksam, Berrak; Demirseren, Mustafa Erol; Metin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to analyze all completely excised BCCs in the head and neck region with regard to age, sex, personal and familial history, skin type, tumor localization and size, histopathological subtype of tumor, reconstruction method, and recurrence rates. Incompletely excised BCCs were not included in this study since incomplete excision is the most important preventable risk factor for recurrence. In 320 patients, 331 lesions were retrospectively evaluated by dividing into the following 8 subunits: scalp, frontotemporal, orbital, nose, cheek, auricula, perioral, and chin-neck area. Most of the patients were in 60-70 age group (34.7%). The nose (32.3%) was the most common site of presentation. Clinically, all lesions and, histopathologically, most of the lesions (42.2%) presented were of the nodular type. All cases of recurrence after complete excision (n = 9, 2.7%) were located in the median parts of the head and neck region and were mainly diagnosed histopathologically as sclerotic and micronodular. Even though completely excised, head and neck region BCCs, especially which are more prone to recurrence due to anatomical and histopathological properties, should be more closely monitored in order to decrease morbidity and health care costs. PMID:24864212

  6. A Study of Basal Cell Carcinoma in South Asians for Risk Factor and Clinicopathological Characterization: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Kaur, Sandeep; Yadav, Ashish; Singh, Navtej; Singh, Amarbir

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Although the incidence of skin cancers in India (part of South Asia) is low, the absolute number of cases may be significant due to large population. The existing literature on BCC in India is scant. So, this study was done focusing on its epidemiology, risk factors, and clinicopathological aspects. Methods. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted in Punjab, North India, from 2011 to 2013. History, examination and histopathological confirmation were done in all the patients visiting skin department with suspected lesions. Results. Out of 36 confirmed cases, 63.9% were females with mean ± SD age being 60.9 ± 14.2 years. Mean duration of disease was 4.7 years. Though there was statistically significant higher sun exposure in males compared to females (P value being 0.000), BCC was commoner in females, explainable by intermittent sun exposure (during household work in the open kitchens) in women. Majority of patients (88.9%) had a single lesion. Head and neck region was involved in 97.2% of cases, with nose being the commonest site (50%) with nodular/noduloulcerative morphology in 77.8% of cases. Pigmentation was evident in 22.2% of cases clinically. Nodular variety was the commonest histopathological variant (77.8%). Conclusions. This study highlights a paradoxically increasing trend of BCC with female preponderance, preferential involvement of nose, and higher percentage of pigmentation in Indians. PMID:25530883

  7. An FGFR1-SPRY2 Signaling Axis Limits Basal Cell Proliferation in the Steady-State Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Balasooriya, Gayan I.; Johnson, Jo-Anne; Basson, M. Albert; Rawlins, Emma L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The steady-state airway epithelium has a low rate of stem cell turnover but can nevertheless mount a rapid proliferative response following injury. This suggests a mechanism to restrain proliferation at steady state. One such mechanism has been identified in skeletal muscle in which pro-proliferative FGFR1 signaling is antagonized by SPRY1 to maintain satellite cell quiescence. Surprisingly, we found that deletion of Fgfr1 or Spry2 in basal cells of the adult mouse trachea caused an increase in steady-state proliferation. We show that in airway basal cells, SPRY2 is post-translationally modified in response to FGFR1 signaling. This allows SPRY2 to inhibit intracellular signaling downstream of other receptor tyrosine kinases and restrain basal cell proliferation. An FGFR1-SPRY2 signaling axis has previously been characterized in cell lines in vitro. We now demonstrate an in vivo biological function of this interaction and thus identify an active signaling mechanism that maintains quiescence in the airway epithelium. PMID:27046834

  8. [Basal cell adenomas of the salivary glands. Analysis of 7 cases and review of the literature. Comparative study with cylindromas].

    PubMed

    Walter, P; Prevôt, M; Ludwig, L

    1977-01-01

    Basal cell adenomas, of which 7 cases are reported here together with 63 others collected in the literature, are benign tumours of the salivary glands, preferentially localised in the parotid and in the upper lip. Mobile, non-ulcerated and painless, these nodules with an average diameter of 2 cm are well circumscribed, fleshy or cystic. Their morphology is characterised by the proliferation of uniform, small cells, with scarcely visible cytoplasm, arranged in layers, cords and canals, which may be ectasic or cystic. Peripheral elements, individualising these different structures, are arranged in palissades and are regularly surrounded by a basal membrane. The histological analogies between basal cell adenomas and cylindromas merely reflect their ultrastructural similarities, cellular as well as architectural. These two neoplasms may be distinguished on the basis of two essential morphological criteria:--basal cell adenomas are well circumscribed, whilst cylindromas are invasive;--the cells in adenomas are closely juxtaposed, endowing the various structures of these tumours with a dense appearance, whilst cylindroma cells are generally separated by clear spaces corresponding to extreme development of the intercellular spaces.

  9. Contributions of PTCH Gene Variants to Isolated Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, M.A.; Cooper, M.E.; Goldstein, T.; Castilla, E.E.; Camelo, J.S. Lopez; Marazita, M.L.; Murray, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Mutations in patched (PTCH) cause the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), or Gorlin syndrome. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome may present with developmental anomalies, including rib and craniofacial abnormalities, and predisposes to several tumor types, including basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma. Cleft palate is found in 4% of individuals with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Because there might be specific sequence alterations in PTCH that limit expression to orofacial clefting, a genetic study of PTCH was undertaken in cases with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) known not to have nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Results Seven new normal variants spread along the entire gene and three missense mutations were found among cases with cleft lip and/or palate. One of these variants (P295S) was not found in any of 1188 control samples. A second variant was found in a case and also in 1 of 1119 controls. The third missense (S827G) was found in 5 of 1369 cases and in 5 of 1104 controls and is likely a rare normal variant. Linkage and linkage desequilibrium also was assessed using normal variants in and adjacent to the PTCH gene in 220 families (1776 individuals), each with two or more individuals with isolated clefting. Although no statistically significant evidence of linkage (multipoint HLOD peak = 2.36) was uncovered, there was borderline evidence of significant transmission distortion for one haplotype of two single nucleotide polymorphisms located within the PTCH gene (p = .08). Conclusion Missense mutations in PTCH may be rare causes of isolated cleft lip and/or palate. An as yet unidentified variant near PTCH may act as a modifier of cleft lip and/or palate. PMID:16405370

  10. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Agarwal, Neha; Singh, Udita

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GS), also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an infrequent multisystem disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterised by keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOT) in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographical examinations in the first decade of life, since the KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This article describes an 11-year-old boy with GS. PMID:23814215

  11. Loss of Basal Cells Precedes Bronchiolitis Obliterans–Like Pathological Changes in a Murine Model of Chlorine Gas Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    O’Koren, Emily G.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a major cause of chronic airway dysfunction after toxic chemical inhalation. The pathophysiology of BO is not well understood, but epithelial cell injury has been closely associated with the development of fibrotic lesions in human studies and in animal models of both toxin-induced and transplant-induced BO. However, whereas almost all cases and models of BO include epithelial injury, not all instances of epithelial injury result in BO, suggesting that epithelial damage per se is not the critical event leading to the development of BO. Here, we describe a model of chlorine-induced BO in which mice develop tracheal and large airway obliterative lesions within 10 days of exposure to high (350 parts per million [ppm]), but not low (200 ppm), concentrations of chlorine gas. Importantly, these lesions arise only under conditions and in areas in which basal cells, the resident progenitor cells for large airway epithelium, are eliminated by chlorine exposure. In areas of basal cell loss, epithelial regeneration does not occur, resulting in persistent regions of epithelial denudation. Obliterative airway lesions arise specifically from regions of epithelial denudation in a process that includes inflammatory cell infiltration by Day 2 after exposure, fibroblast infiltration and collagen deposition by Day 5, and the ingrowth of blood vessels by Day 7, ultimately leading to lethal airway obstruction by Days 9–12. We conclude that the loss of epithelial progenitor cells constitutes a critical factor leading to the development of obliterative airway lesions after chemical inhalation. PMID:23742075

  12. Transcription factor p63 controls the reserve status but not the stemness of horizontal basal cells in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schnittke, Nikolai; Herrick, Daniel B.; Lin, Brian; Peterson, Jesse; Coleman, Julie H.; Packard, Adam I.; Jang, Woochan; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue stem cells can serve two broad functions: to participate actively in the maintenance and regeneration of a tissue or to wait in reserve and participate only when activated from a dormant state. The adult olfactory epithelium, a site for ongoing, life-long, robust neurogenesis, contains both of these functional stem cell types. Globose basal cells (GBCs) act as the active stem cell population and can give rise to all the differentiated cells found in the normal tissue. Horizontal basal cells (HBCs) act as reserve stem cells and remain dormant unless activated by tissue injury. Here we show that HBC activation following injury by the olfactotoxic gas methyl bromide is coincident with the down-regulation of protein 63 (p63) but anticipates HBC proliferation. Gain- and loss-of-function studies show that this down-regulation of p63 is necessary and sufficient for HBC activation. Moreover, activated HBCs give rise to GBCs that persist for months and continue to act as bona fide stem cells by participating in tissue maintenance and regeneration over the long term. Our analysis provides mechanistic insight into the dynamics between tissue stem cell subtypes and demonstrates that p63 regulates the reserve state but not the stem cell status of HBCs. PMID:26305958

  13. Basal-cell keratins in cervical reserve cells and a comparison to their expression in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Smedts, F.; Ramaekers, F.; Troyanovsky, S.; Pruszczynski, M.; Robben, H.; Lane, B.; Leigh, I.; Plantema, F.; Vooijs, P.

    1992-01-01

    Expression of keratins 5, 14 and 17 in endocervical subcolumnar reserve cells was detected by means of immunohistochemical studies using polypeptide specific monoclonal antibodies. These particular keratins that were found among others in basal cells could also be detected to a variable extent in metaplastic and dysplastic cervical lesions. In some cases of immature squamous metaplasia all three keratin subtypes were expressed throughout the full thickness of the epithelium. In contrast, in mature squamous metaplasia a compartmentalization of these keratins was observed. Mature squamous metaplastic epithelium showed a keratin distribution pattern comparable to ectocervical squamous epithelium, with the exception of keratin 17, which was only sporadically found in the basal layer of ectocervical epithelium and was always present in the basal cells of mature squamous metaplastic epithelium. During progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia a clear increase in the expression of keratin 17 was observed. However, also keratins 5 and 14 were expressed. Our results demonstrate that a considerable number of premalignant lesions of the uterine cervix express the same keratins as found in the progenitor reserve cells. Lesions that lack expression of keratin 17 may form a distinct group, which are regressive in nature and do not progress into cervical cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1372156

  14. High fat diet promotes prostatic basal-to-luminal differentiation and accelerates initiation of prostate epithelial hyperplasia originated from basal cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Joon; Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Li; Xin, Li

    2016-05-01

    Recent lineage tracing studies showed that the prostate basal and luminal cells in adult mice are two independent lineages under the physiological condition, but basal cells are capable of generating luminal progenies during bacterial infection-induced prostatitis. Because acute bacterial infection in human prostate tissues is relatively rare, the disease relevance of the bacterial infection-induced basal-to-luminal differentiation is uncertain. Herein we employ a high fat diet-induced sterile prostate inflammation model to determine whether basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by inflammation irrespective of the underlying etiologies. A K14-CreER model and a fluorescent report line are utilized to specifically label basal cells with the green fluorescent protein. We show that high fat diet promotes immune cell infiltration into the prostate tissues and basal-to-luminal differentiation. Increased cell proliferation accompanies basal-to-luminal differentiation, suggesting a concurrent regulation of basal cell proliferation and differentiation. This study demonstrates that basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by different types of prostate inflammation evolved with distinct etiologies. Finally, high fat diet also accelerates initiation and progression of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia that are originated from basal cells with loss-of-function of the tumor suppressor Pten. Because prostate cancer originated from basal cells tends to be invasive, our study also provides an alternative explanation for the association between obesity and aggressive prostate cancer.

  15. Chapter Seven – Hereditary Genodermatoses with Cancer Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Alisa M.; Tucker, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Hereditary genodermatoses with cancer predisposition are reviewed, including Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis Types 1 and 2, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Xeroderma Pigmentosum, and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Hereditary melanoma is also included, though it differs from the others in several respects. The underlying genetic aberrations causing these syndromes are largely known, allowing novel treatments to be developed for some of these disorders. Early recognition and diagnosis allows for close follow-up and surveillance for associated malignancies. PMID:20816579

  16. The Dilemma of Coexisting Nevoid Hyperkeratosis of the Nipple and Areola in Mycosis Fungoides: A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Polat Ekinci, Algun; Ozturk Sari, Sule; Buyukbabani, Nesimi; Baykal, Can

    2015-01-01

    Nevoid hyperkeratosis of the nipple and areola (NHNA) is a rare clinicopathological entity showing persistent and strictly localized hyperkeratotic lesions of the nipple, areola or both with unknown etiopathogenesis. A similar clinical appearance may also be seen in different diseases with specific histopathological features. There are a few anecdotal reports on the association of NHNA with mycosis fungoides (MF), but they do not describe a uniform condition. In this report, we present 3 patients with hyperkeratotic lesions of the nipple and areola associated with MF but showing different histopathological features. We also review similar cases in the literature and discuss possibilities concerning this association. Two of our cases represent the association between MF and NHNA without histopathological features of MF on the nipple-areola complex. The other case represents hyperkeratosis of the nipple and areola with specific histological and immunohistochemical features of MF. Hence, we would like to hypothesize that MF may involve the nipple and areola and have an appearance similar to NHNA. Intriguingly, however, NHNA may occasionally also be seen in association with MF. However, this peculiar association requires further explanation. PMID:27047936

  17. The Dilemma of Coexisting Nevoid Hyperkeratosis of the Nipple and Areola in Mycosis Fungoides: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Polat Ekinci, Algun; Ozturk Sari, Sule; Buyukbabani, Nesimi; Baykal, Can

    2015-01-01

    Nevoid hyperkeratosis of the nipple and areola (NHNA) is a rare clinicopathological entity showing persistent and strictly localized hyperkeratotic lesions of the nipple, areola or both with unknown etiopathogenesis. A similar clinical appearance may also be seen in different diseases with specific histopathological features. There are a few anecdotal reports on the association of NHNA with mycosis fungoides (MF), but they do not describe a uniform condition. In this report, we present 3 patients with hyperkeratotic lesions of the nipple and areola associated with MF but showing different histopathological features. We also review similar cases in the literature and discuss possibilities concerning this association. Two of our cases represent the association between MF and NHNA without histopathological features of MF on the nipple-areola complex. The other case represents hyperkeratosis of the nipple and areola with specific histological and immunohistochemical features of MF. Hence, we would like to hypothesize that MF may involve the nipple and areola and have an appearance similar to NHNA. Intriguingly, however, NHNA may occasionally also be seen in association with MF. However, this peculiar association requires further explanation. PMID:27047936

  18. Multiple keratocysts of the mandible in association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Gayithri Harish; Khaji, Shahanavaj I.; Metkari, Suryakant; Kulkarni, Harish S.; Kulkarni, Reshma

    2014-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a syndrome with wide variety of manifestations ranging from oral lesions to skeletal deformities. It calls for due responsibility of maxillofacial surgeon to diagnose the syndrome because very often they are the first health professionals to see the patient for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor has been the topic of numerous investigators, is known for its potentially aggressive behavior, significant rate of recurrences. KCOT often occurs as a solitary lesion, in some instances multiple keratocysts may occur in association with a syndrome called Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (nevoid BCC, jaw cyst bifid rib basal cell nevus syndrome). Here, we present a case of multiple keratocysts in the mandible in association with skeletal, ocular, cutaneous anomalies in the given clinical scenario, which has profound relevance in the clinical dental practice. PMID:25191087

  19. Multiple keratocysts of the mandible in association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Gayithri Harish; Khaji, Shahanavaj I; Metkari, Suryakant; Kulkarni, Harish S; Kulkarni, Reshma

    2014-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a syndrome with wide variety of manifestations ranging from oral lesions to skeletal deformities. It calls for due responsibility of maxillofacial surgeon to diagnose the syndrome because very often they are the first health professionals to see the patient for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor has been the topic of numerous investigators, is known for its potentially aggressive behavior, significant rate of recurrences. KCOT often occurs as a solitary lesion, in some instances multiple keratocysts may occur in association with a syndrome called Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (nevoid BCC, jaw cyst bifid rib basal cell nevus syndrome). Here, we present a case of multiple keratocysts in the mandible in association with skeletal, ocular, cutaneous anomalies in the given clinical scenario, which has profound relevance in the clinical dental practice.

  20. Basal Cell Adenoma-Clinicopathological, Immunohistochemical Analysis and Surgical Considerations of a Rare Salivary Gland Tumor with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat Singh, AD; Majumdar, Swapan; Ghosh, Amal Kanti; Gandi, Lakshmi; Choudaha, Nidhi; Sharma, Ipsita; Pal, SP

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Basal cell adenoma (BCA) of the salivary glands is a rare benign salivary gland tumour. Differentiation of BCA from varied entities involving maxillofacial area is mandatory. Aim: To analyze the clinicopathological, histopathologic features, immunohistochemcal analysis and surgical considerations of this rare entity. Materials and Methods: This study included 12 cases of BCA from archives of department reported over the period of 13 years. All the pertaining clinicopathologic features such as incidence, age, sex and site of lesions were assessed. Tissue sections were stained by using panel of immunohistochemical markers, i.e. Pan CK, CK 5/6 and S100, Calponin, p63, CD 117 and smooth muscle actin. Results: BCA was observed in 26-52 years age group (mean age, 38.75 years) with female propensity of 7:5 male to female ratio. It is seen more commonly in parotid gland, followed by upper lip, buccal mucosa and palate. Solid type is the most common histopathologic type followed by tubular, membranous and trabecular. Only one case of membranous type of BCA showed recurrence. Pan CK, CK 5/6 showed strong immunoreactivity, calponin showed moderate staining, p63 and Ki-67 mild staining, whereas CD 117 and SMA showed negative immunostaining. Conclusion: Vigilant comprehensive analysis of all the pertaining clinicopathologic and histopathologic features and immunohistochemical analysis are required for differentiating from other lesions with basaloid differentiation having varying prognosis. PMID:25838763

  1. The Ptch1DL mouse: a new model to study lambdoid craniosynostosis and basal cell nevus syndrome associated skeletal defects

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weiguo; Choi, Irene; Clouthier, David E.; Niswander, Lee; Williams, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Mouse models provide valuable opportunities for probing the underlying pathology of human birth defects. Employing an ENU-based screen for recessive mutations affecting craniofacial anatomy we isolated a mouse strain, Dogface-like (DL), with abnormal skull and snout morphology. Examination of the skull indicated that these mice developed craniosynostosis of the lambdoid suture. Further analysis revealed skeletal defects related to the pathology of basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) including defects in development of the limbs, scapula, ribcage, secondary palate, cranial base, and cranial vault. In humans, BCNS is often associated with mutations in the Hedgehog receptor PTCH1 and genetic mapping in DL identified a point mutation at a splice donor site in Ptch1. Using genetic complementation analysis we determined that DL is a hypomorphic allele of Ptch1, leading to increased Hedgehog signaling. Two aberrant transcripts are generated by the mutated Ptch1DL gene, which would be predicted to reduce significantly the levels of functional Patched1 protein. This new Ptch1 allele broadens the mouse genetic reagents available to study the Hedgehog pathway and provides a valuable means to study the underlying skeletal abnormalities in BCNS. In addition, these results strengthen the connection between elevated Hedgehog signaling and craniosynostosis. PMID:23897749

  2. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  3. Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate in the ejaculatory duct.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Salazar, Alma J; Basler, Joseph W; Nicolas, Marlo M

    2010-08-01

    Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate (IDCP) involving prostatic ducts and acini is a well-known phenomenon typically seen in a background of high-grade invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The current case of prostatic adenocarcinoma with Gleason score of 9 (4 + 5) invades the ejaculatory ducts, left seminal vesicle, and extraprostatic tissue. The tumor involving the left ejaculatory duct spans the lumen with preservation of native duct architecture, including basal cells, similar features described in IDCP involving prostatic ducts and acini. PMID:20444733

  4. Expression of KIT (CD117) in neoplasms of the head and neck: an ancillary marker for adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mino, M; Pilch, B Z; Faquin, W C

    2003-12-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma is an indolent salivary gland malignancy that is associated with a poor long-term prognosis. The distinction of adenoid cystic carcinoma from other head and neck neoplasms can occasionally be problematic, particularly in small biopsies. Recent studies suggest that KIT (CD117) might be useful as an ancillary marker for adenoid cystic carcinoma; however, the expression of KIT in other benign and malignant head and neck neoplasms, including those that might mimic adenoid cystic carcinoma, has not been well studied. Here we use two different antibodies against KIT to evaluate its expression in a series of 66 adenoid cystic carcinomas compared with its expression in 98 other neoplasms of the head and neck. Overall, 94% (n = 62) of adenoid cystic carcinomas from various anatomic sites and of various histologic subtypes were positive for at least one of the KIT antibodies, and 77% (n = 50) of adenoid cystic carcinoma cases were positive for both antibodies. This contrasted with only 8% (n = 8) of other head and neck neoplasms that were positive for both KIT antibodies (P <.001). It was of note that certain neoplasms, including pleomorphic adenoma, basal cell adenoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma, that can show histologic overlap with adenoid cystic carcinoma had significantly less KIT immunoreactivity than did adenoid cystic carcinoma (P <.001). In contrast, KIT expression did not reliably distinguish adenoid cystic carcinoma from basal cell adenocarcinoma and basaloid squamous carcinoma (P >.05). The overall sensitivity of the two KIT antibodies for adenoid cystic carcinoma was 82-89%, and the specificity was 87-88%. The findings in this study support the potential use of KIT immunoexpression for distinguishing adenoid cystic carcinoma from many other benign and malignant head and neck neoplasms.

  5. Brachytherapy in Lip Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Guibert, Mireille; David, Isabelle; Vergez, Sebastien; Rives, Michel; Filleron, Thomas; Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local control and relapse-free survival in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the lips. We compared two groups: one with tumors on the skin and the other with tumors on the lip. Patients and methods: All patients had been treated at Claudius Regaud Cancer Centre from 1990 to 2008 for squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed with iridium 192 wires according to the Paris system rules. On average, the dose delivered was 65 Gy. Results: 172 consecutive patients were included in our study; 69 had skin carcinoma (squamous cell or basal cell), and 92 had squamous cell mucosal carcinoma. The average follow-up time was 5.4 years. In the skin cancer group, there were five local recurrences and one lymph node recurrence. In the mucosal cancer group, there were ten local recurrences and five lymph node recurrences. The 8-year relapse-free survival for the entire population was 80%. The 8-year relapse-free survival was 85% for skin carcinoma 75% for mucosal carcinoma, with no significant difference between groups. The functional results were satisfactory for 99% of patients, and the cosmetic results were satisfactory for 92%. Maximal toxicity observed was Grade 2. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate brachytherapy can be used to treat lip carcinomas at Stages T1 and T2 as the only treatment with excellent results for local control and relapse-free survival. The benefits of brachytherapy are also cosmetic and functional, with 91% of patients having no side effects.

  6. Secretory and basal cells of the epithelium of the tubular glands in the male Mullerian gland of the caecilian Uraeotyphlus narayani (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    George, Jancy M; Smita, Matthew; Kadalmani, Balamuthu; Girija, Ramankutty; Oommen, Oommen V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A

    2004-12-01

    Caecilians are exceptional among the vertebrates in that males retain the Mullerian duct as a functional glandular structure. The Mullerian gland on each side is formed from a large number of tubular glands connecting to a central duct, which either connects to the urogenital duct or opens directly into the cloaca. The Mullerian gland is believed to secrete a substance to be added to the sperm during ejaculation. Thus, the Mullerian gland could function as a male accessory reproductive gland. Recently, we described the male Mullerian gland of Uraeotyphlus narayani using light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and histochemistry. The present TEM study reports that the secretory cells of both the tubular and basal portions of the tubular glands of the male Mullerian gland of this caecilian produce secretion granules in the same manner as do other glandular epithelial cells. The secretion granules are released in the form of structured granules into the lumen of the tubular glands, and such granules are traceable to the lumen of the central duct of the Mullerian gland. This is comparable to the situation prevailing in the epididymal epithelium of several reptiles. In the secretory cells of the basal portion of the tubular glands, mitochondria are intimately associated with fabrication of the secretion granules. The structural and functional organization of the epithelium of the basal portion of the tubular glands is complicated by the presence of basal cells. This study suggests the origin of the basal cells from peritubular tissue leukocytes. The study also indicates a role for the basal cells in acquiring secretion granules from the neighboring secretory cells and processing them into lipofuscin material in the context of regression of the Mullerian gland during the period of reproductive quiescence. In these respects the basal cells match those in the epithelial lining of the epididymis of amniotes.

  7. Secretory and basal cells of the epithelium of the tubular glands in the male Mullerian gland of the caecilian Uraeotyphlus narayani (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    George, Jancy M; Smita, Matthew; Kadalmani, Balamuthu; Girija, Ramankutty; Oommen, Oommen V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A

    2004-12-01

    Caecilians are exceptional among the vertebrates in that males retain the Mullerian duct as a functional glandular structure. The Mullerian gland on each side is formed from a large number of tubular glands connecting to a central duct, which either connects to the urogenital duct or opens directly into the cloaca. The Mullerian gland is believed to secrete a substance to be added to the sperm during ejaculation. Thus, the Mullerian gland could function as a male accessory reproductive gland. Recently, we described the male Mullerian gland of Uraeotyphlus narayani using light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and histochemistry. The present TEM study reports that the secretory cells of both the tubular and basal portions of the tubular glands of the male Mullerian gland of this caecilian produce secretion granules in the same manner as do other glandular epithelial cells. The secretion granules are released in the form of structured granules into the lumen of the tubular glands, and such granules are traceable to the lumen of the central duct of the Mullerian gland. This is comparable to the situation prevailing in the epididymal epithelium of several reptiles. In the secretory cells of the basal portion of the tubular glands, mitochondria are intimately associated with fabrication of the secretion granules. The structural and functional organization of the epithelium of the basal portion of the tubular glands is complicated by the presence of basal cells. This study suggests the origin of the basal cells from peritubular tissue leukocytes. The study also indicates a role for the basal cells in acquiring secretion granules from the neighboring secretory cells and processing them into lipofuscin material in the context of regression of the Mullerian gland during the period of reproductive quiescence. In these respects the basal cells match those in the epithelial lining of the epididymis of amniotes. PMID:15487004

  8. Basal cell adenomas of the minor salivary glands. A clinicopathologic study of seventeen new cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, J E; Neville, B W

    1980-11-01

    The basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a benign monomorphic salivary gland tumor. Those of minor gland origin tend to occur within or adjacent to the upper lip (80 percent). The BCA is an encapsulated, slow-growing lesion which most commonly affects older persons. Several different histologic patterns can be noted, and often a combination of these variations is present within the same tumor. Simple surgical excision appears to be adequate treatment.

  9. Identification of genetic loci for basal cell nevus syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease in a single large pedigree.

    PubMed

    Panhuysen, Carolien I; Karban, Amir; Knodle Manning, Alisa; Bayless, Theodore M; Duerr, Richard H; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Epstein, Ervin H; Brant, Steven R

    2006-08-01

    Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant disease. PTCH1 gene mutations have been found responsible in many but not all pedigrees. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a complex genetic disorder, disproportionate in Ashkenazim, and characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. We revisited a large Ashkenazim pedigree, first reported in 1968, with multiple diagnoses of BCNS and IBD, and with a common genetic cause for both disorders proposed. We expanded the pedigree to four generations and performed a genome-wide linkage study for BCNS and IBD traits. Twelve members with BCNS, seven with IBD, five with both diagnoses and eight unaffected were genotyped. Both non-parametric (GENEHUNTER 2.1) and parametric (FASTLINK) linkage analyses were performed and a validation through simulation was performed. BCNS linked to chromosome 9q22 (D9S1120) just proximal to the PTCH1 gene (NPL=3.26, P=0.003; parametric two-point LOD=2.4, parametric multipoint LOD=3.7). Novel IBD linkage evidence was observed at chromosome 1p13 (D1S420, NPL 3.92, P=0.0047; parametric two-point LOD=1.9). Linkage evidence was also observed to previously reported IBD loci on 4q, (D4S2623, NPL 3.02, P=0.012; parametric two-point LOD=2.15), 10q23 (D10S1225 near DLG5, NPL 3.33, P=0.0085; parametric two-point LOD=1.3), 12 overlapping the IBD2 locus (D12S313, NPL 2.6, P=0.018; parametric two-point LOD=1.52), and 7q (D7S510 and D7S3046, NPL 4.06, P=0.0035; parametric two-point LOD=2.18). In this pedigree affected by both BCNS and IBD, the two traits and their respective candidate genetic loci segregate independently; BCNS maps to the PTCH1 gene and IBD maps to several candidate regions, mostly overlapping previously observed IBD loci. PMID:16733713

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis, anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, and risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer: cohort study based on nationwide prospectively recorded data from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Julia F; Asker Hagelberg, Charlotte; Askling, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer in patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologic drugs, in patients starting tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment, and in the general population. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Nationwide data from Sweden. Participants Cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologics (n=46 409), cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting TNF inhibitor treatment as first biologic in 1998-2012 (n=12 558), and matched general population comparator cohort, identified through national quality of care and health registers. Main outcome measure Hazard ratio of first in situ or invasive squamous cell skin cancer (1998-2012) and first basal cell cancer (2004-12). Results For basal cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.22 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.41) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.14 (0.98 to 1.33; 236 v 1587 events) comparing TNF inhibitor treated patients with biologics-naive patients. For squamous cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.88 (1.74 to 2.03) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.30 (1.10 to 1.55; 191 v 847 events) comparing TNF inhibitors with biologics-naive patients; the latter translated to an annual number needed to harm in the order of 1600. Among people with a history of squamous cell or basal cell cancer, TNF inhibitors did not further increase risks. Conclusion A small to moderately increased risk of basal cell cancer was seen in biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients, with no further effect of TNF inhibitors. For squamous cell cancer, the risk was nearly doubled in biologics-naive patients, with a further 30% increase in risk among patients treated with TNF inhibitors; this translates to one additional case for every 1600 years of treatment experience, assuming that this association reflected causality

  11. Carcinoma of the hand: a 20-year experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, D.J.; Rees, R.S.; O'Leary, J.P.; Lynch, J.B.

    1984-08-01

    We reviewed our 20-year experience with cutaneous carcinoma of the hand and identified 70 cases (basal cell 23%, squamous cell 77%). The documented risk factors included solar radiation, trauma, and irradiation. Lesions were treated surgically with amputation, excision, skin graft, or flap closure, and nonsurgically with cryosurgery, curettage, 5-fluorouracil, or irradiation. The recurrence was lower with surgical treatment (3%) than with nonsurgical (33%). Regional lymphadenectomy was required in four patients for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Recurrence was greater (9%) and metastasis more common (38%) in patients with Marjolin's type of secondary squamous cell carcinoma than with solar-induced lesions. Cause is an important factor in outcome and should be considered in initial treatment and long-term management.

  12. Carcinoma of the hand: a 20-year experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, D.J.; Rees, R.S.; O'Leary, J.P.; Lynch, J.B.

    1984-08-01

    The authors reviewed their 20-year experience with cutaneous carcinoma of the hand and identified 70 cases (basal cell 23%, squamous cell 77%). The documented risk factors included solar radiation, trauma, and irradiation. Lesions were treated surgically with amputation, excision, skin graft, or flap closure, and nonsurgically with cryosurgery, curettage, 5-fluorouracil, or irradiation. The recurrence was lower with surgical treatment (3%) than with nonsurgical (33%). Regional lymphadenectomy was required in four patients for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Recurrence was greater (9%) and metastasis more common (38%) in patients with Marjolin's type of secondary squamous cell carcinoma than with solar-induced lesions. Cause is an important factor in outcome and should be considered in initial treatment and long-term management.

  13. Endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma of the eyelid.

    PubMed

    Collinson, Anne C; Sun, Michelle T; James, Craig; Huilgol, Shyamala C; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-12-01

    An elderly woman was incidentally noted to have a nodular mass on the upper eyelid, whilst under investigation for cataracts. Punch biopsy of this presumed basal cell carcinoma revealed it to be endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma (EMPSGC). The tumour extended to the deep dermal layer and comprised solid nests with foci of cystic and papillary change, and additional cytoplasmic and focal extracellular mucin deposits. Immunohistochemistry confirmed epithelial lineage and neuroendocrine differentiation, and adjacent tissue invasion. The tumour was excised completely with Mohs micrographic surgery with no recurrence after 8 months. EMPSGC is a low-grade sweat gland carcinoma with variable neuroendocrine differentiation, a solid, papillary, or cystic growth pattern, and a predilection for the eyelid of elderly women [Am J Surg Pathol 29:1330-1339, 2005]. There have been 54 previously documented cases of EMPSCG. We report an additional case and review the literature. PMID:26373656

  14. Gorlin syndrome and bilateral ovarian fibroma

    PubMed Central

    Pirschner, Fernanda; Bastos, Pollyana Marçal; Contarato, George Luiz; Bimbato, Anna Carolina Bon Lima; Filho, Antônio Chambô

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gorlin syndrome (GS), also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare hereditary, autosomal dominant disease that affects various systems. Its prevalence is estimated at 1/57,000 to 1/256,000 of the population. It is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, multiple odontogenic keratocysts, skeletal abnormalities and ovarian fibroma, among other disorders. PRESENTATION OF CASE To report the case of a young patient with Gorlin syndrome and bilateral ovarian fibroma. DISCUSSION A 20-year old patient with Gorlin syndrome presented with facial asymmetry, broad nasal root, dental abnormalities, micrognathism, convergent strabismus, multiple pigmented lesions on the trunk and face, pectus excavatum, kyphoscoliosis and a palpable mass in the abdomen occupying the entire pelvic region. CONCLUSION Gorlin–Goltz syndrome is a hereditary pathology that includes numerous clinical manifestations. Diagnosis is clinical and genetic confirmation is unnecessary. PMID:22771908

  15. [Carcinomas of internal organs and their relationship to arsenical drinking water in the Republic of Argentina].

    PubMed

    Tello, E E

    1988-01-01

    Presently exist only four regions where the supply of drinking water with an abnormally high content of arsenic and/or its salts, produces cutaneous signs generically termed "arsenical toxidermias" or "chronic arsenism"; they are: Mexico, Taiwan, Chile and Argentina. In this paper details are given of the typical skin lesions of hydroarsenism and the generally multiple epitheliomas of varied histological and clinical pattern in 340 patients; the diseases characterized for not being acute but chronic and the relanodermia holds a secondary place. Among histologically diagnosed carcinomas, deep basal-cell (276) and superficial multiple basal-cell (130) carcinomas predominate over the squamous-cell carcinomas (239) and Bowen disease (113); 18 mixed carcinomas were found. In these 340 patients, 51 carcinomas of the internal organs (15%), 34 of lungs, 8 of larynx, 3 of stomach, 2 of liver and 1 of pharynx, trachea, esophagus and breast in a man were diagnosed, which evolved in a similar manner to that of not arsenical patients.

  16. Further delineation of 9q22 deletion syndrome associated with basal cell nevus (Gorlin) syndrome: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kayono; Yoshihashi, Hiroshi; Furuya, Noritaka; Adachi, Masanori; Ito, Susumu; Tanaka, Yukichi; Masuno, Mitsuo; Chiyo, Hideaki; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2009-03-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS; Gorlin syndrome) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by a predisposition to neoplasms and developmental abnormalities. BCNS is caused by mutations in the human homolog of the Drosophila patched gene-1, PTCH1, which is mapped on chromosome 9q22.3. Nonsense, frameshift, in-frame deletions, splice-site, and missense mutations have been found in the syndrome. Haploinsufficiency of PTCH1, which is caused by interstitial deletion of 9q22.3, is also responsible for the syndrome. To date, 19 cases with interstitial deletion of long arm of chromosome 9 involving the region of q22 have been reported. We describe two unrelated patients with some typical features of BCNS associated with deletion of 9q21.33-q31.1 and determined the boundary of the deletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. The results showed that the size of deletions is between 15.33 and 16.04 Mb in patient 1 and between 18.08 and 18.54 Mb in patient 2. Although the size and breakpoints were different from those of previously reported cases, the clinical features are common to patients with 9q22 deletion associated with BCNS. Delineation of the 9q22 deletions and further consideration of the genes responsible for the characteristic manifestations may provide insight into this newly recognized deletion syndrome. PMID:19243411

  17. The Ptch1(DL) mouse: a new model to study lambdoid craniosynostosis and basal cell nevus syndrome-associated skeletal defects.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weiguo; Choi, Irene; Clouthier, David E; Niswander, Lee; Williams, Trevor

    2013-10-01

    Mouse models provide valuable opportunities for probing the underlying pathology of human birth defects. By using an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-based screen for recessive mutations affecting craniofacial anatomy, we isolated a mouse strain, Dogface-like (DL), with abnormal skull and snout morphology. Examination of the skull indicated that these mice developed craniosynostosis of the lambdoid suture. Further analysis revealed skeletal defects related to the pathology of basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) including defects in development of the limbs, scapula, ribcage, secondary palate, cranial base, and cranial vault. In humans, BCNS is often associated with mutations in the Hedgehog receptor PTCH1 and genetic mapping in DL identified a point mutation at a splice donor site in Ptch1. By using genetic complementation analysis we determined that DL is a hypomorphic allele of Ptch1, leading to increased Hedgehog signaling. Two aberrant transcripts are generated by the mutated Ptch1(DL) gene, which would be predicted to reduce significantly the levels of functional Patched1 protein. This new Ptch1 allele broadens the mouse genetic reagents available to study the Hedgehog pathway and provides a valuable means to study the underlying skeletal abnormalities in BCNS. In addition, these results strengthen the connection between elevated Hedgehog signaling and craniosynostosis. PMID:23897749

  18. Definitive Radiotherapy for Skin and Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma with Perineural Invasion.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Dagan, Roi; Bryant, Curtis M; Amdur, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) and, to a lesser extent, cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas may exhibit perineural invasion (PNI). A subset of patients have tumors with extensive PNI tracking to the skull base that are incompletely resectable and are treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). RT may be administered with intensity-modulated RT or proton RT. Patients with ACC may also be considered for neutron RT, although the number of available neutron facilities is limited. A substantial proportion of patients with incompletely resectable ACCs and cutaneous carcinomas may be cured with definitive RT. Proton RT provides a more conformal dose distribution compared with other modalities and is likely associated with a lower risk of complications. PMID:27123393

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Will heightened awareness of risk factors slow its increase?

    PubMed

    Hacker, S M; Flowers, F P

    1993-06-01

    Although squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is still less common than basal cell carcinoma, its incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Cumulative sun exposure is a major risk factor, and deterioration of the ozone layer combined with life-style choices that promote time in the sun may account for part of the increased incidence. Other risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma include exposure to ionizing radiation, arsenic, or industrial chemicals; viral infection; preexisting burns and scars; and immunosuppression. Actinic keratosis is considered a precancerous lesion that should be watched closely. Treatment methods for squamous cell carcinoma vary depending on the size and location of the lesion. Knowledge of high-risk locations and appropriate treatment choices ensures proper care and decreases the likelihood of metastasis.

  20. Keratin modifications in epidermis, papillomas, and carcinomas during two-stage carcinogenesis in the SENCAR mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K.G.; Slaga, T.J.

    1982-10-01

    To elucidate the role of keratin modification in tumor promotion, the authors investigated the keratin polypeptide patterns of mouse epidermis, papillomas, and carcinomas throughout an initiation-promotion experiment. The epidermal keratin modifications induced by repetitive 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatments in both initiated and noninitiated mouse skin were essentially identical to those observed with a single 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate application. These changes were even more pronounced in epidermal papillomas. As the experiment progressed, there appeared to be a selective loss of one group of high-molecular-weight keratins (M/sub r/ 62,000) in some of the papillomas. Interestingly, the carcinomas that appeared at this time had significant reduction in both groups of high-molecular-weight keratins. In fact, the keratin profiles of carcinomas were very similar to the patterns observed in basal cells after a single 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment of adult epidermis. This may indicate that the program of keratin expression of a carcinoma becomes permanently fixed at a basal cell pattern. Changes in keratin patterns may serve as a biochemical marker of malignant progression in mouse epidermis.

  1. Novel t(1;3)(q21,p21) translocation in a basal cell adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland: potential association with tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Karan; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Myers, Jeffery N; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2016-08-01

    We report a rare translocation involving chromosomes 1q23 and 3p21 regions in a basaloid salivary carcinoma. Our case together with a previously reported instance of translocation involving chromosome 1q 21-24 region defines a specific chromosomal segment that may house a gene associated with the development of a subset of basaloid salivary tumors.

  2. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: Case Report of a Rare Hereditary Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Ashutosh; Murari, Aditi; Vutukuri, Sunil; Singh, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder with complete penetrance and extreme variable expressivity. Case Report. The present paper highlights the importance of diagnostic criteria and histopathology in early and prompt diagnosis which will lead to proper treatment and genetic counseling of the patient. Discussion. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is about multisystem process comprising the triad of basal cell nevi, jaw keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. A spectrum of other neurological, ophthalmic, endocrine and genital manifestations is known to be variably associated with this triad. Diagnosis of the syndrome is based on major and minor criteria. Conclusion. This paper emphasizes the importance of oral and maxillofacial health professionals in the early diagnosis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome and in a preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis to the patient. PMID:23050170

  3. p63 immunohistochemistry differentiates salivary gland oncocytoma and oncocytic carcinoma from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Jonathan B; Hoschar, Aaron P; Dvorakova, Mari; Parwani, Anil V; Barnes, E Leon; Seethala, Raja R

    2007-12-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can pose diagnostic challenges in the head and neck often resembling benign and malignant oncocytic lesions. Immunohistochemical panels have been reported to help with this differential but are not entirely specific or sensitive. We have noticed that p63 routinely stains salivary gland oncocytomas but not metastatic RCC. Nineteen oncocytomas, 9 cases of oncocytosis, 9 oncocytic carcinomas and 16 head and neck metastatic RCC were studied. Morphologic features evaluated were cytoplasmic character (clear versus oncocytic), Fuhrman nuclear grade, mitotic rate, growth pattern, presence of lumens/blood lakes and stromal characteristics. Tumors were stained with antibodies to p63, renal cell carcinoma marker (RCCm), CD10, and vimentin. Eight benign oncocytic tumors (29%) had clear cell features while 6 metastatic RCC (37%) had oncocytic features. Median Fuhrman nuclear grade was 2 in oncocytoma and oncocytosis and 3 both oncocytic carcinoma and metastatic RCC. Mitotic rates were only significantly different between benign oncocytic tumors and metastatic RCC. All oncocytomas had lumina compared to half of metastatic RCC, all of which also demonstrated blood lakes. Seven benign oncocytic tumors (25%) and 5 oncocytic carcinomas (56%) had RCC-like vascular stroma. All primary salivary gland tumors were positive for p63, predominately in basal cell-type distribution. None of the metastatic RCC was positive. RCCm was entirely specific but lacked sensitivity for metastatic RCC while CD10 and vimentin showed variable sensitivity and specificity. While clinical history and morphology usually are adequate, demonstration of p63 staining can definitively exclude metastatic RCC from the differential diagnosis of similar appearing tumors in salivary glands, namely oncocytoma and oncocytic carcinoma, with 100% specificity and sensitivity. While RCCm, CD10, and vimentin performed adequately, they were significantly less reliable than p63 with both

  4. Sarcomatoid carcinoma arising in the congenital pigmented nevus after treatment with carbon dioxide snow freezing method.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Rina; Komine, Mayumi; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Fusumae, Takayuki; Fujita, Yurika; Maekawa, Takeo; Murata, Satoru; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of sarcomatoid carcinoma of the skin in a 63-year-old man who was treated with the carbon dioxide snow freezing method for a huge congenital pigmented nevus that extended from the right upper extremity to the right trunk during childhood. He had an exophytic red tumor on the nevus in the right upper extremity that grew slowly for 4 years and rapidly recently. Histological and immunohistochemical studies revealed both epithelial and mesenchymal malignancy in the same tumor. The epithelial component was composed of basaloid cells forming multiple nests with peripheral palisading, positive for keratins and BerEP4, implying basal cell carcinoma. The mesenchymal component was composed of spindle-shaped cells negative for keratins and positive for vimentin, suggesting sarcoma. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of sarcomatoid carcinoma arising in the primary pigmented nevus that had been treated by the carbon dioxide snow freezing method.

  5. Simulators of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin: Diagnostic Challenges on Small Biopsies and Clinicopathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kong-Bing; Tan, Sze-Hwa; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee; Jaffar, Huma; Lim, Thiam-Chye; Lee, Shu-Jin; Lee, Yoke-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common and important primary cutaneous malignancy. On skin biopsies, SCC is characterized by significant squamous cell atypia, abnormal keratinization, and invasive features. Diagnostic challenges may occasionally arise, especially in the setting of small punch biopsies or superficial shave biopsies, where only part of the lesion may be assessable by the pathologist. Benign mimics of SCC include pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, eccrine squamous syringometaplasia, inverted follicular keratosis, and keratoacanthoma, while malignant mimics of SCC include basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and metastatic carcinoma. The careful application of time-honored diagnostic criteria, close clinicopathological correlation and a selective request for a further, deeper, or wider biopsy remain the most useful strategies to clinch the correct diagnosis. This review aims to present the key differential diagnoses of SCC, to discuss common diagnostic pitfalls, and to recommend ways to deal with diagnostically challenging cases. PMID:23878739

  6. Polymeric Nanoparticles to Combat Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Patients with Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Rajadas, Jayakumar; Inayathullah, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is the leading cause of malignancy in the United States, with Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma , and Melanoma being the three most common diagnoses, respectively. Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) is a particular concern for patients suffering from Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (DEB), a disease that affects the production and function of collagen VII, a protein that forms the anchoring fibrils which bind the epidermis to the dermis. Patients with DEB suffer from chronic blistering and wounds that have impaired healing capabilities, often leading to the development of SCC and eventual mortality. Nanomedicine is playing an increasing role in the delivery of effective therapeutics to combat a wide range of diseases, including the imaging and treatment of SCC. In this review, we discuss the role of nanoparticles in the treatment of SCC with an emphasis on PLGA nanoparticles and SCCs found in patients suffering from DEB, and address recent patents that are pertinent to the development of novel nanomedical therapeutics. PMID:25506404

  7. Gastric Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Alekshun, Todd J.

    2010-01-01

    Case: A 63-year-old male presented with unintentional weight loss of 20 pounds over a 4-month duration. He reported loss of appetite, intermittent post-prandial nausea, bloating and early satiety. He also complained of dyspepsia and had been treated for reflux during the previous 2 years. He denied vomiting, dysphagia, odynophagia, abdominal pain, melena, hematochezia, or alterations in bowel habits. Additionally, he denied fevers, night sweats, cough, or dyspnea. He quit smoking 25 years ago, and denied alcohol use. His past medical history was significant for basal cell carcinoma treated with local curative therapy and he was without recurrence on surveillance. Pertinent family history included a paternal uncle with lung cancer at the age of 74. Physical examination was unremarkable except for occult heme-positive stools. Laboratory evaluation revealed elevated liver enzymes (ALT-112, AST-81, AlkPhos-364). CT scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis showed diffuse heterogeneous liver with extensive nodularity, raising the concern for metastases. Serum tumor-markers: PSA, CEA, CA 19-9, and AFP were all within normal limits. Screening colonoscopy was normal, but esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a malignant-appearing ulcerative lesion involving the gastro-esophageal junction and gastric cardia. Pathology confirmed an invasive gastric large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of a hepatic lesion revealed malignant cells with cytologic features consistent with large-cell type carcinoma and positive immunostaining for synaptophysin favoring neuroendocrine differentiation. A PET-CT demonstrated intense diffuse FDG uptake of the liver, suggesting diffuse hepatic parenchymal infiltration by tumor. There were multiple foci of intense osseous FDG uptake with corresponding osteolytic lesions seen on CT scan. The remaining intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic structures were unremarkable. The patient will receive palliative systemic therapy

  8. Metastatic Breast Carcinoma to the Prostate Gland.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Meghan E; Giannico, Giovanna A; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the male breast is an uncommon event with metastases to the breast occurring even less frequently. Prostate carcinoma has been reported as the most frequent primary to metastasize to the breast; however, the reverse has not been previously reported. Herein, we present, for the first time, a case of breast carcinoma metastasizing to the prostate gland. Prostate needle core biopsy revealed infiltrative nests of neoplastic epithelioid cells, demonstrated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) to be positive for GATA3 and ER and negative for PSA and P501S. A prostate cocktail by IHC study demonstrated lack of basal cells (p63 and CK903) and no expression of P501S. The patient's previous breast needle core biopsy showed strong ER positivity and negative staining for PR and HER2. Similar to the prostate, the breast was negative for CK5/6, p63, and p40. This case demonstrates the importance of considering a broad differential diagnosis and comparing histology and IHC to prior known malignancies in the setting of atypical presentation or rare tumors. PMID:27429817

  9. Adrenocortical carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... this tumor. Adrenocortical carcinoma can produce the hormones cortisol, aldosterone, estrogen, or testosterone, as well as other ... Symptoms of increased cortisol or other adrenal gland hormones: ... high on the back just below the neck ( buffalo hump ) Flushed, ...

  10. Non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Maj, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-12-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cutaneous malignancy after basal cell carcinoma. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for squamous cell carcinoma is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Dermoscopy has become one of the basic diagnostic methods in clinical practice. The most common dermoscopic features of squamous cell carcinoma include clustered vascular pattern, glomerular vessels and hyperkeratosis. Under reflectance confocal microscopy, squamous cell carcinoma shows an atypical honeycomb or disarranged pattern of the spinous-granular layer of the epidermis, round nucleated bright cells in the epidermis and round vessels in the dermis. High frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography may be helpful in predominantly in pre-surgical evaluation of tumor size. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, lip, oral mucosa, vulva or other tissues include high-definition optical coherence tomography, in vivo multiphoton tomography, direct oral microscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, differential path-length spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry.

  11. Non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Maj, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-12-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cutaneous malignancy after basal cell carcinoma. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for squamous cell carcinoma is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Dermoscopy has become one of the basic diagnostic methods in clinical practice. The most common dermoscopic features of squamous cell carcinoma include clustered vascular pattern, glomerular vessels and hyperkeratosis. Under reflectance confocal microscopy, squamous cell carcinoma shows an atypical honeycomb or disarranged pattern of the spinous-granular layer of the epidermis, round nucleated bright cells in the epidermis and round vessels in the dermis. High frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography may be helpful in predominantly in pre-surgical evaluation of tumor size. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, lip, oral mucosa, vulva or other tissues include high-definition optical coherence tomography, in vivo multiphoton tomography, direct oral microscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, differential path-length spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. PMID:26848316

  12. Neglected skin cancer in the elderly: a case of basosquamous cell carcinoma of the right shoulder.

    PubMed

    Bisgaard, Erika; Tarakji, Michael; Lau, Frank; Riker, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer remains the most common cancer worldwide, and basal cell carcinoma represents the largest portion of non-melanomatous skin cancers with over 3 million cases diagnosed annually. Locally advanced disease is frequently seen in the elderly posing clinical challenges regarding proper treatment.We report on an 86-year-old female presenting with fatigue, anemia and a large ulcerated skin lesion along the right upper back. A biopsy of the lesion revealed a basosquamous cell carcinoma. She underwent a wide local excision with complex wound reconstruction.Neglected skin cancers in the elderly can present difficult clinical scenarios. There are associated adjuvant therapies that should be considered following resection, such as local radiation therapy and other novel therapies. Newer therapies, such as with vismodegib, may also be considered. A comprehensive, multimodal approach to treatment should be considered in most cases of locally advanced, non-melanoma skin cancers. PMID:27534889

  13. From Normal Skin to Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Quest for Novel Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Vlad; Calenic, Bogdan; Ghita, Mihaela; Lupu, Mihai; Caruntu, Ana; Moraru, Liliana; Voiculescu, Suzana; Ion, Alexandra; Greabu, Maria; Ishkitiev, Nikolay; Caruntu, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cells carcinoma (SCC) is the second most frequent of the keratinocyte-derived malignancies after basal cell carcinoma and is associated with a significant psychosocial and economic burden for both the patient himself and society. Reported risk factors for the malignant transformation of keratinocytes and development of SCC include ultraviolet light exposure, followed by chronic scarring and inflammation, exposure to chemical compounds (arsenic, insecticides, and pesticides), and immune-suppression. Despite various available treatment methods and recent advances in noninvasive or minimal invasive diagnostic techniques, the risk recurrence and metastasis are far from being negligible, even in patients with negative histological margins and lymph nodes. Analyzing normal, dysplastic, and malignant keratinocyte proteome holds special promise for novel biomarker discovery in SCC that could be used in the future for early detection, risk assessment, tumor monitoring, and development of targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:27642215

  14. From Normal Skin to Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Quest for Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, Mihaela; Moraru, Liliana; Voiculescu, Suzana; Greabu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cells carcinoma (SCC) is the second most frequent of the keratinocyte-derived malignancies after basal cell carcinoma and is associated with a significant psychosocial and economic burden for both the patient himself and society. Reported risk factors for the malignant transformation of keratinocytes and development of SCC include ultraviolet light exposure, followed by chronic scarring and inflammation, exposure to chemical compounds (arsenic, insecticides, and pesticides), and immune-suppression. Despite various available treatment methods and recent advances in noninvasive or minimal invasive diagnostic techniques, the risk recurrence and metastasis are far from being negligible, even in patients with negative histological margins and lymph nodes. Analyzing normal, dysplastic, and malignant keratinocyte proteome holds special promise for novel biomarker discovery in SCC that could be used in the future for early detection, risk assessment, tumor monitoring, and development of targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:27642215

  15. From Normal Skin to Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Quest for Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, Mihaela; Moraru, Liliana; Voiculescu, Suzana; Greabu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cells carcinoma (SCC) is the second most frequent of the keratinocyte-derived malignancies after basal cell carcinoma and is associated with a significant psychosocial and economic burden for both the patient himself and society. Reported risk factors for the malignant transformation of keratinocytes and development of SCC include ultraviolet light exposure, followed by chronic scarring and inflammation, exposure to chemical compounds (arsenic, insecticides, and pesticides), and immune-suppression. Despite various available treatment methods and recent advances in noninvasive or minimal invasive diagnostic techniques, the risk recurrence and metastasis are far from being negligible, even in patients with negative histological margins and lymph nodes. Analyzing normal, dysplastic, and malignant keratinocyte proteome holds special promise for novel biomarker discovery in SCC that could be used in the future for early detection, risk assessment, tumor monitoring, and development of targeted therapeutic strategies.

  16. Neglected skin cancer in the elderly: a case of basosquamous cell carcinoma of the right shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Bisgaard, Erika; Tarakji, Michael; Lau, Frank; Riker, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer remains the most common cancer worldwide, and basal cell carcinoma represents the largest portion of non-melanomatous skin cancers with over 3 million cases diagnosed annually. Locally advanced disease is frequently seen in the elderly posing clinical challenges regarding proper treatment. We report on an 86-year-old female presenting with fatigue, anemia and a large ulcerated skin lesion along the right upper back. A biopsy of the lesion revealed a basosquamous cell carcinoma. She underwent a wide local excision with complex wound reconstruction. Neglected skin cancers in the elderly can present difficult clinical scenarios. There are associated adjuvant therapies that should be considered following resection, such as local radiation therapy and other novel therapies. Newer therapies, such as with vismodegib, may also be considered. A comprehensive, multimodal approach to treatment should be considered in most cases of locally advanced, non-melanoma skin cancers. PMID:27534889

  17. Accelerated growth of skin carcinoma following fludarabine therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Kamran; Ng, Richard; Mastan, Alina; Sager, Dianne; Hirschman, Richard

    2005-07-01

    We present four patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with fludarabine, who developed aggressive skin cancer after years of quiescence, a short time after institution of treatment. Their leukemias responded well to therapy with fludarabine with initial treatment as well as relapse. Three patients had recurrence with basal cell carcinomas with multiple, rapidly growing tumors and one had recurrence of both basal and squamous cancers and eventually died of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Fludarabine induces prolonged period of lymphopenia, affecting especially the T cell population, which is crucial in the defense against skin cancers. There appears to be a direct association between fludarabine and the flare up of skin cancers in these patients, possibly analogous to the increased incidence of these malignancies in patients on chronic cyclosporine immunosuppression.

  18. Cytologic diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Nagel, H; Hotze, H J; Laskawi, R; Chilla, R; Droese, M

    1999-06-01

    The cytomorphologic features in fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from 31 primary and 33 recurrent adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) were investigated. The correct FNA diagnosis was established in 24 of 31 primary ACC (77%). The diagnostic clue in aspirates from ACC are large globules of extracellular matrix, partially surrounded by basaloid tumor cells. In FNAs with predominance of basaloid tumor cells, but lacking characteristic globules, all other benign and malignant salivary gland tumors of epithelial-myoepithelial differentiation should be considered in the cytologic diagnosis. Pleomorphic adenoma is most frequently confused with ACC, and therefore, the cytologic findings in FNAs from 50 pleomorphic adenomas were compared with those diagnosed as ACC. Furthermore, rare neoplasms of salivary glands with epithelial-myoepithelial cell differentiation, including basal-cell adenoma and carcinoma, epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, as well as some nonsalivary gland neoplasms presenting an adenoid cystic pattern, must be considered. The cytologic features of these entities are discussed in detail with respect to the cytologic diagnostic criteria of ACC.

  19. [Thymic carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Ströbel, P; Weis, C-A; Marx, A

    2016-09-01

    Thymic carcinomas (TC) are approximately 10 times less prevalent than thymomas but of high clinical relevance because they are more aggressive, less frequently resectable than thymomas and usually refractory to classical and targeted long-term treatment approaches. Furthermore, in children and adolescents TC are more frequent than thymomas and particularly in this age group, germ cell tumors need to be a differential diagnostic consideration. In diagnostic terms pathologists face two challenges: a), the distinction between thymic carcinomas and thymomas with a similar appearance and b), the distinction between TC and histologically similar metastases and tumor extensions from other primary tumors. Overcoming these diagnostic challenges is the focus of the new WHO classification of thymic epithelial tumors. The objectives of this review are to highlight novel aspects of the WHO classification of thymic carcinomas and to address therapeutically relevant diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:27538748

  20. A Model to Predict the Risk of Keratinocyte Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, David C; Thompson, Bridie S; Thrift, Aaron P; Hughes, Maria-Celia; Muranushi, Chiho; Neale, Rachel E; Green, Adele C; Olsen, Catherine M

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin are the commonest cancers in humans, yet no validated tools exist to estimate future risks of developing keratinocyte carcinomas. To develop a prediction tool, we used baseline data from a prospective cohort study (n = 38,726) in Queensland, Australia, and used data linkage to capture all surgically excised keratinocyte carcinomas arising within the cohort. Predictive factors were identified through stepwise logistic regression models. In secondary analyses, we derived separate models within strata of prior skin cancer history, age, and sex. The primary model included terms for 10 items. Factors with the strongest effects were >20 prior skin cancers excised (odds ratio 8.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 6.73-10.91), >50 skin lesions destroyed (odds ratio 3.37, 95% CI 2.85-3.99), age ≥ 70 years (odds ratio 3.47, 95% CI 2.53-4.77), and fair skin color (odds ratio 1.75, 95% CI 1.42-2.15). Discrimination in the validation dataset was high (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve 0.80, 95% CI 0.79-0.81) and the model appeared well calibrated. Among those reporting no prior history of skin cancer, a similar model with 10 factors predicted keratinocyte carcinoma events with reasonable discrimination (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve 0.72, 95% CI 0.70-0.75). Algorithms using self-reported patient data have high accuracy for predicting risks of keratinocyte carcinomas.

  1. Pseudohyperplastic prostatic carcinoma in simple prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Arista-Nasr, Julián; Martinez-Benitez, Braulio; Fernandez-Amador, Jose Antonio; Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia; Arceo-Olaiz, Ricardo; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    Pseudohyperplastic carcinoma (PHPC) is a prostatic neoplasm that can be easily mistaken for nodular hyperplasia or atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. To determine the frequency and clinicopathologic characteristics of PHPC, we reviewed 200 simple prostatectomy specimens. We found 3 cases (1.5%) of PHPC. The tumors were small and ranged in size from 4 to 6 mm. Two of them were erroneously diagnosed as benign glandular proliferations in the original interpretation. Their histologic aspect at low magnification showed nodules of well-differentiated medium-sized glands with cystic dilation in a tight arrangement that imparted a benign appearance. Corpora amylacea were found in 2 cases. However, the lining cells showed nucleomegaly and prominent nuclei in most of the neoplastic glands, and the high-molecular-weight keratin (34BE12) immunostain revealed absence of basal cells. α-Methylacyl-CoA-racemase was positive in 2 cases. In one case, a small focus of moderated acinar adenocarcinoma was found adjacent to the pseudohyperplastic glands facilitating the diagnosis. The 3 patients are disease-free 3 and 4 years after surgery probably because of the small size of the tumors; however, it must be emphasized that most PHPC are considered moderately differentiated and potentially aggressive neoplasms.

  2. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... The cause of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is unknown. MTC is very rare. It can occur in children and adults. Unlike other types ...

  3. Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Alex C.; Sabolch, Aaron; Raymond, Victoria M.; Kandathil, Asha; Caoili, Elaine M.; Jolly, Shruti; Miller, Barbra S.; Giordano, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare endocrine malignancy, often with an unfavorable prognosis. Here we summarize the knowledge about diagnosis, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and therapy of ACC. Over recent years, multidisciplinary clinics have formed and the first international treatment trials have been conducted. This review focuses on evidence gained from recent basic science and clinical research and provides perspectives from the experience of a large multidisciplinary clinic dedicated to the care of patients with ACC. PMID:24423978

  4. Oral Rigosertib for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  5. Solid Variant of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma: Difficulties in Diagnostic Recognition.

    PubMed

    Ben Salha, Imen; Bhide, Shree; Mourtzoukou, Despoina; Fisher, Cyril; Thway, Khin

    2016-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a malignant neoplasm that mainly affects the salivary glands but has been described in many other anatomical sites. It is composed of basaloid cells with myoepithelial/basal cell differentiation and ductal epithelial cells that proliferate in a fibrous stroma, with variable amounts of myxohyaline material. Three patterns (cribriform, tubular, and solid) occur, and the solid variant is characterized by a predominant compact sheet-like and nested pattern of rounded basaloid cells lacking obvious cribriform or tubular architecture. The solid variant has significant morphological and immunohistochemical overlap with a large range of neoplasms of different lineages, including other carcinomas and sarcomas. We describe a case of solid variant ACC of the paranasal sinuses, which showed an almost entirely solid pattern of growth (in >95% of cells) and which on initial biopsy showed no features of classical ACC. This highlights the potential for diagnostic misinterpretation with a variety of other neoplasms, which is particularly important because of the significant difference in treatment for ACC and tumors in its differential diagnosis.

  6. Adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Recent developments in the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) include diagnostic and prognostic risk stratification algorithms, increasing evidence of the impact of historical therapies on overall survival, and emerging targets from integrated epigenomic and genomic analyses. Advances include proper clinical and molecular characterization of all patients with ACC, standardization of proliferative index analyses, referral of these patients to large cancer referral centers at the time of first surgery, and development of new trials in patients with well-characterized ACC. Networking and progress in the molecular characterization of ACC constitute the basis for significant future therapeutic breakthroughs. PMID:26038209

  7. Thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Skolnik, E.M.; Baim, H.M.; Becker, S.P.; Katz, A.H.; Mantravadi, R.V.

    1980-12-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma was studied with regard to mode of presentation, initial findings, treatment and survival. The classic signs, symptoms, physical and scan findings were found to be present in approximately 70% of the patients. Prognosis was found to be dependent on age of presentation more than any other factor. Patients with prior exposure to radiation were found to have more extensive disease and require more extensive surgery but ultimately had the same prognosis for 15-year cure. Treatment for distant metastatic disease by surgery, radioactive iodine and external radiation all resulted in long-term survival in certain cases.

  8. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the skin of the face and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Chahbazian, C.M.; Brown, G.S.

    1980-09-05

    Approximately 300,000 new cases of carcinomas of the skin are diagnosed each year in the Unied States. The great majority of these lesions are on the skin of the face and neck. The proximity of these neoplasms to important structures such as the eyes, nose, and ears has prompted this discussion of the role of radiation therapy in their management. Most carcinomas of the skin of the nose and eyelids are basal cell carcinomas, while most tumors arising on the pinna are squamous cell carcinomas. Despite the fact that cutaneous carcinomas of the face and neck are essentially totally curable, hundreds of patients in the United States annually die or become horribly disfigured through neglect or improper treatment. Radiotherapy of cutaneous carcinomas can be rewarding when the proper care and expertise are applied. The radiation therapist is afforded an unusual opportunity to deal with a highly curable malignant neoplasm, but at the same time he can model his means to obtain the best aesthetic results. Many carcinomas of the skin are expeditiously and effectively cured by simple excision, but others, regardless of size, may be treated best by radiotherapy because of better aesthetic results. The use of acids, caustics, or electrocoagulation offers no particular advantage and is seldom as satisfactory as a clean excision. The surgical procedure often may be an excisional biopsy, which offers the opportunity of adequate histopathologic study of the specimen. Various modalities of radiation therapy may be successfully utilized, but none has the elasticity and definite advantage of relatively low kilovoltage roentgen therapy.

  9. [Basal cell adenocarcinoma of the sublingual gland].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Stig Krarup; Bjørndal, Kristine; Krogdahl, Annelise; Godballe, Christian

    2010-02-15

    The cause of a swelling in the floor of the mouth will in most cases be benign. For example, a ranula, sialolithiasis and/or infection. Tumors of the sublingual gland are very rare, but 90% are malignant and therefore malignancy should always be excluded in case of an asymptomatic swelling covered by intact mucosa. PMID:20156409

  10. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  11. KCOT Occurring in Bilateral Maxillary Sinus in Non-Syndromic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Newaskar, Vilas; Rajmohan, Sushmita; Dashore, Dolly

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC) also termed as Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour (KCOT) (WHO 2005) is a pathology with unique behavior because of which it is under much scrutiny and continued study. The pathology usually presents itself commonly in mandible and less commonly in maxilla. The occurrence of KCOT in maxillary sinus is reported as rare and multiple occurrences are mostly associated along with the presence of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma (NBCC) syndrome. Here, we present a rare case of bilateral Maxillary OKC involving maxillary sinuses, without the presence of NBCC syndrome. An interesting feature of this case is the presence of left upper third molar in ectopic position in maxillary sinus and a vertically impacted right third molar suggesting an origin from the dental lamina. PMID:27656578

  12. Imaging of acute invasive fungal rhinosinusitis in a patient with gorlin syndrome and acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Donovan, S T; Thompson, J W; Sandlund, J T; Adderson, E E; Pivnick, E K; Harreld, J H

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin Syndrome (GS), also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by developmental abnormalities and predisposition to certain neoplasms. Acute invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (AIFRS) is an uncommon clinical entity characterized by high morbidity and mortality. In immunocompromised patients, computed tomography plays a critical role in screening for suspected AIFRS. However, due to the association between exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of malignancies in patients with GS, patients with GS and suspected AIFRS present a unique and challenging clinical scenario. We present a case of a pediatric patient with GS and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) diagnosed with AIFRS; to the best of our knowledge, it is the only case described in the literature.

  13. KCOT Occurring in Bilateral Maxillary Sinus in Non-Syndromic Patient.

    PubMed

    Newaskar, Vilas; Verma, Manish; Rajmohan, Sushmita; Dashore, Dolly

    2016-08-01

    Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC) also termed as Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour (KCOT) (WHO 2005) is a pathology with unique behavior because of which it is under much scrutiny and continued study. The pathology usually presents itself commonly in mandible and less commonly in maxilla. The occurrence of KCOT in maxillary sinus is reported as rare and multiple occurrences are mostly associated along with the presence of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma (NBCC) syndrome. Here, we present a rare case of bilateral Maxillary OKC involving maxillary sinuses, without the presence of NBCC syndrome. An interesting feature of this case is the presence of left upper third molar in ectopic position in maxillary sinus and a vertically impacted right third molar suggesting an origin from the dental lamina. PMID:27656578

  14. Aggressive osseous commitment result by keratocyst odontogenic tumour: case report, radiographic and clinical standpoints

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Gerusa O.M.; Matta-Neto, Edgard; El Achkar, Vivian N. R.; Niccoli-Filho, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) previously known as odontogenic keratocyst was recently classified as a benign lesion characterized by an infiltrating pattern, local aggressiveness with the propensity to recurrence. It is thought to arise from the dental lamina. Pain is usually not associated with KCOT until swelling occurs, and it commonly affects the posterior mandible. Multiple KCOT are associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. This study reports an aggressive case of KCOT with destruction of the osseous tissue of the mandible, accentuated face asymmetry, dysphagia and dysphonia. It was managed with a defined protocol which entailed diagnosis, treatment with enucleation along with peripheral ostectomy and rehabilitation. A long-term follow-up schedule was provided to the patient to observe the recurrence behaviour of this cyst. In postoperative phase, no complication was noticed regarding wound healing and recurrence. PMID:24964453

  15. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27625882

  16. Immunomodulatory Effectiveness of Fish Oil and omega-3 Fatty Acids in Human Non-melanoma Skin Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Khurram; Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal; Yuen, Ng Pei; Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif

    2016-01-01

    Fish oil is composed of various fatty acids among which omega-3 fatty acids are considered as most beneficial. The effects of fish oil on the activity of a topical anticancer drug, imiquimod, and the immunomodulatory activity of omega-3 fatty acids was investigated in human basal and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Imiquimod-fish oil mixture exhibited higher carcinoma cell growth inhibition and immunomodulatory activity than imiquimod alone, especially against squamous cell carcinoma cells. Omega-3 fatty acids exhibited growth inhibition of both basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and modulated the immune response. Omega-3 fatty acids of fish oil serve as inducers of interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, and as suppressors of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which not only depress tumor growth but also adequately control the inflammatory side effects of imiquimod. Thus, imiquimod administration with fish oil could be beneficial for inhibition of non-melanoma skin carcinoma cells but further in vivo studies are needed to understand their role in skin cancer.

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Marie-Annick; Neuveut, Christine

    2015-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a widespread human pathogen that causes liver inflammation, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent sequencing technologies have refined our knowledge of the genomic landscape and pathogenesis of HCC, but the mechanisms by which HBV exerts its oncogenic role remain controversial. In a prevailing view, inflammation, liver damage, and regeneration may foster the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic defects leading to cancer onset. However, a more direct and specific contribution of the virus is supported by clinical and biological observations. Among genetically heterogeneous HCCs, HBV-related tumors display high genomic instability, which may be attributed to the ability of HBV to integrate its DNA into the host cell genome, provoking chromosomal alterations and insertional mutagenesis of cancer genes. The viral transactivator HBx may also participate in transformation by deregulating diverse cellular machineries. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms linking HBV to HCC will improve prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:25646384

  18. Fibroblasts Regulate Variable Aggressiveness of Syndromic Keratocystic and Non-syndromic Odontogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y.-Y.; Yu, F.-Y.; Qu, J.-F.; Chen, F.; Li, T.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are jaw lesions that can be either sporadic or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, which typically occurs as multiple, aggressive lesions that can lead to large areas of bone destruction and resorption and cause major impairment and even jaw fracture. To clarify the role of fibroblasts in the aggressivness of syndromic (S-) as compared with non-syndromic (NS-) KCOTs, we assessed fibroblasts derived from 16 S- and NS-KCOTs for differences in cell proliferation, multilineage differentiation potential, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteoclastogenic potential. S-KCOT fibroblasts had proliferative and osteoclastogenic capacity higher than those from NS-KCOTs, as evidenced by higher numbers of tartrate-resistant acid-phosphatase-positive multinuclear cells, expression of cyclooxygenase 2, and ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor–kappa B ligand to osteoprotegerin. The osteogenic potential was higher for S- than for NS-KCOT fibroblasts and was associated with lower mRNA expression of runt-related transcription factor 2, collagen type I α1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin as well as reduced alkaline phosphatase activity. These results suggest that the distinct characteristics of fibroblasts in KCOTs are responsible for the greater aggressiveness observed in the syndromic subtype. Abbreviations: AP, alkaline phosphatase; CK, cytokeratin; COL1A1, collagen type I α1; COX-2, cyclooxygenase-2; GM-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; IL-1α, interleukin 1α; KCOT, keratocystic odontogenic tumor; NBCCS, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; NS-KCOT, non-syndrome-associated KCOT; OCN, osteocalcin; OPG, osteoprotegerin; OPN, osteopontin; RANKL, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand; Runx2, runt-related transcription factor 2; S-KCOT, syndrome-associated KCOT; TAF, tumor-associated fibroblast; and TRAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. PMID:24972872

  19. Immunohistochemical determination of ETS-1 oncoprotein expression in urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Sari, Aysegul; Calli, Aylin; Gorgel, Sacit Nuri; Altinboga, Aysegul Aksoy; Kara, Cengiz; Dincel, Cetin; Cakalagaoglu, Fulya

    2012-03-01

    ETS-1 protooncogene is an important transcription factor that plays a role in the regulation of physiological processes, such as cell proliferation and differentiation. ETS-1 is thought to be related to the growth of carcinoma cells by its regulation of the transcription of matrix metalloproteinases and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression pattern of ETS-1 oncoprotein in urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder and determine its relationship with histopathologic parameters, including tumor grade and stage. One hundred six specimens of urothelial carcinoma and a total of 14 normal urothelium were analyzed immunohistochemically with anti-ETS-1 monoclonal antibody. The normal urothelium showed positive ETS-1 immunostaining. ETS-1 expression remained high in low-grade and noninvasive tumors, whereas it frequently decreased in high-grade or invasive carcinomas. Interestingly, ETS-1 was highly expressed in the basal cell layer of the noninvasive urothelial carcinomas. ETS-1 expression showed a strong negative correlation with the tumor grade (P<0.001; r, -0.67) and stage (P<0.001; r, -0.75). The nonmuscle-invasive tumors (pTa+pT1) and noninvasive tumors (pTa) had significantly higher ETS-1 expression than the muscle-invasive tumors (pT2; P<0.001) and invasive tumors (pT1+pT2; P<0.001), respectively. Results of our study show that decreased ETS-1 expression is significantly associated with high grade and advanced stage in urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder, and that the downregulation of ETS-1 expression may be a marker of the aggressiveness of such malignancies.

  20. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or older. Hepatocellular ...

  1. Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Squamous cell carcinoma typically develops in sun-damaged skin in fair-skinned patients. Overview Squamous ... skin cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially in light-skinned individuals with ...

  2. [Hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Colombo, Massimo; Sangiovanni, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death and the first in patients with compensated cirrhosis. Chronic infection with hepatitis B and C, alcohol, smoking, exposure to aflatoxin and metabolic syndrome, associated with diabetes and obesity are the main etiological factors. Regardless of etiology, patients with cirrhosis stand as the category at higher risk of developing HCC, and indeed are the target of surveillance programs aimed to the early diagnosis of HCC, the only chance to reduce HCC-related mortality. This notwithstanding, International Scientific Societies have issued recommendations for the management of HCC, a significant number of patients are treated outside guidelines, due to several reasons. Among queries still unsolved, the impact of biological characterization of HCC, along with the biological profiling of patients at risk of developing HCC represent main challenges for the future. Treatment personalization and multimodal treatment being further challenges. This chapter summarizes the recommendations for surveillance, diagnosis and treatment of HCC and focus on future directions. PMID:27571469

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Llovet, Josep M; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Pikarsky, Eli; Sangro, Bruno; Schwartz, Myron; Sherman, Morris; Gores, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally and has an incidence of approximately 850,000 new cases per year. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents approximately 90% of all cases of primary liver cancer. The main risk factors for developing HCC are well known and include hepatitis B and C virus infection, alcohol intake and ingestion of the fungal metabolite aflatoxin B1. Additional risk factors such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are also emerging. Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of HCC have led to identification of critical driver mutations; however, the most prevalent of these are not yet druggable targets. The molecular classification of HCC is not established, and the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging classification is the main clinical algorithm for the stratification of patients according to prognosis and treatment allocation. Surveillance programmes enable the detection of early-stage tumours that are amenable to curative therapies - resection, liver transplantation or local ablation. At more developed stages, only chemoembolization (for intermediate HCC) and sorafenib (for advanced HCC) have shown survival benefits. There are major unmet needs in HCC management that might be addressed through the discovery of new therapies and their combinations for use in the adjuvant setting and for intermediate- and advanced-stage disease. Moreover, biomarkers for therapy stratification, patient-tailored strategies targeting driver mutations and/or activating signalling cascades, and validated measurements of quality of life are needed. Recent failures in the testing of systemic drugs for intermediate and advanced stages have indicated a need to refine trial designs and to define novel approaches. PMID:27158749

  4. Interstitial brachytherapy of periorificial skin carcinomas of the face: A retrospective study of 97 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Emmanuel . E-mail: e-rio@nantes.fnclcc.fr; Bardet, Etienne; Ferron, Christophe; Peuvrel, Patrick; Supiot, Stephane; Campion, Loic; Beauvillain De Montreuil, Claude; Mahe, Marc Andre; Dreno, Brigitte

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after interstitial brachytherapy of facial periorificial skin carcinomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 97 skin carcinomas (88 basal cell carcinomas, 9 squamous cell carcinomas) of the nose, periorbital areas, and ears from 40 previously untreated patients (Group 1) and 57 patients who had undergone surgery (Group 2). The average dose was 55 Gy (range, 50-65 Gy) in Group 1 and 52 Gy (range, 50-60 Gy) in Group 2 (mean implantation times: 79 and 74 hours, respectively). We calculated survival rates and assessed functional and cosmetic results de visu. Results: Median age was 71 years (range, 17-97 years). There were 29 T1, 8 T2, 1 T3, and 2 Tx tumors in Group 1. Tumors were <2 cm in Group 2. Local control was 92.5% in Group 1 and 88% in Group 2 (median follow-up, 55 months; range, 6-132 months). Five-year disease-free survival was better in Group 1 (91%; range, 75-97) than in Group 2 (80%; range, 62-90; p = 0.23). Of the 34 patients whose results were reassessed, 8 presented with pruritus or epiphora; 1 Group 2 patient had an impaired eyelid aperture. Cosmetic results were better in Group 1 than in Group 2 with, respectively, 72% (8/11) vs. 52% (12/23) good results and 28 (3/11) vs. 43% (10/23) fair results. Conclusions: Brachytherapy provided a high level of local control and good cosmetic results for facial periorificial skin carcinomas that pose problems of surgical reconstruction. Results were better for untreated tumors than for incompletely excised tumors or tumors recurring after surgery.

  5. Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okuda, K

    2000-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in many countries as a result of an increase in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection since World War II. The epidemiology of HCC varies with the global region. There have been conflicting observations from different parts of the world concerning the frequency of HCC in patients who in the distant past had post-transfusion non-A, non-B hepatitis. The genetic basis of hepatocarcinogenesis is still poorly understood. In hepatitis B virus (HVB) associated HCC, codon 249 mutation in the p 53 gene seems more related to exposure to aflatoxin B1 than to hepatocarcinogenesis itself. HCC that occurs in children in high HBV endemic regions could be associated with germ-line mutations, but little information is available; not much is known about chemical hepatocarcinogens in the environment other than aflatoxins. The X gene of HBV seems to play an important role in HBV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis. There are preliminary observations on the molecular mechanism of HCV-associated HCC, such as HCV core protein inducing HCC in transgenic mice and the NS3 genome transforming NIH 3T3 cells. Pathological distinction between preneoplastic and very early transformed lesions still depends on classical morphology, and a more genetically oriented differential diagnosis is required. Clinical diagnosis based on modern imaging has improved greatly, but is still unsatisfactory in the differential diagnosis of preneoplastic and early transformed nodules, because the vasculature changes that occur within the nodule are not accurately discerned with the current imaging. Use of sensitive des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA II) assay, and lectin affinity chromatography separating HCC specific subspecies of AFP molecules with a more practical biochemical technique will further improve diagnosis. Early diagnosis and transplantation are the best treatment at the moment, but transplantation is not widely available because of the donor shortage. Despite

  6. Radiation-induced skin carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, E.; Modan, B.; Preston, D.; Alfandary, E.; Stovall, M.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Radiation exposures to the scalp during childhood for tinea capitis were associated with a fourfold increase in skin cancer, primarily basal cell carcinomas, and a threefold increase in benign skin tumors. Malignant melanoma, however, was not significantly elevated. Overall, 80 neoplasms were identified from an extensive search of the pathology logs of all major hospitals in Israel and computer linkage with the national cancer registry. Radiation dose to the scalp was computed for over 10,000 persons irradiated for ringworm (mean 7 Gy), and incidence rates were contrasted with those observed in 16,000 matched comparison subjects. The relative risk of radiogenic skin cancer did not differ significantly between men or women or by time since exposure; however, risk was greatest following exposures in early childhood. After adjusting for sex, ethnic origin, and attained age, the estimated excess relative risk was 0.7 per Gy and the average excess risk over the current follow-up was 0.31/10(4) PY-Gy. The risk per Gy of radiation-induced skin cancer was intermediate between the high risk found among whites and no risk found among blacks in a similar study conducted in New York City. This finding suggests the role that subsequent exposure to uv radiation likely plays in the expression of a potential radiation-induced skin malignancy.

  7. Skeletal stigmata as keys to access to the composite and ancient Gorlin-Goltz syndrome history: The Egypt, Pompeii and Herculaneum lessons.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Sammaria, Giuliano; Manfredini, Marco

    2016-09-10

    There are several genetic diseases with a wide spectrum of congenital bone stigmata in association to cutaneous and visceral benign and malignant neoplasms. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also named nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant systemic disease with almost complete penetrance and high intra-familial phenotypic variability, caused by germline mutations of the gene PTCH1. The syndrome is characterized by unusual skeletal changes and high predisposition to the development of multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts tumors and other visceral tumors. The Gorlin syndrome, clinically defined as distinct syndrome in 1963, existed during Dynastic Egyptian times, as revealed by a costellation of skeletal findings compatible with the syndrome in mummies dating back to 3000years ago and, most likely, in the ancient population of Pompeii. These paleogenetic and historical evidences, together with the clinical and biomolecular modern evidences, confirm the quite benign behavior of the syndrome and the critical value of the multiple and synchronous skeletal anomalies in the recognition of these rare and complex genetic disease. PMID:26794802

  8. Gorlin–Goltz syndrome: A case series of 5 patients in North Indian population with comparative analysis of literature

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Jeevan; Verma, Nitin; Kaur, Amandeep

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In Indian scenario, Gorlin–Goltz syndrome (nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome [NBCCS]) has been rarely reported. The clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings and major and minor criteria in five cases of NBCCS in North Indian population have been presented along with a discussion of the role of gene mutation analysis in early diagnosis of syndrome. Materials and Methods: The diagnostic findings of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in 5 patients were compared with other reports in Indian population and with reports of this syndrome in other parts of the world. Results: The most common features seen were keratocystic odontogenic tumors (100%), calcifications of falx cerebri (60%), palmar-plantar pits (80%), rib anomalies (80%), macroencephaly (60%), ocular hypertelorism (80%), and frontal bossing (60%) in our series. Retained deciduous teeth seen in 80% patients whose association has not been previously reported has been presented. None of our patients had basal cell carcinoma, syndactyly or polydactyly, pectus deformity, bridging of sella turcica, pigmented nevi, or family history of this syndrome in contrast to such findings in other Indian patients. Medulloblastoma has not been reported in any Indian patient so far compared to this finding in other studies conducted worldwide. Conclusions: Combining the features of 48 patients in 38 cases of NBCCS being published in Indian literature with five cases of our series and on comparison with other studies in the world, a wide disparity in different ethnic groups and a wide variation in presentation of syndrome within the same population is suggested. PMID:26604574

  9. Skeletal stigmata as keys to access to the composite and ancient Gorlin-Goltz syndrome history: The Egypt, Pompeii and Herculaneum lessons.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Sammaria, Giuliano; Manfredini, Marco

    2016-09-10

    There are several genetic diseases with a wide spectrum of congenital bone stigmata in association to cutaneous and visceral benign and malignant neoplasms. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also named nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant systemic disease with almost complete penetrance and high intra-familial phenotypic variability, caused by germline mutations of the gene PTCH1. The syndrome is characterized by unusual skeletal changes and high predisposition to the development of multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts tumors and other visceral tumors. The Gorlin syndrome, clinically defined as distinct syndrome in 1963, existed during Dynastic Egyptian times, as revealed by a costellation of skeletal findings compatible with the syndrome in mummies dating back to 3000years ago and, most likely, in the ancient population of Pompeii. These paleogenetic and historical evidences, together with the clinical and biomolecular modern evidences, confirm the quite benign behavior of the syndrome and the critical value of the multiple and synchronous skeletal anomalies in the recognition of these rare and complex genetic disease.

  10. An unusual composite pilomatrix carcinoma with intralesional melanocytes: differential diagnosis, immunohistochemical evaluation, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jani, Prashant; Chetty, Runjan; Ghazarian, Danny M

    2008-04-01

    We report a case of an extremely rare histologic combination of pilomatrix or pilomatrical carcinoma with admixed melanocytes within the same tumor mass. Pilomatrix carcinoma is a neoplasm of low-grade malignancy that is characterized by a tendency for recurrence but low risk of metastasis. A 77-year-old male presented with a nodule on the bridge of the nose that was excised. Histologically, it was typified by asymmetry and poor circumscription, the presence of several variably sized and shaped basaloid aggregations, and surface ulceration. The tumors were composed of pleomorphic basaloid cells with prominent nucleoli and frequent mitoses (some of which were atypical) accompanied by central areas with keratotic material, shadow cells, and foci of necrosis. In addition, intermingled with the pilomatrix carcinoma, several easily identified pigmented cells with dendritic processes were present singly and as small aggregates. There was no atypia associated with the melanocytic component. Immunohistochemistry revealed the CK14 to be positive mainly within the keratinizing and the squamous epithelial elements of the tumor. The melanocytic component was strongly immunoreactive for S100, melanoma cocktail (HMB45 and Melan-A), and microphthalmia transcription factor. Pilomatrix carcinoma with melanocytes should be distinguished from the conventional pilomatrixoma with pigmentation, melanocytic matricoma, melanoma, and pigmented basal cell carcinoma with matrical differentiation. Clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the occurrence of pilomatrix carcinoma with melanocytes because of its potential for diagnosis as melanoma. This peculiar lesion recapitulates the intimate relationship existing between matrical epithelium and melanocytes in the embryonal hair follicle or in the anagen stage of the hair cycle. It is possible that sun damage played a role in stimulating migration of melanocytes among matrical cells in this case.

  11. Differences in sialyl-Tn antigen expression between keratoacanthomas and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P; Clausen, O P; Bryne, M

    1999-04-01

    Keratoacanthoma and squamous cell carcinoma are common skin tumors, especially in immunosuppressed transplant recipients, but the distinction between these two types of epidermal neoplasia may be difficult. Sialyl-Tn (Sia-GalNAc-O-Ser/Thr) is a cell surface carbohydrate associated with hyperplasia in squamous epithelium, and correlated with poor prognosis in several human adenocarcinomas. Twenty-seven keratoacanthomas and 29 cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas were examined for the expression of sialyl-Tn and of the Ki67 epitope, the latter a marker for cell proliferation. By immunohistochemistry, basaloid tumor cells at the periphery of tumor nests showed some degree of sialyl-Tn expression in 16 keratoacanthomas (59%), while only three squamous cell carcinomas (10%) showed sialyl-Tn-positive basaloid tumor cells (p<0.001). Keratinized, differentiated tumor cells were more often sialyl-Tn-positive in keratoacanthomas (89%) than in squamous cell carcinomas (31%) (p<0.001). A striking sialyl-Tn-positivity in the basal cell layer was found in a border zone directly adjacent to most tumors of both types (88 and 88%). By immunohistochemical examination of parallel sections and by double immunofluorescence, sialyl-Tn antigen expression was primarily seen in cells that did not express Ki67, although some overlap was present. Keratoacanthomas from transplant recipients did not differ in sialyl-Tn expression compared to those from non-immunosuppressed patients. The results indicate that sialyl-Tn expression is not directly related to cell proliferation, but rather to cellular features of post-mitotic cells, and that sialyl-Tn is not associated with a malignant phenotype. Sialyl-Tn may be linked to tumor regression, as seen in keratoacanthomas. PMID:10335895

  12. Immunohistochemical and molecular profiling of histologically defined apocrine carcinomas of the breast.

    PubMed

    Vranic, Semir; Marchiò, Caterina; Castellano, Isabella; Botta, Cristina; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Bender, Ryan P; Payan-Gomez, Cesar; di Cantogno, Ludovica Verdun; Gugliotta, Patrizia; Tondat, Fabrizio; di Celle, Paola Francia; Mariani, Sara; Gatalica, Zoran; Sapino, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Despite the marked improvement in the understanding of molecular mechanisms and classification of apocrine carcinoma, little is known about its specific molecular genetic alterations and potentially targetable biomarkers. In this study, we explored immunohistochemical and molecular genetic characteristics of 37 invasive apocrine carcinomas using immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), and next-generation sequencing (NGS) assays. IHC revealed frequent E-cadherin expression (89%), moderate (16%) proliferation activity [Ki-67, phosphohistone H3], infrequent (~10%) expression of basal cell markers [CK5/6, CK14, p63, caveolin-1], loss of PTEN (83%), and overexpression of HER2 (32%), EGFR (41%), cyclin D1 (50%), and MUC-1 (88%). MLPA assay revealed gene copy gains of MYC, CCND1, ZNF703, CDH1, and TRAF4 in 50% or greater of the apocrine carcinomas, whereas gene copy losses frequently affected BRCA2 (75%), ADAM9 (54%), and BRCA1 (46%). HER2 gain, detected by MLPA in 38% of the cases, was in excellent concordance with HER2 results obtained by IHC/FISH (κ = 0.915, P < .001). TOP2A gain was observed in one case, while five cases (21%) exhibited TOP2A loss. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis revealed two distinct clusters: HER2-positive and HER2-negative (P = .03 and .04, respectively). NGS assay revealed mutations of the TP53 (2 of 7, 29%), BRAF/KRAS (2 of 7, 29%), and PI3KCA/PTEN genes (7 of 7, 100%). We conclude that morphologically defined apocrine carcinomas exhibit complex molecular genetic alterations that are consistent with the "luminal-complex" phenotype. Some of the identified molecular targets are promising biomarkers; however, functional studies are needed to prove these observations.

  13. Concomitant cetuximab and radiation therapy: A possible promising strategy for locally advanced inoperable non-melanoma skin carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    DELLA VITTORIA SCARPATI, GIUSEPPINA; PERRI, FRANCESCO; PISCONTI, SALVATORE; COSTA, GIUSEPPE; RICCIARDIELLO, FILIPPO; DEL PRETE, SALVATORE; NAPOLITANO, ALBERTO; CARRATURO, MARCO; MAZZONE, SALVATORE; ADDEO, RAFFAELE

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) include a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising from the epidermis, comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), Merkel cell carcinoma and more rare entities, including malignant pilomatrixoma and sebaceous gland tumours. The treatment of early disease depends primarily on surgery. In addition, certain patients present with extensive local invasion or metastasis, which renders these tumours surgically unresectable. Improving the outcome of radiotherapy through the use of concurrent systemic therapy has been demonstrated in several locally advanced cancer-treatment paradigms. Recently, agents targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have exhibited a consolidated activity in phase II clinical trials and case series reports. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to and completely inhibits the EGFR, which has been revealed to be up-regulated in a variety of SCCs, including NMSCs. The present review aimed to summarize the role of anti-EGFR agents in the predominant types of NMSC, including SCC and BCC, and focuses on the cetuximab-based studies, highlighting the biological rationale of this therapeutic option. In addition, the importance of the association between cetuximab and radiotherapy for locally advanced NMSC is discussed. PMID:27073643

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    The hallmarks of squamous cell carcinoma are the differentiation features of the squamous epithelium: keratinization and intercellular bridges. Large central masses of keratin, individual cell keratinization, and/or keratin pearls may form. Necrosis of tumor cell nests and accumulation of acute inflammatory cells are frequent features of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined. PMID:27575269

  16. Squamous-cell Carcinoma of the Anus and Anal Canal: An Analysis of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, W. B.

    1941-01-01

    The analysis is of 55 cases admitted into St. Mark's Hospital from 1922 to 1940. The incidence was 3.35% of all cases of cancer of the rectum, anal canal and anus admitted during this period. Sex distribution—27 males and 28 females. The average age (61.7 years) is higher than that of columnar-cell carcinoma of the rectum (57.4 years). Histology.—The cases have been graded into three grades of malignancy—low grade, medium grade, and high grade. Low grade squamous carcinoma is twice as frequent in men as in women, and generally originates at the anal margin. Medium grade squamous carcinoma is equally distributed between men and women; it may arise at the anus or in the anal canal. High grade squamous carcinoma is much more common in the female sex and is almost entirely limited to the anal canal. Quadrant affected—about one-third of the anal margin growths and one-half of the anal canal growths were situated anteriorly. Differential diagnosis from simple papilloma, simple ulcer, chronic inflammation, tuberculous ulcer, tuberculide, primary chancre, amœbic ulcer, basal-cell carcinoma, columnar-cell carcinoma. Biopsy and grading essential before treatment is decided upon. The results of treatment in the three grades of malignancy are described. The best results were obtained in the early low-grade cases treated by interstitial radium needling. In the medium and high grades only three five-year survivals can be reported and these followed excision of the rectum. The management of the inguinal glands is discussed and the importance of a very close post-operative supervision emphasized. Squamous carcinoma of the anal canal may cause lymphatic metastases in the superior hæmorrhoidal glands; there have been four such cases in this series. Diathermy perineal excision is indicated in these cases. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 6aFig. 6bFig. 7Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:19992316

  17. The syndromic multiple odontogenic keratocyst in siblings: A familial study

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vimal; Kaushal, Nitin; Kalra, Geeta

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim is to demonstrate the importance of postoperative assessment and highlight the need for a lifetime follow-up of the patient and the siblings in cases of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS). Materials and Methods: Three siblings out of which two were of syndromic multiple odontogenic keratocysts, with multiple basal cell nevae were followed-up for manifestations of NBCCS from year 2001 till date. Two of the patients were treated for multiple bilateral odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Familial occurrence of the syndromic multiple odontogenic keratocysts was studied. Result: Although NBCCS is associated with multiple OKCs, it does not imply that a patient should have more than one cyst at a given point in time, rather it refers to the lifetime history of the patient. Early diagnosis will often make it possible to use conservative therapies rather than complex treatments. Conclusion: Recognition of the syndrome permits early treatment in other but possibly asymptomatic relatives. Close attention of the family and past medical history and physical examination will alert the clinician to its presence, allowing for appropriate genetic counseling and serial screening for the development of malignancies and other complications besides OKCs. PMID:23483828

  18. Stages of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Childhood Treatment for more information.) Having certain genetic conditions increases the risk of adrenocortical carcinoma. Anything ... can be a sign of disease. CT scan (CAT scan) : A procedure that makes a series of ...

  19. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  20. Cholescintigraphy in gallbladder carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Colletti, P.M.; Ralls, P.W.; Siegel, M.E.; Halls, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    Findings on cholescintigraphy in gallbladder carcinoma are described in five patients. Four patients presenting with acute cholecystitis had nonvisualization of the gallbladder with normal hepatoenteric transit time. One of these had a large portal mass and two had liver metastasis as additional findings. The fifth patient was jaundiced, and showed absence of bowel activity compatible with total biliary obstruction. Both the clinical and scintigraphic findings in gallbladder carcinoma are difficult to separate from findings in cholelithiasis and cholecystitis.

  1. [Pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Antoine, Martine; Vieira, Thibault; Fallet, Vincent; Hamard, Cécile; Duruisseaux, Michael; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinomas are a rare group of tumors accounting for about one percent of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). In 2015, the World Health Organization classification united under this name all the carcinomas with sarcomatous-like component with spindle cell or giant cell appearance, or associated with a sarcomatous component sometimes heterologous. There are five subtypes: pleomorphic carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, giant cell carcinoma, carcinosarcoma and pulmonary blastoma. Clinical characteristics are not specific from the other subtypes of NSCLC. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition pathway may play a key role. Patients, usually tobacco smokers, are frequently symptomatic. Tumors are voluminous more often peripherical than central, with strong fixation on FDG TEP CT. Distant metastases are frequent with atypical visceral locations. These tumors have poorer prognosis than the other NSCLC subtypes because of great aggressivity, and frequent chemoresistance. Here we present pathological description and a review of literature with molecular features in order to better describe these tumors and perhaps introduce new therapeutics.

  2. PTCH1 mutation is a frequent event in oesophageal basaloid squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsuyoshi; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Imamhasan, Abdukadir; Hayashi, Takuo; Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Mitani, Keiko; Takahashi, Michiko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Yao, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC) is a rare and poorly differentiated variant of typical squamous cell carcinoma, and is characterised in part by activation of the Wnt signalling pathway. We previously demonstrated that constitutive activation of the Wnt signalling pathway by epigenetic silencing of secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4) is observed in this tumour. Increasing evidence shows that the Wnt signalling pathway cross-talks with other developmental pathways, including the Hedgehog (HH) pathway. The HH pathway is stimulated by inactivating mutations of PTCH1, which have a well-described oncogenic role in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin. We employed polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing to detect inactivating mutations of PTCH1 using archival tissue samples of 30 oesophageal BSCCs. The frequency of PTCH1 mutation was compared to that of Wnt component genes that we reported previously. We found PTCH1 mutations in 53.3% (16/30) of cases, revealing T1195S as a hotspot mutation. This frequency is quite high for cancers other than BCC of the skin, and PTCH1 mutations were almost mutually exclusive with mutations in APC, Axin1 and Axin2. Considering the fact that activation of Wnt signalling via down-regulation of APC and SFRP5 due to promoter methylation is observed in BCC of the skin, Wnt signalling activation in oesophageal BSCC might be a secondary effect of the PTCH1-inactivating mutations. These findings suggest that the HH and Wnt pathways coordinately contribute to tumourigenesis in oesophageal BSCC. Furthermore, this study provides a potential therapeutic application for HH pathway inhibitors in oesophageal BSCC with highly malignant potential. PMID:25395299

  3. Divergence between the high rate of p53 mutations in skin carcinomas and the low prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Moch, C; Moysan, A; Lubin, R; Salmonière, P de La; Soufir, N; Galisson, F; Vilmer, C; Venutolo, E; Pelletier, F Le; Janin, A; Basset-Séguin, N

    2001-01-01

    Circulating anti-p53 antibodies have been described and used as tumoural markers in patients with various cancers and strongly correlate with the p53 mutated status of the tumours. No study has yet looked at the prevalence of such antibodies in skin carcinoma patients although these tumours have been shown to be frequently p53 mutated. Most skin carcinoma can be diagnosed by examination or biopsy, but aggressive, recurrent and/or non-surgical cases' follow up would be helped by a biological marker of residual disease. We performed a prospective study looking at the prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies using an ELISA technique in a series of 105 skin carcinoma patients in comparison with a sex- and age-matched control skin carcinoma-free group (n = 130). Additionally, p53 accumulation was studied by immunohistochemistry to confirm p53 protein altered expression in a sample of tumours. Anti-p53 antibodies were detected in 2.9% of the cases, with a higher prevalence in patients suffering from the more aggressive squamous cell type (SCC) of skin carcinoma (8%) than for the more common and slowly growing basal cell carcinoma type or BCC (1.5%). p53 protein stabilization could be confirmed in 80% of tumours studied by IHC. This low level of anti-p53 antibody detection contrasts with the high rate of p53 mutations reported in these tumours. This observation shows that the anti-p53 humoral response is a complex and tissue-specific mechanism. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747330

  4. Renal cell carcinoma with angioleiomyoma-like stroma: clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular features supporting classification as a distinct entity.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Cheng, Liang; Eble, John N; True, Lawrence D; Gupta, Nilesh S; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Grignon, David J

    2015-02-01

    Rare renal epithelial neoplasms have been recognized to have an angioleiomyoma or leiomyoma-like proliferation of stromal smooth muscle; however, the nature of these tumors and their relationships to other renal cell carcinomas are poorly understood. We analyzed 23 such tumors for their clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and cytogenetic features using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Twelve showed a homogeneous combination of features and were reclassified as renal cell carcinoma with angioleiomyoma-like stroma. These were composed of neoplastic glandular structures lined by cells with mixed clear, pale, and eosinophilic cytoplasm forming occasional papillary tufts. The stroma resembled smooth muscle and often extended away from the epithelial component, entrapping perinephric fat or non-neoplastic renal elements. Immunohistochemistry showed the epithelium to have reactivity for: carbonic anhydrase IX, CD10, vimentin, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 34βE12, and PAX8 but not α-methylacyl-coA-racemase. The stroma labeled for smooth muscle (smooth muscle actin 3+, desmin 1+, caldesmon 3+) but not epithelial antigens. Neither component showed substantial reactivity for HMB45, melan-A, cathepsin K, or TFE3 protein. An interrupted, conspicuous layer of CD34-positive endothelial cells rimmed the epithelium, imparting a two-cell layer pattern resembling myoepithelial or basal cells. Chromosome 3p deletion and trisomy 7 and 17 were uniformly absent. Follow-up was available for three patients, none of whom experienced malignant behavior. Eleven tumors were excluded from this category and considered to be clear cell renal cell carcinoma with a reactive proliferation of smooth muscle (n=4) or tangential sectioning of the pseudocapsule (n=2), renal cell carcinoma unclassified (n=4), or clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (n=1). In summary, renal cell carcinoma with angioleiomyoma-like stroma is a distinct neoplasm with characteristic morphological

  5. MicroRNA-203 inhibits the progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with restored epithelial tissue architecture in vivo.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Tomoyuki; Shimada, Yutaka; Moriyama, Makoto; Takei, Yoshinori; Omura, Tetsuya; Sekine, Shinichi; Nagata, Takuya; Shimizu, Kazuharu; Tsukada, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-203 has been shown to induce squamous differentiation of epidermal stem cells through the suppression of p63. The aim of this study was to assess the tumor suppressor effect of miR-203 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) with focus on the regulation of the cell fate decisions and organization of tumor tissue architecture in vivo. Our investigation establishing stable clones from ESCC cell lines with induced miR-203 expression resulted in significant growth inhibition in a mouse xenograft model. Small foci were observed in xenograft tumors with stratified squamous differentiation in conjunction with restored baso-apical polarity. The expression of the basement membrane protein laminine was localized at the center of the foci and the basal cell marker p75NTR was expressed in the innermost layer. The expression of ki67 and p63 was co-localized at the center layers, while involucrin was expressed in the outer layers. Flow cytometry revealed that the p75NTR-positive cells expressing p63 and Bmi1 were well maintained, while the expression of p63 was suppressed in the p75NTR-negative cells. Our cDNA microarray analysis demonstrated the upregulation of genes involved in regulating tissue architecture, such as BMP-4 and ZO-1 in the mir-203 transfectant. Investigation using surgically removed ESCC specimens revealed that the expression of miR-203 significantly correlated with a favorable prognosis. These results demonstrated that miR-203 regulated both basal and supra-basal cell components to induce differentiation with restored epithelial tissue architecture, leading to significant tumor growth inhibition in vivo. Those results suggest the use of miR-203 as a novel therapeutic and diagnostic target in patients with ESCC.

  6. [Merkel cell skin carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Krejcí, K; Zadrazil, J; Tichý, T; Horák, P; Ciferská, H; Hodulová, M; Zezulová, M; Zlevorová, M

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare tumour of the skin. It affects predominantly elderly Caucasian males on sun-exposed areas of the skin. Distinctively more frequent and at significantly lower age, its incidence is higher in immunocompromised patients. In these patients we often observe the highly aggressive course of Merkel cell carcinoma and a fatal outcome. The incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma has been rising in recent years and is more dramatic than the increased incidence of cutaneous melanoma. More than one-third of Merkel cell carcinoma patients will die from this cancer, making it twice as lethal as melanoma. The malignant transformation of Merkel cells is currently thought to be related to an infection with Merkel cell polyomavirus. In the early stage the discreet clinical picture may be contrary to extensive microscopic invasion and this seemingly benign appearance can delay diagnosis or increase the risk of insufficient tumour excision. The diagnosis is definitely confirmed by histological evaluation and immunohistochemical tests. A typical feature is the tendency of Merkel cell carcinoma to frequent local recurrence and early metastasizing into regional lymph nodes with subsequent tumour generalization. The mainstay of therapy is radical excision of the tumour and adjuvant radiotherapy targeted at the site of primary incidence and local draining lymph nodes. The efficacy of different chemotherapy protocols in Merkel cell carcinoma is limited and the median survival rate is measured in months. In the future, prophylaxis with vaccination against Merkel cell polyomavirus will hopefully be possible in high-risk patients, as well as therapeutic usage of antisense oligonucleotides or microRNAs, eventually complete Merkel cell carcinoma elimination by affecting the tumour suppressor gene Atonal homolog 1 expression. The staging of the tumour at time of diagnosis is the most important prognostic factor. In this respect, the importance of preventative skin

  7. Chyluria associated with bronchial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morice, A. H.; Wood, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Chylous pleural effusion, though not chyluria, is a recognized association of carcinoma of the bronchus. A case of chyluria associated with squamous bronchial carcinoma is reported. Chyluria in this patient was successfully treated by dietary modification. PMID:7329888

  8. Co-encapsulation of imiquimod and copaiba oil in novel nanostructured systems: promising formulations against skin carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Cristina G; Bruinsmann, Franciele A; Contri, Renata V; Fonseca, Francisco N; Frank, Luiza A; D'Amore, Camilo M; Raffin, Renata P; Buffon, Andréia; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Silvia S

    2015-11-15

    In this study, two types of cutaneous-directed nanoparticles are proposed for the co-encapsulation of imiquimod (a drug approved for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma) and copaiba oil (oil that exhibits anti-proliferative properties). Nanostructured copaiba capsules (NCCImq) were prepared using the interfacial deposition method, and nanostructured Brazilian lipids (NBLImq) were prepared by high-pressure homogenization. The formulations exhibited average diameter, zeta potential, pH and drug content of approximately 200nm, -12mV, 6 and 1mgmL(-1), respectively. In addition, the formulations exhibited homogeneity regarding particle size, high encapsulation efficiency and stability. Both nanocarriers controlled imiquimod release, and NBLImq exhibited slower drug release (p < 0.05), likely due to increased interaction of the drug with the solid lipid (cupuaçu seed butter). The in vitro evaluation of the imiquimod-loaded nanocarriers was performed using healthy skin cells (keratinocytes, HaCaT); no alteration was observed, suggesting the biocompatibility of the nanocarriers. In addition, in vitro skin permeation/penetration using pig skin was performed, and NCCImq led to increased drug retention in the skin layers and reduced amounts of drug found in the receiver solution. Thus, NCCImq is considered the most promising nanoformulation for the treatment of skin carcinoma. PMID:26342772

  9. Nonfunctional parathyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Giessler, G. A.; Beech, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare entity accounting for 0.5% to 5% of parathyroid neoplasia. Most of these malignancies present as functional hormone-producing masses with elevated serum levels of parathormone and calcium. These tumors may also be nonfunctional. Clinical detection of nonfunctioning parathyroid malignancies preoperatively is primarily based on symptoms of an expanding neck mass. This ominous complaint is typically accompanied with an advanced stage of the disease at initial diagnosis. Because there is a paucity of data in the literature regarding nonfunctioning parathyroid carcinoma, prognosis can not be readily assessed. In both functional and nonfunctional parathyroid carcinoma, early surgery has proven to be the only curative treatment approach whereas both chemotherapy and radiation therapy fail to produce systemic or regional benefit when used alone. Hence, parathyroid cancer should be considered in every patient evaluated for a neck mass regardless of the blood calcium and blood parathormone level. PMID:11491274

  10. Primary pulmonary cavitating carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, M. Ray

    1973-01-01

    A primary lung cancer can produce a cavity in three ways. The first is `cavitary necrosis' due to breakdown of the growth itself. The second is `stenotic abscess' due to infection and breakdown of the lung parenchyma distal to bronchial obstruction caused by the growth. The third type is `spill-over abscess'. In the present series, necrosis and cavitation were observed in 100 cases out of a total of 632 primary bronchial carcinomas seen at the London Chest Hospital from July 1967 to June 1970. There were 91 males and nine females with an average age of 58·45 years. All except one smoked very heavily and had considerable symptoms. The size of the cavities ranged from 1 to 10 cm and their wall thickness from 0·5 to 3 cm. They were single in 92 cases and multiple (up to four) in eight. In 42 cases, the cancerous cavitation was central, in 38 intermediate, and in 20 peripheral. The segments most frequently affected were the apicoposterior segment of the left upper lobe and the superior segment of the left lower lobe. For descriptive purposes, these cavitating carcinomas were also divided into six broad groups on the basis of radiological and pathological correlations. Neoplastic cells in the sputum were found in 64 cases. Bronchoscopy revealed growth in 42 cases and biopsy was positive in 48. The main microscopic feature was vascular invasion of medium-sized muscular arteries and veins found in the vicinity of every cavitating bronchial carcinoma. Invasion along with tumour plugging of the vessels was observed in 75 cases and thrombosis alone in 55 cases. There were 82 squamous-cell carcinomas, 11 undifferentiated carcinomas of large polygonal-cell type, and seven adeno-alveolar cell carcinomas. The single most important and noteworthy feature in the present series was that oat-cell carcinoma hardly ever undergoes necrosis. Out of a total of 95 cases observed, only three showed necrosis, and this was minimal and characteristically devoid of cavitation. In oat

  11. Maxillary sinus carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, F.; Ogura, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Primary site control, anatomical site of failure, survival, and complications of treatment were determined in a retrospective review of primary maxillary sinus carcinoma. Sixty-one patients were treated by radiation followed by surgery and 35 by radiation alone. Primary tumor control was achieved in 69% of patients receiving combined treatment, 14% of patients treated with radiation alone, and 49% of all patients. Local control did not differ with histological type. Virtually all epidermoid and undifferentiated carcinoma recurrences occurred within 2 years, but 27% of adenocarcinomas recurred after 2 years.

  12. Retrospective Analysis of Local Control and Cosmetic Outcome of 147 Periorificial Carcinomas of the Face Treated With Low-Dose Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ducassou, Anne; David, Isabelle; Filleron, Thomas; Rives, Michel; Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in white populations. We evaluated the local cure rate and cosmetic outcome of patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the face treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between February 1990 and May 2000, 147 facial carcinomas in 132 patients were treated by {sup 192}Ir wire implantation. Side effects of brachytherapy were noted. Follow-up was 2 years or more. Locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and overall survival were recorded. Group A included patients treated by primary brachytherapy, and Group B included those treated after recurrence. Results: A total of 121 carcinomas were BCCs (82.3%) and 26 were SCCs (17.7%); the median tumor size was 10 mm. Of the tumors, 86 (58.5%) were in men and 61 (41.5%) were in women; the median age was 71 years. Group A comprised 116 lesions (78.9%), and Group B, 31 (21.1%). There were 17 relapses (11.6%) after a median follow-up of 72 months: 12 local, 4 nodal, and 1 local and nodal. Locoregional-free survival was 96.6% at 2 years and 87.3% at 5 years. Five-year LRFS was 82.6% in men and 93.3% in women (p = 0.027). After adjustment for gender, LRFS was better after primary treatment than after recurrence (hasard ratio HR, 2.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-8.03; p = 0.039). Five-year LRFS was 90.4% for BCC and 70.8% for SCC (p = 0.03). There were no Grade 3 complications. Conclusions: Low-dose rate brachytherapy offers good local control and cosmetic outcome in patients with periorificial skin carcinomas, with no Grade 3 complications. Brchytherapy is more efficient when used as primary treatment.

  13. Developing in vitro models of human ductal carcinoma in situ from primary tissue explants.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel D; Dabbs, David J; Lee, Adrian V; McGuire, Kandace P; Ahrendt, Gretchen M; Bhargava, Rohit; Davidson, Nancy E; Brufsky, Adam M; Johnson, Ronald R; Oesterreich, Steffi; McAuliffe, Priscilla F

    2015-09-01

    Because there are currently no reliable predictors for progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive disease, nearly all patients receive comprehensive therapy, leading to over-treatment in many cases. Few in vitro models for studying DCIS progression have been developed. We report here the successful culture and expansion of primary DCIS from surgical specimens using a conditional reprogramming protocol. Patients with percutaneous core-needle biopsy demonstrating DCIS were enrolled in a tissue banking protocol after informed consent was received. Fresh tissue was taken from lumpectomy or mastectomy specimens, mechanically and enzymatically dissociated, cultured in medium conditioned by irradiated mouse fibroblasts and supplemented with rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, and characterized by immunocytochemistry. Out of 33 DCIS cases, 58% (19) were expanded for up to 2 months in culture, and 42% (14) were frozen immediately after mechanical dissociation for future growth. The cultures are almost exclusively composed of cytokeratin 8- and EpCAM-positive luminal and cytokeratin 14-, cytokeratin 5-, and p63-positive basal mammary epithelial cells, suggesting maintenance of heterogeneity in vitro. Furthermore, as assessed by luminal and basal marker expression, these cells retain their cellular identities both in the "conditionally reprogrammed" proliferative state and after conditioned media and ROCK inhibitor withdrawal. When grown to 100 % confluency, the cultures organize into luminal and basal layers as well as luminal compartments surrounded by basal cells. Primary cultures of DCIS derived directly from patient tissues can be generated and may serve as in vitro models for the study of DCIS.

  14. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma arising in Warthin’s tumor of the parotid gland: Clinicopathological characteristics and immunophenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunkai; Song, Zhigang; Xiao, Zhibo; Lin, Qiushi; Dong, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), an extremely rare tumor, arises from the epithelial component of preexisting parotid Warthin tumors (WT). Among the 309 cases of surgically resected WTs in Chinese PLA General Hospital and Beijing Shijitan Hospital of Capital Medical University, 5 cases (1.6%) fulfilled the criteria for MECs transformed from WTs. Clinicopathological characteristics of MECs was demonstrated in order to avoid misdiagnosis of this rare type of tumor. All the 5 patients, 3 males and 2 females, presented painless masses in the parotid gland. MECs were located inside or at the edge of WTs, with an obvious transitional zone between WT and MEC. Basal cells of WTs and epidermoid cells of MECs were strongly positive for cytokeratin CK5/6, CK34βE12, and P63; whereas negative for CK7, CK20, and CEA. Mucous cells of MECs were positive for CK7, CEA, as well as periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), whereas negative for CK5/6, CK34βE12, CK20, and P63. MECs patients were followed up for 25–69 months after surgery, presenting no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. Collectively, MECs arising from WT is very rare. The pathological diagnosis was based on histological morphology, especially the transitional zone between WT and MEC. PMID:27417276

  15. Basal and squamous cell carcinoma of the eyelids and their treatment by radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, P.J.; Thompson, G.A.; Easterbrook, W.M.; Gallie, B.L.; Payne, D.G.

    1984-04-01

    The authors report 1,166 tumors of the eyelids that were treated by single or fractionated exposures to doses of 20-60 Gy. The five year tumor control rate was 95% for basal cell and 93.3% for squamous cell carcinoma. Irradiation was equally successful in primary cases and in those recurrent following surgery. The cosmetic and functional results were generally excellent and readily accepted by most patients. The overall complication rate was 9.6% with fewer than one-half rated as serious; these problems mainly occurred with large tumors that had destroyed normal tissues. In only 14 (1.2%) patients was death related to the tumor. Approximately one-half of the patients received a dose of 35 Gy in five daily fractions, one-quarter, 20 to 22.5 Gy in a single exposure and the others with larger tumors 42.5-60 Gy in 10 to 30 exposures in two to six weeks.

  16. Basaloid ductal carcinoma in situ arising in salivary gland metaplasia of the breast: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Jeong; Kang, Su Hwan; Bae, Young Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland metaplasia is a newly recognized, adenosis-like lesion which could not be classified according to known categories of adenosis of the breast. We report a case of basaloid ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) arising in a background of salivary gland metaplasia in a 49-year old woman who visited our hospital for a right breast mass. Breast ultrasonography showed a multi-lobulating mixed hypoechoic and isoechoic mass measuring 2.9 cm in size at the periareolar area. Histologically, the lesion showed a well-defined DCIS with basaloid tumor cells and central comedo-type necrosis surrounded by salivary gland metaplasia composed of glands or ducts not specific to the breast, ducts with cribriform proliferation of luminal epithelial cells, and ducts with varying degrees of proliferation of basaloid cells including solid nests of basaloid cells. Salivary gland metaplasia is a most unusual lesion of the breast characterized by salivary gland-type acini and ducts with various proliferations of luminal and basaloid cells, and accompanied by malignant tumor of basal cell type.

  17. Utility of GATA3 immunohistochemistry in differentiating urothelial carcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix, anus, and lung.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex; Amin, Ali; Gabrielson, Edward; Illei, Peter; Roden, Richard B; Sharma, Rajni; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2012-10-01

    Distinguishing invasive high-grade urothelial carcinoma (UC) from other carcinomas occurring in the genitourinary tract may be difficult. The differential diagnosis includes high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma, spread from an anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), or spread from a uterine cervical SCC. In terms of metastatic UC, the most common problem is differentiating spread of UC to the lung from a primary pulmonary SCC. Immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) for GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), thrombomodulin (THROMBO), and uroplakin III was performed on a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 35 cases of invasive high-grade UC. GATA3 IHC was also performed on TMAs containing 38 high-grade (Gleason score ≥8) prostatic adenocarcinomas, representative tissue sections from 15 invasive anal SCCs, representative tissue sections from 19 invasive cervical SCCs, and TMAs with 12 invasive cervical carcinomas of the cervix [SCC (n=10), SCC with neuroendocrine features (n=1), and adenosquamous carcinoma (n=1)]. In addition, GATA3 IHC was performed on representative tissue sections from 15 pulmonary UC metastases and a TMA with 25 SCCs of the lung and 5 pulmonary non-small cell carcinomas with squamous features. GATA3, THROMBO, and uroplakin III were positive in 28 (80%), 22 (63%), and 21 (60%) cases of high-grade UC, respectively. All cases of GATA3-positive staining were nonfocal; 25 (89%) cases demonstrated moderate to strong staining, and 3 (11%) demonstrated weak staining. Of the 7 cases that failed to express GATA3, 5 were positive for THROMBO and/or uroplakin III, whereas 2 were negative for all 3 markers. None of the 38 high-grade prostatic adenocarcinomas was positive for GATA3. Weak GATA3 staining was present in occasional basal cells of benign prostate glands, in a few benign atrophic glands, and in urothelial metaplasia. Of the 15 cases of anal SCCs, 2 (7%) cases showed focal weak staining, and 1 (3%) showed focal moderate staining. Weak staining was also rarely

  18. [Merkel cell carcinoma (trabecular carcinoma) of the skin].

    PubMed

    Zala, L; Armagni, C; Krebs, A

    1983-04-01

    The Merkel cell carcinoma was first designated some years ago by the descriptive term trabecular carcinoma. Both names refer to a skin tumor occurring in elderly patients. This is another example where ultrastructural differentiating criteria are necessary for a definite diagnosis i.e., identification of so-called neurosecretory-like granules by electron microscopy. We report clinical, histological, ultrastructural, and histogenetic aspects of such a disease in a woman suffering from a metastasizing Merkel cell carcinoma. PMID:6853165

  19. Expression of GLTSCR2/Pict-1 in squamous cell carcinomas of the skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee-Youn; Cho, Young-Eun; Park, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Sun

    2013-11-01

    The most important cause of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) is DNA damage induced by exposure to solar UV irradiation. DNA damage induced by UV irradiation is sensed by early DNA damage response (DDR) proteins. Recently, GLTSCR2 has been suggested to play a role in UV light-induced DDR. To explore the role of GLTSCR2 in the development of cutaneous SCC, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying GLTSCR2 inactivation in response to UV irradiation. We analyzed cutaneous SCC (n=42), basal cell carcinomas (BCC; n=26), and normal skin tissue samples (n=36) and compared GLTSCR2 expression between tumor and normal tissues, using immunohistochemistry. Next, to investigate the effects of UV irradiation on GLTSCR2, we performed immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, immunoblotting, half-life assay for GLTSCR2, and comet assay after UV irradiation in primary keratinocytes. GLTSCR2 expression in SCC was significantly lower than that of normal skin tissue (p<0.05), but not different between BCC and normal skin. In cultured primary keratinocytes, GLTSCR2 expression was decreased and translocated after UV irradiation. UV irradiation accelerated degradation of GLTSCR2 through proteasomal pathway. Knockdown of GLTSCR2 resulted in marked decrease in γH2AX foci after UV exposure. Furthermore, comet assay showed that DNA damage after UV exposure persists longer in GLTSCR2 knocked-down cells. Our data show that GLTSCR2 is downregulated in SCC of the skin and that UV light exposure decreases the stability of GLTSCR2 and sensitizes keratinocytes to DNA damage. Therefore, our data suggest that GLTSCR2 might be involved in the development and/or progression of SCC of the skin.

  20. Fallacious Carcinoma- Spindle Cell Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bavle, Radhika M; Govinda, Girish; Venkataramanaiah, Padmalatha Gundappanayakanahalli; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-07-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a unique, rare and peculiar biphasic tumour of head and neck which is not frequently observed in the oral cavity. This variant of squamous cell carcinoma although of monophasic epithelial origin, simulates a sarcoma and is an aggressive carcinoma with high frequency of recurrence and metastasis. A correct and timely diagnosis is of paramount importance. Most of the tumours require an Immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for confirmation or diagnosis. We report a case of spindle cell carcinoma with varied histopathological morphology and clinical presentation in a middle aged female with a brief review of literature. PMID:27630965

  1. Fallacious Carcinoma- Spindle Cell Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M; Govinda, Girish; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a unique, rare and peculiar biphasic tumour of head and neck which is not frequently observed in the oral cavity. This variant of squamous cell carcinoma although of monophasic epithelial origin, simulates a sarcoma and is an aggressive carcinoma with high frequency of recurrence and metastasis. A correct and timely diagnosis is of paramount importance. Most of the tumours require an Immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for confirmation or diagnosis. We report a case of spindle cell carcinoma with varied histopathological morphology and clinical presentation in a middle aged female with a brief review of literature.

  2. Fallacious Carcinoma- Spindle Cell Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M; Govinda, Girish; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a unique, rare and peculiar biphasic tumour of head and neck which is not frequently observed in the oral cavity. This variant of squamous cell carcinoma although of monophasic epithelial origin, simulates a sarcoma and is an aggressive carcinoma with high frequency of recurrence and metastasis. A correct and timely diagnosis is of paramount importance. Most of the tumours require an Immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for confirmation or diagnosis. We report a case of spindle cell carcinoma with varied histopathological morphology and clinical presentation in a middle aged female with a brief review of literature. PMID:27630965

  3. Notch1 is a 5-fluorouracil resistant and poor survival marker in human esophagus squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Fan, Huijie; Ma, Yuanyuan; Liang, Dongming; Huang, Ruixia; Wang, Junsheng; Zhou, Fuyou; Kan, Quancheng; Ming, Liang; Li, Huixiang; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Nesland, Jahn Martin; Suo, Zhenhe

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling involves the processes that govern cell proliferation, cell fate decision, cell differentiation and stem cell maintenance. Due to its fundamental role in stem cells, it has been speculated during the recent years that Notch family may have critical functions in cancer stem cells or cancer cells with a stem cell phenotype, therefore playing an important role in the process of oncogenesis. In this study, expression of Notch family in KYSE70, KYSE140 and KYSE450 squamous esophageal cancer cell lines and virus transformed squamous esophageal epithelial cell line Het-1A was examined by quantitative RT-PCR. Compared to the Het-1A cells, higher levels of Nocth1 and Notch3 expression in the cancer cell lines were identified. Due to the finding that NOTCH3 mainly mediates squamous cell differentiation, NOTCH1 expression was further studied in these cell lines. By Western blot analyses, the KYSE70 cell line which derived from a poorly differentiated tumor highly expressed Notch1, and the Notch1 expression in this cell line was hypoxia inducible, while the KYSE450 cell line which derived from a well differentiated tumor was always negative for Notch1, even in hypoxia. Additional studies demonstrated that the KYSE70 cell line was more 5-FU resistant than the KYSE450 cell line and such 5-FU resistance is correlated to Notch1 expression verified by Notch1 knockdown experiments. In clinical samples, Notch1 protein expression was detected in the basal cells of human esophagus epithelia, and its expression in squamous cell carcinomas was significantly associated with higher pathological grade and shorter overall survival. We conclude that Notch1 expression is associated with cell aggressiveness and 5-FU drug resistance in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines in vitro and is significantly associated with a poor survival in human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

  4. Independent bilateral primary bronchial carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, M. Ray

    1971-01-01

    Independent bilateral primary bronchial carcinomas are not common. Since Beyreuther's description in 1924, 16 well-documented cases of independent primary bronchial carcinomas of different histology have been described. From 1965 to 1970, eight cases were seen at the London Chest Hospital. In order to make the diagnosis of a second primary bronchial carcinoma, each tumour should be malignant and neither should be a metastasis from the other. To meet this last criterion, the histopathological features of the two tumours must be different. Many cases have been described in the literature as double primary bronchial carcinomas where the second primary had the same histological features as the first. Images PMID:4327711

  5. Primary biliary carcinoma: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, M.K.; Quiroz, F.; Lawson, T.L.; Smith, D.F.; Foley, W.D.; Steward, E.T.

    1984-08-01

    Fifty-three patients with documented primary biliary carcinoma were studied with computed tomography. Twenty-six patients had gallbladder carcinoma and 27 patients had carcinoma of the biliary ductal system. Ninety percent of patients with gallbladder cancer had an intraluminal mass. Local invasion into the liver was common. The majority of patients with biliary ductal carcinoma had dilated bile ducts, while only 50% of patients with gallbladder cancer had biliary ductal dilatation. The most common location of tumor involving the extrahepatic biliary ductal system was the distal common bile duct. This occurred in eight patients out of 27, or 30% of the cases.

  6. Merkel cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koljonen, Virve

    2006-01-01

    Background Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an unusual primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. MCC is a fatal disease, and patients have a poor chance of survival. Moreover, MCC lacks distinguishing clinical features, and thus by the time the diagnosis is made, the tumour usually have metastasized. MCC mainly affects sun-exposed areas of elderly persons. Half of the tumours are located in the head and neck region. Methods MCC was first described in 1972. Since then, most of the cases reported, have been in small series of patients. Most of the reports concern single cases or epidemiological studies. The present study reviews the world literature on MCC. The purpose of this article is to shed light on this unknown neuroendocrine carcinoma and provide the latest information on prognostic markers and treatment options. Results The epidemiological studies have revealed that large tumour size, male sex, truncal site, nodal/distant disease at presentation, and duration of disease before presentation, are poor prognostic factors. The recommended initial treatment is extensive local excision. Adjuvant radiation therapy has recently been shown to improve survival. Thus far, no chemotherapy protocol have achieved the same objective. Conclusion Although rare, the fatality of this malignancy makes is important to understand the etiology and pathophysiology. During the last few years, the research on MCC has produced prognostic markers, which can be translated into clinical patient care. PMID:16466578

  7. Primary duodenal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Adedeji, O. A.; Trescoli-Serrano, C.; Garcia-Zarco, M.

    1995-01-01

    Eight cases of primary duodenal carcinoma in a district general hospital are presented. The cases highlight the advanced state of the disease at presentation, the difficulty in diagnosis, and its poor prognosis. Duodenal carcinoma occurs in both sexes worldwide with no predisposing factors in the majority of cases. There is an increased risk in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and adenomas of the duodenum. Duodenal carcinoma occurs about 22 years from the diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis in about 2% of patients, forming over 50% of upper gastrointestinal cancers occurring in these patients. Carcinomatous changes occur in 30 to 60% of duodenal villous adenomas and much less in tubulo-villous and tubular adenomas. These categories of patients should be screened and adequately followed up. Aggressive and radical surgery, even in the presence of locally advanced disease and lymph node involvement, gives a better outcome. When curative surgery is not possible, chemotherapy must accompany palliation with or without radiotherapy. Pre-operative chemotherapy may facilitate a curative radical resection. The general five-year survival is 17-33% but some centres have achieved a five-year survival of 40-60% with aggressive management of these patients. PMID:7644397

  8. Non-Syndromic Familial Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour: A Rare Case Report in Japanese Identical Twins.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasuyuki; Maruoka, Yutaka; Yamaji, Iena; Kawai, Shigeo

    2016-08-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour (KCOT) is unicystic or multicystic intraosseous benign tumour of odontogenic origin that recurs due to locally destructive behaviour. KCOTs are usually the first manifestation of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS), an autosomal dominant disorder also known as Gorlin's syndrome and they are most frequently observed familial symptom regardless of patients' nationality. In addition, the recurrence rate and multiplicity of KCOTs is relatively high as compared to that of other sporadic carcinomas. KCOT has been considered as a non-hereditary lesion and its familial onset is an extremely rare event in non-NBCCS cases. Here, we describe previously unreported non-syndromic multiple KCOT cases in identical twins in a Japanese family. The subjects were female Japanese identical twins who were 26 and 27 years old, respectively, at the time of diagnosis for KCOT. They had no major or minor features of NBCCS other than KCOT. Although there were lesions that were likely to be dentigerous cysts based on radiographic findings, one of them was KCOT. This case report highlights the importance of precise diagnosis, choice of surgical method and careful observation for multiplicity or familial onset in sporadic KCOT cases without NBCCS. PMID:27656582

  9. Urinary bladder carcinoma with divergent differentiation featuring small cell carcinoma, sarcomatoid carcinoma, and liposarcomatous component.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Mariko; Morikawa, Teppei; Nakagawa, Tohru; Miyakawa, Jimpei; Maeda, Daichi; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Both small cell carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder are highly aggressive tumors, and a concurrence of these tumors is extremely rare. We report a case of urinary bladder cancer with small cell carcinoma as a predominant component, accompanied by sarcomatoid carcinoma and conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC). Although the small cell carcinoma component had resolved on receiving chemoradiotherapy, rapid growth of the residual tumor led to a fatal outcome. A 47-year-old man presented with occasional bladder irritation and had a 2-year history of asymptomatic hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a huge mass in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Microscopically, small cell carcinoma was detected as the major tumor component. Spindle-shaped sarcomatoid cells were also observed that were intermingled with small cell carcinoma and conventional UC. In addition, a sheet-like growth of the lipoblast-like neoplastic cells was observed focally. Initially, by providing chemoradiotherapy, we achieved a marked tumor regression; however, the tumor rapidly regrew after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, and the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Only conventional UC and sarcomatoid carcinoma were identified in the cystectomy specimen. The patient died of the disease 4 months after cystectomy. Urinary bladder cancer may include a combination of multiple aggressive histologies as in the present case. Because the variation in the tumor components may affect the efficacy of therapy, a correct diagnosis of every tumor component is necessary.

  10. Urinary bladder carcinoma with divergent differentiation featuring small cell carcinoma, sarcomatoid carcinoma, and liposarcomatous component.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Mariko; Morikawa, Teppei; Nakagawa, Tohru; Miyakawa, Jimpei; Maeda, Daichi; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Both small cell carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder are highly aggressive tumors, and a concurrence of these tumors is extremely rare. We report a case of urinary bladder cancer with small cell carcinoma as a predominant component, accompanied by sarcomatoid carcinoma and conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC). Although the small cell carcinoma component had resolved on receiving chemoradiotherapy, rapid growth of the residual tumor led to a fatal outcome. A 47-year-old man presented with occasional bladder irritation and had a 2-year history of asymptomatic hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a huge mass in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Microscopically, small cell carcinoma was detected as the major tumor component. Spindle-shaped sarcomatoid cells were also observed that were intermingled with small cell carcinoma and conventional UC. In addition, a sheet-like growth of the lipoblast-like neoplastic cells was observed focally. Initially, by providing chemoradiotherapy, we achieved a marked tumor regression; however, the tumor rapidly regrew after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, and the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Only conventional UC and sarcomatoid carcinoma were identified in the cystectomy specimen. The patient died of the disease 4 months after cystectomy. Urinary bladder cancer may include a combination of multiple aggressive histologies as in the present case. Because the variation in the tumor components may affect the efficacy of therapy, a correct diagnosis of every tumor component is necessary. PMID:27461832

  11. How Are Squamous and Basal Cell Skin Cancers Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... often enough to cure basal and squamous cell skin cancers without further treatment. There are different types of skin biopsies. The ... and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Skin Cancer - ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Skin Cancer - Basal and Squamous ...

  12. Co-Expression of Bmi-1 and Podoplanin Predicts Overall Survival in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Treated With Radio(chemo)therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vormittag, Laurenz; Thurnher, Dietmar; Geleff, Silvana; Pammer, Johannes; Heiduschka, Gregor; Brunner, Markus; Grasl, Matthaeus Ch.; Erovic, Boban M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to determine the expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin in healthy oral mucosa and in untreated tumor tissues samples of patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. All patients were treated by primary radio(chemo)therapy. Methods and Materials: The expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin was immunohistochemically evaluated in 12 normal oral mucosa and 63 tumor specimens and correlated with patients' clinical data. Results: In healthy mucosa expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin was restricted to the basal cell layer. Expression of both proteins was found in 79% and 86% of our tumor samples, respectively. In 17 and 8 samples, Bmi-1 and podoplanin were co-expressed at the invasive border or diffuse in the bulk of the tumor, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that the co-expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin correlated to decreased overall survival (p = 0.044). Moreover, multivariate testing identified high expression of podoplanin (p = 0.044), co-expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin (p = 0.007) and lack of response to therapy (p < 0.0001) as predictors of shortened overall survival in patients treated with primary radio(chemo)therapy. Conclusions: Bmi-1 and podoplanin are expressed at the invasive front of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Co-expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin predicts significantly overall survival of patients treated with primary radio(chemo)therapy.

  13. Lobomycosis and squamous cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lisiane; Rodrigues, Luciana; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto Chirano; Santos, Mônica; Talhari, Sinésio; Talhari, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    The occurence of squamous cell carcinoma on long-lasting ulcers is classic. Malignant transformation may occur on burn scars and chronic ulcers of varying etiology, including infectious agents. Transformation of old lobomycosis lesion scars into squamous cell carcinoma has been rarely reported. Careful and long-term follow-up of such patients is important to avoid carcinomatous transformation. PMID:23739701

  14. Carcinoma Adenomatodes Cervicis Uteri

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Herbert R.

    1926-01-01

    The case is one of carcinoma adenomatodes (adenoma malignum) cervicis uteri, which occurred in a patient, aged 49. Vaginal hysterectomy was performed with the Pacquelin cautery, and the patient remains well after 22 years. Attention is drawn to the rarity of the disease, and the point is emphasized that in true cases of the disease the glandular epithelium is nowhere proliferated, and therefore reliance on microscopic examination alone for the diagnosis may lead to serious error. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:19985105

  15. Immunotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Märten, Angela

    2008-05-01

    Patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas have especially poor prognosis with a five-year survival rate of <1% and a median survival of 4-6 months. Pancreatic carcinoma is a systemic disease, insensitive to radiotherapy and mostly to chemotherapy. Accordingly, new treatment modalities are worth being investigated. One of the promising approaches is immunotherapy. Several phase I/II trials that have been published show interesting results, whereupon antibody-based strategies seem to fail and unspecific stimulation or vaccination with peptides look encouraging. Furthermore, phase II trials dealing with combination therapies are highly promising. One of them, a combination of chemoradiotherapy plus interferon-alpha is currently tested in a randomized phase III trial. As most of the trials had enrolled only limited numbers of patients and most of the trials were not conducted and/or reported according to the new standards it is difficult to draw final conclusions from the discussed trials. Immuno-monitoring was performed only in 40% of the discussed publications. In all cases immune responses were observed and correlation with the clinical outcome is discussed. Immunotherapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and especially combination therapies including immunotherapy is an up-and-coming approach and needs to be investigated in well conducted phase III randomized controlled trials accompanied by appropriate immuno-monitoring.

  16. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, G; Rubini, C; Fioroni, M; Piattelli, A

    2002-02-01

    Clear cell tumours, in the head and neck region, are usually derived from salivary or odontogenic tissues, or may be metastatic. A few clear cells may be present in odontogenic cysts, while, odontogenic neoplasms composed predominantly of clear cells are quite rare. They include calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumours (CEOT), ameloblastoma and odontogenic carcinoma. Clear cell odontogenic tumour (CCOT) has been classified in the last WHO classification as a benign tumour, but it is now recognized as a more sinister lesion and current opinion is that CCOT should be designated as a carcinoma. These tumours are characterized by aggressive growth, recurrences, and metastatic disease. A recent review of the literature has yielded 30 cases of tumours with similar characteristics. These tumours have a peak incidence in the 5th-7th decades, with a female predilection. The anterior portions of the jaws, especially the mandible, are most frequently affected. The aggressive potential of these neoplasms is well documented by the extensive invasion of adjacent tissues, multiple recurrences and regional or distant metastases.

  17. Etiopathogenesis of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Makazlieva, Tanja; Vaskova, Olivija; Majstorov, Venjamin

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thyroid malignomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm consisting of most frequent differentiated encountered carcinomas, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma, then medullary thyroid carcinoma originating from neuroendocrine calcitonin-producing C-cells and rare forms of thyroid lymphomas arising from intrathyroidal lymphatic tissue, thyroid sarcomas and poorly differentiated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. There are increasing numbers of epidemiological studies and publications that have suggested increased incidence rate of thyroid carcinomas. We have read, analysed and compare available reviews and original articles investigating different etiological factors in the development of thyroid carcinomas through Google Scholar and PubMed Database. DISCUSSION: Aetiology involved in the development of thyroid carcinomas is multifactorial and includes external influences, as well as constitutional predispositions and genetic etiological factors. The actual effect of environmental and constitutional factors is on promoting genetic and epigenetic alterations which result in cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Until now are identified numerous genetic alterations, assumed to have an important role in oncogenesis, with MAPK and PI3K-AKT as crucial signalling networks regulating growth, proliferation, differentiation and cell survival/apoptosis. CONCLUSION: This new molecular insight could have a crucial impact on diagnosis and also on improving and selecting an appropriate treatment to the patients with thyroid malignancies. PMID:27703585

  18. Integrative approach in prevention and therapy of basal cellular carcinoma by association of three actives loaded into lipid nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Badea, Gabriela; Lacatusu, Ioana; Ott, Cristina; Badea, Nicoleta; Grafu, Iulia; Meghea, Aurelia

    2015-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is one of the commonest malignancies occurred on sun-exposed skin, mainly by UV-B radiation, of lighter-skinned individuals. The aim of the present study was to develop advanced drug delivery formulations used in BCC therapy that overcomes chemotherapy-induced side-effects of skin photosensitivity by an integrative approach of nanoencapsulation in conjunction with combination therapy that uses chemotherapeutic, chemoprotective and sunscreen agents. The combination of anticancer drug together with sunscreen agent is very useful in therapy, especially for individuals who are more exposed to the sun without using a sunscreen. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) employed as drug delivery systems were co-loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a hydrophilic chemotherapeutic drug, and ethylhexyl salicylate (EHS), a lipophilic UV-B sunscreen agent. The NLCs were developed using bioactive squalene (50.8% w/w) from amaranth seed oil as chemoprotective agent. By varying the concentrations of 5-FU and EHS, the co-loaded NLCs presented particle sizes of about 100nm, acceptable physical stability with values smaller than -25mV and appropriate entrapment efficiency that reaches values over 65% for both types of drugs. The UV-B blocking ability of EHS loaded into NLCs were influenced by the concentration of 5-FU. The amaranth oil offered a capacity of 70% in scavenging the free radicals. In vitro drug release showed that NLCs presented sustained release of 5-FU that followed the Fick's law of diffusion. PMID:25828466

  19. [DNA methylation in thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Song, Xianyun; Shang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yutuo

    2015-03-01

    Cancer has become clear that not merely gene variations but also epigenetic modifications may contribute to it. Epigenetic changes refer to stable alterations in gene expression with unrelated to changes in the underlying genetic sequence,resulting in heritable. DNA methylation is one of the common epigenetic changes. It control the gene expression through changing DNA conformation and stability, chromatin structer, DNA-protein interaction. The reversal of dysregulated DNA methylation has emerged as a potential strategy for the treatment of thyroid carcinoma. The artical will provide an overview of how DNA methylation contribute to thyroid carcinoma dissemination,invasion and metastasis and we will summarize the latest epigenetic therapies for thyroid carcinoma.

  20. Correlative imaging in gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Willekens, I; Goethals, L R; Brussaard, C; Verdries, D; de Mey, J

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is a relatively rare malignant epithelial neoplasm, arising from gallbladder mucosa. It is the fifth most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the most common biliary tract cancer. Early diagnosis remains difficult, because clinical symptoms are sparse and non-specific, often resulting in advanced stage disease at the time of diagnosis. The most common feature of gallbladder carcinoma on different imaging modalities is focal wall thickening, associated with a large eccentric tumor mass. In this case we report the imaging characteristics of gallbladder carcinoma on ultrasound, MDCT and 18F-FDG PET/CT.