Science.gov

Sample records for nhdd components test

  1. Informed Test Component Weighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies and evaluates alternative methods for weighting tests. Presents formulas for composite reliability and validity as a function of component weights and suggests a rational process that identifies and considers trade-offs in determining weights. Discusses drawbacks to implicit weighting and explicit weighting and the difficulty of…

  2. PACS component testing: beta and acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1997-05-01

    The functionality and performance expectations of all PACS components must be specified at the time of purchase and tested completely upon delivery to assure customer satisfaction and successful adoption of the new technology. This process may be more elaborate if the customer agrees to serve as a Beta test site for a new component or a new revision of an existing component.A carefully designed test plan will save time at installation, will allow the customer and vendor to agree on expectations, and will assure that the installation will proceed as planned. This paper describes the test procedure used at the University of Florida to accept each PACS component, either a commercial product, or one developed in house. A set of documents contain descriptions of the pre-installation environment, sets of studies to be used in the test, installation checklist, functional usage reports, subjective evaluations, and problem reporting forms. Training and user documentation is also reviewed and 'help lists' are created to help users perform the most common functions. Although details in the documents are changed to match the type of component being tested, the general form of the test remains the same. A formal procedure for testing the functionality and performance of new equipment can save time for both the vendor and the customer and, if specified at the time of purchase, can serve to document the expectations of the customer. Following these procedures will assure a successful installation and improve customer satisfaction.

  3. HG ion thruster component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Cathodes, isolators, and vaporizers are critical components in determining the performance and lifetime of mercury ion thrusters. The results of life tests of several of these components are reported. A 30-cm thruster CIV test in a bell jar has successfully accumulated over 26,000 hours. The cathode has undergone 65 restarts during the life test without requiring any appreciable increases in starting power. Recently, all restarts have been achieved with only the 44 volt keeper supply with no change required in the starting power. Another ongoing 30-cm Hg thruster cathode test has successfully passed the 10,000 hour mark. A solid-insert, 8-cm thruster cathode has accumulated over 4,000 hours of thruster operation. All starts have been achieved without the use of a high voltage ignitor. The results of this test indicate that the solid impregnated insert is a viable neutralizer cathode for the 8-cm thruster.

  4. NEXT Thruster Component Verification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Sovey, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Component testing is a critical part of thruster life validation activities under NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project testing. The high voltage propellant isolators were selected for design verification testing. Even though they are based on a heritage design, design changes were made because the isolators will be operated under different environmental conditions including temperature, voltage, and pressure. The life test of two NEXT isolators was therefore initiated and has accumulated more than 10,000 hr of operation. Measurements to date indicate only a negligibly small increase in leakage current. The cathode heaters were also selected for verification testing. The technology to fabricate these heaters, developed for the International Space Station plasma contactor hollow cathode assembly, was transferred to Aerojet for the fabrication of the NEXT prototype model ion thrusters. Testing the contractor-fabricated heaters is necessary to validate fabrication processes for high reliability heaters. This paper documents the status of the propellant isolator and cathode heater tests.

  5. Hg ion thruster component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Electron bombardment thrusters, under development to provide both auxiliary and primary propulsion functions for a large variety of space missions are tested. Thruster design verification which requires life tests of durations of the order of the time anticipated in space applications, are discussed. The life time and reliability of an electron bombardment thruster is dependent upon the performance of several critical components including cathodes, vaporizers, and isolators. The performances of the cathode, vaporizer, and propellant isolaters during fatigue analyses are examined.

  6. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY (SATURN V IN BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. Explosive components facility certification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrell, L.; Johnson, D.

    1995-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently completed construction of a new Explosive Components Facility (ECF) that will be used for the research and development of advanced explosives technology. The ECF includes nine indoor firing pads for detonating explosives and monitoring the detonations. Department of Energy requirements for certification of this facility include detonation of explosive levels up to 125 percent of the rated firing pad capacity with no visual structural degradation resulting from the explosion. The Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia decided to expand this certification process to include vibration and acoustic monitoring at various locations throughout the building during these explosive events. This information could then be used to help determine the best locations for noise and vibration sensitive equipment (e.g. scanning electron microscopes) used for analysis throughout the building. This facility has many unique isolation features built into the explosive chamber and laboratory areas of the building that allow normal operation of other building activities during explosive tests. This paper discusses the design of this facility and the various types of explosive testing performed by the Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia. However, the primary focus of the paper is directed at the vibration and acoustic data acquired during the certification process. This includes the vibration test setup and data acquisition parameters, as well as analysis methods used for generating peak acceleration levels and spectral information. Concerns over instrumentation issues such as the choice of transducers (appropriate ranges, resonant frequencies, etc.) and measurements with long cable lengths (500 feet) are also discussed.

  8. 4. VIEW SOUTHWEST COMPONENTS TEST LAB TEST BAY DETAIL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SOUTHWEST COMPONENTS TEST LAB TEST BAY DETAIL SHOWING EMERGENCY SHOWER, AND EYEWASH, AND OBSERVATION WINDOW. STORAGE TANKS ON ROOF. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. Oxidizer heat exchanger component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, T.; Kanic, P.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the RL10 Rocket Engine Product Improvement Program, Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (OHE) stages 1, 2, and 3 were designed and fabricated during late 1983 and early 1984. The purpose of the OHE is to provide gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector for stable engine operation at tank head idle and pumped idle operating modes. This report summarizes the OHE stages 1 and 3 rig testing, and includes the separation of the stage 1-and-2 assembly and the remanifolding of stage 1. The OHE performance analysis and analytical model modifications for both stages are also presented. The flow tests were accomplished during the time period from 9 October 1984 to 12 November 1984.

  10. Oxidizer heat exchanger component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, is capable of multimode thrust operation. The engine operates at two low-thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust; and pumped idle, 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank prepressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine during the low-thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidized heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. This report summarizes the test activity and post-test data analysis for two possible heat exchangers, each of which employs a completely different design philosophy. One design makes use of a low-heat transfer (PHT) approach in combination with a volume to attenuate pressure and flow oscillations. The test data showed that the LHT unit satisfied the oxygen exit quality of 0.95 or greater in both the THI and PI modes while maintaining stability. The HHT unit fulfilled all PI requirements; data for THI satisfactory operation is implied from experimental data that straddle the exact THI operating point.

  11. Processing, testing and selecting blood components.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alister; Heyes, Jennifer

    Transfusion of blood components can be an essential and lifesaving treatment for many patients. However, components must comply with a number of national requirements to ensure they are safe and fit for use. Transfusion of incorrect blood components can lead to mortality and morbidity in patients, which is why patient testing and blood selection are important. This second article in our five-part series on blood transfusion outlines the requirements for different blood components, the importance of the ABO and RhD blood group systems and the processes that ensure the correct blood component is issued to each patient.

  12. Component evaluation testing and analysis algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John

    2011-10-01

    The Ground-Based Monitoring R&E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. In order to guarantee consistency, traceability, and visibility into the results of the testing process, it is necessary to document the test and analysis procedures that are in place. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007). This document serves to provide a comprehensive overview of the analysis and the algorithms that are applied to the Component Evaluation testing. A brief summary of each test is included to provide the context for the analysis that is to be performed.

  13. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  14. Mechanical Components Branch Test Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center formulates, conducts, and manages research focused on propulsion systems for both present and advanced aeronautical and space vehicles. The branch is comprised of research teams that perform basic research in three areas: mechanical drives, aerospace seals, and space mechanisms. Each team has unique facilities for testing aerospace hardware and concepts. This report presents an overview of the Mechanical Components Branch test facilities.

  15. Component Latent Trait Models for Test Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embretson, Susan Whitely

    Latent trait models are presented that can be used for test design in the context of a theory about the variables that underlie task performance. Examples of methods for decomposing and testing hypotheses about the theoretical variables in task performance are given. The methods can be used to determine the processing components that are involved…

  16. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) - Component test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Z. S.

    1992-07-01

    The preliminary design of the ART and some of the component test results are presented. The goals for the future rotorcraft transmissions include a 25-percent weight reduction in comparison with current state-of-the-art transmissions, a 10-dB reduction in the transmitted noise level, and a system reliability of 5,000 hr mean-time-between-removal for the transmission. The ART tests completed to date support the attainment of the three major goals of the program.

  17. Decontamination of large components-test case

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, A.; Bosco, B.

    1996-12-31

    The rising per-cubic-foot burial costs, together with the trend toward standardized above-ground burial sites, provides the basis for seeking an alternative to direct burial of large components. Large contaminated components such as steam generators can be safely dismantled and decontaminated for free release, metals recycle, and volume reduction. This grand-scale disposal technology will prove to be an economical and ecological alternative to direct burial or interim storage. Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in Bolton, operators and decommissioners of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Rowe, Massachusetts, has teamed with Frank W Hake Associates in Memphis, TN, to decontaminate a large component as a test case. The large component is YAEC`s reactor pressure vessel head (RPVH). The 79 100 lb RPVH is surface contaminated with 0.7 Ci (1500 mR/h contact) resulting from 32 yr of operating in a 2000 psi, 530{degrees}F pressurized water reactor environment.

  18. Coal feed component testing for CDIF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, C. V.; Snyder, B. K.; Fornek, T. E.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations conducted during the conceptual design of the Montana MHD Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) identified commercially available processing and feeding equipment potentially suitable for use in a reference design. Tests on sub-scale units of this equipment indicated that they would perform as intended.

  19. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  20. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2010-05-05

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these

  1. 1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE TESTING AREA, AND PUMP TESTING TOWER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. Feasibility and Testing of Additive Manufactured Components

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Hummelt, Ed; Solovyeva, Lyudmila

    2016-09-01

    This project focused on demonstrating the ability to fabricate two parts with different geometry: an arc flash interrupter and a hydraulic manifold. Eaton Corporation provided ORNL solid models, information related to tolerances and sensitive parameters of the parts and provided testing and evaluation. ORNL successfully manufactured both components, provided cost models of the manufacturing (materials, labor, time and post processing) and delivered test components for Eaton evaluation. The arc flash suppressor was fabricated using the Renishaw laser powder bed technology in CoCrMo while the manifold was produced from Ti-6Al-4V using the Arcam electron beam melting technology. These manufacturing techniques were selected based on the design and geometrical tolerances required. A full-scale manifold was produced on the Arcam A2 system (nearly 12 inches tall). A portion of the manifold was also produced in the Arcam Q10 system. Although a full scale manifold could not be produced in the system, a full scale manifold is expected to have similar material properties, geometric accuracy, and surface finish as could be fabricated on an Arcam Q20 system that is capable of producing four full scale manifolds in a production environment. In addition to the manifold, mechanical test specimens, geometric tolerance artifacts, and microstructure samples were produced alongside the manifold. The development and demonstration of these two key components helped Eaton understand the impact additive manufacturing can have on many of their existing products. By working within the MDF and leveraging ORNL’s manufacturing and characterization capabilities, the work will ensure the rapid insertion and commercialization of this technology.

  3. Software for Testing Electroactive Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Fox, Robert L.; Dimery, Archie D.; Bryant, Robert G.; Shams, Qamar

    2003-01-01

    A computer program generates a graphical user interface that, in combination with its other features, facilitates the acquisition and preprocessing of experimental data on the strain response, hysteresis, and power consumption of a multilayer composite-material structural component containing one or more built-in sensor(s) and/or actuator(s) based on piezoelectric materials. This program runs in conjunction with Lab-VIEW software in a computer-controlled instrumentation system. For a test, a specimen is instrumented with appliedvoltage and current sensors and with strain gauges. Once the computational connection to the test setup has been made via the LabVIEW software, this program causes the test instrumentation to step through specified configurations. If the user is satisfied with the test results as displayed by the software, the user activates an icon on a front-panel display, causing the raw current, voltage, and strain data to be digitized and saved. The data are also put into a spreadsheet and can be plotted on a graph. Graphical displays are saved in an image file for future reference. The program also computes and displays the power and the phase angle between voltage and current.

  4. 14. Interior view of Test Cell 10 (environmental) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Interior view of Test Cell 10 (environmental) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing east and south walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  5. 17. Interior view of Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Interior view of Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing west and north walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. 13. Interior view of Test Cell 9 (fuel) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Interior view of Test Cell 9 (fuel) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing west and north walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. Two windows in the wall to the left enable personnel in the control room to observe component testing in the cell. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 15. Interior view of Test Cell 10 (environmental) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Interior view of Test Cell 10 (environmental) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing north and east walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. The window in the wall to the left enables personnel in the control room to observe component testing in the cell. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 16. Interior view of Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Interior view of Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing east wall. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. The windows in the wall enable personnel in the control room to observe component testing in the cell. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. AMTEC recirculating test cell component testing and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, M. L.; Sievers, R. K.; O'Connor, D.; Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Bankston, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Alkali metal thermoelectric converter operation in a recirculating test cell (RTC), which requires a small electromagnetic pump (EM) and a high-temperature beta-double-prime alumina-solid-electrolyte (BASE)-to-metal seal, is discussed. The design of a pump and an active metal braze seal and the initial operation of a cell using these components are described. The pump delivered 0.25 cu cm/min against a 28-psia head. A braze seal system was selected after shear strength tests of Ta or Nb brazed to BASE by a variety of fillers including TiCuNi, TiNi, and TiNiCr. The TiCuNi filler was chosen for environment cell testing and showed no failure or observable degradation after short-term tests up to 1055 K. The pump and the Nb/TiCuNi/BASE seal were used in a test that demonstrated all the operational functions of the RTC for the first time. An increase in the radiation reduction factor at constant input power was observed, indicating that the condenser was being wet by sodium resulting in an increased reflectivity.

  10. 49 CFR 195.305 - Testing of components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Testing of components. 195.305 Section 195.305... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.305 Testing of components. (a) Each pressure test under § 195.302 must test... prototype that was hydrostatically tested at the factory....

  11. 49 CFR 195.305 - Testing of components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Testing of components. 195.305 Section 195.305... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.305 Testing of components. (a) Each pressure test under § 195.302 must test... prototype that was hydrostatically tested at the factory....

  12. 49 CFR 195.305 - Testing of components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Testing of components. 195.305 Section 195.305... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.305 Testing of components. (a) Each pressure test under § 195.302 must test... prototype that was hydrostatically tested at the factory....

  13. 49 CFR 195.305 - Testing of components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Testing of components. 195.305 Section 195.305... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.305 Testing of components. (a) Each pressure test under § 195.302 must test... prototype that was hydrostatically tested at the factory....

  14. 49 CFR 195.305 - Testing of components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Testing of components. 195.305 Section 195.305... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.305 Testing of components. (a) Each pressure test under § 195.302 must test... prototype that was hydrostatically tested at the factory....

  15. HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2011-10-13

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment

  16. 19. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking toward east wall. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, machinery, and technological modifications for HVAC system installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 18. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing northwest corner. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications for HVAC system installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  18. 11. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking north. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine system and component tests. 33.91... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system and component tests. (a) For those systems or components that cannot be adequately substantiated in...

  20. Corrosion Control Test Method for Avionic Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-25

    pin conn’ecLor adsemblies *Electronic test articles exposed in an avionic box The following test parameters were used: Environment A - Modified Sulfur Dic...carrier correlation criteria in Table IV. The modified sulfur dioxide/salt fog test showed the best correlation with the carrier exposed test arti...capacitor. The HCl/H 2 SO3 environment and the S2C12 environment, as expected, produced more electrical failures than the modified sulfur dioxide test

  1. Monitoring femoral component installation using vibration testing.

    PubMed

    Giardini, Seana; Cornwell, Phillip; Meneghini, R Michael

    2005-01-01

    With emerging minimally invasive surgical techniques in total hip arthroplasty, there has been anecdotal evidence of an increase in fractures associated with the insertion of the prosthesis into the femur. The diminished visibility associated with minimally invasive surgical techniques necessitates a greater emphasis on the surgeon's tactile and auditory senses. These senses are used to ascertain the femoral component position of maximum stability and interference fit, as well as to prevent further component impaction and subsequent fracture of the femur. The work described herein attempts to identify a means to supplement the surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used in civil and mechanical structures to monitor the insertion process of the prosthesis. It is hypothesized that vibration characteristics of the impact process may be used intraoperatively to determine at what position the femoral component has reached appropriate interference fit and stability in the femur. Such information may be used to prevent further impaction of the femoral component past a threshold that could result in a periprosthetic fracture. A piezoelectric accelerometer and impact hammer will be used to monitor the impact process. The acceleration time history data were analyzed by using low and high pass filters to allow frequency analysis of the time history signals. This paper will summarize features derived from the measured data that will be used to develop an insertion process termination indicator.

  2. 5. AERIAL PHOTO OF THE COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY DURING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERIAL PHOTO OF THE COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE EAST TEST AREA. 1955, FRED ORDWAY COLLECTION, U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, AL. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. 12. Interior view of Test Cell 9 (fuel) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Interior view of Test Cell 9 (fuel) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing north and east walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  4. 16 CFR 1109.11 - Component part testing for paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Component part testing for paint. 1109.11... Component part testing for paint. (a) Generally. The Commission will permit certification of a consumer product, or a component part of a consumer product, as being in compliance with the lead paint limit...

  5. 16 CFR 1109.11 - Component part testing for paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Component part testing for paint. 1109.11... Component part testing for paint. (a) Generally. The Commission will permit certification of a consumer product, or a component part of a consumer product, as being in compliance with the lead paint limit...

  6. 16 CFR 1109.11 - Component part testing for paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Component part testing for paint. 1109.11... Component part testing for paint. (a) Generally. The Commission will permit certification of a consumer product, or a component part of a consumer product, as being in compliance with the lead paint limit...

  7. 10. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking east. The control room is located in the center of the building and abuts the Test Cell 8, 9, and 10 and equipment room wings. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. Testing variance components by two jackknife methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The jacknife method, a resampling technique, has been widely used for statistical tests for years. The pseudo value based jacknife method (defined as pseudo jackknife method) is commonly used to reduce the bias for an estimate; however, sometimes it could result in large variaion for an estmimate a...

  9. Component testing for dynamic model verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T. K.; Chrostowski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic model verification is the process whereby an analytical model of a dynamic system is compared with experimental data, adjusted if necessary to bring it into agreement with the data, and then qualified for future use in predicting system response in a different dynamic environment. These are various ways to conduct model verification. The approach taken here employs Bayesian statistical parameter estimation. Unlike curve fitting, whose objective is to minimize the difference between some analytical function and a given quantity of test data (or curve), Bayesian estimation attempts also to minimize the difference between the parameter values of that funciton (the model) and their initial estimates, in a least squares sense. The objectives of dynamic model verification, therefore, are to produce a model which: (1) is in agreement with test data; (2) will assist in the interpretation of test data; (3) can be used to help verify a design; (4) will reliably predict performance; and (5) in the case of space structures, will facilitate dynamic control.

  10. Arcjet component conditions through a multistart test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Frank M.; Haag, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    A low power, dc arcjet thruster was tested for starting reliability using hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. More than 300 starts were accumulated in phases with extended burn-in periods interlaced. A high degree of flow stabilization was built into the arcjet and the power supply incorporated both rapid current regulation and a high voltage, pulsed starting circuit. A nominal current level of 10 A was maintained throughout the test. Photomicrographs of the cathode tip showed a rapid recession to a steady-state operating geometry. A target of 300 starts was selected, as this represents significantly more than anticipated (150 to 240), in missions of 10 yr or less duration. Weighings showed no apparent mass loss. Some anode erosion was observed, particularly at the entrance to the constrictor. This was attributed to the brief period during startup the arc mode attachment point spends in the high pressure region upstream of the nozzle. Based on the results obtained, startup does not appear to be performance or life limiting for the number of starts typical of operational satellite applications.

  11. 16 CFR 1509.6 - Component-spacing test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Component-spacing test method. 1509.6 Section 1509.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.6 Component-spacing test method. The apex of...

  12. 16 CFR 1509.6 - Component-spacing test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component-spacing test method. 1509.6 Section 1509.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.6 Component-spacing test method. The apex of...

  13. 16 CFR 1509.5 - Component-spacing test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Component-spacing test apparatus. 1509.5 Section 1509.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.5 Component-spacing test apparatus. (a)...

  14. 16 CFR 1509.5 - Component-spacing test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component-spacing test apparatus. 1509.5 Section 1509.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.5 Component-spacing test apparatus. (a)...

  15. Component test program for variable-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, A. G.; Whitlow, J. B.; Stitt, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    Variable cycle engine (VCE) concepts for a supersonic cruise aircraft were studied. These VCE concepts incorporate unique critical components and flow path arrangements that provide good performance at both supersonic and subsonic cruise and appear to be economically and environmentally viable. Certain technologies were identified as critical to the successful development of these engine concepts and require considerable development and testing. The feasibility and readiness of the most critical VCE technologies, was assessed, a VCE component test program was initiated. The variable stream control engine (VSCE) component test program, tested and evaluated an efficient low emission duct burner and a quiet coannular ejector nozzle at the rear of a rematched F100 engine.

  16. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine system and component tests. 33.91 Section 33.91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  19. Method - Pressure drop tests for fuel system components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    Techniques are presented for testing components and improving the accuracy of such tests to meet the requirements of MIL-F-8615 or equivalent specifications. Pressure-drop tests for individual components are described generally including the single and double piezometer-tube methods, and many of the suggested improvements apply to these techniques. The test setup is presented graphically, and the procedural conditions are described. The suggestions for improving the test results include notes regarding air bubbles, pumping-source pulsations, attachment fittings, overshooting the flow rate, and the importance of precise calibration. Diagrams are given for the double piezometer-tube, the mercury-manometer, and the fuel-manometer tests, and the arithmetic computation is described for the data-reduction equation.

  20. Lunar Dust Simulant in Mechanical Component Testing - Paradigm and Practicality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, T.; Street, K.; Abel, P.; Richmond, R.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the uniquely harsh lunar surface environment, terrestrial test activities may not adequately represent abrasive wear by lunar dust likely to be experienced in mechanical systems used in lunar exploration. Testing to identify potential moving mechanism problems has recently begun within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center Mechanical Systems Lunar Dust Assessment activity in coordination with the Exploration Technology and Development Program Dust Management Project, and these complimentary efforts will be described. Specific concerns about differences between simulant and lunar dust, and procedures for mechanical component testing with lunar simulant will be considered. In preparing for long term operations within a dusty lunar environment, the three fundamental approaches to keeping mechanical equipment functioning are dust avoidance, dust removal, and dust tolerance, with some combination of the three likely to be found in most engineering designs. Methods to exclude dust from contact with mechanical components would constitute mitigation by dust avoidance, so testing seals for dust exclusion efficacy as a function of particle size provides useful information for mechanism design. Dust of particle size less than a micron is not well documented for impact on lunar mechanical components. Therefore, creating a standardized lunar dust simulant in the particulate size range of ca. 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer is useful for testing effects on mechanical components such as bearings, gears, seals, bushings, and other moving mechanical assemblies. Approaching actual wear testing of mechanical components, it is beneficial to first establish relative wear rates caused by dust on commonly used mechanical component materials. The wear mode due to dust within mechanical components, such as abrasion caused by dust in grease(s), needs to be considered, as well as the effects of vacuum, lunar thermal cycle, and electrostatics on wear rate.

  1. A Small-Scale Safety Test for Initiation Components

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, J; Chow, C; Chau, H; Hodgin, R; Lee, R

    2002-04-22

    We have developed a small-scale safety test for initiation train components. A low-cost test was needed to assess the response of initiation components to an abnormal shock environment and to detect changes in the sensitivity of initiation components as they age. The test uses a disk of Detasheet to transmit a shock through a PMMA barrier into a the test article. A schematic drawing of the fixture is shown. The 10-cm-diameter disk of 3-mm-thick Detasheet, initiated at its center by a RISI, RP detonator, produces a shock wave that is attenuated by a variable-thickness PMMA spacer (gap). Layers of metal and plastic above the test article and the material surrounding the test article may be chosen to mock up the environment of the test article at its location in a warhead. A metal plate at the bottom serves as a witness plate to record whether or not the test article detonated. For articles containing a small amount of explosive, it can be difficult to determine whether or not a detonation has occurred. In such cases, one can use a pressure transducer or laser velocimeter to detect the shock wave from the detonation of the article. The assembly is contained in a 10-cm-ID section of PVC pipe and fired in a containment vessel rated at 100 g. Test results are given for a hemispherical, exploding-bridgewire (EBW) detonator.

  2. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, Monty; Ali, Muhammad; Ravens, Tom

    2013-12-06

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  3. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

    2000-01-01

    Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

  4. TEST PLAN CHARACTERIZATION OF JET FORCES UPON WASTE TANK COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in double-shell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. This test plan describes scaled experiments designed to characterize the velocity profiles of a near floor jet and to quantify the impact farces and drag coefficients of three tank components: radiation dry well, airlift circulator, and steam coil. The experiments will be conducted in water, at approximately 1/6-scale, using one stationary nozzle to simulate the jet. To measure and confirm the velocity profile of the free, submerged jet, the horizontal and vertical velocity profiles will be measured at several distances from the nozzle. The profile will also be measured after the jet impinges upon the tank floor to determine the·extent of the change in the profile caused by impingement. The jet forces upon the test articles will be measured at a maximum of four velocities and a variety of test article orientations. Each orientation will represent a unique position of the test article relative to the jet and the tank floor. In addition, the steam coil will be tested in three rotational orientations because it is not symmetric. The highest jet velocity will be selected so that the Reynolds number of the test article in the model will match that of the prototype when operating at design conditions. The forces measured upon the model components will be used to calculate the force on the prototype components using geometric scaling factors. In addition, the model force measurements will be used to calculate the component's drag coefficient as a function of the component Reynolds number.

  5. Simulation of the dynamic environment for missile component testing: Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kurng Y.

    1989-01-01

    The problems in defining a realistic test requirement for missile and space vehicle components can be classified into two categories: (1) definition of the test environment representing the expected service condition, and (2) simulation of the desired environment in the test laboratory. Recently, a new three-dimensional (3-D) test facility was completed at the U.S. Army Harry Diamond Laboratory (HDL) to simulate triaxial vibration input to a test specimen. The vibration test system is designed to support multi-axial vibration tests over the frequency range of 5 to 2000 Hertz. The availability of this 3-D test system motivates the development of new methodologies addressing environmental definition and simulation.

  6. LEDA RF distribution system design and component test results

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, W.T.; Rees, D.E.; Borchert, H.L.; McCarthy, M.; Toole, L.

    1998-12-31

    The 350 MHz and 700 MHz RF distribution systems for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) have been designed and are currently being installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Since 350 MHz is a familiar frequency used at other accelerator facilities, most of the major high-power components were available. The 700 MHz, 1.0 MW, CW RF delivery system designed for LEDA is a new development. Therefore, high-power circulators, waterloads, phase shifters, switches, and harmonic filters had to be designed and built for this applications. The final Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) RF distribution systems design will be based on much of the same technology as the LEDA systems and will have many of the RF components tested for LEDA incorporated into the design. Low power and high-power tests performed on various components of these LEDA systems and their results are presented here.

  7. Evaluation of Integrated High Temperature Component Testing Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Rafael Soto; David Duncan; Vincent Tonc

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a large-scale component test capability to support the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and their adaptation to commercial applications that advance U.S. energy economy, reliability, and security and reduce carbon emissions.

  8. HPM (high power microwave) testing of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Antinone, R.; Ng, W.C.

    1989-05-10

    This report documents the results of a study of high power microwave (HPM) vulnerability of electronic components commonly used in weapon systems. The study was carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from August through October 1988. The objective of this study was to determine the threshold levels for upset or disturbance and damage of the devices under test (DUT). In these tests pulsed microwave energy was directly injected into the terminal of the DUT and in most cases a 50-ohm microstrip test fixture was used to ensure that 50-ohm transmission was maintained as close to the DUT as possible. 3 refs., 41 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Design and Testing of Improved Spacesuit Shielding Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.; Ferl, J.; Wilson, J.W.; Clowdsley, M.S.; DeAngelis, G.; Tweed, J.; Zeitlin, C.J.

    2002-05-08

    In prior studies of the current Shuttle Spacesuit (SSA), where basic fabric lay-ups were tested for shielding capabilities, it was found that the fabric portions of the suit give far less protection than previously estimated due to porosity and non-uniformity of fabric and LCVG components. In addition, overall material transmission properties were less than optimum. A number of alternate approaches are being tested to provide more uniform coverage and to use more efficient materials. We will discuss in this paper, recent testing of new material lay-ups/configurations for possible use in future spacesuit designs.

  10. Environmental testing of COTS components for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2009-02-01

    Research and development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) has shown a significant promise for a variety of commercial applications. For example, accelerometers are widely used for air bags in automobiles, MEMS inkjet print heads are used for printers, gyroscopes for guidance and navigation and pressure sensors for various industrial applications. Some of the MEMS devices have potential to become the commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. Aerospace requires more sophisticated technology development to achieve significant cost savings if they could utilize COTS components in their systems. A miniature gas chromatograph instrument designed as a space station project will provide onorbit detection, identification, and quantification of potentially toxic trace volatile organic compounds in the human-supporting environment. The instrument consists of several commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) valves, pumps and sensors. This paper describes the thermal environmental requirements and protoflight/qualification thermal test results for the COTS parts at cold and hot temperature extremes. The objective of this study is to qualify several COTS components for specific thermal/dynamic environments to assess their reliability. All COTS components life tested were believed to meet the 3x mission operational life requirements. Test results will be presented.

  11. A simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Jeffery D.; Knaur, James A.; Moore, Truman W., Jr.; Shumpert, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Details of a simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles, motors, and explosive components are described. The test facility is designed to simulate the high current, continuing current, and high rate-of-rise current components of an idealized direct strike lightning waveform. The Lightning Test Facility was in operation since May, 1988, and consists of: 3 separate capacitor banks used to produce the lightning test components; a permanently fixed large steel safety cage for retaining the item under test (should it be ignited during testing); an earth covered bunker housing the control/equipment room; a charge/discharge building containing the charging/discharging switching; a remotely located blockhouse from which the test personnel control hazardous testing; and interconnecting cables.

  12. Relationships of Cognitive Components of Test Anxiety to Test Performance: Implications for Assessment and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruch, Monroe A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the degree to which components of test-taking strategies, covert self-statements, and subjective anxiety during an exam provide increments in prediction of test performance of undergraduates (N=72). Results showed that only test-taking strategies provided a significant increment to multiple-choice and essay test performance but not math…

  13. Integration Test of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a 4 kilowatt-class Hall propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. NASA science mission performance analysis was completed using the latest high voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAc) and Aerojet-Rocketdyne's state-of-the-art BPT-4000 Hall thruster performance curves. Mission analysis results indicated that the HiVHAc thruster out performs the BPT-4000 thruster for all but one of the missions studied. Tests of the HiVHAc system major components were performed. Performance evaluation of the HiVHAc thruster at NASA Glenn's vacuum facility 5 indicated that thruster performance was lower than performance levels attained during tests in vacuum facility 12 due to the lower background pressures attained during vacuum facility 5 tests when compared to vacuum facility 12. Voltage-Current characterization of the HiVHAc thruster in vacuum facility 5 showed that the HiVHAc thruster can operate stably for a wide range of anode flow rates for discharge voltages between 250 and 600 volts. A Colorado Power Electronics enhanced brassboard power processing unit was tested in vacuum for 1,500 hours and the unit demonstrated discharge module efficiency of 96.3% at 3.9 kilowatts and 650 volts. Stand-alone open and closed loop tests of a VACCO TRL 6 xenon flow control module were also performed. An integrated test of the HiVHAc thruster, brassboard power processing unit, and xenon flow control module was performed and confirmed that integrated operation of the HiVHAc system major components. Future plans include continuing the maturation of the HiVHAc system major components and the performance of a single-string integration test.

  14. Allergen Component Testing in the Diagnosis of Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Schussler, Edith; Kattan, Jacob

    2015-09-01

    IgE-mediated food allergies are an important public health problem, affecting 5 % of adults and 8 % of children, with numerous studies indicating that the prevalence is increasing. Food allergic reactions can range in severity from mild to severe and life threatening. Accurate diagnosis of food allergy is necessary not only to provide appropriate and potentially life-saving preventive measures but also to prevent unwarranted dietary restrictions. The diagnosis of food allergy has traditionally been based on clinical history and food specific IgE (sIgE) testing, including skin prick testing (SPT), serum tests, or both. These tests tend to be extremely sensitive, but positive test results to foods that are tolerated are common. Studies of allergen component-resolved diagnostics (CRD) show that adjuvant use of this modality may provide a more accurate assessment in the diagnosis of food allergy, though the reported benefits are questionable for a number of major allergens. Furthermore, diagnostic cutoff values have been difficult to determine for allergens where component testing has been demonstrated to be beneficial.

  15. Computerized ultrasonic test inspection enhancement system for aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, R. G.

    Attention is given to the computerized ultrasonic test inspection enhancement (CUTIE) system which was designed to meet the following program goals: (1) automation of the inspection technique and evaluation of the discontinuities for aircraft components while maintaining reasonable implementation costs and reducing the overall inspection costs; and (2) design of a system which would allow for easy modification so that new concepts could be implemented. The system's ultrasonic test bridge, C-scan recorder, computer control, and ultrasonic flaw detector are described. Consideration is also given to the concurrent development of an eight element array transducer (for increasing the inspection rate) and a high-speed data acquisition system (for signature analysis).

  16. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Component Verification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Pinero, Luis R.; Sovey, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Component testing is a critical facet of the comprehensive thruster life validation strategy devised by the NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) program. Component testing to-date has consisted of long-duration high voltage propellant isolator and high-cycle heater life validation testing. The high voltage propellant isolator, a heritage design, will be operated under different environmental condition in the NEXT ion thruster requiring verification testing. The life test of two NEXT isolators was initiated with comparable voltage and pressure conditions with a higher temperature than measured for the NEXT prototype-model thruster. To date the NEXT isolators have accumulated 18,300 h of operation. Measurements indicate a negligible increase in leakage current over the testing duration to date. NEXT 1/2 in. heaters, whose manufacturing and control processes have heritage, were selected for verification testing based upon the change in physical dimensions resulting in a higher operating voltage as well as potential differences in thermal environment. The heater fabrication processes, developed for the International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor hollow cathode assembly, were utilized with modification of heater dimensions to accommodate a larger cathode. Cyclic testing of five 1/22 in. diameter heaters was initiated to validate these modified fabrication processes while retaining high reliability heaters. To date two of the heaters have been cycled to 10,000 cycles and suspended to preserve hardware. Three of the heaters have been cycled to failure giving a B10 life of 12,615 cycles, approximately 6,000 more cycles than the established qualification B10 life of the ISS plasma contactor heaters.

  17. Low Emissions RQL Flametube Combustor Component Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes and summarizes elements of the High Speed Research (HSR) Low Emissions Rich burn/Quick mix/Lean burn (RQL) flame tube combustor test program. This test program was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center circa 1992. The overall objective of this test program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of the RQL combustor concept for High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) applications with the goal of achieving NOx emission index levels of 5 g/kg-fuel at representative HSCT supersonic cruise conditions. The specific objectives of the tests reported herein were to investigate component performance of the RQL combustor concept for use in the evolution of ultra-low NOx combustor design tools. Test results indicated that the RQL combustor emissions and performance at simulated supersonic cruise conditions were predominantly sensitive to the quick mixer subcomponent performance and not sensitive to fuel injector performance. Test results also indicated the mixing section configuration employing a single row of circular holes was the lowest NOx mixer tested probably due to the initial fast mixing characteristics of this mixing section. However, other quick mix orifice configurations such as the slanted slot mixer produced substantially lower levels of carbon monoxide emissions most likely due to the enhanced circumferential dispersion of the air addition. Test results also suggested that an optimum momentum-flux ratio exists for a given quick mix configuration. This would cause undesirable jet under- or over-penetration for test conditions with momentum-flux ratios below or above the optimum value. Tests conducted to assess the effect of quick mix flow area indicated that reduction in the quick mix flow area produced lower NOx emissions at reduced residence time, but this had no effect on NOx emissions measured at similar residence time for the configurations tested.

  18. Fabrication and Testing of Ceramic Matrix Composite Rocket Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael; Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Dennis, Jay; Elam, Sandy; Genge, Gary; Eckel, Andy; Jaskowiak, Matha; Kiser, J. Doug; Lang, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is pursuing using ceramic matrix composites (CMC) as primary structural components for advanced rocket engines. This endeavor is due to the requirement of increasing safety by two orders of magnitude and reducing costs from $10,000/lb to $1,000/lb both within ten years. Out year goals are even more aggressive. Safety gains, through using CMCS, will be realized by increasing temperature margins, tolerance for extreme thermal transients, and damping capability of components and systems, by using components with lower weight and thermal conductivity, etc. Gains in cost reduction, through using CMCS, are anticipated by enabling higher performance systems, using lighter weight components and systems, enabling 100 mission reusability without system refurbishment, greatly reducing cooling requirements and erosion rates, selecting safe fabrication processes that are ideally cost competitive with metal processes at low volume production, etc. This philosophy contrasts the previous philosophy of rocket engine development focused largely on achieving the highest performance with metals and ablatives -- cost and safety were not the focal point of the initial design. Rocket engine components currently being pursued, largely C/SiC and SiC/SiC, include blisks or rotors, 10 foot by 8 foot nozzle ramps, gas generators, thrust chambers, and upperstage nozzles. The Simplex Turbopump CMC blisk effort has just successfully completed a 4.5 year development and test program. The other components mentioned are in the design or fabrication stage. Although the temperature limits of the CMC materials are not quantified in a realistic environment yet, CMC materials are projected to be the only way to achieve significant safety risks mitigation and cost reductions simultaneously. We, the end-users, material fabricators, technology facilitators, and government organizations are charged with developing and demonstrating a much safer and a

  19. Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of

  20. Case Studies of Rock Reinforcement Components and Systems Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. G.; Villaescusa, E.

    2014-09-01

    Rock reinforcement is widely used in tunnels and surface and underground mines. A large number of proprietary products are available in various configurations of components. While the mechanical properties of the primary element are available from product brochures, the associated component properties may vary widely and adversely influence the overall performance of the system. Field pull out tests are most commonly used to measure the system response in the toe anchor region. However, the response of the collar region is less commonly considered but may be more important. Several case studies are described in which various components and systems of rock bolts and cable bolts have been subjected to static loading in the laboratory and in the field. The results generally demonstrate the importance of considering the properties of all the components and not simply those of the primary element. In some cases, the internal fixtures have strengths much less than the elements. Often it has also been found that the fixture at the collar has significantly less strength than the element and this will result in complete loss of function in restraining surface support hardware, such as plates, mesh and reinforced shotcrete.

  1. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    A prototype of Cold Neutron Source (CNS) for Dhruva Reactor is being manufactured at Centre for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC, Mumbai for validating the mechanical and thermal engineering design aspects, besides checking the integrity of all joints and components at low temperature, 77K. Task of a Cold Neutron Source is to generate cold neutrons by cooling down the thermal neutrons, which are originally produced in a nuclear research reactor. The complete Cold Neutron Source system comprises a complex arrangement of moderator pot, transfer line (piping), pumps, refrigerators, storage tanks, a heat exchanger and associated controls and instrumentation. The heart of the system is moderator pot in which water (moderator) is cooled down by Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) being circulated through an annular cavity machined on the walls of the pot. Transfer lines for LN2 basically consist of two concentric Stainless Steel flexible pipes, which are joined to the inlet and outlet Aluminium tubes of the moderator pot through transition joints. Leak in any component may result in loss of liquid Nitrogen, degradation of vacuum, which in turn may affect the heat removal efficiency of the source. Hence, leak testing was considered a very important quality control tool and all joints and components were subjected to helium leak test using mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD) at cryogenic temperature. During one of the earlier experiments, flow of LN2 through inner flexible pipe of the transfer line resulted in rise of pressure in the vacuum annulus and sweating on the outer flexible pipe. After investigations it was found that large thermal stress compounded with mechanical stress resulted in cracks in the inner pipe. Accordingly design was modified to get leak proof transfer line assembly. Further, during leak testing of thin wall moderator pot, gross leak was observed on the outer jacket welded joint. Leak was so large that even a small amount of Helium gas in the vicinity of the

  2. Energy Efficient Engine high pressure turbine component test performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timko, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The high pressure turbine for the General Electric Energy Efficient Engine is a two stage design of moderate loading. Results of detailed system studies led to selection of this configuration as the most appropriate in meeting the efficiency goals of the component development program. To verify the design features of the high pressure turbine, a full scale warm air turbine test rig with cooling flows simulated was run. Prior to this testing, an annular cascade test was run to select vane unguided turn for the first stage nozzle. Results of this test showed that the base configuration exceeded the lower unguided turning configuration by 0.48 percent in vane kinetic energy efficiency. The air turbine test program, consisting of extensive mapping and cooling flow variation as well as design point evaluation, demonstrated a design point efficiency level of 90.0 percent based on the thermodynamic definition. In terms of General Electric cycle definition, this efficiency was 92.5 percent. Based on this test, it is concluded that efficiency goals for the Flight Propulsion System were met.

  3. Single Component Sorption-Desorption Test Experimental Design Approach Discussions

    SciTech Connect

    Phil WInston

    2011-09-01

    A task was identified within the fission-product-transport work package to develop a path forward for doing testing to determine behavior of volatile fission products behavior and to engage members of the NGNP community to advise and dissent on the approach. The following document is a summary of the discussions and the specific approaches suggested for components of the testing. Included in the summary isare the minutes of the conference call that was held with INL and external interested parties to elicit comments on the approaches brought forward by the INL participants. The conclusion was that an initial non-radioactive, single component test will be useful to establish the limits of currently available chemical detection methods, and to evaluated source-dispersion uniformity. In parallel, development of a real-time low-concentration monitoring method is believed to be useful in detecting rapid dispersion as well as desorption phenomena. Ultimately, the test cycle is expected to progress to the use of radio-traced species, simply because this method will allow the lowest possible detection limits. The consensus of the conference call was that there is no need for an in-core test because the duct and heat exchanger surfaces that will be the sorption target will be outside the main neutron flux and will not be affected by irradiation. Participants in the discussion and contributors to the INL approach were Jeffrey Berg, Pattrick Calderoni, Gary Groenewold, Paul Humrickhouse, Brad Merrill, and Phil Winston. Participants from outside the INL included David Hanson of General Atomics, Todd Allen, Tyler Gerczak, and Izabela Szlufarska of the University of Wisconsin, Gary Was, of the University of Michigan, Sudarshan Loyalka and Tushar Ghosh of the University of Missouri, and Robert Morris of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) was established by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to provide a capability for performing hardware-directed activities to support multiple in-space nuclear reactor concepts by using a non-nuclear test methodology. This includes fabrication and testing at both the module/component level and near prototypic reactor configurations. The EFF-TF is currently supporting an effort to develop an affordable fission surface power (AFSP) system that could be deployed on the Lunar surface. The AFSP system is presently based on a pumped liquid metal-cooled (Sodium-Potassium eutectic, NaK-78) reactor design. This design was derived from the only fission system that the United States has deployed for space operation, the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) 10A reactor, which was launched in 1965. Two prototypical components recently tested at MSFC were a pair of Stirling power conversion units that would be used in a reactor system to convert heat to electricity, and an annular linear induction pump (ALIP) that uses travelling electromagnetic fields to pump the liquid metal coolant through the reactor loop. First ever tests were conducted at MSFC to determine baseline performance of a pair of 1 kW Stirling convertors using NaK as the hot side working fluid. A special test rig was designed and constructed and testing was conducted inside a vacuum chamber at MSFC. This test rig delivered pumped NaK for the hot end temperature to the Stirlings and water as the working fluid on the cold end temperature. These test were conducted through a hot end temperature range between 400 to 550C in increments of 50 C and a cold end temperature range from 30 to 70 C in 20 C increments. Piston amplitudes were varied from 6 to 1 1mm in .5 mm increments. A maximum of 2240 Watts electric was produced at the design point of 550 hot end, 40 C cold end with a piston amplitude of 10.5mm. This power level was reached at a gross thermal

  5. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Godfroy, T. J.; Schoenfeld, M.; Webster, K.; Briggs, M. H.; Geng, S. M.; Adkins, H. E.; Werner, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to perform testing at both the module/component level and in near prototypic reactor configurations using a non-nuclear test methodology allowed for evaluation of two components critical to the development of a potential nuclear fission power system for the lunar surface. A pair of 1 kW Stirling power convertors, similar to the type that would be used in a reactor system to convert heat to electricity, were integrated into a reactor simulator system to determine their performance using pumped NaK as the hot side working fluid. The performance in the pumped-NaK system met or exceed the baseline performance measurements where the converters were electrically heated. At the maximum hot-side temperature of 550 C the maximum output power was 2375 watts. A specially-designed test apparatus was fabricated and used to quantify the performance of an annular linear induction pump that is similar to the type that could be used to circulate liquid metal through the core of a space reactor system. The errors on the measurements were generally much smaller than the magnitude of the measurements, permitting accurate performance evaluation over a wide range of operating conditions. The pump produced flow rates spanning roughly 0.16 to 5.7 l/s (2.5 to 90 GPM), and delta p levels from less than 1 kPa to 90 kPa (greater than 0.145 psi to roughly 13 psi). At the nominal FSP system operating temperature of 525 C the maximum efficiency was just over 4%.

  6. Separating deceptive and orienting components in a Concealed Information Test.

    PubMed

    Ambach, Wolfgang; Stark, Rudolf; Peper, Martin; Vaitl, Dieter

    2008-11-01

    The Concealed Information Test (CIT) requires the examinee to deceptively deny recognition of known stimuli and to truthfully deny recognition of unknown stimuli. Because deception and orienting are typically coupled, it is unclear how exactly these sub-processes affect the physiological responses measured in the CIT. The present study aimed at separating the effects of deception from those of orienting. In a mock-crime study, using a modified CIT, thirty-six of seventy-two subjects answered truthfully ('truth group'), whereas the other thirty-six concealed their knowledge ('lie group'). Answering was delayed for 4 s after item presentation. Electrodermal activity (EDA), respiration (RLL), and phasic heart rate (HR) were recorded. A decomposition of EDA responses revealed two response components; the response in the first interval was expected to indicate orienting, stimulus evaluation, and answer preparation, whereas the response in the second interval was assumed to reflect answer-related processes. Inconclusively, both EDA components differentiated between 'probe' and 'irrelevant' items in both groups. Phasic HR and RLL differed between item classes only in the 'lie' group, thus reflecting answer-related processes, possibly deception, rather than merely orienting responses. The findings further support the notion that psychophysiological measures elicited by a modified CIT may reflect different mental processes involved in orienting and deception.

  7. Plutonium immobilization ceramic feed batching component test report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.A.

    1999-10-04

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Ceramic feed batching (CFB) is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. The CFB step will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization CFB process preliminary concept (including a process block diagram), batch splitting component test results, CFB development areas, and FY 1999 and 2000 CFB program milestones.

  8. NASTRAN Modeling of Flight Test Components for UH-60A Airloads Program Test Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idosor, Florentino R.; Seible, Frieder

    1993-01-01

    Based upon the recommendations of the UH-60A Airloads Program Review Committee, work towards a NASTRAN remodeling effort has been conducted. This effort modeled and added the necessary structural/mass components to the existing UH-60A baseline NASTRAN model to reflect the addition of flight test components currently in place on the UH-60A Airloads Program Test Configuration used in NASA-Ames Research Center's Modern Technology Rotor Airloads Program. These components include necessary flight hardware such as instrument booms, movable ballast cart, equipment mounting racks, etc. Recent modeling revisions have also been included in the analyses to reflect the inclusion of new and updated primary and secondary structural components (i.e., tail rotor shaft service cover, tail rotor pylon) and improvements to the existing finite element mesh (i.e., revisions of material property estimates). Mode frequency and shape results have shown that components such as the Trimmable Ballast System baseplate and its respective payload ballast have caused a significant frequency change in a limited number of modes while only small percent changes in mode frequency are brought about with the addition of the other MTRAP flight components. With the addition of the MTRAP flight components, update of the primary and secondary structural model, and imposition of the final MTRAP weight distribution, modal results are computed representative of the 'best' model presently available.

  9. NASTRAN modeling of flight test components for UH-60A airloads program test configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idosor, Florentino R.; Seible, Frieder

    1993-02-01

    Based upon the recommendations of the UH-60A Airloads Program Review Committee, work towards a NASTRAN remodeling effort has been conducted. This effort modeled and added the necessary structural/mass components to the existing UH-60A baseline NASTRAN model to reflect the addition of flight test components currently in place on the UH-60A Airloads Program Test Configuration used in NASA-Ames Research Center's Modern Technology Rotor Airloads Program. These components include necessary flight hardware such as instrument booms, movable ballast cart, equipment mounting racks, etc. Recent modeling revisions have also been included in the analyses to reflect the inclusion of new and updated primary and secondary structural components (i.e., tail rotor shaft service cover, tail rotor pylon) and improvements to the existing finite element mesh (i.e., revisions of material property estimates). Mode frequency and shape results have shown that components such as the Trimmable Ballast System baseplate and its respective payload ballast have caused a significant frequency change in a limited number of modes while only small percent changes in mode frequency are brought about with the addition of the other MTRAP flight components. With the addition of the MTRAP flight components, update of the primary and secondary structural model, and imposition of the final MTRAP weight distribution, modal results are computed representative of the 'best' model presently available.

  10. Development and testing of a 20-kHz component test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Brush, Andrew S.; Sundberg, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    A history of the General Dynamics Space Systems Division 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including its current configuration and its role in the Space Station Freedom (SSF) program. Highlights and results are presented on a series of tests conducted on the 20 kHz Breadboard. The first test presented is the 20 kHz Breadboard Acceptance test. This test verified the operation of the delivered Breadboard and also characterized the main components of the system. Next, an indepth efficiency testing effort is presented. The tests attempted to apportion all the power losses in the 20 kHz Breadboard Main Invert Units. Distortion test data is presented showing the distortion characteristics of a Mapham inverter. Lastly, current work on the 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including Main Inverter Unit paralleling tests. Conclusions are summarized and references given.

  11. Static Feed Water Electrolysis Subsystem Testing and Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koszenski, E. P.; Schubert, F. H.; Burke, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    A program was carried out to develop and test advanced electrochemical cells/modules and critical electromechanical components for a static feed (alkaline electrolyte) water electrolysis oxygen generation subsystem. The accomplishments were refurbishment of a previously developed subsystem and successful demonstration for a total of 2980 hours of normal operation; achievement of sustained one-person level oxygen generation performance with state-of-the-art cell voltages averaging 1.61 V at 191 ASF for an operating temperature of 128F (equivalent to 1.51V when normalized to 180F); endurance testing and demonstration of reliable performance of the three-fluid pressure controller for 8650 hours; design and development of a fluid control assembly for this subsystem and demonstration of its performance; development and demonstration at the single cell and module levels of a unitized core composite cell that provides expanded differential pressure tolerance capability; fabrication and evaluation of a feed water electrolyte elimination five-cell module; and successful demonstration of an electrolysis module pressurization technique that can be used in place of nitrogen gas during the standby mode of operation to maintain system pressure and differential pressures.

  12. Optical Methods For Automatic Rating Of Engine Test Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, James R.; Moss, Brian C.

    1989-03-01

    In recent years, increasing commercial and legislative pressure on automotive engine manufacturers, including increased oil drain intervals, cleaner exhaust emissions and high specific power outputs, have led to increasing demands on lubricating oil performance. Lubricant performance is defined by bench engine tests run under closely controlled conditions. After test, engines are dismantled and the parts rated for wear and accumulation of deposit. This rating must be consistently carried out in laboratories throughout the world in order to ensure lubricant quality meeting the specified standards. To this end, rating technicians evaluate components, following closely defined procedures. This process is time consuming, inaccurate and subject to drift, requiring regular recalibration of raters by means of international rating workshops. This paper describes two instruments for automatic rating of engine parts. The first uses a laser to determine the degree of polishing of the engine cylinder bore, caused by the reciprocating action of piston. This instrument has been developed to prototype stage by the NDT Centre at Harwell under contract to Exxon Chemical, and is planned for production within the next twelve months. The second instrument uses red and green filtered light to determine the type, quality and position of deposit formed on the piston surfaces. The latter device has undergone feasibility study, but no prototype exists.

  13. 16 CFR 1109.12 - Component part testing for lead content of children's products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Component part testing for lead content of... Chemicals § 1109.12 Component part testing for lead content of children's products. A certifier may rely on component part testing of each accessible component part of a children's product for lead content,...

  14. 16 CFR 1109.12 - Component part testing for lead content of children's products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Component part testing for lead content of... Chemicals § 1109.12 Component part testing for lead content of children's products. A certifier may rely on component part testing of each accessible component part of a children's product for lead content,...

  15. 16 CFR 1109.12 - Component part testing for lead content of children's products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Component part testing for lead content of... Chemicals § 1109.12 Component part testing for lead content of children's products. A certifier may rely on component part testing of each accessible component part of a children's product for lead content,...

  16. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) as an irradiation test bed for fusion materials and components

    SciTech Connect

    Greenslade, D.L.; Puigh, R.J.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Grover, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    The relatively large irradiation volume, instrumentation capabilities, and fast neutron flux associated with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) make this reactor an ideal test bed for fusion materials and components irradiations. Significant fusion materials irradiations are presently being performed in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) in FFTF. The MOTA is providing a controlled temperature and high neutron flux environment for such materials as the low activation alloys, copper alloys, ceramic insulators, and high heat flux materials. Conceptual designs utilizing the versatile MOTA irradiation vehicle have been developed to investigate irradiation effects on the mechanical and tritium breeding behaviors of solid breeder materials. More aggressive conceptual designs have also been developed to irradiate solid breeder blanket submodules in the FFTF. These specific component test designs will be presented and their potential roles in the development of fusion technology discussed.

  17. Investigation of Correlation of Test Sequences for Reliability Testing of Digital Physical System Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushik, N. G.; López, J. E.; Yevtushenko, N. V.

    2016-12-01

    The topical problem of effective verification of digital circuits of different physical systems remains a hot topic. Devices ranging from embedded components to perform specific tasks or experiments to modern communication clusters used for data transmission are concerned. The method of synthesis of the test sequences is based on injection of faults into a reference circuit and deriving a corresponding distinguishing sequence which detects this fault. The method is known as mutation testing and is widely used for the synthesis of high-quality verification tests for digital circuits. Naturally, test suits that detect faults of various classes, and larger amount of faults, are of greater interest. The paper studies the correlation between different test suits derived for different mutant types. The considered fault types include 1) single stuck-at faults, 2) bridges, and 3) hardly detectable faults, i.e., slightly modifying the behavior of a single circuit gate. Tests for detecting faults of each type are derived for the B01-B10 benchmark package (ITC'99 benchmarks (Second Release)), which are components of physical systems intended for various applications including processing of data obtained, load balancing systems, etc. Experiments aim to access the fault coverage of the test derived for one mutant type against faults of other types. It is shown experimentally that the synthesis of tests of one type, including a single stuck-at fault test, is insufficient, because its fault coverage for faults of other types cannot exceed 60%.

  18. Emersion Testing of Phenix Reactor Components From Liquid Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Baque, F.

    2002-07-01

    The life extension of the Phenix LMFR involved the inspection of reactor vessel internal structures: among other techniques, a visual inspection was performed of the above core structure, fuel assembly heads and upper components. To make this inspection possible, a partial draining of the main vessel from primary liquid sodium was carried out (sodium at 180 and argon cover at 150 ). The test program aimed at obtaining further knowledge on the process of wetting of sodium - as pure metal - on Phenix Plant assembly heads - made of stainless steel -, as well as on the internal structure welding, was carried out from November 1998 to January 1999. The main results were as follows: - the sodium meniscus measured during sodium lowering against the non-wet vertical structures reaches 10 mm in height. On wetted structures, it reaches only 5.3 mm. - when sodium level decreases, the process if very regular. However, re-flooding is carried out in stages. - a difference of 0.2 mm between two heads altitudes is enough to observe successively each of the heads. - the quality of sodium does not modify the wetting process (in the range of cold trap temperature: 110-140 deg. C). - the influence of lighting is important. - the visibility limit of emerging electro-eroded cracks (from 0.17 to 1.0 mm) is at 0.20 mm. - the visibility of a horizontal welding, machined or not, is good when the lighting is sufficient. - the superficial flow of sodium only modifies the wetting process for the closest heads. A final test allowed to observe that the global inclination of the assembly head mock-up does not modify the wetting process. These experimental results were part of the feasibility demonstration of the visual inspection within the actual Phenix Plant that was undertaken in 2001. (authors)

  19. High-temperature combustor liner tests in structural component response test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Jet engine combustor liners were tested in the structural component response facility at NASA Lewis. In this facility combustor liners were thermally cycled to simulate a flight envelope of takeoff, cruise, and return to idle. Temperatures were measured with both thermocouples and an infrared thermal imaging system. A conventional stacked-ring louvered combustor liner developed a crack at 1603 cycles. This test was discontinued after 1728 cycles because of distortion of the liner. A segmented or float wall combustor liner tested at the same heat flux showed no significant change after 1600 cycles. Changes are being made in the facility to allow higher temperatures.

  20. Periodic Components in Communication Data: Models and Hypothesis Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, James H., Jr.

    A relatively simple procedure for modeling periodic components in time series data is presented in this paper, along with an example of the procedure's use with communication data. Similar to multiple regression analysis, the described procedure has four steps that are based on information about periodic waves and their components, how to create…

  1. Item Calibrations for Licensure Tests with Multiple Specialty Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chi-Yu; Lohss, William E.; Lin, Chuan-Ju; Shin, David

    This study was conducted to compare the usefulness of three item response theory (IRT) calibration packages (BILOG, BILOG-MG, and PIC) for examinations that include common and specialty components. Because small sample sizes and different mean abilities between specialty components are the most frequent problems that licensure/certification…

  2. Fabrication and Testing of Ceramic Matrix Composite Rocket Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, M. R.; Clinton, R. C., Jr.; Dennis, J.; Elam, S.; Genge, G.; Eckel, A.; Jaskowiak, M. H.; Kiser, J. D.; Lang, J.

    2001-01-01

    NASA has established goals for Second and Third Generation Reusable Launch Vehicles. Emphasis has been placed on significantly improving safety and decreasing the cost of transporting payloads to orbit. Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) components are being developed by NASA to enable significant increases in safety and engineer performance, while reducing costs. The development of the following CMC components are being pursued by NASA: (1) Simplex CMC Blisk; (2) Cooled CMC Nozzle Ramps; (3) Cooled CMC Thrust Chambers; and (4) CMC Gas Generator. These development efforts are application oriented, but have a strong underpinning of fundamental understanding of processing-microstructure-property relationships relative to structural analyses, nondestructive characterization, and material behavior analysis at the coupon and component and system operation levels. As each effort matures, emphasis will be placed on optimizing and demonstrating material/component durability, ideally using a combined Building Block Approach and Build and Bust Approach.

  3. NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record

    SciTech Connect

    S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

    2009-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testing—through large-scale, integrated tests—can be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

  4. Shake, Rattle and Roll: James Webb Telescope Components Pass Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Mike Ressler (right) and Kalyani Sukhatme of JPL pose in the clean room with a model component, called a focal plane module, of the Mid-Infrared Instrument on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. Ressler is the project scientist for the instrument, and Sukhatme is the project element manager for the instrument's focal plane module.

  5. 5. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking northwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking northwest. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 10 (environmental), and that on the right houses Test Cell 9 (fuel) and the fuel storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. 4. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking northeast. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault, and that on the right houses Test Cell 10 (environmental). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 30 CFR 27.35 - Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.35 Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies. Replaceable components... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests to determine life of critical...

  8. 46 CFR 56.97-5 - Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests § 56.97-5 Pressure testing of nonstandard piping... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components... rated pressure stamped thereon, except that no component should be tested at a pressure causing...

  9. 46 CFR 56.97-5 - Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests § 56.97-5 Pressure testing of nonstandard piping... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components... rated pressure stamped thereon, except that no component should be tested at a pressure causing...

  10. 46 CFR 56.97-5 - Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests § 56.97-5 Pressure testing of nonstandard piping... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components... rated pressure stamped thereon, except that no component should be tested at a pressure causing...

  11. 46 CFR 56.97-5 - Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests § 56.97-5 Pressure testing of nonstandard piping... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components... rated pressure stamped thereon, except that no component should be tested at a pressure causing...

  12. 46 CFR 56.97-5 - Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests § 56.97-5 Pressure testing of nonstandard piping... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure testing of nonstandard piping system components... rated pressure stamped thereon, except that no component should be tested at a pressure causing...

  13. Hydrogen-Fuel Engine Component Tests Near Completion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen is burned off at the E1 Test Stand the night of Oct. 7 during a cold-flow test of the fuel turbopump of the Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC). The gaseous hydrogen spins the pump's turbine during the test, which was conducted to verify the pump's performance. Engineers plan one more test before sending the pump to The Boeing Co. for inspection. It will then be returned to SSC for engine system assembly. The IPD is the first reusable hydrogen-fueled advanced engine in development since the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  14. AMTEC cell testing, optimization of rhodium/tungsten electrodes, and tests of other components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Underwood, Mark L.; O'Connor, Dennis; Kikkert, Stan

    1991-01-01

    Electrodes, current collectors, ceramic to metal braze seals, and metallic components exposed to the high 'hot side' temperatures and sodium liquid and vapor environment have been tested and evaluated in laboratory cells running for hundreds of hours at 1100-1200 K. Rhodium/tungsten electrodes have been selected as the optimum electrodes based on performance parameters and durability. Current collectors have been evaluated under simulated and actual operating conditions. The microscopic effects of metal migration between electrode and current collector alloys as well as their thermal and electrical properties determined the suitability of current collector and lead materials. Braze seals suitable for long term application to AMTEC devices are being developed.

  15. Analysis of components from drip tests with ATM-10 glass

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    Waste package assemblies consisting of actinide-doped West Valley ATM-10 reference glass and sensitized 304L stainless steel have been reacted with simulated repository groundwater using the Unsaturated Test Method. Analyses of surface corrosion and reaction products resulting from tests that were terminated at scheduled intervals between 13 and 52 weeks are reported. Analyses reveal complex interactions between the groundwater, the sensitized stainless steel waste form holder, and the glass. Alteration phases form that consist mainly of smectite clay, brockite, and an amorphous thorium iron titanium silicate, the latter two incorporating thorium, uranium, and possibly transuranics. The results from the terminated tests, combined with data from tests that are still ongoing, will help determine the suitability of glass waste forms in the proposed high-level repository at the Yucca Mountain Site.

  16. Structural Dynamics Testing of Advanced Stirling Convertor Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Sal; Williams, Zach

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been supporting the development of Stirling energy conversion for use in space. Lockheed Martin has been contracted by the Department of Energy to design and fabricate flight-unit Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators, which utilize Sunpower, Inc., free-piston Advanced Stirling Convertors. The engineering unit generator has demonstrated conversion efficiency in excess of 20 percent, offering a significant improvement over existing radioisotope-fueled power systems. NASA Glenn has been supporting the development of this generator by developing the convertors through a technology development contract with Sunpower, and conducting research and experiments in a multitude of areas, such as high-temperature material properties, organics testing, and convertor-level extended operation. Since the generator must undergo launch, several launch simulation tests have also been performed at the convertor level. The standard test sequence for launch vibration exposure has consisted of workmanship and flight acceptance levels. Together, these exposures simulate what a flight convertor will experience. Recently, two supplementary tests were added to the launch vibration simulation activity. First was a vibration durability test of the convertor, intended to quantify the effect of vibration levels up to qualification level in both the lateral and axial directions. Second was qualification-level vibration of several heater heads with small oxide inclusions in the material. The goal of this test was to ascertain the effect of the inclusions on launch survivability to determine if the heater heads were suitable for flight.

  17. Detecting Multiple Model Components with the Likelihood Ratio Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protassov, R. S.; van Dyk, D. A.

    2000-05-01

    The likelihood ratio test (LRT) and F-test popularized in astrophysics by Bevington (Data Reduction and Error Analysis in the Physical Sciences ) and Cash (1977, ApJ 228, 939), do not (even asymptotically) adhere to their nominal χ2 and F distributions in many statistical tests commonly used in astrophysics. The many legitimate uses of the LRT (see, e.g., the examples given in Cash (1977)) notwithstanding, it can be impossible to compute the false positive rate of the LRT or related tests such as the F-test. For example, although Cash (1977) did not suggest the LRT for detecting a line profile in a spectral model, it has become common practice despite the lack of certain required mathematical regularity conditions. Contrary to common practice, the nominal distribution of the LRT statistic should not be used in these situations. In this paper, we characterize an important class of problems where the LRT fails, show the non-standard behavior of the test in this setting, and provide a Bayesian alternative to the LRT, i.e., posterior predictive p-values. We emphasize that there are many legitimate uses of the LRT in astrophysics, and even when the LRT is inappropriate, there remain several statistical alternatives (e.g., judicious use of error bars and Bayes factors). We illustrate this point in our analysis of GRB 970508 that was studied by Piro et al. in ApJ, 514:L73-L77, 1999.

  18. Initial Component Testing for a Germanium Array Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Keillor, Martin E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Seifert, Allen

    2009-06-01

    This report describes progress on the construction of two ultra-low-background cryostats that are part of the NA-22 funded “Radionuclide Laboratories” (RN Labs) project. Each cryostat will house seven high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe). These cryostats are being built from a limited set of materials that are known to have very low levels of radioactive impurities. The RN Labs instrument is designed to take advantage of low background performance, high detection efficiency, and γ-γ coincidence signatures to provide unprecedented gamma spectroscopy sensitivity. The project is focused on improving gamma analysis capabilities for nuclear detonation detection (NDD) applications. The instrument also has the potential for basic nuclear physics research. Section 1 provides the background for the project. Section 2 discusses germanium crystal acceptance testing. Design problems were found after the first delivery of new detectors from the vendor, Canberra Semiconductors. The first four crystals were returned for repair, resulting in a delay in crystal procurement. Section 3 provides an update on copper electroforming. In general, electroforming parts for RN Labs has proceeded smoothly, but there have been recent problems in electroforming three large copper parts necessary for the project. Section 4 describes the first round of testing for the instrument: anti-cosmic scintillator testing, electronics testing, and initial vacuum testing. Section 5 concludes with an overall description of the state of the project and challenges that remain.

  19. High level radioactive waste vitrification process equipment component testing

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Heath, W.O.; Larson, D.E.; Craig, S.N.; Berger, D.N.; Goles, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    Remote operability and maintainability of vitrification equipment were assessed under shielded-cell conditions. The equipment tested will be applied to immobilize high-level and transuranic liquid waste slurries that resulted from plutonium production for defense weapons. Equipment tested included: a turntable for handling waste canisters under the melter; a removable discharge cone in the melter overflow section; a thermocouple jumper that extends into a shielded cell; remote instrument and electrical connectors; remote, mechanical, and heat transfer aspects of the melter glass overflow section; a reamer to clean out plugged nozzles in the melter top; a closed circuit camera to view the melter interior; and a device to retrieve samples of the glass product. A test was also conducted to evaluate liquid metals for use in a liquid metal sealing system.

  20. Wear Testing of Moving Components in Ultra-High Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Arnelia; McAlister, T.; Ellis, R.; Mosleh, M.

    2010-11-01

    Wear and friction in moving parts in an Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) environment is a fundamental challenge in the design of mechanical assemblies in fusion experiments. In a reactor-scale experiment, constraints have been placed on the material choices and mechanical motions within the system due to their vacuum environment. Wear and friction only serve to complicate these constraints. Textured surfaces, bonded lubricants, and vacuum compatible greases have shown promise as possible means of reducing friction and wear. We have designed a machine for testing wear in a UHV environment, at room temperature, and elevated temperatures. This poster describes the design of the wear test machine and its operating parameters. We have presented an outline of the material test program along with a discussion of the pros and cons of anti-friction and anti-wear treatments.

  1. A review of DOE HEPA filter component test activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slawski, J.W.; Bresson, J.F.; Scripsick, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    All HEPA filters purchased for installation in DOE nuclear facilities are required to be tested at a Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. The number of HEPA filters purchased by DOE has been reduced so much that the Hanford FTF was closed. From Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 to 1994, funding was not provided to the FTF Technical Support Group (TSG) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As a consequence, Round Robin Tests (RRTs), performed twice each year by the FTFs to assess constituency of test results among the FTFs, were not performed in FY 1992 and FY 1993. The Annual Reports of FTF test activities were not prepared for FY 1992 - 1995. Technical support provided to the FTFs was minimal. There is talk of closing a second FTF, and ongoing discussions as to whether DOE will continue to fund operation of the FTFs. In FY 1994, DOE Defense Programs commenced funding the TSG. RRT data for FY 1994 and 1995 have been entered into the database; the FY 1994 RRT report has been issued; and the FY 1995 RRT report is in progress. Data from semiannual reports have been retrieved and entered into the database. Standards related to HEPA filter test and procurement activities are now scheduled for issuance by FY 1996. Continuation of these activities depends on whether DOE will continue to support the HEPA filter test program. The history and activities of the FTFs and the TSG at Los Alamos have been reported at previous Air Cleaning Conferences. Data from the FY 1991 Annual Report of FTF activities was presented at the 1992 Air Cleaning Conference. Preparation of the Annual Reports was temporarily suspended in 1992. However, all of the FTF Semiannual report data have been retrieved and entered into the data base. This paper focuses primarily on the results of HEPA filter tests conducted by FTFs during FY 1992 - FY 1995, and the possible effects of the DOE program uncertainties on the quality of HEPA filters for installation at the DOE sites. 15 refs., 13 tabs.

  2. 3. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. The building wing on the left houses the equipment room, and that on the right houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. 2. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. The building wing on the left houses the equipment room and that on the right houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  4. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system and..., reliability, and durability. (c) Each unpressurized hydraulic fluid tank may not fail or leak when subjected... hydraulic fluid tank must meet the requirements of § 33.64. (d) For an engine type certificated for use...

  5. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system and..., reliability, and durability. (c) Each unpressurized hydraulic fluid tank may not fail or leak when subjected... hydraulic fluid tank must meet the requirements of § 33.64. (d) For an engine type certificated for use...

  6. Space Flight Requirements for Fiber Optic Components: Qualification Testing and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the qualification testing requirements for Fiber Optic Components used during space flight. Since most components for space flight fiber optic components are now commercial of the shelf (COTS) products, and the changes at Goddard Space Flight Center, such as short term projects, and low budgets and other changes, have made full qualification of Fiber Optic Components not only too expensive also impossible. This presentation reviews the environmental parameters, the testing and or testing requirements of some optical components on board some NASA satellites.

  7. Round Robin Experiments on the Explosive Components Water Gap Test (ECWGT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    58.4 23941 TNO-report Round Robin experiments on the Explosive PML 1992-69 Components Water Gap Test (ECWGT) January 1993 CoPY no:- / Author(s): E.G...carried out on the Explosive Components Water Gap Test (ECWGT). This rest is proposed by the Experts Group on Explosive Components for Fuzing Systems of...8217Round Robin’ experimenten uirgevoerd met de ’Explosive Components Water Gap Test’ (ECWGT). Deze test is voorgesteld door de Expert Group on Explosive

  8. Major advances in testing of dairy products: milk component and dairy product attribute testing.

    PubMed

    Barbano, D M; Lynch, J M

    2006-04-01

    Milk component analysis is relatively unusual in the field of quantitative analytical chemistry because an analytical test result determines the allocation of very large amounts of money between buyers and sellers of milk. Therefore, there is high incentive to develop and refine these methods to achieve a level of analytical performance rarely demanded of most methods or laboratory staff working in analytical chemistry. In the last 25 yr, well-defined statistical methods to characterize and validate analytical method performance combined with significant improvements in both the chemical and instrumental methods have allowed achievement of improved analytical performance for payment testing. A shift from marketing commodity dairy products to the development, manufacture, and marketing of value added dairy foods for specific market segments has created a need for instrumental and sensory approaches and quantitative data to support product development and marketing. Bringing together sensory data from quantitative descriptive analysis and analytical data from gas chromatography olfactometry for identification of odor-active compounds in complex natural dairy foods has enabled the sensory scientist and analytical chemist to work together to improve the consistency and quality of dairy food flavors.

  9. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 6, Operation of the Component Development Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the component development and laboratory binder test work at Wilsonville during Task 6. This Task included the construction and startup of the Component Development Test Facility (CDTF), coal procurement, evaluation of unit operation and dewatering performance, laboratory binder tests for diesel and heptane, production characterization, and vendor tests. Data evaluation, interpretation, and analysis are not included in this report, but will be discussed in the Task 7 report.

  10. No masking between test and mask components in perceptually different depth planes.

    PubMed

    Hibbeler, Patrick J; Olzak, Lynn A

    2011-01-01

    2-D cues to perceived depth organization have been used to segregate test and mask stimulus components in a discrimination task. Observers made either spatial-frequency or orientation judgments on a rectangular test component by itself or in the presence of constant rectangular masks. There were two basic masking conditions: same-plane or different-plane. In the same-plane conditions, the test components and masks are perceived as existing in the same depth plane. In the different-plane conditions, the test and mask components are perceived to exist in different depth planes. The perception of different depth planes was achieved by using perceived occlusion, which could place either component closer or further from the observer. The results suggest that when test and mask components are separated into different depth planes they no longer influence one another. This effect could be observed in either depth organization, test components in front of the masks or mask components in front of the test. These results indicate that the figure-ground organization of components is not important. Only the designation as existing in the same or different depth planes affects whether or not a mask is effective.

  11. Mutation Testing for Effective Verification of Digital Components of Physical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushik, N. G.; Evtushenko, N. V.; Torgaev, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Digital components of modern physical systems are often designed applying circuitry solutions based on the field programmable gate array technology (FPGA). Such (embedded) digital components should be carefully tested. In this paper, an approach for the verification of digital physical system components based on mutation testing is proposed. The reference description of the behavior of a digital component in the hardware description language (HDL) is mutated by introducing into it the most probable errors and, unlike mutants in high-level programming languages, the corresponding test case is effectively derived based on a comparison of special scalable representations of the specification and the constructed mutant using various logic synthesis and verification systems.

  12. Ecological, psychological, and cognitive components of reading difficulties: testing the component model of reading in fourth graders across 38 countries.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ming Ming; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lin, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The authors tested the component model of reading (CMR) among 186,725 fourth grade students from 38 countries (45 regions) on five continents by analyzing the 2006 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study data using measures of ecological (country, family, school, teacher), psychological, and cognitive components. More than 91% of the differences in student difficulty occurred at the country (61%) and classroom (30%) levels (ecological), with less than 9% at the student level (cognitive and psychological). All three components were negatively associated with reading difficulties: cognitive (student's early literacy skills), ecological (family characteristics [socioeconomic status, number of books at home, and attitudes about reading], school characteristics [school climate and resources]), and psychological (students' attitudes about reading, reading self-concept, and being a girl). These results extend the CMR by demonstrating the importance of multiple levels of factors for reading deficits across diverse cultures.

  13. 7. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking south. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking south. The wing in the immediate foreground houses the equipment room. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  14. 16 CFR 1508.5 - Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b). 1508.5 Section 1508.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.5 Component spacing test method...

  15. Techniques employed by the NASA White Sands Test Facility to ensure oxygen system component safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stradling, J. S.; Pippen, D. L.; Frye, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of ascertaining the safety and suitability of a variety of oxygen system components are discussed. Additionally, qualification and batch control requirements for soft goods in oxygen systems are presented. Current oxygen system component qualification test activities in progress at White Sands Test Facility are described.

  16. THE COMPONENT TEST FACILITY – A NATIONAL USER FACILITY FOR TESTING OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR) COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Duncan; Vondell J. Balls; Stephanie L. Austad

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Projects require research, development, design, construction, and operation of a nuclear plant intended for both high-efficiency electricity production and high-temperature industrial applications, including hydrogen production. During the life cycle stages of an HTGR, plant systems, structures and components (SSCs) will be developed to support this reactor technology. To mitigate technical, schedule, and project risk associated with development of these SSCs, a large-scale test facility is required to support design verification and qualification prior to operational implementation. As a full-scale helium test facility, the Component Test facility (CTF) will provide prototype testing and qualification of heat transfer system components (e.g., Intermediate Heat Exchanger, valves, hot gas ducts), reactor internals, and hydrogen generation processing. It will perform confirmation tests for large-scale effects, validate component performance requirements, perform transient effects tests, and provide production demonstration of hydrogen and other high-temperature applications. Sponsored wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the CTF will support NGNP and will also act as a National User Facility to support worldwide development of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technologies.

  17. Estimation procedures to measure and monitor failure rates of components during thermal-vacuum testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. E.; Kruger, R.

    1980-01-01

    Estimation procedures are described for measuring component failure rates, for comparing the failure rates of two different groups of components, and for formulating confidence intervals for testing hypotheses (based on failure rates) that the two groups perform similarly or differently. Appendix A contains an example of an analysis in which these methods are applied to investigate the characteristics of two groups of spacecraft components. The estimation procedures are adaptable to system level testing and to monitoring failure characteristics in orbit.

  18. High-temperature test facility at the NASA Lewis engine components research laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Renato O.

    1990-01-01

    The high temperature test facility (HTTF) at NASA-Lewis Engine Components Research Laboratory (ECRL) is presently used to evaluate the survivability of aerospace materials and the effectiveness of new sensing instrumentation in a realistic afterburner environment. The HTTF has also been used for advanced heat transfer studies on aerospace components. The research rig uses pressurized air which is heated with two combustors to simulate high temperature flow conditions for test specimens. Maximum airflow is 31 pps. The HTTF is pressure rated for up to 150 psig. Combustors are used to regulate test specimen temperatures up to 2500 F. Generic test sections are available to house test plates and advanced instrumentation. Customized test sections can be fabricated for programs requiring specialized features and functions. The high temperature test facility provides government and industry with a facility for testing aerospace components. Its operation and capabilities are described.

  19. The use of programmable logic controllers (PLC) for rocket engine component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nail, William; Scheuermann, Patrick; Witcher, Kern

    1991-01-01

    Application of PLCs to the rocket engine component testing at a new Stennis Space Center Component Test Facility is suggested as an alternative to dedicated specialized computers. The PLC systems are characterized by rugged design, intuitive software, fault tolerance, flexibility, multiple end device options, networking capability, and built-in diagnostics. A distributed PLC-based system is projected to be used for testing LH2/LOx turbopumps required for the ALS/NLS rocket engines.

  20. Fiber Optics Component Testing: Requirements And Trends-Fibers, Cables, Connectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, John A.

    1983-03-01

    A review of requirements for testing of fibre optic components is presented, with emphasis on connectors, the connector/cable interface, and fibre and cable parameters affecting the connector/connector interface parameters. The review will be developed from the point of view of an ultimate user of a connectorized cable, and will correlate system requirements with the parameters to be tested and the trends in developing test techniques which properly assign performance responsibility to the cognizant component supplier.

  1. Payload and Components Real-Time Automated Test System (PACRATS), Data Acquisition of Leak Rate and Pressure Data Test Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Maegan L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to provide the Mechanical Components Test Facility (MCTF) with the capability to obtain electronic leak test and proof pressure data, Payload and Components Real-time Automated Test System (PACRATS) data acquisition software will be utilized to display real-time data. It will record leak rates and pressure/vacuum level(s) simultaneously. This added functionality will provide electronic leak test and pressure data at specified sampling frequencies. Electronically stored data will provide ES61 with increased data security, analysis, and accuracy. The tasks performed in this procedure are to verify PACRATS only, and are not intended to provide verifications for MCTF equipment.

  2. 1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast from hill north of structure. The building wing in the right foreground houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. Test Cell 10 is located in the center background, Test Cell 9 is at the far left, and the equipment room is in the immediate left foreground. The control room is in the center of the structure and abuts the aforementioned test cell and equipment room wings. This structure served as a facility for testing, handling, and storage of Titan II's hydrazine- and nitrogen teteroxide-based propellant system components for compatability determinations. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. Investigating the Reliability of the Civics Component of the U.S. Naturalization Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winke, Paula

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I investigated the reliability of the U.S. Naturalization Test's civics component by asking 414 individuals to take a mock U.S. citizenship test comprising civics test questions. Using an incomplete block design of six forms with 16 nonoverlapping items and four anchor items on each form (the anchors connected the six subsets of…

  4. Development and testing of CMC components for automotive gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials are currently being developed and evaluated for advanced gas turbine engine components because of their high specific strength and resistance to catastrophic failure. Components with 2D and 3D composite architectures have been successfully designed and fabricated. This is an overview of the test results for a backplate, combustor, and a rotor.

  5. Miniature probes for use in gas turbine testing. [component reliability measuring instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.; Krause, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    Several examples of miniature probes (null type as well as fixed position) are presented which have proved useful in aircraft and space power systems component testing and are applicable to automotive gas turbine testing. These probes are used to determine component or system performance from the measurement of gas temperature as well as total and static pressure, and flow direction. Detailed drawings of the sensors are presented along with experimental data covering the flow characteristics over the range of intended use.

  6. On testing of functionally equivalent components of fault-tolerant software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Helsabeck, Michael L.; Tai, Kuo-Chung; Mcallister, David F.

    1986-01-01

    Six functionally equivalent programs were tested with specification based random and extremal/special value (ESV) test cases. Statement and branch coverage were used to measure and compare the attained testing effectiveness. It was observed that both measures reached a nearly steady state value after 25 to 75 random test cases. Coverage saturation curves appear to follow an exponential growth model. However, the steady state values for branch coverage of different components, but the same input cases, differed by as much as 22 percent. The effect is the result of the differences in the detailed structure of the components. Improvement in coverage provided by the random test data, after the ESV cases were executed, was only about 1 percent. Results indicate that extensive random testing can be a process of diminishing returns, and that in the FTS context functional ('black box') testing can provide a very uneven execution coverage of the functionally equivalent software, and therefore should be supplemented by structure based testing.

  7. Energy efficient engine low-pressure compressor component test hardware detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, C. J.; Halle, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic and mechanical design description of the low pressure compressor component of the Energy Efficient Engine were used. The component was designed to meet the requirements of the Flight Propulsion System while maintaining a low cost approach in providing a low pressure compressor design for the Integrated Core/Low Spool test required in the Energy Efficient Engine Program. The resulting low pressure compressor component design meets or exceeds all design goals with the exception of surge margin. In addition, the expense of hardware fabrication for the Integrated Core/Low Spool test has been minimized through the use of existing minor part hardware.

  8. Use of multidimensional scaling in the selection of wastewater toxicity test battery components.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shijin; Frymier, Paul D

    2003-04-01

    In aquatic toxicity testing, no single test species is sensitive to all toxicants. Therefore, test batteries consisting of several individual assays are becoming more common. The organisms in a test battery should be representative of the entire system of interest. The results of the assays should be complementary to other components in the test battery to avoid redundancy. With the aid of multidimensional scaling (MDS), a multivariate statistical method, we examined the toxicity data of five bioassays (the continuous Shk1, Polytox, activated sludge respiration inhibition, Nitrosomonas, and Tetrahymena assays) that could serve as test battery components for the assessment of wastewater toxicity to activated sludge. MDS mapped the five assays into a two-dimensional space and showed that the Nitrosomonas assay should be included in test batteries plus one of the remaining four assays for assessing wastewater toxicity to activated sludge.

  9. 30 CFR 27.35 - Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies. 27.35 Section 27.35 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5380 Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5380 Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A...

  12. Patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis to cigarettes: smoked/unsmoked components and formaldehyde factors.

    PubMed

    Carew, Benjamin; Muir, Jim

    2014-08-01

    A patient with hand dermatitis reported that switching her smoking hand resulted in reduced symptoms. When allergy to cigarettes is suspected the literature supports standard allergy testing as well as testing the individual components of cigarettes. Initial standard patch testing revealed an allergy to formaldehyde and the formaldehyde releasing agent, quaternium-15. The patient did not react to her usual roll-your-own cigarette components but reacted to the smoked filter paper of a particular brand of cigarette she frequently borrowed from a friend. Possible explanations include either a variation of ingredients between cigarettes that alters the formaldehyde concentration or another unidentified allergen in the branded cigarette causing allergic contact dermatitis.

  13. 6. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southwest. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 9 (fuel), and that on the right houses the equipment room. The corrugated aluminum shed that is taller than the main building in the left foreground houses a citric acid air pollution control room (also known as scrubber room), the interior of which may be seen in CO-88-A-21. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  14. Experience with helium leak and thermal shocks test of SST-1 cryo components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajiv; Nimavat, Hiren; Srikanth, G. L. N.; Bairagi, Nitin; Shah, Pankil; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2012-11-01

    A steady state superconducting Tokamak SST-1 is presently under its assembly stage at the Institute for Plasma Research. The SST-1 machine is a family of Superconducting SC coils for both Toroidal field and Poloidal Field. An ultra high vacuum compatible vacuum vessel, placed in the bore of the TF coils, houses the plasma facing components. A high vacuum cryostat encloses all the SC coils and the vacuum vessel. Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) cooled thermal shield between the vacuum vessel & SC coils as well as between cryostat and the SC coils. There are number of crucial cryogenic components as Electrical isolators, 80 K thermal shield, Cryogenic flexible hose etc., which have to be passed the performance validation tests as part of fulfillment of the stringent QA/QC before incorporated in the main assembly. The individual leak tests of components at RT as well as after thermal cycle from 300 K to 77 K ensure us to make final overall leak proof system. These components include, Large numbers of Electrical Isolators for Helium as well as LN2 services, Flexible Bellows and Hoses for Helium as well as LN2 services, Thermal shock tests of large numbers of 80 K Bubble shields In order to validate the helium leak tightness of these components, we have used the calibrated mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD) at 300 K, 77 K and 4.2. Since it is very difficult to locate the leaks, which are appearing at rather lower temperatures e.g. less than 20 K, We have invented different approaches to resolve the issue of such leaks. This paper, in general describes the design of cryogenic flexible hose, assembly, couplings for leak testing, test method and techniques of thermal cycles test at 77 K inflow conditions and leak testing aspects of different cryogenic components. The test results, the problems encountered and its solutions techniques are discussed.

  15. Test Results of the RS-44 Integrated Component Evaluator Liquid Oxygen/Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R. F.; Lariviere, B. W.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced LOX/LH2 expander cycle rocket engine, producing 15,000 lbf thrust for Orbital Transfer Vehicle missions, was tested to determine ignition, transition, and main stage characteristics. Detail design and fabrication of the pump fed RS44 integrated component evaluator (ICE) was accomplished using company discretionary resources and was tested under this contracted effort. Successful demonstrations were completed to about the 50 percent fuel turbopump power level (87,000 RPM), but during this last test, a high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) bearing failed curtailing the test program. No other hardware were affected by the HPFTP premature shutdown. The ICE operations matched well with the predicted start transient simulations. The tests demonstrated the feasibility of a high performance advanced expander cycle engine. All engine components operated nominally, except for the HPFTP, during the engine hot-fire tests. A failure investigation was completed using company discretionary resources.

  16. C/SiC Component & Material Analysis, Attachment Verification, & Blisk Turbopump Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Genge, Gary; Gregg, Wayne; Jordan, William

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic composite blisk components constructed of carbon fibers & silicon carbide ceramic matrix have been fabricated and tested. Room and cryogenic torque testing have verified the attachment configuration. The polar and quasi-isotropic blisks have been proof spun, balanced, and tested in the Simplex turbopump. Foreign particle impact analysis was conducted for C/SiC. Data and manufacturing lessons learned are significantly benefiting the development of the Reusable Launch Vehicle's ceramic matrix composite integrally bladed disk.

  17. The development and testing of ceramic components in piston engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McEntire, B.J.; Willis, R.W.; Southam, R.E.

    1994-10-01

    Within the past 10--15 years, ceramic hardware has been fabricated and tested in a number of piston engine applications including valves, piston pins, roller followers, tappet shims, and other wear components. It has been shown that, with proper design and installation, ceramics improve performance, fuel economy, and wear and corrosion resistance. These results have been obtained using rig and road tests on both stock and race engines. Selected summaries of these tests are presented in this review paper.

  18. The SHOOT cryogenic components - Testing and applicability to other flight programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Schein, Michael E.; Boyle, Robert F.; Figueroa, Orlando; Lindauer, David A.; Mchugh, Daniel C.; Shirron, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenic components and techniques for the superfluid helium on-orbit transfer (SHOOT) flight demonstration are described. Instrumentation for measuring liquid quantity, position, flow rate, temperature, and pressure has been developed using the data obtained from the IRAS, Cosmic Background Explorer, and Spacelab 2 helium dewars. Topics discussed include valves and burst disks, fluid management devices, structural/thermal components, instrumentation, and ground support equipment and performance test apparatus.

  19. Space Flight Requirements for Fiber Optic Components; Qualification Testing and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Jin, Xiaodan Linda; Chuska, Richard; Friedberg, Patricia; Malenab, Mary; Matuszeski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    "Qualification" of fiber optic components holds a very different meaning than it did ten years ago. In the past, qualification meant extensive prolonged testing and screening that led to a programmatic method of reliability assurance. For space flight programs today, the combination of using higher performance commercial technology, with shorter development schedules and tighter mission budgets makes long term testing and reliability characterization unfeasible. In many cases space flight missions will be using technology within years of its development and an example of this is fiber laser technology. Although the technology itself is not a new product the components that comprise a fiber laser system change frequently as processes and packaging changes occur. Once a process or the materials for manufacturing a component change, even the data that existed on its predecessor can no longer provide assurance on the newer version. In order to assure reliability during a space flight mission, the component engineer must understand the requirements of the space flight environment as well as the physics of failure of the components themselves. This can be incorporated into an efficient and effective testing plan that "qualifies" a component to specific criteria defined by the program given the mission requirements and the component limitations. This requires interaction at the very initial stages of design between the system design engineer, mechanical engineer, subsystem engineer and the component hardware engineer. Although this is the desired interaction what typically occurs is that the subsystem engineer asks the components or development engineers to meet difficult requirements without knowledge of the current industry situation or the lack of qualification data. This is then passed on to the vendor who can provide little help with such a harsh set of requirements due to high cost of testing for space flight environments. This presentation is designed to guide the

  20. Tritium experiments on components for fusion fuel processing at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y. ); Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Under a collaborative agreement between US and Japan, two tritium processing components, a palladium diffuser and a ceramic electrolysis cell have been tested with tritium for application to a Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for plasma exhaust processing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The fundamental characteristics, compatibility with tritium, impurities effects with tritium, and long-term behavior of the components, were studied over a three year period. Based on these studies, an integrated process loop, JAERI Fuel Cleanup System'' equipped with above components was installed at the TSTA for full scale demonstration of the plasma exhaust reprocessing.

  1. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Sacit M; Flanagan, George F; Peretz, Fred J; Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  2. A comparison of 'anaerobic' components of O2 debt and the Wingate test.

    PubMed

    Goslin, B R; Graham, T E

    1985-09-01

    This study compared measurements which were considered traditionally to reflect alactacid and lactacid components of anaerobic metabolism. Subjects (men (N = 9) and women (N = 5)) on one occasion performed an exhaustive cycle ergometer ride at VO2 max and had peak lactate and O2 debt (fast and slow components) determined. On a second occasion, they performed a Wingate test. All data were normalized for body weight. Very few correlations were found between O2 debt or peak lactate and the peak power, mean power and power decrease of the Wingate test. In particular, both peak lactate and the fast O2 debt component had low, nonsignificant correlations with either peak or mean power. The study failed to support the traditional assumptions that both tests are quantifying the same anaerobic energy systems.

  3. Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) Component Responses to Payload Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration testing of SUMI was performed at both the experiment and payload levels. No accelerometers were installed inside the experiment during testing, but it is certain that component responses were very high. The environments experienced by optical and electronic components in these tests is an area of ongoing concern. The analysis supporting this presentation included a detailed finite element model of the SUMI experiment section, the dynamic response of which, correlated well with accelerometer measurements from the testing of the experimental section at Marshall Space Flight Center. The relatively short timeframe available to complete the task and the limited design information available was a limitation on the level of detail possible for the non-experiment portion of the model. However, since the locations of interest are buried in the experimental section of the model, the calculated responses should be enlightening both for the development of test criteria and for guidance in design.

  4. Combustor and Vane Features and Components Tested in a Gas Turbine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roinson, R. Craig; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) as combustor liners and turbine vanes provides the potential of improving next-generation turbine engine performance, through lower emissions and higher cycle efficiency, relative to today s use of superalloy hot-section components. For example, the introduction of film-cooling air in metal combustor liners has led to higher levels of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from the combustion process. An environmental barrier coated (EBC) siliconcarbide- fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite is a new material system that can operate at higher temperatures, significantly reducing the film-cooling requirements and enabling lower NOx production. Evaluating components and subcomponents fabricated from these advanced CMCs under gas turbine conditions is paramount to demonstrating that the material system can perform as required in the complex thermal stress and environmentally aggressive engine environment. To date, only limited testing has been conducted on CMC combustor and turbine concepts and subelements of this type throughout the industry. As part of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, the High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at the NASA Glenn Research Center was selected to demonstrate coupon, subcomponent feature, and component testing because it can economically provide the temperatures, pressures, velocities, and combustion gas compositions that closely simulate the engine environments. The results have proven the HPBR to be a highly versatile test rig amenable to multiple test specimen configurations essential to coupon and component testing.

  5. A study of facilities and fixtures for testing of a high speed civil transport wing component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, J. A.; Vause, R. F.; Bowman, L. M.; Jensen, J. K.; Martin, C. J., Jr.; Stockwell, A. E.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the feasibility of testing a large-scale High Speed Civil Transport wing component in the Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory in Building 1148 at NASA Langley Research Center. The report includes a survey of the electrical and hydraulic resources and identifies the backing structure and floor hard points which would be available for reacting the test loads. The backing structure analysis uses a new finite element model of the floor and backstop support system in the Structures Laboratory. Information on the data acquisition system and the thermal power requirements is also presented. The study identified the hardware that would be required to test a typical component, including the number and arrangement of hydraulic actuators required to simulate expected flight loads. Load introduction and reaction structure concepts were analyzed to investigate the effects of experimentally induced boundary conditions.

  6. Noise control of a model scale jet engine component test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simcox, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Noise control is a fundamental design requirement in a test facility used for research and development of noise suppression devices and test techniques for modern fan jet engines. For every type of test in the facility, three aspects of noise control must be considered: noise exchange between the community and the test chamber, the acoustic characteristics of the chamber, and the methodology of the experiment. Boeing has designed and built a large anechoic test chamber (LTC) for engine component noise tests, with special emphasis on these three areas of noise control. Primary design goals were established by a need for high quality model scale jet engine exhaust studies, with minimum noise interaction with nearby communities. This paper discusses the noise control aspects of the LTC for both jet exhaust and fan noise testing.

  7. Developing standard performance testing procedures for MC&A components at a site

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Carolynn

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements, documentation and the human factor, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following elements and subsystems or components for a material control and accountability system: (1) MC&A Elements: Information subsystem, Measurement subsystem, NM access subsystem, including a tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated information-gathering subsystem; and (2) Detecting NM Loses Elements: Inventory differences, Shipper/receiver differences, Confirmatory measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or seal violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems (from the list above). Additionally this work includes a review of the status of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system components and potential criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a pilot Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the MBAs of SSC RF IPPE.

  8. Seawater test results of Open-Cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OC-OTEC) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrando, F.; Bharathan, D.; Link, H.; Panchal, C. B.

    Key components of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion systems- the flash evaporator, mist eliminator, passive predeaerator, two surface condenser stages, and two direct-contact condenser stages- have been tested using seawater. These components operate at lower steam pressures and higher inlet noncondensable gas concentrations than do conventional power plant heat exchangers. The rate of heat exchanged between the evaporator and the condenser is on the order of 1.25MW-thermal, requiring a warm seawater flow of about 0.1 cu m/s; the cold seawater flow is on the order of half the warm water flow. In addition to characterizing the performance of the various components, the system has produced potable water from condensation of the steam produced in the evaporator. The information obtained in these tests is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which net power production is expected to be demonstrate for the first time using OC-OTEC technology.

  9. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for

  10. Correlational structure of ‘frontal’ tests and intelligence tests indicates two components with asymmetrical neurostructural correlates in old age

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Simon R.; MacPherson, Sarah E.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Nissan, Jack; Royle, Natalie A.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Both general fluid intelligence (gf) and performance on some ‘frontal tests’ of cognition decline with age. Both types of ability are at least partially dependent on the integrity of the frontal lobes, which also deteriorate with age. Overlap between these two methods of assessing complex cognition in older age remains unclear. Such overlap could be investigated using inter-test correlations alone, as in previous studies, but this would be enhanced by ascertaining whether frontal test performance and gf share neurobiological variance. To this end, we examined relationships between gf and 6 frontal tests (Tower, Self-Ordered Pointing, Simon, Moral Dilemmas, Reversal Learning and Faux Pas tests) in 90 healthy males, aged ~ 73 years. We interpreted their correlational structure using principal component analysis, and in relation to MRI-derived regional frontal lobe volumes (relative to maximal healthy brain size). gf correlated significantly and positively (.24 ≤ r ≤ .53) with the majority of frontal test scores. Some frontal test scores also exhibited shared variance after controlling for gf. Principal component analysis of test scores identified units of gf-common and gf-independent variance. The former was associated with variance in the left dorsolateral (DL) and anterior cingulate (AC) regions, and the latter with variance in the right DL and AC regions. Thus, we identify two biologically-meaningful components of variance in complex cognitive performance in older age and suggest that age-related changes to DL and AC have the greatest cognitive impact. PMID:25278641

  11. 16 CFR 1508.5 - Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., aluminum, or equivalent) as shown in figure 1. (b) Place the wedge midway between two vertical components... DPP-50, or equivalent spring scale) to the eyebolt and exert a 9-kilogram (20-pound) direct pull on the wedge. The test may be performed by suspending a 9-kilogram (20-pound) weight from the...

  12. 76 FR 69545 - Conditions and Requirements for Relying on Component Part Testing or Certification, or Another...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ...The Consumer Product Safety Commission (``CPSC,'' ``Commission,'' or ``we'') is issuing a final rule regarding the conditions and requirements for relying on testing or certification of either component parts of consumer products, or another party's finished product, or both, to demonstrate, in whole or in part, compliance of a consumer product with all applicable rules, bans, standards, and......

  13. Association between anaerobic components of the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit and 30-second Wingate test.

    PubMed

    Bertuzzi, R; Kiss, M A P D M; Damasceno, M; Oliveira, R S F; Lima-Silva, A E

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between the anaerobic components of the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) and of the 30-second Wingate anaerobic test (30-WAnT). Nine male physical education students performed: a) a maximal incremental exercise test; b) a supramaximal constant workload test to determine the anaerobic components of the MAOD; and c) a 30-WAnT to measure the peak power (PP) and mean power (MP). The fast component of the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption and blood lactate accumulation were measured after the supramaximal constant workload test in order to determine the contributions made by alactic (ALMET) and lactic (LAMET) metabolism. Significant correlations were found between PP and ALMET (r=0.71; P=0.033) and between MP and LAMET (r=0.72; P=0.030). The study results suggested that the anaerobic components of the MAOD and of the 30-WAnT are similarly applicable in the assessment of ALMET and LAMET during high-intensity exercise.

  14. Components of Spatial Thinking: Evidence from a Spatial Thinking Ability Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jongwon; Bednarz, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the development and validation of the spatial thinking ability test (STAT). The STAT consists of sixteen multiple-choice questions of eight types. The STAT was validated by administering it to a sample of 532 junior high, high school, and university students. Factor analysis using principal components extraction was applied…

  15. Analysis of Removal Alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, M.B.

    1996-08-01

    This engineering study was developed to evaluate different options for decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) at the Savannah River Site. This document will be placed in the DOE-SRS Area reading rooms for a period of 30 days in order to obtain public input to plans for the demolition of HWCTR.

  16. Concentrating Solar Power Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Michael W; Miner, Kris

    2013-03-30

    The objective of this project is to complete a design of an advanced concentrated solar panel and demonstrate the manufacturability of key components. Then confirm the operation of the key components under prototypic solar flux conditions. This work is an important step in reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from a central receiver solar power plant. The key technical risk to building larger power towers is building the larger receiver systems. Therefore, this proposed technology project includes the design of an advanced molten salt prototypic sub-scale receiver panel that can be utilized into a large receiver system. Then complete the fabrication and testing of key components of the receive design that will be used to validate the design. This project shall have a significant impact on solar thermal power plant design. Receiver panels of suitable size for utility scale plants are a key element to a solar power tower plant. Many subtle and complex manufacturing processes are involved in producing a reliable, robust receiver panel. Given the substantial size difference between receiver panels manufactured in the past and those needed for large plant designs, the manufacture and demonstration on prototype receiver panel components with representative features of a full-sized panel will be important to improving the build process for commercial success. Given the thermal flux limitations of the test facility, the panel components cannot be rendered full size. Significance changes occurred in the projects technical strategies from project initiation to the accomplishments described herein. The initial strategy was to define cost improvements for the receiver, design and build a scale prototype receiver and test, on sun, with a molten salt heat transport system. DOE had committed to constructing a molten salt heat transport loop to support receiver testing at the top of the NSTTF tower. Because of funding constraints this did not happen. A subsequent plan to

  17. Boeing Helicopters Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program summary of component tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.; Valco, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    The principal objectives of the ART program are briefly reviewed, and the results of advanced technology component tests are summarized. The tests discussed include noise reduction by active cancellation, hybrid bidirectional tapered roller bearings, improved bearing life theory and friction tests, transmission lube study with hybrid bearings, and precision near-net-shape forged spur gears. Attention is also given to the study of high profile contact ratio noninvolute tooth form spur gears, parallel axis gear noise study, and surface modified titanium accessory spur gears.

  18. Boeing Helicopters Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program summary of component tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.; Valco, Mark J.

    1992-07-01

    The principal objectives of the ART program are briefly reviewed, and the results of advanced technology component tests are summarized. The tests discussed include noise reduction by active cancellation, hybrid bidirectional tapered roller bearings, improved bearing life theory and friction tests, transmission lube study with hybrid bearings, and precision near-net-shape forged spur gears. Attention is also given to the study of high profile contact ratio noninvolute tooth form spur gears, parallel axis gear noise study, and surface modified titanium accessory spur gears.

  19. Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine component rig performance test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    A rig test of the cooled high-pressure turbine component for the Energy Efficient Engine was successfully completed. The principal objective of this test was to substantiate the turbine design point performance as well as determine off-design performance with the interaction of the secondary flow system. The measured efficiency of the cooled turbine component was 88.5 percent, which surpassed the rig design goal of 86.5 percent. The secondary flow system in the turbine performed according to the design intent. Characterization studies showed that secondary flow system performance is insensitive to flow and pressure variations. Overall, this test has demonstrated that a highly-loaded, transonic, single-stage turbine can achieve a high level of operating efficiency.

  20. Field Testing of Nano-PCM-Enhanced Building Envelope Components in a Warm-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; LuPh.D., Jue; Soroushian, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy-efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy-efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential enduse energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase-change material (PCM) enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative PCM (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility in Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCMenhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheet-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side that served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. This paper presents the measured performance and analysis to evaluate the

  1. A discrimination-association model for decomposing component processes of the implicit association test.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Luca; Robusto, Egidio; Vianello, Michelangelo; Anselmi, Pasquale

    2013-06-01

    A formal model is proposed that decomposes the implicit association test (IAT) effect into three process components: stimuli discrimination, automatic association, and termination criterion. Both response accuracy and reaction time are considered. Four independent and parallel Poisson processes, one for each of the four label categories of the IAT, are assumed. The model parameters are the rate at which information accrues on the counter of each process and the amount of information that is needed before a response is given. The aim of this study is to present the model and an illustrative application in which the process components of a Coca-Pepsi IAT are decomposed.

  2. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, Dennis

    2010-06-01

    The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

  4. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  5. Development of a container for handling, testing, and storing discrete microelectronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filip, G. L.; Caruso, S. V.

    1972-01-01

    A container has been developed for handling, testing, burning-in, and storing discrete microelectronic components without removal from the protective package. The package was designed to accommodate the leadless inverted device and other carrier-mounted active devices and chip-type discrete resistors and capacitors. Before the indicated development, components were handled and tested in various ways, some of which resulted in damage or contamination. The basic design of the container utilizes precision machined printed circuit boards and chemically milled (photoetched) contact springs. Included in this design for protection is an O-ring-sealed cover. Methods of fabrication and limitations of the current hardware are presented. Current applications of and possible extensions to the technology are discussed.

  6. Development and testing of hermetic, laser-ignited pyrotechnic and explosive components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Daniel P.; Beckman, Thomas M.; Spangler, Ed M.; Munger, Alan C.; Woods, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing interest in the use of lasers in place of electrical systems to ignite various pyrotechnic and explosive materials. The principal driving force for this work was the requirement for safer energetic components which would be insensitive to electrostatic and electromagnetic radiation. In the last few years this research has accelerated since the basic concepts have proven viable. At the present time it is appropriate to shift the research emphasis in laser initiation from the scientific arena--whether it can be done--to the engineering realm--how it can be put into actual practice in the field. Laser initiation research and development at EG&G Mound was in three principal areas: (1) laser/energetic material interactions; (2) development of novel processing techniques for fabricating hermetic (helium leak rate of less than 1 x 10(exp -8) cu cm/s) laser components; and (3) evaluation and testing of laser-ignited components. Research in these three areas has resulted in the development of high quality, hermetic, laser initiated components. Examples are presented which demonstrate the practicality of fabricating hermetic, laser initiated explosive or pyrotechnic components that can be used in the next generation of ignitors, actuators, and detonators.

  7. Proton radiation testing of laser optical components for NASA Jupiter Europa Orbiter Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomes, W. Joe, Jr.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Ott, Melanie N.

    2011-09-01

    The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) is NASA's element of the joint Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). Based on current trajectories, the spacecraft will spend a significant amount of time in the Jovian radiation belts. Therefore, research endeavors are underway to study the radiation effects on the various parts and components needed to implement the instruments. Data from these studies will be used for component selection and system design to ensure reliable operation throughout the mission duration. The radiation environment en route to Jupiter is nothing new for NASA designed systems, however, the long durations orbiting Jupiter and Europa present new challenges for radiation exposure. High-energy trapped electrons and protons at Jupiter dominate the expected radiation environment. Therefore, most of the initial component level radiation testing is being conducted with proton exposure. In this paper we will present in-situ monitoring of the optical transmission of various laser optical components during proton irradiation. Radiation induced optical attenuation of some components is less than would be expected, based on the authors experiences, and is attributed to the interaction of the protons with the materials. The results are an encouraging first step in screening these optical materials for spaceflight in a high radiation environment.

  8. Full scale technology demonstration of a modern counterrotating unducted fan engine concept: Component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The UDF trademark (Unducted Fan) engine is a new aircraft engine concept based on an ungeared, counterrotating, unducted, ultra-high-bypass turbofan configuration. This engine is being developed to provide a high thrust-to-weight ratio powerplant with exceptional fuel efficiency for subsonic aircraft application. This report covers the testing of pertinent components of this engine such as the fan blades, control and actuation system, turbine blades and spools, seals, and mixer frame.

  9. Scaling Analysis Techniques to Establish Experimental Infrastructure for Component, Subsystem, and Integrated System Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sabharwall, Piyush; O'Brien, James E.; McKellar, Michael G.; Housley, Gregory K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid energy system research has the potential to expand the application for nuclear reactor technology beyond electricity. The purpose of this research is to reduce both technical and economic risks associated with energy systems of the future. Nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) mitigate the variability of renewable energy sources, provide opportunities to produce revenue from different product streams, and avoid capital inefficiencies by matching electrical output to demand by using excess generation capacity for other purposes when it is available. An essential step in the commercialization and deployment of this advanced technology is scaled testing to demonstrate integrated dynamic performance of advanced systems and components when risks cannot be mitigated adequately by analysis or simulation. Further testing in a prototypical environment is needed for validation and higher confidence. This research supports the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and NHES, and their adaptation to commercial industrial applications that will potentially advance U.S. energy security, economy, and reliability and further reduce carbon emissions. Experimental infrastructure development for testing and feasibility studies of coupled systems can similarly support other projects having similar developmental needs and can generate data required for validation of models in thermal energy storage and transport, energy, and conversion process development. Experiments performed in the Systems Integration Laboratory will acquire performance data, identify scalability issues, and quantify technology gaps and needs for various hybrid or other energy systems. This report discusses detailed scaling (component and integrated system) and heat transfer figures of merit that will establish the experimental infrastructure for component, subsystem, and integrated system testing to advance the technology readiness of components and systems to the level required for commercial

  10. Fracture Tests of Etched Components Using a Focused Ion Beam Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan, L.; Fettig, Rainer K.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Orloff, Jon; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many optical MEMS device designs involve large arrays of thin (0.5 to 1 micron components subjected to high stresses due to cyclic loading. These devices are fabricated from a variety of materials, and the properties strongly depend on size and processing. Our objective is to develop standard and convenient test methods that can be used to measure the properties of large numbers of witness samples, for every device we build. In this work we explore a variety of fracture test configurations for 0.5 micron thick silicon nitride membranes machined using the Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. Testing was completed using an FEI 620 dual focused ion beam milling machine. Static loads were applied using a probe. and dynamic loads were applied through a piezo-electric stack mounted at the base of the probe. Results from the tests are presented and compared, and application for predicting fracture probability of large arrays of devices are considered.

  11. Fracture tests of etched components using a focused ion beam machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Fettig, Rainer K.; Moseley, Samuel H., Jr.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Orloff, Jon

    2000-08-01

    Many optical MEMS device designs involve large arrays of thin (0.5 to 1 (mu) m) components subjected to high stresses due to cyclic loading. These devices are fabricated from a variety of materials, and the properties strongly depend on size and processing. Our objective is to develop standard and convenient test methods that can be used to measure the properties of large numbers of witness samples, for every device we build. In this work we explore a variety of fracture tests configurations for 0.5 (mu) m thick silicon nitride membranes machined using the Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. Testing was completed using an FEI 620 dual focused ion beam milling machine. Static loads were applied using a probe, and dynamic loads were applied through a piezo-electric stack mounted at the base of the probe. Results from the tests are presented and compared, and application for predicting fracture probability of large arrays of devices are considered.

  12. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components exhibiting a near zero coefficient of thermal expansion are described. Analytical methods were utilized, with the aid of a computer program, to define the most efficient laminate configurations in terms of thermal behavior and structural requirements. This was followed by an extensive material characterization and selection program, conducted for several graphite/graphite/hybrid laminate systems to obtain experimental data in support of the analytical predictions. Mechanical property tests as well as the coefficient of thermal expansion tests were run on each laminate under study, the results of which were used as the selection criteria for the single most promising laminate. Further coefficient of thermal expansion measurement was successfully performed on three subcomponent tubes utilizing the selected laminate.

  13. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Pavei, Mauro Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo; Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri

    2016-02-15

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results.

  14. Results of Component and Engineering Unit Tests of the ACRIM III Radiometer (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; Socker, D. G.; Thernisien, A. F.; McMullin, D. R.; Shirley, E. L.; Hanssen, L. M.; Zeng, J.; Lorentz, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    As part of a NASA-Sponsored program to understand the differences in Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) results reported by ACRIM III on ACRIMSAT and TIM on SORCE, a series of tests and modeling studies of ACRIM III instrument component as well as tests of the ACRIM III engineering unit have been conducted. The modeling effort involves estimating the contribution of diffraction on the TSI results and the measurements involve the determination of this diffraction contribution as well as contributions due to scattered light and the cavity reflectance. The tests of the engineering unit were performed at the TRF (TSI Radiometer Facility) at LASP/Univ. of Colorado and were conducted in both power and irradiance mode. In this presentation we will describe the results of these studies and how these results compare with the recent tests of ACRIM III sensors at the LASP / TRF facility. This work is sponsored by NASA Earth Science Division.

  15. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source.

    PubMed

    Pavei, Mauro; Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri; Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results.

  16. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavei, Mauro; Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri; Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results.

  17. Preparation of a Frozen Regolith Simulant Bed for ISRU Component Testing in a Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenhenz, Julie; Linne, Diane

    2013-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) systems and components have undergone extensive laboratory and field tests to expose hardware to relevant soil environments. The next step is to combine these soil environments with relevant pressure and temperature conditions. Previous testing has demonstrated how to incorporate large bins of unconsolidated lunar regolith into sufficiently sized vacuum chambers. In order to create appropriate depth dependent soil characteristics that are needed to test drilling operations for the lunar surface, the regolith simulant bed must by properly compacted and frozen. While small cryogenic simulant beds have been created for laboratory tests, this scale effort will allow testing of a full 1m drill which has been developed for a potential lunar prospector mission. Compacted bulk densities were measured at various moisture contents for GRC-3 and Chenobi regolith simulants. Vibrational compaction methods were compared with the previously used hammer compaction, or "Proctor", method. All testing was done per ASTM standard methods. A full 6.13 m3 simulant bed with 6 percent moisture by weight was prepared, compacted in layers, and frozen in a commercial freezer. Temperature and desiccation data was collected to determine logistics for preparation and transport of the simulant bed for thermal vacuum testing. Once in the vacuum facility, the simulant bed will be cryogenically frozen with liquid nitrogen. These cryogenic vacuum tests are underway, but results will not be included in this manuscript.

  18. Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Carolynn P; Bushlya, Anatoly V; Efimenko, Vladimir F; Ilyanstev, Anatoly; Regoushevsky, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC&A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC&A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

  19. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1, Demonstration tests: Volume 1, Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.; Shipway, G.D.; Glozman, V.

    1987-08-01

    This report describes tests performed in Phase I of the NRC Component Fragility Research Program. The purpose of these tests was to demonstrate procedures for characterizing the seismic fragility of a selected component, investigating how various parameters affect fragility, and finally using test data to develop practical fragility descriptions suitable for application in probabilistic risk assessments. A three-column motor control center housing motor controllers of various types and sizes as well as relays of different types and manufacturers was subjected to seismic input motions up to 2.5g zero period acceleration. To investigate the effect of base flexibility on the structural behavior of the MCC and on the functional behavior of the electrical devices, multiple tests were performed on each of four mounting configurations: four bolts per column with top bracking, four bolts per column with no top brace, four bolts per column with internal diagonal bracking, and two bolts per column with no top or internal bracking. Device fragility was characterized by contact chatter correlated to local in-cabinet response at the device location. Seismic capacities were developed for each device on the basis of local input motion required to cause chatter; these results were then applied to develop probabilistic fragility curves for each type of device, including estimates of the ''high-confidence low probability of failure'' capacity of each.

  20. Initial results for a 170 GHz high power ITER waveguide component test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Dukes, Carl; Killough, Stephen; Kaufman, Michael; White, John; Bell, Gary; Hanson, Greg; Rasmussen, Dave

    2014-10-01

    A high power microwave test stand is being setup at ORNL to enable prototype testing of 170 GHz cw waveguide components being developed for the ITER ECH system. The ITER ECH system will utilize 63.5 mm diameter evacuated corrugated waveguide and will have 24 >150 m long runs. A 170 GHz 1 MW class gyrotron is being developed by Communications and Power Industries and is nearing completion. A HVDC power supply, water-cooling and control system has been partially tested in preparation for arrival of the gyrotron. The power supply and water-cooling system are being designed to operate for >3600 second pulses to simulate the operating conditions planned for the ITER ECH system. The gyrotron Gaussian beam output has a single mirror for focusing into a 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide in the vertical plane. The output beam and mirror are enclosed in an evacuated duct with absorber for stray radiation. Beam alignment with the waveguide is a critical task so a combination of mirror tilt adjustments and a bellows for offsets will be provided. Analysis of thermal patterns on thin witness plates will provide gyrotron mode purity and waveguide coupling efficiency data. Pre-prototype waveguide components and two dummy loads are available for initial operational testing of the gyrotron. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  1. A Single-Block TRL Test Fixture for the Cryogenic Characterization of Planar Microwave Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mejia, M.; Creason, A. S.; Toncich, S. S.; Ebihara, B. T.; Miranda, F. A.

    1996-01-01

    The High-Temperature-Superconductivity (HTS) group of the RF Technology Branch, Space Electronics Division, is actively involved in the fabrication and cryogenic characterization of planar microwave components for space applications. This process requires fast, reliable, and accurate measurement techniques not readily available. A new calibration standard/test fixture that enhances the integrity and reliability of the component characterization process has been developed. The fixture consists of 50 omega thru, reflect, delay, and device under test gold lines etched onto a 254 microns (0.010 in) thick alumina substrate. The Thru-Reflect-Line (TRL) fixture was tested at room temperature using a 30 omega, 7.62 mm (300 mil) long, gold line as a known standard. Good agreement between the experimental data and the data modelled using Sonnet's em(C) software was obtained for both the return (S(sub 11)) and insertion (S( 21)) losses. A gold two-pole bandpass filter with a 7.3 GHz center frequency was used as our Device Under Test (DUT), and the results compared with those obtained using a Short-Open-Load-Thru (SOLT) calibration technique.

  2. Seasonal changes in immunoreactivity of activin signaling component proteins in wild ground squirrel testes.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; Zhang, Haolin; Zhang, Mengyuan; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Xiao; Song, Moshi; Zhou, Jiao; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal spermatogenesis and localization of inhibin/activin subunits (alpha, betaA, betaB) in the testes of wild ground squirrel has been previously described; however, the expression pattern of activin receptors and cytoplasmic signaling SMADs has not been detected in any seasonal breeders. The objective of this study was to investigate the abundance and cellular localization of activin signaling components in testes of the wild ground squirrel during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. The immunolocalizations of ActRIIB (activin type II receptor B) and activin-related SMADs (phospho-SMAD2/3, SMAD4 and SMAD7) were observed by immunohistochemistry. Total proteins were extracted from testicular tissues in the breeding and nonbreeding seasons and were used for Western blotting analysis for ActRIIB and SMADs. Immunoreactivities of activin signaling components were greater in the testes of the breeding season, and then decreased to a relatively low level in the nonbreeding season. ActRIIB and related SMADs were widely spread in the active testes, while spermatogonia were the predominant cellular sites of activin signal transduction during arrested spermatogenesis. The dynamic regulation of activin type II receptor and SMADs indicated that the activin signal pathway played an important paracrine role in seasonal spermatogenesis of the wild ground squirrel. Furthermore, the distinct localizations and immunoreactivity of ActRIIB and SMADs might suggest different functions of activin in seasonal spermatogenesis.

  3. Seawater test results of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components

    SciTech Connect

    Zangrando, F.; Bharathan, D.; Link, H. ); Panchal, C.B. )

    1994-01-01

    Key components of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion systems--the flash evaporator, mist eliminator, passive predeaerator, two surface condenser stages, and two direct-contact condenser stages--have been tested using seawater. These components operate at lower steam pressures and higher inlet noncondensable gas concentrations than do conventional power plant heat exchangers. The rate of heat exchanged between the evaporator and the condenser is on the order of 1.25MW-thermal, requiring a warm seawater flow of about 0.1 m[sup 3]/s; the cold seawater flow is on the order of half the warm water flow. In addition to characterizing the performance of the various components, the system has produced potable water from condensation of the steam produced in the evaporator. The information obtained in these tests is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which net power production is expected to be demonstrate for the first time using OC-OTEC technology.

  4. Application of differential similarity to finding nondimensional groups important in tests of cooled engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sucec, J.

    1977-01-01

    The method of differential similarity is applied to the partial differential equations and boundary conditions which govern the temperature, velocity, and pressure fields in the flowing gases and the solid stationary components in air-cooled engines. This procedure yields the nondimensional groups which must have the same value in both the test rig and the engine to produce similarity between the test results and the engine performance. These results guide the experimentalist in the design and selection of test equipment that properly scales quantities to actual engine conditions. They also provide a firm fundamental foundation for substantiation of previous similarity analyses which employed heuristic, physical reasoning arguments to arrive at the nondimensional groups.

  5. Phosphorylated SAP155, the spliceosomal component, is localized to chromatin in postnatal mouse testes

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Ko; Sonoda, Yoshiyuki; Jin, Yuji; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2010-03-19

    SAP155 is an essential component of the spliceosome and its phosphorylation is required for splicing catalysis, but little is known concerning its expression and regulation during spermatogenesis in postnatal mouse testes. We report that SAP155 is ubiquitously expressed in nuclei of germ and Sertoli cells within the seminiferous tubules of 6- and 35-day postpartum (dpp) testes. Analyses by fractionation of testes revealed that (1) phosphorylated SAP155 was found in the fraction containing nuclear structures at 6 dpp in amounts much larger than that at other ages; (2) non-phosphorylated SAP155 was detected in the fraction containing nucleoplasm; and (3) phosphorylated SAP155 was preferentially associated with chromatin. Our findings suggest that the active spliceosome, containing phosphorylated SAP155, performs pre-mRNA splicing on chromatin concomitant with transcription during testicular development.

  6. Department of Defense picture archiving and communication system acceptance testing: results and identification of problem components.

    PubMed

    Allison, Scott A; Sweet, Clifford F; Beall, Douglas P; Lewis, Thomas E; Monroe, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    The PACS implementation process is complicated requiring a tremendous amount of time, resources, and planning. The Department of Defense (DOD) has significant experience in developing and refining PACS acceptance testing (AT) protocols that assure contract compliance, clinical safety, and functionality. The DOD's AT experience under the initial Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support System contract led to the current Digital Imaging Network-Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (DIN-PACS) contract AT protocol. To identify the most common system and component deficiencies under the current DIN-PACS AT protocol, 14 tri-service sites were evaluated during 1998-2000. Sixteen system deficiency citations with 154 separate types of limitations were noted with problems involving the workstation, interfaces, and the Radiology Information System comprising more than 50% of the citations. Larger PACS deployments were associated with a higher number of deficiencies. The most commonly cited systems deficiencies were among the most expensive components of the PACS.

  7. Integrated flow and structural modeling for rocket engine component test facility propellant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dequay, L.; Lusk, A.; Nunez, S.

    1991-01-01

    A set of PC-based computational Dynamic Fluid Flow Simulation models is presented for modeling facility gas and cryogenic systems. Data obtained provide important information regarding performance envelope parameters for the facility using different engine components; time-dependent valve setting for controlling steady-state, quasi-steady state, and transient profiles; optimum facility pipe and pipe component sizes and parameters; momentum transfer loads; and fluid conditions at critical points. A set of COSMIC NASTRAN-based finite element models is also presented to evaluate the loads and stresses on test facility piping systems from fluid and gaseous effects, thermal chill down, and occasional wind loads. The models are based on Apple Macintosh software which makes it possible to change numerous parameters.

  8. A tension-torsional fatigue testing apparatus for micro-scale components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sichao; Wang, Lei; Chen, Gang; Yu, Dunji; Chen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical characterization of micro-scale components under complex loading conditions is a great challenge. To meet such a challenge, a microtension-torsional fatigue testing apparatus is developed in this study that specializes in the evaluation of multiaxial fatigue behavior of thin stent wires. The actuation and measurement in two controlled directions are incorporated in the tensile and torsional load frames, respectively, and a thrust air bearing is applied for the coupling of the two frames. The axial deformation of specimens measured by a grating sensor built in the linear motor and by a non-contact displacement detect system is compared and corrected. The accuracy of the torque measurement is proved by torsion tests on thin wires of 316L stainless steel in nominal diameters of 100 μm. Multistep torsion test, multiaxial ratcheting test, and a fully strain controlled multiaxial cyclic test are performed on 100 μm and 200 μm-diameter 316L wires using this apparatus. The capability of the equipment in tension-torsional cyclic tests for micro-scale specimens is demonstrated by the experimental results.

  9. Testing Multiple Psychological Processes for Common Neural Mechanisms Using EEG and Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R

    2016-03-08

    Temporal independent component analysis (ICA) is applied to an electrophysiological signal mixture (such as an EEG recording) to disentangle the independent neural source signals-independent components-underlying said signal mixture. When applied to scalp EEG, ICA is most commonly used either as a pre-processing step (e.g., to isolate physiological processes from non-physiological artifacts), or as a data-reduction step (i.e., to focus on one specific neural process with increased signal-to-noise ratio). However, ICA can be used in an even more powerful way that fundamentally expands the inferential utility of scalp EEG. The core assumption of EEG-ICA-namely, that individual independent components represent separable neural processes-can be leveraged to derive the following inferential logic: If a specific independent component shows activity related to multiple psychological processes within the same dataset (e.g., elicited by different experimental events), it follows that those psychological processes involve a common, non-separable neural mechanism. As such, this logic allows testing a class of hypotheses that is beyond the reach of regular EEG analyses techniques, thereby crucially increasing the inferential utility of the EEG. In the current article, this logic will be referred to as the 'common independent process identification' (CIPI) approach. This article aims to provide a tutorial into the application of this powerful approach, targeted at researchers that have a basic understanding of standard EEG analysis. Furthermore, the article aims to exemplify the usage of CIPI by outlining recent studies that successfully applied this approach to test neural theories of mental functions.

  10. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, J.A.; Wicks, G.G.; Molecke, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of `pineapple slices`, polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90{degrees}C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants.

  11. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, J.A. ); Wicks, G.G. ); Molecke, M.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of pineapple slices', polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90{degrees}C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants.

  12. Detecting determinism in EEG signals using principal component analysis and surrogate data testing.

    PubMed

    Meghdadi, Amir H; Fazel-Rezai, Reza; Aghakhani, Yahya

    2006-01-01

    A novel method is proposed here to determine whether a time series is deterministic even in the presence of noise. The method is the extension of an existing method based on smoothness analysis of the signal in state space with surrogate data testing. While classical measures fail to detect determinism when the time series is corrupted by noise, the proposed method can clearly distinguish between pure stochastic and originally deterministic but noisy time series. A set of measures is defined here named partial smoothness indexes corresponding to principal components of the time series in state space. It is shown that when the time series is not pure stochastic, at least one of the indexes reflects determinism. The method is first successfully tested through simulation on a chaotic Lorenz time series contaminated with noise and then applied on EEG signals. Testing results on both our experimental recorded EEG signals and a benchmark EEG database verifies this hypothesis that EEG signals are deterministic in nature while contain some stochastic components as well.

  13. Testing Requirements for Performance and Reliability of Marine Hydrokinetic Components and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, R. A.; Metzinger, C.; Schluntz, J.

    2010-12-01

    The development of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) energy is an emerging industry and a recent surge of interest has produced over 100 new device concepts and designs for extracting energy from waves, tides, ocean and river currents, and ocean thermal gradients. Improved testing, analysis, and design tools are needed to more accurately model operational conditions, to optimize design parameters, and predict technology viability. With more interest and investment occurring in the MHK industry, it is imperative to apply up to date research and development principals to reliably accelerate the deployment and integration of this renewable resource. When developing any technology or understanding of a system, one must go through an iterative analysis and test process. This generally begins from a small proof of concept test based on an innovative idea to progressively larger scale component and system tests. The progression of testing and analysis eventually has a goal of reaching a full scale validation once process understanding and designs are refined enough for confidence in predicting the performance of the full scale application. There are several documented process descriptions for this approach such as Verification and Validation (V&V), Stage Gate progression, and Technology Readiness Level (TRL) progression. Any one of these is directly applicable to the development of MHK technologies. However, in order to follow the outline of these procedures, a developer must have both the analysis and test capabilities to ultimately reach a full understanding of a deployed system. A review of the development and testing history for MHK devices along with current testing requirements and capabilities regarding MHK development will be presented with items such as scaling, performance and reliability addressed.

  14. Component Testing of the J-2X Augmented Spark Igniter (ASI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Robin J.; Peters, Warren T.; Gaspar, Kenny C.; Hauger, Katherine; Kwapisz, Mike J.

    2013-01-01

    In support of the development of the J-2X engine, 201 low pressure, liquid oxygen / liquid hydrogen (LOX/LH2) J-2X Augmented Spark Igniter (ASI) subsystem ignition tests were conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The main objective of these tests was to start the ASI within the anticipated J-2X engine start box, as well as outside of it, to check for ignition margin. The setup for the J-2X ASI component testing simulated, as much as possible, the tank-head start-up configuration of the ASI within the J-2X Engine. The ignition tests were divided into 124 vacuum start tests to simulate altitude start on a flight engine, and 77 sea-level start tests to simulate the first set of ground tests for the J-2X Engine at Stennis Space Center (SSC). Other ignition parameters that were varied included propellant tank pressures, oxidizer temperature entering the ASI oxidizer feedline, oxidizer valve timing, spark igniter condition (new versus damaged), and oxidizer and fuel feedline orifice sizes. Propellant blowdowns using venturis sized to simulate the ASI resistance allowed calculation of transient propellant mass flow rates as well as global mixture ratio for all ignition tests. Global mixture ratio within the ASI at the time of ignition varied from 0.2 to 1.2. Detailed electronics data obtained from an instrumented ignition lead allowed characterization of the breakdown voltage, sustaining voltage and energy contained in each spark as the ASI propellants ignited. Results indicated that ignition always occurred within the first five sparks when both propellants were present in the ASI chamber.

  15. High Pressure Burner Rig Testing of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for Si3N4 Turbine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Pastel, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings are being developed for Si3N4 components for turbine engine propulsion applications. High pressure burner rig testing was used to evaluate the coating system performance and durability. Test results demonstrated the feasibility and durability of the coating component systems under the simulated engine environments.

  16. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60 Food... § 212.60 What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and..., in-process materials, and finished PET drug products must have and follow written procedures for...

  17. Implementation of Leak Test Methods for the International Space Station (ISS) Elements, Systems and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve; Lvovsky, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS has Qualification and Acceptance Environmental Test Requirements document, SSP 41172 that includes many environmental tests such as Thermal vacuum & Cycling, Depress/Repress, Sinusoidal, Random, and Acoustic Vibration, Pyro Shock, Acceleration, Humidity, Pressure, Electromatic Interference (EMI)/Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMCO), etc. This document also includes (13) leak test methods for Pressure Integrity Verification of the ISS Elements, Systems, and Components. These leak test methods are well known, however, the test procedure for specific leak test method shall be written and implemented paying attention to the important procedural steps/details that, if omitted or deviated, could impact the quality of the final product and affect the crew safety. Such procedural steps/details for different methods include, but not limited to: - Sequence of testing, f or example, pressurization and submersion steps for Method I (Immersion); - Stabilization of the mass spectrometer leak detector outputs fo r Method II (vacuum Chamber or Bell jar); - Proper data processing an d taking a conservative approach while making predictions for on-orbit leakage rate for Method III(Pressure Change); - Proper Calibration o f the mass spectrometer leak detector for all the tracer gas (mostly Helium) Methods such as Method V (Detector Probe), Method VI (Hood), Method VII (Tracer Probe), Method VIII(Accumulation); - Usage of visibl ility aides for Method I (Immersion), Method IV (Chemical Indicator), Method XII (Foam/Liquid Application), and Method XIII (Hydrostatic/Visual Inspection); While some methods could be used for the total leaka ge (either internal-to-external or external-to-internal) rate requirement verification (Vacuum Chamber, Pressure Decay, Hood, Accumulation), other methods shall be used only as a pass/fail test for individual joints (e.g., welds, fittings, and plugs) or for troubleshooting purposes (Chemical Indicator, Detector Probe

  18. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  19. A unique high heat flux facility for testing hypersonic engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Gladden, Herbert J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the Hot Gas Facility, a unique, reliable, and cost-effective high-heat-flux facility for testing hypersonic engine components developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Hot Gas Facility is capable of providing heat fluxes ranging from 200 Btu/sq ft per sec on flat surfaces up to 8000 Btu/sq ft per sec at a leading edge stagnation point. The usefulness of the Hot Gas Facility for the NASP community was demonstrated by testing hydrogen-cooled structures over a range of temperatures and pressures. Ranges of the Reynolds numbers, Prandtl numbers, enthalpy, and heat fluxes similar to those expected during hypersonic flights were achieved.

  20. Shock Desensitization Effect in the STANAG 4363 Confined Explosive Component Water Gap Test

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A S; Lee, R S; Tarver, C M

    2006-06-07

    The Explosive Component Water Gap Test (ECWGT) in the Stanag 4363 has been recently investigated to assess the shock sensitivity of lead and booster components having a diameter less than 5 mm. For that purpose, Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) based pellets having a height and diameter of 3 mm have been confined by a steel annulus of wall thickness 1-3.5 mm and with the same height as the pellet. 1-mm wall thickness makes the component more sensitive (larger gap). As the wall thickness is increased to 2-mm, the gap increases a lesser amount, but when the wall thickness is increased to 3.5-mm a decrease in sensitivity is observed (smaller gap). This decrease of the water gap has been reproduced experimentally by many nations. Numerical simulations using Ignition and Growth model have been performed in this paper and have reproduced the experimental results for the steel confinement up to 2 mm thick and aluminum confinement. A stronger re-shock following the first input shock from the water is focusing on the axis due to the confinement. The double shock configuration is well-known to lead in some cases to shock desensitization.

  1. Three-dimensional NDE of VHTR core components via simulation-based testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Guzina, Bojan; Kunerth, Dennis

    2014-09-30

    A next generation, simulation-driven-and-enabled testing platform is developed for the 3D detection and characterization of defects and damage in nuclear graphite and composite structures in Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs). The proposed work addresses the critical need for the development of high-fidelity Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) technologies for as-manufactured and replaceable in-service VHTR components. Centered around the novel use of elastic (sonic and ultrasonic) waves, this project deploys a robust, non-iterative inverse solution for the 3D defect reconstruction together with a non-contact, laser-based approach to the measurement of experimental waveforms in VHTR core components. In particular, this research (1) deploys three-dimensional Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometry (3D SLDV) as a means to accurately and remotely measure 3D displacement waveforms over the accessible surface of a VHTR core component excited by mechanical vibratory source; (2) implements a powerful new inverse technique, based on the concept of Topological Sensitivity (TS), for non-iterative elastic waveform tomography of internal defects - that permits robust 3D detection, reconstruction and characterization of discrete damage (e.g. holes and fractures) in nuclear graphite from limited-aperture NDE measurements; (3) implements state-of-the art computational (finite element) model that caters for accurately simulating elastic wave propagation in 3D blocks of nuclear graphite; (4) integrates the SLDV testing methodology with the TS imaging algorithm into a non-contact, high-fidelity NDE platform for the 3D reconstruction and characterization of defects and damage in VHTR core components; and (5) applies the proposed methodology to VHTR core component samples (both two- and three-dimensional) with a priori induced, discrete damage in the form of holes and fractures. Overall, the newly established SLDV-TS testing platform represents a next-generation NDE tool that surpasses

  2. Plant tests for determining the suitability of grape marc composts as components of plant growth media.

    PubMed

    Paradelo, Remigio; Moldes, Ana Belén; González, Desiree; Barral, María Teresa

    2012-10-01

    Five grape marc composts prepared by different procedures (composting and vermicompost at several scales) were tested as potential components of plant growth media. The five composts had high organic matter content (>90%), low electric conductivity (<1 dS m(-1)) and a pH between 7 and 8. Different chemical and biochemical analyses performed indicated the higher stability of those composts submitted to a longer composting process or to a vermicomposting process (lower water soluble organic matter, respiration and dehydrogenase activity). In order to determine the suitability of the composts as substrate components, plant growth tests were performed by blending the composts with peat or commercial substrate at two compost rates (25% and 50%). The mixtures were sown with barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and grown under controlled conditions in an incubation chamber. No prejudicial effects derived from the use of composted grape marc were observed, whatever the procedure of composting used. The results showed that four out of the five composts would be suitable for use in plant growth substrates elaboration, as they did not reduce productivity with respect to the control substrates.

  3. Performance Testing of Lidar Components Subjected to Space Exposure in Space via MISSE 7 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    .The objective of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) is to study the performance of novel materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the harsh space environment for several months. MISSE missions provide an opportunity for developing space qualifiable materials. Several laser and lidar components were sent by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) as a part of the MISSE 7 mission. The MISSE 7 module was transported to the international space station (ISS) via STS 129 mission that was launched on Nov 16, 2009. Later, the MISSE 7 module was brought back to the earth via the STS 134 that landed on June 1, 2011. The MISSE 7 module that was subjected to exposure in space environment for more than one and a half year included fiber laser, solid-state laser gain materials, detectors, and semiconductor laser diode. Performance testing of these components is now progressing. In this paper, the current progress on post-flight performance testing of a high-speed photodetector and a balanced receiver is discussed. Preliminary findings show that detector characteristics did not undergo any significant degradation.

  4. Performance testing of lidar components subjected to exposure in space via MISSE 7 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) is to study the performance of novel materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the harsh space environment for several months. MISSE missions provide an opportunity for developing space qualifiable materials. Several laser and lidar components were sent by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) as a part of the MISSE 7 mission. The MISSE 7 module was transported to the international space station (ISS) via STS 129 mission that was launched on Nov 16, 2009. Later, the MISSE 7 module was brought back to the earth via the STS 134 that landed on June 1, 2011. The MISSE 7 module that was subjected to exposure in space environment for more than one and a half year included fiber laser, solid-state laser gain materials, detectors, and semiconductor laser diode. Performance testing of these components is now progressing. In this paper, the current progress on post-flight performance testing of a high-speed photodetector and a balanced receiver is discussed. Preliminary findings show that detector characteristics did not undergo any significant degradation.

  5. Component Selection, Accelerated Testing, and Improved Modeling of AMTEC Systems for Space Power (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Suitor, J.; O'Connor, D.

    1993-01-01

    Alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) designs for space power are numerous, but selection of materials for construction of long-lived AMTEC devices has been limited to electrodes, current collectors, and the solid electrolyte. AMTEC devices with lifetimes greater than 5 years require careful selection and life testing of all hot-side components. The likely selection of a remote condensed design for initial flight test and probable use with a GPHS in AMTEC powered outer planet probes requires the device to be constructed to tolerate T greater than 1150K, as well as exposure to Na(sub (g)), and Na(sub (liq)) on the high pressure side. The temperatures involved make critical high strength and chemical resistance to Na containing Na(sub 2)O. Selection among materials which can be worked should not be driven by ease of fabricability, as high temperature stability is the critical issue. These concepts drive the selection of Mo alloys for Na(sub (liq)) containment in AMTEC cells for T to 1150K operation, as they are significantly stronger than comparable NB or Ta alloys, are less soluble in Na(sub (liq)) containing dissolved Na(sub 2)O, are workable compared to W alloys (which might be used for certain components), and are ductile at the T greater than 500K of proposed AMTEC modules in space applications.

  6. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Synthetic Instrument Capabilities Assessment and Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of synthetic instruments (SIs) for Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) is to provide an external lower-level diagnostic and functional test capability beyond the built-in-test capabilities of spacecraft electronics. Built-in diagnostics can report faults and symptoms, but isolating the root cause and performing corrective action requires specialized instruments. Often a fault can be revealed by emulating the operation of external hardware. This implies complex hardware that is too massive to be accommodated in spacecraft. The SI strategy is aimed at minimizing complexity and mass by employing highly reconfigurable instruments that perform diagnostics and emulate external functions. In effect, SI can synthesize an instrument on demand. The SI architecture section of this document summarizes the result of a recent program diagnostic and test needs assessment based on the International Space Station. The SI architecture addresses operational issues such as minimizing crew time and crew skill level, and the SI data transactions between the crew and supporting ground engineering searching for the root cause and formulating corrective actions. SI technology is described within a teleoperations framework. The remaining sections describe a lab demonstration intended to show that a single SI circuit could synthesize an instrument in hardware and subsequently clear the hardware and synthesize a completely different instrument on demand. An analysis of the capabilities and limitations of commercially available SI hardware and programming tools is included. Future work in SI technology is also described.

  7. Adaptive elastic-net sparse principal component analysis for pathway association testing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi

    2011-10-24

    Pathway or gene set analysis has become an increasingly popular approach for analyzing high-throughput biological experiments such as microarray gene expression studies. The purpose of pathway analysis is to identify differentially expressed pathways associated with outcomes. Important challenges in pathway analysis are selecting a subset of genes contributing most to association with clinical phenotypes and conducting statistical tests of association for the pathways efficiently. We propose a two-stage analysis strategy: (1) extract latent variables representing activities within each pathway using a dimension reduction approach based on adaptive elastic-net sparse principal component analysis; (2) integrate the latent variables with the regression modeling framework to analyze studies with different types of outcomes such as binary, continuous or survival outcomes. Our proposed approach is computationally efficient. For each pathway, because the latent variables are estimated in an unsupervised fashion without using disease outcome information, in the sample label permutation testing procedure, the latent variables only need to be calculated once rather than for each permutation resample. Using both simulated and real datasets, we show our approach performed favorably when compared with five other currently available pathway testing methods.

  8. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  9. Adaptive Elastic-Net Sparse Principal Component Analysis for Pathway Association Testing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Pathway or gene set analysis has become an increasingly popular approach for analyzing high-throughput biological experiments such as microarray gene expression studies. The purpose of pathway analysis is to identify differentially expressed pathways associated with outcomes. Important challenges in pathway analysis are selecting a subset of genes contributing most to association with clinical phenotypes and conducting statistical tests of association for the pathways efficiently. We propose a two-stage analysis strategy: (1) extract latent variables representing activities within each pathway using a dimension reduction approach based on adaptive elastic-net sparse principal component analysis; (2) integrate the latent variables with the regression modeling framework to analyze studies with different types of outcomes such as binary, continuous or survival outcomes. Our proposed approach is computationally efficient. For each pathway, because the latent variables are estimated in an unsupervised fashion without using disease outcome information, in the sample label permutation testing procedure, the latent variables only need to be calculated once rather than for each permutation resample. Using both simulated and real datasets, we show our approach performed favorably when compared with five other currently available pathway testing methods. PMID:23089825

  10. Development and testing of an integrated smart tool holder for four-component cutting force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhengyou; Lu, Yong; Li, Jianguang

    2017-09-01

    Cutting force measurement is a significant requirement for monitoring and controlling the machining processes. Hence, various methods of measuring the cutting force have been proposed by many researchers. In this study, an innovative integrated smart tool holder system based on capacitive sensors is designed, constructed and tested, which is capable of measuring triaxial cutting force and a torque simultaneously in a wireless environment system. A standard commercial tool holder is modified to make itself be the force sensing element that has advantages of simple structure and easy machining. Deformable beams are created in the tool holder, and the tiny deformations of which used to calculate the four-component cutting force are detected by six high precision capacitive sensors. All the sensors and other electronics, like data acquisition and transmitting unit, and wireless power unit, are incorporated into the tool holder as a whole system. The device is intended to be used in a rotating spindle such as in milling and drilling processes. Eventually, the static and dynamic characteristics of the smart tool holder have been determined by a series of tests. Cutting tests have also been carried out and the results show it is stable and practical to measure the cutting force in milling and drilling processes.

  11. A unique high heat flux facility for testing hypersonic engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Gladden, Herbert J.

    1990-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flights. Consequently, there is a need for experimental facilities capable of providing a high heat flux environment for testing compound concepts and verifying analyses. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine was developed to provide a high enthalpy/high heat flux environment for component evaluation. This Hot Gas Facility is capable of providing heat fluxes ranging from 200 (on flat surfaces) up to 8000 Btu per sq ft per sec (at a leading edge stagnation point). Gas temperatures up to 5500 R can be attained as well as Reynolds numbers up to 360,000 per ft. Test articles such as cowl leading edges, transpiration-cooled seals, fuel injectors, and cooled panel concepts can be evaluated with gaseous hydrogen as coolant. This facility and its configuration and test capabilities are discussed. Results from flow characterization experiments are also shown and their implications considered.

  12. Flexural Properties of PLA Components Under Various Test Condition Manufactured by 3D Printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya Christiyan, K. G.; Chandrasekhar, U.; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-10-01

    Rapid Prototyping (RP) technologies have emerged as a fabrication method to obtain engineering components in the resent past. Desktop 3D printing, also referred as an additive layer manufacturing technology is a powerful method of RP technique that can fabricate 3 dimensional engineering components. In this method, 3D digital data is converted into real product. In the present investigation, Polylactic Acid (PLA) was considered as a starting material. Flexural strength of PLA material was evaluated using 3-point bend test, as per ASTM D790 standard. Specimens with flat (0°) and vertical (90°) orientation were considered. Moreover, layer thicknesses of 0.2, 0.25, and 0.3 mm were considered. To fabricate these specimens, printing speed of 38 and 52 mm/s was maintained. Nozzle diameter of 0.4 mm with 40 % of infill density were used. Based on the experimental results, it was observed that 0° orientation, 38 mm/s printing speed, and 0.2 mm layer thickness resulted maximum flexural strength, as compared to all other specimens. The improved flexural strength was due to the lower layer thickness (0.2 mm) specimens, as compared with other specimens made of 0.25 and 0.30 mm layer thicknesses. It was concluded that flexural strength properties were greatly influenced by lower the layer thickness, printing speed, and orientation.

  13. Final report on the in situ testing of electrical components and devices at TMI-2

    SciTech Connect

    Soberano, F T

    1984-06-01

    A total of 88 electrical components and devices were in situ tested. Of these, 11 totally failed and 21 suffered degradation that varied from mild to severe. The equipment that failed or incurred severe degradation was located in areas of known environmental extremes. Several motor operated valves in the Reactor Building basement failed because of submersion in water. Others severely degraded from contamination tracking, resulting in the alteration of their circuit electrical characteristics - a circumstance that could compromise their designed function. One backup oil lift pump motor for a reactor coolant pump motor, although located well above the Reactor Building basement high water mark, failed because of a break in its armature and field circuits; this failure was surmised to be a result of corrosion. The limit switch of a Class 1E solenoid valve likewise failed due to moisture intrusion. Components that noticeably degraded exhibited anomalies, likely due to the incursion of moisture, that varied from high capacitance to increased circuit resistance. The effect of the other degenerating conditions that existed during the accident, such as high temperature, high radiation levels, and the hydrogen burn, could not be evaluated individually or synergistically.

  14. Photogrammetric Deflection Measurements for the Tiltrotor Test Rig (TTR) Multi-Component Rotor Balance Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solis, Eduardo; Meyn, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Calibrating the internal, multi-component balance mounted in the Tiltrotor Test Rig (TTR) required photogrammetric measurements to determine the location and orientation of forces applied to the balance. The TTR, with the balance and calibration hardware attached, was mounted in a custom calibration stand. Calibration loads were applied using eleven hydraulic actuators, operating in tension only, that were attached to the forward frame of the calibration stand and the TTR calibration hardware via linkages with in-line load cells. Before the linkages were installed, photogrammetry was used to determine the location of the linkage attachment points on the forward frame and on the TTR calibration hardware. Photogrammetric measurements were used to determine the displacement of the linkage attachment points on the TTR due to deflection of the hardware under applied loads. These measurements represent the first photogrammetric deflection measurements to be made to support 6-component rotor balance calibration. This paper describes the design of the TTR and the calibration hardware, and presents the development, set-up and use of the photogrammetry system, along with some selected measurement results.

  15. Design, process development, manufacture, test and evaluation of boron-aluminum for space shuttle components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, R. A.; Niemann, J. T.; Otto, O. R.; Brown, N. M.; Heinrich, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A multi phase boron-aluminum design and evaluation program for space shuttle components was conducted, culminating in the fabrication of a 1.22 m (48 inch) x 1.83 m (72 inch) boron-aluminum compression panel capable of distributing a point load of 1555 kN (350,000 lbs) into a uniform running load at a temperature of 589 K (600 F). This panel was of the skin-stringer construction with two intermediate frame supports; seven unidirectional stringers varied in thickness from 5 plies to 52 plies and the skin was contoured to thicknesses ranging from 10 plies to 62 plies. Both the stringers and the skin incorporated Ti-6Al-4V titanium interleaves to increase bearing and in-plane shear strength. The discrete program phases were materials evaluation, design studies, process technology development, fabrication and assembly, and test and evaluation.

  16. A novel test of the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis reveals independent components of fertility.

    PubMed Central

    Pizzari, Tommaso; Jensen, Per; Cornwallis, Charles K.

    2004-01-01

    The phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis predicts that male sexual ornaments signal fertilizing efficiency and that the coevolution of male ornaments and female preference for such ornaments is driven by female pursuit of fertility benefits. In addition, directional testicular asymmetry frequently observed in birds has been suggested to reflect fertilizing efficiency and to covary with ornament expression. However, the idea of a phenotypic relationship between male ornaments and fertilizing efficiency is often tested in populations where environmental effects mask the underlying genetic associations between ornaments and fertilizing efficiency implied by this idea. Here, we adopt a novel design, which increases genetic diversity through the crossing of two divergent populations while controlling for environmental effects, to test: (i) the phenotypic relationship between male ornaments and both, gonadal (testicular mass) and gametic (sperm quality) components of fertilizing efficiency; and (ii) the extent to which these components are phenotypically integrated in the fowl, Gallus gallus. We show that consistent with theory, the testosterone-dependent expression of a male ornament, the comb, predicted testicular mass. However, despite their functional inter-dependence, testicular mass and sperm quality were not phenotypically integrated. Consistent with this result, males of one parental population invested more in testicular and comb mass, whereas males of the other parental population had higher sperm quality. We found no evidence that directional testicular asymmetry covaried with ornament expression. These results shed new light on the evolutionary relationship between male fertilizing efficiency and ornaments. Although testosterone-dependent ornaments may covary with testicular mass and thus reflect sperm production rate, the lack of phenotypic integration between gonadal and gametic traits reveals that the expression of an ornament is unlikely to reflect the

  17. Wear Scar Similarities between Retrieved and Simulator-Tested Polyethylene TKR Components: An Artificial Neural Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how representative wear scars of simulator-tested polyethylene (PE) inserts compare with retrieved PE inserts from total knee replacement (TKR). By means of a nonparametric self-organizing feature map (SOFM), wear scar images of 21 postmortem- and 54 revision-retrieved components were compared with six simulator-tested components that were tested either in displacement or in load control according to ISO protocols. The SOFM network was then trained with the wear scar images of postmortem-retrieved components since those are considered well-functioning at the time of retrieval. Based on this training process, eleven clusters were established, suggesting considerable variability among wear scars despite an uncomplicated loading history inside their hosts. The remaining components (revision-retrieved and simulator-tested) were then assigned to these established clusters. Six out of five simulator components were clustered together, suggesting that the network was able to identify similarities in loading history. However, the simulator-tested components ended up in a cluster at the fringe of the map containing only 10.8% of retrieved components. This may suggest that current ISO testing protocols were not fully representative of this TKR population, and protocols that better resemble patients' gait after TKR containing activities other than walking may be warranted. PMID:27597955

  18. Wear Scar Similarities between Retrieved and Simulator-Tested Polyethylene TKR Components: An Artificial Neural Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Orozco Villaseñor, Diego A; Wimmer, Markus A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how representative wear scars of simulator-tested polyethylene (PE) inserts compare with retrieved PE inserts from total knee replacement (TKR). By means of a nonparametric self-organizing feature map (SOFM), wear scar images of 21 postmortem- and 54 revision-retrieved components were compared with six simulator-tested components that were tested either in displacement or in load control according to ISO protocols. The SOFM network was then trained with the wear scar images of postmortem-retrieved components since those are considered well-functioning at the time of retrieval. Based on this training process, eleven clusters were established, suggesting considerable variability among wear scars despite an uncomplicated loading history inside their hosts. The remaining components (revision-retrieved and simulator-tested) were then assigned to these established clusters. Six out of five simulator components were clustered together, suggesting that the network was able to identify similarities in loading history. However, the simulator-tested components ended up in a cluster at the fringe of the map containing only 10.8% of retrieved components. This may suggest that current ISO testing protocols were not fully representative of this TKR population, and protocols that better resemble patients' gait after TKR containing activities other than walking may be warranted.

  19. Flight service evaluation of composite components on the Bell Helicopter model 206L: Design, fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinberg, H.

    1982-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing phases of a program to obtain long term flight service experience on representative helicopter airframe structural components operating in typical commercial environments are described. The aircraft chosen is the Bell Helicopter Model 206L. The structural components are the forward fairing, litter door, baggage door, and vertical fin. The advanced composite components were designed to replace the production parts in the field and were certified by the FAA to be operable through the full flight envelope of the 206L. A description of the fabrication process that was used for each of the components is given. Static failing load tests on all components were done. In addition fatigue tests were run on four specimens that simulated the attachment of the vertical fin to the helicopter's tail boom.

  20. Creep-fatigue interaction in aircraft gas turbine components by simulation and testing at scaled temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabour, Mohammad Hossein

    components in general, and specifically using thermal scaling for the first time for prototype and model with two different materials. (2) Developing 1-D creep ANSYS macro to study creep effects to get meaningful results for industrial applications of gas turbine blade. (3) Analyzing the curve veering and flattening phenomena in rotating blade at thermal environment, using Lagrange-Bhat method. (4) Simple constitutive models in creep-fatigue interaction are proposed that can predict the lifetime in complicated situations of creep-fatigue, using the pure creep and pure fatigue test data.

  1. AGR-3/4 Irradiation Test Train Disassembly and Component Metrology First Look Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stempien, John Dennis; Rice, Francine Joyce; Harp, Jason Michael; Winston, Philip Lon

    2016-03-01

    The AGR-3/4 experiment was designed to study fission product transport within graphitic matrix material and nuclear-grade graphite. To this end, this experiment consisted of 12 capsules, each fueled with 4 compacts containing UCO TRISO particles as driver fuel and 20 UCO designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles in each compact. The DTF fuel was fabricated with a thin pyrocarbon layer which was intended to fail during irradiation and provide a source of fission products. These fission products could then migrate through the compact and into the surrounding concentric rings of graphitic matrix material and/or nuclear graphite. Through post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the rings (including physical sampling and gamma scanning) fission product concentration profiles within the rings can be determined. These data can be used to elucidate fission product transport parameters (e.g. diffusion coefficients within the test materials) which will be used to inform and refine models of fission product transport. After irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) had been completed in April 2014, the AGR-3/4 experiment was shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for inspection, disassembly, and metrology. The AGR-3/4 test train was received at MFC in two separate shipments between February and April 2015. Visual examinations of the test train exterior did not indicate dimensional distortion, and only two small discolored areas were observed at the bottom of Capsules 8 and 9. No corresponding discoloration was found on the inside of these capsules, however. Prior to disassembly, the two test train sections were subject to analysis via the Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS), which did not indicate that any gross fuel relocation had occurred. A series of specialized tools (including clamps, cutters, and drills) had been designed and fabricated in order to carry out test train disassembly and recovery of capsule components (graphite

  2. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  3. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  4. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  5. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  6. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  7. AN INVESTIGATION OF NON-INDEPENDENCE OF COMPONENTS OF SCORES ON MULTIPLE-CHOICE TESTS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZIMMERMAN, DONALD W.; BURKHEIMER, GRAHAM J., JR.

    INVESTIGATION IS CONTINUED INTO VARIOUS EFFECTS OF NON-INDEPENDENT ERROR INTRODUCED INTO MULTIPLE-CHOICE TEST SCORES AS A RESULT OF CHANCE GUESSING SUCCESS. A MODEL IS DEVELOPED IN WHICH THE CONCEPT OF THEORETICAL COMPONENTS OF SCORES IS NOT INTRODUCED AND IN WHICH, THEREFORE, NO ASSUMPTIONS REGARDING ANY RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SUCH COMPONENTS NEED…

  8. A Two-Dimensional One Component Plasma and a Test Charge: Polarization Effects and Effective Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez, Gabriel; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    We study the effective interactions between a test charge Q and a one-component plasma, i.e. a complex made up of mobile point particles with charge q, and a uniform oppositely charged background. The background has the form of a flat disk, in which the mobile charges can move. The test particle is approached perpendicularly to the disk, along its axis of symmetry. All particles interact by a logarithmic potential. The long and short distance features of the effective potential—the free energy of the system for a given distance between Q and the disk—are worked out analytically in detail. They crucially depend on the sign of Q/q, and on the global charge borne by the discotic complex, that can vanish. While most results are obtained at the intermediate coupling Γ≡βq 2=2 (β being the inverse temperature), we have also investigated situations with stronger couplings: Γ=4 and 6. We have found that at large distances, the sign of the effective force reflects subtle details of the charge distribution on the disk, whereas at short distances, polarization effects invariably lead to effective attractions.

  9. Testing of the ITER-ECE prototype receiver and related components on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, M. E.; Brookman, M. W.; Phillips, P. E.; Rowan, W. L.; Danani, S.

    2015-11-01

    Real-world testing of advanced plasma diagnostic instruments and techniques intended for use on ITER is crucial to ensure their success. A prototype millimeter-wave receiver developed by Virginia Diodes, Inc. was brought to DIII-D to check its performance by measuring third harmonic ECE in high temperature plasmas. The receiver is state-of-the art, employing a waveguide based triplexer and a DRO-based local oscillator with an integrated tripler, subharmonic mixer and amplifier to detect emission in the 200-300 GHz range. Comparisons of ECE measurements with those from the DIII-D Michelson interferometer will evaluate linearity, sensitivity, and noise temperature. Also, transmission measurements of a double wedged quartz window, very similar to that proposed for the ITER vacuum interface, are given, showing no interference effects and good broadband performance. Additionally, results of the testing of a new high intensity LED light source for alignment of transmission line components are shown. Supported by US DOE DE-FG02-97ER54415, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  10. Can the Red-Green Duochrome Test Be Used Prior to Correcting the Refractive Cylinder Component?

    PubMed Central

    Gantz, Liat; Schrader, Shlomo; Ruben, Ruthie; Zivotofsky, Ari Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A primary task of the eye care professional is determining the refraction, or optical correction, of a patient. The duochrome red-green test is a standard tool for verification of the final refraction. Traditionally, it is recommended for use both prior to and subsequent to determining the cylindrical or astigmatic component of the refraction. In order for it to be effective when used before correcting the cylinder it is necessary that the COLC (Circle of Least Confusion) be on the retina. This study examined whether it is necessarily true that the duochrome response in uncorrected astigmatism will be as trust-worthy as it is with corrected cylinders. Methods The red-green examination was performed monocularly under the following three conditions: a. fully corrected refraction for the subgroup of eyes that had spherical refractions and for the subgroup of eyes with sphero-cylindrical refractions. b. best sphere-only correction without cylinder correction in sphero-cylindrical eyes c. an induced cylinder error in spherical eyes. The interval between the last “red” response and the first “green” response for the right eyes as a group and separately for the physiological cylinder and induced cylinder correction sub-groups was calculated and compared using a paired, two-tailed t-test. Results The intervals between “red” and “green” responses were not significantly different in the population as a whole and in the uncorrected physiological cylinder and induced cylinder subgroups examined. Conclusion Based on the finding that the interval of red-green equality with fully corrected cylinder and without the cylindrical correction are not significantly different, the red-green duochrome test can indeed be used both before and after cylindrical correction. PMID:25775478

  11. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-02-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

  12. Synthesis and field tests of possible minor components of the sex pheromone of Prionus californicus.

    PubMed

    Maki, Elin C; Rodstein, Joshua; Millar, Jocelyn G; Barbour, Karen S; Hanks, Lawrence M; Barbour, James D

    2011-07-01

    Earlier work has shown that adult male Prionus californicus Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) are attracted to the female-produced compound (3R,5S)-3,5-dimethyldodecanoic acid, and to a synthetic mixture of the four stereoisomers of 3,5-dimethyldodecanoic acid. Here, we report the results of field trials that tested whether or not three structurally related compounds (methyl 3,5-dimethyldodecanoate, 3,5-dimethyltridecanoic acid, and 3,5-dimethylpentadecanoic acid), present in extracts of virgin females, are attractive, and whether or not they influence attraction to 3,5-dimethyldodecanoic acid. In a trial with single components, only traps baited with the acid or its methyl ester captured more beetles than did control traps; catches to the acid were five times higher than to the methyl ester. Another trial, excluding 3,5-dimethyldodecanoic acid, confirmed the activity of the methyl ester. Finally, addition of the three compounds to 3,5-dimethyldodecanoic acid, in the ratio found in extracts from female beetles, gave a catch similar to that of traps baited with 3,5-dimethyldodecanoic acid alone. Consequently, the function of these minor compounds remains undetermined.

  13. 21 CFR 211.84 - Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Representative samples of each shipment of each lot shall be collected for testing or examination. The number of... potential for microbiological contamination that is objectionable in view of its intended use shall be subjected to microbiological tests before use. (e) Any lot of components, drug product containers,...

  14. Tests of association for quantitative traits in nuclear families using principal components to correct for population stratification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Jian; Pei, Yu-Fang; Liu, Yongjun; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2009-11-01

    Traditional transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) based methods for genetic association analyses are robust to population stratification at the cost of a substantial loss of power. We here describe a novel method for family-based association studies that corrects for population stratification with the use of an extension of principal component analysis (PCA). Specifically, we adopt PCA on unrelated parents in each family. We then infer principal components for children from those for their parents through a TDT-like strategy. Two test statistics within the variance-components model are proposed for association tests. Simulation results show that the proposed tests have correct type I error rates regardless of population stratification, and have greatly improved power over two popular TDT-based methods: QTDT and FBAT. The application to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 (GAW16) data sets attests to the feasibility of the proposed method.

  15. Test Directions as a Critical Component of Test Design: Best Practices and the Impact of Examinee Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Joni M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of test directions is to familiarize examinees with a test so that they respond to items in the manner intended. However, changes in educational measurement as well as the U.S. student population present new challenges to test directions and increase the impact that differential familiarity could have on the validity of test score…

  16. Fault mechanism analysis and simulation for continuity resistance test of electrical components in aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xudong; Yin, Yaping; Wang, Jialin; Sun, Zhaorong

    2017-01-01

    A large number of electrical components are used in civil aircraft engines, whose electrical circuits are usually intricate and complicated. Continuity resistance is an important parameter for the operating state of electrical components. Electrical continuity fault has serious impact on the reliability of the aircraft engine. In this paper, mathematical models of electrical components are established, and simulation is made by Simulink to analyze the electrical continuity fault.

  17. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques free secretory component (normally a portion of the secretory IgA antibody molecule) in... repetitive lung infections and other hypogammaglobulinemic conditions (low antibody levels)....

  18. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques free secretory component (normally a portion of the secretory IgA antibody molecule) in... repetitive lung infections and other hypogammaglobulinemic conditions (low antibody levels)....

  19. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques free secretory component (normally a portion of the secretory IgA antibody molecule) in... repetitive lung infections and other hypogammaglobulinemic conditions (low antibody levels)....

  20. Exact Tests for the Main Effects’ Variance Components in an Unbalanced Random Two-Way Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    crossed classification with interaction model.The tests are based on four sums of squares which are distributed independently as scalar multiples of chi...component is different from zero. A comparison of the power of the exact tests with simulated powers of approximate ANOVA- based F tests shows that in...interval [0,I), as a measure of imbalance. Small values of this measure are associated with designs that are nearly balanced. For a more general

  1. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator: MSFC-Langley joint test of large space structures component assembly:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  2. Residual radioactivity guidelines for the heavy water components test reactor at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, M.B. Smith, R.; McNeil, J.

    1997-04-01

    Guidelines were developed for acceptable levels of residual radioactivity in the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility at the conclusion of its decommissioning. Using source terms developed from data generated in a detailed characterization study, the RESRAD and RASRAD-BUILD computer codes were used to calculate derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the radionuclides that will remain in the facility. The calculated DCGLs, when compared to existing concentrations of radionuclides measured during a 1996 characterization program, indicate that no decontamination of concrete surfaces will be necessary. Also, based on the results of the calculations, activated concrete in the reactor biological shield does not have to be removed, and imbedded radioactive piping in the facility can remain in place. Viewed in another way, the results of the calculations showed that the present inventory of residual radioactivity in the facility (not including that associated with the reactor vessel and steam generators) would produce less than one millirem per year above background to a hypothetical individual on the property. The residual radioactivity is estimated to be approximately 0.04 percent of the total inventory in the facility as of March, 1997. According to the results, the only radionuclides that would produce greater than 0.0.1-millirem per year are Am-241 (0.013 mrem/yr at 300 years), C-14 (0.022 mrem/yr at 1000 years) and U-238 (0.034 mrem/yr at 6000 years). Human exposure would occur only through the groundwater pathways, that is, from water drawn from, a well on the property. The maximum exposure would be approximately one percent of the 4 millirem per year ground water exposure limit established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 11 refs., 13 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Testing the Presence of Multiple Photometric Components in Nearby Early-type Galaxies using SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Semyeong; Greene, Jenny E.; Lackner, Claire N.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate two-dimensional image decomposition of nearby, morphologically selected early-type galaxies (ETGs). We are motivated by recent observational evidence of significant size growth of quiescent galaxies and theoretical development advocating a two-phase formation scenario for ETGs. We find that a significant fraction of nearby ETGs show changes in isophotal shape that require multi-component models. The characteristic sizes of the inner and outer component are ∼3 and ∼15 kpc. The inner component lies on the mass–size relation of ETGs at z ∼ 0.25–0.75, while the outer component tends to be more elliptical and hints at a stochastic buildup process. We find real physical differences between single- and double-component ETGs, with double-component galaxies being younger and more metal-rich. The fraction of double-component ETGs increases with increasing σ and decreases in denser environments. We hypothesize that double-component systems were able to accrete gas and small galaxies until later times, boosting their central densities, building up their outer parts, and lowering their typical central ages. In contrast, the oldest galaxies, perhaps due to residing in richer environments, have no remaining hints of their last accretion episode.

  4. An Investigation of Similarities in Parent-Child Test Scores for Evidence of Hereditary Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Richard E.

    This study on psychological traits examines three hypotheses: (1) there is a similarity between parents and their children unexplained by a similarity between the parents, (2) this similarity may be explained by hereditary components, and (3) these hereditary components are of the discrete or segregated type of inheritance. There were 104 families…

  5. A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

    2014-05-01

    A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

  6. Preliminary vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the SRB, ET, and SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Specifications for vibration, acoustic and shock design for components and subassemblies on the External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), and Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Included are vibration, acoustic, shock, transportation, handling, and acceptance test requirements and procedures. The space shuttle ET, SRB, and SSME have been divided into zones and subzones. Zones are designated primarily to assist in determining the applicable specifications. A subzone (General Specification) is available for use when the location of the component is known but component design and weight are not well defined. When the location, weight, and mounting configuration of the component are known, specifications for appropriate subzone weight ranges are available. Criteria for some specific components are also presented.

  7. Preliminary vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the Lightweight External Tank (LWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Space Shuttle LWT is divided into zones and subzones. Zones are designated primarily to assist in determining the applicable specifications. A subzone (general Specification) is available for use when the location of the component is known but component design and weight are not well defined. When the location, weight, and mounting configuration of the component are known, specifications for appropriate subzone weight ranges are available. Along with the specifications are vibration, acoustic, shock, transportation, handling, and acceptance test requirements and procedures. A method of selecting applicable vibration, acoustic, and shock specifications is presented.

  8. In-vacuum sensors for the beamline components of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sartori, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Veltri, P.

    2016-11-01

    Embedded sensors have been designed for installation on the components of the MITICA beamline, the prototype ITER neutral beam injector (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), to derive characteristics of the particle beam and to monitor the component conditions during operation for protection and thermal control. Along the beamline, the components interacting with the particle beam are the neutralizer, the residual ion dump, and the calorimeter. The design and the positioning of sensors on each component have been developed considering the expected beam-surface interaction including non-ideal and off-normal conditions. The arrangement of the following instrumentation is presented: thermal sensors, strain gages, electrostatic probes including secondary emission detectors, grounding shunt for electrical currents, and accelerometers.

  9. Testing methods and techniques: Strength of materials and components. A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The methods, techniques, and devices used in testing the mechanical properties of various materials are presented. Although metals and metal alloys are featured prominently, some of the items describe tests on a variety of other materials, from concrete to plastics. Many of the tests described are modifications of standard testing procedures, intended either to adapt them to different materials and conditions, or to make them more rapid and accurate. In either case, the approaches presented can result in considerable cost savings and improved quality control. The compilation is presented in two sections. The first deals specifically with material strength testing; the second treats the special category of fracture and fatigue testing.

  10. Eye blink correction: a test on the preservation of common ERP components using a regression based technique.

    PubMed

    Woltering, Steven; Bazargani, Narges; Liu, Zhong-Xu

    2013-01-01

    Eye blinks are a pervasive problem in electroencephalography research as they contaminate the brain signal. This paper tests the merits of a software tool employing the regression-based Gratton method that claims to remove the detrimental effects of the eye blink and leaves the activity of the brain. The efficacy of the correction tool was tested on five common stimulus-locked Event Related Potential (ERP) components used in a standard Go/Nogo task. Results suggested that the 'corrected' data could be predicted from data containing no eye blinks, suggesting the tool does not distort the data to great extent. This effect was found significant for all components, except for the P3. The conclusion is that this tool distorts the data at acceptable levels, yet caution should be taken when interpreting later components, like the P3.

  11. Eye blink correction: a test on the preservation of common ERP components using a regression based technique

    PubMed Central

    Bazargani, Narges; Liu, Zhong-Xu

    2013-01-01

    Eye blinks are a pervasive problem in electroencephalography research as they contaminate the brain signal. This paper tests the merits of a software tool employing the regression-based Gratton method that claims to remove the detrimental effects of the eye blink and leaves the activity of the brain. The efficacy of the correction tool was tested on five common stimulus-locked Event Related Potential (ERP) components used in a standard Go/Nogo task. Results suggested that the ‘corrected’ data could be predicted from data containing no eye blinks, suggesting the tool does not distort the data to great extent. This effect was found significant for all components, except for the P3. The conclusion is that this tool distorts the data at acceptable levels, yet caution should be taken when interpreting later components, like the P3. PMID:23682349

  12. Test procedures, AN/AIC-27 system and component units. [for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    The AN/AIC-27 (v) intercommunication system is a 30-channel audio distribution which consists of: air crew station units, maintenance station units, and a central control unit. A test procedure for each of the above units and also a test procedure for the system are presented. The intent of the test is to provide data for use in shuttle audio subsystem design.

  13. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Cryogenic Component Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Edward A.; Tolson, Julius; Or, Tak; Skocik, Christopher; Glazer, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: James Webb Space Telescope/Integrated Science Instrument Module (JWST/ISIM) Overview. ISIM Thermal Verification Requirements. Emittance Test Objectives. Cryochamber Design Requirements. Cryochamber Construction. Emittance Test Sample Selection and Configuration. Error Sources and Error Mitigation. Cryochamber Operation. Cryochamber and Emittance Sample Test Results.

  14. Sex pheromone components ofEuxoa drewseni Chemical identification, electrophysiological evaluation, and field attractancy tests.

    PubMed

    Struble, D L

    1983-03-01

    Eleven compounds structurally similar to known lepidopterous pheromone components were identified in the extract from 18 calling female moths ofEuxoa drewseni (Staudinger). The identifications were done by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-resolution gas chromatography with flame ionization and electroantennographic detectors simultaneously. Detector antennae were from five species of moths. In the field, male moths were specifically attracted to a three-component blend of dodecyl, (Z)-5-dodecenyl, and (Z)-7-tetradecenyl acetates in a ratio of 2∶6∶1. This blend at 1000 μg/rubber septum dispenser is recommended as a trap bait for monitoring purposes. Low concentrations of (Z)-7-dodecenyl acetate or (Z)-7-tetradecenol inhibited the attraction of moths to the three-component blend. (Z)-7-Pentadecenyl acetate functioned as a parapheromone in place of (Z)-7-tetradecenyl acetate in the pheromone blend, and they appear to react via the same antennal receptor.

  15. 21 CFR 211.84 - Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.84 Section 211.84 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD...

  16. 21 CFR 211.84 - Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.84 Section 211.84 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD...

  17. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Laboratory Controls... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  18. 21 CFR 211.84 - Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.84 Section 211.84 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD...

  19. 21 CFR 211.84 - Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.84 Section 211.84 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD...

  20. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Laboratory Controls... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  1. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Laboratory Controls... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  2. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS (Eff. 12-12-2011... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  3. System Engineering Program Applicability for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Bryan

    2009-06-01

    This white paper identifies where the technical management and systems engineering processes and activities to be used in establishing the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC) should be addressed and presents specific considerations for these activities under each CTC alternative

  4. Results of scoping tests for open-cycle OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) components operating with seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrando, F.; Bharathan, D.; Green, H. J.; Link, H. F.; Parsons, B. K.; Parsons, J. M.; Pesaran, A. A.; Panchal, C. B.

    1990-09-01

    This report presents comprehensive documentation of the experimental research conducted on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components operating with seawater as a working fluid. The results of this research are presented in the context of previous analysis and fresh-water testing; they provide a basis for understanding and predicting with confidence the performance of all components of an OC-OTEC system except the turbine. Seawater tests have confirmed the results that were obtained in fresh-water tests and predicted by the analytical models of the components. A sound technical basis has been established for the design of larger systems in which net power will be produced for the first time from OC-OTEC technology. Design and operation of a complete OC-OTEC system that produces power will provide sufficient confidence to warrant complete transfer of OC-OTEC technology to the private sector. Each components performance is described in a separate chapter written by the principal investigator responsible for technical aspects of the specific tests. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  5. Competency Test Items for Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Agricultural Production Component. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; McGhee, Max B.

    An activity was undertaken to develop written criterion-referenced tests for the agricultural production component of Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Intended for tenth grade students who have completed Fundamentals of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations, applied principles were designed to consist…

  6. Qualifying Solar Array Components for High Intensity, High Temperature Environments- The Test Approach for the BepiColombo Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Thomas; Zimmermann, Claus; Lohberg, Andreas; de Jong, Sybren; Schuhmacher, Udo; Schneider, Jurgen; Kostler, Wolfgang; Parketta, Peter; Zah, Erwen; Holzbauer, Roland; Fink, Markus; Hall, James; Lisbona, Emilio Fernandez; Lundmark, Karin; Baur, Carsten; Taylor, Stephen; Panin, Fabio; Caon, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    We report on design and qualification of solar array components such as solar cells, cell protection diodes, optical reflectors and wires for high temperature space missions. The ECSS standard ECSS-E-ST-20-08C and ESCC specification 3901 are appropriat baselines which have been tailored, in particular for long duration tests.

  7. Results of scoping tests for open-cycle OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion) components operating with seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Zangrando, F; Bharathan, D; Green, H J; Link, H F; Parsons, B K; Parsons, J M; Pesaran, A A; Panchal, C B

    1990-09-01

    This report presents comprehensive documentation of the experimental research conducted on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components operating with seawater as a working fluid. The results of this research are presented in the context of previous analysis and fresh-water testing; they provide a basis for understanding and predicting with confidence the performance of all components of an OC-OTEC system except the turbine. Seawater tests have confirmed the results that were obtained in fresh-water tests and predicted by the analytical models of the components. A sound technical basis has been established for the design of larger systems in which net power will be produced for the first time from OC-OTEC technology. Design and operation of a complete OC-OTEC system that produces power will provide sufficient confidence to warrant complete transfer of OC-OTEC technology to the private sector. Each components performance is described in a separate chapter written by the principal investigator responsible for technical aspects of the specific tests. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  8. Development of a butterfly multiprocessor test bed description of butterfly components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodhue, J.; Starr, E.

    1985-03-01

    In this, the first in a series of quarterly technical reports on the development of a 128-node Butterfly (TM) testbed we present descriptions of the major components of the Butterfly Parallel Processor: the Processor Node (BPN), the MSI Switch Node (BSN), the VLSI Switch Node (BVSN), the Butterfly I/O Board (BI1), the Multibus Adapter (BMA), and the Butterfly Fantail (BFAN). At the end of the report, there is a set of tables that summarize the important characteristics of each component.

  9. Reliability Testing Beyond Qualification as a Key Component in Photovoltaic's Progress Toward Grid Parity: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper discusses why it is necessary for new lower cost PV modules to be tested using a reliability test sequence that goes beyond the Qualification test sequence now utilized for modules. Today most PV modules are warranted for 25 years, but the Qualification Test Sequence does not test for 25-year life. There is no accepted test protocol to validate a 25-year lifetime. This paper recommends the use of long term accelerated testing to compare now designs directly with older designs that have achieved long lifetimes in outdoor exposure. If the new designs do as well or better than the older ones, then it is likely that they will survive an equivalent length of time in the field.

  10. Solar cyclic tests of optical fiber components working in ammonia and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelus, Janusz D.; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Wysokiński, Karol; Lipiński, Stanisław; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Rodriguez Garcia, José; Canadas Martinez, Inmaculada; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on the metal (Cu, Ni, Au)-coated fibers annealed under concentrated solar radiation in ammonia and N2/H2 atmospheres at temperatures up to 580 °C. Tensile strength of the annealed fiber components was studied from the point of view of their possible application as a fiber optic sensors in urea chemical synthesis process control.

  11. Testing and Performance Verification of a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Podboy, Gary G.; Miller, Christopher J.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    A 1/5 scale model rotor representative of a current technology, high bypass ratio, turbofan engine was installed and tested in the W8 single-stage, high-speed, compressor test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The same fan rotor was tested previously in the GRC 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel as a fan module consisting of the rotor and outlet guide vanes mounted in a flight-like nacelle. The W8 test verified that the aerodynamic performance and detailed flow field of the rotor as installed in W8 were representative of the wind tunnel fan module installation. Modifications to W8 were necessary to ensure that this internal flow facility would have a flow field at the test package that is representative of flow conditions in the wind tunnel installation. Inlet flow conditioning was designed and installed in W8 to lower the fan face turbulence intensity to less than 1.0 percent in order to better match the wind tunnel operating environment. Also, inlet bleed was added to thin the casing boundary layer to be more representative of a flight nacelle boundary layer. On the 100 percent speed operating line the fan pressure rise and mass flow rate agreed with the wind tunnel data to within 1 percent. Detailed hot film surveys of the inlet flow, inlet boundary layer and fan exit flow were compared to results from the wind tunnel. The effect of inlet casing boundary layer thickness on fan performance was quantified. Challenges and lessons learned from testing this high flow, low static pressure rise fan in an internal flow facility are discussed.

  12. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  13. Heat Pipes and Heat Rejection Component Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanzi, James L.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water heat pipes are being evaluated for use in the heat rejection system for space fission power systems. The heat rejection syst em currently comprises heat pipes with a graphite saddle and a composite fin. The heat input is a pumped water loop from the cooling of the power conversion system. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been life testing titanium-water heat pipes as well as eval uating several heat pipe radiator designs. The testing includes thermal modeling and verification of model, material compatibility, frozen startup of heat pipe radiators, and simulating low-gravity environments. Future thermal testing of titanium-water heat pipes includes low-g ravity testing of thermosyphons, radiation testing of heat pipes and fin materials, water pump performance testing, as well as Small Busine ss Innovation Research funded deliverable prototype radiator panels.

  14. Fractionation and Composition Studies of Skin Test-Active Components of Sensitins from Coccidioides immitis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kenneth L.; Wheat, Robert W.; Conant, Norman F.

    1971-01-01

    Coccidioidin skin-test activities from mycelial culture filtrates and autolysates were partially purified. Major chemical constituents included 3-O-methylmannose, mannose, and amino acids. PMID:5119201

  15. LH2 pump component development testing in the electric pump room at test cell C inducer no. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, F. X.; Brunner, J. J.; Kirk, K. G.; Mathews, J. P.; Nishioka, T.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of a turbine pump for use with the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles are discussed. It was determined that the pump will be a two stage centrifugal pump with both stages having backswept impellers and an inducer upstream of the first stage impeller. The test program provided demonstration of the ability of the selected design to meet the imposed requirements.

  16. Identification of Sensorimotor Components Accounting for Individual Variability in Zahlen-Verbindungs-Test (ZVT) Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rammsayer, Thomas H.; Stahl, Jutta

    2007-01-01

    The Zahlen-Verbindungs-Test (ZVT) represents a highly feasible measure of information-processing speed that correlates quite highly with standard psychometric tests of intelligence. The present study was designed to identify specific stages of the sensorimotor processing system that may account for individual differences in overall variability of…

  17. Design, manufacture, development, test, and evaluation of boron/aluminum structural components for space shuttle. Volume 4: Repairability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. F.; Christian, J. L.; Doyal, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    The repairability of boron/aluminum structural components was investigated. It was demonstrated that metal matrix composite material, damaged in service, can be repaired by techniques that are not very different from those currently in use for conventional materials. A list of repair guidelines was prepared to aid in determining the proper repair techniques for a given structure. The guidelines include specifying types of repair material and their applicability, corrosion prevention procedures, design criteria, and inspection criteria. Boron/aluminum structural components were repaired and tested to compare as-fabricated and repaired performance. All but one set of specimens, when repaired, exceeded the strength of the original specimens.

  18. Multi-component testing using HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN Sorbents for OSPREY Model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Garn, Troy G.; Greenhalgh, Mitchell; Lyon, Kevin L.; Law, Jack D.

    2015-04-01

    In efforts to further develop the capability of the Off-gas SeParation and RecoverY (OSPREY) model, multi-component tests were completed using both HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN sorbents. The primary purpose of this effort was to obtain multi-component xenon and krypton capacities for comparison to future OSPREY predicted multi-component capacities using previously acquired Langmuir equilibrium parameters determined from single component isotherms. Experimental capacities were determined for each sorbent using two feed gas compositions of 1000 ppmv xenon and 150 ppmv krypton in either a helium or air balance. Test temperatures were consistently held at 220 K and the gas flowrate was 50 sccm. Capacities were calculated from breakthrough curves using TableCurve® 2D software by Jandel Scientific. The HZ-PAN sorbent was tested in the custom designed cryostat while the AgZ-PAN was tested in a newly installed cooling apparatus. Previous modeling validation efforts indicated the OSPREY model can be used to effectively predict single component xenon and krypton capacities for both engineered form sorbents. Results indicated good agreement with the experimental and predicted capacity values for both krypton and xenon on the sorbents. Overall, the model predicted slightly elevated capacities for both gases which can be partially attributed to the estimation of the parameters and the uncertainty associated with the experimental measurements. Currently, OSPREY is configured such that one species adsorbs and one does not (i.e. krypton in helium). Modification of OSPREY code is currently being performed to incorporate multiple adsorbing species and non-ideal interactions of gas phase species with the sorbent and adsorbed phases. Once these modifications are complete, the sorbent capacities determined in the present work will be used to validate OSPREY multicomponent adsorption predictions.

  19. Analysis of Power Distribution on Beamline Components at Different Neutralization Efficiencies on NBI Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Yongjian; Yu, Ling; Chen, Yu; Hu, Chundong; Tao, Ling

    2016-12-01

    Neutral beam injection is recognized as one of the most effective means for plasma heating. According to the research plan of the EAST physics experiment, two sets of neutral beam injector (4-8 MW, 10-100 s) were built and operated in 2014. Neutralization efficiency is one of the important parameters for neutral beam. High neutralization efficiency can not only improve injection power at the same beam energy, but also decrease the power deposited on the heat-load components in the neutral beam injector (NBI). This research explores the power deposition distribution at different neutralization efficiencies on the beamline components of the NBI device. This work has great significance for guiding the operation of EAST-NBI, especially in long pulse and high power operation, which can reduce the risk of thermal damage of the beamline components and extend the working life of the NBI device. supported by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (No. 2014DFG61950), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405207) and the Foundation of ASIPP (No. DSJJ-15-GC03)

  20. Complex Demodulation in Monitoring Earth Rotation by VLBI: Testing the Algorithm by Analysis of Long Periodic EOP Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgosz, A.; Brzeziński, A.; Böhm, S.

    2016-12-01

    The complex demodulation (CD) algorithm is an efficient tool for extracting the diurnal and subdiurnal components of Earth rotation from the routine VLBI observations (Brzeziński, 2012). This algorithm was implemented by Böhm et al (2012b) into a dedicated version of the VLBI analysis software VieVs. The authors processed around 3700 geodetic 24-hour observing sessions in 1984.0-2010.5 and estimated simultaneously the time series of the long period components as well as diurnal, semidiurnal, terdiurnal and quarterdiurnal components of polar motion (PM) and universal time UT1. This paper describes the tests of the CD algorithm by checking consistency of the low frequency components of PM and UT1 estimated by VieVS CD and those from the IERS and IVS combined solutions. Moreover, the retrograde diurnal component of PM demodulated from VLBI observations has been compared to the celestial pole offsets series included in the IERS and IVS solutions. We found for all three components a good agreement of the results based on the CD approach and those based on the standard parameterization recommended by the IERS Conventions (IERS, 2010) and applied by the IERS and IVS. We conclude that an application of the CD parameterization in VLBI data analysis does not change those components of EOP which are included in the standard adjustment, while enabling simultaneous estimation of the high frequency components from the routine VLBI observations. Moreover, we deem that the CD algorithm can also be implemented in analysis of other space geodetic observations, like GNSS or SLR, enabling retrieval of subdiurnal signals in EOP from the past data.

  1. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft. Phase 3: Production readiness verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A.; Sandifer, J.; Sandorff, P.; Vancleave, R.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-two specimens of each of two key structural elements of the Advance Composite Vertical Fin (ACVF) were fabricated and tested. One element represented the front spar at the fuselage attachment area and the other element represented the cover at the fuselage joint area. Ten specimens of each element were selected for static testing. The coefficient of variation resulting from the tests was 3.28 percent for the ten cover specimens and 6.11 percent for the ten spar specimens, which compare well with metallic structures. The remaining twelve cover and twelve spar specimens were durability tested in environmental chambers which permitted the temperature and humidity environment to be cycled as well as the applied loads. Results of the durability tests indicated that such components will survive the service environment.

  2. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Cryogenic Component Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the design, construction, and operation of a cryogenic chamber, and its use in testing the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

  3. A testing program to evaluate the effects of simulant mixed wastes on plastic transportation packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.; Dickman, P.T.

    1997-08-01

    Based on regulatory requirements for Type A and B radioactive material packaging, a Testing Program was developed to evaluate the effects of mixed wastes on plastic materials which could be used as liners and seals in transportation containers. The plastics evaluated in this program were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile rubber), cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbons, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), butyl rubber, polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). These plastics were first screened in four simulant mixed wastes. The liner materials were screened using specific gravity measurements and seal materials by vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements. For the screening of liner materials, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals. The tests also indicated that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. Those materials which passed the screening tests were subjected to further comprehensive testing in each of the simulant wastes. The materials were exposed to four different radiation doses followed by exposure to a simulant mixed waste at three temperatures and four different exposure times (7, 14, 28, 180 days). Materials were tested by measuring specific gravity, dimensional, hardness, stress cracking, VTR, compression set, and tensile properties. The second phase of this Testing Program involving the comprehensive testing of plastic liner has been completed and for seal materials is currently in progress.

  4. Vapor Compression Distillation Subsystem (VCDS) component enhancement, testing and expert fault diagnostics development, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, L. S.; Zdankiewicz, E. M.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor compression distillation technology for phase change recovery of potable water from wastewater has evolved as a technically mature approach for use aboard the Space Station. A program to parametrically test an advanced preprototype Vapor Compression Distillation Subsystem (VCDS) was completed during 1985 and 1986. In parallel with parametric testing, a hardware improvement program was initiated to test the feasibility of incorporating several key improvements into the advanced preprototype VCDS following initial parametric tests. Specific areas of improvement included long-life, self-lubricated bearings, a lightweight, highly-efficient compressor, and a long-life magnetic drive. With the exception of the self-lubricated bearings, these improvements are incorporated. The advanced preprototype VCDS was designed to reclaim 95 percent of the available wastewater at a nominal water recovery rate of 1.36 kg/h achieved at a solids concentration of 2.3 percent and 308 K condenser temperature. While this performance was maintained for the initial testing, a 300 percent improvement in water production rate with a corresponding lower specific energy was achieved following incorporation of the improvements. Testing involved the characterization of key VCDS performance factors as a function of recycle loop solids concentration, distillation unit temperature and fluids pump speed. The objective of this effort was to expand the VCDS data base to enable defining optimum performance characteristics for flight hardware development.

  5. Development of modified vibration test criteria for qualifying space vehicle components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. Y.; Kao, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the evaluation of two response prediction methods relating to the prediction of structural responses of stiffened shell structures with or without attached components, and subjected to broadband acoustic excitations are presented. The methods under evaluation were the constant mass attenuation method and the impedance ratio method. Example problems were used to illustrate the application procedures of these two methods and to compare their predicted results with the experimentally measured data. It is found that more realistic estimates of the structural response can be obtained by the impedance ratio method.

  6. Statistics, Handle with Care: Detecting Multiple Model Components with the Likelihood Ratio Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protassov, Rostislav; van Dyk, David A.; Connors, Alanna; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2002-05-01

    The likelihood ratio test (LRT) and the related F-test, popularized in astrophysics by Eadie and coworkers in 1971, Bevington in 1969, Lampton, Margon, & Bowyer, in 1976, Cash in 1979, and Avni in 1978, do not (even asymptotically) adhere to their nominal χ2 and F-distributions in many statistical tests common in astrophysics, thereby casting many marginal line or source detections and nondetections into doubt. Although the above authors illustrate the many legitimate uses of these statistics, in some important cases it can be impossible to compute the correct false positive rate. For example, it has become common practice to use the LRT or the F-test to detect a line in a spectral model or a source above background despite the lack of certain required regularity conditions. (These applications were not originally suggested by Cash or by Bevington.) In these and other settings that involve testing a hypothesis that is on the boundary of the parameter space, contrary to common practice, the nominal χ2 distribution for the LRT or the F-distribution for the F-test should not be used. In this paper, we characterize an important class of problems in which the LRT and the F-test fail and illustrate this nonstandard behavior. We briefly sketch several possible acceptable alternatives, focusing on Bayesian posterior predictive probability values. We present this method in some detail since it is a simple, robust, and intuitive approach. This alternative method is illustrated using the gamma-ray burst of 1997 May 8 (GRB 970508) to investigate the presence of an Fe K emission line during the initial phase of the observation. There are many legitimate uses of the LRT and the F-test in astrophysics, and even when these tests are inappropriate, there remain several statistical alternatives (e.g., judicious use of error bars and Bayes factors). Nevertheless, there are numerous cases of the inappropriate use of the LRT and similar tests in the literature, bringing substantive

  7. Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

    2002-05-16

    An automated fault detection and diagnosis tool for HVAC systems is being developed, based on an integrated, life-cycle, approach to commissioning and performance monitoring. The tool uses component-level HVAC equipment models implemented in the SPARK equation-based simulation environment. The models are configured using design information and component manufacturers' data and then fine-tuned to match the actual performance of the equipment by using data measured during functional tests of the sort using in commissioning. This paper presents the results of field tests of mixing box and VAV fan system models in an experimental facility and a commercial office building. The models were found to be capable of representing the performance of correctly operating mixing box and VAV fan systems and detecting several types of incorrect operation.

  8. Slowly moving test charge in two-electron component non-Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; Eliasson, B.

    2015-08-15

    Potential distributions around a slowly moving test charge are calculated by taking into account the electron-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma. Considering a neutralizing background of static positive ions, the supra-thermal hot and cold electrons are described by the Vlasov equations to account for the Kappa (power-law in velocity space) and Maxwell equilibrium distributions. Fourier analysis further leads to the derivation of electrostatic potential showing the impact of supra-thermal hot electrons. The test charge moves slowly in comparison with the hot and cold electron thermal speeds and is therefore shielded by the electrons. This gives rise to a short-range Debye-Hückel potential decaying exponentially with distance and to a far field potential decaying as inverse third power of the distance from the test charge. The results are relevant for both laboratory and space plasmas, where supra-thermal hot electrons with power-law distributions have been observed.

  9. Numerical Modeling for Hole-Edge Cracking of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) Components in the Static Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Mohr, William; Yang, Yu-Ping; Zelenak, Paul; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    Numerical modeling of local formability, such as hole-edge cracking and shear fracture in bending of AHSS, is one of the challenging issues for simulation engineers for prediction and evaluation of stamping and crash performance of materials. This is because continuum-mechanics-based finite element method (FEM) modeling requires additional input data, "failure criteria" to predict the local formability limit of materials, in addition to the material flow stress data input for simulation. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting hole-edge failures during static bend tests of AHSS structures. A local-strain-based failure criterion and a stress-triaxiality-based failure criterion were developed and implemented in LS-DYNA simulation code to predict hole-edge failures in component bend tests. The holes were prepared using two different methods: mechanical punching and water-jet cutting. In the component bend tests, the water-jet trimmed hole showed delayed fracture at the hole-edges, while the mechanical punched hole showed early fracture as the bending angle increased. In comparing the numerical modeling and test results, the load-displacement curve, the displacement at the onset of cracking, and the final crack shape/length were used. Both failure criteria also enable the numerical model to differentiate between the local formability limit of mechanical-punched and water-jet-trimmed holes. The failure criteria and static bend test developed here are useful to evaluate the local formability limit at a structural component level for automotive crash tests.

  10. The GTE-65 gas turbine unit: Rig tests of the main components, possibilities of use and lines of further improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. S.; Simin, N. O.; Petrenya, Yu. K.; Mikhailov, V. E.

    2008-04-01

    This paper is a continuation of publication [1] on the project of a GTE-65 medium-capacity power-generating gas-turbine unit and describes rig tests of its components: the compressor, the turbine’s cooled blades, and the combustion chamber. Alternative versions for possible use of the GTE-65 unit in the schemes of combined-cycle plants and its further improvement are described.

  11. High rate lithium batteries safety testing for U.L. component recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snuggerud, D. K.

    1985-12-01

    An evaluation is made of the safety-related aspects of high energy density lithium thionyl chloride batteries by subjecting them to extensive testing in that system configuration that has the highest hazard potential in virtue of its high voltage. The molten Li (at above 180 C) is violently reactive with the battery cathode material. Attention is given to designs which fuse current collectors to the Li at high heat values, and especially to a design that limits the movement of molten Li and thereby prevents internal short circuits. Results of safety tests concerned with battery operation in military applications are also noted.

  12. The effect of sunshine testing on terrestrial solar cell system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Anagnostou, E.

    1975-01-01

    Samples of FEP-encapsulated silicon solar cells and various potential encapsulation or cover materials were subjected to both accelerated and real-time testing. The durability of the samples was determined by measuring changes in solar cell output or optical transmission as a function of exposure. The tests revealed some problem areas in the structural integrity of the materials, e.g., delamination and cracking in FEP. These problems were probably related to defects in fabrication. FEP and Aclar had the least transmission loss after accelerated exposure equivalents of 5 and 3 years, respectively.

  13. Ground-based tests of JEM-EUSO components at the Telescope Array site, "EUSO-TA"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    We are conducting tests of optical and electronics components of JEMEUSO at the Telescope Array site in Utah with a ground-based "EUSO-TA" detector. The tests will include an engineering validation of the detector, cross-calibration of EUSO-TA with the TA fluorescence detector and observations of air shower events. Also, the proximity of the TA's Electron Light Source will allow for convenient use of this calibration device. In this paper, we report initial results obtained with the EUSO-TA telescope.

  14. Results of low power deicer tests on a swept inlet component in the NASA Lewis icing research tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Thomas H.; Shin, Jaiwon

    1993-01-01

    Tests were conducted under a USAF/NASA Low Power Deicer program on two expulsive technologies to examine system performance on hardware representative of a modern aircraft part. The BF Goodrich Electro-Expulsive Deicing System and Pneumatic Impulse Ice Protection System were installed on a swept, compound curve, engine inlet component with varying leading edge radius, and tested through a range of icing and system operating conditions in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. A description of the experimental procedure and results, including residual ice thickness, shed ice particle size, and changes in system energy/pressure characteristics are presented.

  15. Recent progress in developing a 170 GHz, 500 kW gyrotron for testing ITER transmission line components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felch, Kevin; Blank, Monica; Borchard, Philipp; Cahalan, Pat; Cauffman, Steve

    2011-10-01

    A 170 GHz, 500 kW CW gyrotron has been developed for testing ITER transmission line components. Although specified as a 500 kW source, the electrical design has been conceived with the goal of generating up to 1 MW of continuous output power. The design employs a double-anode electron gun, an interaction cavity operating in the TE31,8 cavity mode, a three-mirror internal converter to produce a fundamental Gaussian output beam, a CVD diamond output window and a depressed collector to safely dissipate the spent electron beam power. Fabrication of the gyrotron is nearly complete and initial high-power tests will soon be carried out. Details of the gyrotron design, results of low-power tests on the internal converter and initial high-power tests will be presented.

  16. Identification of heterotic loci associated with grain yield and its components using two CSSL test populations in maize

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongqiu; Zhang, Xiangge; Yang, Huili; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Huimin; Yuan, Liang; Li, Weihua; Fu, Zhiyuan; Tang, Jihua; Kang, Dingming

    2016-01-01

    Heterosis has widely been used to increase grain yield and quality. In this study, the genetic basis of heterosis on grain yield and its main components in maize were examined over 2 years in two locations in two test populations constructed from a set of 184 chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) and two inbred lines (Zheng58 and Xun9058). Of the 169 heterotic loci (HL) associated with grain yield and its five components identified in CSSL × Zheng58 and CSSL × Xun9058 test populations, only 25 HL were detected in both populations. The comparison of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected in the CSSL population with HL detected in the two test populations revealed that only 15.46% and 17.35% of the HL in the given populations respectively, shared the same chromosomal regions as that of the corresponding QTLs and showed dominant effects as well as pleiotropism with additive and dominant effects. In addition, most of the HL (74.23% and 74.49%) had overdominant effects. These results suggest that overdominance is the main contributor to the effects of heterosis on grain yield and its components in maize, and different HL are associated with heterosis for different traits in different hybrids. PMID:27917917

  17. Analytical Study of High Concentration PCB Paint at the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, N.J.

    1998-10-21

    This report provides results of an analytical study of high concentration PCB paint in a shutdown nuclear test reactor located at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The study was designed to obtain data relevant for an evaluation of potential hazards associated with the use of and exposure to such paints.

  18. Volume Sensor Development Test Series 4 Results - Multi-Component Prototype Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-25

    multiple locations in the test space by two aerosols, The aerosols used were: 1) Old Spice High Endurance deodorant 2) Lysol disinfectant spray. 9... Deodorant / Lysol and Old spice Deodorant (High Endurance) were sprayed Aerosol 5 seconds, off for 5 seconds, then sprayed for 5 seconds at spray

  19. Emotional-volitional components of operator reliability. [sensorimotor function testing under stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileryan, Y. A.

    1975-01-01

    Sensorimotor function testing in a tracking task under stressfull working conditions established a psychological characterization for a successful aviation pilot: Motivation significantly increased the reliability and effectiveness of their work. Their acitivities were aimed at suppressing weariness and the feeling of fear caused by the stress factors; they showed patience, endurance, persistence, and a capacity for lengthy volitional efforts.

  20. Estimating Bias in Test Items Utilizing Principal Components Analysis and the General Linear Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merz, William R.

    A number of methods have been used to identify potentially biased items within a test. These methods examine one item at a time and do not deal with the complex interrelationships among items or among items and the potentially biasing elements. The use of multivariate procedures to assess whether or not items are biased and to obtain clues about…

  1. Nimbus-6 and -7 Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) sensor details and component tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soule, H. V.; Kyle, H. L.; Jacobowitz, H.; Hickey, J.

    1983-01-01

    Construction details and operating characteristics are described for the thermopile (used in the solar and fixed-Earth channels) and the pyroelectric detector (used in the Earth-scanning channels) carried on the Nimbus 6 and the Nimbus 7 satellites for gathering Earth radiation budget data. Properties of the black coating for the detectors, and sensor testing and calibration are discussed.

  2. The Effects of Component Variables on Performance in Graph Comprehension Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal; Goldschmidt, Chanan

    1996-01-01

    Sources of observed differences in difficulty between items in graph comprehension performance were studied using 132 items from the Psychometric Entrance Test, an Israeli college entrance examination. Results indicate that item difficulty can be predicted successfully on the basis of item characteristics and task demands. Implications for graph…

  3. Integrated Component-based Data Acquisition Systems for Aerospace Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    The Multi-Instrument Integrated Data Acquisition System (MIIDAS), developed by the NASA Langley Research Center, uses commercial off the shelf (COTS) products, integrated with custom software, to provide a broad range of capabilities at a low cost throughout the system s entire life cycle. MIIDAS combines data acquisition capabilities with online and post-test data reduction computations. COTS products lower purchase and maintenance costs by reducing the level of effort required to meet system requirements. Object-oriented methods are used to enhance modularity, encourage reusability, and to promote adaptability, reducing software development costs. Using only COTS products and custom software supported on multiple platforms reduces the cost of porting the system to other platforms. The post-test data reduction capabilities of MIIDAS have been installed at four aerospace testing facilities at NASA Langley Research Center. The systems installed at these facilities provide a common user interface, reducing the training time required for personnel that work across multiple facilities. The techniques employed by MIIDAS enable NASA to build a system with a lower initial purchase price and reduced sustaining maintenance costs. With MIIDAS, NASA has built a highly flexible next generation data acquisition and reduction system for aerospace test facilities that meets customer expectations.

  4. Immunotoxicity testing: Implementation of mechanistic understanding, key pathways of toxicological concern and components of these pathways.

    EPA Science Inventory

    At present, several animal-based assays are used to assess immunotoxic effects such as immunosuppression and sensitization. Growing societal and ethical concerns, European legislation and current research demands by industry are driving animal-based toxicity testing towards new a...

  5. Assessing Attitudes about Genetic Testing as a Component of Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mrazek, Michael; Koenig, Barbara; Skime, Michelle; Snyder, Karen; Hook, Christopher; Black, John, III; Mrazek, David

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the attitudes among mental health professionals regarding the use of genetic testing. Methods: Psychiatrists and other mental health professionals (N = 41) who were enrolled in a week-long course in psychiatric genomics completed questionnaires before and after the course designed to assess how diagnostic genetic tests…

  6. The effect of sunshine testing on terrestrial solar cell system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Anagnostou, E.

    1975-01-01

    Samples of FEP encapsulated silicon solar cells and various potential encapsulation or cover materials were subjected to accelerated and real time testing. By measuring changes in solar cell output or optical transmission as a function of exposure the durability of the samples was evaluated. Results are presented.

  7. Nondestructive testing of ceramic engine components. Final progress report for completed CRADAs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.; Happoldt, G.P.

    1993-07-15

    This report describes a method for the nondestructive testing of ZrO{sub 2} plasma-sprayed layers with intentional disbonds. A theoretical analysis was conducted to determine the surface-temperature difference for each disbond using a given input heat pulse.

  8. Development of the six-component rotating shaft balances for counter rotating open rotor testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, V. V.; Lytov, V. V.; Manvelyan, V. S.

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of total aerodynamic loads acting on airplane's high speed CRORs, is one of the tasks of experimental aerodynamics. A special plant for this task solving was developed in TsAGI. One of the main challenges in the way of solving this problem is to develop a six-component rotating shaft balance (RSB) for the front and rear airscrews of CROR. The substantial stage of the balance development is the choice of the design. A promising design for the RSB was developed. It is a system of 12 non-prismatic beams, which is transmitting loads from the airscrews throughout a rim to a support. The rim connected to an airscrews hub and support rigidly connected to the shaft of VVP. Calculations have shown that this design has several advantages compared to known designs of eight beams.

  9. The defining issues test and the four component model: contributions to professional education.

    PubMed

    Bebeau, Muriel J

    2002-09-01

    This article reviews studies examining the effect of professional education on ethical development. Most studies limit assessment to the measurement of moral judgement, observing that moral judgement plateaus during professional school unless an ethics intervention is present. Whereas interventions influence the shift to postconventional reasoning (the DIT P score), a more illuminating picture of change may emerge if researchers examined DIT profiles. More importantly, limiting assessment to measures of moral judgement ignores important aspects of moral functioning suggested by the Four Components Model. Assessment methods have been validated for sensitivity, role concept and ethical implementation that could be adapted to provide individuals in a particular profession with a more complete picture of abilities needed for real-life professional practice.

  10. S-PRIME/TI-SNPS program activities in FY94 critical components testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Colette; Dale Rogers, R.; Determan, William R.; Van Hagan, Tom

    1995-01-01

    A conceptual design for a 40-kWe thermionic space nuclear power system (TI-SNPS) known as the S-PRIME system is being developed by Rockwell and its subcontractors for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), United States Air Force (USAF), and Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) under the TI-SNPS Program. Phase 1 of this program includes developing a conceptual design of a 5- to 40-kWe range TI-SNPS and validating key technologies that support the design. All key technologies for the S-PRIME design have been identified along with six critical component demonstrations, which will be used to validate the S-PRIME design features.

  11. Information processing components of Koppitz errors on the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test.

    PubMed

    Blaha, J; Fawaz, N; Wallbrown, F H

    1979-10-01

    Correlated performance and latencies on the Bender, Matching Familiar Figures Test and Draw-a-Person along with the Slosson Intelligence Test for 39 male and 35 female middle-class black first graders. The results suggest that the Bender may owe much of its clinical validity to loadings across all stages of human information processing. General intelligence accounted for 9% of Bender variance. With the higher order variable intelligence partialed out, the preprocessing and central processing stages accounted for 16% and the response selection and response execution stages accounted for 6% of Bender variance. Kagan's hypothesis with retard to the involvement of conceptual tempo in Bender performance was not supported. However, Kagan's contention that impulsivity is measured only in situations with high response uncertainty did receive some support.

  12. Development of a propulsion system and component test facility for advanced radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. O'Brien; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe

    2011-02-01

    Verification and validation of design and modeling activities for radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms undertaken at the Center for Space Nuclear Research is essential for proof of concept. Previous research at the center has driven the selection of advanced material combinations; some of which require specialized handling capabilities. The development of a closed and contained test facility to forward this research is discussed within this paper.

  13. Fabrication and component testing results for a Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Dell`Orco, D.; Scanlan, R.M.; Taylor, C.E.; Lietzke, A.; Caspi, S.; van Oort, J.M.; McInturff, A.D.

    1994-10-01

    At present, the maximum field achieved in accelerator R&D dipoles is slightly over 10T, with NbTi conductor at 1.8 K. Although Nb{sub 3}Sn has the potential to achieve much higher fields, none of the previous dipoles constructed from Nb{sub 3}Sn have broken the 10T barrier. We report here on the construction of a dipole with high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn with a predicted short sample limit of 13T. A wind and react technique, followed by epoxy impregnation of the fiberglass insulated coils, was used. The problems identified with the use of Nb{sub 3}SD in earlier dipole magnets were investigated in a series of supplemental tests. This includes measurement of the degradation of J{sub c} with transverse strain, cabling degradation, joint resistance measurements, and epoxy strength tests. In addition, coff assembly techniques were developed to ensure that adequate prestress could be applied without damaging the reacted Nb{sub 3}Sn cable. We report here the results of these tests and the construction status of this 50 mm bore dipole.

  14. Design and Testing of Braided Composite Fan Case Materials and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Braley, Michael S.; Arnold, William a.; Dorer, James D.; Watson, William R/.

    2009-01-01

    Triaxial braid composite materials are beginning to be used in fan cases for commercial gas turbine engines. The primary benefit for the use of composite materials is reduced weight and the associated reduction in fuel consumption. However, there are also cost benefits in some applications. This paper presents a description of the braided composite materials and discusses aspects of the braiding process that can be utilized for efficient fabrication of composite cases. The paper also presents an approach that was developed for evaluating the braided composite materials and composite fan cases in a ballistic impact laboratory. Impact of composite panels with a soft projectile is used for materials evaluation. Impact of composite fan cases with fan blades or blade-like projectiles is used to evaluate containment capability. A post-impact structural load test is used to evaluate the capability of the impacted fan case to survive dynamic loads during engine spool down. Validation of these new test methods is demonstrated by comparison with results of engine blade-out tests.

  15. Vapor Compression Distillation Subsystem (VCDS) Component Enhancement, Testing and Expert Fault Diagnostics Development, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinak, E. S.

    1987-01-01

    A wide variety of Space Station functions will be managed via computerized controls. Many of these functions are at the same time very complex and very critical to the operation of the Space Station. The Environmental Control and Life Support System is one group of very complex and critical subsystems which directly affects the ability of the crew to perform their mission. Failure of the Environmental Control and Life Support Subsystems are to be avoided and, in the event of failure, repair must be effected as rapidly as possible. Due to the complex and diverse nature of the subsystems, it is not possible to train the Space Station crew to be experts in the operation of all of the subsystems. By applying the concepts of computer-based expert systems, it may be possible to provide the necessary expertise for these subsystems in dedicated controllers. In this way, an expert system could avoid failures and extend the operating time of the subsystems even in the event of failure of some components, and could reduce the time to repair by being able to pinpoint the cause of a failure when one cannot be avoided.

  16. Variance component score test for time-course gene set analysis of longitudinal RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Agniel, Denis; Hejblum, Boris P

    2017-03-10

    As gene expression measurement technology is shifting from microarrays to sequencing, the statistical tools available for their analysis must be adapted since RNA-seq data are measured as counts. It has been proposed to model RNA-seq counts as continuous variables using nonparametric regression to account for their inherent heteroscedasticity. In this vein, we propose tcgsaseq, a principled, model-free, and efficient method for detecting longitudinal changes in RNA-seq gene sets defined a priori. The method identifies those gene sets whose expression varies over time, based on an original variance component score test accounting for both covariates and heteroscedasticity without assuming any specific parametric distribution for the (transformed) counts. We demonstrate that despite the presence of a nonparametric component, our test statistic has a simple form and limiting distribution, and both may be computed quickly. A permutation version of the test is additionally proposed for very small sample sizes. Applied to both simulated data and two real datasets, tcgsaseq is shown to exhibit very good statistical properties, with an increase in stability and power when compared to state-of-the-art methods ROAST (rotation gene set testing), edgeR, and DESeq2, which can fail to control the type I error under certain realistic settings. We have made the method available for the community in the R package tcgsaseq.

  17. Component and prototype panel testing of the mini-dome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; Swartz, Clifford K.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    The mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator array, a high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic array concept, is described. The three critical elements of the array concept are the Fresnel lens concentrator, the prismatic cell power cover, and the photovoltaic cell. Prototype concentrator lenses have been fabricated and tested, with optical efficiencies reaching 90 percent. Work is progressing on the design and fabrication of the panel structure. The impact of recent advances in 30 percent-efficient multijunction photovoltaic cells on array performance is also discussed. Near-term performance goals of 300 w/sq m and 100 w/kg are now feasible.

  18. Test simulation of neutron damage to electronic components using accelerator facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. B.; Fleming, R. M.; Bielejec, E. S.; McDonald, J. K.; Vizkelethy, G.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate equivalent bipolar transistor damage response to neutrons and silicon ions. We report on irradiation tests performed at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor, the SNL SPHINX accelerator, and the SNL Ion Beam Laboratory using commercial silicon npn bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and III-V Npn heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). Late time and early time gain metrics as well as defect spectra measurements are reported.

  19. Controlling system components with a sound card: A versatile inkjet fluid testing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognet, Brice; Guo, Yang; Ma, Anson W. K.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how to use a personal computer sound card to develop an experimental platform for evaluating the jettability and jetting behavior of inkjet fluids. The test fluid is driven out of a nozzle acoustically using a loudspeaker, forming a jet. The subsequent jet breakup process is then captured using a stroboscopic light source and a camera. Instead of using a delay generator as in previous work, the current setup uses a computer sound card and audio amplifier to (i) generate actuation waveforms of arbitrary shapes and (ii) synchronize the jet actuation and imaging with a time precision close to 5 μs. To correct for any signal distortions caused by the built-in high pass filters of the sound card and amplifier, a numerical filter is created and applied before sending the desired signal to the sound card. Such correction method does not require physically modifying the hardware of the sound card or amplifier and is applicable to different waveforms and filters provided that the transfer function is correctly identified. The platform has been tested using 20% (v/v) glycerol in water as a model fluid. Combining this platform with digital image analysis further enables a quantitative assessment of parameters such as the volumes and positions of the jet and drop that are important for quality control and development of new ink formulations.

  20. Mixed waste chemical compatibility: A testing program for plastic packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations in the United States have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified by the US Department of Transportation (DOT, 49 CFR 173) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 10 CFR 71). The design requirements for both hazardous [49 CFR 173.24 (e)(1)] and radioactive [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] materials packaging specify packaging compatibility, i.e., that the materials of the packaging @d any contents be chemically compatible with each other. Furthermore, Type A [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] and Type B (10 CFR 71.43) packaging design requirements stipulate that there be no significant chemical, galvanic, or other reaction between the materials and contents of the package. Based on these requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The program attempts to assure any regulatory body that the issue of packaging material compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. This program has been described in considerable detail in an internal SNL document, the Chemical Compatibility Test Plan & Procedure Report (Nigrey 1993).

  1. Test and Analysis of Sub-Components of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynie, Waddy T.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Hilburger, Mark W.; Smith, Russell W.

    2012-01-01

    Integrally machined blade-stiffened panels subjected to an axial compressive load were tested and analyzed to observe the buckling, crippling, and postcrippling response of the panels. The panels were fabricated from aluminum-lithium alloys 2195 and 2050, and both alloys have reduced material properties in the short transverse material direction. The tests were designed to capture a failure mode characterized by the stiffener separating from the panel in the postbuckling range. This failure mode is attributed to the reduced properties in the short transverse direction. Full-field measurements of displacements and strains using three-dimensional digital image correlation systems and local measurements using strain gages were used to capture the deformation of the panel leading up to the failure of the panel for specimens fabricated from 2195. High-speed cameras were used to capture the initiation of the failure. Finite element models were developed using an isotropic strain-hardening material model. Good agreement was observed between the measured and predicted responses for both alloys.

  2. CR TKA UHMWPE Wear Tested after Artificial Aging of the Vitamin E Treated Gliding Component by Simulating Daily Patient Activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwiesau, Jens; Fritz, Bernhard; Kutzner, Ines; Bergmann, Georg; Grupp, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The wear behaviour of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is dominated by two wear mechanisms: the abrasive wear and the delamination of the gliding components, where the second is strongly linked to aging processes and stress concentration in the material. The addition of vitamin E to the bulk material is a potential way to reduce the aging processes. This study evaluates the wear behaviour and delamination susceptibility of the gliding components of a vitamin E blended, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cruciate retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty. Daily activities such as level walking, ascending and descending stairs, bending of the knee, and sitting and rising from a chair were simulated with a data set received from an instrumented knee prosthesis. After 5 million test cycles no structural failure of the gliding components was observed. The wear rate was with 5.62 ± 0.53 mg/million cycles falling within the limit of previous reports for established wear test methods. PMID:25506594

  3. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 5 psi, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.5 GPM.

  4. Development and successful testing of MCP BSCCO-2212 components for a 10 MVA resistive superconducting fault current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, J.; Breuer, F.; Walter, H.; Noe, M.; Kreutz, R.; Kleimaier, M.; Weck, K.-H.; Elschner, S.

    2004-05-01

    The German government funded resistive superconducting fault current limiter project CURL 10 is based on bulk material and aims at the development of a three-phase prototype for the medium voltage level (10 kV, 10 MVA). The key element of the project is the development of suitable robust superconducting components. On the basis of the well known melt cast process (MCP) for BSCCO-2212, these are manufactured by cutting superconducting tubes to bifilar coils. At the operation temperature of 65 K a current density of 4000 A cm-2 was achieved. In order to protect the superconductor during limitation the component was equipped with an electrical shunt contacted on its entire length. Single-phase tests with nine of these components in series, corresponding to a protected load of 1.2 MVA, have been successfully accomplished and are described in detail. These tests include different types of short circuits as specified by the utilities within the project and included lightning surge loads up to 75 kV.

  5. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2008-01-21

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 34.5 kPa, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.114 m{sup 3}/hr.

  6. The mini-dome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator array - Current status of component and prototype panel testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, M. F.; Swartz, C. K.; O'Neill, M. J.; Mcdanal, A. J.; Fraas, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    NASA Lewis and ENTECH have been developing a high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic concentrator array. The emphasis of the program has shifted to fabrication and testing of the minidome Fresnel lens and other array components. Protototype lenses have been tested for optical efficiency, with results around 90 percent, and tracking error performance. The results of these tests have been very consistent with the predicted analytical performance. Work has also progressed in the fabrication of the array support structure. Recent advances in 30 percent efficient stacked cell technology will have a significant effect on the array performance. It is concluded that near-term array performance goals of 300 W/sq m and 100 W/kg are feasible.

  7. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E.; Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.

    2015-12-01

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  8. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E. Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.

    2015-12-15

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  9. Preliminary results of accelerated exposure testing of solar cell system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostou, E.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Plastic samples and solar cell sub modules were exposed to an accelerated outdoor environment in Arizona and an accelerated simulated environment in a cyclic ultraviolet exposure tester which included humidity exposure. These tests were for preliminary screening of materials suitable for use in the manufacture of solar cell modules which are to have a 20-year lifetime. The samples were exposed for various times up to six months, equivalent to a real time exposure of four years. Suitable materials were found to be FEP-A, FEP-C, PFA, acrylic, silicone compounds and adhesives and possibly parylene. The method of packaging the sub modules was also found to be important to their performance.

  10. Fabrication and Testing of Habitat Components Using In-Situ Materials for Martian Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M.-H. Y.; Thibeault, S. A.; Kiefer, R. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C.; Moore, J.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2004-01-01

    The development of Mars for human activity will require the utilization of Martian materials in building habitats and working structures. One approach is to use polymer binders with regolith to form structural elements. Not only can useful composite materials be produced in this way but the radiation protection properties are also increased. This is important since only modest protection from space radiation is provided by the Martian atmosphere. We have studied composites fabricated using Martian regolith simulant and polymers which can be synthesized from local Martian materials for their potential use as radiation shields for manned Mars missions. To validate shielding effectiveness, composites are irradiated with a 55 MeV proton beam and neutron beams up to 800 MeV. Shielding effects on microelectronic devices are measured by placing them behind samples of the composites during irradiation. To measure structural properties of the composites, preliminary characterization and mechanical testing are made for the composites.

  11. Real time outdoor exposure testing of solar cell modules and component materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostou, E.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Plastic samples, solar cell modules, and sub-modules were exposed at test sites in Florida, Arizona, Puerto Rico, and Cleveland, Ohio, in order to determine materials suitable for use in solar cell modules with a proposed 20-year lifetime. Various environments were encountered including subtropical, subtropical with a sea air atmosphere, desert, rain forest, normal urban, and urban-polluted. The samples were exposed for periods up to six months. Materials found not suitable were polyurethane, polyester, Kapton, Mylar, and UV-stabilized Lexan. Suitable materials were acrylic, FEP-A, and glass. The results of exposure of polyvinylidene fluoride were dependent on the specific formulation, but several types appear suitable. RTV silicone rubber (clear) appears to pick up and hold dirt both as a free film and as a potting medium for modules. The results indicate that dirt accumulation and cleanability are important factors in the selection of solar cell module covers and encapsulants.

  12. Cesium reservoir and interconnective components. Final test report: TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE (thermionic fuel element) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW range. A thermionic converter must be supplied with cesium vapor for two reasons. Cesium atoms adsorbed on the surface of the emitter cause a reduction of the emitter work function to permit high current densities without excessive heating of the emitter. The second purpose of the cesium vapor is to provide space-charge neutralization in the emitter-collector gap so that the high current densities may flow across the gap unattenuated. The function of the cesium reservoir is to provide a source of cesium atoms, and to provide a reserve in the event that cesium is lost from the plasma by any mechanism. This can be done with a liquid cesium metal reservoir in which case it is heated to the desired temperature with auxiliary heaters. In a TFE, however, it is desirable to have the reservoir passively heated by the nuclear fuel. In this case, the reservoir must operate at a temperature intermediate between the emitter and the collector, ruling out the use of liquid reservoirs. Integral reservoirs contained within the TFE will produce cesium vapor pressures in the desired range at typical electrode temperatures. The reservoir material that appears to be the best able to meet requirements is graphite. Cesium intercalates easily into graphite, and the cesium pressure is insensitive to loading for a given intercalation stage. The goals of the cesium reservoir test program were to verify the performance of Cs-graphite reservoirs in the temperature-pressure range of interest to TFE operation, and to test the operation of these reservoirs after exposure to a fast neutron fluence corresponding to seven year mission lifetime. In addition, other materials were evaluated for possible use in the integral reservoir.

  13. Vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB), Lightweight External Tank (LWT), and Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The vibration, acoustics, and shock design and test criteria for components and subassemblies on the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB), lightweight tank (LWT), and main engines (SSME) are presented. Specifications for transportation, handling, and acceptance testing are also provided.

  14. Optical test bench for high precision metrology and alignment of zoom sub-assembly components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprêtre, F.; Levillain, E.; Wattellier, B.; Delage, P.; Brahmi, D.; Gascon, A.

    2013-09-01

    Thales Angénieux (TAGX) designs and manufactures zoom lens assemblies for cinema applications. These objectives are made of mobile lens assemblies. These need to be precisely characterized to detect alignment, polishing or glass index homogeneity errors, which amplitude may range to a few hundreds of nanometers. However these assemblies are highly aberrated with mainly spherical aberration (>30 μm PV). PHASICS and TAGX developed a solution based on the use of a PHASICS SID4HR wave front sensor. This is based on quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry, a technology known for its high dynamic range. A 100-mm diameter He:Ne source illuminates the lens assembly entrance pupil. The transmitted wave front is then directly measured by the SID4- HR. The measured wave front (WFmeas) is then compared to a simulation from the lens sub-assembly optical design (WFdesign). We obtain a residual wave front error (WFmanufactured), which reveals lens imperfections due to its manufacturing. WFmeas=WFdesign+(WFEradius+WFEglass+WFEpolish)=WF design + WFmanufactured The optical test bench was designed so that this residual wave front is measured with a precision below 100 nm PV. The measurement of fast F-Number lenses (F/2) with aberrations up to 30 μm, with a precision of 100 nm PV was demonstrated. This bench detects mismatches in sub-assemblies before the final integration step in the zoom. Pre-alignment is also performed in order to overpass the mechanical tolerances. This facilitates the completed zoom alignment. In final, productivity gains are expected due to alignment and mounting time savings.

  15. PV Standards Work: Photovoltaic System and Component Certification, Test Facility Accreditation, and Solar Photovoltaic Energy Systems International Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, T. S.; Chalmers, S.; Barikmo, H. O.

    2005-11-01

    This paper discusses efforts led by two companies (PowerMark Corporation and Sunset Technologies Inc.) to support both U.S. domestic and international photovoltaic (PV) system and component certification and test facility accreditation programs and the operation of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC-82) Photovoltaic Energy Systems. International and national PV certification/accreditation programs are successfully facilitating entry of only the highest quality PV products into the marketplace. Standards also continue to be a cornerstone for assuring global PV product conformity assessment, reducing non-tariff trade barriers, and ultimately improving PV products while lowering cost.

  16. PTSD in victims of sexual assault: test of a major component of the Ehlers-Clark theory.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Nichole; Rachman, S

    2006-06-01

    We investigated a major component of the Ehlers-Clark theory of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of 50 female victims of sexual assault. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that the victims' appraisals of the trauma and its consequences contribute significantly to the persistence of PTSD symptoms. The results indicated that the victims' appraisals of the sexual assault and its sequelae are strongly and positively related to PTSD symptoms. This finding remained significant after statistically controlling for the perceived severity of the assault. Most of the results are consistent with the Ehlers-Clark theory.

  17. Assessment of two alternative standardised tests for the vascular component of the hand–arm vibration syndrome (HAVS)

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ying; Griffin, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background Vibration-induced white finger (VWF) is the vascular component of the hand–arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Two tests have been standardised so as to assist the diagnosis of VWF: the measurement of finger rewarming times and the measurement of finger systolic blood pressures (FSBPs). Objectives This study investigates whether the two tests distinguish between fingers with and without symptoms of whiteness and compares individual results between the two test methods. Methods In 60 men reporting symptoms of the HAVS, the times for their fingers to rewarm by 4°C (after immersion in 15°C water for 5 min) and FSBPs at 30°C, 15°C and 10°C were measured on the same day. Results There were significant increases in finger rewarming times and significant reductions in FSBPs at both 15°C and 10°C in fingers reported to suffer blanching. The FSBPs had sensitivities and specificities >90%, whereas the finger rewarming test had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 79%. Fingers having longer rewarming times had lower FSBPs at both temperatures. Conclusions The findings suggest that, when the test conditions are controlled according to the relevant standard, finger rewarming times and FSBPs can provide useful information for the diagnosis of VWF, although FSBPs are more sensitive and more specific. PMID:27535036

  18. Test-Analysis Correlation for Space Shuttle External Tank Foam Impacting RCC Wing Leading Edge Component Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2008-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommended that NASA develop, validate, and maintain a modeling tool capable of predicting the damage threshold for debris impacts on the Space Shuttle Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) wing leading edge and nosecap assembly. The results presented in this paper are one part of a multi-level approach that supported the development of the predictive tool used to recertify the shuttle for flight following the Columbia Accident. The assessment of predictive capability was largely based on test analysis comparisons for simpler component structures. This paper provides comparisons of finite element simulations with test data for external tank foam debris impacts onto 6-in. square RCC flat panels. Both quantitative displacement and qualitative damage assessment correlations are provided. The comparisons show good agreement and provided the Space Shuttle Program with confidence in the predictive tool.

  19. Difference in Physiological Components of VO2 Max During Incremental and Constant Exercise Protocols for the Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Junshiro; Harada, Tetsuya; Okada, Akinori; Maemura, Yuko; Yamamoto, Misaki; Tabira, Kazuyuki

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] VO2 is expressed as the product of cardiac output and O2 extraction by the Fick equation. During the incremental exercise test and constant high-intensity exercise test, VO2 results in the attainment of maximal O2 uptake at exhaustion. However, the differences in the physiological components, cardiac output and muscle O2 extraction, have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that constant exercise would result in higher O2 extraction than incremental exercise at exhaustion. [Subjects] Twenty-five subjects performed incremental exercise and constant exercise at 80% of their peak work rate. [Methods] Ventilatory, cardiovascular, and muscle oxygenation responses were measured using a gas analyzer, Finapres, and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. [Results] VO2 was not significantly different between the incremental exercise and constant exercise. However, cardiac output and muscle O2 saturation were significantly lower for the constant exercise than the incremental exercise at the end of exercise. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that if both tests produce a similar VO2 value, the VO2 in incremental exercise would have a higher ratio of cardiac output than constant exercise, and VO2 in constant exercise would have a higher ratio of O2 extraction than incremental exercise at the end of exercise.

  20. Test of Clausius' Virial Dynamical Theory of Fundamental Plane By Homogeneous + γ-Free Two Component Galaxy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindoni, D.; Secco, L.; Caimmi, R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Valentinuzzi, T.

    2007-05-01

    Introduction: the theory of the Fundamental Plane (FP) proposed by Secco (2000, 2001,2005) is based on the existence of a maximum in the Clausius' Virial potential energy (CV) of a stellar component when it is completely embedded inside a dark matter (DM) halo. At the first order approximation the theory was developed by modeling the two-components with two power-law density profiles and two homogeneous cores. In order to test the extension of the theory to an higher order we explore the effect on an homogeneous stellar component due to a DM halo with a density profile characterized by a inner slope γfree and an outer slope -3, according to high resolution rotation curves of Sps (Garrido et al. 2004). The aim is to investigate the role of the dark to bright mass ratio m and of the halo concentration C[D] in order to produce the maximum of CV. Particular attention is devoted to the slope of the density halo profile at the maximum location, to its height in comparison with the CV value when the two component coincide, V[n.] For all the models we choose γ=0. Method: we follow the general method proposed by Caimmi (1993) for two striated ellipsoidals with Zhao-density profiles. Virial equilibrium is described by tensor virial equations extended to two subcomponents (Caimmi & Secco,1992). The interaction terms are numerically performed for different values of m and C [D] and sequences of CV as function of the ratio baryonic to halo virial semi-axis are taken into account. Results: the special configuration at the CV maximum with all the properties discovered with the theory of first order appears if m is greater than a given threshold .The corresponding slope (in absolute value) on the halo DM profile decreases either as m increases at fixed C[D] or as C[D] decreases at fixed m. The same conspiracy between m and C[D] appears in order to obtain the highest values of V[n]. Discussion: the test is relevant in order to confirm the main results of the first order approach

  1. Manufacturing and High Heat Flux Testing of Brazed Flat-Type W/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Feng, Fan; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zhengkui; Wang, Jin; Chen, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Water-cooled flat-type W/CuCrZr plasma facing components with an interlayer of oxygen-free copper (OFC) have been developed by using vacuum brazing route. The OFC layer for the accommodation of thermal stresses was cast onto the surface of W at a temperature range of 1150 °C-1200 °C in a vacuum furnace. The W/OFC cast tiles were vacuum brazed to a CuCrZr heat sink at 940 °C using the silver-free filler material CuMnSiCr. The microstructure, bonding strength, and high heat flux properties of the brazed W/CuCrZr joint samples were investigated. The W/Cu joint exhibits an average tensile strength of 134 MPa, which is about the same strength as pure annealed copper. High heat flux tests were performed in the electron beam facility EMS-60. Experimental results indicated that the brazed W/CuCrZr mock-up experienced screening tests of up to 15 MW/m2 and cyclic tests of 9 MW/m2 for 1000 cycles without visible damage. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205049) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2011GB110004)

  2. A Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Combining Wavelet Denoising, Principal Component Analysis, and Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Sensor Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Man Gyun; Oh, Seungrohk

    2002-11-15

    A neuro-fuzzy inference system combined with the wavelet denoising, principal component analysis (PCA), and sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) methods has been developed to monitor the relevant sensor using the information of other sensors. The parameters of the neuro-fuzzy inference system that estimates the relevant sensor signal are optimized by a genetic algorithm and a least-squares algorithm. The wavelet denoising technique was applied to remove noise components in input signals into the neuro-fuzzy system. By reducing the dimension of an input space into the neuro-fuzzy system without losing a significant amount of information, the PCA was used to reduce the time necessary to train the neuro-fuzzy system, simplify the structure of the neuro-fuzzy inference system, and also, make easy the selection of the input signals into the neuro-fuzzy system. By using the residual signals between the estimated signals and the measured signals, the SPRT is applied to detect whether the sensors are degraded or not. The proposed sensor-monitoring algorithm was verified through applications to the pressurizer water level, the pressurizer pressure, and the hot-leg temperature sensors in pressurized water reactors.

  3. The Mission and Technology of a Gas Dynamic Trap Neutron Source for Fusion Material and Component Testing and Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Simonen, T C

    2009-07-17

    This report summarizes discussions and conclusions of the workshop to 'Assess The Mission and Technology of a Gas Dynamic Trap Neutron Source for Fusion Material and Component Testing and Qualification'. The workshop was held at LBNL, Berkeley, CA on March 12, 2009. Most workshop attendees have worked on magnetic mirror systems, several have worked on similar neutron source designs, and others are knowledgeable of materials, fusion component, and neutral beams The workshop focused on the gas dynamic trap DT Neutron Source (DTNS) concept being developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) in Novosibirsk, Russia. The DTNS may be described as a line source of neutrons, in contrast to a spallation or a D-Lithium source with neutrons beaming from a point, or a tokamak volume source. The DTNS is a neutral beam driven linear plasma system with magnetic mirrors to confine the energetic deuterium and tritium beam injected ions, which produce the 14 MeV neutrons. The hot ions are imbedded in warm-background plasma, which traps the neutral atoms and provides both MHD and micro stability to the plasma. The 14 MeV neutron flux ranges typically at the level of 1 to 4 MW/m2.

  4. High fidelity replication of surface texture and geometric form of a high aspect ratio aerodynamic test component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Karl; Fleming, Leigh; Goodhand, Martin; Racasan, Radu; Zeng, Wenhan

    2016-06-01

    This paper details, assesses and validates a technique for the replication of a titanium wind tunnel test aerofoil in polyurethane resin. Existing resin replication techniques are adapted to overcome the technical difficulties associated with casting a high aspect ratio component. The technique is shown to have high replication fidelity over all important length-scales. The blade chord was accurate to 0.02%, and the maximum blade thickness was accurate to 2.5%. Important spatial and amplitude areal surface texture parameter were accurate to within 2%. Compared to an existing similar system using correlation areal parameters the current technique is shown to have lower fidelity and this difference is discussed. The current technique was developed for the measurement of boundary layer flow ‘laminar to turbulent’ transition for gas turbine compressor blade profiles and this application is illustrated.

  5. Reliability testing of active SDHW components. Part II. Results of collector scaling tests and the effect on thermal performance from scale build-up

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.E.; Farrington, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine how much scale accumulates in a flat-plate collector caused by repeated filling and draining. Laboratory testing of solar domestic hot water system components in FY 1983 showed that a significant amount of scale accumulated on draindown (drainout) valves, air vents, vacuum breakers, check valves subject to periodic draining on one side (such as when used as an isolation valve), and tempering valves. In FY 1984, we tested a flat-plate collector to measure the degree of scale accumulation caused by evaporation of water. Testing over a period of one year and 9733 cycles caused a 7% decrease in collector volume because of scale, which is equivalent to uniform scaling of 0.25 mm. A 1-mm scaling thickness would decrease the heat removal factor by 6% of increase the absorber plate temperature and overall heat loss factor U/sub L/ by 5/sup 0/C and 2%, respectively. This would result in a 13% reduction in the amount of energy collected. Homeowners in geographical areas where the water has a high potential for scaling should not use direct solar energy systems that use conventional flat-plate collectors unless they treat the water before it enters the system.

  6. An investigation of the main mutagenic components of a carcinogenic oil by fractionation and testing in the modified Ames assay.

    PubMed

    Ingram, A J; Scammells, D V; May, K

    1994-01-01

    A low-viscosity carcinogenic oil was extracted with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and the extract fractionated into 1-3 ring aromatic components, 4-6 ring polycyclic aromatic compounds (PCAs) and polar materials. Each of these fractions was tested in the Mobil modified Ames assay at the same concentration as in the DMSO extract, alongside unfractionated DMSO extracts from the same oil and two reference oils. In addition the fractions were combined in various ways to examine inhibitory or additive effects. Clear positive findings were obtained with the DMSO extract of the main test oil, with some reduction in activity in a sample (the starting material for fractionation) that was back-extracted to remove DMSO. Of the three fractions tested on their own and assessed in terms of mutagenicity index, the 1-3 ring aromatic fraction had the greatest mutagenic activity, showing similar activity to the starting material, whereas the 4-6 ring PCA fraction had much lower activity and the polar fraction showed the lowest activity with an absence of doubling in one of the tests. The polar fraction showed signs of an inhibitory effect on the response to the 1-3 ring aromatic fraction and to a questionable extent on that of the 4-6 ring PCA fraction. Although a low level of the 4-6 ring PCA fraction showed some inhibitory effect on the response to the 1-3 ring aromatic fraction, a low level of the 1-3 ring aromatic fraction added to the 4-6 ring PCA fraction enhanced the response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Comparison of multianalyte proficiency test results by sum of ranking differences, principal component analysis, and hierarchical cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Škrbić, Biljana; Héberger, Károly; Durišić-Mladenović, Nataša

    2013-10-01

    Sum of ranking differences (SRD) was applied for comparing multianalyte results obtained by several analytical methods used in one or in different laboratories, i.e., for ranking the overall performances of the methods (or laboratories) in simultaneous determination of the same set of analytes. The data sets for testing of the SRD applicability contained the results reported during one of the proficiency tests (PTs) organized by EU Reference Laboratory for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (EU-RL-PAH). In this way, the SRD was also tested as a discriminant method alternative to existing average performance scores used to compare mutlianalyte PT results. SRD should be used along with the z scores--the most commonly used PT performance statistics. SRD was further developed to handle the same rankings (ties) among laboratories. Two benchmark concentration series were selected as reference: (a) the assigned PAH concentrations (determined precisely beforehand by the EU-RL-PAH) and (b) the averages of all individual PAH concentrations determined by each laboratory. Ranking relative to the assigned values and also to the average (or median) values pointed to the laboratories with the most extreme results, as well as revealed groups of laboratories with similar overall performances. SRD reveals differences between methods or laboratories even if classical test(s) cannot. The ranking was validated using comparison of ranks by random numbers (a randomization test) and using seven folds cross-validation, which highlighted the similarities among the (methods used in) laboratories. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis justified the findings based on SRD ranking/grouping. If the PAH-concentrations are row-scaled, (i.e., z scores are analyzed as input for ranking) SRD can still be used for checking the normality of errors. Moreover, cross-validation of SRD on z scores groups the laboratories similarly. The SRD technique is general in nature, i.e., it can

  8. Testing evolutionary models of senescence in a natural population: age and inbreeding effects on fitness components in song sparrows.

    PubMed

    Keller, L F; Reid, J M; Arcese, P

    2008-03-22

    Mutation accumulation (MA) and antagonistic pleiotropy (AP) have each been hypothesized to explain the evolution of 'senescence' or deteriorating fitness in old age. These hypotheses make contrasting predictions concerning age dependence in inbreeding depression in traits that show senescence. Inbreeding depression is predicted to increase with age under MA but not under AP, suggesting one empirical means by which the two can be distinguished. We use pedigree and life-history data from free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to test for additive and interactive effects of age and individual inbreeding coefficient (f) on fitness components, and thereby assess the evidence for MA. Annual reproductive success (ARS) and survival (and therefore reproductive value) declined in old age in both sexes, indicating senescence in this short-lived bird. ARS declined with f in both sexes and survival declined with f in males, indicating inbreeding depression in fitness. We observed a significant agexf interaction for male ARS (reflecting increased inbreeding depression as males aged), but not for female ARS or survival in either sex. These analyses therefore provide mixed support for MA. We discuss the strengths and limitations of such analyses and therefore the value of natural pedigreed populations in testing evolutionary models of senescence.

  9. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  10. The international experience of bacterial screen testing of platelet components with an automated microbial detection system: a need for consensus testing and reporting guidelines.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Richard J; McDonald, Carl P

    2014-04-01

    The BacT/ALERT microbial detection system (bioMerieux, Inc, Durham, NC) is in routine use in many blood centers as a prerelease test for platelet collections. Published reports document wide variation in practices and outcomes. A systematic review of the English literature was performed to describe publications assessing the use of the BacT/ALERT culture system on platelet collections as a routine screen test of more than 10000 platelet components. Sixteen publications report the use of confirmatory testing to substantiate initial positive culture results but use varying nomenclature to classify the results. Preanalytical and analytical variables that may affect the outcomes differ widely between centers. Incomplete description of protocol details complicates comparison between sites. Initial positive culture results range from 539 to 10606 per million (0.054%-1.061%) and confirmed positive from 127 to 1035 per million (0.013%-0.104%) donations. False-negative results determined by outdate culture range from 662 to 2173 per million (0.066%-0.217%) and by septic reactions from 0 to 66 per million (0%-0.007%) collections. Current culture protocols represent pragmatic compromises between optimizing analytical sensitivity and ensuring the timely availability of platelets for clinical needs. Insights into the effect of protocol variations on outcomes are generally restricted to individual sites that implement limited changes to their protocols over time. Platelet manufacturers should reassess the adequacy of their BacT/ALERT screening protocols in light of the growing international experience and provide detailed documentation of all variables that may affect culture outcomes when reporting results. We propose a framework for a standardized nomenclature for reporting of the results of BacT/ALERT screening.

  11. An integrated approach to 300 kV electrostatic discharge application during component testing that will satisfy MIL-STD-331B Appendix F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Monty R.; Nial, Jack; Whitaker, Mike

    1992-11-01

    The widely differing methods of producing and applying a 300 kV electrostatic stimulus to components during testing to satisfy MIL-STD-331B Appendix F has resulted in uncertainty about the validity of some test results data. Problems encountered in test methodology are examined and possible solutions are proposed. The resulting integrated systematic approach is presented; specific equipment is described, and sample waveforms are shown. Test procedures are presented in a standardized format.

  12. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS

  13. Energy efficient engine: Turbine intermediate case and low-pressure turbine component test hardware detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, K.; Thulin, R. D.; Howe, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    A four stage, low pressure turbine component has been designed to power the fan and low pressure compressor system in the Energy Efficient Engine. Designs for a turbine intermediate case and an exit guide vane assembly also have been established. The components incorporate numerous technology features to enhance efficiency, durability, and performance retention. These designs reflect a positive step towards improving engine fuel efficiency on a component level. The aerodynamic and thermal/mechanical designs of the intermediate case and low pressure turbine components are presented and described. An overview of the predicted performance of the various component designs is given.

  14. Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, M.B.

    1997-04-01

    This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

  15. Random regression test day models to estimate genetic parameters for milk yield and milk components in Philippine dairy buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Flores, E B; van der Werf, J

    2015-08-01

    Heritabilities and genetic correlations for milk production traits were estimated from first-parity test day records on 1022 Philippine dairy buffalo cows. Traits analysed included milk (MY), fat (FY) and protein (PY) yields, and fat (Fat%) and protein (Prot%) concentrations. Varying orders of Legendre polynomials (Leg(m)) as well as the Wilmink function (Wil) were used in random regression models. These various models were compared based on log likelihood, Akaike's information criterion, Bayesian information criterion and genetic variance estimates. Six residual variance classes were sufficient for MY, FY, PY and Fat%, while seven residual classes for Prot%. Multivariate analysis gave higher estimates of genetic variance and heritability compared with univariate analysis for all traits. Heritability estimates ranged from 0.25 to 0.44, 0.13 to 0.31 and 0.21 to 0.36 for MY, FY and PY, respectively. Wilmink's function was the better fitting function for additive genetic effects for all traits. It was also the preferred function for permanent environment effects for Fat% and Prot%, but for MY, FY and PY, the Legm was the appropriate function. Genetic correlations of MY with FY and PY were high and they were moderately negative with Fat% and Prot%. To prevent deterioration in Fat% and Prot% and improve milk quality, more weight should be applied to milk component traits.

  16. Investigation on the components removed in loss on ignition test of sandy crushed construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Yamada, Masato; Inoue, Yuzo; Watanabe, Yoichi; Ono, Yusaku

    2010-01-01

    Processed sandy residue generated from mixed construction and demolition waste (mixed C&D-W) was investigated for possible deposition in landfill. The basic properties and the components removed in the loss on ignition (LOI) test were examined. The target material for decreasing LOI was elucidated and the validity of LOI used as landfill standard for inert industrial solid waste was discussed. LOI of most of the samples was above 5% and therefore, in principle, processed sandy residue should not be deposited in inert-type landfill. As LOI of sandy residue was mainly due to bound water, the LOI could not be decreased to below 5% even if wood, which is the major organic matter in the sandy residue, was removed. However, decreasing the amount of wood could lead to a subsequent decrease in the amount of dissolved organic matter. Therefore, the LOI of processed mixed C&D-W used as landfill standard for inert industrial solid waste should be re-evaluated.

  17. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing Part I: System Analysis, Component Identification, Additive Manufacturing, and Testing of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Haller, William J.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Schnulo, Sydney L.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Weir, Don; Wali, Natalie; Vinup, Michael; Jones, Michael G.; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The research and development activities reported in this publication were carried out under NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) funded project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing." The objective of the project was to conduct evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. The results of the activities are described in three part report. The first part of the report contains the data and analysis of engine system trade studies, which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. The technical scope of activities included an assessment of the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composites, which were accomplished by fabricating prototype engine components and testing them in simulated engine operating conditions. The manufacturing process parameters were developed and optimized for polymer and ceramic composites (described in detail in the second and third part of the report). A number of prototype components (inlet guide vane (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included turbine nozzle components. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  18. An empirical test of the decision to lie component of the Activation-Decision-Construction-Action Theory (ADCAT).

    PubMed

    Masip, Jaume; Blandón-Gitlin, Iris; de la Riva, Clara; Herrero, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    Meta-analyses reveal that behavioral differences between liars and truth tellers are small. To facilitate lie detection, researchers are currently developing interviewing approaches to increase these differences. Some of these approaches assume that lying is cognitively more difficult than truth telling; however, they are not based on specific cognitive theories of lie production, which are rare. Here we examined one existing theory, Walczyk et al.'s (2014) Activation-Decision-Construction-Action Theory (ADCAT). We tested the Decision component. According to ADCAT, people decide whether to lie or tell the truth as if they were using a specific mathematical formula to calculate the motivation to lie from (a) the probability of a number of outcomes derived from lying vs. telling the truth, and (b) the costs/benefits associated with each outcome. In this study, participants read several hypothetical scenarios and indicated whether they would lie or tell the truth in each scenario (Questionnaire 1). Next, they answered several questions about the consequences of lying vs. telling the truth in each scenario, and rated the probability and valence of each consequence (Questionnaire 2). Significant associations were found between the participants' dichotomous decision to lie/tell the truth in Questionnaire 1 and their motivation to lie scores calculated from the Questionnaire 2 data. However, interestingly, whereas the expected consequences of truth telling were associated with the decision to lie vs. tell the truth, the expected consequences of lying were not. Suggestions are made to refine ADCAT, which can be a useful theoretical framework to guide deception research.

  19. Testing the Efficacy of a Multi-Component DNA-Prime/DNA-Boost Vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio-Burgos, José E.; Ochoa-García, Laucel; Zepeda-Escobar, José Antonio; Gupta, Shivali; Dhiman, Monisha; Martínez, José Simón; de Oca-Jiménez, Roberto Montes; Arreola, Margarita Val; Barbabosa-Pliego, Alberto; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan C.; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2011-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas Disease, is a major vector borne health problem in Latin America and an emerging infectious disease in the United States. Methods We tested the efficacy of a multi-component DNA-prime/DNA-boost vaccine (TcVac1) against experimental T. cruzi infection in a canine model. Dogs were immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids and cytokine adjuvants, and two weeks after the last immunization, challenged with T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We measured antibody responses by ELISA and haemagglutination assay, parasitemia and infectivity to triatomines by xenodiagnosis, and performed electrocardiography and histology to assess myocardial damage and tissue pathology. Results Vaccination with TcVac1 elicited parasite-and antigen-specific IgM and IgG (IgG2>IgG1) responses. Upon challenge infection, TcVac1-vaccinated dogs, as compared to non-vaccinated controls dogs, responded to T. cruzi with a rapid expansion of antibody response, moderately enhanced CD8+ T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, and suppression of phagocytes’ activity evidenced by decreased myeloperoxidase and nitrite levels. Subsequently, vaccinated dogs controlled the acute parasitemia by day 37 pi (44 dpi in non-vaccinated dogs), and exhibited a moderate decline in infectivity to triatomines. TcVac1-immunized dogs did not control the myocardial parasite burden and electrocardiographic and histopatholgic cardiac alterations that are the hallmarks of acute Chagas disease. During the chronic stage, TcVac1-vaccinated dogs exhibited a moderate decline in cardiac alterations determined by EKG and anatomo-/histo-pathological analysis while chronically-infected/non-vaccinated dogs continued to exhibit severe EKG alterations. Conclusions Overall, these results demonstrated that TcVac1 provided a partial resistance to T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease, and provide an impetus to improve the vaccination strategy against Chagas disease. PMID:21625470

  20. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft. Phase 4: Full scale ground test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Dorwald, F.

    1982-01-01

    The ground tests conducted on the advanced composite vertical fin (ACVF) program are described. The design and fabrication of the test fixture and the transition structure, static test of Ground Test Article (GTA) No. 1, rework of GTA No. 2, and static, damage tolerance, fail-safe and residual strength tests of GTA No. 2 are described.

  1. Operation Sun Beam, Shot Small Boy. Project Officer's report - Project 7. 8. Arming and fuzing component test

    SciTech Connect

    Taslitt, N.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) determine whether the radiation from a nuclear weapon can disable various arming and fuzing components by causing permanent damage; (2) determine whether transient nuclear radiation can induce an operating fuze to malfunction; and (3) compare nuclear weapon radiation effects with those produced by various radiation simulators. Data obtained revealed that none of the inertial components were detrimentally affected. The electronic components were severely degraded but would have satisfactorily accomplished their tactical functions. No electromagnetic effects were detected.

  2. Development and testing of laser Doppler system components for wake vortex monitoring. Volume 2: Scanner operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, B. B.; Coffey, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    The theory and operation of the scanner portion of the laser Doppler system for detecting and monitoring aircraft trailing vortices in an airport environment are discussed. Schematics, wiring diagrams, component values, and operation and checkout procedures are included.

  3. Component Test Facility (Comtest) Phase 1 Engineering For 760°C (1400°F) Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC) Steam Generator Development

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, Paul

    2016-05-13

    The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) performed a Pre-Front End Engineering Design (Pre-FEED) of an A-USC steam superheater for a proposed component test program achieving 760°C (1400°F) steam temperature. This would lead to follow-on work in a Phase 2 and Phase 3 that would involve detail design, manufacturing, construction and operation of the ComTest. Phase 1 results have provided the engineering data necessary for proceeding to the next phase of ComTest. The steam generator superheater would subsequently supply the steam to an A-USC prototype intermediate pressure steam turbine. The ComTest program is important in that it will place functioning A-USC components in operation and in coordinated boiler and turbine service. It is also important to introduce the power plant operation and maintenance personnel to the level of skills required and provide the first background experience with hands-on training. The project will provide a means to exercise the complete supply chain events required in order to practice and perfect the process for A-USC power plant design, supply, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance. Representative participants will then be able to transfer knowledge and recommendations to the industry. ComTest is conceived in the manner of using a separate standalone plant facility that will not jeopardize the host facility or suffer from conflicting requirements in the host plant’s mission that could sacrifice the nickel alloy components and not achieve the testing goals. ComTest will utilize smaller quantities of the expensive materials and reduce the risk in the first operational practice for A-USC technology in the United States. Components at suitable scale in ComTest provide more assurance before putting them into practice in the full size A-USC demonstration plant.

  4. Principles and Application of Magnetic Rubber Testing for Crack Detection in High-Strength Steel Components: II. Residual-Field Inspection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    DSTO Defence Science and Technology Organisation D6ac Denotes a grade of high strength steel FEM Finite element modelling (for calculating magnetic...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Principles and Application of Magnetic Rubber Testing for Crack Detection in High-Strength Steel Components: II...ABSTRACT Since its introduction in the 1970s, magnetic rubber testing (MRT) has been used successfully to inspect critical high-strength steel

  5. Principles and Application of Magnetic Rubber Testing for Crack Detection in High-Strength Steel Components: I. Active-Field Inspection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    D6ac Denotes a grade of high strength steel MLE Maximum likelihood estimate MPI Magnetic particle inspection MRT Magnetic rubber testing NDE...crack detection if the coercive field of the grade of steel is increased [45]. Field values quoted in the general MRT literature† are of limited value...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Principles and Application of Magnetic Rubber Testing for Crack Detection in High-Strength Steel Components: I

  6. Oklahoma School Testing Program: Writing Assessment Component. 1992 Summary Report. Stanford Writing Assessment Program for Grades 7 and 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This report provides an overview of the Oklahoma School Testing Program (OSTP) and summarizes students' average writing assessment scores from 1987 through 1992. Oklahoma has completed its 6th year of administering a state legislature mandated test to 10th graders and its 5th year of testing 7th graders. The Stanford Writing Assessment Program was…

  7. Passive exposure of Earth radiation budget experiment components LDEF experiment AO-147: Post-flight examinations and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The Passive Exposure of Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Components (PEERBEC) experiment of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission was composed of sensors and components associated with the measurement of the earth radiation budget (ERB) from satellites. These components included the flight spare sensors from the ERB experiment which operated on Nimbus 6 and 7 satellites. The experiment components and materials as well as the pertinent background and ancillary information necessary for the understanding of the intended mission and the results are described. The extent and timing of the LDEF mission brought the exposure from solar minimum between cycles 21 and 22 through the solar maximum of cycle 22. The orbital decay, coupled with the events of solar maximum, caused the LDEF to be exposed to a broader range of space environmental effects than were anticipated. The mission spanned almost six years concurrent with the 12 year (to date) Nimbus 7 operations. Preliminary information is presented on the following: (1) the changes in transmittance experienced by the interference filters; (2) the results of retesting of the thermopile sensors, which appear to be relatively unaffected by the exposure; and (3) the results of the recalibration of the APEX cavity radiometer. The degradation and recovery of the filters of the Nimbus 7 ERB are also discussed relative to the apparent atomic oxygen cleaning which also applies to the LDEF.

  8. Field test results for nitrogen removal by the constructed wetland component of an agricultural water recycling system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wetland Reservoir Subirrigation Systems (WRSIS) are innovative agricultural water recycling systems that can provide economic and environmental benefits. A constructed wetland is a main component of WRSIS, and an important function of this constructed wetland is drainage water treatment of nitrog...

  9. Implementation and testing of a real-time 3-component phase picking program for Earthworm using the CECM algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B. I.; Friberg, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Modern seismic networks typically deploy three component (3C) sensors, but still fail to utilize all of the information available in the seismograms when performing automated phase picking for real-time event location. In most cases a variation on a short term over long term average threshold detector is used for picking and then an association program is used to assign phase types to the picks. However, the 3C waveforms from an earthquake contain an abundance of information related to the P and S phases in both their polarization and energy partitioning. An approach that has been overlooked and has demonstrated encouraging results is the Component Energy Comparison Method (CECM) by Nagano et al. as published in Geophysics 1989. CECM is well suited to being used in real-time because the calculation is not computationally intensive. Furthermore, the CECM method has fewer tuning variables (3) than traditional pickers in Earthworm such as the Rex Allen algorithm (N=18) or even the Anthony Lomax Filter Picker module (N=5). In addition to computing the CECM detector we study the detector sensitivity by rotating the signal into principle components as well as estimating the P phase onset from a curvature function describing the CECM as opposed to the CECM itself. We present our results implementing this algorithm in a real-time module for Earthworm and show the improved phase picks as compared to the traditional single component pickers using Earthworm.

  10. SARA Reading Components Tests, RISE Forms: Technical Adequacy and Test Design, 2nd Edition. Research Report. ETS RR-15-32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatini, John; Bruce, Kelly; Steinberg, Jonathan; Weeks, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This technical report describes the conceptual foundation and measurement properties of the Reading Inventory and Scholastic Evaluation (RISE). The RISE is a 6-subtest, Web-administered reading skills components battery. The theoretical and empirical foundations of each subtest in the battery are reviewed, as well as item designs. The results…

  11. Component Testing for Modular Pier Replacement at McMurdo Station, Antarctica: Inflatable Pontoons, Gelbo Flex and Full-Scale Cold Storage/Fold Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Replacement at McMurdo Station, Antarctica: Inflatable Pontoons Gelbo Flex and Full-Scale Cold Storage /Fold Tests Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h an...Pontoons Gelbo Flex and Full-Scale Cold Storage /Fold Tests Jason C. Weale and Margaret A. Knuth Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL...4 4 Full-Scale Pontoon Cold Storage and Inflation Tests

  12. Developing and evaluating a paper-and-pencil test to assess components of physics teachers' pedagogical content knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Sophie; Borowski, Andreas; Fischer, Hans E.; Gess-Newsome, Julie; von Aufschnaiter, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Teachers' professional knowledge is assumed to be a key variable for effective teaching. As teacher education has the goal to enhance professional knowledge of current and future teachers, this knowledge should be described and assessed. Nevertheless, only a limited number of studies quantitatively measures physics teachers' professional knowledge. The study reported in this paper was part of a bigger project with the broader goal of understanding teacher professional knowledge. We designed a test instrument to assess the professional knowledge of physics teachers (N = 186) in the dimensions of content knowledge (CK), pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), and pedagogical knowledge (PK). A model describing the relationships between these three dimensions of professional knowledge was created to inform the design of the tests used to measure CK, PCK, and PK. In this paper, we describe the model with particular emphasis on the PCK part, and the subsequent PCK test development and its implementation in detail. We report different approaches to evaluate the PCK test, including the description of content validity, the examination of the internal structure of professional knowledge, and the analysis of construct validity by testing teachers across different school subjects, teachers from different school types, pre-service teachers, and physicists. Our findings demonstrate that our PCK test results could distinguish physics teachers from the other groups tested. The PCK test results could not be explained by teachers' CK or PK, cognitive abilities, computational skills, or science knowledge.

  13. Assessing the Basic Components of Reading: A Revision of the Castles and Coltheart Test with New Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castles, Anne; Coltheart, Max; Larsen, Linda; Jones, Pip; Saunders, Steven; McArthur, Genevieve

    2009-01-01

    We present administration details and normative data for a new version of the word and nonword reading test originally developed by Castles and Coltheart. The new test contains an expanded set of items, with 40 each of regular words, irregular words and nonwords, rather than the original 30 items of each type. The new items extend the upper-end of…

  14. Repeated Measurement of the Components of Attention with Young Children Using the Attention Network Test: Stability, Isolability, Robustness, and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishigami, Yoko; Klein, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the robustness, stability, reliability, and isolability of the attention network scores (alerting, orienting, and executive control) when young children experienced repeated administrations of the child version of the Attention Network Test (ANT; Rueda et al., 2004). Ten test sessions of the ANT were administered to 12…

  15. Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT): Estimating the General Ability Component. Interim Technical Paper for Period July 1989-June 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earles, James A.; Ree, Malcolm James

    Many multiple aptitude test batteries, including the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT), used for assigning or classifying individuals to jobs or for occupational counseling have subtests covering a broad range of content such as science, mathematics, reading, vocabulary, perceptual, mechanical, or technical knowledge. This content reflects…

  16. Oklahoma School Testing Program: Writing Assessment Component. 1993 Summary Report. Stanford Writing Assessment Program for Grades 7 and 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This report provides an overview of the Oklahoma School Testing Program (OSTP) and summarizes students' average writing assessment scores from 1987 through 1993. In 1992, the Stanford Writing Assessment replaced the MAT-6 Writing Test as the instrument for measuring writing achievement for 7th and 10th graders in Oklahoma. Student papers were hand…

  17. Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

  18. Development of improved high pressure turbine outer gas path seal components. [abradability and thermal cycling test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.

    1980-01-01

    A plasma sprayed graded layered ceramic/metallic (ZrO2/CoCrAlY) seal was evaluated for JT9D turbine application by rig and engine tests. Four cyclic thermal shock rig tests were conducted during the program. Three completed 1000 simulated engine thermal cycle tests and the fourth completed 500 cycles without severe cracking or spalling. Three ceramic seals were installed in a JT9D experimental engine to evaluate the effect of the engine thermal environment on the seals. All three seals completed the test successfully without severe cracking or spalling. The three seals did have slight laminar cracks at the 85/15-40/60 ZrO2/CoCrAlY interface. The second engine test evaluated the rub capabilities of the seal. Six ceramic seals were installed in the engine with fourteen abrasive tip blades. Three of the six seals rubbed to a depth of 24 mils. Eight of the fourteen abrasive tip blades showed evidence of wear. Three of the eight blades wore a maximum of five mils. Engine rub test results demonstrated the potential of reducing turbine clearances and thereby improving engine performance by use of sprayed ceramic seals.

  19. The Two Components of the Evolved Massive Binary LZ Cephei: Testing the Effects of Binarity on Stellar Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Donati, J.-F.; Bouret, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We present an in-dep(h study of the two components of the binary system LZ Cep to constrain the effects of binarity on the evolution of massive stars. Methods. We analyzed a set of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra obtained over the orbital period of the system to perform a spectroscopic disentangling and derive an orbital solution. We subsequently determine the stellar properties of each component by means of an analysis with the CMFGEN atmosphere code. Finally, with the derived stellar parameters, we model the Hipparcos photometric light curve using the program NIGHTFALL to obtain the orbit inclination and the stellar masses. Results.LZ Cep is a O9III+ON9.7V binary. It is as a semi-detailed system in which either the primary or the secondary star almost fills up its Roche lobe. The dynamical masses are about 16.0 Stellar Mass (primary) and 6.5 Stellar Mass (secondary). The latter is lower than the typical mass of late-type O stars. The secondary component is chemically more evolved than the primary (which barely shows any sign of CNO processing), with strong helium and nitrogen enhancements as well as carbon and oxygen depletions. These properties (surface abundances and mass) are typical of Wolf-Rayet stars, although the spectral type is ON9.7V. The luminosity of the secondary is consistent with that of core He-burning objects. The preferred, tentative evolutionary scenario to explain abe observed properties involves mass transfer from the secondary - which was initially more massive- towards the primary. The secondary is now almost a core He-burning object, probably with only a thin envelope of H-rich and CNO processed material. A very inefficient mass transfer is necessary to explain the chemical appearance of the primary. Alternative scenarios are discussed but they are affected by greater uncertainties.

  20. Combining the least correlation design, wavelet packet transform and correlation coefficient test to reduce the size of calibration set for NIR quantitative analysis in multi-component systems.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chen-Bo; Xu, Lu; Han, Qing-Juan; Wu, Hai-Long; Nie, Jin-Fang; Fu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2010-05-15

    The paper focuses on solving a common and important problem of NIR quantitative analysis in multi-component systems: how to significantly reduce the size of the calibration set while not impairing the predictive precision. To cope with the problem orthogonal discrete wavelet packet transform (WPT), the least correlation design and correlation coefficient test (r-test) have been combined together. As three examples, a two-component carbon tetrachloride system with 21 calibration samples, a two-component aqueous system with 21 calibration samples, and a two-component aqueous system with 41 calibration samples have been treated with the proposed strategy, respectively. In comparison with some previous methods based on much more calibration samples, the results out of the strategy showed that the predictive ability was not obviously decreased for the first system while being clearly strengthened for the second one, and the predictive precision out of the third one was even satisfactory enough for most cases of quantitative analysis. In addition, all important factors and parameters related to our strategy are discussed in detail.

  1. HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2

    SciTech Connect

    KIRK WINTERHOLLER

    2008-02-25

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

  2. Can pin-on-disk testing be used to assess the wear performance of retrieved UHMWPE components for total joint arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Steven M; MacDonald, Daniel W; Kocagöz, Sevi; Tohfafarosh, Mariya; Baykal, Doruk

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the suitability of using multidirectional pin-on-disk (POD) testing to characterize wear behavior of retrieved ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The POD wear behavior of 25 UHMWPE components, retrieved after 10 years in vivo, was compared with 25 that were shelf aged for 10-15 years in their original packaging. Components were gamma sterilized (25-40 kGy) in an air or reduced oxygen (inert) package. 9 mm diameter pins were fabricated from each component and evaluated against CoCr disks using a super-CTPOD with 100 stations under physiologically relevant, multidirectional loading conditions. Bovine serum (20 g/L protein concentration) was used as lubricant. Volumetric wear rates were found to vary based on the aging environment, as well as sterilization environment. Volumetric wear rates were the lowest for the pins in the gamma inert, shelf aged cohort. These results support the utility of using modern, multidirectional POD testing with a physiologic lubricant as a novel method for evaluating wear properties of retrieved UHMWPE components. The data also supported the hypothesis that wear rates of gamma-inert liners were lower than gamma-air liners for both retrieved and shelf aging conditions. However, this difference was not statistically significant for the retrieved condition.

  3. A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.; Erickson, R.; Frisch, J.; Hast, C.; Jobe, R.K.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, T.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nelson, T.; Phinney, N.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Seryi, A.; Smith, S.; Szalata, Z.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Beard, C.; /Daresbury /CERN /DESY /KEK, Tsukuba /LLNL, Livermore /Lancaster U. /Manchester U. /Notre Dame U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /Birmingham U. /Bristol U. /UC, Berkeley /Cambridge U. /University Coll. London /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Oregon U.

    2005-05-23

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

  4. Modification of the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel for component acoustic testing for the second generation supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Allmen, J. R.; Soderman, P. T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of a large-scale anechoic test facility where large models of engine/airframe/high-lift systems can be tested for both improved noise reduction and minimum performance degradation is described. The facility development is part of the effort to investigate economically viable methods of reducing second generation high speed civil transport noise during takeoff and climb-out that is now under way in the United States. This new capability will be achieved through acoustic modifications of NASA's second largest subsonic wind tunnel: the 40-by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. Three major items are addressed in the design of this large anechoic and quiet wind tunnel: a new deep (42 inch (107 cm)) test section liner, expansion of the wind tunnel drive operating envelope at low rpm to reduce background noise, and other promising methods of improving signal-to-noise levels of inflow microphones. Current testing plans supporting the U.S. high speed civil transport program are also outlined.

  5. Combined Effects of the Three Commitment Components on Focal and Discretionary Behaviors: A Test of Meyer and Herscovitch's Propositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Ian R.; Meyer, John P.; Luchak, Andrew A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test theoretical propositions advanced by Meyer and Herscovitch (2001) concerning the interactive effects of affective, normative, and continuance commitment on focal (staying intentions) and discretionary (citizenship) behavior. Study measures were gathered from a sample of 545 hospital employees. Several a priori…

  6. Testing to determine relationship between explosive-contaminated sludge components and reactivity. Final report, June 1985-January 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kristoff, F.T.; Ewing, T.W.; Johnson, D.E.

    1987-01-31

    Explosives manufacture and ammunition load, assembly and pack (LAP) operations result in the generation of explosives-contaminated wastewater. Over the years, the Department of the Army has used lagoons for treatment of these wastewaters by evaporation/percolation. These lagoons contain the remaining explosives-contaminated waters and sludges are listed as hazardous wastes under Federal regulations promulgated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The basis for this listing is the assumed explosive reactivity of these wastes if subjected to a strong initiating source or if heated under confinement. The objective of this study was to investigate and define the reactivity of explosive-contaminated soils to flame and shock as a function of explosive composition using the Bureau of Mines (BOM) Zero Gap (shock) and Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT flame) tests. The resultant technical data will be used to define the reactivity of explosive-contaminated soil on the basis of compositional analyses. Extensive testing was conducted to investigate and define the reactivity of explosive-contaminated soils to flame and shock stimuli. From these tests, it is also concluded that explosive-contaminated soils can be diluted with virgin soil to reduce the total explosive content of < or = 12% and result in a composition which is not reactive in the BOM flame and shock tests.

  7. Archaeological Test Excavations of the Historic Component of 45-WT-1 Texas City/Riparia, Whitman County, Washington, 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    P-x -1OO COV Fi- 0 Archaeological Test Excavations of the Historic Final Report %oponent of 45-𔃻T-I, Texas City/Riparia, 𔃻hitian -- County ... County Airport ,3. NUMBER OF PAGES Walla Walla, Washington 99362 171 14. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(if differeni from Conlrolling Office) 15...Moscow. Coues, Elliott, Editor 1893 The History of the Lewis and Clark Expedition By Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, Vol. II. (Dover Reprint) New

  8. Investigation of difficult component effects on finite element model vibration prediction for the Bell AH-1G helicopter. Volume 1: Ground vibration test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS) program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Previous correlations of the AH-1G showed good agreement between NASTRAN and tests through 15 to 20 Hz, but poor agreement in the higher frequency range of 20 to 30 Hz. Thus, this effort emphasized the higher frequency airframe vibration response correlations and identified areas that need further R and T work. To conduct the investigations, selected difficult components (main rotor pylon, secondary structure, nonstructural doors/panels, landing gear, engine, fuel, etc.) were systematically removed to quantify their effects on overall vibratory response of the airframe. The entire effort was planned and documented, and the results reviewed by NASA and industry experts in order to ensure scientific control of the testing, analysis, and correlation exercise. In particular, secondary structure and damping had significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. Also, the nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomer mounts were significant on the low frequency pylon modes below main rotor 1p (5.4 Hz). The results of the ground vibration testing are presented.

  9. High-temperature high-bandwidth fiber optic MEMS pressure-sensor technology for turbine engine component testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Wade J.; Russler, Patrick M.; Fielder, Robert S.

    2002-02-01

    Acquiring accurate, transient measurements in harsh environments has always pushed the limits of available measurement technology. Until recently, the technology to directly measure certain properties in extremely high temperature environments has not existed. Advancements in optical measurement technology have led to the development of measurement techniques for pressure, temperature, acceleration, skin friction, etc. using extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometry (EFPI). The basic operating principle behind EFPI enables the development of sensors that can operate in the harsh conditions associated with turbine engines, high-speed combustors, and other aerospace propulsion applications where the flow environment is dominated by high frequency pressure and temperature variations caused by combustion instabilities, blade-row interactions, and unsteady aerodynamic phenomena. Using micromachining technology, these sensors are quite small and therefore ideal for applications where restricted space or minimal measurement interference is a consideration. In order to help demonstrate the general functionality of this measurement technology, sensors and signal processing electronics currently under development by Luna Innovations were used to acquire point measurements during testing of a transonic fan in the Compressor Research Facility (CRF) at the Turbine Engine Research Center (TERC), WPAFB. Acquiring pressure measurements at the surface of the casing wall provides data that are useful in understanding the effects of pressure fluctuations on the operation and lifetime wear of a fan. This measurement technique is useful in both test rig applications and in operating engines where lifetime wear characterization is important. The measurements acquired during this test also assisted in the continuing development of this technology for higher temperature environments by providing proof-of-concept data for sensors based on advanced microfabrication and optical techniques.

  10. EarthCube Integration and Test Environment (ECITE) : An environment to verify, validate, integrate and demonstrate EarthCube technology components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fils, D.; Law, E.; Keiser, K.; Middleton, D.; Pearlman, J.; Stults, M.; MacDermaid, C.; Yang, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    NSF EarthCube is building a community-driven cyberinfrastructure that supports standards for interoperability, infuses advanced technologies to improve and facilitate interdisciplinary research, and helps educate scientists in the emerging practices of digital scholarship, data and software stewardship, and open science. A Testbed Working Group (TWG) was formed by the EarthCube's Technology and Architecture Committee, and is working with the EarthCube and user communities to define and design a testbed that will facilitate the integration of separately funded EarthCube components and promote collaborative planning, testing and integration of technologies. Specifically, the testbed seeks to: Serve as a common ground for prototyping, testing,integration and preservation of EarthCube components and products; Facilitate verification and validation of technologies, use cases, architecture design, components, scalability, interface specifications and standards; Provide a platform for demonstration and showcasing of EarthCube technologies for science users, technologists and the broader geosciences community. This talk gives a brief overview of the role, activities and accomplished achieved by the TWG, as well as the requirements and design developed to drive the implementation of a sustainable EarthCube testbed.

  11. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Maezawa, Masaaki; Urano, Chiharu

    2015-11-01

    We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80-120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  12. Development and testing of laser Doppler system components for wake vortex monitoring. Volume 1: Scanner development, laboratory and field testing and system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Krause, M. C.; Coffey, E. W.; Huang, C. C.; Edwards, B. B.; Shrider, K. R.; Jetton, J. L.; Morrison, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    A servo-controlled range/elevation scanner for the laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) was developed and tested in the field to assess its performance in detecting and monitoring aircraft trailing vortices in an airport environment. The elevation scanner provides a capability to manually point the LDV telescope at operator chosen angles from 3.2 deg. to 89.6 deg within 0.2 deg, or to automatically scan the units between operator chosen limits at operator chosen rates of 0.1 Hz to 0.5 Hz. The range scanner provides a capability to manually adjust the focal point of the system from a range of 32 meters to a range of 896 meters under operator control, or to scan between operator chosen limits and at rates from 0.1 Hz to 6.9 Hz. The scanner controls are designed to allow simulataneous range and elevation scanning so as to provide finger scan patterns, arc scan patterns, and vertical line scan patterns. The development and testing of the unit is discussed, along with a fluid dynamic model of the wake vortex developed in a laser Doppler vortex sensor simulation program.

  13. Task completion report for investigating why output signal-variable values differ from their output component-parameter values in test problem MST2

    SciTech Connect

    Steinke, R.G.

    1997-09-10

    Signal-variable values and their component-parameter values differ in an end-of-timestep edit to the TRCOUT and TRCGRF files because signal variables have beginning-of-timestep values, and component parameters have end-of-timestep values. Oscillatory divergence in the MST2 standard test problem after 9000 s occurs because of TRAC-P`s numerical evaluation at a 1000 material Courant number. The magnitude of that divergence has diminished by a factor of 3.5 from Version 5.3.01 to 5.4.15 and by a factor of 25 from Version 5.4.15 to 5.4.28. That divergence can be eliminated by evaluating MST2 with a maximum material Courant number of 500.

  14. The Mission and Technology of a Gas Dynamic Trap Neutron Source for Fusion Material and Component Testing and Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A; Kulcinski, J; Molvik, A; Ryutov, D; Santarius, J; Simonen, T; Wirth, B D; Ying, A

    2009-11-23

    The successful operation (with {beta} {le} 60%, classical ions and electrons with Te = 250 eV) of the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) device at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) in Novosibirsk, Russia, extrapolates to a 2 MW/m{sup 2} Dynamic Trap Neutron Source (DTNS), which burns only {approx}100 g of tritium per full power year. The DTNS has no serious physics, engineering, or technology obstacles; the extension of neutral beam lines to steady state can use demonstrated engineering; and it supports near-term tokamaks and volume neutron sources. The DTNS provides a neutron spectrum similar to that of ITER and satisfies the missions specified by the materials community to test fusion materials (listed as one of the top grand challenges for engineering in the 21st century by the U.S. National Academy of Engineering) and subcomponents (including tritium-breeding blankets) needed to construct DEMO. The DTNS could serve as the first Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), called for by ReNeW, and could provide the data necessary for licensing subsequent FSNFs.

  15. Molar ratio iron: zinc and folic acid in Brazilian biscuits and snacks and test for classification using principal component analyses.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Adriana Teixeira; Rebelatto, Ana Paula; Borin-Nogueira, Alessandra; Lima-Pallone, Juliana Azevedo

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate molar ratio iron: zinc and the levels of folic acid in biscuit and snacks commercialized in Brazil, prepared with folic acid and iron fortified flours. These nutrients are important for human nutrition; however, iron can have a negative effect on zinc absorption. Molar ratio iron:zinc can indicate if there will be any problems for absorption of these nutrients. The folic acid content varied from 58 to 433 μg/100 g and iron and zinc levels varied from 2.9 to 9.4 mg/100 g and from 0.2 to 1.3 mg/100 g, respectively, for 75 analyzed samples. The average iron contents observed in the products and molar ratio iron:zinc (in average 8:1 for biscuits and 12.8:1 for snacks) could result in problems with the zinc absorption. Moreover, principal compo- nent analyses (PCA) indicated low uniformity in the distribution of minerals and vitamin in the majority of the samples, mainly among brands. The results indicated that for the majority of the samples tested folic acid and iron content was higher than expected for flours and could be useful to governmental authorities in their evaluation program of flour fortification.

  16. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  17. Estimation of the Unsteady Aerodynamic Load on Space Shuttle External Tank Protuberances from a Component Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayatana; Martin, Fred W.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    At the wake of the Columbia (STS-107) accident it was decided to remove the Protuberance Aerodynamic Load (PAL) Ramp that was originally intended to protect various protuberances outside of the Space Shuttle External Tank from high buffet load induced by cross-flows at transonic speed. In order to establish the buffet load without the PAL ramp, a wind tunnel test was conducted where segments of the protuberances were instrumented with dynamic pressure transducers; and power-spectra of sectional lift and drag forces at various span-wise locations between two adjacent support brackets were measured under different cross flow angles, Mach number and other conditions. Additionally, frequency-dependent spatial correlations between the sectional forces were also established. The sectional forces were then adjusted by the correlation length to establish span-averaged spectra of normal and lateral forces that can be suitably "added" to various other unsteady forces encountered by the protuberance. This paper describes the methodology used for calculating the correlation-adjusted power spectrum of the buffet load. A second part of the paper describes wind-tunnel results on the difference in the buffet load on the protuberances with and without the PAL ramp. In general when the ramp height is the same as that of the protuberance height, such as that found on the liquid Oxygen part of the tank, the ramp is found to cause significant reduction of the unsteady aerodynamic load. However, on the liquid Hydrogen part of the tank, where the Oxygen feed-line is far larger in diameter than the height of the PAL ramp, little protection is found to be available to all but the Cable Tray.

  18. The development of an in vitro test method for predicting the abrasion resistance of textile and metal components of endovascular stent grafts.

    PubMed

    Yao, Tong; Choules, Brian D; Rust, Jon P; King, Martin W

    2014-04-01

    Implantable endovascular stent grafts have become a frequent option for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aneurysms. Given that such devices are permanent implants, the question of long-term biostability needs to be addressed. This article describes the development of an in vitro stent graft abrasion test method between the graft fabric and metal stent of an endovascular device. Three endpoints were established to determine the abrasion resistance between the fabric and stent surfaces after a predetermined number of abrasion cycles. During initial testing, two types of graft fabric materials, multifilament woven polyester fabric and monofilament woven polyester fabric, and two types of stent materials, laser cut nitinol stents and regular nitinol stent wire, were evaluated under dry and wet conditions. The results have shown that this test method is viable for testing the relative abrasion resistance of the components of endovascular stent grafts. The abrasion resistance of both fabrics was lower in a wet environment compared to being tested dry. Additionally, the multifilament polyester fabric had better abrasion resistance than the monofilament polyester fabric. The laser cut nitinol stent was more aggressive in creating holes and breaking yarns, while the regular nitinol stent wire caused a greater loss in fabric strength.

  19. An evaluation of rational-emotive imagery as a component of rational-emotive therapy in the treatment of test anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hymen, S P; Warren, R

    1978-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of rational-emotive imagery as a component of rational-emotive therapy in reduction of college students' test anxiety. 11 volunteers met for 6 1-hr. group treatment sessions over a 3-wk. period. After 2 initial treatment sessions subjects were randomly assigned to groups given either rational-emotive therapy with rational-emotive imagery or rational-emotive therapy without imagery. Contrary to predictions, improvement between groups on self-report and performance measures was nonsignificant. Failure to obtain differences was attributed to similarities in content of treatment sessions and short treatment time. Combined groups reported significant improvement on all dependent measures. Although the study did not yield the predicted benefits of the imagery, results lend further support to the efficacy of rational-emotive therapy procedures in the reduction of test anxiety.

  20. Characterization of Fractured Rock during Well Tests using Tilt-X, a Portable Tiltmeter and Extensometer for Multi-Component Deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisz, D. B.; Ebenhack, J.; Germanovich, L. N.; Murdoch, L. C.

    2010-12-01

    We have been characterizing the hydromechanical behavior of fractured rock by measuring axial displacements and measurements of rotations about the horizontal axes (tilts) during well tests using a new device, called Tilt-X (short for tiltmeter and extensometer). The device includes a pair of retractable anchors connected by an invar rod. The device functions like an extensometer by measuring axial displacement of the anchors using a Differential Variable Reluctance Transducer, which can resolve displacements of approximately +/- 5 nanometers. It also contains a tiltmeter that can resolve tilts of less than +/- 30 nano-radians. An important component of the functionality of both measurement systems is the ability to register high-resolution sensors in the middle of their stroke. The displacement sensor is registered using a linear actuator to move the invar rod into a pre-determined location. Field tests show the registration system has repeatability to several 10s of microns, which is a key factor enabling the use of high resolutions sensors with a short stroke length. The tiltmeter is registered to the middle of its stroke using a self-leveling mechanism. The Tilt-X device was evaluated by conducting pumping tests at the Clemson University Well Field in western South Carolina. Boreholes are cased through approximately 20 m of saprolite, with total depths of 60 m and 120 m in fractured biotite gneiss. Fracture zones a few meters thick occur at depths of 26 m, 35 m, and a single conductive fracture occurs at 50 m. The Tilt-X was deployed across and below each zone. Equilibration times of 3 to several hours were required for the Tilt-X to stabilize each time it was moved. Four- hour-long constant-rate pumping tests were conducted in well LAR3, and displacements, tilts, pressure and temperature were monitored in a monitoring well approximately 5 m WNW of the pumping well. Preliminary results show displacement and tilt occurring at each interval. The tilt direction

  1. Technical Letter Report, An Evaluation of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Reactor Piping System Components Containing Dissimilar Metal Welds, JCN N6398, Task 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-11-30

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light-water reactor components. The scope of this research encom¬passes primary system pressure boundary materials including dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, inlays and onlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in steel components that challenge standard and/or conventional inspection methodologies. This interim technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of small-bore DMW components that exist in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience and events such as the circumferential cracking in the reactor vessel nozzle-to-RCS hot leg pipe at V.C. Summer nuclear power station, identified in 2000, show that in PWRs where primary coolant water (or steam) are present under normal operation, Alloy 82/182 materials are susceptible to pressurized water stress corrosion cracking. The extent and number of occurrences of DMW cracking in nuclear power plants (domestically and internationally) indicate the necessity for reliable and effective inspection techniques. The work described herein was performed to provide insights for evaluating the utility of advanced NDE approaches for the inspection of DMW components such as a pressurizer surge nozzle DMW, a shutdown cooling pipe DMW, and a ferritic (low-alloy carbon steel)-to-CASS pipe DMW configuration.

  2. Software component quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a software inspection process that can be used to evaluate the quality of software components. Quality criteria, process application, independent testing of the process and proposed associated tool support are covered. Early results indicate that this technique is well suited for assessing software component quality in a standardized fashion. With automated machine assistance to facilitate both the evaluation and selection of software components, such a technique should promote effective reuse of software components.

  3. [Girls are more successful than boys at the university. Gender group differences in models integrating motivational and aggressive components correlated with Test-Anxiety].

    PubMed

    Masson, A-M; Hoyois, Ph; Cadot, M; Nahama, V; Petit, F; Ansseau, M

    2004-01-01

    It is surprising to note the evolution of success rates in Belgian universities especially in the first Year. Men are less successful than women and the differences are escalating in an alarming way. Dropouts take the same direction and women now represent a majority of the students at the university. In a previous study, we assessed 616 students in the first Year at the university of Liège with Vasev, the English name of which was TASTE, a self report questionnaire constituted of 4 factors: anxiety, self confidence, procrastination and performance value; anxiety particularly concerned somatic expression of students before and during test evaluations; self confidence was a cognitive component close to self efficacy; procrastination was the behavioral component characterizing avoidance when students are confronted with the risk of failure; performance value referred to intrinsic and extrinsic motivations. French validation of TASTE led to an abbreviated version of 50 items (THEE) consisting of 5 factors, the four of TASTE and an additional one, very consistent, at first called depression because of its correlations with this dimension, then called sense of competence on account of its semantic content. Self-competence has been described in the literature of Achievement Motivation and corresponded to expectancy and ability beliefs in performance process which was also relevant to self-efficacy except the particularity of comparison with others, which was not included in the last construct. Self-competence has been considered as an important part of the Worry component of test anxiety. Some Authors didn't hesitate to view causality flowing from self-competence to test anxiety and have conceptualized the latter as a failure of the self where one's sense of competence has been undermined as a result of experienced failure. In our study, only that factor was equally scored in women and men whereas it was scored higher in failed students. In other respects anxiety and

  4. Derivation of the Data Reduction Equations for the Calibration of the Six-component Thrust Stand in the CE-22 Advanced Nozzle Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Kin C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the derivation of the data reduction equations for the calibration of the six-component thrust stand located in the CE-22 Advanced Nozzle Test Facility. The purpose of the calibration is to determine the first-order interactions between the axial, lateral, and vertical load cells (second-order interactions are assumed to be negligible). In an ideal system, the measurements made by the thrust stand along the three coordinate axes should be independent. For example, when a test article applies an axial force on the thrust stand, the axial load cells should measure the full magnitude of the force, while the off-axis load cells (lateral and vertical) should read zero. Likewise, if a lateral force is applied, the lateral load cells should measure the entire force, while the axial and vertical load cells should read zero. However, in real-world systems, there may be interactions between the load cells. Through proper design of the thrust stand, these interactions can be minimized, but are hard to eliminate entirely. Therefore, the purpose of the thrust stand calibration is to account for these interactions, so that necessary corrections can be made during testing. These corrections can be expressed in the form of an interaction matrix, and this paper shows the derivation of the equations used to obtain the coefficients in this matrix.

  5. Design and Construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHZ Klystron To Be Used As RF Power Source For LHC/RF Component Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Chris

    2003-05-05

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented.

  6. Test method for the presence or absence of Pb in electrical components using energy-dispersive micro X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Araki, Wakako; Mizoroki, Kaoru; Oki, Mitsuhiro; Takenaka, Miyuki

    2005-07-01

    The micro-EDXRF (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence) method was applied to the screening of Pb in micrometer-area samples, such as a Cu contact in electrical components that had been coated by Pb-free Sn-Ag-Cu solder. The reliability of the screening method was evaluated by a comparison with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation and a precious chemical analysis method of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Some factors that affect the testing reliability, such as the thickness of the solder, the segregation of Pb and Ag, etc. were found by SEM observations. By adjusting some calculation parameters, screening of the micrometer area (0.1 mm) was performed using the fundamental parameter (FP) method for a thin film in conjunction with micro-EDXRF. The measurement error ranged by 25% for the thin film-FP method. The resulted detection limit was 0.04 wt% for Pb, depending on the solder thickness. This method can be successively applied for quality control to check the purity of a Pb-free Sn-Ag-Cu solder coating in electrical components.

  7. Anti-HIV antibody in saliva: an assessment of the role of the components of saliva, testing methodologies and collection systems.

    PubMed

    Lamey, P J; Nolan, A; Follett, E A; Coote, I; MacFarlane, T W; Kennedy, D H; Connell, A; Parry, J V

    1996-03-01

    The various components of saliva, namely mixed saliva, parotid saliva, submandibular saliva, crevicular fluid and minor (labial) gland secretions, were collected from 63 known HIV antibody seropositive patients. A commercial test system, Wellcozyme HIV 1+2, and an antibody capture ELISA (GACELISA), were compared for sensitivity against all components. Sensitivity of the GACELISA system was 100% in 123 mixed saliva, 121 parotid saliva and 127 labial fluid samples, and 98% in 99 submandibular samples and 127 crevicular fluid samples. Respective figures for Wellcozyme 1+2 were 92%, 55%, 73%, 66% and 63%. Mixed saliva was most easily, conveniently and effectively collected using a plain Salivette. In 241 Salivette samples examined from the 63 patients, GACELISA proved 100% sensitive, and Wellcozyme 95% sensitive. Another form of Salivette impregnated with citric acid was unsuitable for GACELISA and gave a false negative value of 45%. In 197 samples from the gingival margin taken by a dry swab, GACELISA showed a sensitivity of 98% and Wellcozyme 81%. The most sensitive method for demonstrating anti-HIV antibody in saliva is to collect mixed saliva with the plain Salivette system and assay anti-HIV antibody levels by GACELISA.

  8. Testing the Li-Strahler four-component canopy reflectance model in the HAPEX-Sahel shrub savanna sites using ground reflectance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J.; Duncan, J.

    1992-01-01

    The rate at which a light field decays in water is characterized by the diffuse attenuation coefficient k. The Li-Strahler discrete-object canopy reflectance model was tested in two sites, a shrub grass savanna and a degraded shrub savanna on bare soil, in the proposed HAPEX (Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment) II/Sahel study area in Niger, West Africa. Average site reflectance was predicted for each site from the reflectances and cover proportions of four components: shrub canopy, background (soil or grass and soil), shaded canopy, and shaded background. Component reflectances were sampled in the SPOT wavebands using a hand-held radiometer. Predicted reflectance was compared to average site reflectance measured using the same radiometer mounted on a backpack with measurements recorded every 5 m along two 1-km transects, also in the SPOT (Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre) bands. Measurements and predictions were made for each of the three days during the summer growing season, approximately two weeks apart. Red, near infrared reflectance, and the NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) were all predicted with a high degree of accuracy for the shrub/grass site and with reasonable accuracy for the degraded shrub site.

  9. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 3 Summary report: Shear web component testing and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Three large scale advanced composite shear web components were tested and analyzed to evaluate application of the design concept to a space shuttle orbiter thrust structure. The shear web design concept consisted of a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web laminate stiffened with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners. The design concept was evaluated to be efficient and practical for the application that was studied. Because of the effects of buckling deflections, a requirement is identified for shear buckling resistant design to maximize the efficiency of highly-loaded advanced composite shear webs. An approximate analysis of prebuckling deflections is presented and computer-aided design results, which consider prebuckling deformations, indicate that the design concept offers a theoretical weight saving of 31 percent relative to all metal construction. Recommendations are made for design concept options and analytical methods that are appropriate for production hardware.

  10. Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-05-05

    In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

  11. System and component design and test of a 10 hp, 18,000 rpm AC dynamometer utilizing a high frequency AC voltage link, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipo, Thomas A.; Alan, Irfan

    1991-01-01

    Hard and soft switching test results conducted with one of the samples of first generation MOS-controlled thyristor (MCTs) and similar test results with several different samples of second generation MCT's are reported. A simple chopper circuit is used to investigate the basic switching characteristics of MCT under hard switching and various types of resonant circuits are used to determine soft switching characteristics of MCT under both zero voltage and zero current switching. Next, operation principles of a pulse density modulated converter (PDMC) for three phase (3F) to 3F two-step power conversion via parallel resonant high frequency (HF) AC link are reviewed. The details for the selection of power switches and other power components required for the construction of the power circuit for the second generation 3F to 3F converter system are discussed. The problems encountered in the first generation system are considered. Design and performance of the first generation 3F to 3F power converter system and field oriented induction moter drive based upon a 3 kVA, 20 kHz parallel resonant HF AC link are described. Low harmonic current at the input and output, unity power factor operation of input, and bidirectional flow capability of the system are shown via both computer and experimental results. The work completed on the construction and testing of the second generation converter and field oriented induction motor drive based upon specifications for a 10 hp squirrel cage dynamometer and a 20 kHz parallel resonant HF AC link is discussed. The induction machine is designed to deliver 10 hp or 7.46 kW when operated as an AC-dynamo with power fed back to the source through the converter. Results presented reveal that the proposed power level requires additional energy storage elements to overcome difficulties with a peak link voltage variation problem that limits reaching to the desired power level. The power level test of the second generation converter after the

  12. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high

  13. Simulation of the passive condensation cooling tank of the PASCAL test facility using the component thermal-hydraulic analysis code CUPID

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kang, K. H.; Yoon, H. Y.

    2012-07-01

    For the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components, a three-dimensional thermal hydraulics code, named CUPID, has been being developed. In the present study, the CUPID code was applied for the simulation of the PASCAL (PAFS Condensing Heat Removal Assessment Loop) test facility constructed with an aim of validating the cooling and operational performance of the PAFS (Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System). The PAFS is one of the advanced safety features adopted in the APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor +), which is intended to completely replace the conventional active auxiliary feedwater system. This paper presents the preliminary simulation results of the PASCAL facility performed with the CUPID code in order to verify its applicability to the thermal-hydraulic phenomena inside the system. A standalone calculation for the passive condensation cooling tank was performed by imposing a heat source boundary condition and the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviors inside the system, such as the water level, temperature and velocity, were qualitatively investigated. The simulation results verified that the natural circulation and boiling phenomena in the water pool can be well reproduced by the CUPID code. (authors)

  14. Microbiological test results of the environmental control and life support systems vapors compression distillation subsystem recycle tank components following various pretreatment protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Tim

    1993-01-01

    Microbiological samples were collected from the recycle tank of the vapor compression distillation (VCD) subsystem of the water recovery test at NASA MSFC following a 68-day run. The recycle tank collects rejected urine brine that was pretreated with a commercially available oxidant (Oxone) and sulfuric acid and pumps it back to the processing component of the VCD. Samples collected included a water sample and two swab samples, one from the particulate filter surface and a second from material floating on the surface of the water. No bacteria were recovered from the water sample. Both swab samples contained a spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus insolitus. A filamentous fungus was isolated from the floating material. Approximately 1 month after the pretreatment chemicals were changed to sodium hypochlorite and sulfuric acid, a swab of the particulate filter was again analyzed for microbial content. One fungus was isolated, and spore-forming bacteria were observed. These results indicate the inability of these pretreatments to inhibit surface attachment. The implications of the presence of these organisms are discussed.

  15. Use of system code to estimate equilibrium tritium inventory in fusion DT machines, such as ARIES-AT and components testing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    C.P.C. Wong; B. Merrill

    2014-10-01

    ITER is under construction and will begin operation in 2020. This is the first 500 MWfusion class DT device, and since it is not going to breed tritium, it will consume most of the limited supply of tritium resources in the world. Yet, in parallel, DT fusion nuclear component testing machines will be needed to provide technical data for the design of DEMO. It becomes necessary to estimate the tritium burn-up fraction and corresponding initial tritium inventory and the doubling time of these machines for the planning of future supply and utilization of tritium. With the use of a system code, tritium burn-up fraction and initial tritium inventory for steady state DT machines can be estimated. Estimated tritium burn-up fractions of FNSF-AT, CFETR-R and ARIES-AT are in the range of 1–2.8%. Corresponding total equilibrium tritium inventories of the plasma flow and tritium processing system, and with the DCLL blanket option are 7.6 kg, 6.1 kg, and 5.2 kg for ARIES-AT, CFETR-R and FNSF-AT, respectively.

  16. Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas

    SciTech Connect

    C.A.Gentile, W.R.Blanchard, T.Kozub, C.Priniski, I.Zatz, S.Obenschain

    2009-09-21

    It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (~ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a "gas shield" may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering metmethods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

  17. Effects of stage of pregnancy on variance components, daily milk yields and 305-day milk yield in Holstein cows, as estimated by using a test-day model.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, T; Hagiya, K; Takeda, H; Osawa, T; Yamaguchi, S; Nagamine, Y

    2016-08-01

    Pregnancy and calving are elements indispensable for dairy production, but the daily milk yield of cows decline as pregnancy progresses, especially during the late stages. Therefore, the effect of stage of pregnancy on daily milk yield must be clarified to accurately estimate the breeding values and lifetime productivity of cows. To improve the genetic evaluation model for daily milk yield and determine the effect of the timing of pregnancy on productivity, we used a test-day model to assess the effects of stage of pregnancy on variance component estimates, daily milk yields and 305-day milk yield during the first three lactations of Holstein cows. Data were 10 646 333 test-day records for the first lactation; 8 222 661 records for the second; and 5 513 039 records for the third. The data were analyzed within each lactation by using three single-trait random regression animal models: one model that did not account for the stage of pregnancy effect and two models that did. The effect of stage of pregnancy on test-day milk yield was included in the model by applying a regression on days pregnant or fitting a separate lactation curve for each days open (days from calving to pregnancy) class (eight levels). Stage of pregnancy did not affect the heritability estimates of daily milk yield, although the additive genetic and permanent environmental variances in late lactation were decreased by accounting for the stage of pregnancy effect. The effects of days pregnant on daily milk yield during late lactation were larger in the second and third lactations than in the first lactation. The rates of reduction of the 305-day milk yield of cows that conceived fewer than 90 days after the second or third calving were significantly (P<0.05) greater than that after the first calving. Therefore, we conclude that differences between the negative effects of early pregnancy in the first, compared with later, lactations should be included when determining the optimal number of days open

  18. Develop a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensey, Tyler S.

    2013-01-01

    During my internship at NASA, I was a model developer for Ground Support Equipment (GSE). The purpose of a model developer is to develop and unit test model component libraries (fluid, electrical, gas, etc.). The models are designed to simulate software for GSE (Ground Special Power, Crew Access Arm, Cryo, Fire and Leak Detection System, Environmental Control System (ECS), etc. .) before they are implemented into hardware. These models support verifying local control and remote software for End-Item Software Under Test (SUT). The model simulates the physical behavior (function, state, limits and 110) of each end-item and it's dependencies as defined in the Subsystem Interface Table, Software Requirements & Design Specification (SRDS), Ground Integrated Schematic (GIS), and System Mechanical Schematic.(SMS). The software of each specific model component is simulated through MATLAB's Simulink program. The intensiv model development life cycle is a.s follows: Identify source documents; identify model scope; update schedule; preliminary design review; develop model requirements; update model.. scope; update schedule; detailed design review; create/modify library component; implement library components reference; implement subsystem components; develop a test script; run the test script; develop users guide; send model out for peer review; the model is sent out for verifictionlvalidation; if there is empirical data, a validation data package is generated; if there is not empirical data, a verification package is generated; the test results are then reviewed; and finally, the user. requests accreditation, and a statement of accreditation is prepared. Once each component model is reviewed and approved, they are intertwined together into one integrated model. This integrated model is then tested itself, through a test script and autotest, so that it can be concluded that all models work conjointly, for a single purpose. The component I was assigned, specifically, was a

  19. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  20. Analysis of SATIR test for the qualification of high heat flux components: defect detection and classification by signal-to-noise ratio maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismondi, F.; Xerri, B.; Jauffret, C.; Schlosser, J.; Vignal, N.; Durocher, A.

    2007-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFC) in Tore Supra and W7X adopt the flat tile concept using carbon fibre composite (CFC) material for the plasma facing material. As the cooling structure is made of a copper alloy material (CuCrZr), the bonding technique between CFC tiles and CuCrZr is critical. Currently, a soft metallic compliant layer is interposed between the two; in such a way the significant thermal expansion mismatch between carbon and copper can be accomodated. The development of a reliable non-destructive inspection technique (NDT) for the bond, to be performed during the manufacturing process, is obviously of great importance. The SATIR (infrared thermography) test bed operating at Commisariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) Cadarache performs this function using transient infrared thermography: the thermal excitation is realized in the cooling channel and the presence of a faulty tile is detected in the form of a delayed thermal response. With this technique, the evolution of the surface temperature of an inspected element was compared to that of a defined free-defect element, using the so-called DTref criterion (maximum of the transient temperature difference). The defect detection capability of the SATIR test bed can be improved using signal processing methods. A first treatment based on spatial image autocorrelation allows a better localization of the bond defect. Moreover, the problem of detection and classification of random signals (like the thin defect signature) can be solved maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Two filters maximizing this ratio were optimized: the stochastic matched filter (SMF) aims at defect detection, while the constrained SMF aims at defect classification. These methods assume that the second-order properties of the process at play are known, through covariance matrices. All these methods process the SATIR signal utilizing any free-defect element as reference signal. The tile temperature signal is either processed by itself or

  1. Battery component

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, F.; Batson, D.C.; Miserendino, A.J.; Boyle, G.

    1988-03-15

    A mechanical component for reserve type electrochemical batteries having cylindrical porous members is described comprising a disc having: (i) circular grooves in one flat side for accepting the porous members; and (ii) at least one radial channel in the opposite flat side in fluid communication with the grooves.

  2. Development, Evaluation, and Validation of a Paper-and-Pencil Test for Measuring Two Components of Biology Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge Concerning the "Cardiovascular System"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmelzing, Stephan; van Driel, Jan H.; Jüttner, Melanie; Brandenbusch, Stefanie; Sandmann, Angela; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2013-01-01

    One main focus of teacher education research concentrates on teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). It has been shown that teachers' PCK correlates with teaching effectiveness as well as with students' achievement gains. Teachers' PCK should be analyzed as one of the main important components to evaluate professional…

  3. The Lamprey River Curriculum: A Teacher-Written, Teacher-Tested Social Studies Curriculum with a Science Component for Elementary, Middle and High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNelly, Deborah; Hoff, Douglas

    This social studies curriculum with a science component contains two sections. The first section targets elementary schools and includes six lessons. The second section is intended for middle schools and high schools and contains four units. These two sections overlap with each other and can be used by teachers from any grade level. The content of…

  4. Diagnose Test-Taker's Profile in Terms of Core Profile Patterns: Principal Component (PC) vs. Profile Analysis via MDS (PAMS) Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.

    A study was conducted to examine how principal components analysis (PCA) and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) can be used to diagnose individuals observed score profiles in terms of core profile patterns identified by each method. The standardization sample from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition…

  5. Testing the Relationship between Three-Component Organizational/Occupational Commitment and Organizational/Occupational Turnover Intention Using a Non-Recursive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Huo-Tsan; Chi, Nai-Wen; Miao, Min-Chih

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between three-component organizational/occupational commitment and organizational/occupational turnover intention, and the reciprocal relationship between organizational and occupational turnover intention with a non-recursive model in collectivist cultural settings. We selected 177 nursing staffs out of 30…

  6. Revealing Optical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Optical Vector Analyzer (OVA) 1550 significantly reduces the time and cost of testing sophisticated optical components. The technology grew from the research Luna Technologies' Dr. Mark Froggatt conducted on optical fiber strain measurement while working at Langley Research Center. Dr. Froggatt originally developed the technology for non- destructive evaluation testing at Langley. The new technique can provide 10,000 independent strain measurements while adding less than 10 grams to the weight of the vehicle. The OVA is capable of complete linear characterization of single-mode optical components used in high- bit-rate applications. The device can test most components over their full range in less than 30 seconds, compared to the more than 20 minutes required by other testing methods. The dramatically shortened measurement time results in increased efficiency in final acceptance tests of optical devices, and the comprehensive data produced by the instrument adds considerable value for component consumers. The device eliminates manufacturing bottlenecks, while reducing labor costs and wasted materials during production.

  7. FIELD TEST OF CYCLODEXTRIN FOR ENHANCED IN-SITU FLUSHING OF MULTIPLE-COMPONENT IMMISCIBLE ORGANIC LIQUID CONTAMINATION: PROJECT OVERVIEW AND INITIAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview and the initial results of a pilot-scale experiment designated to test the use of cyclodextrin for enhanced in-situ flushing of an aquifer contaminated by immiscible liquid. This is the first field test of this technology, terme...

  8. Developing a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) was a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The initial purpose of the UCTS was to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The UCTS is designed with the capability of servicing future space vehicles; including all Space Station Requirements necessary for the MPLM Modules. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems during their development. As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (dryer) to model in Simulink. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink. The dryer is a Catch All replaceable core type filter-dryer. The filter-dryer provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-dryer also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. The filter-dryer was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure and velocity of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my filter-dryer model in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements. I participated in Simulation meetings and was involved in the subsystem design process and team collaborations. I gained valuable work experience and insight into a career path as an engineer.

  9. Developing a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is,. responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) is a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The purpose of the UCTS is to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems s:luring their development. As an intern at KSC, my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (drier) to model in Matlab. The drier was a Catch All replaceable core type filter-drier. The filter-drier provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-drier also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink to help aid in my assignment. The filter-drier was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure, velocity and temperature of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my model filter-drier in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements.

  10. A proficiency test system to improve performance of milk analysis methods and produce reference values for component calibration samples for infrared milk analysis.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Karen L; Melilli, Caterina; Barbano, David M

    2016-08-01

    Our goal was to determine the feasibility of combining proficiency testing, analytical method quality-assurance system, and production of reference samples for calibration of infrared milk analyzers to achieve a more efficient use of resources and reduce costs while maximizing analytical accuracy within and among milk payment-testing laboratories. To achieve this, we developed and demonstrated a multilaboratory combined proficiency testing and analytical method quality-assurance system as an approach to evaluate and improve the analytical performance of methods. A set of modified milks was developed and optimized to serve multiple purposes (i.e., proficiency testing, quality-assurance and method improvement, and to provide reference materials for calibration of secondary testing methods). Over a period of years, the approach has enabled the group of laboratories to document improved analytical performance (i.e., reduced within- and between-laboratory variation) of chemical reference methods used as the primary reference for calibration of high-speed electronic milk-testing equipment. An annual meeting of the laboratory technicians allows for review of results and discussion of each method and provides a forum for communication of experience and techniques that are of value to new analysts in the group. The monthly proficiency testing sample exchanges have the added benefit of producing all-laboratory mean reference values for a set of 14 milks that can be used for calibration, evaluation, and troubleshooting of calibration adjustment issues on infrared milk analyzers.

  11. Educational antimicrobial susceptibility testing as a critical component of microbiology laboratory proficiency programs: American Proficiency Institute results for 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Glick, Teri; Sader, Helio S; Flamm, Robert K; Ross, James E; Rhomberg, Paul R; Edson, Daniel C

    2013-04-01

    External laboratory proficiency programs are an important requirement for test quality assurance (EQA) and compliance to regulatory guidelines (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments and inspections). The American Proficiency Institute (API) regularly distributes EQA sample challenges (test events) including an Educational Sample (ES) for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Beginning in 2007, API has sent 3 ES samples annually, each a well-characterized (molecular/phenotypic methods) strain having an interesting/emerging mechanism of resistance. Hundreds of USA laboratories, usually serving small- to medium-size hospitals and clinics, participate in the API ungraded ES test event. Analysis of responses is made and reported electronically as ES critiques addressing contemporary susceptibility testing issues that affect patient therapy. Seven Gram-positive (+) and 8 Gram-negative (-) ES strains were tested over the 5 years (2007-2011) with organism identification (graded) accuracy of 95.3% (range, 91.0-99.2%) for Gram (-) and 97.0% (range, 94.2-100.0%) for Gram (+) challenges. Susceptibility testing categorical accuracy was generally greatest for the disk diffusion test (91.0/97.0%) compared to the MIC methods (commercial automated or manual) combined (89.9/96.1%, for Gram [-]/Gram [+], respectively). The most worrisome observations of these ES samples were as follows: 1) poor recognition of ESBL- and serine carbapenemase-producing strains (various types including Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapanemase) due to delayed application of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute [CLSI] guidelines; 2) overcalling of ESBL in organisms having wild-type non-ESBL enzymes (OXA series; OXA, 1/30) due to commercial system or participant interpretive error; and 3) occasional drug-bug discords noted in nonfermentative Gram (-) bacilli. In conclusion, the API ES series of ungraded susceptibility testing challenges (accuracy was >90%) has been well received by subscribers and

  12. GCS component development cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Jose A.; Macias, Rosa; Molgo, Jordi; Guerra, Dailos; Pi, Marti

    2012-09-01

    The GTC1 is an optical-infrared 10-meter segmented mirror telescope at the ORM observatory in Canary Islands (Spain). First light was at 13/07/2007 and since them it is in the operation phase. The GTC control system (GCS) is a distributed object & component oriented system based on RT-CORBA8 and it is responsible for the management and operation of the telescope, including its instrumentation. GCS has used the Rational Unified process (RUP9) in its development. RUP is an iterative software development process framework. After analysing (use cases) and designing (UML10) any of GCS subsystems, an initial component description of its interface is obtained and from that information a component specification is written. In order to improve the code productivity, GCS has adopted the code generation to transform this component specification into the skeleton of component classes based on a software framework, called Device Component Framework. Using the GCS development tools, based on javadoc and gcc, in only one step, the component is generated, compiled and deployed to be tested for the first time through our GUI inspector. The main advantages of this approach are the following: It reduces the learning curve of new developers and the development error rate, allows a systematic use of design patterns in the development and software reuse, speeds up the deliverables of the software product and massively increase the timescale, design consistency and design quality, and eliminates the future refactoring process required for the code.

  13. Designing Cool Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA SBIR contract served as the beginning for the development of Daat Research Corporation's Coolit software. Coolit is a unique computational fluid dynamics (CFD) application aimed at thermal and cooling design problems. Coolit can generate 3-D representations of the thermofluid environment and "sketch" the component on the computer. The software modeling reduces time and effort in prototype building and testing.

  14. Repeated Measurement of the Components of Attention of Older Adults using the Two Versions of the Attention Network Test: Stability, Isolability, Robustness, and Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Ishigami, Yoko; Klein, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    Ishigami and Klein (2010) showed that scores of the three attention networks (alerting, orienting, and executive control) measured with the two versions of the Attention Network Test (ANT; Fan et al., 2002; Callejas et al., 2005) were robust over 10 sessions of repeated testing even though practice effects were consistently observed especially in the executive network when young adults were tested. The current study replicated their method to examine robustness, stability, reliability, and isolability of the networks scores when older adults were tested with these ANTs. Ten test sessions, each containing two versions of the ANT, were administered to 10 older adults. Participants were asked to indicate the direction of a target arrow, flanked by distractors, presented either above or below the fixation following auditory signals or/and visual cue. Network scores were calculated using orthogonal subtractions of performance in selected conditions. All network scores remained highly significant even after nine previous sessions despite some practice effects in the executive and the alerting networks. Some lack of independence among the networks was found. The relatively poor reliability of network scores with one session of data rises to respectable levels as more data is added. PMID:22110440

  15. Possible Chemical Source of Discrepancy between in Vitro and in Vivo Tests in Nanotoxicology Caused by Strong Adsorption of Buffer Components.

    PubMed

    Marucco, Arianna; Catalano, Federico; Fenoglio, Ivana; Turci, Francesco; Martra, Gianmario; Fubini, Bice

    2015-01-20

    In the course of studies of the interaction of proteins with TiO2 nanoparticles, we have investigated the role of the medium employed in cellular tests, by measuring the variation of ζ-potential vs pH in the range 2-9 and bovine serum albumin adsorption on TiO2 P25 in the presence of either HEPES or PBS as buffers, both mimicking the physiological pH, but with different chemical nature. The two buffers yield remarkably dissimilar surface charges and protein uptake, i.e., they impart different surface characteristics to the particles which could affect the contact with cells or tissues. This may account for dissimilar toxicological outcomes among in vitro tests and particularly between in vitro vs in vivo tests, considering the high amount of phosphate ions present in body fluids.

  16. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Harihar, Vivek; Kothudum, Ashwini Rajareddy; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism.

  17. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  18. Ising universality class for the liquid-liquid critical point of a one component fluid: a finite-size scaling test.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Paola; Sciortino, Francesco

    2012-10-26

    We present a finite-size scaling study of the liquid-liquid critical point in the Jagla model, a prototype model for liquids that present the same thermodynamic anomalies which characterize liquid water. Performing successive umbrella sampling grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, we evaluate an accurate density of states for different system sizes and determine the size-dependent critical parameters. Extrapolation to infinite size provides estimates of the bulk critical values for this model. The finite-size study allows us to establish that critical fluctuations are consistent with the Ising universality class and to provide definitive evidence for the existence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the Jagla potential. This finding supports the possibility of the existence of a genuine liquid-liquid critical point in anomalous one-component liquids like water.

  19. Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, M.G.S.

    1992-06-01

    The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

  20. Suppressive components in rice husk against mutagens-induced SOS response using Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 umu test.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yoshiharu; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2007-07-20

    The EtOAc extract from rice (Oriza sativa cv. Hinohikari) husk showed a suppressive effect on umu gene expression of the SOS response in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 against the mutagen, Trp-P-1, which requires liver metabolizing enzyme. To obtain the suppressive compound, the EtOAc extract was fractionated by SiO(2) column chromatography using umu test as a bioassay guide. Suppressive compound was isolated and identified as momilactone A (1) by EIMS, IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Compound 1 inhibited of the SOS-inducing activity of Trp-P-1 in the umu test. Gene expression was suppressed by 32.6% at less than 0.60 mM. Compound 1 was assayed with activated Trp-P-1. The suppressive effect of Compound 1 was decreased compared with that of Trp-P-1. Furthermore, 1 was assayed with another mutagens, such as MeIQ, activated MeIQ, furylfuramide (AF-2), MNNG, and UV-irradiation. Compound 1 showed greater suppressive effect on AF-2-inducing SOS response than other mutagens.

  1. Design of smart 3D-digital X-ray microtomographic scanners for non-destructive testing of materials and components of electronic devices with a multilayered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syryamkin, V. I.; Suntsov, S. B.; Klestov, S. A.; Echina, E. S.

    2015-10-01

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. Chapter 4 covers general procedures of defect search, which is based on vector analysis principles. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  2. Design of smart 3D-digital X-ray microtomographic scanners for non-destructive testing of materials and components of electronic devices with a multilayered structure

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A. Echina, E. S.; Suntsov, S. B.

    2015-10-27

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. Chapter 4 covers general procedures of defect search, which is based on vector analysis principles. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  3. Design integration and noise studies for jet STOL aircraft. Task 7C: Augmentor wing cruise blowing valveless system. Volume 2: Small-scale development testing of augmentor wing critical ducting components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, J. N.; Gupfa, A.

    1973-01-01

    Augmentor wing ducting system studies conducted on a valveless system configuration that provides cruise thrust from the augmentor nozzles have shown that most of the duct system pressure loss would occur in the strut-wing duct y-junction and the wing duct-augmentor lobe nozzles. These components were selected for development testing over a range of duct Mach numbers and pressure ratios to provide a technical basis for predicting installed wing thrust loading and for evaluating design wing loading of a particular wing aspect ratios. The flow characteristics of ducting components with relatively high pressure loss coefficients were investigated. The turbulent pressure fluctuations associated with flows at high Mach numbers were analyzed to evaluate potential duct fatigue problems.

  4. Nickel-hydrogen component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charleston, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Light weight energy storage systems for future space missions are investigated. One of the systems being studied is the nickel hydrogen battery. This battery is designed to achieve longer life, improve performance, and higher energy densities for space applications. The nickel hydrogen component development is discussed. Test data from polarization measurements of the hydrogen electrode component is presented.

  5. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 1: Influence of airplane components for model D. [Langley spin tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralston, J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of airplane components, as well as wing location and tail length, on the rotational flow aerodynamics is discussed for a 1/6 scale general aviation airplane model. The airplane was tested in a built-up fashion (i.e., body, body-wing, body-wing-vertical, etc.) in the presence of two wing locations and two body lengths. Data were measured, using a rotary balance, over an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg, and for clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations covering an omega b/2V range of 0 to 0.9.

  6. Long-term test-retest reliability of the P3 NoGo wave and two independent components decomposed from the P3 NoGo wave in a visual Go/NoGo task.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Jan Ferenc; Hansen, Tor Ivar; Olsen, Alexander; Skandsen, Toril; Håberg, Asta; Kropotov, Juri

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine long-term test-retest reliability of the P3 NoGo wave as well as two independent components (IC P3 NoGo early and IC P3 NoGo late) decomposed from this wave by independent component analysis (ICA). For this purpose 19-channel EEG was recorded during a cued visual Go/NoGo task. First, spatial filters of the two independent components (ICs) were obtained by application of ICA to ERPs of 102 healthy adults. Second, in 26 individuals, ERPs were recorded from the same task a second time 6-18 months after the first recording. Statistical analyses were performed on both the P3 NoGo waves and the activation curves of the two ICs from both recordings. Amplitude and latency were estimated by "peak" and "fractional area" (FA) methods for both the P3 NoGo wave and ICs. Intraclass correlations (ICC) for latency were excellent (ICC>.90) for both the P3 NoGo wave and the two ICs when measured with the FA method, and good (ICC>.75) for amplitude measured by both methods (FA or peak). We conclude that the long-term stability of P3 NoGo wave and the two IC makes them well suited for reliable assessment of cognitive control function in research and clinic.

  7. Precision Cleaning Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

    2000-02-02

    Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

  8. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1 component prioritization

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1987-06-01

    Current probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods for nuclear power plants utilize seismic ''fragilities'' - probabilities of failure conditioned on the severity of seismic input motion - that are based largely on limited test data and on engineering judgment. Under the NRC Component Fragility Research Program (CFRP), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed and demonstrated procedures for using test data to derive probabilistic fragility descriptions for mechanical and electrical components. As part of its CFRP activities, LLNL systematically identified and categorized components influencing plant safety in order to identify ''candidate'' components for future NRC testing. Plant systems relevant to safety were first identified; within each system components were then ranked according to their importance to overall system function and their anticipated seismic capacity. Highest priority for future testing was assigned to those ''very important'' components having ''low'' seismic capacity. This report describes the LLNL prioritization effort, which also included application of ''high-level'' qualification data as an alternate means of developing probabilistic fragility descriptions for PRA applications.

  9. Energetic component treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Gildea, P.D.; Brandon, S.L.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-11-01

    The effectiveness of three environmentally sound processes for small energetic component disposal was examined experimentally in this study. The three destruction methods, batch reactor supercritical water oxidation, sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff were selected based on their potential for producing a clean solid residue and minimum release of toxic gases after component detonation. The explosive hazard was destroyed by all three processes. Batch supercritical water oxidation destroyed both the energetics and organics. Further development is desired to optimize process parameters. Sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff results indicated the potential for scrubbing gaseous detonation products. Further study and testing are needed to quantify the effectiveness of these later two processes for full-scale munition destruction. The preliminary experiments completed in this study have demonstrated the promise of these three processes as environmentally sound technologies for energetic component destruction. Continuation of these experimental programs is strongly recommended to optimize batch supercritical water oxidation processing, and to fully develop the sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff technologies.

  10. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  11. A comparison between finite element modeling and various thermographic non-destructive testing techniques for the quantification of the thermal integrity of macro-brush plasma facing components used in a tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Santosh P.; Pandya, Shwetang N.; Patil, Yashashri V.; Krishnan, Deepu S.; Murugesan, Menaka; Sharath, D.; Singh, K. Premjit; Khan, Md. Shoaib; Arafat, M.; Biju, N.; Khirwadkar, Samir S.; Govidarajan, Jagannathan; Venkatraman, B.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    The plasma facing components (PFCs) inside a tokamak are typically exposed to extremely high heat flux of the order of MW/m2. The brazing quality between the plasma facing materials (PFMs) and the heat sink will determine the structural integrity and hence the effective service life of these PFCs. Suitable non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques for the pre-qualification of these components are thus essential to evaluate their structural integrity at various stages of their service life. Macro-brush type mockups of prototype PFCs with graphite as PFM have been inspected for their brazing quality using different active Infrared (IR)-thermographic NDT techniques. The results obtained from these techniques are compared and discussed. The brazing quality was quantified by establishing a comparison between the experimental results and the results from Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The percentage of contact between the PFM and the substrate was varied in FEA. FEA results when compared with experiments shows that tiles have different amounts of contact with the substrate ranging between 10% and 80%.

  12. A comparison between finite element modeling and various thermographic non-destructive testing techniques for the quantification of the thermal integrity of macro-brush plasma facing components used in a tokamak.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang N; Patil, Yashashri V; Krishnan, Deepu S; Murugesan, Menaka; Sharath, D; Singh, K Premjit; Khan, Md Shoaib; Arafat, M; Biju, N; Khirwadkar, Samir S; Govidarajan, Jagannathan; Venkatraman, B; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    The plasma facing components (PFCs) inside a tokamak are typically exposed to extremely high heat flux of the order of MW/m(2). The brazing quality between the plasma facing materials (PFMs) and the heat sink will determine the structural integrity and hence the effective service life of these PFCs. Suitable non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques for the pre-qualification of these components are thus essential to evaluate their structural integrity at various stages of their service life. Macro-brush type mockups of prototype PFCs with graphite as PFM have been inspected for their brazing quality using different active Infrared (IR)-thermographic NDT techniques. The results obtained from these techniques are compared and discussed. The brazing quality was quantified by establishing a comparison between the experimental results and the results from Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The percentage of contact between the PFM and the substrate was varied in FEA. FEA results when compared with experiments shows that tiles have different amounts of contact with the substrate ranging between 10% and 80%.

  13. Evaluation of the major female Eurytoma amygdali sex pheromone components, (Z,Z)-6,9-tricosadiene and (Z,Z)-6,9-pentacosadiene for male attraction in field tests.

    PubMed

    Mazomenos, Basilis E; Athanassiou, Christos G; Kavallieratos, Nickolas; Milonas, Panagiotis

    2004-06-01

    We evaluated the attraction of male almond seed wasp Eurytoma amygdali to the synthetic alkadienes (Z,Z)-6,9-tricosadiene and (Z,Z)-6,9-pentacosadiene and their blend in almond orchards using baited rubber septa attached to cardboard rectangular adhesive traps. The two alkadienes were recently isolated from virgin female whole body extracts and SPME collected volatiles. The alkenes (Z)-9-tricosene, (Z)-9-pentacosene, and (Z)-9-heptacosene, present in female extracts, were also added to the blend of the alkadienes and tested. The alkadienes tested individually attracted males when the traps were baited with doses ranging from 10 to 30 mg/trap. The maximum number of males was attracted to traps baited with 10 mg of a (Z,Z)-6,9-C(23:2):(Z,Z)-6,9-C(25:2) blend at a ratio of 7:3. Results with the three alkenes added to the blend were inconclusive because of low populations. The present study on E. amygdali is the first one reporting attraction of males to synthetic sex pheromone components in field trials for a Eurytomidae species. The synthetic alkadienes blend offers the potential to develop an effective system for monitoring populations of the almond seed wasp in almond orchards.

  14. Mechanical component screening for scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J. L.; Quinn, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The critical mechanical components of the scan mirror mechanism are described and their evaluation and screening procedures are discussed. A bumper/damper unit is used in the design to reverse motion of the mirror and effect scan and retrace cycles. A wear evaluation was conducted on the bumper impact surfaces that established nylon 6-10 as an acceptable material. The elastomeric dampers were subjected to thermal vacuum tests for condensables and outgassing as well as parametric life tests. The flexure pivots that support the mirror were tested to establish a curve of stress plotted as a function of cycles to failure for rotational operation. The pivots met the life requirement of 150,000,000 cycles at a + or - 2.9 deg amplitude during fatigue testing. Screening procedures were established for dampers and flexure pivots to obtain flight quality components.

  15. Failure Analysis of Ceramic Components

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. Morris

    2000-06-29

    Ceramics are being considered for a wide range of structural applications due to their low density and their ability to retain strength at high temperatures. The inherent brittleness of monolithic ceramics requires a departure from the deterministic design philosophy utilized to analyze metallic structural components. The design program ''Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life'' (CARES/LIFE) developed by NASA Lewis Research Center uses a probabilistic approach to predict the reliability of monolithic components under operational loading. The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of the theories used by CARES/LIFE to predict the reliability of ceramic components and to assess the ability of CARES/LIFE to accurately predict the fast fracture behavior of monolithic ceramic components. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the temperature and stress distribution of a silicon carbide O-ring under diametral compression. The results of the finite element analysis were supplied as input into CARES/LIFE to determine the fast fracture reliability of the O-ring. Statistical material strength parameters were calculated from four-point flexure bar test data. The predicted reliability showed excellent correlation with O-ring compression test data indicating that the CARES/LIFE program can be used to predict the reliability of ceramic components subjected to complicated stress states using material properties determined from simple uniaxial tensile tests.

  16. Optimizing connected component labeling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow; Shoshani, Arie

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents two new strategies that can be used to greatly improve the speed of connected component labeling algorithms. To assign a label to a new object, most connected component labeling algorithms use a scanning step that examines some of its neighbors. The first strategy exploits the dependencies among them to reduce the number of neighbors examined. When considering 8-connected components in a 2D image, this can reduce the number of neighbors examined from four to one in many cases. The second strategy uses an array to store the equivalence information among the labels. This replaces the pointer based rooted trees used to store the same equivalence information. It reduces the memory required and also produces consecutive final labels. Using an array instead of the pointer based rooted trees speeds up the connected component labeling algorithms by a factor of 5 ~ 100 in our tests on random binary images.

  17. Towards Prognostics for Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Celaya, Jose R.; Wysocki, Philip F.; Goebel, Kai F.

    2013-01-01

    Electronics components have an increasingly critical role in avionics systems and in the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is becoming a very important research field as a result of the need to provide aircraft systems with system level health management information. This paper focuses on a prognostics application for electronics components within avionics systems, and in particular its application to an Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT). This application utilizes the remaining useful life prediction, accomplished by employing the particle filter framework, leveraging data from accelerated aging tests on IGBTs. These tests induced thermal-electrical overstresses by applying thermal cycling to the IGBT devices. In-situ state monitoring, including measurements of steady-state voltages and currents, electrical transients, and thermal transients are recorded and used as potential precursors of failure.

  18. Flight service evaluation of composite helicopter components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.; Lowry, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment of composite helicopter structures, exposed to environmental effects, after four years of commercial service is presented. This assessment is supported by test results of helicopter components and test panels which have been exposed to environmental effects since late 1979. Full scale static and fatigue tests are being conducted on composite components obtained from S-76 helicopters in commercial operations in the Gulf Coast region of Louisiana. Small scale tests are being conducted on coupons obtained from panels being exposed to outdoor conditions in Stratford, Connecticut and West Palm Beach, Florida. The panel layups represent S-76 components. Moisture evaluations and strength tests are being conducted, on the S-76 components and panels, over a period of eight years. Results are discussed for components and panels with up to four years of exposure.

  19. Initial Ada components evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebes, Travis

    1989-01-01

    The SAIC has the responsibility for independent test and validation of the SSE. They have been using a mathematical functions library package implemented in Ada to test the SSE IV and V process. The library package consists of elementary mathematical functions and is both machine and accuracy independent. The SSE Ada components evaluation includes code complexity metrics based on Halstead's software science metrics and McCabe's measure of cyclomatic complexity. Halstead's metrics are based on the number of operators and operands on a logical unit of code and are compiled from the number of distinct operators, distinct operands, and total number of occurrences of operators and operands. These metrics give an indication of the physical size of a program in terms of operators and operands and are used diagnostically to point to potential problems. McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity Metrics (CCM) are compiled from flow charts transformed to equivalent directed graphs. The CCM is a measure of the total number of linearly independent paths through the code's control structure. These metrics were computed for the Ada mathematical functions library using Software Automated Verification and Validation (SAVVAS), the SSE IV and V tool. A table with selected results was shown, indicating that most of these routines are of good quality. Thresholds for the Halstead measures indicate poor quality if the length metric exceeds 260 or difficulty is greater than 190. The McCabe CCM indicated a high quality of software products.

  20. Robotic component preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Dokos, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    This report provides information on the preparation of robotic components. Component preparation includes pretinning or solder dipping, preforming, and pretrimming of component leads. Since about 70% of all components are axial-leaded resistor-type components, it was decided to begin with them and then later develop capabilities to handle other types. The first workcell is the first phase of an overall system to pretin, preform, and pretrim all components and to feed them to an automatic insertion system. Before use of the robot, a Unimation PUMA Modal 260, pretinning and preforming was done by first hand with a shield and vented booth.

  1. VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW INCLUDES STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS TEST STAND COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND AND COMPONENTS TEST LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. Optical components damage parameters database system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Jin, Yuquan; Xie, Dongmei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    Optical component is the key to large-scale laser device developed by one of its load capacity is directly related to the device output capacity indicators, load capacity depends on many factors. Through the optical components will damage parameters database load capacity factors of various digital, information technology, for the load capacity of optical components to provide a scientific basis for data support; use of business processes and model-driven approach, the establishment of component damage parameter information model and database systems, system application results that meet the injury test optical components business processes and data management requirements of damage parameters, component parameters of flexible, configurable system is simple, easy to use, improve the efficiency of the optical component damage test.

  3. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOEpatents

    Greenaway, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  4. Microalbumin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test to detect very small levels of a blood protein (albumin) in your urine. A microalbumin test is used ... kidney disease. Healthy kidneys filter waste from your blood and hang on to the healthy components, including proteins such as albumin. Kidney damage can cause proteins to leak through ...

  5. Filter Component Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced particulate filtration systems are currently being developed at Westinghouse for use in both coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems. To date, Westinghouse has demonstrated 5855 hours of successful operation of first generation monolithic filter elements in PFBC applications when ash bridging or process thermal transient excursions are avoided. Alternate advanced monolithic and second generation fiber reinforced, filament wound and vacuum infiltrated filters are also being developed which are considered to have enhanced high temperature creep resistance, improved fracture toughness, or enhanced thermal shock characteristics, respectively. Mechanical and component fabrication improvements, as well as degradation mechanisms for each filter element have been identified by Westinghouse during exposure to simulated PFBC operating conditions and alkali-containing steam/air environments. Additional effort is currently being focused on determining the stability of the advanced monolithic high temperature creep resistant clay bonded silicon carbide (SiC) materials, alumina/mullite, and chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC materials during operation in the Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (W-APF) system at Foster Wheeler`s pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) test facility in Karhula, Finland. Select advanced filter materials are being defined for additional long-term exposure in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) gas streams. The results of these efforts are summarized in this paper. 6 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Psychological Component of Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  7. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  8. Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to partial least squares for path analysis with components, called generalized structured component analysis. The proposed method replaces factors by exact linear combinations of observed variables. It employs a well-defined least squares criterion to estimate model parameters. As a result, the proposed method…

  9. The elusive third component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. F.

    The historical development of techniques for measuring three velocity components using laser velocimetry is presented. The techniques are described and their relative merits presented. Many of the approaches currently in use based on the fringe laser velocimeter have yielded inaccurate measurements of turbulence intensity in the on-axis component. A possible explanation for these inaccuracies is presented along with simulation results.

  10. The Elusive Third Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    2004-01-01

    The historical development of techniques for measuring three velocity components using laser velocimetry is presented. The techniques are described and their relative merits presented. Many of the approaches currently in use based on the fringe laser velocimeter have yielded inaccurate measurements of turbulence intensity in the on-axis component. A possible explanation for these inaccuracies is presented along with simulation results.

  11. Design of Critical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Critical component design is based on minimizing product failures that results in loss of life. Potential catastrophic failures are reduced to secondary failures where components removed for cause or operating time in the system. Issues of liability and cost of component removal become of paramount importance. Deterministic design with factors of safety and probabilistic design address but lack the essential characteristics for the design of critical components. In deterministic design and fabrication there are heuristic rules and safety factors developed over time for large sets of structural/material components. These factors did not come without cost. Many designs failed and many rules (codes) have standing committees to oversee their proper usage and enforcement. In probabilistic design, not only are failures a given, the failures are calculated; an element of risk is assumed based on empirical failure data for large classes of component operations. Failure of a class of components can be predicted, yet one can not predict when a specific component will fail. The analogy is to the life insurance industry where very careful statistics are book-kept on classes of individuals. For a specific class, life span can be predicted within statistical limits, yet life-span of a specific element of that class can not be predicted.

  12. Flight service evaluation of composite helicopter components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardoian, G. H.; Ezzo, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents an assessment of composite helicopter tail rotor spars and horizontal stabilizers, exposed to the effects of the environment, after up to five and a half years of commercial service. This evaluation is supported by test results of helicopter components and panels which have been exposed to outdoor environmental effects since September 1979. Full scale static and fatigue tests have been conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy composite components obtained from Sikorsky Model S-76 helicopters in commercial operations in the Gulf Coast region of Louisiana. Small scale static and fatigue tests are being conducted on coupons obtained from panels under exposure to outdoor conditions in Stratford, Connecticut and West Palm, Florida. The panel layups are representative of the S-76 components. Additionally, this report discusses the results of moisture absorption evaluations and strength tests on the S-76 components and composite panels with up to five years of outdoor exposure.

  13. 46 CFR 58.30-35 - Testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... associated equipment components, including hydraulic steering gear, in lieu of being tested at the time of... and control systems and associated hydraulic equipment components which have been tested...

  14. 46 CFR 58.30-35 - Testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... associated equipment components, including hydraulic steering gear, in lieu of being tested at the time of... and control systems and associated hydraulic equipment components which have been tested...

  15. 46 CFR 58.30-35 - Testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... associated equipment components, including hydraulic steering gear, in lieu of being tested at the time of... and control systems and associated hydraulic equipment components which have been tested...

  16. 46 CFR 58.30-35 - Testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... associated equipment components, including hydraulic steering gear, in lieu of being tested at the time of... and control systems and associated hydraulic equipment components which have been tested...

  17. 46 CFR 58.30-35 - Testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... associated equipment components, including hydraulic steering gear, in lieu of being tested at the time of... and control systems and associated hydraulic equipment components which have been tested...

  18. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  19. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the second year effort of a 3-year program to develop methodology for component specific modeling of aircraft engine hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models; (2) geometry model generators; (3) remeshing; (4) specialty 3-D inelastic stuctural analysis; (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies; (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis; (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  20. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes consists of HfO.sub.2 and sufficient Tb.sub.4 O.sub.7 to stabilize at least 60 volume percent of the HfO.sub.2 into the cubic structure. The ceramic component may also contain a small amount of PrO.sub.2, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 or a mixture of both to improve stability and electronic conductivity of the electrode. The component is highly resistant to corrosion by molten potassium seed and molten coal slag in the MHD fluid and exhibits both ionic and electronic conductivity.