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Sample records for ni-mo coatings produced

  1. Electrodeposition and characterization of Ni-Mo-ZrO2 composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszczyńska, A.; Winiarski, J.; Szczygieł, B.; Szczygieł, I.

    2016-04-01

    Ni-Mo-ZrO2 composite coatings were produced by electrodeposition technique from citrate electrolytes containing dispersed ZrO2 nanopowder. The influence of deposition parameters i.e. concentration of molybdate and ZrO2 nanoparticles in the electrolyte, bath pH and deposition current density on the composition and surface morphology of the coating has been investigated. The structure, microhardness and corrosion properties of Ni-Mo-ZrO2 composites with different molybdenum and ZrO2 content have been also examined. It was found that ZrO2 content in the deposit is increased by rising the nanoparticles concentration in the plating solution up to 20 g dm-3. An increase in molybdate concentration in the electrolyte affects negatively the amount of codeposited ZrO2 nanoparticles. The correlation between the deposition current efficiency and ZrO2 content in the composite coating has been also observed. A decrease in deposition current efficiency leads to deposition of Ni-Mo-ZrO2 composite with low nanoparticles content. This may be explained by formation of higher amounts of gas bubbles on the cathode surface, which prevent the adsorption of ZrO2 nanoparticles on the growing deposit. The XRD analysis revealed that all the studied Ni-Mo-ZrO2 coatings were composed of a single, nanocrystalline phase with FCC structure. It was found that the incorporation of ZrO2 nanoparticles into Ni-Mo alloy matrix affects positively the microhardness and also slightly improves the corrosion properties of Ni-Mo alloy coating.

  2. Electrolytical production of Ni + Mo + Si composite coatings with enhanced content of Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubisztal, J.; Budniok, A.

    2006-10-01

    Ni + Mo + Si composite coatings were prepared by co-deposition of nickel with molybdenum and silicon powders from a nickel solution in which Mo and Si particles were suspended by stirring. The layers have been deposited on a carbon steel substrate (St3S) under galvanostatic conditions. The content of Si in deposited layers was about 2-5 wt.% depending on deposition current density and the value of electric charge. For comparison Ni + Mo composite coatings were obtained under analogous current conditions. Composite coatings of enhanced Si content (15 wt.%) were deposited from an electrolyte in which 40 g/dm 3 of Si covered with electroless plated nickel was dispersed. Deposition current density was equal 0.1 A/cm 2 and the value of electric charge Q = 500 C/cm 2. The thickness of the coatings was about 100-300 μm depending on their kind, electric charge and the deposition current density. Surface and cross-section morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). All deposited coatings are characterized by great, developed surface area. No internal stresses causing their cracking were observed. Chemical composition of the layers was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) method and quantitative X-ray analysis (QXRD). It was stated, that the content of molybdenum and silicon in Ni + Mo + Si coatings depends on deposition current density and the amount of the powder in bath. The results of structural investigation of the obtained layers by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method show, that they consist in crystalline Mo or Mo and Si phases built into Ni matrix. Moreover, Ni + Mo + Si composite coatings were modified by thermal treatment. It has been found that the thermal treatment of Ni + Mo + Si composite coatings caused that the new phases (NiSi, Mo 2Ni 3Si and Ni 6Mo 6C 1.06) were obtained.

  3. Microstructural Characterization and Tribological Behavior of HVOF Sprayed NiMoAl Coating from 20 to 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Zhou, Huidi; Zhao, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianmin; An, Yulong; Yan, Fengyuan

    2015-02-01

    NiMoAl coating was deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying from gas-atomized powders and its tribological properties from 20 to 800 °C under unlubricated conditions were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the coating and corresponding wear tracks to determine the lubrication mechanisms. The friction coefficient of NiMoAl coating that decreased gradually with the increase of temperature exhibited the highest value of 0.8 at 20 °C and the lowest value of 0.29 at 800 °C. Meanwhile, NiMoAl coating also possessed an excellent anti-wear property and the wear rate of the coating maintained at a relatively low value at all test temperatures. Characterizations of worn surfaces revealed that the coating suffered abrasive wear at the low temperature. When the temperature elevated to 600 and 800 °C, molybdenum oxide and nickel molybdate that were formed through tribo-chemistry reactions acted as lubricants at the high temperature. In addition, NiMoAl coating experienced no obvious oxidation or phase transition on the unrubbed surface during the friction test at 800 °C, indicating that the coating performed both thermal stability and lubrication function at the high temperature.

  4. Impact of Nanometer Graphite Addition on the Anti-deliquescence and Tribological Properties of Ni/MoS2 Lubricating Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Li, G. L.; Wang, H. D.; Xu, B. S.; Ma, G. Z.

    In order to improve the long-standing problem of MoS2 coating that lubrication performance drop dramatic after storage in humid air, using nano-composite electro brush plating technology and Ni/MoS2-C combination coating with thinness of 100 μm was succeed deposited on GCr15 substrate. Microstructure, surface morphology and elements of this composite coating were analyzed using SEM, XPS and TEM while phase structure was tested by XRD. The tribological properties of this composite coating were tested by MSTS-1; Test the preceding tribological properties of Ni/MoS2-C composite coatings to the pure Ni/MoS2 after different period storage at room temperature and 100% relative humidity atmosphere of 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h as well as the element of the chemical changes. Research shows that there is a small amount of MoS2 in pure MoS2 coatings behind a 12 hours storage in humid air became MoO3 and the tribological performance decreased significantly followed, in the same conditions composite coating with nanometer graphite addition get a preferably tribological properties while the hardness of this coating was improved by the nanometer graphite addition and combination plating showed a well duration tribological properties as a result.

  5. Electrochemical Deposition and Characterization of Ni-Mo Alloys as Cathode for Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manazoğlu, Mert; Hapçı, Gökçe; Orhan, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Ni-Mo alloy coatings were electrochemically deposited on a copper plate in citrate solutions. The effects of Ni/Mo mole ratio in the electrolyte and pH value on hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) as well as the electrochemical stability were investigated in the alkaline solution for electrodeposited NiMo. The electrocatalytic activity of the fabricated NiMo alloys for HER in alkaline solutions was investigated by the polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The morphology and chemical composition of the electrodeposited Ni-Mo were investigated using SEM and EDS analyses. It was found that NiMo electrode with the highest molybdenum content (ca. 38 wt.%) and high surface area show high electrocatalytic activity in the HER. This was produced from a bath with a pH of 9.5, Ni/Mo ratio of 1/10 and 0.5 M sodium citrate concentration. The stability of this coating was tested by polarization measurements after different anodic and cathodic treatment in 1 M NaOH solution. The open circuit potential ( E ocp) of the electrode as a function of immersion time was also measured.

  6. Surface morphology and electrochemical characterization of electrodeposited Ni-Mo nanocomposites as cathodes for hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhachmi Guettaf, Temam; Hachemi Ben, Temam; Said, Benramache

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we study the influences of current density on surface morphology and electrochemical characterization of electrodeposited Ni-Mo. The Ni-Mo composite coatings are deposited on pretreated copper substrates by electrolytic deposition. The Ni-Mo solution is taken from nickel sulfate fluid and ammonium heptamolybdate with 10 g/l. The Ni-Mo composite coatings are deposited at a temperature of 303 K with an applied current density of jdep = 10 A/dm2-30 A/dm2. We find that the corrosion resistance is improved by incorporating Mo particles into Ni matrix in 0.6-M NaCl solution. From the potentiodynamic polarization curve of electrodeposited Ni-Mo it is confirmed that the corrosion resistance decreases with increasing applied current density. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of Ni-Mo coatings indicate three phases of MoNi4, Mo1.24Ni0.76, and Ni3Mo phases crystallites of nickel and molybdenum. The scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) tests indicate that Ni-Mo coatings present cracks and pores.

  7. Development of Ni-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst for reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction.

    PubMed

    Kharaji, Abolfazl Gharibi; Shariati, Ahmad; Ostadi, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, Mo/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared using impregnation method. Then it was promoted with Ni ions to produce Ni-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst. The structures of the catalysts were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), CO chemisorption, temperature programmed reduction of hydrogen (H2-TPR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. Catalytic performances of the two catalysts were investigated in a fixed-bed reactor for RWGS reaction. The results indicated that addition of nickel promoter to Mo/Al2O3 catalyst enhances its activity. It is reasonable for the electron deficient state of the Ni species and existence of NiMoO4 phase to possess high activity in RWGS reaction. Stability test of Ni-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst was carried out in a fixed bed reactor and a high CO2 conversion for 60 h time on stream was demonstrated. This study introduces a new catalyst, Ni-Mo/Al2O3, with high activity and stability for RWGS reaction.

  8. Effect of surface oxidation of the support on the thiophene hydrodesulfurization activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts supported on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Calafat, A. |; Lopez-Agudo, A.; Palacios, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    The present investigation attempts to provide a better understanding of the influence of the nature of the carbon support on the HDS activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts. For this purpose a high purity activated carbon was subjected to oxidative treatments with HNO{sub 3} to modify its surface properties. NiMo catalysts supported on the resulting activated carbons were prepared and characterized by TPR, XRD, and SEM-EDX, and their activity for HDS of thiophene at 30 bars and 375{degrees}C was evaluated. The results obtained showed that oxidation of the carbon surface does not affect the HDS activity and other characteristics of the supported Mo phase. In contrast, the HDS activity of the Ni catalysts is enhanced by acid treatments of the carbon support. In this case, introduction of oxygen-containing functional groups (O{sub (s)}) leads to a strong interaction of O{sub (s)}-Ni during impregnation, which becomes essential to achieving and preserving high nickel dispersion. This effect on NiMo/C catalysts. The synergistic effect of the bimetallic catalysts is observed only when oxygen functional groups are present on the carbon surface, which are necessary for a good HDS activity, mainly because they enhance Ni-Mo interactions that produce the highly active Ni-Mo-S phase. A NiMoO{sub 4}-like phase formed during impregnation seems to be the precursor for the active sulfide phase over the present NiMo/C catalysts. 34 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Strain hardening mechanisms in a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dymek, S. ); Dollar, M. ); Klarstrom, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    HAYNES 242 alloy has been recently developed for gas turbine components applications. This age-hardenable alloy, consisting essentially of Ni-25%Mo-8%Cr, utilizes a long-range-ordering reaction to form uniformly sized and distributed, extremely small (on the order of 10nm), ordered particles. Excellent strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, low thermal expansion characteristics and good oxidation resistance of Haynes 242 alloy has encouraged a number of studies designed to characterize its properties. What is lacking is an attempt to understand the fundamentals of the deformation and strengthening mechanisms in this alloy. This on-going research has been undertaken to explore deformation mechanisms in unaged and aged Haynes 242 alloy. The emphasis has been put on the effects of initial precipitation structure on the development of deformation structure and how it controls selected mechanical properties. This paper presents selected results and reports a change in the deformation mode from crystallographic glide in an unaged alloy into twinning in the presence of ordered particles. Deformation twinning in Ni-Mo and Ni-Mo-Cr alloys was reported earlier but was not discussed in detail. This research sheds light on possible origins of particle-induced twinning in alloys strengthened by small ordered particles.

  10. Undercooled and rapidly quenched Ni-Mo alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic nickel-molybdenum alloys were rapidly solidified by both bulk undercooling and melt spinning techniques. Alloys were undercooled in both electromagnetic levitation and differential thermal analysis equipment. The rate of recalescence depended upon the degree of initial undercooling and the nature (faceted or nonfaceted) of the primary nucleating phase. Alloy melts were observed to undercool more in the presence of primary Beta (NiMo intermetallic) phase than in gamma (fcc solid solution) phase. Melt spinning resulted in an extension of molybdenum solid solubility in gamma nickel, from 28 to 37.5 at % Mo. Although the microstructures observed by undercooling and melt spinning were similar the microsegregation pattern across the gamma dendries was different. The range of microstructures evolved was analyzed in terms of the nature of the primary phase to nucleate, its subsequent dendritic growth, coarsening and fragmentation, and final solidification of interfenderitic liquid.

  11. Fault structures in rapidly quenched Ni-Mo binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraman, N.; Tewari, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Fault structures in two Ni-Mo alloy ribbons (Ni-28 at. pct Mo and Ni-35 at. pct Mo) cast by a free jet chill block melt spinning process were studied. Thin foils for TEM studies were made by electrochemical thinning using an alcohol/butyl cellosolve/perchloric acid mixture in a twin jet electropolishing device. The samples displayed typical grains containing linear faulted regions on the wheelside of the two alloy ribbons. However, an anomalous diffraction behavior was observed upon continuous tilting of the sample: the network of diffraction spots from a single grain appeared to expand or contract and rotate. This anomalous diffraction behavior was explained by assuming extended spike formation at reciprocal lattice points, resulting in a network of continuous rel rods. The validity of the model was confirmed by observations of a cross section of the reciprocal lattice parallel to the rel rods.

  12. Reactivity and Morphology of Ni, Mo, and Ni-Mo Oxide Clusters Supported on MCM-48 Toward Thiophene Hydrodesulphurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomew, Catherine; Chakradhar, Ashish; Burghaus, Uwe; Wu, Chia-Ming; Peng, Rui; Mishra, Srujan; Koodali, Ranjit T.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the morphology, chemical composition and reactivity of MCM-48 powders impregnated with Ni, Mo or both toward hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of thiophene were characterized. The reactivity of the catalyst was quantitatively compared with a standard industrial catalyst (from HaldorTopsoe, Denmark) and a novel WS2 nanotube-based catalysts (from R. Tenne, Israel). Morphology and chemical composition were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and EDX elemental maps. Reactivity was determined in a gas-chromatograph based mini flow reactor using thiophene as a probe molecule. The sulfided MCM-48 supported Mo catalyst showed the largest HDS activity with turnover frequencies (TOF) about half as large as for the commercial system under the test conditions used here. Presulfiding did increase activity of all MCM-48 catalysts.

  13. Non-enzymatic electrochemical glucose sensor based on NiMoO₄ nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dandan; Cai, Daoping; Huang, Hui; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lingling; Liu, Yuan; Li, Han; Wang, Yanrong; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2015-04-10

    A non-enzymatic glucose sensor based on the NiMoO4 nanorods has been fabricated for the first time. The electrocatalytic performance of the NiMoO4 nanorods' modified electrode toward glucose oxidation was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. The NiMoO4 nanorods' modified electrode showed a greatly enhanced electrocatalytic property toward glucose oxidation, as well as an excellent anti-interference and a good stability. Impressively, good accuracy and high precision for detecting glucose concentration in human serum samples were obtained. These excellent sensing properties, combined with good reproducibility and low cost, indicate that NiMoO4 nanorods are a promising candidate for non-enzymatic glucose sensors. PMID:25772142

  14. Cracking vegetable oil from Callophylluminnophyllum L. seeds to bio-gasoline by Ni-Mo/Al2O3 and Ni-Mo/Zeolite as micro-porous catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitri, Effendi, R.; Tursiloadi, S.

    2016-02-01

    Natural minerals such as zeolite are local natural resources in the various regions in Indonesia. Studies on the application of natural mineral currently carried out by national research institutions, among others, as a filler, bleaching agent, or dehydration agent. However, not many studies that utilize these natural minerals as green catalysts material which has high performance for biomass conversion processes and ready to be applied directly by the bio-fuel industry. The trend movement of green and sustainable chemistry research that designing environmentally friendly chemical processes from renewable raw materials to produce innovative products derived biomass for bio-fuel. Callophylluminnophyllum L. seeds can be used as raw material for bio-energy because of its high oil content. Fatty acid and triglyceride compounds from this oil can be cracked into bio-gasoline, which does not contain oxygen in the hydrocarbon structure. Bio-gasoline commonly is referred to as drop-in biofuel because it can be directly used as a substitute fuel. This paper focused on the preparation and formulation of the catalyst NiMo/H-Zeolite and Ni-Mo/Al2O3 which were used in hydro-cracking process of oil from Callophylluminnophyllum L. seeds to produce bio-gasoline. The catalysts were analyzed using XRD, BET and IR-adsorbed pyridine method. The results of hydro-cracking products mostly were paraffin (C10-C19) straight chain, with 59.5 % peak area based on GC-MS analysis.

  15. Calcium phosphate coatings produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolbasov, E. N.; Zheravin, A. A.; Klimov, I. A.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Perelmuter, V. M.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings on titanium implants surface, produced by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method with hydroxyapatite solid target were investigated. It was found that produced coatings are calcium deficient compared to stoichiometric hydroxyapatite. The surface of the coatings is highly rough at the nanoscale and highly elastic. In vivo experiments on rats revealed that titanium implants with the calcium phosphate coatings do not cause negative tissue reaction after 6 months incubation period.

  16. Electron microscopy investigation of the microstructure of unsupported Ni-Mo-W sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.S.; Yi, Y.J.; Zhang, W.; Liang, C.H.; Su, D.S.

    2011-07-15

    An exploration was made on structure and active sites of the unsupported Ni-Mo-W sulfide hydrodesulphurization catalyst prepared by a thiosalt decomposition method. More insights into the nanocomposite structure were provided by introducing the concept of average curvature of Mo(W)S{sub 2} and establishing a new structure model. The defects of cross and mixed stacks, steps along c-axis, expansion of (002) interplanar spacing and mixing structure of Mo(W)/Ni sulfides were investigated using advanced electron microscopy. All these defects in Mo(W) sulfides are closely correlated with increasing active sites of unsupported Ni-Mo-W sulfide catalyst. - Graphical Abstract: From the top schematic of unsupported Ni-Mo-W sulfide, the MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, or Mo{sub x}W{sub 1-x}S{sub 2} are surrounded by the dispersed Ni sulfide, which make the formation of nanocomposite phases possible. For the bottom colorized high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image with 3D rotation, the variation in sample thickness leads to a varying representation of the contrast of the Ni-Mo-W sulfide sheet, ... Research Highlights: {yields} Rich microstructural features of unsupported Ni-Mo-W sulfide catalyst were revealed. {yields} Curvature of HDS catalyst was firstly proposed, also illustrative for other catalysts. {yields} Insights into the nano-composite were gained from its new structure model.

  17. Technology for producing carbon field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Khatapova, R.M.; Demskaya, L.L.; Romanova, V.K.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes methods for producing field emitters from carbon filaments. Coating of Ni and two-layer coatings of Ni-Mo with a thickness of 10-40 um are applied to the carbon filaments by electrochemical deposition so that they can be spot welded to a metal holder. A technology for attaching carbon filaments with a refractory adhesive composition is also described. Field emitters with point radius of curvature of 0.2-0.4 um are made from three types of carbon filament.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of specific heat of liquid Ni Mo alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W. J.; Wang, N.

    2008-11-01

    The Monte Carlo method with embedded-atom method (EAM) potential is applied to simulate the specific heat Cp of a liquid Ni-Mo binary alloy system. The simulated Cp value of liquid Ni at the melting temperature is 22.79 J mol-1 K-1, indicating that the simulation method and EAM parameters in simulation are acceptable. The simulated temperature coefficient of the specific heat for liquid Ni is -2.10 × 10-2 J mol-1 K-2. Based on the relationship between system energy and temperature, the various specific heats of liquid Ni-Mo alloys under different undercooling and compositions were determined. The dependence of the specific heat of liquid Ni-Mo alloys on the composition and undercooling is discussed.

  19. Structural and catalytic properties of zeolite EMT containing NiMo sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Becue, T.; Manoli, J.M.; Potvin, C.; Leglise, J.; Cornet, D.

    1998-10-01

    This work examines bifunctional catalysts made of an acidic EMT zeolite into which Ni and Mo ions were introduced, and then sulfided. Their structure and catalytic properties were compared to those of analogous NiMo/HY. Ni and Mo were loaded onto the HEMT by wet treatment, and the solids were characterized in the calcined and sulfided state by means of XRD, porosimetry, and TEM coupled with EDX analysis. When the oxidic NiMo/EMT was sulfided, the zeolite crystals fractured in a few planar directions, and the fissures appeared to be filled with MoS{sub 2} particles promoted with Ni. This is very different to the HY zeolite in which the sulfide slabs were scattered into the mesopores. With both supports, however, about half of the NiMo is present outside the zeolite as incompletely sulfided particles. The catalytic properties of the sulfided NiMo/EMT were examined by measuring the conversion of an n-heptane and benzene mixture in a flow reactor under 8 MPa hydrogen pressure. With the EMT as well as with the HY support, the rate of benzene hydrogenation varied in accordance with the amount of internal Mo. The intrinsic activity of the internal Mo matched that of a commercial NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The NiMo/zeolites exhibited high activity for the conversion of heptane, but the cracked products exceeded by far the heptane isomers. Differences in selectivity between EMT and HY catalysts are interpreted on the basis of the balance between acidic and hydrogenation functions.

  20. Properties of multilayer coatings produced by coaxial laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovskiy, V. N.; Bykovskiy, D. P.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Polskiy, V. I.; Prokopova, N. M.; Chirikov, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    This article contains results of the study of multilayer coatings produced by laser cladding on the substrate steel 34HMA using iron based powder PR-10R6M5 as the filler material. The coatings were produced with consistent application of the tracks with fixed overlapping. The dependencies between the characteristics of tracks and the technological mode of deposition were revealed. Properties of coatings were determined for various overlapping of tracks and directions of the cladding layers.

  1. Support chemistry, surface area, and preparation effects on sulfided NiMo catalyst activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Sandoval, R.S.

    1996-06-01

    Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials which contain a homogeneous distribution of ion exchangeable alkali cations that provide charge compensation to the metal-oxygen framework. In terms of the major types of inorganic ion exchangers defined by Clearfield, these amorphous HMO materials are similar to both hydrous oxides and layered oxide ion exchangers (e.g., alkali metal titanates). For catalyst applications, the HMO material serves as an ion exchangeable support which facilitates the uniform incorporation of catalyst precursor species. Following catalyst precursor incorporation, an activation step is required to convert the catalyst precursor to the desired active phase. Considerable process development activities at Sandia National Laboratories related to HMO materials have resulted in bulk hydrous titanium oxide (HTO)- and silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si)-supported NiMo catalysts that are more active in model reactions which simulate direct coal liquefaction (e.g., pyrene hydrogenation) than commercial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported NiMo catalysts. However, a fundamental explanation does not exist for the enhanced activity of these novel catalyst materials; possible reasons include fundamental differences in support chemistry relative to commercial oxides, high surface area, or catalyst preparation effects (ion exchange vs. incipient wetness impregnation techniques). The goals of this paper are to identify the key factors which control sulfided NiMo catalyst activity, including those characteristics of HTO- and HTO:Si-supported NiMo catalysts which uniquely set them apart from conventional oxide supports.

  2. Enhancement of the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction from Ni-MoS2 Hybrid Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This report focuses on a novel strategy for the preparation of transition metal–MoS2 hybrid nanoclusters based on a one-step, dual-target magnetron sputtering, and gas condensation process demonstrated for Ni-MoS2. Aberration-corrected STEM images coupled with EDX analysis confirms the presence of Ni and MoS2 in the hybrid nanoclusters (average diameter = 5.0 nm, Mo:S ratio = 1:1.8 ± 0.1). The Ni-MoS2 nanoclusters display a 100 mV shift in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) onset potential and an almost 3-fold increase in exchange current density compared with the undoped MoS2 nanoclusters, the latter effect in agreement with reported DFT calculations. This activity is only reached after air exposure of the Ni-MoS2 hybrid nanoclusters, suggested by XPS measurements to originate from a Ni dopant atoms oxidation state conversion from metallic to 2+ characteristic of the NiO species active to the HER. Anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) experiments on the Ni-MoS2 hybrid nanoclusters confirm the presence of Ni-doped edge sites and reveal distinctive electrochemical features associated with both doped Mo-edge and doped S-edge sites which correlate with both their thermodynamic stability and relative abundance.

  3. Structural, Optical, and Magnetic Properties of NiMoO4 Nanorods Prepared by Microwave Sintering

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Ana P.; de Oliveira, Larissa H.; Rosa, Ieda L. V.; Xavier, Camila S.; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo N.; Li, Máximo S.; La Porta, Felipe A.; Longo, Elson; Varela, José A.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the structural, optical, and magnetic properties of α,β-NiMoO4 nanorods synthesized by annealing the NiMoO4:nH2O precursor at 600°C for 10 minutes in a domestic microwave. The crystalline structure properties of α,β-NiMoO4 were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopies. The particle morphologies and size distributions were identified by field emission microscopy (FE-SEM). Experimental data were obtained by magnetization measurements for different applied magnetic fields. Optical properties were analyzed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Our results revealed that the oxygen atoms occupy different positions and are very disturbed in the lattice and exhibit a particular characteristic related to differences in the length of the chemical bonds (Ni-O and Mo-O) of the cluster structure or defect densities in the crystalline α,β-NiMoO4 nanorods, which are the key to a deeper understanding of the exploitable physical and chemical properties in this study. PMID:25802887

  4. Method of Producing Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coatings includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer or a diameter of less than 5 micron. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate. and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of the invention a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  5. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOEpatents

    Byrnes, Larry Edward; Kramer, Martin Stephen; Neiser, Richard A.

    2003-08-26

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  6. Hierarchical Ni-Mo-S nanosheets on carbon fiber cloth: A flexible electrode for efficient hydrogen generation in neutral electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianwei; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Khoo, Si Yun; Chen, Jiazang; Fan, Zhanxi; Hsu, Ying-Ya; Chen, Hao Ming; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Bin

    2015-08-01

    A unique functional electrode made of hierarchal Ni-Mo-S nanosheets with abundant exposed edges anchored on conductive and flexible carbon fiber cloth, referred to as Ni-Mo-S/C, has been developed through a facile biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal method. The incorporation of Ni atoms in Mo-S plays a crucial role in tuning its intrinsic catalytic property by creating substantial defect sites as well as modifying the morphology of Ni-Mo-S network at atomic scale, resulting in an impressive enhancement in the catalytic activity. The Ni-Mo-S/C electrode exhibits a large cathodic current and a low onset potential for hydrogen evolution reaction in neutral electrolyte (pH ~7), for example, current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at a very small overpotential of 200 mV. Furthermore, the Ni-Mo-S/C electrode has excellent electrocatalytic stability over an extended period, much better than those of MoS2/C and Pt plate electrodes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to understand the formation process and electrocatalytic properties of Ni-Mo-S/C. The intuitive comparison test was designed to reveal the superior gas-evolving profile of Ni-Mo-S/C over that of MoS2/C, and a laboratory-scale hydrogen generator was further assembled to demonstrate its potential application in practical appliances.

  7. Hierarchical Ni-Mo-S nanosheets on carbon fiber cloth: A flexible electrode for efficient hydrogen generation in neutral electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jianwei; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Khoo, Si Yun; Chen, Jiazang; Fan, Zhanxi; Hsu, Ying-Ya; Chen, Hao Ming; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    A unique functional electrode made of hierarchal Ni-Mo-S nanosheets with abundant exposed edges anchored on conductive and flexible carbon fiber cloth, referred to as Ni-Mo-S/C, has been developed through a facile biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal method. The incorporation of Ni atoms in Mo-S plays a crucial role in tuning its intrinsic catalytic property by creating substantial defect sites as well as modifying the morphology of Ni-Mo-S network at atomic scale, resulting in an impressive enhancement in the catalytic activity. The Ni-Mo-S/C electrode exhibits a large cathodic current and a low onset potential for hydrogen evolution reaction in neutral electrolyte (pH ~7), for example, current density of 10 mA/cm2 at a very small overpotential of 200 mV. Furthermore, the Ni-Mo-S/C electrode has excellent electrocatalytic stability over an extended period, much better than those of MoS2/C and Pt plate electrodes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to understand the formation process and electrocatalytic properties of Ni-Mo-S/C. The intuitive comparison test was designed to reveal the superior gas-evolving profile of Ni-Mo-S/C over that of MoS2/C, and a laboratory-scale hydrogen generator was further assembled to demonstrate its potential application in practical appliances. PMID:26601227

  8. Anodization process produces opaque, reflective coatings on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Opaque, reflective coatings are produced on aluminum articles by an anodizing process wherein the anodizing bath contains an aqueous dispersion of finely divided insoluble inorganic compounds. These particles appear as uniformly distributed occlusions in the anodic deposit on the aluminum.

  9. Preparation of highly dispersed NiMo catalysts supported on carbon black particles of hollow spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Sakanishi, K.; Hasuo, H.; Mochida, I.

    1995-12-01

    One of unique carbon blacks, Ketjen Black (KB) which has extremely high surface area and low specific gravity, was selected as a catalyst support to prepare a highly dispersed NiMo catalyst with the function for recovery and the high activity for hydrogenation. KB-supported NiMo catalysts were prepared by means of impregnation, ion exchange, and incipient wetness methods from various kinds and amounts of Ni and Mo salts, and their activities were examined in the hydrogenation of 1-methyinaphthalene(1-MN) using a magnetic-stirred autoclave of 50 ml capacity at 380{degrees}C for 40 min under 10 MPa H{sub 2} reaction pressure. The catalyst, prepared from (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}MoS{sub 4} and Ni(OAc){sub 2} in their methanol solution by successive impregnations of Mo10% and Ni(2 wt%) in this order supported on nitric acid-treated carbon black(KB JD-O), provided the highest conversion of 86% to methyl-tetralins. Combinations of metal salts soluble in organic solvent, impregnation solvents, and surface properties of carbon black are suggested to be important for the preparation of highly active catalysts with higher dispersions of Ni and Mo on the carbon black, because they are easily agglomerated in impregnation solvent. It is also noted that KB-supported NiMo catalysts showed much higher activity for the hydrogenation than a commercial NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the smaller weight of catalyst.

  10. NiMoO4 nanofibres designed by electrospining technique for glucose electrocatalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sheng-Hui; Lu, Shi-Yu; Bao, Shu-Juan; Yu, Ya-Nan; Wang, Min-Qiang

    2016-01-28

    Electrochemical oxidation of glucose is the guarantee to realize nonenzymatic sensing of glucose, but greatly hindered by the slow kinetics of its oxidation process. Herein, various nanomaterials were designed as catalysts to accelerate glucose oxidation reaction. However, how to effectively build an excellent platform for promoting the glucose oxidation is still a great challenge. In our work, 1D CaMoO4 and NiMoO4 nanofibres with same morphologies and sub-microstructures were fabricated by electrospinning technique in the first time, and explored to modify the detection electrodes of nonenzymatic glucose sensors. The electrochemical results indicated that the NiMoO4 based sensor exhibited a good catalytic activity toward glucose including the low response potential (0.5 V), high sensitivity(193.8 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)) with a linear response region of 0.01-8 mM, low detection limit (4.6 μM) and fast response time (2 s), all of which are superior to the corresponding values of CaMoO4 nanofibres and even higher than those of most reported NiO and Co3O4 catalysts, which is due to the NiMoO4 nanofibres are not only advantageous to electron transfer, but can mediated the electrocatalytic reaction of glucose. This work should provide a new pathway for the design of advanced glucose catalysts for nonenzymatic sensor.

  11. Fabrication of Low Adsorption Energy Ni-Mo Cluster Cocatalyst in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Visible Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Wenlong; Gao, Haibo; Tian, Bin; Ma, Jiantai; Lu, Gongxuan

    2016-05-01

    An effective cocatalyst is crucial for enhancing the visible photocatalytic performance of the hydrogen generation reaction. By using density-functional theory (DFT) and frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory calculation analysis, the hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) of Ni-Mo alloy (458 kJ·mol(-1)) is found to be lower than that of Ni itself (537 kJ·mol(-1)). Inspired by these results, the novel, highly efficient cocatalyst NiMo@MIL-101 for photocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was fabricated using the double solvents method (DSM). In contrast with Ni@MIL-101 and Mo@MIL-101, NiMo@MIL-101 exhibited an excellent photocatalytic performance (740.2 μmol·h(-1) for HER), stability, and high apparent quantum efficiency (75.7%) under 520 nm illumination at pH 7. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst also showed a higher transient photocurrent, lower overpotential (-0.51 V), and longer fluorescence lifetime (1.57 ns). The results uncover the dependence of the photocatalytic activity of HER on the ΔGH of Ni-Mo (MoNi4) alloy nanoclusters, i.e., lower ΔGH corresponding to higher HER activity for the first time. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst could be a promising candidate to replace precious-metal catalysts of the HER.

  12. Fabrication of Low Adsorption Energy Ni-Mo Cluster Cocatalyst in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Visible Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Wenlong; Gao, Haibo; Tian, Bin; Ma, Jiantai; Lu, Gongxuan

    2016-05-01

    An effective cocatalyst is crucial for enhancing the visible photocatalytic performance of the hydrogen generation reaction. By using density-functional theory (DFT) and frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory calculation analysis, the hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) of Ni-Mo alloy (458 kJ·mol(-1)) is found to be lower than that of Ni itself (537 kJ·mol(-1)). Inspired by these results, the novel, highly efficient cocatalyst NiMo@MIL-101 for photocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was fabricated using the double solvents method (DSM). In contrast with Ni@MIL-101 and Mo@MIL-101, NiMo@MIL-101 exhibited an excellent photocatalytic performance (740.2 μmol·h(-1) for HER), stability, and high apparent quantum efficiency (75.7%) under 520 nm illumination at pH 7. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst also showed a higher transient photocurrent, lower overpotential (-0.51 V), and longer fluorescence lifetime (1.57 ns). The results uncover the dependence of the photocatalytic activity of HER on the ΔGH of Ni-Mo (MoNi4) alloy nanoclusters, i.e., lower ΔGH corresponding to higher HER activity for the first time. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst could be a promising candidate to replace precious-metal catalysts of the HER. PMID:27070204

  13. Novel alkyd-type coating resins produced using cationic polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, Bret J.; Kalita, Harjyoti; Alam, Samim; Jayasooriyamu, Anurad; Fernando, Shashi; Samanata, Satyabrata; Bahr, James; Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Sibi, Mukund; Vold, Jessica; Ulven, Chad

    2015-05-06

    Novel, partially bio-based poly(vinyl ether) copolymers derived from soybean oil and cyclohexyl vinyl ether (CHVE) were produced by cationic polymerization and investigated for application as alkyd-type surface coatings. Compared to conventional alkyd resins, which are produced by high temperature melt condensation polymerization, the poly(v9nyl ether)s provide several advantages. These advantages include milder, more energy efficient polymer synthesis, elimination of issues associated with gelation during polymer synthesis, production of polymers with well-defined composition and relatively narrow molecular weight distribution, and elimination of film formation and physical property issues associated with entrained monomers, dimers, trimers, etc. The results of the studied showed that the thermal, mechanical, and physical properties of the coatings produced from these novel polymers varied considerably as a function of polymer composition and cure temperature. Overall, the results suggest a good potential for these novel copolymers to be used for coatings cured by autoxidation.

  14. A NiMoS flower-like structure with self-assembled nanosheets as high-performance hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Weikun; Chen, Zhou; Zhu, Jianping; Yang, Lefu; Zheng, Jinbao; Yi, Xiaodong; Fang, Weiping

    2016-02-01

    Uniform 3D NiMoS nanoflowers with self-assembled nanosheets were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal growth method using cheap and nontoxic elemental sulfur as sulfur sources. The structure and morphology of the nanomaterials were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, Raman and XPS analyses, revealing that the NiMoS nanoflowers were composed of ultrathin nanosheets with a thickness of approximately 6-12 nm. The HRTEM results indicate that the curve/short MoS2 slabs on the nanosheets possess the characteristics of dislocations, distortions and discontinuity, which suggests a defect-rich structure, resulting in the exposure of additional Ni-Mo-S edge sites. The obtained NiMoS nanoflowers exhibited an excellent activity for thiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene deep HDS due to their high density of active sites. The outstanding HDS performance suggests that these NiMoS composites with a unique flower-like nanostructure could be useful as promising catalysts for deep desulfurization of fuel oils.Uniform 3D NiMoS nanoflowers with self-assembled nanosheets were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal growth method using cheap and nontoxic elemental sulfur as sulfur sources. The structure and morphology of the nanomaterials were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, Raman and XPS analyses, revealing that the NiMoS nanoflowers were composed of ultrathin nanosheets with a thickness of approximately 6-12 nm. The HRTEM results indicate that the curve/short MoS2 slabs on the nanosheets possess the characteristics of dislocations, distortions and discontinuity, which suggests a defect-rich structure, resulting in the exposure of additional Ni-Mo-S edge sites. The obtained NiMoS nanoflowers exhibited an excellent activity for thiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene deep HDS due to their high density of active sites. The outstanding HDS performance suggests that these NiMoS composites with a unique flower

  15. Primary arm spacing in chill block melt spun Ni-Mo alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    Chill block melt spun ribbons of Ni-Mo binary alloys containing 8.0 to 41.8 wt % Mo have been prepared under carefully controlled processing conditions. The growth velocity has been determined as a function of distance from the quench surface from the observed ribbon thickness dependence on the melt puddle residence time. Primary arm spacings measured at the midribbon thickness locations show a dependence on growth velocity and alloy composition which is expected from dendritic growth models for binary alloys directionally solidified in a positive temperature gradient.

  16. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  17. Exchange bias in zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB based metallic glass composite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    R, Lisha; P, Geetha; B, Aravind P.; Anantharaman, M. R.; T, Hysen; Ojha, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-06-24

    The Exchange bias phenomenon and methods to manipulate the bias field in a controlled manner are thrust areas in magnetism due to its sophisticated theoretical concepts as well as advanced technological utility in the field of spintronics. The Exchange bias effect is observed as a result of ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FM-AFM) exchange interaction, usually observed as a loop shift on field cooling below the Neel temperature of AFM. In the present study, we have chosen zinc ferrite which is a well known antiferromagnet, and FeNiMoB based metallic glass as the ferromagnet. The films were prepared by RF sputtering technique. The thickness and composition was obtained by RBS. The magnetic studies using SQUID VSM indicate exchange bias effect in the system. The effect of thermal annealing on exchange bias effect was studied. The observed exchange bias in the zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB system is not due to FM-AFM coupling but due to spin glass-ferromagnetic interaction.

  18. Evolution of oxide scale on a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy at 900 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Ul-Hamid, A. . E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa; Mohammed, A.I.; Al-Jaroudi, S.S.; Tawancy, H.M.; Abbas, N.M.

    2007-01-15

    The cyclic oxidation behavior of a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy was studied in air at 900 deg. C for exposure periods of up to 1000 h. The morphology, microstructure and composition of the oxide scale was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Oxidation kinetics was determined by weight gain measurements. The results show that steady state oxidation was achieved within 1 h of exposure. During transient oxidation, the alloy grain boundaries intersecting the alloy surface became depleted in Ni and enriched in Mo and Cr. The scale initially formed at the surface was NiO which grew outwardly. However, a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer developed, rapidly retarding the rate of oxidation. Formation of NiMoO{sub 4} was also observed. The presence of Mo in the alloy facilitated the formation of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at an early stage of oxidation. The alloy exhibited considerable oxide spalling during prolonged exposure.

  19. Exchange bias in zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB based metallic glass composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R, Lisha; T, Hysen; P, Geetha; B, Aravind P.; Ojha, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Ramanujan, R. V.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    The Exchange bias phenomenon and methods to manipulate the bias field in a controlled manner are thrust areas in magnetism due to its sophisticated theoretical concepts as well as advanced technological utility in the field of spintronics. The Exchange bias effect is observed as a result of ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FM-AFM) exchange interaction, usually observed as a loop shift on field cooling below the Neel temperature of AFM. In the present study, we have chosen zinc ferrite which is a well known antiferromagnet, and FeNiMoB based metallic glass as the ferromagnet. The films were prepared by RF sputtering technique. The thickness and composition was obtained by RBS. The magnetic studies using SQUID VSM indicate exchange bias effect in the system. The effect of thermal annealing on exchange bias effect was studied. The observed exchange bias in the zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB system is not due to FM-AFM coupling but due to spin glass-ferromagnetic interaction.

  20. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.

  1. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed intomore » the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.« less

  2. Novel alkyd-type coating resins produced using cationic polymerization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chisholm, Bret J.; Kalita, Harjyoti; Alam, Samim; Jayasooriyamu, Anurad; Fernando, Shashi; Samanata, Satyabrata; Bahr, James; Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Sibi, Mukund; Vold, Jessica; et al

    2015-05-06

    Novel, partially bio-based poly(vinyl ether) copolymers derived from soybean oil and cyclohexyl vinyl ether (CHVE) were produced by cationic polymerization and investigated for application as alkyd-type surface coatings. Compared to conventional alkyd resins, which are produced by high temperature melt condensation polymerization, the poly(v9nyl ether)s provide several advantages. These advantages include milder, more energy efficient polymer synthesis, elimination of issues associated with gelation during polymer synthesis, production of polymers with well-defined composition and relatively narrow molecular weight distribution, and elimination of film formation and physical property issues associated with entrained monomers, dimers, trimers, etc. The results of the studied showedmore » that the thermal, mechanical, and physical properties of the coatings produced from these novel polymers varied considerably as a function of polymer composition and cure temperature. Overall, the results suggest a good potential for these novel copolymers to be used for coatings cured by autoxidation.« less

  3. Electrochemical investigations of Cr-Ni-Mo stainless steel used in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przondziono, J.; Walke, W.

    2011-05-01

    The influence of chemical passivation process on physical and chemical characteristics of samples made of X2CrNiMo 17-7-2 steel with differentiated hardening, in the solution simulating the environment of human urine was analysed in the study. Wire obtained in cold drawing process is used for the production of stents and appliances in urological treatment. Proper roughness of the surface was obtained through mechanical working - grinding (Ra = 0,40 μn) and electrochemical polishing (Ra = 0,12 μn). Chemical passivation process was carried out in 40% solution of HN03 within 60 minutes in the temperature of 65°C. The tests of corrosion resistance were made on the ground of registered anodic polarisation curves and Stern method. For evaluation of phenomena occurring on the surface of tested steel, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was applied.

  4. Co(Ni)/MoS2 nanostructured catalysts for the hydrodesulphurization of dibenzothiophene.

    PubMed

    Albiter, M A; Huirache-Acuña, R; Paraguay-Delgado, F; Zaera, F; Alonso-Núñez, G

    2008-12-01

    In this study Co(Ni)/MoS2 unsupported nanocatalysts (nanorods and nanoribbons) were synthesized with Co(Ni)/(Co(Ni) + Mo) = 0.3, 0.5 molar ratios for Co and Ni respectively. First the alpha-MoO3 nanostructures were impregnated with an aqueous solution of Co(Ni)Cl2 x 6H2O or Co(Ni)(NO3)2 x 6H2O, then were treated for 2 h at 473 K, and finally the precursors were activated under a H2S/H2 mixture (15% v/v H2S) by ramping the temperature from room temperature to 773 K and keeping it at that value for 2 h. The resulting materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface area and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and tested as catalysts for the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). It was found that these materials presented specific surface areas below 25 m2/g. The catalytic test showed that only when Co is added a promoter effect is observed compared with MoS2 unpromoted catalysts. Among the materials prepared, the Co/MoS2 catalyst made from cobalt chloride presented the highest catalytic activity (6.95 mol s(-1) g(-1)catalyst) for the HDS of DBT. The selectivity for the latter indicated a clear preference for the direct desulphurization over the hydrogenating pathway. PMID:19205218

  5. Amorphous boron coatings produced with vacuum arc deposition technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepper, C. C.; Hazelton, R. C.; Yadlowsky, E. J.; Carlson, E. P.; Keitz, M. D.; Williams, J. M.; Zuhr, R. A.; Poker, D. B.

    2002-05-01

    In principle, boron (B) as a material has many excellent surface properties, including corrosion resistance, very high hardness, refractory properties, and a strong tendency to bond with most substrates. The potential technological benefits of the material have not been realized, because it is difficult to deposit it as coatings. B is difficult to evaporate, does not sputter well, and cannot be thermally sprayed. In this article, first successful deposition results from a robust system, based on the vacuum (cathodic) arc technology, are reported. Adherent coatings have been produced on 1100 Al, CP-Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, 316 SS, hard chrome plate, and 52 100 steel. Composition and thickness analyses have been performed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Hardness (H) and modules (E) have been evaluated by nanoindentation. The coatings are very pure and have properties characteristic of B suboxides. A microhardness of up to 27 GPa has been measured on a 400-nm-thick film deposited on 52 100 steel, with a corresponding modulus of 180 GPa. This gives a very high value for the H/E ratio, a figure-of-merit for impact resistance of the film. A number of applications are contemplated, including corrosion/abrasion protection for die-casting dies and improved wear resistance for biomedical implants.

  6. Catalyseur d'hydrocraquage à base de sulfure de NiMo déposé sur une zéolithe HEMT modifiée

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalala, M.; Becue, T.; Leglise, J.; Manoli, J. M.; van Gestel, J. N. M.; Lamotte, J.; Bensitel, M.; Goupil, J. M.; Cornet, D.

    1999-02-01

    Treating a NH4EMT zeolite with a solution of (NH4)2SiF6 at 80 °C affords a solid containing amorphous SiO2 intimately mixed with the zeolite. This acidic support EMT-Si was loaded with NiMo sulfide in order to prepare a bifunctional catalyst, which was tested for the hydrogenation of benzene and the hydrocracking of n-heptane. This NiMo/EMT-Si catalyst was found more active for hydrogenation than the analogous NiMo/HY. This is ascribed to a higher dispersion of the NiMo sulfide, which is almost equally shared between the internal mesopores in the modified EMT solid, and the fissures, which were created throughout the zeolite grains upon inserting the NiMo sulfide. The catalyst with the EMT-Si support was also found more active than the NiMo/HY for the hydrocracking of heptane, with a slightly higher selectivity into heptane isomers. Le traitement d'une zéolithe NH4EMT par une solution de (NH4)2SiF6 fournit un solide comportant une phase SiO2 amorphe intimement mélangée aux parties intactes de la zéolithe. Sur ce support acide EMT-Si, on a greffé un sulfure de NiMo afin de préparer un catalyseur bifonctionnel qui a été testé dans les réactions d'hydrogénation du benzène et d'hydrocraquage du n-heptane. Ce catalyseur NiMo/EMT-Si s'avère plus actif en hydrogénation que son analogue NiMo/HY, en raison d'une meilleure dispersion du sulfure de NiMo. Sur le solide EMT modifié, le sulfure se répartit à peu près également entre les mésopores internes et les fissures crées dans les grains de zéolithe lors de l'insertion du sulfure de NiMo. Au contraire sur le support Y, une partie du sulfure est externe aux grains de zéolithe et inactive en catalyse. Le catalyseur NiMo/EMT-Si est aussi trouvé plus actif que le NiMo/HY en hydrocraquage du n-heptane, et un peu plus sélectif en isomères.

  7. Low temperature physical properties of a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy Haynes® 242™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Han, K.; Choi, E. S.; Jo, Y.; Balicas, L.; Xin, Y.

    2007-06-01

    Haynes 242 is a Ni-Mo-Cr based superalloy. High strength and high fracture toughness at low temperatures make Haynes 242 an attractive choice for cryogenic applications such as the conduit material for the cable-in-conduit conductor of superconducting magnets. In this work, its low temperature physical properties including magnetization, specific heat, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient are measured from 2to300K. Haynes 242 shows Curie paramagnetism with a Curie constant C =0.0289K. The electrical resistivity has a minimum at ˜12K and shows weakly linear T dependence at high temperatures as expected. The specific heat Cp between 10 and 40K can be fitted by Cp=γT+AT3 with γ =9.43×10-5J/gK2 and A =5.91×10-7J/gK4. Below 10K, an upturn in Cp/T with decreasing T is interpreted by the existence of very small ferromagnetic clusters which is supported by our magnetization data. The thermal conductivity is analyzed by separating the electronic and phonon contributions. The relatively strong phonon thermal conduction at temperatures <100K results in effective Lorenz number a few times larger than the ideal Lorenz number. Our results suggest that Haynes 242 is suitable for many cryogenic applications including conduit for large superconducting magnet and low temperature probe.

  8. Deposition and characterization of pyrocarbon coatings produced by use of CO/sub 2/ dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.

    1981-10-01

    A Biso-coated fuel particle for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) consists of a 500 ..mu..m ThO/sub 2/ kernel, an 85-..mu..m layer of low-density carbon, and a 75-..mu..m layer of high-density pyrocarbon. Coatings produced from mixtures of 50% propylene, 25% CO/sub 2/, and 25% Ar were found to be more gastight than were coatings produced from mixtures of propylene and argon, helium, or H/sub 2/. Higher concentrations of CO/sub 2/ in the gas mixture caused severe oxidation of graphite components within the coating furnace. The permeability of coatings deposited by use of CO/sub 2/ dilution was found to depend on the deposition temperature. Low deposition temperatures produced more gastight coatings. It was determined that CO/sub 2/ had little or no effect on coating anisotropy. 6 figures.

  9. Combustion synthesis in the Ti-C-Ni-Mo system: Part I. Micromechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasalvia, J. C.; Kim, D. K.; Lipsett, R. A.; Meyers, M. A.

    1995-11-01

    Combustion-wave arresting experiments were conducted on Ti-C-Ni and Ti-C-Ni-Mo powder mixtures. The reactant powder mixtures were placed within a conical hole machined in a Cu block. The reaction was initiated at the base of the cone and proceeded down the cone axis, toward the apex, until the heat loss to the Cu block was sufficient to arrest the reaction. This enabled the postreaction characterization of the three distinct regions of the combustion wave: unreacted, partially reacted, and fully reacted. The unreacted region is characterized by removal of a surface scale on the Ti particles and Ti α → β solid-state phase transformation. The partially reacted region is characterized by a number of physical processes and a distinct interface with the unreacted region. These processes include the formation of Ti-Ni phases, Ti-Ni melt, TiC, layer on the C particles, and TiCx spherules. The TiCx layer is composed of coarsening TiCx precipitates which are ejected into the progressively Ni-rich Ti-Ni melt. These TiCx spherules vary in size with apparent diameters of approximately 0.2 to 1 μm. No distinct interface exists between the partially and fully reacted regions. Final consumption of C is followed by TiCx spherule growth by combined Ostwald ripening and grain coalescence mechanisms resulting in an apparent diameter of 2.5 μm. The addition of Mo does not significantly affect the processes occurring within the partially reacted region. It is apparent that Mo enters into solution with the Ti-Ni melt at a rate much slower than that characteristic of the other processes (i.e., Ti-Ni melt mixing or Ti-C reaction).

  10. Photocatalytic Iron Oxide Coatings Produced by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Salehi, M.; Amirnasr, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.; Kalantari, Y.; Mohammadnezhad, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, hematite coatings with semiconductor properties have received attention for photocatalytic applications. In this study, plasma and flame spraying techniques were used for hematite deposition on 316 stainless steel plates. X-ray diffraction was used for phase composition analysis, and methylene blue was used as an organic pollutant to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of thermally sprayed coatings. The results showed that all these coatings could act under visible-light irradiation but the one deposited by flame spraying at 20 cm stand-off distance showed the highest photocatalytic activity. The results showed that wavelength of the light source and pH of the solution affected the photocatalytic activity significantly. It was also shown that thermally sprayed iron oxide coatings could have a high photo-absorption ability, which could positively affect the photocatalytic activity.

  11. Process for producing a corrosion-resistant solid lubricant coating

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhaeuser, P.; Hintermann, H.E.; Maillat, M.

    1983-11-15

    A corrosion-resistant surface formed of a sulfide-forming metal, in particular nickel, is first subjected to an electric plasma in an atmosphere containing hydrogen sulfide to form an adherent sulfide on said surface. The sulfided surface is then exposed to simultaneous cathodic sputtering of at least one solid lubricant which is a chalcogen compound of layer structure, in particular MoS/sub 2/, and at least one hydrophobic solid polymer, in particular PTFE. The coating thus formed is a composite coating in which the particles of the chalcogen compound are coated by the polymer. When the surface of the part to be coated does not consist of a corrosion-resistant sulfide-forming metal, a layer of such a metal is first deposited by cathodic sputtering. The composite coating withstands a wet oxidizing atmosphere, contrary to a coating of MoS/sub 2/ alone, and the method is applicable to any mechanical part intended to rub on other surfaces, such as a watch balance wheel staff and ball or roller bearings.

  12. Method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane and associated product

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Paul K. T.; Gallaher, George R.; Wu, Jeffrey C. S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane including passing a selected hydrocarbon vapor through a ceramic membrane and controlling ceramic membrane exposure temperature and ceramic membrane exposure time. The method produces a carbon coated ceramic membrane of reduced pore size and modified surface properties having increased chemical, thermal and hydrothermal stability over an uncoated ceramic membrane.

  13. Method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane and associated product

    DOEpatents

    Liu, P.K.T.; Gallaher, G.R.; Wu, J.C.S.

    1993-11-16

    A method is described for producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane including passing a selected hydrocarbon vapor through a ceramic membrane and controlling ceramic membrane exposure temperature and ceramic membrane exposure time. The method produces a carbon coated ceramic membrane of reduced pore size and modified surface properties having increased chemical, thermal and hydrothermal stability over an uncoated ceramic membrane. 12 figures.

  14. Micro- and nano-testing of calcium phosphate coatings produced by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Arias, J L; Mayor, M B; Pou, J; Leng, Y; León, B; Pérez-Amor, M

    2003-09-01

    Micro- and nano-testing methods have been explored to study the thin calcium phosphate coatings with high adhesive strength. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique was utilised to produce calcium phosphate coatings on metal substrates, because this type of coatings exhibit much higher adhesive strength with substrates than conventional plasma-sprayed coatings. Due to the limitations of the conventional techniques to evaluate the mechanical properties of these thin coatings (1 microm thick), micro-scratch testing has been applied to evaluate the coating-to-substrate adhesion, and nano-indentation to determine the coating hardness and elastic modulus. The test results showed that the PLD produced amorphous and crystalline HA coatings are more ductile than titanium substrates, and the PLD coatings are not delaminated from the substrates by scratch. Also, the results showed that the crystalline HA coating is superior in internal cohesion to the amorphous one, even though the lower elastic modulus of amorphous coating could be more mechanically compatible with natural bone. PMID:12809768

  15. Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires grown on carbon cloth as integrated electrode for high-performance supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jinwei; Xu, Henghui; Li, Guolong; Huang, Yunhui

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires were grown on carbon cloth (CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4) by a two-step hydrothermal route to fabricate a flexible binder-free electrode. The prepared CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 integrated electrode was directly used as an electrode for faradaic supercapacitor. It shows a high areal capacitance of 2.917 F cm(-2) at 2 mA cm(-2) and excellent cycling stability with 90.6% retention over 2000 cycles at a high current density of 20 mA cm(-2). The superior specific capacitance, rate and cycling performance can be ascribed to the fast transferring path for electrons and ions, synergic effect and the stability of the hierarchical core-shell structure.

  16. Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires grown on carbon cloth as integrated electrode for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jinwei; Xu, Henghui; Li, Guolong; Huang, Yunhui

    2016-08-01

    Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires were grown on carbon cloth (CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4) by a two-step hydrothermal route to fabricate a flexible binder-free electrode. The prepared CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 integrated electrode was directly used as an electrode for faradaic supercapacitor. It shows a high areal capacitance of 2.917 F cm‑2 at 2 mA cm‑2 and excellent cycling stability with 90.6% retention over 2000 cycles at a high current density of 20 mA cm‑2. The superior specific capacitance, rate and cycling performance can be ascribed to the fast transferring path for electrons and ions, synergic effect and the stability of the hierarchical core-shell structure.

  17. Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires grown on carbon cloth as integrated electrode for high-performance supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jinwei; Xu, Henghui; Li, Guolong; Huang, Yunhui

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires were grown on carbon cloth (CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4) by a two-step hydrothermal route to fabricate a flexible binder-free electrode. The prepared CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 integrated electrode was directly used as an electrode for faradaic supercapacitor. It shows a high areal capacitance of 2.917 F cm(-2) at 2 mA cm(-2) and excellent cycling stability with 90.6% retention over 2000 cycles at a high current density of 20 mA cm(-2). The superior specific capacitance, rate and cycling performance can be ascribed to the fast transferring path for electrons and ions, synergic effect and the stability of the hierarchical core-shell structure. PMID:27515274

  18. Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires grown on carbon cloth as integrated electrode for high-performance supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jinwei; Xu, Henghui; Li, Guolong; Huang, Yunhui

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires were grown on carbon cloth (CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4) by a two-step hydrothermal route to fabricate a flexible binder-free electrode. The prepared CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 integrated electrode was directly used as an electrode for faradaic supercapacitor. It shows a high areal capacitance of 2.917 F cm−2 at 2 mA cm−2 and excellent cycling stability with 90.6% retention over 2000 cycles at a high current density of 20 mA cm−2. The superior specific capacitance, rate and cycling performance can be ascribed to the fast transferring path for electrons and ions, synergic effect and the stability of the hierarchical core-shell structure. PMID:27515274

  19. Refractory coatings and method of producing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and wear properties of sputtered refractory coatings on substrates of materials that form stable nitrides is improved by placing each substrate directly below a titanium carbide target of a commercial radiofrequency diode apparatus in a vacuum chamber. Nitrogen is bled into the system through a nozzle resulting in a small partial pressure of about 0.5% to 2.5% during the first two minutes of deposition. The flow of nitrogen is then stopped, and the sputtering ambient is reduced to pure argon through a nozzle without interrupting the sputtering process. When nitrogen is deliberately introduced during the crucial interface formation, some of the titanium at the interface reacts to form titanium nitride while the metal of the substrate also forms the nitride. These two nitrides atomically mixed together in the interfacial region act to more strongly bond the growing titanium carbide coating as it forms on the substrate.

  20. Surface modification of 40CrNiMo7 steel with high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shengzhi; Wang, Huihui; Zhao, Limin

    2016-02-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment was conducted on 40CrNiMo7 steel with accelerating voltage 27 kV, energy density 3 J/cm2, pulse duration 2.5 μs and 1-50 pulses. The evolutions of surface microstructure were investigated by using optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. It was found that the carbides in the surface remelted layer of depth ∼4 μm were dissolved gradually along with the increasing number of HCPEB pulses. Eventually, the surface microstructure of 40CrNiMo7 steel was transformed to a complex structure composed of very refined ∼150 nm austenite as the main part and a little quantity of martensite phases. After 15 pulses of HCPEB treatment, the surface microhardness was doubled to 553 HV, and the wear rate decreased to one third of the initial state correspondingly.

  1. Cyclic variations of sulfur isotopes in Cambrian stratabound Ni-Mo-(PGE-Au) ores of southern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murowchick, J.B.; Coveney, R.M.; Grauch, R.I.; Eldridge, C.S.; Shelton, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    Cyclic variations of ??34S values over a range of at least 48??? in pyrite nodules from stratabound Ni-Mo-PGE(Au) ores of southern China are attributed to biogenic reduction of seawater sulfate in an anoxic, phosphogenic, and metallogenic basin. Cyclic introduction and mixing of normal seawater into typically stagnant basin waters led to extreme variations in ??34S values of aqueous sulfide species present at different times. Intermittent venting of metal-laden hydrothermal fluids into such a bacteriogenic sulfide-rich environment resulted in precipitation of metal sulfides as pseudomorphous replacements of organic debris and as sulfide sediments that record large ??34SCDT variations from -26 to +22???. Apatite and silica dominated the replacement of the organic debris when metals were not being introduced into the basin. The combination of abundant organic debris, localized topographic basins for accumulation of the debris, bacterial production of sulfide species, and introduction of metal-bearing hydrothermal fluids provided the environment necessary to form these unusually rich Ni-Mo ores. ?? 1994.

  2. Hydroprocessing of sunflower oil-gas oil blends over sulfided Ni-Mo-Al-zeolite beta composites.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, T M; Banu, M; Pandurangan, A; Sivasanker, S

    2011-11-01

    Mixtures of sunflower oil and a straight run gas oil in the diesel fuel range were hydroprocessed over sulfided NiO(3%)-MoO3(12%)-γ-Al2O3 incorporating 0, 15 or 30 wt.% zeolite beta (BEA). The studies were carried out at 320-350 °C; 30-60 bars, and weight hourly space velocities (WHSV), 1-4 h(-1). Catalyst containing 30% BEA achieved nearly 100 % conversion of the vegetable oil into hydrocarbons at 330 °C, 60 bars and a WHSV of 2 h(-1) compared to 95.5% by the Ni-Mo-γ-alumina catalyst without BEA. Hydroprocessing with blends containing oleic acid revealed that the catalysts were able to transform the acid into hydrocarbons. An analysis of the ratios of the n-C18 and n-C17 paraffins formed from the vegetable oil at different process conditions revealed that the catalyst containing 15% BEA was most active for hydrodeoxygenation. The gas oil-hydrodesulfurization activity of the Ni-Mo-Al2O3 was enhanced by the addition of BEA by more than 10%. PMID:21945166

  3. Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

  4. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  5. Structure of Biocompatible Coatings Produced from Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles by Detonation Spraying.

    PubMed

    Nosenko, Valentyna; Strutynska, Nataliia; Vorona, Igor; Zatovsky, Igor; Dzhagan, Volodymyr; Lemishko, Sergiy; Epple, Matthias; Prymak, Oleg; Baran, Nikolai; Ishchenko, Stanislav; Slobodyanik, Nikolai; Prylutskyy, Yuriy; Klyui, Nickolai; Temchenko, Volodymyr

    2015-12-01

    Detonation-produced hydroxyapatite coatings were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The source material for detonation spraying was a B-type carbonated hydroxyapatite powder. The coatings consisted of tetracalcium phosphate and apatite. The ratio depended slightly on the degree of crystallinity of the initial powder and processing parameters of the coating preparation. The tetracalcium phosphate phase was homogeneous; the apatite phase contained defects localized on the sixfold axis and consisted of hydroxyapatite and oxyapatite. Technological factors contributing to the transformation of hydroxyapatite powder structure during coating formation by detonation spraying are discussed. PMID:26625888

  6. Structure of Biocompatible Coatings Produced from Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles by Detonation Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, Valentyna; Strutynska, Nataliia; Vorona, Igor; Zatovsky, Igor; Dzhagan, Volodymyr; Lemishko, Sergiy; Epple, Matthias; Prymak, Oleg; Baran, Nikolai; Ishchenko, Stanislav; Slobodyanik, Nikolai; Prylutskyy, Yuriy; Klyui, Nickolai; Temchenko, Volodymyr

    2015-12-01

    Detonation-produced hydroxyapatite coatings were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The source material for detonation spraying was a B-type carbonated hydroxyapatite powder. The coatings consisted of tetracalcium phosphate and apatite. The ratio depended slightly on the degree of crystallinity of the initial powder and processing parameters of the coating preparation. The tetracalcium phosphate phase was homogeneous; the apatite phase contained defects localized on the sixfold axis and consisted of hydroxyapatite and oxyapatite. Technological factors contributing to the transformation of hydroxyapatite powder structure during coating formation by detonation spraying are discussed.

  7. Moisture resistant and anti-reflection optical coatings produced by plasma polymerization of organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    The need for protective coatings on critical optical surfaces, such as halide crystal windows or lenses used in spectroscopy, has long been recognized. It has been demonstrated that thin, one micron, organic coatings produced by polymerization of flourinated monomers in low temperature gas discharge (plasma) exhibit very high degrees of moisture resistence, e.g., hundreds of hours protection for cesium iodide vs. minutes before degradation sets in for untreated surfaces. The index of refraction of these coatings is intermediate between that of the halide substrate and air, a condition for anti-reflection, another desirable property of optical coatings. Thus, the organic coatings not only offer protection, but improved transmittance as well. The polymer coating is non-absorbing over the range 0.4 to 40 microns with an exception at 8.0 microns, the expected absorption for C-F bonds.

  8. Antimicrobial coatings for ensuring safety of fresh produces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Safety of fresh produce has been a perennial issue for the industry in the US despite tightening up regulations and implementing good manufacturing practice. The diversity of crops and labor-intense operations in the fresh produce production created a unique set of contamination routes that are not...

  9. Reaction of H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S with CoMoO{sub 4} and NiMoO{sub 4}: TPR, XANES, time-resolved XRD, and molecular-orbital studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Chaturvedi, S.; Hanson, J.C.; Brito, J.L.

    1999-02-04

    The combination of two metals in an oxide matrix can produce materials with novel physical and chemical properties. The reactivity of a series of cobalt and nickel molybdates ({alpha}-AMoO{sub 4}, {beta}-AMoO{sub 4}, and AmoO{sub 4}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O; A = Co or Ni) toward H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S was examined using temperature programmed reduction (TPR), synchrotron-based X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption near-edge-spectroscopy (XANES). In general, the cobalt and nickel molybdates are more reactive toward H{sub 2} and easier to reduce than pure molybdenum oxides: MoO{sub 2} < MoO{sub 3} < CoMoO{sub 4} < NiMoO{sub 4}. The interaction of H{sub 2} with surfaces of {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4}, {alpha}-CoMoO{sub 4}, and {alpha}-MoO{sub 3} was investigated using ab initio SCF calculations and cluster models. The mixed-metal oxides are easier to reduce due to the combination of two factors. First, it is easier to adsorb and dissociate H{sub 2} on Ni or Co sites than on Mo sites of an oxide. And second, as a result of differences in the strength of the metal-oxygen bonds, it is easier to remove oxygen as water from the nickel and cobalt molybdates than from MoO{sub 3} or MoO{sub 2}. The extra reactivity that the Co and Ni atoms provide also makes the rate of sulfidation of the cobalt and nickel molybdates faster than that of pure molybdenum oxides. For the adsorption of H{sub 2}S, HS, and S on {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} and {alpha}-MoO{sub 3} clusters, the results of ab initio SCF calculations show bigger bonding energies on the Ni sites than on the Mo sites. In these systems, the oxidation state of the Ni atoms is substantially lower (i.e., larger electron density) than that of the Mo atoms, favoring the formation of Ni {r_arrow} SH and Ni {r_arrow} S dative bonds. Results of time-resolved XRD and XANES indicate that the reduced AMoO{sub 4} compounds can be regenerated by reaction with O{sub 2} at high temperatures (350--450 C). A similar procedure (S{sub a} + O

  10. Layer structured Na2Ni(MoO4)2 particles as a visible-light-driven photocatalyst for degradation of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuting; Chen, Luyang; Huang, Yanlin; Chen, Cuili; Kim, Sun Il; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-03-01

    A new visible-light-driven photocatalyst of Na2Ni(MoO4)2 particle was prepared by the modified Pechini method. The crystal structure was measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the structural refinement. The sample was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-vis absorption spectrum measurements. The average size of Na2Ni(MoO4)2 particle is about 180 nm. Na2Ni(MoO4)2 particle have an efficient optical absorption in the UV-visible light wavelength region with a direct allowed electronic transition of 2.06 eV. The effective photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye was demonstrated, which benefits from the special crystal structure of Na2Ni(MoO4)2 particle. This crystal lattice has two infinite chains formed by (Ni,Na)O6 and MoO4 polyhedra standing in lines alone with the inner wall of the hexagonal tunnels. This results in the efficient optical absorption and provides more chances for electron-hole separations, which can further react with dye molecules to oxidize the dye pollutant into non-toxic products.

  11. Laminar iridium coating produced by pulse current electrodeposition from chloride molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li'an; Bai, Shuxin; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Yicong

    2013-10-01

    Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, Iridium (Ir) is one of the most promising oxidation-resistant coatings for refractory materials above 1800 °C in aerospace field. However, the Ir coatings prepared by traditional methods are composed of columnar grains throughout the coating thickness. The columnar structure of the coating is considered to do harm to its oxidation resistance. The laminar Ir coating is expected to have a better high-temperature oxidation resistance than the columnar Ir coating does. The pulse current electrodeposition, with three independent parameters: average current density (Jm), duty cycle (R) and pulse frequency (f), is considered to be a promising method to fabricate layered Ir coating. In this study, laminar Ir coatings were prepared by pulse current electrodeposition in chloride molten salt. The morphology, roughness and texture of the coatings were determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), profilometer and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results showed that the laminar Ir coatings were composed of a nucleation layer with columnar structure and a growth layer with laminar structure. The top surfaces of the laminar Ir coatings consisted of cauliflower-like aggregates containing many fine grains, which were separated by deep grooves. The laminar Ir coating produced at the deposition condition of 20 mA/cm2 (Jm), 10% (R) and 6 Hz (f) was quite smooth (Ra 1.01 ± 0.09 μm) with extremely high degree of preferred orientation of <1 1 1>, and its laminar structure was well developed with clear boundaries and uniform thickness of sub-layers.

  12. The effect of copper doping on martensite shear stress in porous TiNi(Mo,Fe,Cu) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodorenko, V. N.; Kaftaranova, M. I.; Gunther, V. E.

    2015-03-01

    The properties of alloys based on porous nickel-titanium (TiNi) with copper additives have been studied. It is established that the copper doping of porous TiNi(Mo,Fe,Cu) alloys fabricated by the method of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis leads to a significant decrease in the martensite shear stress (below 30 MPa). Low values of the martensite shear stress (σmin) in copper-doped TiNi-based alloys allows medical implants of complex shapes to be manufactured for various purposes, including oral surgery. The optimum concentration of copper additives (within 3-6 at %) has been determined that ensures high performance characteristics of TiNi-based porous alloys for medical implants.

  13. Phase composition of Al-Ni-Mo catalysts for hydrotreatment prepared by one-step impregnation using different procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Gazimzyanov, N.R.; Mikhailov, V.I.; Volod`ko, V.V.

    1995-09-01

    X-ray diffraction, Raman and diffuse-reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, coupled with selective extraction of Mo and Ni, are applied to investigate the phase composition of Al-Ni-Mo catalysts prepared both by a conventional one-step impregnation with ammonia and phosphoric acid, and by a new method based on the use of nickel heteropolymolybdate. By comparing the data obtained by Raman and DR spectroscopy with the data on water extraction, it is shown that the phase removed on washing can be ascribed to heteropolymolybdates. Formation of these compounds is found to be favored by the use of the solution containing H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} to impregnate the catalyst with Mo and Ni.

  14. Diffusion aluminizing coatings to produce Ni{sub 3}Al alloy welding rods

    SciTech Connect

    McVay, C.; Rapp, R.A.

    1995-07-15

    A pack chemistry of 40 wt% Ni-Al powder (30 at% Ni-70 Al), 1.75 wt% AlF{sub 3}, and balance Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used to produce Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3} coatings that contained the required amount of Al for the average composition of a Ni{sub 3}Al alloy welding rod. The coating time was 7.8 hr. at a temperature of 1,000 C. Coatings produced at shorter time showed slower kinetics and a lower Al surface composition due to an adherent layer of sintered pack powder that was not present for longer coating times.

  15. Process for producing plasma sprayed carbide-based coatings with minimal decarburization and near theoretical density

    SciTech Connect

    Lenling, W.J. ); Smith, M.F.; Henfling, J.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Plasma spray deposition of carbide/metal hardcoatings is difficult because complex chemical transformations can occur while spraying, especially in the presence of oxygen. A commercial plasma spray torch has been modified to simultaneously inject carbide powder and a metal alloy powder at two different locations in the plasma stream. Composite hardcoatings of tungsten carbide/cobalt with a nickel-base alloy matrix have been produce with this dual-injection spray process and compared to coatings sprayed with a conventional plasma spray process. X-ray diffraction revealed very little change in the carbide phase composition of dual-injection coatings as compared to the original composition of the carbide spray powder. Conversely, the conventionally sprayed coatings showed significant transformation of the WC phase to the less desirable W{sub 2}C phase, and secondary oxy- carbide phases were also clearly evident. Porosity in the dual- injection coatings was consistently less than 2%, as measured by image analysis of polished metallographic samples. Microhardness results for the dual injection coatings also compared very favorably with values for the conventional coatings. Preliminary results from an ongoing abrasive wear study indicate that the dual-injection coatings are more wear resistant than the conventional coatings, but further research is needed. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Characterization of Vc-Vb Particles Reinforced Fe-Based Composite Coatings Produced by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, K. L.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, Z. K.

    2016-03-01

    In situ synthesized VC-VB particles reinforced Fe-based composite coatings were produced by laser beam melting mixture of ferrovanadium (Fe-V) alloy, boron carbide (B4C), CaF2 and Fe-based self-melting powders. The results showed that VB particles with black regular and irregular blocky shape and VC with black flower-like shape were uniformly distributed in the coatings. The type, amount, and size of the reinforcements were influenced by the content of FeV40 and B4C powders. Compared to the substrate, the hardness and wear resistance of the composite coatings were greatly improved.

  17. Toxicity of hydrogen peroxide produced by electroplated coatings to pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z H; Sakagami, Y; Osaka, T

    1998-05-01

    The ability of various electroplated coatings (cobalt, zinc, copper, and cobalt-containing alloys of nickel, zinc, chromium, etc.) to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria (Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) was determined by a drop-method antibacterial experiment. The amounts of H2O2 produced and metal ions dissolved from the surfaces of various electroplated coatings were measured and it was found that the inhibitory ability of coatings corresponded to the amounts of H2O2 produced. The more significant the inhibition of the coating to bacterial growth, the greater the amount of H2O2 production. In addition, the bacterial survival rates on the surfaces of coatings were almost zero when H2O2 was produced in amounts greater than 10(-6) mmol/cm2. However, the dominant concentrations of metal ions dissolved from coatings were outside of the bacterial lethal range.

  18. Zwitterionic Antifouling Coatings for the Purification of High-Salinity Shale Gas Produced Water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Goktekin, Esma; Gleason, Karen K

    2015-11-01

    Fouling refers to the undesirable attachment of organic molecules and microorganisms to submerged surfaces. It is an obstacle to the purification of shale gas produced water and is currently without an effective solution due to the highly contaminated nature of produced water. Here, we demonstrate the direct vapor application of a robust zwitterionic coating to a variety of substrates. The coating remains unprecedentedly hydrophilic, smooth, and effectively antifouling in extremely high salinity solutions (with salt concentration of 200,000 ppm). The fouling resistance is assessed rapidly and quantitatively with a molecular force spectroscopy-based method and corroborated using quartz crystal microbalance system with dissipation monitoring. Grazing angle attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared is used in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry to lend insight into the underlying mechanism for the exceptional stability and effectiveness of the zwitterionic coating under high-salinity conditions. A unique coating architecture, where the surface is concentrated with mobile zwitterionic moieties while the bulk is cross-linked to enhance coating durability, was discovered to be the origin of its stable fouling resistance under high salinity. Combined with previously reported exceptional stability in highly oxidative environments and strong fouling resistance to oil and grease, the zwitterionic surface here has the potential to enable low-cost, membrane-based techniques for the purification of produced water and to eventually balance the favorable economics and the concerning environmental impacts of the hydraulic fracturing industry.

  19. Zwitterionic Antifouling Coatings for the Purification of High-Salinity Shale Gas Produced Water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Goktekin, Esma; Gleason, Karen K

    2015-11-01

    Fouling refers to the undesirable attachment of organic molecules and microorganisms to submerged surfaces. It is an obstacle to the purification of shale gas produced water and is currently without an effective solution due to the highly contaminated nature of produced water. Here, we demonstrate the direct vapor application of a robust zwitterionic coating to a variety of substrates. The coating remains unprecedentedly hydrophilic, smooth, and effectively antifouling in extremely high salinity solutions (with salt concentration of 200,000 ppm). The fouling resistance is assessed rapidly and quantitatively with a molecular force spectroscopy-based method and corroborated using quartz crystal microbalance system with dissipation monitoring. Grazing angle attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared is used in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry to lend insight into the underlying mechanism for the exceptional stability and effectiveness of the zwitterionic coating under high-salinity conditions. A unique coating architecture, where the surface is concentrated with mobile zwitterionic moieties while the bulk is cross-linked to enhance coating durability, was discovered to be the origin of its stable fouling resistance under high salinity. Combined with previously reported exceptional stability in highly oxidative environments and strong fouling resistance to oil and grease, the zwitterionic surface here has the potential to enable low-cost, membrane-based techniques for the purification of produced water and to eventually balance the favorable economics and the concerning environmental impacts of the hydraulic fracturing industry. PMID:26449686

  20. Correlations between spraying conditions and microstructure for alumina coatings produced by HVOF and VPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramm, D.A.J.; Clyne, T.W.; Sturgeon, A.J.; Dunkerton, S.

    1994-12-31

    Coatings have been produced on steel substrates by thermal spraying of alumina, using the High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) and Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) techniques. Only fine powder ({approximately} 10 {micro}m) could be sprayed by HVOF, but VPS was carried out both with this powder and two coarser ones. Particle impact velocities were measured using a mechanical technique based on twin rotating cylinders. These were shown to be in the range 100--300 m s{sup {minus}1} for VPS, depending primarily on the chamber pressure. The limited data obtained to date indicate that velocities during HVOF are appreciably higher. The phase constitutions of the coatings were studied using three different techniques. The coatings were in all cases found to consist largely of {gamma}-alumina. The {alpha}-alumina content, attributable to the presence of unmolten particles, varied between about 10% and 30%. Porosity contents, determined using high precision densitometry, were in the range 2--8%. For the VPS coatings, higher impact velocities, lower {alpha} phase contents and lower porosity levels were found for the intermediate size ({approximately} 15 {micro}m) particles, the latter two being similar to those for the HVOF coatings. The erosion resistance of these two coatings were also found to be similar.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performance of graphene decorated with 1D NiMoO4.nH2O nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debasis; Giri, Soumen; Das, Chapal Kumar

    2013-10-01

    One-dimensional NiMoO4.nH2O nanorods and their graphene based hybrid composite with good electrochemical properties have been synthesized by a cost effective hydrothermal procedure. The formation of the mixed metal oxide and the composite was confirmed by XRD, XPS and Raman analyses. The morphological characterizations were carried out using FESEM and TEM analyses. The materials were subjected to electrochemical characterization through cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies with 6 M KOH as the supporting electrolyte. For NiMoO4.nH2O, a maximum specific capacitance of 161 F g-1 was obtained at 5 A g-1 current density, accompanied with an energy density of 4.53 W h kg-1 at a steady power delivery rate of 1125 W kg-1. The high utility of the pseudocapacitive NiMoO4.nH2O was achieved in its graphene based composite, which exhibited a high specific capacitance of 367 F g-1 at 5 A g-1 current density and a high energy density of 10.32 W h kg-1 at a power density of 1125 W kg-1 accompanied with long term cyclic stability.One-dimensional NiMoO4.nH2O nanorods and their graphene based hybrid composite with good electrochemical properties have been synthesized by a cost effective hydrothermal procedure. The formation of the mixed metal oxide and the composite was confirmed by XRD, XPS and Raman analyses. The morphological characterizations were carried out using FESEM and TEM analyses. The materials were subjected to electrochemical characterization through cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies with 6 M KOH as the supporting electrolyte. For NiMoO4.nH2O, a maximum specific capacitance of 161 F g-1 was obtained at 5 A g-1 current density, accompanied with an energy density of 4.53 W h kg-1 at a steady power delivery rate of 1125 W kg-1. The high utility of the pseudocapacitive NiMoO4.nH2O was achieved in its graphene

  2. Properties of pure and sulfided NiMoO{sub 4} and CoMoO{sub 4} catalysts: TPR, XANES and time-resolved XRD studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, S.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Hanson, J.C.; Albornoz, A.; Brito, J.L.

    1998-12-31

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used to characterize the structural and electronic properties of a series of cobalt- and nickel-molybdate catalysts (AMoO{sub 4}.nH{sub 2}O, {alpha}-AMoO{sub 4}, {beta}-AMoO{sub 4}; A=Co or Ni). The results of XANES indicate that the Co and Ni atoms are in octahedral sites in all these compounds, while the coordination of Mo varies from octahedral in the {alpha}-phases to tetrahedral in the {beta}-phases and hydrate. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction shows a direct transformation of the hydrates into the {beta}-AMoO{sub 4} compounds (following a kinetics of first order) at temperatures between 200 and 350{degrees}C. This is facilitated by the similarities that the AMoO{sub 4}.nH{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} at temperatures between 400 and 600{degrees}C, forming gaseous water oxides in which the oxidation state of Co and Ni remains +2 while that of Mo is reduced to +5 or +4. After exposing {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} and {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4} to H{sub 2}S, both metals get sulfided and a NiMoS{sub x} phase is formed. For the {beta} phase of NiMoO{sub 4} the sulfidation of Mo is more extensive than for the {alpha} phase, making the former a better precursor for catalysts of hydrodesulfurization reactions.

  3. Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis in the Ti-C-Ni-Mo System on Application of Powerful Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulak, M. M.; Khina, B. B.

    2014-03-01

    An experimental setup has been developed and a study has been made of the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis in a Ti-C-Ni-Mo system under the conditions of action of ultrasonic vibrations. The influence of the amplitude of ultrasonic vibrations on the combustion rate and temperature and on the phase composition and structure of the derived composite material based on titanium carbide with a metal binder has been determined. The heat-transfer coefficient on the surface of a sample for vibrations at ultrasound frequency has been evaluated. Consideration has been given to possible mechanisms of influence of ultrasonic vibrations on the process of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. It has been shown that the reduction in the synthesis temperature is due to the cooling of the sample because of the forced convection of the surrounding gas, whereas the change in the structure of the synthesized material is related to the change in the conditions of high-temperature heterogeneous interaction in the wave of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis.

  4. Effect of Ti addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a cast Fe-Ni-Mo-Mn maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, S. Hossein; Nili Ahmadabadi, M.

    2003-10-01

    To study the effect of Ti on the age hardening behavior of Fe-Ni-Mn maraging steels, a Fe-Ni-Mo-Mn steel was alloyed with Ti then mechanical properties and aging behavior of two cast steels were investigated. In this regard, two heats of nominal compositions of Fe-10Ni-6Mo-3Mn and Fe-lONi-6Mo-3Mn-0. 7Ti were induction melted in air and vacuum respectively and cast in iron mold. After homogenizing at 1473K for 21.6ks and water quenching, solution annealing was performed at 1223K for 3.6ks followed by air cooling. Age hardening behavior at 773Kin the range of 0.36-172. 8 ks was determined. Tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were measured in the solution annealed and peak-aged conditions. Fractographic features were studied by scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX microanalyses. Tensile properties of the alloys in the peakaged condition were in the range of grade 200 standard maraging steel. It has been found that Ti addition resulted in increasing of hardness and strength in aged condition and decreasing of Charpy impact toughness in both solution annealed and aged conditions. Ti addition also changes type and morphology of inclusions and fracture mechanism from semi-ductile intergranular mode to semi-ductile transgranular one.

  5. Kinetic Parameters of Secondary Carbide Precipitation in High-Cr White Iron Alloyed by Mn-Ni-Mo-V Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, V. G.; Chabak, Yu. G.; Brykov, M. N.

    2013-05-01

    This study presents kinetics of precipitation of secondary carbides in 14.55%Cr-Mn-Ni-Mo-V white cast iron during the destabilization heat treatment. The as-cast iron was heat treated at temperatures in the range of 800-1100 °C with soaking up to 6 h. Investigation was carried out by optical and electron microscopy, dilatometric analysis, Ms temperature measurement, and bulk hardness evaluation. TTT-curve of precipitation process of secondary carbides (M7C3, M23C6, M3C2) has been constructed in this study. It was determined that the precipitation occurs at the maximum rate at 950 °C where the process is started after 10 s and completed within 160 min further. The precipitation leads to significant increase of Ms temperature and bulk hardness; large soaking times at destabilization temperatures cause coarsening of secondary carbides and decrease in particles number, followed by decrease in hardness. The results obtained are discussed in terms of solubility of carbon in the austenite and diffusion activation of Cr atoms. The precipitation was found to consist of two stages with activation energies of 196.5 kJ/g-mole at the first stage and 47.1 kJ/g-mole at the second stage.

  6. Structural and electrical characterizations of cerium (Ce3+)-doped double perovskite system Sr2NiMoO6- δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pravin; Singh, Nitish Kumar; Sinha, A. S. K.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2016-09-01

    The double perovskite system Sr2- x Ce x NiMoO6- δ (SCNM) with 0.01 ≤ x ≤ 0.05 was synthesized by the citrate-nitrate auto-combustion synthesis route. Thermal studies were carried out by simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetry. Phase constitution was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Rietveld refinement showed that the major phase exists in tetragonal form with space group I4/m. Microstructural investigations revealed the formation of uniform grains. The electrical conductivity studied by impedance spectroscopy in the temperature range 300-600 °C was found to follow a thermally activated process. The sample with x = 0.01 showed the highest conductivity with lowest activation energy. The electrical conductivity of the system was discussed in terms of identified impurity phases and charge density [{{{Mo}}_{{{{Mo}}^{6 +}}}^{5 +} {}^' ]. The variation of electrical conductivity with composition was explained on the basis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and XRD studies.

  7. Study of Effect of Quenching Deformation Influenced by 17CrNiMo6 Gear Shaft of Carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zirui; Yu, Shenjun; Xu, Jinwu

    The 17CrNiMo6 steel is mainly used for the gear shaft of large modulus in many fields of heavy industry such as mining, transit, hoist, forging and so on[1]. The size of addendum circle and common normal line is changed a lot beyond the tolerance because of the long time of carburizing process and the out-of-step structural stress and thermal stress during the quenching process. And thus the posterior grinding efficiency and quality are influenced. In the paper comparison and analysis of the deformation affected by solid and hollow gear shafts were done and the methods of simulation and practice were both used. The results are as follows: the deformation of gear shaft was small before and after carburizing while that of gear shaft was large before and after quenching because of different cooling velocity, structure and hardness of each position. And the deformation of hollow was much smaller than that of solid. Therefore, if the hollow gear shaft is used, the waste of material will be decreased, and finishing cost will be reduced, and thus the technology of heat treatment will be optimized.

  8. Effect of Grain Boundary Character Distribution on the Impact Toughness of 410NiMo Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, M.; Das, C. R.; Chowdhury, Sandip Ghosh; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    Grain boundary character distributions in 410NiMo weld metal were studied in the as-welded, first-stage, and second-stage postweld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions, and these were correlated with the Charpy-V impact toughness values of the material. The high impact toughness values in the weld metal in the as-welded and first-stage PWHT conditions compared to that in the second-stage condition are attributed to the higher fraction of low-energy Σ boundaries. A higher volume fraction of retained austenite and coarser martensite after second-stage PWHT accompanied by the formation of the ideal cube component in the 2-hour heat-treated specimen led to a reduction in the toughness value. A subsequent increase in the PWHT duration at 873 K (600 °C) enhanced the formation of {111}<112>, which impedes the adverse effect of the cubic component, resulting in an increase in the impact toughness. In addition to this, grain refinement during 4-hour PWHT in the second stage also increased the toughness of the weld metal.

  9. Property evaluation of thermal sprayed metallic coating by acoustic emission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Asako; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Mikio; Ono, Kanji

    2000-03-01

    The authors analyzed acoustic emission signals from plasma sprayed sheets by first obtaining the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and density. The sheets of a high Cr-Ni alloy (55Cr-41Ni-Mo, Si, B) were made by low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) and heat treated. Utilizing laser induced surface acoustic waves (SAWs), the group velocity dispersion data of Rayleigh waves was obtained and matched to that computed by Adler's matrix transfer method. They monitored the acoustic emissions (Lamb waves) produced by microfractures in free standing as sprayed coating subjected to bending. Fast cleavage type microfracture with source rise time of around 2 {micro}s occurred as precursors to the final brittle fracture. The velocity and time-frequency amplitude spectrograms (wavelet contour maps) of the Lamb waves were utilized for the source location and fracture kinetic analyses.

  10. CVD aluminiding process for producing a modified platinum aluminide bond coat for improved high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Williams, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of depositing by chemical vapor deposition a modified platinum aluminide diffusion coating onto a superalloy substrate comprising the steps of applying a layer of a platinum group metal to the superalloy substrate; passing an externally generated aluminum halide gas through an internal gas generator which is integral with a retort, the internal gas generator generating a modified halide gas; and co-depositing aluminum and modifier onto the superalloy substrate. In one form, the modified halide gas is hafnium chloride and the modifier is hafnium with the modified platinum aluminum bond coat comprising a single phase additive layer of platinum aluminide with at least about 0.5 percent hafnium by weight percent and about 1 to about 15 weight percent of hafnium in the boundary between a diffusion layer and the additive layer. The bond coat produced by this method is also claimed.

  11. A photo-triggered layered surface coating producing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Doris; Monteiro, Isa P; Huang, David; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-12-01

    We report a photoactive surface coating which produces cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon irradiation with near infrared (NIR) light. The coating is assembled layer-by-layer, and consists of cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) and poly-l-lysine (PLL) modified with the photoactive molecule pheophorbide a. Pheophorbide a loading can be fine-tuned by varying the number of bilayers, yielding stable materials with the capacity to generate repeated and/or prolonged light-triggered ROS release. Light irradiation of the photoactive surface coatings provides a versatile platform for the spatiotemporal control of events at the material-tissue interface, such as bacterial colonization, platelet adhesion, and mammalian cell attachment.

  12. Plasma-produced erbia coatings for waste reduction in plutonium casting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Soderquist, D.; Gurevitch, A.; Steele, J.; Hampel, F.; Walter, K.C.; Perry, A.J.; Treglio, J.

    1997-12-31

    Disposal of molds used in plutonium casting operations creates a significant waste stream, since such molds are typically only used once or twice, due to the highly corrosive nature of molten plutonium. Erbia (erbium oxide) is inert to molten plutonium, but being a brittle ceramic material, is difficult to make adhere to mold surfaces under severe conditions of thermal expansion mismatch. The authors report on efforts to utilize an ion implantation process to improve the adhesion of erbia coatings deposited from a cathodic arc derived erbium plasma. Coatings were created using both dc and pulsed cathodic arc sources in a low pressure oxygen background. Ion implantation was achieved by pulse biasing the target to several 10`s of kilovolts during some steps in the process. This high energy ion bombardment was found to produce superior coating adhesion, and treated samples successfully resisted attack from molten plutonium in a casting test. The effect of variations in ion implantation parameters, coating parameters, and coating stoichiometry is discussed.

  13. Process of high temperature synthesis in producing composite carbide powders for thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, K.; Formanek, B.

    2011-05-01

    The paper presents the characterization of powders containing hard phases of chromium carbides in a NiCr matrix, intended for thermal spraying coatings. The synthesized composite powder containing hard phases and plastic matrix, produced in high-temperature synthesis with chosen powder metallurgy processes has been presented. Commercial materials, such as NiCr- CrxCy, are fabricated by means of agglomeration and sintering method. Processes of high temperature synthesis of Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6 carbides combined with NiCr powder mechanical alloying are presented in the article. Parameters of the carbides synthesis were determined in the reactive -protective atmosphere. In the rotation- vibration mill, processes were conducted using grinding and appropriate mechanical alloying at variable amplitude. The standard and synthesized powders were thermally sprayed by HVOF method in Jet Kote II and Diamond Jet system. The structure and phase composition of the powders and coatings were determined by: light and scanning microscopy, X-ray phase analysis (RTG) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The structure and wear properties of HVOF sprayed coatings containing chromium carbides has been presented. The thermally sprayed coatings are characterized of wear resistance in abrasion and erosion tests. The sprayed coatings characterized high resistance in wear conditions.

  14. Review on materials & methods to produce controlled release coated urea fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Babar; KuShaari, KuZilati; Man, Zakaria B; Basit, Abdul; Thanh, Trinh H

    2014-05-10

    With the exponential growth of the global population, the agricultural sector is bound to use ever larger quantities of fertilizers to augment the food supply, which consequently increases food production costs. Urea, when applied to crops is vulnerable to losses from volatilization and leaching. Current methods also reduce nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by plants which limits crop yields and, moreover, contributes towards environmental pollution in terms of hazardous gaseous emissions and water eutrophication. An approach that offsets this pollution while also enhancing NUE is the use of controlled release urea (CRU) for which several methods and materials have been reported. The physical intromission of urea granules in an appropriate coating material is one such technique that produces controlled release coated urea (CRCU). The development of CRCU is a green technology that not only reduces nitrogen loss caused by volatilization and leaching, but also alters the kinetics of nitrogen release, which, in turn, provides nutrients to plants at a pace that is more compatible with their metabolic needs. This review covers the research quantum regarding the physical coating of original urea granules. Special emphasis is placed on the latest coating methods as well as release experiments and mechanisms with an integrated critical analyses followed by suggestions for future research. PMID:24593892

  15. Review on materials & methods to produce controlled release coated urea fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Babar; KuShaari, KuZilati; Man, Zakaria B; Basit, Abdul; Thanh, Trinh H

    2014-05-10

    With the exponential growth of the global population, the agricultural sector is bound to use ever larger quantities of fertilizers to augment the food supply, which consequently increases food production costs. Urea, when applied to crops is vulnerable to losses from volatilization and leaching. Current methods also reduce nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by plants which limits crop yields and, moreover, contributes towards environmental pollution in terms of hazardous gaseous emissions and water eutrophication. An approach that offsets this pollution while also enhancing NUE is the use of controlled release urea (CRU) for which several methods and materials have been reported. The physical intromission of urea granules in an appropriate coating material is one such technique that produces controlled release coated urea (CRCU). The development of CRCU is a green technology that not only reduces nitrogen loss caused by volatilization and leaching, but also alters the kinetics of nitrogen release, which, in turn, provides nutrients to plants at a pace that is more compatible with their metabolic needs. This review covers the research quantum regarding the physical coating of original urea granules. Special emphasis is placed on the latest coating methods as well as release experiments and mechanisms with an integrated critical analyses followed by suggestions for future research.

  16. Analysis of microstructure and properties of multilayer coatings produced by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Polskiy, V. I.; Yermachenko, V. M.

    2016-02-01

    Purpose of the work is to prepare multilayer coatings corresponding to specified requirements to recovery and improvement of surface details. Requirements to coatings: providing durable and reliable adhesion base and filler materials, absence of pores, cracks, delaminations, reducing mixing metal base and cladding. We used iron-based PR-10R6M5 and tungsten carbide Hoganas 44712 powders. Experimental determination of the optimal technological mode of application of the single track, the coefficient of overlapping tracks to create a full layer, the angle of the second cladding layer, relative to the first one and, finally, the determination of the optimal additive tungsten carbide to achieve increased durability were produced to fulfill these requirements.

  17. Coatings with Thermally Switchable Surface Energy Produced From Block Copolymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Raleigh; Register, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-based coatings are employed across a wide array of sectors. One application of such coatings is to impart a prescribed surface energy, i . e . hydrophilic or hydrophobic character. The present work explores an approach to create surfaces with thermally switchable wetting behavior by employing coatings based on block copolymers which possess both hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments. The amphiphilic block copolymers were synthesized by coupling allyl-ended poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and hydride-ended poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers via a Pt catalyst. One PEO-PDMS diblock possessed an order-disorder-transition-temperature (TODT) of 64°C as characterized by small angle x-ray scattering. Above the TODT the polymer is a disordered melt, but below this temperature it self-assembles into alternating lamellae with a repeat spacing of 7.7 nm. When cooled through the TODT in vacuum or dry air, the PDMS-enriched domains wet the film's surface, producing a hydrophobic surface with a contact angle (CA) ~ 90° as measured from CA goniometry. However, when cooled under water or in humid air, a PEO-rich hydrophilic surface is produced, yielding CAs ranging from 20-40°. The coatings can then be reversibly switched between the two states by reheating above the TODT, exposing to the appropriate environment, and re-cooling, ideally ``locking in'' the structure until the next processing cycle. The TODT, and thus the switching temperature, can be continuously tuned by blending with PEO-PDMS diblocks of different molecular weights.

  18. Preparation and properties of the Ni-Al/Fe-Al intermetallics composite coating produced by plasma cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Min; Liu, Bang-Wu; Sun, Dong-Bai

    2011-12-01

    A novel approach to produce an intermetallic composite coating was put forward. The microstructure, microhardness, and dry-sliding wear behavior of the composite coating were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) analysis, microhardness test, and ball-on-disc wear experiment. XRD results indicate that some new phases FeAl, Fe0.23Ni0.77Al, and Ni3Al exit in the composite coating with the Al2O3 addition. SEM results show that the coating is bonded with carbon steel metallurgically and exhibits typical rapid directional solidification structures. The Cr7C3 carbide and intermetallic compounds co-reinforced composite coating has a high average hardness and exhibits an excellent wear resistance under dry-sliding wear test compared with the Cr7C3 carbide-reinforced composite coating. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was also investigated.

  19. Co-blasting of titanium surfaces with an abrasive and hydroxyapatite to produce bioactive coatings: substrate and coating characterisation.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Conor F; Twomey, Barry; O'Neill, Liam; Stanton, Kenneth T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the influence of two blast media on the deposition of hydroxyapatite onto a titanium substrate using a novel ambient temperature coating technique named CoBlast. CoBlast was developed to address the problems with high temperature coating techniques. The blasting media used in this study were Al2O3 and a sintered apatite powder. The prepared and coated surfaces were compared to plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite on the same substrates using the same hydroxyapatite feedstock powder. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the coating crystallinity was the same as the original hydroxyapatite feedstock powder for the CoBlast samples while evidence of amorphous hydroxyapatite phases and β-TCP was observed in the plasma sprayed samples. The blast media type significantly influences the adhesive strength of the coating, surface roughness of both the substrate and coating and the microstructure of the substrate. The coating adhesion increased for the CoBlasted samples from 50 MPa to 60 MPa for sintered apatite powder and alumina, respectively, while plasma spray samples were significantly lower (5 MPa) when tested using a modified pull-test. In conclusion, the choice of blast medium is shown to be a key parameter in the CoBlast process. This study indicates that sintered apatite powder is the most suitable candidate for use as a blast medium in the coating of medical devices.

  20. A Comparative Study on Improved Arrhenius-Type and Artificial Neural Network Models to Predict High-Temperature Flow Behaviors in 20MnNiMo Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chun-tang; Liu, Ying-ying; Xia, Yu-feng

    2014-01-01

    The stress-strain data of 20MnNiMo alloy were collected from a series of hot compressions on Gleeble-1500 thermal-mechanical simulator in the temperature range of 1173∼1473 K and strain rate range of 0.01∼10 s−1. Based on the experimental data, the improved Arrhenius-type constitutive model and the artificial neural network (ANN) model were established to predict the high temperature flow stress of as-cast 20MnNiMo alloy. The accuracy and reliability of the improved Arrhenius-type model and the trained ANN model were further evaluated in terms of the correlation coefficient (R), the average absolute relative error (AARE), and the relative error (η). For the former, R and AARE were found to be 0.9954 and 5.26%, respectively, while, for the latter, 0.9997 and 1.02%, respectively. The relative errors (η) of the improved Arrhenius-type model and the ANN model were, respectively, in the range of −39.99%∼35.05% and −3.77%∼16.74%. As for the former, only 16.3% of the test data set possesses η-values within ±1%, while, as for the latter, more than 79% possesses. The results indicate that the ANN model presents a higher predictable ability than the improved Arrhenius-type constitutive model. PMID:24688358

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of Sulfided Silico-Alumino-Titanate (Si-Al-Ti) Mixed Oxides Xerogels Supported Ni-Mo Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Adwani, H.A.; Anthony, R.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Thammachote, N.

    1999-02-24

    Layered semicrystalline silico-alumino-titanate (Si-Al-Ti) mixed oxides were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method with hydrothermal synthesis temperatures less than 200 C and autogenic pressure. The solid products are semicrystalline materials with a surface area of 136-367 m{sup 2}/g and a monomodal pore size distribution with an average pore diameter of 3.6-4.7 nrn. The catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation in a batch reactor at 300 C and 500 psig was determined for sulfided Ni-Mo supported on the Si-Al-Ti mixed oxide. The activity was a function of the support composition the heat treatment before and after loading the active metals, the addition of organic templates, and different methods of metal loading. The most active sulfided Ni-Mo/Si-Al-Ti catalyst has an activity in the same range as the commercial catalyst, Shell 324, but the metal loading is 37% less than the commercial catalyst.

  2. Essais de fissuration a froid appliques aux metaux d'apport inoxydables martensitiques 410NiMo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquin, Mathieu

    Martensitic stainless steels have represented since few years a material of choice for the manufacture of mechanical parts such as hydroelectric turbines. The development of the alloy has led to grades with very low amount of carbon giving them a good weldability. The assembly of these parts, made by autogenous welding, requires the use of materials with low transformation temperature (LTT) such as 410NiMo. These filler metals are also used for assembly by heterogeneous welding of steel parts susceptible to cold cracking. The transformation of austenite to martensite occurring at low temperature, residual stresses from single-pass welding operation are different from those normally found and reduce the risk of cracking. By cons, industrial experience shows that in situation of multipass welding, the risks of cold cracking are still present. This project aimed to determine a cracking test for assessing susceptibility to cold cracking of 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel according to the welding procedure, in autogenous welding situation. Literature contains much information about cold cracking phenomena. That phenomena occurs under three conditions. These conditions are: a high diffusible hydrogen level, significant residual stresses and a brittle microstructure. It seems that despite the low mass ratio of carbon (0.022%C) and the low diffusible hydrogen level (< 3 ml/100g) risks of cold cracking remain present during multipass deposits. Use of cracking tests was necessary to assess the sensitivity to cracking of the martensitic stainless steel. Before the work preliminary tests have been made or tested Tekken GBOP and testing to determine that to obtain the most representative of the industrial reality results. Then they have been modified to reverse the compression stress in the seam test to tension by the addition of a second weld. This inversion occurs in multipass welding and has been targeted as an important factor in the occurrence of cold cracking phenomenon. The

  3. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J. A.; Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Mateo, M. P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G.

    2015-05-01

    Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  4. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  5. Uniform trapped fields produced by stacks of HTS coated conductor tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Williams, T. B.; Baskys, A.; Hopkins, S. C.; Kalitka, V.; Molodyk, A.; Glowacki, B. A.; Patel, A.

    2016-08-01

    The trapped magnetic field profile of stacks of GdBa2Cu3O7-x superconducting tape was investigated. Angled stacks of superconducting tape were magnetized and found to produce very uniform trapped field profiles. The angled stacks were made of 12 mm × 24 mm solder coated tape pieces and were bonded together following a brief consolidation heat treatment. Layering multiple stacks together and adding a ferromagnetic plate beneath the samples were both found to enhance the magnitude and uniformity of the trapped field profiles. Stationary and time-dependent critical state finite element models were also developed to complement the experimental results and investigate the magnetization process. The size and shapes possible with the angled stacks make them attractive for applications requiring uniform magnetic fields over larger areas than can be achieved with existing bulk rings or tape annuli.

  6. Uniform trapped fields produced by stacks of HTS coated conductor tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Williams, T. B.; Baskys, A.; Hopkins, S. C.; Kalitka, V.; Molodyk, A.; Glowacki, B. A.; Patel, A.

    2016-08-01

    The trapped magnetic field profile of stacks of GdBa2Cu3O7‑x superconducting tape was investigated. Angled stacks of superconducting tape were magnetized and found to produce very uniform trapped field profiles. The angled stacks were made of 12 mm × 24 mm solder coated tape pieces and were bonded together following a brief consolidation heat treatment. Layering multiple stacks together and adding a ferromagnetic plate beneath the samples were both found to enhance the magnitude and uniformity of the trapped field profiles. Stationary and time-dependent critical state finite element models were also developed to complement the experimental results and investigate the magnetization process. The size and shapes possible with the angled stacks make them attractive for applications requiring uniform magnetic fields over larger areas than can be achieved with existing bulk rings or tape annuli.

  7. Relative Importance of Various Sources of Defect-Producing Hydrogen Introduced into Steel During Application of Vitreous Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Dwight G; Mason, Mary A; Harrison, William N

    1953-01-01

    When porcelain enamels or vitreous-type ceramic coatings are applied to ferrous metals, there is believed to be an evolution of hydrogen gas both during and after the firing operation. At elevated temperatures rapid evolution may result in blistering while if hydrogen becomes trapped in the steel during the rapid cooling following the firing operation gas pressures may be generated at the coating-metal interface and flakes of the coating literally blown off the metal. To determine experimentally the relative importance of the principal sources of the hydrogen causing the defects, a procedure was devised in which heavy hydrogen (deuterium) was substituted in turn for regular hydrogen in each of five possible hydrogen-producing operations in the coating process. The findings of the study were as follows: (1) the principal source of the defect-producing hydrogen was the dissolved water present in the enamel frit that was incorporated into the coating. (2) the acid pickling, the milling water, the chemically combined water in the clay, and the quenching water were all minor sources of defect-producing hydrogen under the test conditions used. Confirming experiments showed that fishscaling could be eliminated by using a water-free coating.

  8. Tribological and Corrosion Properties of Nickel/TiC Bilayered Coatings Produced by Electroless Deposition and PACVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanaghi, Ali; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-10-01

    Ni/TiC bilayered coatings are deposited on hot-working steel (H11) by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and electroless technique. The TiC layer is deposited at 490 °C using a gas mixture of TiCl4, CH4, H2, and Ar, and a dense nanostructured TiC coating with minimum excessive carbon phases and low chlorine concentration is produced. The effects of the Ni intermediate layer on the microstructure, tribology, and corrosion behavior of the nanostructured TiC coating are investigated. The friction coefficient of the Ni/TiC bilayered coating (Ni thickness = 4 µm) at 500 cycles is much smaller than that of the coating without the Ni intermediate layer. The smallest friction coefficient is about 0.2, and the hardness values of the Ni/TiC bilayered samples with three different Ni layer thicknesses of 2, 4, and 6 µm are 2534, 3070, and 2008 Hv, respectively. The wear mechanism of the Ni/TiC bilayered coatings is abrasive induced by plastic deformation and fatigue during the sliding process. The smaller groove width on the 4-µm electroless nickel-Ni3P/TiC bilayered coating correlates with the larger H/E ratio and the 4-µm nickel/TiC bilayered sample shows the better wear resistance. The polarization resistance of the 6-µm electroless nickel-Ni3P/TiC coating in 0.05 M NaCl and 0.5 M H2SO4 increases by about 8 and 15 times, respectively. The Ni intermediate layer increases the toughness of the coating and adhesion between the hard coating and steel substrate thereby enhancing the tribological properties and corrosion resistance.

  9. Hydrocracking of n-decane over zeolite-supported metal sulfide catalysts. 2: Zeolite Y-supported Ni and Ni-Mo sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Welters, W.J.J.; Waerden, O.H. van der; Beer, V.H.J. de; Santen, R.A. van

    1995-04-01

    For zeolite Y-supported nickel sulfide catalysts the influence of the metal sulfide dispersion on the hydrocracking properties for n-decane is examined. In order to obtain different nickel sulfide distributions (inside or outside the zeolite structure) and dispersions, the preparation method (impregnation of CaY or ion exchange of NaY), sulfidation procedure (direct sulfidation or sulfidation after drying), and metal loading are varied. A higher nickel sulfide surface (as measured by dynamic oxygen chemisorption) results in a strong increase of the n-decane conversion, but this is not accompanied by an improvement of the catalytic properties toward ideal hydrocracking. Additionally, some zeolite Y-supported Ni-Mo sulfide catalysts (varying in preparation method and sulfidation procedure) are tested for the hydroconversion of it-decane. However, no promoter effect could be observed. The activity of the bimetallic sulfide catalysts is always almost equal to that of the most active monometallic sulfide constituent.

  10. Development and Characterization of Nanostructured Cermet Coatings Produced by Co-electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhzad, Mohammad Ali

    Nanostructured cermet (ceramic-metallic) coatings are a group of materials that combine properties possessed by ceramics, such as oxidation resistance and high hardness, and the properties of metals such as strength and ductility. These coatings consist of nano-sized metal-oxide particles (i.e. Al2 O3) dispersed into a corrosion resistant metal matrix such as nickel. Cermet coatings have been used in many industrial applications such as cutting tools and jet engines where high temperature and erosion resistance performance are required. However, despite the promising properties, the lack of experimental data and theories on high temperature oxidation and mechanical properties of cermet coatings have restricted their full potential to be used in technologies for oil sand production such as In-Situ Combustion (ISC). In this study, the structure of cermet coatings was investigated to identify the characteristics that give rise to oxidation performance and wear resistance properties of cermet coatings. The experimental oxidation results on the single-component oxide cermet coatings showed that when Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined in the electrolyte, the new combination can improve oxidation performance (less mass gain) as compared to a pure Ni coating. Based on the oxidation and micro-hardness results, a new group of nanostructured cermet coatings (double-component oxides) was developed and investigated using long term oxidation tests, thermo-gravimetric analysis in mixed gas, thermal cycling, micro-hardness and abrasive wear tests. The mechanical analysis of the newly developed coatings showed improved resistance against wear and thermal cycling compared to single-component oxide cermet and pure Ni coatings. Furthermore, some new theoretical analysis were also put forward that aims at a new explanation of high temperature oxidation for cermet coatings.

  11. Laser Surface Treatment of Silica Sol-gel Coating to Produce Nanocrystalline Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, R. Shoja; Gordani, Gh.; Hojjati, A.

    2011-12-01

    In this study two methods of laser and furnace sintering are used to prepare nanocrystalline structure of silica sol-gel coating on glass substrate. In laser sintering method, an Nd:YAG pulsed laser with a laser pulse energy of 1 J used to sinter the silica sol-gel coating. To evaluate the surface morphology and microstructural analysis, XRD and SEM were used. The optical properties of coatings were examined by UV/VIS spectroscopy. The results indicated that the laser sintered coating was denser than the furnace sintered coating. No porosity and cracks were detected on the surface of laser sintered coating. Using Scherer mathematical equation, it was shown that the grain size of laser sintered coating is well within nano size range. The uniformity of nanocrystalline structure clearly improved the reflection of incident beam from the laser sintered coating. This was mainly due to increase in grain boundary regions which in turn can cause some the wavelength of the incident beam to be transmitted from silica coatings.

  12. Broadband antireflective silicon nanostructures produced by spin-coated Ag nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the fabrication of broadband antireflective silicon (Si) nanostructures fabricated using spin-coated silver (Ag) nanoparticles as an etch mask followed by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process. This fabrication technique is a simple, fast, cost-effective, and high-throughput method, making it highly suitable for mass production. Prior to the fabrication of Si nanostructures, theoretical investigations were carried out using a rigorous coupled-wave analysis method in order to determine the effects of variations in the geometrical features of Si nanostructures to obtain antireflection over a broad wavelength range. The Ag ink ratio and ICP etching conditions, which can affect the distribution, distance between the adjacent nanostructures, and height of the resulting Si nanostructures, were carefully adjusted to determine the optimal experimental conditions for obtaining desirable Si nanostructures for practical applications. The Si nanostructures fabricated using the optimal experimental conditions showed a very low average reflectance of 8.3%, which is much lower than that of bulk Si (36.8%), as well as a very low reflectance for a wide range of incident angles and different polarizations over a broad wavelength range of 300 to 1,100 nm. These results indicate that the fabrication technique is highly beneficial to produce antireflective structures for Si-based device applications requiring low light reflection. PMID:24484636

  13. Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles

    DOEpatents

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

    2013-12-17

    A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

  14. Quality optimization of thermally sprayed coatings produced by the JP-5000 (HVOF) gun using mathematical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawfik, Hazem

    1994-01-01

    Currently, thermal barrier coatings (TBC) of gas-turbine blades and similar applications have centered around the use of zirconia as a protective coating for high thermal applications. The advantages of zirconia include low thermal conductivity and good thermal shock resistance. Thermally sprayed tungsten carbide hardface coatings are used for a wide range of applications spanning both the aerospace and other industrial markets. Major aircraft engine manufacturers and repair facilities use hardface coatings for original engine manufacture (OEM), as well as in the overhaul of critical engine components. The principle function of these coatings is to resist severe wear environments for such wear mechanisms as abrasion, adhesion, fretting, and erosion. The (JP-5000) thermal spray gun is the most advanced in the High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) systems. Recently, it has received considerable attention because of its relative low cost and its production of quality coatings that challenge the very successful but yet very expensive Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) system. The quality of thermal spray coatings is enhanced as porosity, oxidation, residual stress, and surface roughness are reduced or minimized. Higher densification, interfacial bonding strength, hardness and wear resistance of coating are desirable features for quality improvement.

  15. Magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite formation on (Ti,Mg)N coatings produced by cathodic arc PVD technique.

    PubMed

    Onder, Sakip; Kok, Fatma Nese; Kazmanli, Kursat; Urgen, Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    In this study, formation of magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite (Ca10-xMgx(PO4)6(OH)2) on (Ti,Mg)N and TiN coating surfaces were investigated. The (Ti1-x,Mgx)N (x=0.064) coatings were deposited on titanium substrates by using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition technique. TiN coated grade 2 titanium substrates were used as reference to understand the role of magnesium on hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. The HA formation experiments was carried out in simulated body fluids (SBF) with three different concentrations (1X SBF, 5X SBF and 5X SBF without magnesium ions) at 37 °C. The coatings and hydroxyapatite films formed were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR Spectroscopy techniques. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses and XRD investigations of the coatings indicated that magnesium was incorporated in the TiN structure rather than forming a separate phase. The comparison between the TiN and (Ti, Mg)N coatings showed that the presence of magnesium in TiN structure facilitated magnesium substituted HA formation on the surface. The (Ti,Mg)N coatings can potentially be used to accelerate the HA formation in vivo conditions without any prior hydroxyapatite coating procedure.

  16. Friction and wear of self-lubricating TiN-MoS{sub 2} coatings produced by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Yust, C.S.; Bae, Y.W.; Besmann, T.M.; Lee, W.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the work reported here was to develop special chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods to produce self-lubricating ceramic coatings in which the lubricating and structural phases were co-deposited on Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrates. These novel composite coatings are based on a system containing titanium nitride and molybdenum disulfide. The method for producing these coatings and their sliding behavior against silicon nitride counterfaces, in the temperature range 20--700 C in air, are described. The initial sliding friction coefficients for the composite coatings at room temperature were 0.07--0.30, but longer-term transitions to higher friction occurred, and specimen-to-specimen test variations suggested that further developments of the deposition process are required to assure repeatable friction and wear results. Friction and wear tests at 300 and 700 C produced encouraging results, but tests run at an intermediate temperate of 400 C exhibited friction coefficients of 1.0 or more. Oxidation and a change in the nature of the debris layers formed during sliding are believed to be responsible for this behavior.

  17. Method of producing an oxide dispersion strengthened coating and micro-channels

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Bruce S; Chyu, Minking K; Alvin, Mary Anne; Gleeson, Brian M

    2013-12-17

    The disclosure provides a method for the production of composite particles utilizing a mechano chemical bonding process following by high energy ball milling on a powder mixture comprised of coating particles, first host particles, and second host particles. The composite particles formed have a grain size of less than one micron with grains generally characterized by a uniformly dispersed coating material and a mix of first material and second material intermetallics. The method disclosed is particularly useful for the fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened coatings, for example using a powder mixture comprised of Y.sub.2O.sub.3, Cr, Ni, and Al. This particular powder mixture may be subjected to the MCB process for a period generally less than one hour following by high energy ball milling for a period as short as 2 hours. After application by cold spraying, the composite particles may be heat treated to generate an oxide-dispersion strengthened coating.

  18. Microstructure and Sliding Wear Behavior of Fe-Based Coatings Manufactured with HVOF and HVAF Thermal Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanti, A.; Matikainen, V.; Bolelli, G.; Koivuluoto, H.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vuoristo, P.

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure and micromechanical behavior of thermally sprayed Fe-based coatings manufactured with high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes were investigated. Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C and Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C powders were used as the feedstock materials. The coatings showed a highly dense microstructure with near-zero oxidation. The microstructure of the feedstock powders was better retained when sprayed with HVAF process. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed two small exothermic peaks at about 600 °C for the HVOF-sprayed coatings, without any increase in weight in thermogravimetric analysis. It suggested the re-precipitation of carbides that were dissolved during spraying due to the higher particle temperature reported by spray diagnostics system during the HVOF process (≈1800 °C) compared to the HVAF one (≈1400 °C). Micro- and nano-indentations helped to show the difference in inter-lamellar cohesive strength and, in turn, in the particle deposition mechanism. Coatings sprayed with Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C composition possessed higher sliding wear resistance than that of Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C due to higher nano-hardness. More specifically, HVOF-sprayed Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C coating showed the largest intra-lamellar hardness, the largest elasticity, and high quality of particle interfaces which resulted in lower sliding wear rate.

  19. Hydrophilicity Characteristics of Thermal Sprayed Coating Produced Using Calcination Powder Recovered from Waste Dry Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futamata, Masami; Nakanishi, Kimio; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Itoh, Hidenobu

    The exhaust amount of the waste dry batteries in our country tends to increase every year. However, most of the recycled calcinations powder gained from the disposal process of these waste dry batteries is still unutilized. ZnO and MnO are the main consists of the calcinations powder, they are expected to be used as thermal spraying materials. This paper describes a study result of the hydrophilicity on the sprayed coating formatted by the calcinations powder. When a water drop spread on the coating surface, the diameter of the droplet is considered as an indicator to evaluate the hydrophilicity in this study. The influences of the coating thickness, temperature and existence of grinding on the droplet diameter are clarified. Furthermore, the infiltration speed of the water drop in the capillary of coating, and the ionic property of combination between the elements, which constitute the coating are discussed. From the results of these general investigations, it is clarified that the sprayed coating formatted by the calcinations powder has a remarkable hydrophilicity. It is shown that the application to a heat exchanger, etc. is expectable.

  20. Effect of Electromagnetic Field on Microstructure and Properties of Bulk AlCrFeNiMo0.2 High-Entropy Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yong; Jiang, Li; Tang, Zhongyi; Lu, Yiping; Li, Tingju

    2015-11-01

    The bulk AlCrFeNiMo0.2 high-entropy alloy was successfully prepared by vacuum medium frequency induction melting. The effects of electromagnetic field on microstructure and properties were investigated. The alloy possessed a mixed structure of B2 and BCC, and the phase types were not changed by the electromagnetic field treatment. The microstructure exhibited typical lamellar eutectic cell and rod eutectic cell structures. These eutectic cell structures were constituted by the AlNi-type intermetallic compound and the FeCr-type solid solution. With the increase of electromagnetic field intensity, the hardness increases, while the compressive fracture strength and fracture strain of the alloy first increases and then decreases. The alloy with 15 mT electromagnetic field has the largest fracture strength 2282.3 MPa, yield strength 1160.5 MPa, and fracture strain 0.29. The alloy shows typical ferromagnetic behavior, and the homogenized lamellar eutectic cell microstructure significantly decreased the specific saturation magnetizations.

  1. Rhenium and osmium isotopes in black shales and Ni-Mo-PGE-rich sulfide layers, Yukon Territory, Canada, and Hunan and Guizhou provinces, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horan, M.F.; Morgan, J.W.; Grauch, R.I.; Coveney, R.M.; Murowchick, J.B.; Hulbert, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Rhenium and osmium abundances and osmium isotopic compositions were determined by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry for samples of Devonian black shale and an associated Ni-enriched sulfide layer from the Yukon Territory, Canada. The same composition information was also obtained for samples of early Cambrian Ni-Mo-rich sulfide layers hosted in black shale in Guizhou and Hunan provinces, China. This study was undertaken to constrain the origin of the PGE enrichment in the sulfide layers. Samples of the Ni sulfide layer from the Yukon Territory are highly enriched in Re, Os, and other PGE, with distinctly higher Re/192Os but similar Pt/Re, compared to the black shale host. Re-Os isotopic data of the black shale and the sulfide layer are approximately isochronous, and the data plot close to reference isochrons which bracket the depositional age of the enclosing shales. Samples of the Chinese sulfide layers are also highly enriched in Re, Os, and the other PGE. Re/192Os are lower than in the Yukon sulfide layer. Re-Os isotopic data for the sulfide layers lie near a reference isochron with an age of 560 Ma, similar to the depositional age of the black shale host. The osmium isotopic data suggest that Re and PGE enrichment of the brecciated sulfide layers in both the Yukon Territory and in southern China may have occurred near the time of sediment deposition or during early diagenesis, during the middle to late Devonian and early Cambrian, respectively. ?? 1994.

  2. Influence of Ni/Mo ratio on structural and electrical properties of double perovskite system Sr2Ni1+ x Mo1- x O6- δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pravin; Singh, Nitish Kumar; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Prabhakar

    2015-11-01

    Technologically important double perovskite system Sr2Ni1+ x Mo1- x O6- δ with x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 was prepared by solution combustion method. The structural and the Rietveld analysis of compositions revealed the formation of double perovskite tetragonal phase Sr2NiMoO6 with space group I4/m as a major phase. SrMoO4 and NiO were also observed as minor phases. Microstructural studies depicted the formation of uniform grains for all the samples. The average grain size was found to lie between the ranges of 1-4 μm. XPS analysis of the synthesized compositions showed the decreasing ratio of Mo5+ to Mo6+ ions in the system with increasing Ni content, which played an important role in the conduction mechanism. The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of all compositions indicated that it is more compatible to the TEC of standard electrolytes. The electrical conductivity for all the compositions was studied using impedance spectroscopy in the temperature range 200-600 °C. Composition with x = 0.05 showed better electrical conductivity with good catalytic activity.

  3. The effects of Ni, Mo, Ti and Si on the mechanical properties of Cr free Mn steel (Fe-25Mn-5Al-2C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The FeMnAlC alloys may hold potential as Cr-free replacements for high strategic material iron base superalloys, but little is known about their intermediate temperature (650 C to 870 C) mechanical properties. The effects of alloying elements on the mechanical properties of model FeMnAlC alloys were studied. Results showed that modified FeMnAlC alloys had promising short term, intermediate temperature properties but had relatively poor stress rupture lives at 172 MPa and 788 C. Room temperature and 788 C tensile strength of FeMnAlC alloys were better than common cast stainless steels. Changes in room temperature tensile and 788 C tensile strength and ductility, and 788 C stress rupture life were correlated with changes in Ni, Mo, Ti, and Si levels due to alloying effects on interstitial carbon levels and carbide morphology. Fe-25Mn-5Al-2C had a very poor stress rupture life at 172 MPa and 788 C. Addition of carbide-forming elements improved the stress rupture life.

  4. Structure and Properties of Ti-O-N Coatings Produced by Reactive Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konischev, M. E.; Kuzmin, O. S.; Pustovalova, A. A.; Morozova, N. S.; Evdokimov, K. E.; Surmenev, R. A.; Pichugin, V. F.; Epple, M.

    2014-02-01

    Results of an experimental study of the optical characteristics of gas discharges are presented. The study was aimed at optimizing the operating modes of a mid-frequency magnetron sputtering system to efficiently deposit Ti-O-N coatings. The conditions for maintaining the intensity of the chosen spectroscopic lines that ensure synthesis of titanium oxide and titanium oxynitride coatings have been revealed. The morphology, structure, contact angle, and free surface energy of titanium oxide and titanium oxynitride coatings on type 12Kh18N10T stainless steel substrates were examined by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy, and by measuring the wetting angle. The results of examination of the structure and properties of the synthesized films and their physicomechanical and optical characteristics are given.

  5. Characterization of zirconia- and niobia-silica mixture coatings produced by ion-beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Melninkaitis, Andrius; Tolenis, Tomas; Mazule, Lina; Mirauskas, Julius; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Mangote, Benoit; Fu Xinghai; Zerrad, Myriam; Gallais, Laurent; Commandre, Mireille; Kicas, Simonas; Drazdys, Ramutis

    2011-03-20

    ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} mixture coatings as well as those of pure zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}), niobia (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) deposited by ion-beam sputtering were investigated. Refractive-index dispersions, bandgaps, and volumetric fractions of materials in mixed coatings were analyzed from spectrophotometric data. Optical scattering, surface roughness, nanostructure, and optical resistance were also studied. Zirconia-silica mixtures experience the transition from crystalline to amorphous phase by increasing the content of SiO{sub 2}. This also results in reduced surface roughness. All niobia and silica coatings and their mixtures were amorphous. The obtained laser-induced damage thresholds in the subpicosecond range also correlates with respect to the silica content in both zirconia- and niobia-silica mixtures.

  6. Antimicrobial Activities and Water Vapor Barrier of Starch-Lipid Based Edible Coatings on Fresh Produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The uses of edible antimicrobial films or coatings have been proven to be a novel way of suppressing pathogen contaminations of fresh foods where physical barriers alone aren’t enough. In the present study, we embedded essential oils into a proprietary starch-lipids composite, called Fantesk, to in...

  7. Use of gamma-irradiation technology in combination with edible coating to produce shelf-stable foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouattara, B.; Sabato, S. F.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-03-01

    This research was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of low-dose gamma-irradiation combined with edible coatings to produce shelf-stable foods. Three types of commercially distributed food products were investigated: precooked shrimps, ready to cook pizzas, and fresh strawberries. Samples were coated with various formulations of protein-based solutions and irradiated at total doses between 0 and 3 kGy. Samples were stored at 4°C and evaluated periodically for microbial growth. Sensorial analysis was also performed using a nine-point hedonic scale to evaluate the organoleptic characteristics (odor, taste and appearance). The results showed significant ( p⩽0.05) combined effect of gamma-irradiation and coating on microbial growth (APCs and Pseudomonas putida). The shelf-life extension periods ranged from 3 to 10 days for shrimps and from 7 to 20 days for pizzas, compared to uncoated/unirradiated products. No significant ( p>0.05) detrimental effect of gamma-irradiation on sensorial characteristics (odor, taste, appearance) was observed. In strawberries, coating with irradiated protein solutions resulted in significant reduction of the percentage of mold contamination.

  8. Enteric coated spheres produced by extrusion/spheronization provide effective gastric protection and efficient release of live therapeutic bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Barros, João M S; Lechner, Tabea; Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Edwards, Alexander D

    2015-09-30

    We present a novel but simple enteric coated sphere formulation containing probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus casei). Oral delivery of live bacterial cells (LBC) requires live cells to survive firstly manufacturing processes and secondly GI microbicidal defenses including gastric acid. We incorporated live L. casei directly in the granulation liquid, followed by granulation, extrusion, spheronization, drying and spray coating to produce dried live probiotic spheres. A blend of MCC, calcium-crosslinked alginate, and lactose was developed that gave improved live cell survival during manufacturing, and gave excellent protection from gastric acid plus rapid release in intestinal conditions. No significant loss of viability was observed in all steps except drying, which resulted in approximately 1 log loss of viable cells. Eudragit coating was used to protect dried live cells from acid, and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was combined with sodium alginate to achieve efficient sphere disintegration leading to rapid and complete bacterial cell release in intestinal conditions. Viability and release of L. casei was evaluated in vitro in simulated GI conditions. Uncoated spheres gave partial acid protection, but enteric coated spheres effectively protected dried probiotic LBC from acid for 2h, and subsequently released all viable cells within 1h of transfer into simulated intestinal fluid.

  9. Durability of Solar Reflective Materials with an Alumina Hard Coat Produced by Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C. E.; Smilgys, R. V.

    2002-10-01

    A promising low-cost reflector material for solar concentrating power (CSP) generation is a silvered substrate protected by an alumina coating several microns thick. The alumina hard coat is deposited under high vacuum by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD). Samples of this material have been produced both by batch and continuous roll-coating processes. The substrate materials investigated were polyethylene terephthalate (PET), PET laminated to stainless-steel foil, and chrome-plated carbon steel strip. The advantage of steel strip compared to PET is that it withstands a higher process temperature and lowers the final product installation costs. In this paper, we compare the durability of batch and roll-coated reflective materials with an alumina deposition rate as high as 10 nm/s. In general, the durability of the samples is found to be excellent. Comparisons between accelerated and outdoor exposure testing results indicate that these front-surface mirrors are more susceptible to weather conditions not simulated by accelerated tests (i.e., rain, sleet, snow, etc.) than other types of solar reflectors. For long-term durability, edge protection will be necessary, and durability could be improved by the addition of an adhesion-promoting layer between the silver and alumina.

  10. Some preliminary evaluations of black coating on aluminium AA2219 alloy produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, S.; Merstallinger, A.; Sickert, D.; Dunn, B. D.

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes the results of a study of a black coating produced on aluminium AA2219 alloy using a process that involves creation of a hard ceramic oxide layer on the surface of the alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) known as the 'KERONITE®' process. Coating microstructure has been examined and the coating characteristics such as porosity, hardness, adhesion and phase composition were measured. The thermo-optical properties such as solar absorptance 'as' and normal infrared emittance 'en-IR' of the coating were measured in the 'as-prepared' condition and after environmental exposures to humidity, thermal cycling and UV-radiation in vacuum and to thermal shock. Comparison was made with alternative coatings produced using standard black anodising processes. The study also looked at the cold welding and friction behaviours of the coated alloy in vacuum and in an ambient laboratory environment. Standard spacecraft materials tests were conducted on the coated disc against an AISI 52100 steel ball and also against a coated pin using a pin-on-disc apparatus. Parameters such as friction coefficient and wear depth were measured and the cold welding behaviours were investigated. Test results were compared with the data generated for NiCr plated and anodised coatings. Corrosion performance was assessed using a salt spray exposure test and using an accelerated electrochemical test method. In addition, the study looked at the effect of post coating sealing with a sol-gel solution.

  11. Ceramics reinforced metal base composite coatings produced by CO II laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xichen; Wang, Yu; Yang, Nan

    2008-03-01

    Due to the excellent performance in high strength, anti-temperature and anti-wear, ceramics reinforced metal base composite material was used in some important fields of aircraft, aerospace, automobile and defense. The traditional bulk metal base composite materials are the expensive cost, which is limited in its industrial application. Development of laser coating of ceramics reinforced metal base composite is very interesting in economy. This paper is focused on three laser cladding ceramics coatings of SiC particle /Al matrix , Al IIO 3 powder/ Al matrix and WC + Co/mild steel matrix. Powder particle sizes are of 10-60μm. Chemical contents of aluminum matrix are of 3.8-4.0% Cu, 1.2-1.8% Mg, 0.3-0.99% Mn and balance Al. 5KW CO II laser, 5 axes CNC table, JKF-6 type powder feeder and co-axis feeder nozzle are used in laser cladding. Microstructure and performance of laser composite coatings have been respectively examined with OM,SEM and X-ray diffraction. Its results are as follows : Microstructures of 3C-,6H- and 5H- SiC particles + Al + Al 4SiC 4 + Si in SiC/Al composite, hexagonal α-Al IIO 3 + cubic γ-Al IIO 3 + f.c.c Al in Al IIO 3 powder/ Al composite and original WC particles + separated WC particles + eutectic WC + γ-Co solid solution + W IIC particles in WC + Co/steel coatings are respectively recognized. New microstructures of 5H-SiC in SiC/Al composite, cubic γ-Al IIO 3 in Al IIO 3 composite and W IIC in WC + Co/ steel composite by laser cladding have been respectively observed.

  12. Nitric oxide producing coating mimicking endothelium function for multifunctional vascular stents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilu; Yang, Ying; Xiong, Kaiqin; Li, Xiangyang; Qi, Pengkai; Tu, Qiufen; Jing, Fengjuan; Weng, Yajun; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2015-09-01

    The continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) by the native endothelium of blood vessels plays a substantial role in the cardiovascular physiology, as it influences important pathways of cardiovascular homeostasis, inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, inhibits platelet activation and aggregation, and prevents atherosclerosis. In this study, a NO-catalytic bioactive coating that mimics this endothelium functionality was presented as a hemocompatible coating with potential to improve the biocompatibility of vascular stents. The NO-catalytic bioactive coating was obtained by covalent conjugation of 3,3-diselenodipropionic acid (SeDPA) with glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like catalytic activity to generate NO from S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) via specific catalytic reaction. The SeDPA was immobilized to an amine bearing plasma polymerized allylamine (PPAam) surface (SeDPA-PPAam). It showed long-term and continuous ability to catalytically decompose endogenous RSNO and generate NO. The generated NO remarkably increased the cGMP synthesis both in platelets and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). The surface exhibited a remarkable suppression of collagen-induced platelet activation and aggregation. It suppressed the adhesion, proliferation and migration of HUASMCs. Additionally, it was found that the NO catalytic surface significantly enhanced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesion, proliferation and migration. The in vivo results indicated that the NO catalytic surface created a favorable microenvironment of competitive growth of HUVECs over HUASMCs for promoting re-endothelialization and reducing restenosis of stents in vivo.

  13. Corrosion Resistance of Laser Produced in-situ Particle Reinforced Fe-matrix Composite Coating with High Nickel Content on Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiwen, W.; Mingxing, M.; Cunyuan, P.; Xiaohui, Y.; Weiming, Z.

    Fe-matrix composite coatings reinforced by in-situ particles with high nickel content were produced on QT450-10 by laser alloying. Coatings with different microstructure proportions and particle distributions were obtained by the adjustment of the content of Ni, Ti and Zr in the alloying powder and the laser parameters. The influence of the content of Ni and the particle distribution on coating's corrosion resistance is studied, which is revealed by the electrochemical characteristics. The results indicate that the alloying coating with more content of nickel and less particles get corroded much harder with a higher corrosion rate.

  14. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Stainless Steel 316L Coatings Produced by Cold Spray for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Mangour, Bandar; Vo, Phuong; Mongrain, Rosaire; Irissou, Eric; Yue, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of cold sprayed stainless steel 316L coatings using N2 and He as propellant gases were investigated. Powder and coating characterizations, including coating microhardness, coating porosity, and XRD phase analysis were performed. It was found that heat treatment reduced porosity, improved inter-particle bonding, and increased ductility. XRD results confirmed that no phase transformation occurred during deposition. Significant increase in UTS and ductility was observed for the annealed specimens obtained with nitrogen propellant, whereas little changes were observed for the helium propellant produced specimen.

  15. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D.; Blue, Craig A.; Rivard, John D. K.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Kohler, Leslie K.; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J.; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2013-07-09

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  16. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

    2013-09-03

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  17. Substrate having high absorptance and emitance black electroless nicel coating and a process for producing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Greeson, R.; Geikas, G. I.

    1985-04-16

    A substrate having high absorptance and emittance is produced by roughening the surface of the substrate, immersing the substrate in a first electroless plating bath having a low phosphorus to nickel concentration, then immersing the substrate in a second electroless plating bath having a phosphorus to nickel concentration higher than that of said first electroless plating bath. Thereafter, the resulting electroless nickel-phosphorus alloy coated substrate is immersed in an aqueous acidic etchant bath containing sulfuric acid, nitric acid and divalent nickel to develop a highly blackened surface on said substrate.

  18. Tribological coatings for complex mechanical elements produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of metal dichalcogenide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzoni, C.; Buttery, M.; Hampson, M. R.; Roberts, E. W.; Ducati, C.; Lenardi, C.; Cavaliere, F.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.

    2015-07-01

    Fullerene-like MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of fluid and solid lubricants. Metal dichalcogenide films have a very low friction coefficient in vacuum, therefore they have mostly been used as solid lubricants in space and vacuum applications. Unfortunately, their use is significantly hampered by the fact that in the presence of humidity, oxygen and moisture, the low-friction properties of these materials rapidly degrade due to oxidation. The use of closed-cage MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles may eliminate this problem, although the fabrication of lubricant thin films starting from dichalcogenide nanoparticles is, to date, a difficult task. Here we demonstrate the use of supersonic cluster beam deposition for the coating of complex mechanical elements (angular contact ball bearings) with nanostructured MoS2 and WS2 thin films. We report structural and tribological characterization of the coatings in view of the optimization of tribological performances for aerospace applications.

  19. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating.

    PubMed

    Biemond, J E; Hannink, G; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P

    2013-03-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and bone implant contact specimens were implanted in the femoral condyle of goats. For mechanical push out tests to analyse mechanical implant fixation specimens were implanted in the iliac crest. The follow up periods were 4 (7 goats) and 15 weeks (7 goats). Both the SLM and EBM produced trabecular-like structures showed a variable bone ingrowth after 4 weeks. After 15 weeks good bone ingrowth was found in both implant types. Irrespective to the follow up period, and the presence of a coating, no histological differences in tissue reaction around SLM and EBM produced specimens was found. Histological no coating was detected at 4 and 15 weeks follow up. At both follow up periods the mechanical push out strength at the bone implant interface was significantly lower for the coated SLM specimens compared to the uncoated SLM specimens. The expected better ingrowth characteristics and mechanical fixation strength induced by the coating were not found. The lower mechanical strength of the coated specimens produced by SLM is a remarkable result, which might be influenced by the gross morphology of the specimens or the coating characteristics, indicating that further research is necessary.

  20. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating.

    PubMed

    Biemond, J E; Hannink, G; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P

    2013-03-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and bone implant contact specimens were implanted in the femoral condyle of goats. For mechanical push out tests to analyse mechanical implant fixation specimens were implanted in the iliac crest. The follow up periods were 4 (7 goats) and 15 weeks (7 goats). Both the SLM and EBM produced trabecular-like structures showed a variable bone ingrowth after 4 weeks. After 15 weeks good bone ingrowth was found in both implant types. Irrespective to the follow up period, and the presence of a coating, no histological differences in tissue reaction around SLM and EBM produced specimens was found. Histological no coating was detected at 4 and 15 weeks follow up. At both follow up periods the mechanical push out strength at the bone implant interface was significantly lower for the coated SLM specimens compared to the uncoated SLM specimens. The expected better ingrowth characteristics and mechanical fixation strength induced by the coating were not found. The lower mechanical strength of the coated specimens produced by SLM is a remarkable result, which might be influenced by the gross morphology of the specimens or the coating characteristics, indicating that further research is necessary. PMID:23254345

  1. Starting to Gel: How Arabidopsis Seed Coat Epidermal Cells Produce Specialized Secondary Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Yang, Bo; Schmidt, Maximilian Heinrich-Wilhelm; Günl, Markus; Usadel, Björn

    2015-01-01

    For more than a decade, the Arabidopsis seed coat epidermis (SCE) has been used as a model system to study the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall polysaccharides, particularly pectin. Our detailed re-evaluation of available biochemical data highlights that Arabidopsis seed mucilage is more than just pectin. Typical secondary wall polymers such as xylans and heteromannans are also present in mucilage. Despite their low abundance, these components appear to play essential roles in controlling mucilage properties, and should be further investigated. We also provide a comprehensive community resource by re-assessing the mucilage phenotypes of almost 20 mutants using the same conditions. We conduct an in-depth functional evaluation of all the SCE genes described in the literature and propose a revised model for mucilage production. Further investigation of SCE cells will improve our understanding of plant cell walls. PMID:25658798

  2. EXAFS study of metal-coated particles produced by ball milling

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.M.; Jayanetti, S.; Pandya, K.I.

    1992-01-01

    EXAFS measurements have been carried out on mixtures of Sa with Ge and Si, and Pt with SiO[sub 2] which have been ball milled for extended periods. In these systems the brittle component (Ge, Si, or SiO[sub 2]) is ground to nanocrystalline dimensions while the ductile metal is found to coat the outer surface the particles. Analysis shows that in the Sn-Ge and Sn-Si systems, mixing at the interface is found to form apparently cubic SnGe and SnSi alloys respectively. In the Pt-SiO[sub 2] system while no mixing is observed, the Pt is found to be highly dispersed on the surface of SiO[sub 2] particles.

  3. EXAFS study of metal-coated particles produced by ball milling

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.M.; Jayanetti, S.; Pandya, K.I.

    1992-11-01

    EXAFS measurements have been carried out on mixtures of Sa with Ge and Si, and Pt with SiO{sub 2} which have been ball milled for extended periods. In these systems the brittle component (Ge, Si, or SiO{sub 2}) is ground to nanocrystalline dimensions while the ductile metal is found to coat the outer surface the particles. Analysis shows that in the Sn-Ge and Sn-Si systems, mixing at the interface is found to form apparently cubic SnGe and SnSi alloys respectively. In the Pt-SiO{sub 2} system while no mixing is observed, the Pt is found to be highly dispersed on the surface of SiO{sub 2} particles.

  4. Starting to gel: how Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells produce specialized secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Yang, Bo; Schmidt, Maximilian Heinrich-Wilhelm; Günl, Markus; Usadel, Björn

    2015-02-04

    For more than a decade, the Arabidopsis seed coat epidermis (SCE) has been used as a model system to study the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall polysaccharides, particularly pectin. Our detailed re-evaluation of available biochemical data highlights that Arabidopsis seed mucilage is more than just pectin. Typical secondary wall polymers such as xylans and heteromannans are also present in mucilage. Despite their low abundance, these components appear to play essential roles in controlling mucilage properties, and should be further investigated. We also provide a comprehensive community resource by re-assessing the mucilage phenotypes of almost 20 mutants using the same conditions. We conduct an in-depth functional evaluation of all the SCE genes described in the literature and propose a revised model for mucilage production. Further investigation of SCE cells will improve our understanding of plant cell walls.

  5. Increasing heat stress relief produced by coupled coat wetting and forced ventilation.

    PubMed

    Berman, A

    2008-12-01

    Coupling repeated wetting of the coat and forced ventilation is most efficient in removing heat stress in more humid climates. The procedure was initiated approximately 24 yr ago and is widely used, but the impact of air velocity on the efficiency of heat stress relief has not been examined. This study examined the feasibility of using surface temperature for real-time estimation of heat stress relief. It was carried out in midsummer in Israel on 6 mature lactating Holsteins. A 15 x 15 cm area on the right side of the body was thoroughly wetted. Hair surface and skin temperature on the wetted area and adjacent dry area were measured at 1-min intervals for 15 min while air movement was less than 0.1 m/s, and the sequence was repeated with air velocities of 0.5 to 3 m/s perpendicular to the body surface. Because the cooled surface was small, the response to cooling was local. In 3 animals, the whole left side of the body also was wetted and exposed to forced ventilation (1.5 m/s) to combine local cooling with larger body surface cooling. The air temperature was 29.5 +/- 0.05 degrees C, and the relative humidity was 56.7 +/- 0.2%. Rectal temperature and respiratory frequency indicated minor heat stress. Mean wet hair surface temperature (Thw) and wet skin temperature were 2.1 and 1.5 degrees C lower than the respective dry hair surface temperature (Thd) and dry skin temperature. At an air velocity of 0.5 m/s, Thw was practically identical to that in still air and to Thd. At greater air velocities, Thw decreased immediately after wetting, and minimal values were reached within 1 min, were maintained for 6 to 7 min after wetting, and reached 95% of the mean Thd value by 8 and 11 min after wetting at 1 and 2 m/s, respectively. Wetting the coat had the potential to reduce Thd temperature by 10 to 11 degrees C. The relatively small difference between Thd and Thw probably is due to heat flow from the body. The latter was estimated by comparing enthalpies at Thd, at Thw, and

  6. Increasing heat stress relief produced by coupled coat wetting and forced ventilation.

    PubMed

    Berman, A

    2008-12-01

    Coupling repeated wetting of the coat and forced ventilation is most efficient in removing heat stress in more humid climates. The procedure was initiated approximately 24 yr ago and is widely used, but the impact of air velocity on the efficiency of heat stress relief has not been examined. This study examined the feasibility of using surface temperature for real-time estimation of heat stress relief. It was carried out in midsummer in Israel on 6 mature lactating Holsteins. A 15 x 15 cm area on the right side of the body was thoroughly wetted. Hair surface and skin temperature on the wetted area and adjacent dry area were measured at 1-min intervals for 15 min while air movement was less than 0.1 m/s, and the sequence was repeated with air velocities of 0.5 to 3 m/s perpendicular to the body surface. Because the cooled surface was small, the response to cooling was local. In 3 animals, the whole left side of the body also was wetted and exposed to forced ventilation (1.5 m/s) to combine local cooling with larger body surface cooling. The air temperature was 29.5 +/- 0.05 degrees C, and the relative humidity was 56.7 +/- 0.2%. Rectal temperature and respiratory frequency indicated minor heat stress. Mean wet hair surface temperature (Thw) and wet skin temperature were 2.1 and 1.5 degrees C lower than the respective dry hair surface temperature (Thd) and dry skin temperature. At an air velocity of 0.5 m/s, Thw was practically identical to that in still air and to Thd. At greater air velocities, Thw decreased immediately after wetting, and minimal values were reached within 1 min, were maintained for 6 to 7 min after wetting, and reached 95% of the mean Thd value by 8 and 11 min after wetting at 1 and 2 m/s, respectively. Wetting the coat had the potential to reduce Thd temperature by 10 to 11 degrees C. The relatively small difference between Thd and Thw probably is due to heat flow from the body. The latter was estimated by comparing enthalpies at Thd, at Thw, and

  7. The effect of colouring agent on the physical properties of glass ceramic produced from waste glass for antimicrobial coating deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juoi, J. M.; Ayoob, N. F.; Rosli, Z. M.; Rosli, N. R.; Husain, K.

    2016-07-01

    Domestic waste glass is utilized as raw material for the production of glass ceramic material (GCM) via sinter crystallisation route. The glass ceramic material in a form of tiles is to be utilized for the deposition of Ag-TiO2 antimicrobial coating. Two types of soda lime glass (SLG) that are non-coloured and green SLG are utilised as main raw materials during the batch formulation in order to study the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the physical and mechanical properties of glass ceramic produced. Glass powder were prepared by crushing bottles using hammer milled with milling machine and sieved until they passed through 75 µm sieve. The process continues by mixing glass powder with ball clay with ratio of 95:5 wt. %, 90:10 wt. % and 85:15 wt. %. Each batch mixture was then uniaxial pressed and sintered at 800°C, 825 °C and 850 °C. The physical and mechanical properties were then determined and compared between those produced from non-coloured and green coloured SLG in order to evaluate the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the GCM produced. The optimum properties of non-coloured SLG is produced with smaller ball clay content (10 wt. %) compared to green SLG (15 wt. %). The physical properties (determined thru ASTM C373) of the optimized GCM produced from non-coloured SLG and green SLG are 0.69 % of porosity, 1.92 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.36 % of water absorption; and 1.96 % of porosity, 2.69 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.73 % of water absorption; respectively. Results also indicate that the most suitable temperature in producing GCM from both glasses with optimized physical and mechanical properties is at 850 °C.

  8. Method and system for producing lower alcohols. [Heteropolyatomic lead salt coated with alkali metal formate

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.; Heiberger, J.J.

    1983-09-26

    It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved catalyst for the reaction of carbon monoxide with water to produce methanol and other lower alcohols. It is a further object to provide a process for the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and water in which a relatively inexpensive catalyst permits the reaction at low pressures. It is also an object to provide a process for the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and water in which a relatively inexpensive catalyst permits the reaction at low pressures. It is also an object to provide a process for the production of methanol in which ethanol is also directly produced. It is another object to provide a process for the production of mixtures of methanol with ethanol and propanol from the reaction of carbon monoxide and water at moderate pressure with inexpensive catalysts. It is likewise an object to provide a system for the catalytic production of lower alcohols from the reaction of carbon monoxide and water at moderate pressure with inexpensive catalysts. In accordance with the present invention, a catalyst is provided for the reaction of carbon monoxide and water to produce lower alcohols. The catalyst includes a lead heteropolyatomic salt in mixture with a metal formate or a precursor to a metal formate.

  9. Sugar-coated: exopolysaccharide producing lactic acid bacteria for food and human health applications.

    PubMed

    Ryan, P M; Ross, R P; Fitzgerald, G F; Caplice, N M; Stanton, C

    2015-03-01

    The human enteric microbiome represents a veritable organ relied upon by the host for a range of metabolic and homeostatic functions. Through the production of metabolites such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), folate, vitamins B and K, lactic acid, bacteriocins, peroxides and exopolysaccharides, the bacteria of the gut microbiome provide nutritional components for colonocytes, liver and muscle cells, competitively exclude potential pathogenic organisms and modulate the hosts immune system. Due to the extensive variation in structure, size and composition, microbial exopolysaccharides represent a useful set of versatile natural ingredients for the food industrial sector, both in terms of their rheological properties and in many cases, their associated health benefits. The exopolysaccharide-producing bacteria that fall within the 35 Lactobacillus and five Bifidobacterium species which have achieved qualified presumption of safety (QPS) and generally recognised as safe (GRAS) status are of particular interest, as their inclusion in food products can avoid considerable scrutiny. In addition, additives commonly utilised by the food industry are becoming unattractive to the consumer, due to the demand for a more 'natural' and 'clean labelled' diet. In situ production of exopolysaccharides by food-grade cultures in many cases confers similar rheological and sensory properties in fermented dairy products, as traditional additives, such as hydrocolloids, collagen and alginate. This review will focus on microbial synthesis of exopolysaccharides, the human health benefits of dietary exopolysaccharides and the technofunctional applications of exopolysaccharide-synthesising microbes in the food industry.

  10. Anticorrosion Performance of Electrochemically Produced Zn-1% Mn-Doped TiO2 Nanoparticle Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punith Kumar, M. K.; Venkatesha, T. V.; Pavithra, M. K.; Nithyananda Shetty, A.

    2015-05-01

    The Zn-TiO2 composite coatings were electrodeposited on mild steel using sulfate plating bath dispersed with 1% Mn-doped TiO2 nanoparticles. The agglomeration state and charge on the particles in plating condition were analyzed by zeta potential and particle size distribution measurements. The change in microstructure and morphology in composite coatings was analyzed by x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction, and Scanning electron microscopic analyses. The corrosion behavior of the coatings was tested by electrochemical methods such as Tafel polarization and Electrochemical Impedance study. The increased charge transfer resistance with reduced corrosion rate was observed for composite coatings compared to pure zinc coating. The morphology and corrosion behavior of the composite coatings are correlated with pure zinc coating properties.

  11. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, F.; Ahmad, A.; Farooq, A.; Haider, W.

    2016-08-01

    In the present research work, corrosion behavior of post-weld heat-treated (PWHT) AISI 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) specimens joined by gas metal arc welding is compared with as-welded samples by using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Welded samples were PWHT at 1323 K for 480 s and quenched. Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and microstructures of as-welded and PWHT specimens were investigated. Microstructural studies have shown grain size refinement after PWHT. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were found maximum for PWHT samples. Bend test have shown that PWHT imparted ductility in welded sample. Fractographic analysis has evidenced ductile behavior for samples. Potentiodynamic polarization test was carried out in a solution composed of 1 M H2SO4 and 1 N NaCl. Corrosion rate of weld region was 127.6 mpy, but after PWHT, it was decreased to 13.12 mpy.

  12. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, F.; Ahmad, A.; Farooq, A.; Haider, W.

    2016-10-01

    In the present research work, corrosion behavior of post-weld heat-treated (PWHT) AISI 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) specimens joined by gas metal arc welding is compared with as-welded samples by using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Welded samples were PWHT at 1323 K for 480 s and quenched. Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and microstructures of as-welded and PWHT specimens were investigated. Microstructural studies have shown grain size refinement after PWHT. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were found maximum for PWHT samples. Bend test have shown that PWHT imparted ductility in welded sample. Fractographic analysis has evidenced ductile behavior for samples. Potentiodynamic polarization test was carried out in a solution composed of 1 M H2SO4 and 1 N NaCl. Corrosion rate of weld region was 127.6 mpy, but after PWHT, it was decreased to 13.12 mpy.

  13. Stabilization of the high-temperature phases in ceramic coatings on zirconium alloy produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apelfeld, A. V.; Betsofen, S. Y.; Borisov, A. M.; Vladimirov, B. V.; Savushkina, S. V.; Knyazev, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    The composition and structure of ceramic coatings obtained on Zr-1%Nb alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in aqueous electrolyte comprising 2 g/L KOH, 6 g/L NaAlO2 and 2 g/L Na2SiO3 with addition of yttria nanopowder, have been studied. The PEO coatings of thickness ∼⃒20 μm were studied using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis and X-ray phase analysis. Additives in the electrolyte of yttria nanopowder allowed stabilizing the high-temperature tetragonal and cubic zirconia in the coating.

  14. Process for producing a well-adhered durable optical coating on an optical plastic substrate. [abrasion resistant polymethyl methacrylate lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubacki, R. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A low temperature plasma polymerization process is described for applying an optical plastic substrate, such as a polymethyl methacrylate lens, with a single layer abrasive resistant coating to improve the durability of the plastic.

  15. Phase transformations in nanostructured coatings based on Zr-Y-O and produced by a pulse magnetron sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorischeva, Marina V. Kalashnikov, Mark P. Sergeev, Victor P.

    2015-10-27

    Deposition of nanostructured coatings on the basis of Zr-Y-O was implemented by the pulse magnetron methods. Structural-phase states and morphology of the nanostructured coatings were investigated by TEM, SEM and the high-temperature X-ray method. The method of the high-temperature X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of reversible phase transition of the tetragonal phase to the monoclinic phase, which can ensure stress relaxation and closure of surface cracks.

  16. Crystal structure and oxidation behavior of Aluminum-containing stainless steel coatings produced by cryomilling and spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulaziz, Al-Mathami

    Three austenitic 316LSS alloys containing 0, 2 and 6wt% Al were prepared by cryomilling and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). It was shown that aluminum influences the FCC to BCC strain induced phase transformation that occurs during milling and also the FCC recovery during heat treatment and SPS consolidation. The Al-containing SS had accelerated strain induced transformation in the early stage of milling, while the rate of transformation became similar thereafter for all systems. The degree to which the induced BCC structure reverted to FCC was found dependent upon the Al content. Complete recovery of the FCC during heat treatment was achieved between 565 to 594°C for nSS6Al and 605 to 618°C for nSS2Al, depending on the heating rate. However, heat treatment of nSS0Al up to 1000°C resulted in incomplete reversion of the strain induced structure. The SPS process was found to minimally influence the FCC recovery compared to conventional powder consolidation heat treatments. The energy supplied by the SPS process was insufficient to overcome the activation energy governing the rearrangement of dislocations required to complete the FCC recovery. The modification of the composition of 316LSS combined with a grain refinement to the nanometer level was investigated to determine the potential gain in oxidation resistance on coatings produced using the SPS technique. For the base alloy, the increased number of diffusion paths present in nanostructured materials yielded a thicker oxide scale, when compared to conventional SS, and this independently on the tested oxidation temperature (500°C, 800°C and 1000°C). For the nanostructured SS, the scale had an enriched Cr-content which improves the resistance to static and cyclic oxidation, and adherence to the substrate. Aluminum was also added at concentrations of 2 and 6 wt% to the base SS, which caused the scale composition to change to a continuous double layer consisting of an inner Al2O3 and an outer Cr2O3 for both alloys

  17. Enhanced Droplet Erosion Resistance of Laser Treated Nano Structured TWAS and Plasma Ion Nitro-Carburized Coatings for High Rating Steam Turbine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, B. K.; Arya, Vivek; Mann, B. S.

    2010-09-01

    This article deals with surface modification of twin wire arc sprayed (TWAS) and plasma ion nitro-carburized X10CrNiMoV1222 steel using high power diode laser (HPDL) to overcome water droplet erosion occurring in low pressure steam turbine (LPST) bypass valves and LPST moving blades used in high rating conventional, critical, and super critical thermal power plants. The materials commonly used for high rating steam turbines blading are X10CrNiMoV1222 steel and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy. The HPDL surface treatment on TWAS coated X10CrNiMoV1222 steel as well as on plasma ion nitro-carburized steel has improved water droplet resistance manifolds. This may be due to combination of increased hardness and toughness as well as the formation of fine grained structure due to rapid heating and cooling rates associated with the laser surface treatment. The water droplet erosion test results along with their damage mechanism are reported in this article.

  18. Transparent binary-thickness coatings on metal substrates that produce binary patterns of orthogonal elliptical polarization states in reflected light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Rasheed M. A.; Angel, Wade W.

    1992-12-01

    A reflective division-of-wavefront polarizing beam splitter is described that uses a dual- thickness transparent thin-film coating on a metal substrate. A previous design that used a partially clad substrate at the principal angle of the metal [Azzam, JOSA A 5, 1576 (1988)] is replaced by a more general one in which the substrate is coated throughout and the film thickness alternates between two non-zero levels. The incident linear polarization azimuth is chosen near, but not restricted to, 45 degree(s) (measured from the plane of incidence), and the angle of incidence may be selected over a range of values. The design procedure, which uses the two-dimensional Newton-Raphson method, is applied to the SiO2-Au film- substrate system at 633 nm wavelength, as an example, and the characteristics of the various possible coatings are presented.

  19. Effect of Nano-crystalline Ceramic Coats Produced by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on Corrosion Behavior of AA5083 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayananth, T.; Muthupandi, V.; Rao, S. R. Koteswara

    2010-10-01

    High specific strength offered by aluminum and magnesium alloys makes them desirable in modern transportation industries. Often the restrictions imposed on the usage of these alloys are due to their poor tribological and corrosion properties. However, their corrosion properties can be further enhanced by synthesizing ceramic coating on the substrate through Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) process. In this study, nano-crystalline alumina coatings were formed on the surface of AA5083 aluminum alloy test coupons using PEO process in aqueous alkali-silicate electrolyte with and without addition of sodium aluminate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the crystallite size varied between 38 and 46 nm and α- and γ- alumina were the dominant phases present in the coatings. Corrosion studies by potentiodynamic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl revealed that the electrolyte composition has an influence on the corrosion resistance of nano-crystalline oxide layer formed.

  20. A new titanium based alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Marcio W D; Ágreda, Carola G; Bressiani, Ana H A; Bressiani, José C

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for >3 days in the SBF solution. PMID:27040264

  1. A new titanium based alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Marcio W D; Ágreda, Carola G; Bressiani, Ana H A; Bressiani, José C

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for >3 days in the SBF solution.

  2. Bioactive ZnO Coatings Deposited by MAPLE-An Appropriate Strategy to Produce Efficient Anti-Biofilm Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Pandel, Loredana Mihaela; Dumitrescu, Ana Maria; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Grumezescu, Valentina; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Mogoantă, Laurenţiu; Bălşeanu, Tudor-Adrian; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Socol, Gabriel; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Iordache, Florin; Maniu, Horia; Chirea, Mariana; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of bioactive coatings composed of zinc oxide, cyclodextrin and cefepime (ZnO/CD/Cfp) was performed by the Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique. The obtained nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The efficient release of cefepime was correlated with an increased anti-biofilm activity of ZnO/CD/Cfp composites. In vitro and in vivo tests have revealed a good biocompatibility of ZnO/CD/Cfp coatings, which recommend them as competitive candidates for the development of antimicrobial surfaces with biomedical applications. The release of the fourth generation cephalosporin Cfp in a biologically active form from the ZnO matrix could help preventing the bacterial adhesion and the subsequent colonization and biofilm development on various surfaces, and thus decreasing the risk of biofilm-related infections. PMID:26891290

  3. Photoemissive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Polystyrene coating is applied to holographic storage tube substrate via glow discharge polymerization in an inert environment. After deposition of styrene coating, antimony and then cesium are added to produce photoemissive layer. Technique is utilized in preparing perfectly organized polymeric films useful as single-crystal membranes.

  4. A robust method for producing electromagnetic shielding cellulose via iron oxide pillared clay coating under ultraviolet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashti, Mazeyar Parvinzadeh; Eslami, Shima

    2015-07-01

    We successfully immobilized Fe-pillared clay (Fe-PILC) nanoparticles on a cotton surface via the pad-dry method and achieved cross-linking under ultraviolet irradiation. We investigated the influence of Fe-PILC concentration on the surface morphology, optical and electromagnetic (EM) shielding properties using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrophotometry and EM field detector. We demonstrated a simple and versatile method for coating highly absorbent EM shielding nanocomposites on cotton.

  5. Scale-Up of SLIP Process: Producing Nanoengineered Coatings at High Volumes to Meet Multi-Directorate Needs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K C; Sanders, D M; Moffitt, K C; Marquez, R; Spadaccini, C

    2005-10-27

    There are a variety of applications that require the use of nanoengineered surfaces for separation applications. Surfaces are commonly functionalized in order to facilitate the purification of gases and liquids. Functionalization often requires the application of a polymer to the surface. The most common means is to dissolve the polymer in a solvent and then either cast or spray it onto the surface. This traditional approach causes two severe limitations: (1) the polymer must be soluble; (2) the solvent must be removed from the final coating. The first limitation often eliminates many potential candidate polymers. The second limitation is influential on the transport and separation properties of the coating. Low levels of residual solvents can significantly degrade the ability of the coating to perform the separation process. These two issues can be overcome through the use of ''Solvent-Less vapor deposition followed by In-situ Polymerization'' (SLIP). The SLIP process was originally developed for the fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets. This application required the deposition of films of 100 to 200 microns in thickness onto a spherical substrate. The process consists of two evaporation chambers each containing a quantity of monomer. The precursors, monomers, are vaporized and flow though a mixing nozzle and eventually are deposited on a substrate surface. They react at the surface and form a nanoengineered polymer film. The SLIP process has been utilized to develop composite membranes for gas and liquid separation applications. Polyimide films that range in thickness from 50 to 400 nm were deposited onto a range of substrates. The SLIP process has been shown to be robust and current plans are in place to scale-up the process. This scale-up would enable the coating of flat sheets and fibers. This paper will outline the roadmap to constructing a pilot scale SLIP system in order to meet multiple programmatic needs.

  6. Iron and Fe-Ni alloy coatings containing ɛ-Fe produced by non-stationary deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Natalya; Zhikhareva, Irina; Schmidt, Vadim; Vorobyev, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    A novel material, an electrolytic coating of iron and Fe-Ni alloy containing ɛ-Fe hexagonal close-packed phase (HCP) was obtained using the method of high-frequency alternating current at atmospheric pressure. This transition occurs according to the orientational mechanism by removing weak extreme iron atoms in the crystal lattice of α-Fe due to anodic dissolution and action of the electromagnetic waves loosening the valence bonds.

  7. In Vivo Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin Producing Cells on Electrospun Poly-L-Lactide Acid Scaffolds Coated with Matricaria chamomilla L. Oil

    PubMed Central

    Fazili, Afsaneh; Gholami, Soghra; Minaie Zangi, Bagher; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Gholami, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the in vivo differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into insulin producing cells (IPCs) on electrospun poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) scaffolds coated with Matricaria chammomila L. (chamomile) oil. Materials and Methods In this interventional, experimental study adipose MSCs (AMSCs) were isolated from 12 adult male New Zealand white rabbits and characterized by flow cytometry. AMSCs were subsequently differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic lines. Cells were seeded onto either a PLLA scaffold (control) or PLLA scaffold coated with chamomile oil (experimental). A total of 24 scaffolds were inserted into the pancreatic area of each rabbit and placement was confirmed by ultrasound. After 21 days, immunohistochemistry analysis of insulin-producing like cells on protein levels confirmed insulin expression of insulin producing cells (IPSCs). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) determined the expressions of genes related to pancreatic endocrine development and function. Results Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results confirmed the existence of oil on the surface of the PLLA scaffold. The results showed a new peak at 2854 cm-1 for the aliphatic CH2 bond. Pdx1 expression was 0.051 ± 0.007 in the experimental group and 0.009 ± 0.002 in the control group. There was significantly increased insulin expression in the scaffold coated with chamomile oil (0.09 ± 0.001) compared to control group (0.063 ± 0.009, P≤0.05). Both groups expressed Ngn3 and Pdx1 specific markers and pancreatic tissue was observed at 21 days post transplantation. Conclusion The pancreatic region is an optimal site for differentiation of AMSCs to IPCs. Chamomile oil (as an antioxidant agent) can affect cell adhesion to the scaffold and increase cell differentiation. In addition, the oil may lead to increased blood glucose uptake in pathways in the muscles, liver and fatty tissue of a diabetic animal model by some probable molecular mechanisms

  8. In Vivo Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin Producing Cells on Electrospun Poly-L-Lactide Acid Scaffolds Coated with Matricaria chamomilla L. Oil

    PubMed Central

    Fazili, Afsaneh; Gholami, Soghra; Minaie Zangi, Bagher; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Gholami, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the in vivo differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into insulin producing cells (IPCs) on electrospun poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) scaffolds coated with Matricaria chammomila L. (chamomile) oil. Materials and Methods In this interventional, experimental study adipose MSCs (AMSCs) were isolated from 12 adult male New Zealand white rabbits and characterized by flow cytometry. AMSCs were subsequently differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic lines. Cells were seeded onto either a PLLA scaffold (control) or PLLA scaffold coated with chamomile oil (experimental). A total of 24 scaffolds were inserted into the pancreatic area of each rabbit and placement was confirmed by ultrasound. After 21 days, immunohistochemistry analysis of insulin-producing like cells on protein levels confirmed insulin expression of insulin producing cells (IPSCs). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) determined the expressions of genes related to pancreatic endocrine development and function. Results Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results confirmed the existence of oil on the surface of the PLLA scaffold. The results showed a new peak at 2854 cm-1 for the aliphatic CH2 bond. Pdx1 expression was 0.051 ± 0.007 in the experimental group and 0.009 ± 0.002 in the control group. There was significantly increased insulin expression in the scaffold coated with chamomile oil (0.09 ± 0.001) compared to control group (0.063 ± 0.009, P≤0.05). Both groups expressed Ngn3 and Pdx1 specific markers and pancreatic tissue was observed at 21 days post transplantation. Conclusion The pancreatic region is an optimal site for differentiation of AMSCs to IPCs. Chamomile oil (as an antioxidant agent) can affect cell adhesion to the scaffold and increase cell differentiation. In addition, the oil may lead to increased blood glucose uptake in pathways in the muscles, liver and fatty tissue of a diabetic animal model by some probable molecular mechanisms.

  9. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  10. A novel double-coating carrier produced by solid-in-oil and solid-in-water nanodispersion technology for delivery of genes and proteins into cells.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Yoshiro; Kaneko, Takeshi; Toita, Riki; Yoshiyama, Chiharu; Kitaoka, Takuya; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2012-08-10

    A novel intracellular delivery method both for genes and proteins is one of the most coveted systems in the drug delivery field. In the present study, we developed a double-coating carrier loaded with gene and protein produced by solid-in-oil and solid-in-water nanodispersion technology. The double-coating carriers did not require electrostatic interactions during the preparation so were able to encapsulate plasmid DNA, ovalbumin (pI 4.5), horseradish peroxidase (pI 7.2), and cytochrome-c (pI 10.5) in a consistent manner. The carriers had practical encapsulation efficiencies and release profiles for genes and proteins. Furthermore, effective gene expression and cellular uptakes of both anionic and cationic proteins were achieved by modification of carriers with functional molecules. These findings indicate that the double-coating carrier has high potential for cellular delivery of various drugs and is a novel, superior method for both gene and protein delivery into cells. PMID:22580226

  11. Metal-coated second-order fibre Bragg gratings produced by infrared femtosecond radiation for dual temperature and strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chah, K.; Kinet, D.; Caucheteur, C.

    2016-05-01

    We report highly localized second-order fibre Bragg gratings at 1585 nm inscribed by point-by-point focused infrared femtosecond pulses. A thin gold coating deposited on the fibre outer surface at the grating location allows shielding the cladding mode resonances from the outer medium, so that they remain present in the transmitted amplitude spectrum. The Bragg resonance of the second-order grating is surrounded by high-order cladding mode resonances of the first-order grating. These cladding modes exhibit the same temperature sensitivity as the Bragg resonance (10.6 pm/°C) but high differential strain sensitivity (-0.55 pm/μepsilon versus 1.20 pm/μepsilon for the Bragg mode). Therefore, the conditioning of the matrix inversion as demodulation method is fully satisfied, yielding a new design of fibre sensor able to discriminate between temperature and strain, with an unprecedented sensitivity.

  12. Plasma mediated collagen-I-coating of metal implant materials to improve biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Joerg; Koeller, Manfred; Bensch, Sebastian; Halfmann, Helmut; Awakowicz, Peter; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Esenwein, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    This study describes the collagen-I coating of titanium and steel implants via cold low-pressure gas plasma treatment. To analyze the coatings in terms of biocompatibility osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells and human leukocytes were cultivated on the metal surfaces. Two different implant materials were assessed (Ti6Al4V, X2CrNiMo18) and four different surface properties were evaluated: (a) plasma pretreated and collagen-I coated implant materials; (b) collagen-I dip-coated without plasma pretreatment; (c) plasma treated but not collagen-I coated; (d) standard implant materials served as control. The different coating characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For adhesion and viability tests calcein-AM staining of the cells and Alamar blue assays were performed. The quantitative analysis was conducted by computer assisted microfluorophotography and spectrometer measurements. SEM analysis revealed that stable collagen-I coatings could not be achieved on the dip-coated steel and titanium alloys. Only due to pretreatment with low-pressure gas plasma a robust deposition of collagen I on the surface could be achieved. The cell viability and cell attachment rate on the plasma pretreated, collagen coated surfaces was significantly (p < 0.017) increased compared to the non coated surfaces. Gas plasma treatment is a feasible method for the deposition of proteins on metal implant materials resulting in an improved biocompatibility in vitro. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010.

  13. All-atom force field for molecular dynamics simulations on organotransition metal solids and liquids. Application to M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) compounds.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Carlos E S; Canongia Lopes, José N; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E

    2013-10-31

    A previously developed OPLS-based all-atom force field for organometallic compounds was extended to a series of first-, second-, and third-row transition metals based on the study of M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) complexes. For materials that are solid at ambient temperature and pressure (M = Cr, Mo, W) the validation of the force field was based on reported structural data and on the standard molar enthalpies of sublimation at 298.15 K, experimentally determined by Calvet-drop microcalorimetry using samples corresponding to a specific and well-characterized crystalline phase: Δ(sub)H(m)° = 72.6 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Cr(CO)(6), 73.4 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Mo(CO)(6), and 77.8 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for W(CO)(6). For liquids, where problems of polymorphism or phase mixtures are absent, critically analyzed literature data were used. The force field was able to reproduce the volumetric properties of the test set (density and unit cell volume) with an average deviations smaller than 2% and the experimentally determined enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization with an accuracy better than 2.3 kJ·mol(–1). The Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function parameters used to calculate the repulsive and dispersion contributions of the metals within the framework of the force field were found to be transferable between chromium, iron, and nickel (first row) and between molybdenum and ruthenium (second row). PMID:24079472

  14. High-performance resin-bonded magnets produced from zinc metal-coated Sm2(Fe0.9Co0.1)17Nx fine powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, K.; Machida, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Nishimura, M.; Adachi, G.

    1999-09-01

    Fine powders of Sm2(Fe0.9Co0.1)17Nx (x=˜3) with particle sizes (d) around 1 μm as coated with zinc metal produced via the photodecomposition of diethylzinc [Zn(C2H5)2], which still provided high remanence (Br) and coercivity (Hcj) values of ˜1.43 T and ˜0.85 MAm-1, were molded to compression-type resin bonded Zn/Sm2(Fe0.9Co0.1)17Nx magnets with density values of ˜6.33 g cm-3. By optimizing the preparation conditions such as grinding, surface coating, and molding for them, the highest maximum energy product of (BH)max=186 kJm-3 for Hcj=0.73 MAm-1 was recorded among all kinds of the Sm-Fe-N based magnets reported to date. Furthermore, the excellent aging behavior of the bonded Zn/Sm2(Fe0.9Co0.1)17Nx magnets was observed after standing in air at ˜393 K and the thermal coefficient for permanent magnet was evaluated to be α(Br)=-0.04% K-1.

  15. The effect of silicon on the oxidation behavior of NiAlHf coating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Pengchao; Wu, Qiong; Ma, Yue; Li, Shusuo; Gong, Shengkai

    2013-04-01

    Two types of NiAlHf coatings doped with different content of Si (1 at.% and 2 at.%) were deposited on a Ni3Al based single crystal superalloy IC32 by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) method, respectively. For comparison, NiAlHf coating with 0 at.% Si was also prepared. The oxidation tests were carried out at 1423 K in air. At the initial stage of oxidation, large amount of flake-like θ-Al2O3 was found on NiAlHf coating surface. However, no θ-Al2O3 was observed in 2 at.% Si doped NiAlHf coating except α-Al2O3. It revealed that the Si additions could contribute to the transformation from θ-Al2O3 to α-Al2O3. When oxidation time prolonged to 100 h, it was found that the degradation of NiAlHf coating was very severe with no residual β-phase, which was due to the serious inter-diffusion between the coating and substrate. In contrast, the inter-diffusion in Si-doped coating was reduced with some residual β-phase and R-Ni(Mo, Re) precipitates. The presence of Si could retard the inter-diffusion of elements between coating and substrate, indicating a barrier diffusion effect. As a result, the oxidation resistance of NiAlHf coating was improved significantly.

  16. Effect of adhesive properties of buffy coat on the quality of blood components produced with Top & Top and Top & Bottom bags

    PubMed Central

    Cerelli, Eugenio; Nocera, Martina; Di Bartolomeo, Erminia; Panzani, Paola; Baricchi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background The Transfusion Medicine Unit of Reggio Emilia currently collects whole blood using conventional quadruple Fresenius Top & Top bags. In this study, new Fresenius Top & Bottom bags were assessed and compared to the routine method with regards to product quality and operational requirements. Material and methods Twenty-one whole blood units were collected with both the new and the traditional bags, and then separated. Quality control data were evaluated and compared in order to estimate yield and quality of final blood components obtained with the two systems. We collected other bags, not included in the ordinary quality control programme, for comparison of platelet concentrates produced by pools of buffy coat. Results Compared to the traditional system, the whole blood units processed with Top & Bottom bags yielded larger plasma volumes (+5.7%) and a similar amount of concentrated red blood cells, but with a much lower contamination of lymphocytes (−61.5%) and platelets (−86.6%). Consequently, the pooled platelets contained less plasma (−26.3%) and were significantly richer in platelets (+17.9%). Discussion This study investigated the effect of centrifugation on the adhesiveness of the buffy coat to the bag used for whole blood collection. We analysed the mechanism by which this undesirable phenomenon affects the quality of packed red blood cells in two types of bags. We also documented the incomparability of measurements on platelet concentrates performed with different principles of cell counting: this vexing problem has important implications for biomedical research and for the establishment of universal product standards. Our results support the conclusion that the Top & Bottom bags produce components of higher quality than our usual system, while having equal operational efficiency. Use of the new bags could result in an important quality improvement in blood components manufacturing. PMID:25545866

  17. Microstructure and wear properties of WC particle reinforced composite coating on Ti6Al4V alloy produced by the plasma transferred arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Osman Nuri

    2013-06-01

    The microstructure and wear properties of a WC particle reinforced composite coating produced by the plasma transferred arc (PTA) method on Ti6Al4V alloy were investigated in this study. PTA processing was carried out using argon as the plasma gas at arc current values of 70 A, 80 A and 90 A. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the microstructure of the composite layer formed on the surface of a Ti6Al4V substrate. The results indicate that the WC, TiC and W2C carbide phases formed in the composite layers produced by PTA on the surface of the Ti6Al4V alloy. The distributions and volume fractions of these phases were found to vary with the arc current values. Wear tests were performed under dry sliding conditions using a linear ball-on-disc geometry. The microhardness and wear resistances of all of the composite layers produced by the PTA process were enhanced relative to those of the Ti6Al4V substrate. The homogeneity and volume fractions of the carbide phases in the composite layers were responsible for the improvement in the wear resistance of the alloy. The wear test results indicate that the alloy modified at 70 A shows better wear resistance than the alloys modified at 80 A and 90 A.

  18. Investigation of the Microstructure and the Mechanical Properties of Cu-NiC Composite Produced by Accumulative Roll Bonding and Coating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Ali; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, Cu-1.8 wt.% NiC (nickel coating) composite was produced by the combination of two methods, including accumulative roll bonding (ARB) and electroplating processes. Electroplating process was done on copper strips in order to produce a nickel-particle-reinforced composite. Microstructure, texture, and the mechanical properties of the produced composite were evaluated during various cycles of ARB using optical and scanning electron microscopes, x-ray diffraction, microhardness, and tensile tests. In addition, the results were compared with Cu-Cu and also Cu-NiS (nickel sheet) samples. It was found that nickel layers were fractured from the first cycle of the process, and nickel fragments were distributed in the copper matrix as the number of cycles was increased. Variation of orientation density of α-, β-, and τ-fibers for the produced composite was examined in different cycles. Microhardness for different elements in different cycles of Cu-NiC was also evaluated. Also, the investigation of the mechanical properties showed that by proceeding the ARB process, the tensile strength of the produced Cu-NiC and Cu-Cu samples was increased. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of composite samples was more noticeable due to the reinforcing effect of nickel particles. The elongation of composite samples showed a decrease in the primary cycles, unlike Cu-Cu ones; however, it was then increased. Finally, by using scanning electron microscopy, the fracture surfaces of Cu-NiC composite were studied to disclose the fracture mechanism of the samples.

  19. Low Conductive Thermal Barrier Coatings Produced by Ion Beam Assisted EB-PVD with Controlled Porosity, Microstructure Refinement and Alloying Additions for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Douglas E.; Singh, Jogender

    2005-01-01

    Various advanced Hafnia-based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) were applied on nickel-based superalloy coupons by electron beam physical vapor deposition. In addition, microstructural modifications to the coating material were made in an effort to reduce the thermal conductivity of the coating materials. Various processing parameters and coating system modifications were made in order to deposit the alloyed TBC with the desired microstructure and thus coating performance, some of which include applying coatings at substrate temperatures of 1150 C on both PtAl and CoNiCrAlY bond coated samples, as well as using 8YSZ as a bond layer. In addition, various characterization techniques including thermal cyclic tests, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity measurements were performed. Although the coating microstructure was never fully optimized due to funding being cut short, significant reductions in thermal conductivity were accomplished through both chemistry changes (composition) and microstructural modifications.

  20. In vivo assessment of bone ingrowth potential of three-dimensional e-beam produced implant surfaces and the effect of additional treatment by acid etching and hydroxyapatite coating.

    PubMed

    Biemond, J Elizabeth; Hannink, Gerjon; Jurrius, Annemarijn M G; Verdonschot, Nico; Buma, Pieter

    2012-03-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of three-dimensional E-beam-produced implant surfaces was examined by histology and compared to a porous plasma-sprayed control. The effects of acid etching and a hydroxyapatite (HA) coating were also evaluated by histology. Specimens were implanted in the distal femur of 10 goats. Histological analysis of bone ingrowth was performed 6 weeks after implantation. The E-beam-produced surfaces showed significantly better bone ingrowth compared to the plasma-sprayed control. Additional treatment of the E-beam surface structures with a HA coating, further improved bone ingrowth potential of these structures significantly. Acid etching of the E-beam structures did not influence bone ingrowth significantly. In conclusion, the HA-coated, E-beam-produced structures are promising potential implant surfaces.

  1. Heat-to-Heat Variation in Creep Life and Fundamental Creep Rupture Strength of 18Cr-8Ni, 18Cr-12Ni-Mo, 18Cr-10Ni-Ti, and 18Cr-12Ni-Nb Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Fujio

    2016-09-01

    Metallurgical factors causing the heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture have been investigated for 300 series stainless steels for boiler and heat exchanger seamless tubes, 18Cr-8Ni (JIS SUS 304HTB), 18Cr-12Ni-Mo (JIS SUS 316HTB), 18Cr-10Ni-Ti (JIS SUS321 HTB), and 18Cr-12Ni-Nb (JIS SUS 347HTB), at 873 K to 1023 K (600 °C to 750 °C) using creep rupture data for nine heats of the respective steels in the NIMS Creep Data Sheets. The maximum time to rupture was 222,705.3 hours. The heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture of the 304HTB and 316HTB becomes more significant with longer test durations at times above ~10,000 hours at 973 K (700 °C) and reaches to about an order of magnitude difference between the strongest and weakest heats at 100,000 hours, whereas that of the 321HTB and 347HTB is very large of about an order of magnitude difference from a short time of ~100 hours to long times exceeding 100,000 hours at 873 K to 973 K (600 °C to 700 °C). The heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture is mainly explained by the effect of impurities: Al and Ti for the 304HTB and 316HTB, which reduces the concentration of dissolved nitrogen available for the creep strength by the formation of AlN and TiN during creep, and boron for the 347HTB, which enhances fine distributions of M23C6 carbides along grain boundaries. The heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture of the 321HTB is caused by the heat-to-heat variation in grain size, which is inversely proportional to the concentration of Ti. The fundamental creep rupture strength not influenced by impurities is estimated for the steels. The 100,000 hours-fundamental creep rupture strength of the 347HTB steel is lower than that of 304HTB and 316HTB at 873 K and 923 K (600 °C and 650 °C) because the slope of stress vs time to rupture curves is steeper in the 347HTB than in the 304HTB and 316HTB. The 100,000 hours-fundamental creep rupture strength of the 321HTB exhibits large variation depending on grain size.

  2. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  3. Comparative High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Ni-20Cr Coatings on T22 Boiler Steel Produced by HVOF, D-Gun, and Cold Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Gagandeep; Bala, Niraj; Kaur, Narinder; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    To protect materials from surface degradations such as wear, corrosion, and thermal flux, a wide variety of materials can be deposited on the materials by several spraying processes. This paper examines and compares the microstructure and high-temperature corrosion of Ni-20Cr coatings deposited on T22 boiler steel by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF), detonation gun spray, and cold spraying techniques. The coatings' microstructural features were characterized by means of XRD and FE-SEM/EDS analyses. Based upon the results of mass gain, XRD, and FE-SEM/EDS analyses it may be concluded that the Ni-20Cr coating sprayed by all the three techniques was effective in reducing the corrosion rate of the steel. Among the three coatings, D-gun spray coating proved to be better than HVOF-spray and cold-spray coatings.

  4. Investigation of Wear and Corrosion Protection of AlSi20 Coatings Produced by Plasma Spraying and Laser Cladding on AZ31B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Kopp, Nils; Warda, Thomas; Schulz, Christiane; Rolink, Gesa; Weisheit, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Magnesium and magnesium alloys are the lightest structural materials with an approximate density of 1.7 g/cm2 (density of aluminum ~2.7 g/cm2). Due to poor corrosion and wear resistance properties, they need to be coated for usage in service conditions under corrosive and tribological loads. AlSi20 was found to be a suitable coating material to improve the wear and corrosion protection properties of magnesium alloys. Within this work, AlSi20 coatings were applied by plasma spraying, laser cladding, and a combination of both processes. First, the coatings are characterized by their microhardness and residual stresses formed within the coating during the different coating processes. Then, these coatings were investigated regarding corrosion resistance in 3.5% sodium chloride solution in a three-electrode setup to obtain electrochemical corrosion characteristics. Abrasive wear was investigated using a pin-on-disk tribometer and the abrasion rate was calculated. Resistance against shock loads was tested by applying a cyclic load at 50 Hz to investigate the resistance against impact stresses.

  5. Laser Surface Treatment of Hydro and Thermal Power Plant Components and Their Coatings: A Review and Recent Findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2015-11-01

    High-power diode laser (HPDL) surface modification of hydro and thermal power plant components is of the utmost importance to minimize their damages occurring due to cavitation erosion, water droplet erosion, and particle erosion (CE, WDE, and PE). Special emphasis is given on the HPDL surface treatment of martensitic and precipitate-hardened stainless steels, Ti6Al4V alloy, plasma ion nitro-carburized layers, high pressure high velocity oxy-fuel and twin-wire arc sprayed coatings. WDE test results of all these materials and coatings in `untreated' and `HPDL- treated at 1550 °C' conditions, up to 8.55 million cycles, are already available. Their WDE testing was further continued up to 10.43 million cycles. The X20Cr13 and X10CrNiMoV1222, the most common martensitic stainless steels used in hydro and thermal power plants, were HPDL surface treated at higher temperature (1650 °C) and their WDE test results were also obtained up to 10.43 million cycles. It is observed that the increased HPDL surface temperature from 1550 to 1650 °C has resulted in significant improvement in their WDE resistances because of increased martensitic (ά) phase at higher temperature. After conducting long-range WDE tests, the correlation of CE, WDE, and PE resistances of these materials and protective coatings with their mechanical properties such as fracture toughness and microhardness product, ultimate resilience, modified resilience, and ultimate modified resilience has been reviewed and discussed. One of the edges of a 500 MW low pressure steam turbine moving blade (X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel) was HPDL surface treated at 1550 °C and its radii of curvatures and deflections were measured. These were compared with the data available earlier from a flat rectangular sample of similar composition and identical HPDL surface temperature.

  6. A View of Compatible Heat-Resistant Alloy and Coating Systems at High-Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Narita, Toshio

    2009-09-14

    Conventional and advanced coatings were reviewed, and it was pointed out that the coated Ni-base superalloys decreased their creep rupture life significantly at higher temperatures, and the advanced high strength superalloy became more remarkably. Concept of diffusion barrier coating system (DBC system) and their formation process was introduced, and the results obtained for several heat-resistant alloys, stainless steel (SUS310S), Ni-Mo base alloy (Hastelloy-X), and 4{sup th} generation single crystal superalloy (TMS-138) were given. It was noted that creep-rupture life of the SUS310S and Hastelloy-X with the DBC system became longer than those of the bare alloys with or without conventional {beta}-NiAl coatings. This is due to slow creep-deformation of the Re-base alloy layer as the diffusion barrier. A novel concept based on combination of superalloys and coatings was proposed, by taking both the materials science and corrosion science into consideration.

  7. A View of Compatible Heat-Resistant Alloy and Coating Systems at High-Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Toshio

    2009-09-01

    Conventional and advanced coatings were reviewed, and it was pointed out that the coated Ni-base superalloys decreased their creep rupture life significantly at higher temperatures, and the advanced high strength superalloy became more remarkably. Concept of diffusion barrier coating system (DBC system) and their formation process was introduced, and the results obtained for several heat-resistant alloys, stainless steel (SUS310S), Ni-Mo base alloy (Hastelloy-X), and 4th generation single crystal superalloy (TMS-138) were given. It was noted that creep-rupture life of the SUS310S and Hastelloy-X with the DBC system became longer than those of the bare alloys with or without conventional β-NiAl coatings. This is due to slow creep-deformation of the Re-base alloy layer as the diffusion barrier. A novel concept based on combination of superalloys and coatings was proposed, by taking both the materials science and corrosion science into consideration.

  8. High Power Diode Laser-Treated HP-HVOF and Twin Wire Arc-Sprayed Coatings for Fossil Fuel Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2013-08-01

    This article deals with high power diode laser (HPDL) surface modification of twin wire arc-sprayed (TWAS) and high pressure high velocity oxy-fuel (HP-HVOF) coatings to combat solid particle erosion occurring in fossil fuel power plants. To overcome solid particle impact wear above 673 K, Cr3C2-NiCr-, Cr3C2-CoNiCrAlY-, and WC-CrC-Ni-based HVOF coatings are used. WC-CoCr-based HVOF coatings are generally used below 673 K. Twin wire arc (TWA) spraying of Tafa 140 MXC and SHS 7170 cored wires is used for a wide range of applications for a temperature up to 1073 K. Laser surface modification of high chromium stainless steels for steam valve components and LPST blades is carried out regularly. TWA spraying using SHS 7170 cored wire, HP-HVOF coating using WC-CoCr powder, Ti6Al4V alloy, and high chromium stainless steels (X20Cr13, AISI 410, X10CrNiMoV1222, 13Cr4Ni, 17Cr4Ni) were selected in the present study. Using robotically controlled parameters, HPDL surface treatments of TWAS-coated high strength X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and HP-HVOF-coated AISI 410 stainless steel samples were carried out and these were compared with HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and titanium alloy for high energy particle impact wear (HEPIW) resistance. The HPDL surface treatment of the coatings has improved the HEPIW resistance manifold. The improvement in HPDL-treated stainless steels and titanium alloys is marginal and it is not comparable with that of HPDL-treated coatings. These coatings were also compared with "as-sprayed" coatings for fracture toughness, microhardness, microstructure, and phase analyses. The HEPIW resistance has a strong relationship with the product of fracture toughness and microhardness of the HPDL-treated HP-HVOF and TWAS SHS 7170 coatings. This development opens up a possibility of using HPDL surface treatments in specialized areas where the problem of HEPIW is very severe. The HEPIW resistance of HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and

  9. Coated Aerogel Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  10. Infrared emission spectrophotometric study of the changes produced by TiN coating of metal surfaces in an operating EHD contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. E.; Lauer, J. L.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra and related measurements were obtained from an operating ball/plate elastohydrodynamic (EHD) sliding contact under a variety of operating conditions. In order to be able to compare the effect of the ball surface, some of the balls were coated with a thin layer of titanium nitride (TiN) by vapor deposition. Polyphenyl ether (5P4E) was used as lubricant and 1 percent of 1,1,2-trichloroethane (TCE) as a surface-probing additive. TiN is chemically inert and its thermal conductivity is lower than that of steel. Therefore, the overall temperatures with TiN coated balls were higher. Nevertheless, no scuffing was observed with the coated balls under conditions giving rise to scuffing with the uncoated balls. Tractions were lower with the TiN coated balls and always when TCE was added to the 5P4E. These findings were found to be inversely related to the degree of polarization of the spectral emission bands. The intensity and the dichrosim of these bands were related to shear rates and inlet conditions of the EHD contact.

  11. Infrared emission spectrophotometric study of the changes produced by TiN coating of metal surfaces in an operating EHD contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. E.; Lauer, J. L.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra and related measurements were obtained from an operating ball/plate EHD sliding contact under a variety of operating conditions. In order to be able to compare the effect of the ball surface, some of the steel balls were coated with a thin layer of titanium nitride (TiN) by vapor deposition. Polyphenyl ether (5P4E) was used as the lubricant and 1 percent of 1,1,2-trichloroethane TCE) as an additive with a high affinity for steel but a low affinity for TiN. TiN is chemically inert, but its thermal conductivity is lower than that of steel. Therefore, the overall temperatures with TiN-coated balls were higher. Nevertheless, no scuffng was observed with the coated balls under conditions giving rise to scuffing with the uncoated balls. Tractions were lower with the TiN-coated balls and with the steel balls when TCE was added to the 5P4E. These findings were found to be inversely related to the degree of polarization of the spectral emission bands. The intensity and the dichroism of these bands were related to shear rates and inlet conditions of the EHD contact.

  12. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  13. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  14. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  15. Corrosive sliding wear behavior of laser clad Mo 2Ni 3Si/NiSi intermetallic coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X. D.; Wang, H. M.

    2005-05-01

    Many ternary metal silicides such as W 2Ni 3Si, Ti 2Ni 3Si and Mo 2Ni 3Si with the topologically closed-packed (TCP) hP12 MgZn 2 type Laves phase crystal structure are expected to have outstanding wear and corrosion resistance due to their inherent high hardness and sluggish temperature dependence and strong atomic bonds. In this paper, Mo 2Ni 3Si/NiSi intermetallic coating was fabricated on substrate of an austenitic stainless steel AISI321 by laser cladding using Ni-Mo-Si elemental alloy powders. Microstructure of the coating was characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). Wear resistance of the coating is evaluated under corrosive sliding wear test condition. Influence of corrosion solutions on the wear resistance of the coating was studied and the wear mechanism was discussed based on observations of worn surface morphology. Results showed that the laser clad Mo 2Ni 3Si/NiSi composite coating have a fine microstructure of Mo 2Ni 3Si primary dendrites and the interdendritic Mo 2Ni 3Si/NiSi eutectics. The coating has excellent corrosive wear resistance compared with austenitic stainless steel AISI321 under acid, alkaline and saline corrosive environments.

  16. Effect of surfactant concentration in the electrolyte on the tribological properties of nickel-tungsten carbide composite coatings produced by pulse electro co-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartal, Muhammet; Uysal, Mehmet; Gul, Harun; Alp, Ahmet; Akbulut, Hatem

    2015-11-01

    A nickel plating bath containing WC particles was used to obtain hard and wear-resistant particle reinforced Ni/WC MMCs on steel surfaces for anti-wear applications. Copper substrates were used for electro co-deposition of Ni matrix/WC with the particle size of <1 μm tungsten carbide reinforcements. The influence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) concentration on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings has been studied. The nickel films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the surfactant on the zeta potential, co-deposition and distribution of WC particles in the nickel matrix, as well as the tribological properties of composite coatings were also investigated. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited WC composite coatings sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a CSM Instrument. All friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55-65%).

  17. Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coating includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX, and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer, or a diameter of less than 5 microns. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate, and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of die invention, a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  18. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  19. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  20. Coatings for graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite fibers released from composites during burning or an explosion caused shorting of electrical and electronic equipment. Silicon carbide, silica, silicon nitride and boron nitride were coated on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistances. Resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than uncoated fiber were attained without any significant degradation of the substrate fiber. An organo-silicone approach to produce coated fibers with high electrical resistance was also used. Celion 6000 graphite fibers were coated with an organo-silicone compound, followed by hydrolysis and pyrolysis of the coating to a silica-like material. The shear and flexural strengths of composites made from high electrically resistant fibers were considerably lower than the shear and flexural strengths of composites made from the lower electrically resistant fibers. The lower shear strengths of the composites indicated that the coatings on these fibers were weaker than the coating on the fibers which were pyrolyzed at higher temperature.

  1. Effect of particle concentration on the structure and tribological properties of submicron particle SiC reinforced Ni metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings produced by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, H.; Kılıç, F.; Uysal, M.; Aslan, S.; Alp, A.; Akbulut, H.

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, a nickel sulfate bath containing SiC submicron particles between 100 and 1000 nm was used as the plating electrolyte. The aim of this work is to obtain Ni-SiC metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with submicron particles on steel surfaces with high hardness and wear resistance for using in anti-wear applications such as dies, tools and working parts for automobiles and vehicles. The influence of the SiC content in the electrolyte on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of nano-composite coatings was studied. During the electroplating process, the proper stirring speed was also determined for sub-micron SiC deposition with Ni matrix. The Ni films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The depositions were controlled to obtain a specific thickness (between 50 and 200 μm) and volume fraction of the particles in the matrix (between 0.02 and 0.10). The hardness of the coatings was measured to be 280-571 HV depending on the particle volume in the Ni matrix. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited SiC nanocomposite coatings sliding against an M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a tribometer. All the friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (with a relative humidity of 55-65%). The results showed that the wear resistance of the nanocomposites was approximately 2-2.2 times more than those of unreinforced Ni.

  2. New nano-sized Al2O3-BN coating 3Y-TZP ceramic composites for CAD/CAM-produced all-ceramic dental restorations. Part I. Fabrication of powders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Se Fei; Yang, Li Qiang; Jin, Zhi Hao; Guo, Tian Wen; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hong Chen

    2009-06-01

    Partially sintered 3 mol % yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconium dioxide (ZrO(2), zirconia) polycrystal (3Y-TZP) ceramics are used in dental posterior restorations with computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques. High strength is acquired after sintering, but shape distortion of preshaped compacts during their sintering is inevitable. The aim of this study is to fabricate new machinable ceramic composites with strong mechanical properties that are fit for all-ceramic dental restorations. Aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3))-coated 3Y-TZP powders were first prepared by the heterogeneous precipitation method starting with 3Y-TZP, Al(NO(3))(3) . 9H(2)O, and ammonia, then amorphous boron nitride (BN) was produced and the as-received composite powders were coated via in situ reaction with boric acid and urea. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze the status of Al(2)O(3)-BN on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles. TEM micrographs show an abundance of Al(2)O(3) particles and amorphous BN appearing uniformly on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles after the coating process. The size of the Al(2)O(3) particles is about 20 nm. The XRD pattern shows clearly the peak of amorphous BN among the peaks of ZrO(2). PMID:19223246

  3. Reduction of hematite with ethanol to produce magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4, Fe1 - x O or Fe0 coated with carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tristão, Juliana C.; Ardisson, José D.; Sansiviero, Maria Terezinha C.; Lago, Rochel M.

    2010-01-01

    The production of magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 or Fe0 coated with carbon and carbon nanotubes was investigated by the reduction of hematite with ethanol in a Temperature Programmed Reaction up to 950°C. XRD and Mössbauer measurements showed after reaction at 350°C the partial reduction of hematite to magnetite. At 600°C the hematite is completely reduced to magnetite (59%), wüstite (39%) and metallic iron (7%). At higher temperatures, carbide and metallic iron are the only phases present. TG weight losses suggested the formation of 3-56 wt.% carbon deposits after reaction with ethanol. It was observed by SEM images a high concentration of nanometric carbon filaments on the material surface. BET analyses showed a slight increase in the surface area after reaction. These materials have potential application as catalyst support and removal of spilled oil contaminants.

  4. Aluminide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Jr; Charles, H; Shin, Yongsoon; Samuels, William D

    2009-08-18

    Disclosed herein are aluminide coatings. In one embodiment coatings are used as a barrier coating to protect a metal substrate, such as a steel or a superalloy, from various chemical environments, including oxidizing, reducing and/or sulfidizing conditions. In addition, the disclosed coatings can be used, for example, to prevent the substantial diffusion of various elements, such as chromium, at elevated service temperatures. Related methods for preparing protective coatings on metal substrates are also described.

  5. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  6. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production. PMID:26850143

  7. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production.

  8. Aerocoat 7 Replacement Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center has used Aerocoat 7 (AR-7) to protect stainless-steel flex hoses at Launch Complex (LC-39) and hydraulic lines of the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) because it provides excellent corrosion protection in low-temperature applications. The Sovereign Company produced AR-7 exclusively for NASA but discontinued production because the coating released high levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and had a significant environmental impact. The purpose of this project was to select and evaluate potential replacement coatings for AR-7 that would be more environmentally sound. The physical and mechanical properties of commercially available coatings were investigated through the Internet. The ideal coating would be fluid enough to penetrate the outer mesh of a stainless-steel flex hose and coat the inner hose, and flexible enough to withstand the movement of the hose, as well as the expansion and contraction of its metal caused by changes in temperature.

  9. Coated microneedles for transdermal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harvinder S.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Coated microneedles have been shown to deliver proteins and DNA into the skin in a minimally invasive manner. However, detailed studies examining coating methods and their breadth of applicability are lacking. This study’s goal was to develop a simple, versatile and controlled microneedle coating process to make uniform coatings on microneedles and establish the breadth of molecules and particles that can be coated onto microneedles. First, microneedles were fabricated from stainless steel sheets as single microneedles or arrays of microneedles. Next, a novel micron-scale dip-coating process and a GRAS coating formulation were designed to reliably produce uniform coatings on both individual and arrays of microneedles. This process was used to coat compounds including calcein, vitamin B, bovine serum albumin and plasmid DNA. Modified vaccinia virus and microparticles of 1 to 20 μm diameter were also coated. Coatings could be localized just to the needle shafts and formulated to dissolve within 20 s in porcine cadaver skin. Histological examination validated that microneedle coatings were delivered into the skin and did not wipe off during insertion. In conclusion, this study presents a simple, versatile, and controllable method to coat microneedles with proteins, DNA, viruses and microparticles for rapid delivery into the skin. PMID:17169459

  10. Natural-oxide solar-collector coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupnick, A. C.; Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    Optically selective coatings for solar collectors are produced by thermally treating stainless steel in furnace after series of cleaning and soaking operations. Coatings have withstood 18-month exposure tests at 100 percent relative humidity and temperatures of 95 F. Room temperature coatings are valuable as they are inexpensive to produce, highly production oriented, and environmentally stable.

  11. Electrodeposition of nickel composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, Tushar

    Pulse electrodeposition (PC) and pulse reverse electrodeposition (PRC) bring a new era in improving the surface properties of metals. These processes are associated with many advantages, such as reduction in porosity, low level of inclusions, and higher deposition rates compared to direct current (DC) electrodeposition process. There is much more flexibility in varying three basic parameters which are, pulse current density, on time, and off time in pulse electrodeposition resulting in unique composition and microstructure of coating being deposited. In this work, nickel matrix composite coatings were synthesized by co-depositing nano particles (Al2O3, SiC, and ZrO2) from Watts bath. To get detailed insight into effect of processing parameters on the microstructure, mechanical, and tribological properties of the composite coatings, the coatings were also fabricated using DC, PC, and PRC techniques. Also, the effect of bath loading on the level of reinforcement in the coating was investigated for Ni-Al2O 3 composite coatings. Furthermore an attempt was made to produce Ni-CNT coatings by pulse electrodeposition method. Pure nickel coatings were also prepared for comparison. Composite coatings deposited using PC and PRC techniques exhibited significant improvement in microhardness and wear resistance. The presence of nanoparticles in the composite coating seems to prohibit the columnar growth of the nickel grains resulting in random/weak texture and smaller thickness of the composite coatings. Ni-Al2O3 composite coatings show maximum hardness and wear resistance compared to Ni-SiC and Ni-ZrO 2 composite coatings. As Al2O3 content in electroplating bath increases, Microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings increases but thickness of the coatings decreases due to nanoparticles obstructing grain growth. The Ni-CNT composite coatings exhibited significantly improved microhardness compared to pure nickel coatings.

  12. Process to minimize cracking of pyrolytic carbon coatings

    DOEpatents

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Sease, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon-coated microspheroids useful as fuels in nuclear reactors are produced with a low percentage of cracked coatings and are imparted increased strength and mechanical stability characteristics by annealing immediately after the carbon coating processes.

  13. Spray-Deposited Superconductor/Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Tran, Sang Q.; Hooker, Matthew W.

    1993-01-01

    Coatings that exhibit the Meissner effect formed at relatively low temperature. High-temperature-superconductor/polymer coatings that exhibit Meissner effect deposited onto components in variety of shapes and materials. Simple, readily available equipment needed in coating process, mean coatings produced economically. Coatings used to keep magnetic fields away from electronic circuits in such cryogenic applications as magnetic resonance imaging and detection of infrared, and in magnetic suspensions to provide levitation and/or damping of vibrations.

  14. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  15. XPS-nanocharacterization of organic layers electrochemically grafted on the surface of SnO2 thin films to produce a new hybrid material coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevet, R.; Dragoé, D.; Barthés-Labrousse, M. G.; Chaussé, A.; Andrieux, M.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the synthesis and the characterization of hybrid material thin films obtained by the combination of two processes. The electrochemical grafting of organic layers made of carboxyphenyl moieties is carried out from the reduction of a diazonium salt on tin dioxide (SnO2) thin films previously deposited on Si substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Since the MOCVD experimental parameters impact the crystal growth of the SnO2 layer (i.e. its morphology and its texturation), various electrochemical grafting models can occur, producing different hybrid materials. In order to evidence the efficiency of the electrochemical grafting of the carboxyphenyl moieties, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) is used to characterize the first nanometers in depth of the synthesized hybrid material layer. Then three electrochemical grafting models are proposed.

  16. Metal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, General Magnaplate Corporation developed process techniques for bonding dry lubricant coatings to space metals. The coatings were not susceptible to outgassing and offered enhanced surface hardness and superior resistance to corrosion and wear. This development was necessary because conventional lubrication processes were inadequate for lightweight materials used in Apollo components. General Magnaplate built on the original technology and became a leader in development of high performance metallurgical surface enhancement coatings - "synergistic" coatings, - which are used in applications from pizza making to laser manufacture. Each of the coatings is designed to protect a specific metal or group of metals to solve problems encountered under operating conditions.

  17. Methods for Coating Particulate Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  18. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous powder coating system was developed for coating carbon fiber with LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center-Thermoplastic Polyimide), a high-temperature thermoplastic polymide invented by NASA-Langley. The coating line developed used a pneumatic fiber spreader to separate the individual fibers. The polymer was applied within a recirculating powder coating chamber then melted using a combination of direct electrical resistance and convective heating to make it adhere to the fiber tow. The tension and speed of the line were controlled with a dancer arm and an electrically driven fiber wind-up and wind-off. The effects of heating during the coating process on the flexibility of the prepreg produced were investigated. The uniformity with which the fiber tow could be coated with polymer also was examined. Composite specimens were fabricated from the prepreg and tested to determine optimum process conditions. The study showed that a very uniform and flexible prepeg with up to 50 percent by volume polymer could be produced with this powder coating system. The coating line minimized powder loss and produced prepeg in lengths of up to 300 m. The fiber spreading was found to have a major effect on the coating uniformity and flexibility. Though test results showed low composite tensile strengths, analysis of fracture surfaces under scanning electron microscope indicated that fiber/matrix adhesion was adequate.

  19. Manufacturing and producibility technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of the manufacturing/producibility working group within the Advanced High-Pressure O2/H2 Technology Program are summarized. The objectives of the M/P working group are: to develop and evaluate process and manufacturing techniques for advanced propulsion hardware design and selected materials; and to optimize the producibility of (SSME) components and assemblies by improved performance, increased life, greater reliability, and/or reduced cost. The technologies being developed include: plasma arc, laser, and inertia welding; combustion chamber and turbine blade coatings; coating processes; high performance alloy electroforming; and process control technology.

  20. Environmental Barrier Coatings Having a YSZ Top Coat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Gray, Hugh (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) with a Si bond coat, a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat, and various intermediate coats were investigated. EBCs were processed by atmospheric pressure plasma spraying. The EBC durability was determined by thermal cycling tests in water vapor at 1300 C and 1400 C, and in air at 1400 C and 1500 C. EBCs with a mullite (3Al2O3 (dot) 2SiO2) + BSAS (1 - xBaO (dot) xSrO (dot) Al2O3 (dot) 2SiO2) intermediate coat were more durable than EBCs with a mullite intermediate coat, while EBCs with a mullite/BSAS duplex intermediate coat resulted in inferior durability. The improvement with a mullite + BSAS intermediate coat was attributed to enhanced compliance of the intermediate coat due to the addition of a low modulus BSAS second phase. Mullite + BSAS/YSZ and BSAS/YSZ interfaces produced a low melting (less than 1400 C) reaction product, which is expected to degrade the EBC performance by increasing the thermal conductivity. EBCs with a mullite + BSAS / graded mullite + YSZ intermediate coat showed the best durability among the EBCs investigated in this study. This improvement was attributed to diffused CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) mismatch stress and improved chemical stability due to the compositionally graded mullite+YSZ layer.

  1. Formulation and production of intumescent coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J.; Schwartz, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    Methods for manufacturing and producing fire protective intumescent coatings are described. The coatings consist of three reactive parts mixed together at the time of use. The chemical composition of the reactive parts is discussed. The characteristics of the coatings which are obtained by three types of processing are analyzed. Qualification tests of the materials to determine acceptability are reported.

  2. Absorptive coating for aluminum solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.; Parr, A.

    1979-01-01

    Method for coating forming coating of copper oxide from copper component of sheet aluminum/copper alloy provides strong durable solar heat collector panels. Copper oxide coating has solar absorption characteristics similar to black chrome and is much simpler and less costly to produce.

  3. Efficient Utilization of Nickel Laterite to Produce Master Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Cui, Zhixiang; Zhao, Baojun

    2016-07-01

    To lower the smelting temperature associated with the carbothermic reduction processing of laterite, the optimization of slag and alloy systems was investigated to enable the reduction of laterite ore in the molten state at 1723 K. The master Fe-Ni-Mo alloy was successfully produced at a lower temperature (1723 K). The liquidus of the slag decreased with the addition of oxide flux (Fe2O3 and CaO) and that of the ferronickel alloy decreased with the addition of Mo/MoO3. More effective metal-slag separation was achieved at 1723 K, which reduces the smelting temperature by 100 K compared with the current electric furnace process. A small addition of Mo/MoO3 not only decreased the melting point of ferronickel alloys but also served as a collector to aggregate the ferronickel sponges allowing them to grow larger. The FeO concentration in the slag and the nickel grade of the alloy decreased with increasing graphite reductant addition.

  4. Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  5. Direct Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    P. Schaaf; Michelle D. Shinn; E. Carpene; J. Kaspar

    2005-06-01

    The direct laser synthesis of functional coatings employs the irradiation of materials with short intensive laser pulses in a reactive atmosphere. The material is heated and plasma is ignited in the reactive atmosphere. This leads to an intensive interaction of the material with the reactive species and a coating is directly formed on the materials surface. By that functional coatings can be easily produced a fast way on steel, aluminium, and silicon by irradiation in nitrogen, methane, or even hydrogen. The influence of the processing parameters to the properties of the functional coatings will be presented for titanium nitride coating produced on titanium with the free electron laser.

  6. Regulatory Aspects of Coatings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a history of the development and uses of edible coating regulations, detailed chapters on coating caracteristics, determination of coating properties, methods for making coatings, and discription of coating film formers (polysaccharieds, lipids, resins, proteins). The chapter also...

  7. Protective Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Inorganic Coatings, Inc.'s K-Zinc 531 protective coating is water-based non-toxic, non-flammable and has no organic emissions. High ratio silicate formula bonds to steel, and in 30 minutes, creates a very hard ceramic finish with superior adhesion and abrasion resistance. Improved technology allows application over a minimal commercial sandblast, fast drying in high humidity conditions and compatibility with both solvent and water-based topcoats. Coating is easy to apply and provides long term protection with a single application. Zinc rich coating with water-based potassium silicate binder offers cost advantages in materials, labor hours per application, and fewer applications over a given time span.

  8. Top-Coating Silicon Onto Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Nelson, L. D.; Zook, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon for solar cells produced at low cost. Molten silicon poured from quartz trough onto moving carbon-coated ceramic substrate. Doctor blade spreads liquid silicon evenly over substrate. Molten material solidifies to form sheet of polycrystalline silicon having photovoltaic conversion efficiency greater than 10 percent. Method produces 100-um-thick silicon coatings at speed 0.15 centimeter per second.

  9. Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M.

    2008-09-23

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

  10. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Luis A M; Facio, Dario S; Mosquera, Maria J

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a 'green' product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  11. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascosa, Luis A. M.; Facio, Dario S.; Mosquera, Maria J.

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a ‘green’ product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  12. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  13. Nanostructured Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, J.-P.

    In many branches of technology where surfaces are playing a growing role, the use of coatings is often the only way to provide surfaces with specific functional properties. For example, the austenitic stainless steels or titanium alloys exhibit poor resistance to wear and low hardness values, which limits the field of applications. The idea then is to develop new solutions which would improve the mechanical performance and durability of objects used in contact and subjected to mechanical forces in hostile gaseous or liquid environments. Hard coatings are generally much sought after to enhance the resistance to wear and corrosion. They are of particular importance because they constitute a class of protective coatings which is already widely used on an industrial scale to improve the hardness and lifetime of cutting tools.

  14. Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    General Magnaplate Corporation's pharmaceutical machine is used in the industry for high speed pressing of pills and capsules. Machine is automatic system for molding glycerine suppositories. These machines are typical of many types of drug production and packaging equipment whose metal parts are treated with space spinoff coatings that promote general machine efficiency and contribute to compliance with stringent federal sanitation codes for pharmaceutical manufacture. Collectively known as "synergistic" coatings, these dry lubricants are bonded to a variety of metals to form an extremely hard slippery surface with long lasting self lubrication. The coatings offer multiple advantages; they cannot chip, peel or be rubbed off. They protect machine parts from corrosion and wear longer, lowering maintenance cost and reduce undesired heat caused by power-robbing friction.

  15. Gold Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Epner Technology Inc. responded to a need from Goddard Space Flight Center for the ultimate in electroplated reflectivity needed for the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Made of beryllium, the MOLA mirror was coated by Epner Technology Laser Gold process, specially improved for the project. Improved Laser Gold- coated reflectors have found use in an epitaxial reactor built for a large semiconductor manufacturer as well as the waveguide in Braun-Thermoscan tympanic thermometer and lasing cavities in various surgical instruments.

  16. Development of sputtered high temperature coatings for thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, R.; Bayne, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    Adherent insulating coatings were developed for thrust chamber service. The coatings consisted of nickel and a ceramic, and were graded in composition from pure nickel at the thrust chamber wall to pure ceramic at the coating surface. The coatings were deposited by rf sputtering from a target with a reversed composition gradient, which was produced by plasma spraying powder mixtures. The effect of deposition parameters on coating characteristics and adherence is discussed.

  17. Cold-Sprayed Nanostructured Pure Cobalt Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cold-sprayed pure cobalt coatings were deposited on carbon-steel substrate. Submicrometer particles for spraying were produced via cryomilling. Deposits were produced using different processing conditions (gas temperature and pressure, nozzle-to-substrate distance) to evaluate the resulting variations in grain size dimension, microhardness, adhesion strength, and porosity. The coating mechanical properties improved greatly with higher temperature and carrying-gas pressure. The coating microstructure was analyzed as a function of spraying condition by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, revealing many different microstructural features for coatings experiencing low or high strain rates during deposition.

  18. TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3 coated nanopores and nanotubes produced by ALD in etched ion-track membranes for transport measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spende, Anne; Sobel, Nicolas; Lukas, Manuela; Zierold, Robert; Riedl, Jesse C.; Gura, Leonard; Schubert, Ina; Montero Moreno, Josep M.; Nielsch, Kornelius; Stühn, Bernd; Hess, Christian; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, Maria E.

    2015-08-01

    Low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3 was applied to modify the surface and to tailor the diameter of nanochannels in etched ion-track polycarbonate membranes. The homogeneity, conformity, and composition of the coating inside the nanochannels are investigated for different channel diameters (18-55 nm) and film thicknesses (5-22 nm). Small angle x-ray scattering before and after ALD demonstrates conformal coating along the full channel length. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy provide evidence of nearly stoichiometric composition of the different coatings. By wet-chemical methods, the ALD-deposited film is released from the supporting polymer templates providing 30 μm long self-supporting nanotubes with walls as thin as 5 nm. Electrolytic ion-conductivity measurements provide proof-of-concept that combining ALD coating with ion-track nanotechnology offers promising perspectives for single-pore applications by controlled shrinking of an oversized pore to a preferred smaller diameter and fine-tuning of the chemical and physical nature of the inner channel surface.

  19. TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3 coated nanopores and nanotubes produced by ALD in etched ion-track membranes for transport measurements.

    PubMed

    Spende, Anne; Sobel, Nicolas; Lukas, Manuela; Zierold, Robert; Riedl, Jesse C; Gura, Leonard; Schubert, Ina; Moreno, Josep M Montero; Nielsch, Kornelius; Stühn, Bernd; Hess, Christian; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, Maria E

    2015-08-21

    Low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3 was applied to modify the surface and to tailor the diameter of nanochannels in etched ion-track polycarbonate membranes. The homogeneity, conformity, and composition of the coating inside the nanochannels are investigated for different channel diameters (18-55 nm) and film thicknesses (5-22 nm). Small angle x-ray scattering before and after ALD demonstrates conformal coating along the full channel length. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy provide evidence of nearly stoichiometric composition of the different coatings. By wet-chemical methods, the ALD-deposited film is released from the supporting polymer templates providing 30 μm long self-supporting nanotubes with walls as thin as 5 nm. Electrolytic ion-conductivity measurements provide proof-of-concept that combining ALD coating with ion-track nanotechnology offers promising perspectives for single-pore applications by controlled shrinking of an oversized pore to a preferred smaller diameter and fine-tuning of the chemical and physical nature of the inner channel surface.

  20. Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  1. Investigation of the bond coats for thermal barrier coatings on Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xizhi; Zou, Binglin; Gu, Lijian; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Ying; Huang, Wenzhi; Zhu, Ling; Cao, Xueqiang

    2013-01-01

    Bond coats play a significant role in manipulating the stability of 8YSZ thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited on Mg alloy. In this study, different bond coats from the Al@Ni, Ni@Al and MCrAlY (M = Co, Ni) powders were prepared on the Mg alloy by atmospheric plasma spraying. The spraying behavior of the powders, the microstructure, oxidation and corrosion resistance of the produced bond coats were investigated to find the positive bond coat for TBCs on Mg alloy. Results indicate that the composition and structure of original powders affect the structure and properties of the sprayed bond coats. For the candidate bond coats, the MCrAlY bond coat is demonstrated as the most appropriate one for 8YSZ TBCs deposited on Mg alloy substrate, which is mainly attributed to its moderate thermal expansion match and excellent corrosion and oxidation resistance under the simulated corrosion and relatively high temperature conditions.

  2. COATING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, R.G.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for protectively coating beryllium metal by etching the metal in an acid bath, immersing the etched beryllium in a solution of sodium zincate for a brief period of time, immersing the beryllium in concentrated nitric acid, immersing the beryhlium in a second solution of sodium zincate, electroplating a thin layer of copper over the beryllium, and finally electroplating a layer of chromium over the copper layer.

  3. Acrylic purification and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuźniak, Marcin

    2011-04-01

    Radon (Rn) and its decay daughters are a well-known source of background in direct WIMP detection experiments, as either a Rn decay daughter or an alpha particle emitted from a thin inner surface layer of a detector could produce a WIMP-like signal. Different surface treatment and cleaning techniques have been employed in the past to remove this type of contamination. A new method of dealing with the problem has been proposed and used for a prototype acrylic DEAP-1 detector. Inner surfaces of the detector were coated with a layer of ultra pure acrylic, meant to shield the active volume from alphas and recoiling nuclei. An acrylic purification technique and two coating techniques are described: a solvent-borne (tested on DEAP-1) and solvent-less (being developed for the full scale DEAP-3600 detector).

  4. Acrylic purification and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzniak, Marcin

    2011-04-27

    Radon (Rn) and its decay daughters are a well-known source of background in direct WIMP detection experiments, as either a Rn decay daughter or an alpha particle emitted from a thin inner surface layer of a detector could produce a WIMP-like signal. Different surface treatment and cleaning techniques have been employed in the past to remove this type of contamination. A new method of dealing with the problem has been proposed and used for a prototype acrylic DEAP-1 detector. Inner surfaces of the detector were coated with a layer of ultra pure acrylic, meant to shield the active volume from alphas and recoiling nuclei. An acrylic purification technique and two coating techniques are described: a solvent-borne (tested on DEAP-1) and solvent-less (being developed for the full scale DEAP-3600 detector).

  5. Thermal removal of asbestos pipeline coating

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, W.H.

    1997-03-01

    A heat (thermal) technique, not previously used in the US for removing external pipe coating was used to remove asbestos-wrapped coating from 17 miles of 24-inch-diameter pipe. The process was conducted in compliance with all asbestos and air quality regulations, and produced asbestos-free pipe at timely and cost-effective rates.

  6. Thermal radiative properties: Coatings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Dewitt, D. P.; Hernicz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    This volume consists, for the most part, of a presentation of numerical data compiled over the years in a most comprehensive manner on coatings for all applications, in particular, thermal control. After a moderately detailed discussion of the theoretical nature of the thermal radiative properties of coatings, together with an overview of predictive procedures and recognized experimental techniques, extensive numerical data on the thermal radiative properties of pigmented, contact, and conversion coatings are presented. These data cover metallic and nonmetallic pigmented coatings, enamels, metallic and nonmetallic contact coatings, antireflection coatings, resin coatings, metallic black coatings, and anodized and oxidized conversion coatings.

  7. Method for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles, device for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Liu, Yung Y

    2015-01-20

    The invention provides a method for dispersing particles within a reaction field, the method comprising confining the particles to the reaction field using a standing wave. The invention also provides a system for coating particles, the system comprising a reaction zone; a means for producing fluidized particles within the reaction zone; a fluid to produce a standing wave within the reaction zone; and a means for introducing coating moieties to the reaction zone. The invention also provides a method for coating particles, the method comprising fluidizing the particles, subjecting the particles to a standing wave; and contacting the subjected particles with a coating moiety.

  8. Space station protective coating development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. G.; Hill, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    A generic list of Space Station surfaces and candidate material types is provided. Environmental exposures and performance requirements for the different Space Station surfaces are listed. Coating materials and the processing required to produce a viable system, and appropriate environmental simulation test facilities are being developed. Mass loss data from the original version of the atomic oxygen test chamber and the improved facility; additional environmental exposures performed on candidate materials; and materials properties measurements on candidate coatings to determine the effects of the exposures are discussed. Methodologies of production, and coating materials, used to produce the large scale demonstration articles are described. The electronic data base developed for the contract is also described. The test chamber to be used for exposure of materials to atomic oxygen was built.

  9. Bond-coating in plasma-sprayed calcium-phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Oktar, F N; Yetmez, M; Agathopoulos, S; Lopez Goerne, T M; Goller, G; Peker, I; Ipeker, I; Ferreira, J M F

    2006-11-01

    The influence of bond-coating on the mechanical properties of plasma-spray coatings of hydroxyatite on Ti was investigated. Plasma-spray powder was produced from human teeth enamel and dentine. Before processing the main apatite coating, a very thin layer of Al2O3/TiO2 was applied on super clean and roughened, by Al2O3 blasting, Ti surface as bond-coating. The experimental results showed that bond-coating caused significant increase of the mechanical properties of the coating layer: In the case of the enamel powder from 6.66 MPa of the simple coating to 9.71 MPa for the bond-coating and in the case of the dentine powder from 6.27 MPa to 7.84 MPa, respectively. Both tooth derived powders feature high thermal stability likely due to their relatively high content of fluorine. Therefore, F-rich apatites, such those investigated in this study, emerge themselves as superior candidate materials for calcium phosphate coatings of producing medical devices. The methods of apatite powder production and shaping optimization of powder particles are both key factors of a successful coating. The methods used in this study can be adopted as handy, inexpensive and reliable ways to produce high quality of powders for plasma spray purposes.

  10. Method for forming hermetic coatings for optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Michalske, Terry A.; Rye, Robert R.; Smith, William L.

    1993-01-01

    A method for forming hermetic coatings on optical fibers by hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition advantageously produces a desirable coating while maintaining the pristine strength of the pristine fiber. The hermetic coatings may be formed from a variety of substances, such as, for example, boron nitride and carbon.

  11. NICKEL COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Nickel coatings on uranium and various methods of obtaining such coatings are described. Specifically disclosed are such nickel or nickel alloy layers as barriers between uranium and aluminum- silicon, chromium, or copper coatings.

  12. Brush seal shaft wear resistant coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Harold

    1995-03-01

    Brush seals suffer from high wear, which reduces their effectiveness. This work sought to reduce brush seal wear by identifying and testing several industry standard coatings. One of the coatings was developed for this work. It was a co-sprayed PSZ with boron-nitride added for a high temperature dry lubricant. Other coatings tested were a PSZ, chrome carbide and a bare rotor. Testing of these coatings included thermal shocking, tensile testing and wear/coefficient of friction testing. Wear testing consisted of applying a coating to a rotor and then running a sample tuft of SiC ceramic fiber against the coating. Surface speeds at point of contact were slightly over 1000 ft/sec. Rotor wear was noted, as well as coefficient of friction data. Results from the testing indicates that the oxide ceramic coatings cannot withstand the given set of conditions. Carbide coatings will not work because of the need for a metallic binder, which oxidizes in the high heat produced by friction. All work indicated a need for a coating that has a lubricant contained within itself and the coating must be resistant to an oxidizing environment.

  13. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  14. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  15. Superconducting articles of manufacture and method of producing same

    DOEpatents

    Newkirk, Lawrence R.; Valencia, Flavio A.

    1980-01-01

    Bulk coatings of Nb.sub.3 Ge with high superconducting transition temperatures bonded to metallic substrates and a chemical vapor deposition method for producing such coatings on metallic substrates are disclosed. In accordance with the method, a Nb.sub.3 Ge coating having a transition temperature in excess of 21.5 K may be tightly bonded to a copper substrate.

  16. The Chemistry of Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James R.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of natural and synthetic polymeric "coatings" are reviewed, including examples and uses of such coatings as cellulose nitrate lacquers (for automobile paints), polyethylene, and others. (JN)

  17. Nanosilica-Chitosan Composite Coating on Cotton Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharani, Dina Kartika; Kartini, Indriana; Aprilita, Nurul Hidayat

    2010-10-01

    Nanosilica-chitosan composite coating on cotton fabrics has been prepared by sol-gel method. The sol-gel procedure allows coating of material on nanometer scale, which several commonly used coating procedure cannot achieve. In addition, sol-gel coating technique can be applied to system without disruption of their structure functionaly. The coating were produced via hidrolysis and condensation of TEOS and GPTMS and then mixed with chitosan. The composite coating on cotton fabrics were characterized with X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM) method. The result showed that the coating not changed or disrupted the cotton stucture. The coating result in a clear transparent thin layer on cotton surface. The nanocomposite coating has new applications in daily used materials, especially those with low heat resistance, such as textiles and plastics, and as an environmentally friendly water-repellent substitute for fluorine compounds.

  18. Ex vivo surface and mechanical properties of coated orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Elayyan, Firas; Silikas, Nick; Bearn, David

    2008-12-01

    This study examined the mechanical and physical properties of retrieved coated nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwires compared with unused samples. Ultraesthetic 0.016 inch coated archwires (G&H(R) Wire Company) were investigated. Ten as-received wires were subjected to a three-point bending test using conventional and self-ligating bracket systems. Surface roughness of the coating was measured with a contact stylus profilometer. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were used to assess surface topography. Ten archwires were used in vivo for a period of between 4 and 6 weeks. Retrieved archwires were subjected to the same tests. The percentage of the remaining coating was calculated using digital photography. Coated archwires were used in vivo for a mean period of 33 days. Differences between the mean values of the as-received and retrieved archwires were determined using t-tests. In the three-point bending test, with conventional elastomeric ligation, retrieved wires produced a lower unloading force (P < 0.001). Both retrieved and as-received coated archwires produced zero values of unloading force when deflected for 4 mm. When tested using a self-ligating bracket system, retrieved and as-received coated archwires produced the same amount of force (P > 0.05). With surface profilometry, all measured roughness parameters (except R(sm)) had greater surface roughness for the retrieved coated archwires (P < 0.05). Under microscopy, retrieved coated archwires showed discolouration, ditching, and delamination. Only 75 per cent of the coating was present in retrieved coated archwires. Retrieved coated archwires produced lower unloading force values than as-received coated archwires with conventional ligation. Surface roughness of coated archwires increased after use. Coated archwires have a low aesthetic value, with 25 per cent of the coating lost within 33 days in vivo. PMID:19011166

  19. Carbon Coating Of Copper By Arc-Discharge Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebihara, Ben T.; Jopek, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    Adherent, abrasion-resistant coat deposited with existing equipment. Carbon formed and deposited as coating on copper substrate by pyrolysis of hydrocarbon oil in electrical-arc discharges. Technique for producing carbon deposits on copper accomplished with electrical-discharge-machining equipment used for cutting metals. Applications for new coating technique include the following: solar-energy-collecting devices, coating of metals other than copper with carbon, and carburization of metal surfaces.

  20. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  1. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Glass, Robert S.; Lee, Tae H.

    2002-01-01

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  2. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Glass, Robert S.; Lee, Tae H.

    2005-01-25

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  3. Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Boyd, Donald W.; Buchanan, Michael J.; Kelly, Patrick; Kutilek, Luke A.; McCamy, James W.; McPheron, Douglas A.; Orosz, Gary R.; Limbacher, Raymond D.

    2013-10-15

    An electrically conductive protective coating or film is provided over the surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by flowing or directing a cation containing liquid and an anion containing liquid onto the conductive surface. The cation and the anion containing liquids are spaced from, and preferably out of contact with one another on the surface of the reflective coating as an electric current is moved through the anion containing liquid, the conductive surface between the liquids and the cation containing liquid to coat the conductive surface with the electrically conductive coating.

  4. Multi-layer coatings

    DOEpatents

    Maghsoodi, Sina; Brophy, Brenor L.; Abrams, Ze'ev R.; Gonsalves, Peter R.

    2016-06-28

    Disclosed herein are coating materials and methods for applying a top-layer coating that is durable, abrasion resistant, highly transparent, hydrophobic, low-friction, moisture-sealing, anti-soiling, and self-cleaning to an existing conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating. The top coat imparts superior durability performance and new properties to the under-laying conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating without reducing the anti-reflectiveness of the coating. Methods and data for optimizing the relative thickness of the under-layer high temperature anti-reflective coating and the top-layer thickness for optimizing optical performance are also disclosed.

  5. Multi-layered ruthenium-containing bond coats for thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, Brian S.

    Advances in thermal barrier coating (TBC) technology for Ni-base superalloys have shown that B2 Pt-modified NiAl-based bond coatings outperform conventional NiAl bond coat layers for high temperature TBC multilayer systems. This thesis addresses the potential improvement in the high temperature capability of a 132 Ru-modified aluminide bond coat layer due to improved high temperature properties of RuAl over NiAl. The objectives of this research have been to define a processing path for fabrication of a multi-layered Ru-modified aluminide bond coating and to investigate its performance within a TBC system. Microstructural development and the oxidation behavior of Ru-modified and Ru/Pt-modified bond coatings have been studied in detail. Two types of Ru-modified bond coatings have been fabricated: one by means of high temperature, low activity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processing, and one via high temperature, high activity pack-aluminization. The location of the RuAl-rich layer has been shown to be process dependent with a low activity Ru-containing bond coating producing an exterior B2 NiAl layer with an interior B2 RuAl layer and a high activity Ru-containing bond coat producing the reverse arrangement of B2 layers. While all bond coating systems studied offer some oxidation protection by forming alpha-Al2O3, the low activity Ru/Pt-modified bond coatings exhibited a higher resistance to oxidation-induced failure compared to Ru-modified bond coatings. Through 1000 cyclic oxidation exposures, the Ru/Pt-modified coatings with an initial Ru deposition of 3mum are comparable to conventional Pt-modified aluminide coatings. The Ru-Al-Ni ternary system is the basis for Ru-modifed aluminide coating systems. An experimental assessment of the Ru-Al-Ni phase diagram at 1000°C and 1100°C has been produced via a series of diffusion couple experiments. A continuous solid-solution has been shown to exist between the RuAl and NiAl phases in the ternary system at the

  6. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor description (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard power or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increase upon being exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicates that if these coatings reach a temperature above

  7. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicate that if these coatings reach a temperature above 1100 C

  8. Coating life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Gedwill, Michael A.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation combines both experimental studies and numerical modeling to predict coating life in an oxidizing environment. The experimental work provides both input to and verification of two numerical models. The coatings being examined are an aluminide coating on Udimet 700 (U-700), a low-pressure plasma spray (LPPS) Ni-18Co-17Cr-24Al-0.2Y overlay coating also on U- 700, and bulk deposits of the LPPS NiCoCrAlY coating.

  9. Surface properties of semi-synthetic enteric coating films: Opportunities to develop bio-based enteric coating films for colon- targeted delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the surface properties of the semi-synthetic enteric coating materials for potential colon- targeted bioactive delivery. The enteric coating materials were produced by combining nanoscale resistant starch, pectin, and carboxymethylcellulose. The surface properties of the co...

  10. Modelling the microstructure of thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Cirolini, S.; Marchese, M.; Jacucci, G.; Harding, J.H.; Mulheran, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal barrier coatings produced by plasma spraying have a characteristic microstructure of lamellae, pores and cracks. The lamellae are produced by the splashing of particles onto the substrate. As the coating grows, the lamellae pile on top of each other, producing an interlocking structure. In most cases the growth is rapid and chaotic. The result is a microstructure characterized by pores and cracks. The authors present an improved model for the deposition process of thermal barrier coatings. The task of modeling the coating growth is split into two parts: first the authors consider a description of the particle on arrival at the film, based on the available theoretical, numerical and experimental findings. Second they define and discuss a set of physically-based rules for combining these events to obtain the film. The splats run along the surface and are permitted to curl up (producing pores) or interlock. The computer model uses a mesh to combine these processes and build the coating. They discuss the use of the proposed model in predicting microstructures and hence in correlating the properties of these coatings with the parameters of the process used to make them.

  11. Flow coating apparatus and method of coating

    SciTech Connect

    Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

    2014-03-11

    Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

  12. Microstructural investigation of phases and pinning properties in MBa2Cu3O7-x (M = Y and/or Gd) coated conductors produced by scale-up facilitie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hye-Jin; Moon, Han-Kyoul; Yoon, Seokhyun; Jo, William; Kim, Kunsu; Kim, Miyoung; Ko, Rock-Kil; Jo, Young-Sik; Ha, Dong-Woo

    2016-03-01

    To expedite the commercialization of coated conductors, a robust stacking architecture of the wires must be developed and the performance of the critical currents improved. More importantly, the manufacturability, or large-scale delivery, and the capability of sustaining production at a high rate must be considered. The products of three companies, American Superconductor, Superpower Inc., and SuNAM Co., Ltd, were selected because these companies have announced commercial-grade production lines and delivered a significant amounts of wires to the open market that meet the standards demanded by power devices. X-ray diffraction patterns were used to verify the structural properties and the phase formation in the wires, and transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to investigate the microstructure and composition of the conductors. In addition, Raman scattering spectroscopy was used for the analysis of the phase formation and for the elucidation of secondary phases in the superconducting layers. The field dependence of the critical current was also studied to compare the transport characteristics under relatively low and medium magnetic field at 77 K and 60 K. Pinning forces were obtained from the field dependence of transport properties and pinning characteristics were investigated. The theoretical and experimental analyses were combined together using the Dew-Hughes formula to extract the scaling exponents and estimate the irreversibility lines of the fields. The results showed that the three conductors possess pinning mechanisms that originate from core pinning with a surface pinning geometry. It is remarkable that the wires discussed in this paper exhibit very similar pinning characteristics even though they have different characteristics in terms of chemical composition, microstructure, stacking architectures, and distribution of parasitic phases.

  13. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  14. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    Using a continuous powder coating process, more than 1500 meters of T 300/LaRC-TPI prepreg were produced. Two different types of heating sections in the coating line, namely electrical resistance and convection heating, were utilized. These prepregs were used to fabricate unidirectional composites. During composite fabrication the cure time of the consolidation was varied, and composites samples were produced with and without vacuum. Under these specimens, the effects of the different heating sections and of the variation of the consolidation parameters on mechanical properties and void content were investigated. The void fractions of the various composites were determined from density measurements, and the mechanical properties were measured by tensile testing, short beam shear testing and dynamic mechanical analysis.

  15. Hierarchical Micro-Nano Coatings by Painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirveslahti, Anna; Korhonen, Tuulia; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the wettability properties of coatings with hierarchical surface structures and low surface energy were studied. Hierarchically structured coatings were produced by using hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microparticles as additives in polyester (PES) and polyvinyldifluoride (PVDF). These particles created hierarchical micro-nano structures on the paint surfaces and lowered or supported the already low surface energy of the paint. Two standard application techniques for paint application were employed and the presented coatings are suitable for mass production and use in large surface areas. By regulating the particle concentrations, it was possible to modify wettability properties gradually. Highly hydrophobic surfaces were achieved with the highest contact angle of 165∘. Dynamic contact angle measurements were carried out for a set of selected samples and low hysteresis was obtained. Produced coatings possessed long lasting durability in the air and in underwater conditions.

  16. Predictive Failure of Cylindrical Coatings Using Weibull Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2002-01-01

    Rotating, coated wiping rollers used in a high-speed printing application failed primarily from fatigue. Two coating materials were evaluated: a hard, cross-linked, plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and a softer, plasticized PVC. A total of 447 tests was conducted with these coatings in a production facility. The data were evaluated using Weibull analysis. The softer coating produced more than twice the life of the harder cross-linked coating and reduced the wiper replacement rate by two-thirds, resulting in minimum production interruption.

  17. Modular Coating for Flexible Gas Turbine Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, J. R. A.; Schab, J. C.; Stankowski, A.; Grasso, P. D.; Olliges, S.; Leyens, C.

    2016-01-01

    In heavy duty gas turbines, the loading boundary conditions of MCrAlY systems are differently weighted for different operation regimes as well as for each turbine component or even in individual part locations. For an overall optimized component protection it is therefore of interest to produce coatings with flexible and individually tailored properties. In this context, ALSTOM developed an Advanced Modular Coating Technology (AMCOTEC™), which is based on several powder constituents, each providing specific properties to the final coating, in combination with a new application method, allowing in-situ compositional changes. With this approach, coating properties, such as oxidation, corrosion, and cyclic lifetime, etc., can be modularly adjusted for individual component types and areas. For demonstration purpose, a MCrAlY coating with modular ductility increase was produced using the AMCOTEC™ methodology. The method was proven to be cost effective and a highly flexible solution, enabling fast compositional screening. A calculation method for final coating composition was defined and validated. The modular addition of ductility agent enabled increasing the coating ductility with up to factor 3 with only slight decrease of oxidation resistance. An optimum composition with respect to ductility is reached with addition of 20 wt.% of ductility agent.

  18. Project Produce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfinger, Donna M.

    2005-01-01

    The grocery store produce section used to be a familiar but rather dull place. There were bananas next to the oranges next to the limes. Broccoli was next to corn and lettuce. Apples and pears, radishes and onions, eggplants and zucchinis all lay in their appropriate bins. Those days are over. Now, broccoli may be next to bok choy, potatoes beside…

  19. Antifouling properties of zinc oxide nanorod coatings.

    PubMed

    Al-Fori, Marwan; Dobretsov, Sergey; Myint, Myo Tay Zar; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, the antifouling (AF) properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod coatings were investigated using the marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C, larvae of the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the microalga Tetraselmis sp. ZnO nanorod coatings were fabricated on microscope glass substrata by a simple hydrothermal technique using two different molar concentrations (5 and 10 mM) of zinc precursors. These coatings were tested for 5 h under artificial sunlight (1060 W m(-2) or 530 W m(-2)) and in the dark (no irradiation). In the presence of light, both the ZnO nanorod coatings significantly reduced the density of Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C and Tetraselmis sp. in comparison to the control (microscope glass substratum without a ZnO coating). High mortality and low settlement of B. neritina larvae was observed on ZnO nanorod coatings subjected to light irradiation. In darkness, neither mortality nor enhanced settlement of larvae was observed. Larvae of B. neritina were not affected by Zn(2+) ions. The AF effect of the ZnO nanorod coatings was thus attributed to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by photocatalysis. It was concluded that ZnO nanorod coatings effectively prevented marine micro and macrofouling in static conditions.

  20. Antifouling properties of zinc oxide nanorod coatings.

    PubMed

    Al-Fori, Marwan; Dobretsov, Sergey; Myint, Myo Tay Zar; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, the antifouling (AF) properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod coatings were investigated using the marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C, larvae of the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the microalga Tetraselmis sp. ZnO nanorod coatings were fabricated on microscope glass substrata by a simple hydrothermal technique using two different molar concentrations (5 and 10 mM) of zinc precursors. These coatings were tested for 5 h under artificial sunlight (1060 W m(-2) or 530 W m(-2)) and in the dark (no irradiation). In the presence of light, both the ZnO nanorod coatings significantly reduced the density of Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C and Tetraselmis sp. in comparison to the control (microscope glass substratum without a ZnO coating). High mortality and low settlement of B. neritina larvae was observed on ZnO nanorod coatings subjected to light irradiation. In darkness, neither mortality nor enhanced settlement of larvae was observed. Larvae of B. neritina were not affected by Zn(2+) ions. The AF effect of the ZnO nanorod coatings was thus attributed to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by photocatalysis. It was concluded that ZnO nanorod coatings effectively prevented marine micro and macrofouling in static conditions. PMID:25115521

  1. Parylene coating of syntactic composites. [Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Schloman, A.H.

    1980-11-01

    A manufacturing process developed for parylene coating syntactic parts has resulted in several improvements. Thin edges have been strengthened, which minimizes breakage during the manufacturing process and subsequent assembly; part and surface toughness has been improved; the coefficient of friction during assembly has been reduced; and the bonding of the pads, shoehorn, and clips has been enhanced. Improvements in the tensile strength and flexural strength of the syntactic composite as a result of the coating are discussed, and coated parts and deposited films produced by laboratory and production coaters are compared.

  2. Degradation mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinde, S. L.; Olson, D. A.; Dejonghe, L. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The degradation mechanism in thermal barrier coating systems subjected to prolonged heating in air as well as to thermal cycling was studied. Bond coat oxidation was found to be the most important reason for degradation. The oxidation produced NiO as well as Al?O? in one set of samples, but the variation in initial coating structure made it difficult to resolve systematic differences between isothermally heated and thermally cycled samples. However, the contribution to degradation from changes in substrate composition seemed less in the cycled sample.

  3. Method for depositing an oxide coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A metal oxide coating is plated onto a metal substrate at the cathode from an acid solution which contains an oxidizing agent. The process is particularly useful for producing solar panels. Conventional plating at the cathode avoids the presence of oxidizing agents. Coatings made in accordance with the invention are stable both at high temperatures and while under the influence of high photon flux in the visible range.

  4. Structure and hot hardness of RuAl-based alloys produced by reactive sintering using hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarova, K. B.; Morozov, A. E.; Padalko, A. G.; Drozdov, A. A.

    2008-04-01

    The structure and hot hardness (at temperatures up to 1100°C) of RuAl-based powder alloys with 1 3 at % Ni, Mo, Re, or Ru are studied. The alloys are produced by the reactive sintering of cold-compacted bars and subsequent threefold isostatic pressing with intermediate annealing at 1500°C performed after the first hot isostatic pressing. The samples have a residual pore content of 1 2.5 vol % and are characterized by a micrononuniform distribution of base and alloying elements. The alloys with refractory metals, such as Re, Mo, or Ru, are found to have the maximum hardness at all temperatures under study. At low temperatures, the effect is more substantial; the hardness of the Re-containing alloys exceeds that of the other alloys by a factor of 1.3 3.6. The increase in the hardness related to solid-solution alloying becomes more substantial owing to the microinhomogeneity of the sintered powder alloys and weakens because of microporosity. Recommendations that allow the uniformity of the distribution of the base and alloying elements to be increased are given.

  5. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  6. Experiments with ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, E. K.; Rollins, C. T.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes the procedures and techniques used in the application of a ceramic coating and the evaluation of test parts through observation of the cracks that occur in this coating due to loading.

  7. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature oxidation resistant, thermal barrier coating system is disclosed for a nickel cobalt, or iron base alloy substrate. An inner metal bond coating contacts the substrate, and a thermal barrier coating covers the bond coating. NiCrAlR, FeCrAlR, and CoCrAlR alloys are satisfactory as bond coating compositions where R=Y or Yb. These alloys contain, by weight, 24.9-36.7% chromium, 5.4-18.5% aluminum, and 0.05 to 1.55% yttrium or 0.05 to 0.53% ytterbium. The coatings containing ytterbium are preferred over those containing yttrium. An outer thermal barrier coating of partial stabilized zirconium oxide (zirconia) which is between 6% and 8%, by weight, of yttrium oxide (yttria) covers the bond coating. Partial stabilization provides a material with superior durability. Partially stabilized zirconia consists of mixtures of cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phases.

  8. A Novel Type of Environmentally Friendly Slurry Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Xabier; Galetz, Mathias C.; Schütze, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A variety of commercial slurries are available to aluminize the surfaces of nickel-based superalloys; however, they have three main disadvantages. First, the phosphates and chromates or halides used as binders or to activate the diffusion species are environmentally harmful and toxic; second, the slurry coatings can only produce high-aluminum-activity coatings which form precipitate-rich coatings that are detrimental to adherence. Finally, these coatings are limited to the incorporation of aluminum and silicon, whereas the co-deposition of other elements such as chromium or cobalt has not been achieved so far. In this work, the limitations of slurry coatings have been overcome by carefully designing the powder composition and controlling the process to produce co-deposition coatings with chromium, cobalt, or nickel by using nontoxic water-based slurries. This also opens an effective way to control Al activity and to produce low-activity aluminized coatings for the first time when using the slurry technique. These results expand the application range of slurry coatings so they can also be applied under ambient atmosphere, making it possible to fully coat aero engine pieces or large-scale industrial components, providing all properties that are usually only achieved by using more complex and expensive methods such as chemical vapor deposition. Furthermore, these new coatings offer unique advantages that can be very favorable especially as a repairing technique.

  9. METHOD FOR TESTING COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Johns, I.B.; Newton, A.S.

    1958-09-01

    A method is described for detecting pin hole imperfections in coatings on uranium-metal objects. Such coated objects are contacted with a heated atmosphere of gaseous hydrogen and imperfections present in the coatings will allow the uranlum to react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride. Since uranium hydride is less dense than uranium metal it will swell, causing enlargement of the coating defeot and rendering it visible.

  10. Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings - Part I: Coating deposition process and basic coating properties characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir; Bowman, C.; Gannon, Paul E.; VanVorous, D.; Voevodin, A. A.; Rutkowski, A.; Muratore, C.; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Gelles, David S.; Shutthanandan, V.; Trusov, B. G.

    2006-12-04

    Aircraft propulsion applications require low-friction and wear resistant surfaces that operate under high contact loads in severe environments. Recent research on supertough and low friction nanocomposite coatings produced with hybrid plasma deposition processes was demonstrated to have a high potential for such demanding applications. However, industrially scalable hybrid plasma technologies are needed for their commercial realization. The Large area Filtered Arc Deposition (LAFAD) process provides atomically smooth coatings at high deposition rates over large surface areas. The LAFAD technology allows functionally graded, multilayer, super-lattice and nanocomposite architectures of multi-elemental coatings via electro-magnetic mixing of two plasma flows composed of different metal ion vapors. Further advancement can be realized through a combinatorial process using a hybrid filtered arc-magnetron deposition system. In the present study, multilayer and nanostructured TiCrCN/TiCr +TiBC composite cermet coatings were deposited by the hybrid filtered arc-magnetron process. Filtered plasma streams from arc evaporated Ti and Cr targets, and two unbalanced magnetron sputtered B4C targets, were directed to the substrates in the presence of reactive gases. A multiphase nanocomposite coating architecture was designed to provide the optimal combination of corrosion and wear resistance of advanced steels (Pyrowear 675) used in aerospace bearing and gear applications. Coatings were characterized using SEM/EDS, XPS and RBS for morphology and chemistry, XRD and TEM for structural analyses, wafer curvature and nanoindentation for stress and mechanical properties, and Rockwell and scratch indentions for adhesion. Coating properties were evaluated for a variety of coating architectures. Thermodynamic modeling was used for estimation of phase composition of the top TiBC coating segment. Correlations between coating chemistry, structure and mechanical properties are discussed.

  11. Influence of coating material on the flowability and dissolution of dry-coated fine ibuprofen powders.

    PubMed

    Qu, Li; Zhou, Qi Tony; Denman, John A; Stewart, Peter J; Hapgood, Karen P; Morton, David A V

    2015-10-12

    This study investigates the effects of a variety of coating materials on the flowability and dissolution of dry-coated cohesive ibuprofen powders, with the ultimate aim to use these in oral dosage forms. A mechanofusion approach was employed to apply a 1% (w/w) dry coating onto ibuprofen powder with coating materials including magnesium stearate (MgSt), L-leucine, sodium stearyl fumarate (SSF) and silica-R972. No significant difference in particle size or shape was measured following mechanofusion with any material. Powder flow behaviours characterised by the Freeman FT4 system indicated coatings of MgSt, L-leucine and silica-R972 produced a notable surface modification and substantially improved flow compared to the unprocessed and SSF-mechanofused powders. ToF-SIMS provided a qualitative measure of coating extent, and indicated a near-complete layer on the drug particle surface after dry coating with MgSt or silica-R972. Of particular note, the dissolution rates of all mechanofused powders were enhanced even with a coating of a highly hydrophobic material such as magnesium stearate. This surprising increase in dissolution rate of the mechanofused powders was attributed to the lower cohesion and the reduced agglomeration after mechanical coating.

  12. Coatings for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-12-18

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors.

  13. Spin coating of electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-01-01

    Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

  14. Ceramic with zircon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An article comprises a silicon-containing substrate and a zircon coating. The article can comprise a silicon carbide/silicon (SiC/Si) substrate, a zircon (ZrSiO.sub.4) intermediate coating and an external environmental/thermal barrier coating.

  15. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  16. Optimizing High-Z Coatings for Inertial Fusion Energy Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Nikroo, Abbas; Goodin, Daniel T.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.

    2003-05-15

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors require shells with a high-Z coating that is both permeable, for timely filling with deuterium-tritium, and reflective, for survival in the chamber. Previously, gold was deposited on shells while they were agitated to obtain uniform, reproducible coatings. However, these coatings were rather impermeable, resulting in unacceptably long fill times. We report here on an initial study on Pd coatings on shells in the same manner. We have found that these palladium-coated shells are substantially more permeable than gold. Pd coatings on shells remained stable on exposure to deuterium. Pd coatings had lower reflectivity compared to gold that leads to a lower working temperature, and efficiency, of the proposed fusion reactor. Seeking to combine the permeability of Pd coatings and high reflectivity of gold, AuPd-alloy coatings were produced using a cosputtering technique. These alloys demonstrated higher permeability than Au and higher reflectivity than Pd. However, these coatings were still less reflective than the gold coatings. To improve the permeability of gold's coatings, permeation experiments were performed at higher temperatures. With the parameters of composition, thickness, and temperature, we have the ability to comply with a large target design window.

  17. Metallurgical coatings and thin films; Proceedings of the International Conference, 18th, San Diego, CA, Apr. 22-26, 1991. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Gary E. (Editor); Mcintyre, Dale C. (Editor); Hofmann, Siegfried (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    A conference on metallurgical coatings and thin films produced papers in the areas of coatings for use at high temperatures; hard coatings and deposition technologies; diamonds and related materials; tribological coatings/surface modifications; thin films for microelectronics and high temperature superconductors; optical coatings, film characterization, magneto-optics, and guided waves; and methods for characterizing films and modified surfaces.

  18. Wrinkling of solidifying polymeric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Soumendra Kumar

    2005-07-01

    In coatings, wrinkles are viewed as defects or as desired features for low gloss, and texture. In either case, discovering the origin of wrinkles and the conditions that lead to their formation is important. This research examines what wrinkling requires and proposes a mechanism to explain the observations. All curing wrinkling coatings contain multi-functional reactants. Upon curing, all develop a depth-wise gradient in solidification that result in a cross-linked elastic skin atop a viscous bottom layer. It is hypothesized that compressive stress develops in the skin when liquid below diffuses up into the skin. High enough compressive stress buckles the skin to produce wrinkles. The hypothesis is substantiated by experimental and theoretical evidences. Effects of various application and compositional parameters on wrinkle size in a liquid-applied acrylic coating and a powder-applied epoxy coating were examined. All three components, namely resin, cross-linker and catalyst blocked with at least equimolar volatile blocker, proved to be required for wrinkling. The wrinkling phenomenon was modeled with a theory that accounts for gradient generation, cross-linking reaction and skinning; predictions compared well with observations. Two-layer non-curing coatings that have a stiff elastic layer atop a complaint elastic bottom layer wrinkled when the top layer is compressed. The top layer was compressed by either moisture absorption or differential thermal expansion. Experimental observations compared well with predictions from a theory based on force balance in multilayer systems subjected to differential contraction or expansion. A model based on the Flory-Rehner free energy of a constrained cross-linked gel was constructed that predicts the compressive stress generated in a coating when it absorbs solvent. Linear stability analysis predicts that when a compressed elastic layer is attached atop a viscous layer, it is always unstable to buckles whose wavelength exceeds a

  19. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  20. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Liquid, spray on elastomeric polyurethanes are selected and investigated as best candidates for aircraft external protective coatings. Flight tests are conducted to measure drag effects of these coatings compared to paints and a bare metal surface. The durability of two elastometric polyurethanes are assessed in airline flight service evaluations. Laboratory tests are performed to determine corrosion protection properties, compatibility with aircraft thermal anti-icing systems, the effect of coating thickness on erosion durability, and the erosion characteristics of composite leading edges-bare and coated. A cost and benefits assessment is made to determine the economic value of various coating configurations to the airlines.

  1. Coating Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Gedwill, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Hot-section gas-turbine components typically require some form of coating for oxidation and corrosion protection. Efficient use of coatings requires reliable and accurate predictions of the protective life of the coating. Currently engine inspections and component replacements are often made on a conservative basis. As a result, there is a constant need to improve and develop the life-prediction capability of metallic coatings for use in various service environments. The purpose of this present work is aimed at developing of an improved methodology for predicting metallic coating lives in an oxidizing environment and in a corrosive environment.

  2. Antibacterial polymer coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Allen, Ashley N.; Barnhart, Meghan; Tucker, Mark David; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2009-09-01

    A series of poly(sulfone)s with quaternary ammonium groups and another series with aldehyde groups are synthesized and tested for biocidal activity against vegetative bacteria and spores, respectively. The polymers are sprayed onto substrates as coatings which are then exposed to aqueous suspensions of organisms. The coatings are inherently biocidal and do not release any agents into the environment. The coatings adhere well to both glass and CARC-coated coupons and they exhibit significant biotoxicity. The most effective quaternary ammonium polymers kills 99.9% of both gram negative and gram positive bacteria and the best aldehyde coating kills 81% of the spores on its surface.

  3. Coatings For Plastic Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, Robert W.

    1983-11-01

    Over the past decade there has been a tremendous surge of interest in the use of plastic optical elements to supplement or replace glass optics. While the technology of molding and polishing plastic optics has been the chief interest, there has been increasing need for precision coatings for these elements. In some instances these coatings are as critical as the elements themselves. In this paper we will describe the difficulties incurred in coating plastic and some of the many coatings presently available today despite the difficulties encountered. We will then cover the durability aspects of these coatings and lastly, point out some areas to consider when evaluating using plastic instead of glass.

  4. Lubricant Coating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    "Peen Plating," a NASA developed process for applying molybdenum disulfide, is the key element of Techniblast Co.'s SURFGUARD process for applying high strength solid lubricants. The process requires two machines -- one for cleaning and one for coating. The cleaning step allows the coating to be bonded directly to the substrate to provide a better "anchor." The coating machine applies a half a micron thick coating. Then, a blast gun, using various pressures to vary peening intensities for different applications, fires high velocity "media" -- peening hammers -- ranging from plastic pellets to steel shot. Techniblast was assisted by Rural Enterprises, Inc. Coating service can be performed at either Techniblast's or a customer's facility.

  5. Alternative waste form development - low-temperature pyrolytic carbon coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Oma, K.H.; Rusin, J.M.; Kidd, R.W.; Browning, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Although several chemical vapor deposition (CVD) - coated waste forms have been successfully produced, some major disadvantages associated with the high-temperature fluidized-bed CVD coating process exist. To overcome these disadvantages, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory has initiated the development of a pyrolytic carbon CVD coating system to coat large waste-form particles at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500/degree/C. This relatively simple system has been used to coat kilogram quantities of simulated waste-glass marbles. Further development of this system could result in a viable process to coat bulk quantities of both glass and ceramic waste forms. This paper discusses various aspects of the development work, including coating techniques, parametric study, and coater equipment. 10 refs.

  6. ALD Produced B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} Coatings on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} Burnable Poison Nanoparticles and Carbonaceous TRISO Coating Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, Alan

    2012-11-26

    This project will demonstrate the feasibility of using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to apply ultrathin neutron-absorbing, corrosion-resistant layers consisting of ceramics, metals, or combinations thereof, on particles for enhanced nuclear fuel pellets. Current pellet coating technology utilizes chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a fluidized bed reactor to deposit thick, porous layers of C (or PyC) and SiC. These graphitic/carbide materials degrade over time owing to fission product bombardment, active oxidation, thermal management issues, and long-term irradiation effects. ALD can be used to deposit potential ceramic barrier materials of interest, including ZrO{sub 2}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and TiO{sub 2}, or neutron-absorbing materials, namely B (in BN or B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Gd (in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}). This project consists of a two-pronged approach to integrate ALD into the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) fuel pellet manufacturing process:

  7. Development of Processing Windows for HVOF Carbide-Based Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Andrew Siao Ming; Howse, Hugo; Wade, Scott A.; Berndt, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Optimized processing windows for spraying high-quality metal carbide-based coatings are developed using particle diagnostic technology. The cermet coatings were produced via the high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process and are proposed for service applications such as marine hydraulics. The traditional "trial and error" method for developing coating process parameters is not technically robust, as well as being costly and time consuming. Instead, this contribution investigated the use of real-time monitoring of parameters associated with the HVOF flame jets and particles using in-flight particle diagnostics. Subsequently, coatings can be produced with knowledge concerning the molten particle size, temperature, and velocity profile. The analytical results allow identification of optimized coating process windows, which translate to coatings of lower porosity and improved mechanical performance.

  8. Coatings for directional eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of an environmentally stable coating for a very high strength, directionally solidified eutectic alloy designated NiTaC-13. Three duplex (two-layer) coatings survived 3,000 hours on a cyclic oxidation test (1,100 C to 90 C). These coatings were fabricated by first depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam heated source, followed by depositing an aluminizing overlayer. The alloy after exposure with these coatings was denuded of carbide fibers at the substrate/coating interface. It was demonstrated that TaC fiber denudation can be greatly retarded by applying a carbon-bearing coating. The coating was applied by thermal spraying followed by aluminization. Specimens coated with NiCrAlCY+Al survived over 2,000 hours in the cyclic oxidation test with essentially no TaC denudation. Coating ductility was studied for coated and heat-treated bars, and stress rupture life at 871 C and 1,100 C was determined for coated and cycled bars.

  9. Bacillus subtilis Spore Coat

    PubMed Central

    Driks, Adam

    1999-01-01

    In response to starvation, bacilli and clostridia undergo a specialized program of development that results in the production of a highly resistant dormant cell type known as the spore. A proteinacious shell, called the coat, encases the spore and plays a major role in spore survival. The coat is composed of over 25 polypeptide species, organized into several morphologically distinct layers. The mechanisms that guide coat assembly have been largely unknown until recently. We now know that proper formation of the coat relies on the genetic program that guides the synthesis of spore components during development as well as on morphogenetic proteins dedicated to coat assembly. Over 20 structural and morphogenetic genes have been cloned. In this review, we consider the contributions of the known coat and morphogenetic proteins to coat function and assembly. We present a model that describes how morphogenetic proteins direct coat assembly to the specific subcellular site of the nascent spore surface and how they establish the coat layers. We also discuss the importance of posttranslational processing of coat proteins in coat morphogenesis. Finally, we review some of the major outstanding questions in the field. PMID:10066829

  10. Microstructural studies of thermal spray coatings for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Limin

    2002-01-01

    /EMAA (ethylene methacrylic acid copolymer) coatings were produced using a flame spray system. The coatings exhibited increased Young's modulus compared to pure EMAA coatings and reasonable toughness and dissolution. The mechanical and dissolution behaviors were related to the volume and distribution of the HA in the polymer matrix. This technique provides a new means of preparing HA/polymer coatings for application as implants.

  11. A protein coated piezoelectric crystal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, Ahmad; Pender, Marie; Ngeh-Ngwainbi, Jerome; Lubrano, Glenn; Guilbault, George

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a protein coated, portable piezoelectric crystal detector for organophosphorus compounds. The performance of acetylcholinesterase, GD-1 anti-soman, anti-DMMP antibody, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) coatings was evaluated. Different immobilization methods were also tested. The responses obtained with the protein coatings immobilized via cross-linking with glutaraldehyde were acceptable, provided that the reference crystal was coated with dextran. The proposed coatings showed good stability and reasonable lifetimes that ranged from approximately three weeks in the case of the antibody coatings to several months in the case of BSA. Although moisture, gasoline, and sulfur are potential interferents, their effects on the sensor were eliminated by using a sodium sulfate scrubber which did not affect the performance of the detector towards organophosphates. A small, battery operated portable instrument capable of real time measurements with alarm function was produced. The instrument can be used in a wide range of applications, depending on the coatings applied to the crystals.

  12. Non-eluting Enzymatic Antibiofilm Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Pavlukhina, Svetlana V.; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Xu, Li; Chang, Wei; Yu, Xiaojun; Madhyastha, Srinivasa; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Mentbayeva, Almagul; Khan, Babar; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a highly efficient, biocompatible surface coating that disperses bacterial biofilms through enzymatic cleavage of the extracellular biofilm matrix. The coating was fabricated by binding the naturally existing enzyme dispersin B (DspB) to surface-attached polymer matrices constructed via a layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique. LbL matrices were assembled through electrostatic interactions of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), followed by chemical crosslinking with glutaraldehyde and pH triggered removal of PMAA, producing a stable PAH hydrogel matrix used for DspB loading. The amount of DspB loaded increased linearly with the number of PAH layers in surface hydrogels. DspB was retained within these coatings in the pH range from 4 to 7.5. DspB-loaded coatings inhibited biofilm formation by two clinical strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biofilm inhibition was ≥ 98% compared to mock-loaded coatings as determined by CFU enumeration. In addition, DspB-loaded coatings did not inhibit attachment or growth of cultured human osteoblast cells. We suggest that the use of DspB-loaded multilayer coatings presents a promising method for creating biocompatible surfaces with high antibiofilm efficiency, especially when combined with conventional antimicrobial treatment of dispersed bacteria. PMID:22909396

  13. Continuous coating of silicon-on-ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Schuldt, S. B.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Butter, C. D.

    1980-01-01

    Growth of sheet silicon on low-cost substrates has been demonstrated by the silicon coating with inverted meniscus (SCIM) technique. A mullite-based ceramic substrate is coated with carbon and then passed over a trough of molten silicon with a raised meniscus. Solidification occurs at the trailing edge of the downstream meniscus, producing a silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) layer. Meniscus shape and stability are controlled by varying the level of molten silicon in a reservoir connected to the trough. The thermal conditions for growth and the crystallographic texture of the SOC layers are similar to those produced by dip-coating, the original technique of meniscus-controlled growth. The thermal conditions for growth have been analyzed in some detail. The analysis correctly predicts the velocity-thickness relationship and the liquid-solid interface shape for dip-coating, and appears to be equally applicable to SCIM-coating. Solar cells made from dip-coated SOC material have demonstrated efficiencies of 10% on 4-sq cm cells and 9.9% on 10-sq cm cells.

  14. Microstructure of Kinetic Spray Coatings: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhee; Kim, Jaeick

    2015-04-01

    Kinetic spray process has been applied to various industrial fields such as automotive, aviation, and defense industries due to its availability to produce high-performing coating layer. However, since the properties of kinetic-sprayed coating layer are significantly affected by the microstructures of deposit, the microstructures of the deposit should be controlled to acquire advanced coating layer and, accordingly, deep understanding of microstructural evolution must be achieved before controlling the microstructure of the coating layer. This paper gives an overview of contents related to the microstructure of kinetic-sprayed deposition. The most powerful influencing factors in microstructural evolution of kinetic-sprayed coating layer are instant generation of thermal energy and high-strain, high-strain-rate plastic deformation at the moment of particle impact. A high-density coating layer with low porosity can be produced, although some micro-cracks are occasionally induced at the interparticle boundary or at the inner region of the particles. Also, a microstructure which is distinct from the inner particle region is created in the vicinity of the particle-particle or particle-substrate interface region. However, almost no crystal phase transformation or chemical reaction is induced since the deposited particles are not heated directly by a thermal energy source.

  15. Process for Coating Substrates with Catalytic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klelin, Ric J. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for forming catalysts by coating substrates with two or more catalytic components, which comprises the following sequence of steps. First, the substrate is infused with an adequate amount of solution having a starting material comprising a catalytic component precursor, wherein the thermal decomposition product of the catalytic component precursor is a catalytic component. Second, the excess of the solution is removed from the substrate. thereby leaving a coating of the catalytic component precursor on the surface of the substrate. Third, the coating of the catalytic component precursor is converted to the catalytic component by thermal decomposition. Finally, the coated substance is etched to increase the surface area. The list three steps are then repeated for at least a second catalytic component. This process is ideally suited for application in producing efficient low temperature oxidation catalysts.

  16. Paper-Thin Coating Offers Maximum Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wessex Incorporated has recently taken a technology that was originally developed for NASA as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in heatshields for space vehicles, and modified it for use in applications such as building materials, machinery, and transportation. The technology, developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a protective coating for flexible ceramic composites (PCC), is environmentally safe, water-based, and contains no solvents. Many other flame-retardant materials contain petroleum-based components, which can produce toxic smoke under flame. Wessex versions of PCC can be used to shield ceramics, wood, plasterboard, steel, plastics, fiberglass, and other materials from catastrophic fires. They are extraordinarily tough and exhibit excellent resistance to thermal shock, vibration, abrasion, and mechanical damage. One thin layer of coating provides necessary protection and allows for flexibility while avoiding excessive weight disadvantages. The coating essentially reduces the likelihood of the underlying material becoming so hot that it combusts and thus inhibits the "flashover" phenomenon from occurring.

  17. Coatings Extend Life of Engines and Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    MesoCoat Inc., of Euclid, Ohio, collaborated with Glenn Research Center to provide thermal barrier coating (TBC) technology, developed by Glenn researcher Dongming Zhu, to enhance the lifespan and performance of engines in U.S. Air Force legacy aircraft. The TBC reduces thermal stresses on engine parts, increasing component life by 50 percent. MesoCoat is also producing metal cladding technology that may soon provide similar life-lengthening benefits for the Nation's infrastructure. Through a Space Act Agreement with Glenn, the company employs the Center's high-density infrared arc lamp system to bond its cladding materials for demonstration prototypes; the coating technology can prevent corrosion on metal beams, pipes, and rebar for up to 100 years.

  18. High efficiency turbine blade coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600 oC and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the production of layered

  19. Tailored coatings for hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Dustoor, M.R.; Moskowitz, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    An update on Conforma Clad coatings, first presented at the 1982 National Powder Metallurgy Conference in Montreal, Canada, is presented. The major advantage is the ability to offer selective-area coatings in a wide range of thicknesses and material choices while retaining dimensional and edge control of the coating. Complex geometries can be coated with a high materials utilization and with coating properties tailored to the end application. Porosity and bond strength values can match or exceed those seen with the best commercially available thermal sprayed coatings. The ability of the process to balance abrasion resistance and toughness requirements for a specific wear mode, is illustrated by microstructural control of the size, shape and density of carbide particles contained in the coatings. Dry sand abrasive test data are provided on Conforma Clad coatings and competitive processes. Ongoing developments of non-furnace fusion techniques, such as laser cladding, are presented and the microstructures compared with those obtained with conventional coating processes. Commercial applications for these coatings are highlighted with some typical examples.

  20. Nanophase hydroxyapatite coatings for dental and orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Michiko

    In order to improve dental and orthopedic implant performance, the objective of this study was to synthesize nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) powders to coat metals (specifically, titanium and tantalum). Precipitated HA powders were either sintered in order to produce UltraCaP HA (or microcrystalline size HA) or were treated hydrothermally to produce nanocrystalline HA. Some of the UltraCaP and nanocrystalline HA powders were doped with yttrium (Y) since previous in vitro studies demonstrated that Y-doped HA in bulk improved osteoblast (or bone-forming cell) function over undoped HA. The nanocrystalline HA powders were also mixed with nanophase titania powders because previous studies demonstrated that titania/HA composite coatings increased coating adhesive strength and HA nucleation. These powders were then deposited onto titanium by a novel room-temperature process, called IonTiteT(TM). The results demonstrated that the chemical properties and crystallite size of the original HA powders were maintained in the coatings. More importantly, in vitro studies showed increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion on the single phase nanocrystalline HA and nano-titania/HA coatings compared to traditionally used plasma-sprayed HA coatings and uncoated metals. Results further demonstrated greater amounts of calcium deposition by osteoblasts cultured on nanocrystalline HA coatings compared to UltraCaP coatings and conventionally used plasma-sprayed HA coatings. To elucidate mechanisms that influenced osteoblast functions on the HA coatings, the amount of proteins (fibronectin and vitronectin) onto the HA powders and the adsorbed fibronectin conformation were investigated. Exposure of cell integrin binding domains (in fibronectin III10 segments) was greater in fibronectin adsorbed onto 1.2 mole% Y-doped UltraCaP HA coatings compared to nanocrystalline HA coatings tested. However, 1.2 mole% Y-doped UltraCaP HA coatings did not increase mineralization by osteoblasts

  1. Cellulose nanofibers use in coated paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Finley

    Cellulose Nanofibers (CNF) are materials that can be obtained by the mechanical breakdown of natural fibers. CNF have the potential to be produced at low cost in a paper mill and may provide novel properties to paper, paper coatings, paints, or other products. However, suspensions have a complex rheology even at low solid contents. To be able to coat, pump, or mix CNF at moderate solids, it is critical to understand the rheology of these suspensions and how they flow in process equipment; current papers only report the rheology up to 6% solids. Few publications are available that describe the coating of CNF onto paper or the use of CNF as an additive into a paper coating. The rheology of CNF suspensions and coatings that contain CNF were characterized with parallel-disk geometry in a controlled stress rheometer. The steady shear viscosity, the complex viscosity, the storage modulus, and the yield stress were determined for the range of solids or concentrations (2.5-10.5%). CNF were coated onto paper with a laboratory rod coater, a size press and a high speed cylindrical laboratory coater (CLC). For each case, the coat weights were measures and the properties of the papers were characterized. CNF water base suspension was found to be a shear thinning with a power law index of around 0.1. Oscillatory tests showed a linear viscoelastic region at low strains and significant storage and loss moduli even at low solids. The Cox Merz rule does not hold for CNF suspensions or coating formulations that contain CNF with complex viscosities that are about 100 times larger than the steady shear viscosities. Paper coating formulations that contain CNF were found to have viscosities and storage and loss moduli that are over ten times larger than coatings that contain starch at similar solids. CNF suspensions were coated on papers with low amount transferred on paper either at high solids or high nip loadings. The amount transferred appears to be controlled by an interaction of

  2. Atomically Precise Surface Engineering for Producing Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Frank (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    High-quality surface coatings, and techniques combining the atomic precision of molecular beam epitaxy and atomic layer deposition, to fabricate such high-quality surface coatings are provided. The coatings made in accordance with the techniques set forth by the invention are shown to be capable of forming silicon CCD detectors that demonstrate world record detector quantum efficiency (>50%) in the near and far ultraviolet (155 nm-300 nm). The surface engineering approaches used demonstrate the robustness of detector performance that is obtained by achieving atomic level precision at all steps in the coating fabrication process. As proof of concept, the characterization, materials, and exemplary devices produced are presented along with a comparison to other approaches.

  3. Fogging technique used to coat magnesium with plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mroz, T. S.

    1967-01-01

    Cleaning process and a fogging technique facilitate the application of a plastic coating to magnesium plates. The cleaning process removes general organic and inorganic surface impurities, oils and greases, and oxides and carbonates from the magnesium surfaces. The fogging technique produces a thin-filmlike coating in a clean room atmosphere.

  4. Oxidation-Resistant Slurry Coating for Carbon-Based Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    New process uses paint sprayer and vacuum furnace to produce silicon carbide outer layer. In cross section of silicon and silicon carbide reaction zone, top layer of silicon adheres to silicon carbide layer. Crystals prominent on melted top surface of slurry coating. Process especially useful in coating repair.

  5. Pericellular coat of chick embryo chondrocytes: structural role of hyaluronate

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Chondrocytes produce large pericellular coats in vitro that can be visualized by the exclusion of particles, e.g., fixed erythrocytes, and that are removed by treatment with Streptomyces hyaluronidase, which is specific for hyaluronate. In this study, we examined the kinetics of formation of these coats and the relationship of hyaluronate and proteoglycan to coat structure. Chondrocytes were isolated from chick tibia cartilage by collagenase-trypsin digestion and were characterized by their morphology and by their synthesis of both type II collagen and high molecular weight proteoglycans. The degree of spreading of the chondrocytes and the size of the coats were quantitated at various times subsequent to seeding by tracing phase-contrast photomicrographs of the cultures. After seeding, the chondrocytes attached themselves to the tissue culture dish and exhibited coats within 4 h. The coats reached a maximum size after 3-4 d and subsequently decreased over the next 2-3 d. Subcultured chondrocytes produced a large coat only if passaged before 4 d. Both primary and first passage cells, with or without coats, produced type II collagen but not type I collagen as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with Streptomyces hyaluronidase (1.0 mU/ml, 15 min), which completely removed the coat, released 58% of the chondroitin sulfate but only 9% of the proteins associated with the cell surface. The proteins released by hyaluronidase were not digestible by bacterial collagenase. Monensin and cycloheximide (0.01-10 microM, 48 h) caused a dose-dependent decrease in coat size that was linearly correlated to synthesis of cell surface hyaluronate (r = 0.98) but not chondroitin sulfate (r = 0.2). We conclude that the coat surrounding chondrocytes is dependent on hyaluronate for its structure and that hyaluronate retains a large proportion of the proteoglycan in the coat. PMID:6501414

  6. Optical coating in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunner, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    A technological appraisal of the steps required to approach the goal of in-situ optical coating, cleaning and re-coating the optical elements of a remote telescope in space is reported. Emphasis is placed on the high ultraviolet throughput that a telescope using bare aluminum mirrors would offer. A preliminary design is suggested for an Orbital Coating Laboratory to answer basic technical questions.

  7. Thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, D.J.; Blann, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Standardization of specimen preparation for microstructural evaluation of thermally sprayed coatings is considered. Metallographic specimen preparation procedures including sectioning, encapsulation, planar grinding, and power lapping of thermally sprayed coatings are described. A Co-Ni-Cr-W coating on an AISI 410 stainless steel substrate is used as a control sample. Specimen-preparation techniques have been evaluated through scanning electron microscopy for determining the percentage of apparent porosity and energy dispersive spectroscopy for determining elemental composition.

  8. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A series of studies in which films and liquid spray-on materials were evaluated in the laboratory for transport aircraft external surface coatings are summarized. Elastomeric polyurethanes were found to best meet requirements. Two commercially available products, CAAPCO B-274 and Chemglaze M313, were subjected to further laboratory testing, airline service evaluations, and drag-measurement flight tests. It was found that these coatings were compatible with the severe operating environment of airlines and that coatings reduced airplane drag. An economic analysis indicated significant dollar benefits to airlines from application of the coatings.

  9. Oxide coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    Monolithic SiC heat exchangers and fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchangers and filters are susceptible to corrosion by alkali metals at elevated temperatures. Protective coatings are currently being developed to isolate the SiC materials from the corrodants. Unfortunately, these coatings typically crack and spall when applied to SiC substrates. The purpose of this task is to determine the feasibility of using a compliant material between the protective coating and the substrate. The low-modulus compliant layer could absorb stresses and eliminate cracking and spalling of the protective coatings.

  10. Coatings for Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Several approaches for applying high resistance coatings continuously to graphite yarn were investigated. Two of the most promising approaches involved (1) chemically vapor depositing (CVD) SiC coatings on the surface of the fiber followed by oxidation, and (2) drawing the graphite yarn through an organo-silicone solution followed by heat treatments. In both methods, coated fibers were obtained which exhibited increased electrical resistances over untreated fibers and which were not degraded. This work was conducted in a previous program. In this program, the continuous CVD SiC coating process used on HTS fiber was extended to the coating of HMS, Celion 6000, Celion 12000 and T-300 graphite fiber. Electrical resistances three order of magnitude greater than the uncoated fiber were measured with no significant degradation of the fiber strength. Graphite fibers coated with CVD Si3N4 and BN had resistances greater than 10(exp 6) ohm/cm. Lower pyrolysis temperatures were used in preparing the silica-like coatings also resulting in resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than the uncoated fiber. The epoxy matrix composites prepared using these coated fibers had low shear strengths indicating that the coatings were weak.

  11. Explosion risk evaluation during production of coating powder.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Yuan, Chunmiao; Chen, Baozhi

    2007-10-22

    Powder coating is widely used in industry to prevent equipment corrosion. More than 600 companies produce coating powder in China, but most do not understand the explosion hazard of such products. In the present investigation the explosibility parameters of a coating powder were determined. Results showed that the coating powder is explosible, though the ignition energy is higher than those of normal dusts such as coal powder and corn starch. Based on these experimental findings, a systematic explosion protection method is proposed, with explosion isolation and explosion venting being adopted as the main protective methods.

  12. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  13. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J.; Herman, Herbert; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  14. Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Min; Shen, Zhigang; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liang, Shuaishuai; Liu, Lei

    2014-04-07

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

  15. Magnetron co-sputtering system for coating ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.; Halsey, W.G.; Jameson, G.T.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1981-12-09

    Fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets requires deposition of various types of coatings on microspheres. The mechanical strength, and surface finish of the coatings are of concern in ICF experiments. The tensile strength of coatings can be controlled through grain refinement, selective doping and alloy formation. We have constructed a magnetron co-sputtering system to produce variable density profile coatings with high tensile strength on microspheres. The preliminary data on the properties of a Au-Cu binary alloy system by SEM and STEM analysis is presented.

  16. Final Project Report G-Plus Windshield Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, Dean W.; Koram, Kwaku

    2002-08-01

    Samples of Sungate windshield material provided by PPG were analyzed to ascertain failure mechanisms observed at the interface between a copper busbar and the electrically conductive coating in use. Samples of “failed” windshield material were characterized using optical and electron microscopy, as well as surface analysis methods. These were compared to corresponding samples of “good” coatings. The primary failure mechanism of the coated windshield appears to be related to electrical discharges that originate where air-filled gaps are present between the copper busbar and the conductive coating. Gaps are produced by irregularities or wrinkles in the copper busbar that may result from the installation process.

  17. Ion sequestration particles for naval anticorrosion coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zguris, Zachary Z.

    Corrosion is the electrochemical process of a metal returning to its lower energy state, the metal oxide. The cost of corrosion is difficult to estimate. One area particularly susceptible to corrosion problems with high maintenance costs is that of the 20,000 tanks existent in the US Naval Fleet. The Navy is sponsoring the development of novel coatings and additives that can be used to decrease the rising corrosion related costs. This dissertation describes in detail the synthesis of Ion Sequestration Particles (ISP) that when added to the standard MIL-DTL-24441 or potentially another coating system act to enhance the anticorrosion properties of the coating. A solid ion sequestration core material (SISCM) is first produced. The core is then encapsulated in a second stage forming a shell that protects the SISCM sufficiently from the harmful interactions with uncured epoxy based coatings. ISPs were designed to sequester harmful ions while releasing passivating ions in their place. The passivating ions then migrate to defect sites at the coating interface where they act to inhibit corrosion. The anticorrosion performance of ISPs in epoxy coatings has been demonstrated by both 500 hrs of hot deionized water immersion and 1000 hrs of salt spray exposure (ASTM B117). The best improvements in coating performance are attained with ISP content ranging from 5-10 wt % loading in a coating. ISPs were designed to limit the transport of harmful ions through the coating. However this work has determined high diffusion coefficients for ions (CI- and PO42-) through the epoxy matrix. Without ISPs, the diffusion coefficient through the MIL-DTL-24441 coating was determined for phosphate to be 1.16x10-7 cm2/s and for chloride to be in the range of 2.7x10-9 to 5.6x10-10 cm2/s. The addition of 5 wt % ISPs to the coating had the effect of decreasing the diffusion coefficient by an average of 25.5%. These results yield the conclusion that the enhanced anticorrosion properties of coatings

  18. Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV

  19. Electrospinning Yarn Formation and Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahbaee Bagherzadeh, Arash

    Electrospinning is a process by which nano polymer fibers can be produced using an electrostatically driven jet of polymer solution. Electrospinning seems to be a relatively simple process for producing nanofibers since it utilizes a few readily available components. On closer examination it is however clearly evident that successful electrospinning involves an understanding of the complex interaction of electrostatic fields, properties of polymer solutions and component design and system geometry. Using grounded plate as a collector causes the uniform electric field in all directions, so the electrostatic forces acting on the fiber have no preferential direction in the plane of the collector, results in a random deposition of the electrospun fibers leading to an isotropic web. For achieving their unique abilities to be useful in devices needs to deposit them in specific location and orientation. In this project a unique needle electrospinning process is described in which nanofibers are continuously fabricated, uniaxially oriented, and twisted to form of a yarn. It is shown that perfectly aligned nanofiber assemblies can be generated by manipulating the electric field. Twist insertion is accomplished by using two stepper motors and associated software. ANSYS/Emag.3-D is used to model the path of the electric field between the needle and the collector and the electrostatic forces acting on a charged nanofiber. The apparatus described, appears to offer advantages over other techniques. Nanofibers need not only be used as webs or yarn in order to attain the performance enhancement of high tech applications, but it is possible to introduce the benefit of nanofiber to regular yarn and other materials, by coating with nanofibers An addition advantage of the present setup is that it is possible to produce continuous fiber hybrid yarn coated with aligned nanofibers along the core yarn axis. With this method it is not only possible to coat regular yarn with aligned

  20. Survey of coatings for solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    Optimum solar selective properties of black chrome require some tailoring of current and time for plating solution being used. Black zinc is produced from high zinc electroplate by subsequent conversion with chromate dip. Measurements have also been made of reflectance of previously known solar selective coatings of black copper and electroplated black nickel.

  1. Laser reflection from oxide-coated aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of reflection from an oxide-coated metal is combined with experimentally measured parameters of aluminum to produce useful amplitude and phase shift information applicable to the concentration and direction of laser light. Amplitude and phase are plotted vs angle of incidence for several important laser wavelengths in the near UV, visible, and IR spectral regions.

  2. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  3. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  4. Improved high-temperature silicide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.; Stephens, J. R.; Stetson, A. R.; Wimber, R. T.

    1969-01-01

    Special technique for applying silicide coatings to refractory metal alloys improves their high-temperature protective capability. Refractory metal powders mixed with a baked-out organic binder and sintered in a vacuum produces a porous alloy layer on the surface. Exposing the layer to hot silicon converts it to a silicide.

  5. Coatings for fresh fruits and vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coatings (waxes) are applied to apples, citrus, stone fruits, avocados, tomatoes and cucumbers prior to marketing in order to reduce water loss and shrinkage, create a modified atmosphere inside the produce, slow down senescence and ageing, impart shine, and allow for better quality and marketing pr...

  6. Corrosion-resistant coating prepared by the thermal decomposition of lithium permanganate

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrando, W.A.

    1999-09-01

    A ceramic, metal, or metal alloy surface is covered with lithium permanganate which is then thermally decomposed to produce a corrosion resistant coating on the surface. This coating serves as a primer coating which is preferably covered with an overcoat of a sealing paint.

  7. Fabrication of nanogradient coatings for laser devices using the method of magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, N F; Volpyan, O D; Obod, Yu A; Dronskii, R V

    2013-09-30

    Significant advantages of the magnetron sputtering method for producing complex high-quality optical coatings for laser devices are shown. Technology aspects of efficient fabrication of such coatings are considered. The capabilities of the developed automated technological and control equipment are described. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  8. Improved coating for silica fiber based ceramic Reusable Surface Insulation (CRSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    A series of coatings was developed for the space shuttle type silica fiber insulation system and characterized for optical and physical properties. Reentry simulation tests were run using a radiant panel and also using a hypersonic plasma arc. The coatings produced had improved physical and optical properties as well as greater reuse capability over the GE version of the JSC-0042 coating.

  9. Conducting polymers as corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Although the majority of top coatings used for corrosion protection are electrically insulating, previous workers have proposed using an electrically active barrier for corrosion control. The most effective corrosion resistant undercoatings in use today are based on chromium compounds. Coatings based on other materials will need to replace these coatings by the turn of the century because of environmental and health concerns. For this reason the authors have begun an investigation of the use of conducting polymers as corrosion resistant coatings as an alternative to metal-based coatings. Conducting polymers have long been considered to be unsuitable for commercial processing, hindering their use for practical applications. Research in the field of electrically conducting polymers has recently produced a number of polymers such as polyaniline and its derivatives which are readily soluble in common organic solvents. The authors coating system, consisting of a conducting polyaniline primer layer, topcoated with epoxy or polyurethane, has been evaluated for corrosion resistance on mild steel substrates. In this paper, the authors report the results of laboratory testing under acidic and saline conditions and the results of testing in the severe launch environment at the Beach Testing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The launch environment consists of exposure to corrosive HCl exhaust fumes and the salt spray from the Atlantic Ocean.

  10. Superhard coatings for bearings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ordway, F.; Feldman, C.

    1990-11-05

    The object of the work to produce cubic boron nitride (cBN) coatings in types 17-4 and 440 stainless steel used in spherical rod end bearings. The coatings were formed on these and other substrates by ion-assisted physical vapor deposition. Infrared absorption spectra of coatings on silicon substrates showed the presence of th cubic modification of BN. Indentation measurements, by a special technique that separates the contribution of the film from that of the substrate, demonstrated high microhardness values. Motor-driven feedthroughs were installed in the vacuum chamber in preparation for the coating of spherical bearing components. Sample coupons submitted to the sponsor were found by a scratch test technique to show poor adhesion to the stainless steel. The remainder of the program was therefore devoted to improvement of the coating-substrate bond. Tensile bond strength values as high as 6,700 lb/sq in were attained. Some time after completion of the experimental work, however, it was found that the coatings were cracking into minute fragment and spalling off the substrates. The failure mechanism remains to be determined.

  11. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOEpatents

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  12. Carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon-coated conductive Kevlar fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Changsheng; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Yu; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Hwang, Chi-Chau; Tour, James M

    2012-01-01

    Conductive carbon material-coated Kevlar fibers were fabricated through layer-by-layer spray coating. Polyurethane was used as the interlayer between the Kevlar fiber and carbon materials to bind the carbon materials to the Kevlar fiber. Strongly adhering single-walled carbon nanotube coatings yielded a durable conductivity of 65 S/cm without significant mechanical degradation. In addition, the properties remained stable after bending or water washing cycles. The coated fibers were analyzed using scanning electron microcopy and a knot test. The as-produced fiber had a knot efficiency of 23%, which is more than four times higher than that of carbon fibers. The spray-coating of graphene nanoribbons onto Kevlar fibers was also investigated. These flexible coated-Kevlar fibers have the potential to be used for conductive wires in wearable electronics and battery-heated armors.

  13. Method of forming metallic coatings on polymeric substrates

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond

    1984-01-01

    Very smooth polymeric coatings or films graded in atomic number and density an readily be formed by first preparing the coating or film from the desired monomeric material and then contacting it with a fluid containing a metal or a mixture of metals for a time sufficient for such metal or metals to sorb and diffuse into the coating or film. Metal resinate solutions are particularly advantageous for this purpose. A metallic coating can in turn be produced on the metal-loaded film or coating by exposing it to a low pressure plasma of air, oxygen, or nitrous oxide. The process permits a metallic coating to be formed on a heat sensitive substrate without the use of elevated temperatures.

  14. Method of forming graded polymeric coatings or films

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond

    1983-01-01

    Very smooth polymeric coatings or films graded in atomic number and density can readily be formed by first preparing the coating or film from the desired monomeric material and then contacting it with a fluid containing a metal or a mixture of metals for a time sufficient for such metal or metals to sorb and diffuse into the coating or film. Metal resinate solutions are particularly advantageous for this purpose. A metallic coating can in turn be produced on the metal-loaded film or coating by exposing it to a low pressure plasma of air, oxygen, or nitrous oxide. The process permits a metallic coating to be formed on a heat sensitive substrate without the use of elevated temperatures.

  15. Failure Mechanism for Thermal Fatigue of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giolli, C.; Scrivani, A.; Rizzi, G.; Borgioli, F.; Bolelli, G.; Lusvarghi, L.

    2009-06-01

    Thick thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), consisting of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat and yttria-partially stabilized zirconia top coat with different porosity values, were produced by air plasma spray (APS). The thermal fatigue resistance limit of the TBCs was tested by furnace cycling tests (FCT) according to the specifications of an original equipment manufacturer (OEM). The morphology, residual stresses, and micromechanical properties (microhardness, indentation fracture toughness) of the TBC systems before and after FCT were analyzed. The thermal fatigue resistance increases with the amount of porosity in the top coat. The compressive in-plane stresses increase in the TBC systems after thermal cycling; nevertheless the increasing rate has a trend contrary to the porosity level of top coat. The data suggest that the spallation happens at the TGO/top coat interface. The failure mechanism of thick TBCs was found to be similar to that of conventional thin TBC systems made by APS.

  16. Measurement of thermal noise in multilayer coatings with optimized layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, Akira E.; Black, Eric D.; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Pinto, Innocenzo M.; Pierro, Vincenzo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Principe, Maria; Taurasi, Ilaria

    2010-06-15

    A standard quarter-wavelength multilayer optical coating will produce the highest reflectivity for a given number of coating layers, but in general it will not yield the lowest thermal noise for a prescribed reflectivity. Coatings with the layer thicknesses optimized to minimize thermal noise could be useful in future generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors where coating thermal noise is expected to limit the sensitivity of the instrument. We present the results of direct measurements of the thermal noise of a standard quarter-wavelength coating and a low noise optimized coating. The measurements indicate a reduction in thermal noise in line with modeling predictions.

  17. Internal oxidation of laminated ternary Ru-Ta-Zr coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-I.; Lu, Tso-Shen

    2015-10-01

    Researchers have observed the internal oxidation phenomenon in binary alloy coatings when developing refractory alloy coatings for protective purposes by conducting annealing at high temperatures and in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coatings were assembled using cyclical gradient concentration deposition during cosputtering by employing a substrate holder rotating at a slow speed. The internally oxidized zone demonstrated a laminated structure, comprising alternating oxygen-rich and oxygen-deficient layers stacked in a general orientation. In the current study, Ru-Ta-Zr coatings were prepared with various stacking sequences during cosputtering. The Ru-Ta-Zr coatings were annealed at 600 °C in an atmosphere continuously purged with 1% O2-99% Ar mixed gas for 30 min. A transmission electron microscope was used to examine the periods of the laminated layers and crystallinity of the annealed coatings. Depth profiles produced using an Auger electron spectroscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope were used to certify the periodic variation of the related constituents and chemical states of the elements, respectively. The results indicate that the internally oxidized ternary coatings are stacked of Ru-, Ta2O5-, and ZrO2-dominant sublayers and that the stacking sequences of the sublayers affect the crystalline structure of the coatings. Zr is oxidized preferentially in the Ru-Ta-Zr coatings, increasing the surface hardness of the oxidized coatings.

  18. Thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  19. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxide thermal barrier coating comprises ZrO3-Yb2O3 that is plasma sprayed onto a previously applied bond coating. The zirconia is partially stabilized with about 124 w/o ytterbia to insure cubic, monoclinic, and terragonal phases.

  20. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  1. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-04-07

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  2. Duplex aluminized coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Grisaffe, S. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    The surface of a metallic base system is initially coated with a metallic alloy layer that is ductile and oxidation resistant. An aluminide coating is then applied to the metallic alloy layer. The chemistry of the metallic alloy layer is such that the oxidation resistance of the subsequently aluminized outermost layer is not seriously degraded.

  3. Fast-drying coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszek, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nontoxic coating has excellent optical properties and can be pigmented in many different colors. It bonds well, can be applied by conventional methods, weathers well, and is self-extinguishing. Coating composition comprises latex blends of fluorocarbons, acrylic resins, stabilizers, modifiers, variety of inorganic pigments, and other additives. Suitable latex primers have also been developed from acrylic latex base.

  4. Polyphosphazene Icephobic Coating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.

    1992-01-01

    Coating materials consisting mostly of modified polyphosphazene (Class FZ) elastomers provide better protection against icing than fluorocarbon polymers and silicone elastomers. Reduces adhesive force between ice and surface. As consequence, increasing weight of ice, wind loading, or vibration of surface causes ice to be shed. New icephobic coats reduce accumulation of ice on aircraft, radomes, antennas, ships, and power-transmission lines.

  5. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  6. Durability of hydrophobic coatings for superhydrophobic aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenner, Elliot; Barbier, Charlotte; D'Urso, Brian

    2013-10-01

    Robust and easily produced superhydrophobic surfaces are of great interest for mechanical applications, including drag reduction and MEMS. We produce novel superhydrophobic surfaces with several different coatings and tested the durability of each of these coatings with respect to long term immersion in water in order to determine the most long-lasting surface preparation. A pair of combinations of spin on polymers, surface features, and adhesion promoters was found that provide long term durability.

  7. Durability of Hydrophobic Coatings for Superhydrophobic Aluminum Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Jenner, Elliot; Barbier, Charlotte N; D'Urso, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Robust and easily produced Superhydrophobic surfaces are of great interest for mechanical applications, including drag reduction and MEMS. We produce novel superhydrophobic surfaces with several different coatings and tested the durability of each of these coatings with respect to long term immersion in water in order to determine the most long-lasting surface preparation. A pair of combinations of spin on polymers, surface features, and adhesion promoters was found that provide long term durability.

  8. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  9. Coated carbonaceous material

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.B.F.

    1989-04-18

    This patent describes a coated fuel product comprising a piece of charcoal, and a glossy coating of paraffin completely enclosing the piece of charcoal, the charcoal further including a flammable liquid therein, the flammable liquid consisting of a light kerosene product and being sealed within the charcoal by the coating, the coating of paraffin consisting of from about 3 percent to about 7 percent by weight of the fuel product, and the flammable liquid consisting of from about 7 percent to 12 percent by weight of the fuel product. It also describes a similar product further including an additive for increasing the gloss of the coating, the additive being selected from the group consisting of polyethylene, stearic amide and monocrystalline wax.

  10. Thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne

    2010-06-22

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

  11. LEVELING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Gage, H.A.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

  12. Deposition of wear-resistant steel surfaces by the plasma rotating electrode coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michael Robert

    A high-deposition rate thermal spray method was investigated for the purpose of coating aluminum cylinder bores with a wear resistant surface. This method, the plasma rotating electrode coating system (PROTEC) utilized transferred-arc melting of a rapidly rotating consumable electrode to create a droplet stream via centrifugal atomization. A cylindrical substrate was placed around the rotating rod, in the flight path of the droplets, to deposit a coating onto the internal surface of the cylinder. Selected coatings of 1045 steel deposited by the PROTEC coating method exhibited lower wear loss in lubricated sliding than wire-arc sprayed carbon steel coatings and gray cast iron. Splat cohesion was shown to be a significant factor in the wear resistance of PROTEC coatings. The relationship between deposition enthalpy and cooling rate of the coating was found to have the greatest effect on coating microstructure, and the coating cohesion. The most rapidly solidified coatings showed inferior splat cohesion in comparison to coatings that cooled more slowly. The increase in splat cohesion with decreased cooling rate was accompanied by the formation of a directionally oriented coating microstructure, likely formed during cellular solidification of the coating. A model describing the thermal state of the deposition process was used to predict the deposition conditions that would result in a cellular structure, and the level of splat cohesion required to produce a wear resistant coating.

  13. Physicochemical and Antibacterial Characterization of a Novel Fluorapatite Coating

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peri-implantitis remains the major impediment to the long-term use of dental implants. With increasing concern over the growth in antibiotic resistance, there is considerable interest in the preparation of antimicrobial dental implant coatings that also induce osseointegration. One such potential coating material is fluorapatite (FA). The aim of this study was to relate the antibacterial effectiveness of FA coatings against pathogens implicated in peri-implantitis to the physicochemical properties of the coating. Ordered and disordered FA coatings were produced on the under and upper surfaces of stainless steel (SS) discs, respectively, using a hydrothermal method. Surface charge, surface roughness, wettability, and fluoride release were measured for each coating. Surface chemistry was assessed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and FA crystallinity using X-ray diffraction. Antibacterial activity against periodontopathogens was assessed in vitro using viable counts, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM showed that the hydrothermal method produced FA coatings that were predominately aligned perpendicular to the SS substrate or disordered FA coatings consisting of randomly aligned rodlike crystals. Both FA coatings significantly reduced the growth of all examined bacterial strains in comparison to the control. The FA coatings, especially the disordered ones, presented significantly lower charge, greater roughness, and higher area when compared to the control, enhancing bacteria–material interactions and therefore bacterial deactivation by fluoride ions. The ordered FA layer reduced not only bacterial viability but adhesion too. The ordered FA crystals produced as a potential novel implant coating showed significant antibacterial activity against bacteria implicated in peri-implantitis, which could be explained by a detailed understanding of their physicochemical properties. PMID:27656690

  14. Physicochemical and Antibacterial Characterization of a Novel Fluorapatite Coating

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peri-implantitis remains the major impediment to the long-term use of dental implants. With increasing concern over the growth in antibiotic resistance, there is considerable interest in the preparation of antimicrobial dental implant coatings that also induce osseointegration. One such potential coating material is fluorapatite (FA). The aim of this study was to relate the antibacterial effectiveness of FA coatings against pathogens implicated in peri-implantitis to the physicochemical properties of the coating. Ordered and disordered FA coatings were produced on the under and upper surfaces of stainless steel (SS) discs, respectively, using a hydrothermal method. Surface charge, surface roughness, wettability, and fluoride release were measured for each coating. Surface chemistry was assessed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and FA crystallinity using X-ray diffraction. Antibacterial activity against periodontopathogens was assessed in vitro using viable counts, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM showed that the hydrothermal method produced FA coatings that were predominately aligned perpendicular to the SS substrate or disordered FA coatings consisting of randomly aligned rodlike crystals. Both FA coatings significantly reduced the growth of all examined bacterial strains in comparison to the control. The FA coatings, especially the disordered ones, presented significantly lower charge, greater roughness, and higher area when compared to the control, enhancing bacteria–material interactions and therefore bacterial deactivation by fluoride ions. The ordered FA layer reduced not only bacterial viability but adhesion too. The ordered FA crystals produced as a potential novel implant coating showed significant antibacterial activity against bacteria implicated in peri-implantitis, which could be explained by a detailed understanding of their physicochemical properties.

  15. Silicon oxynitride: A field emission suppression coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Nimel D.

    We have studied coatings deposited using our inductively-coupled RF plasma ion implantation and desposition system to suppress field emission from large, 3-D electrode structures used in high voltage applications, like those used by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in their DC-field photoelectron gun. Currently time and labor-intensive hand-polishing procedures are used to minimize field emission from these structures. Previous work had shown that the field emission from polished stainless steel (27 muA of field-emitted current at 15 MV/m) could be drastically reduced with simultaneous deposition of sputtered silicon dioxide during nitrogen implantation (167 pA of field-emitted current at 30 MV/m). We have determined that this unique implantation and deposition procedure produces high-purity silicon oxynitride films that can suppress field emission from stainless steel regardless of their initial surface polish. However, when this implantation procedure was applied to large, 3-D substrates, arcs occurred, damaging the coating and causing unreliable and unrepeatable field emission suppression. We have developed a novel reactive sputtering procedure to deposit high-purity silicon oxynitride coatings without nitrogen ion implantation. We can control the stoichometry and deposition rate of these coatings by adjusting the nitrogen pressure and incident RF-power. Using profilometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis, and current-voltage measurements, we have determined that the elemental composition, chemical bonding, density, and electrical properties of the reactively-sputtered silicon oxynitride coatings are similar to those produced by nitrogen implantation during silicon dioxide deposition. Furthermore, high voltage tests determined that both coatings similarly suppress field emission from 6" diameter, polished

  16. Anti-friction Coating for Drilling of Green Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, A.; El Mansori, M.; Ghidossi, P.; Mkaddem, A.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper the anti-friction performance of two types of coating, post-coated coating and PVD-TiAlN coating were investigated when drilling green austempered ductile iron (ADI) grade. The green ADI grade is produced by a new processing technology known as continuous casting-heat treatment process. The effect of coatings on tool wear and surface finish of the holes when drilling using coolant were reported. Results showed that the tool with post-coated coating has higher anti-friction properties as compared to PVD-TiAlN coating in terms of tool wear and surface roughness. Results also showed that there is a formation of preventive aluminum oxide layer during machining for both types of coating.

  17. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  18. Parametric Appraisal of Slurry-Sprayed Mullite Coatings for Coating Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, R.; Suri, N. M.; Kant, S.

    2016-10-01

    The slurry spray technique (SST) has been employed to deposit mullite-based coatings on ASTM 1018 low-carbon steel substrate for environmental barrier coating applications. A Taguchi L18 orthogonal array is adopted for optimization of the identified process variables and material parameters, namely stamping pressure, fly-ash content, and sintering additive, time, and temperature. The measured thickness of the produced coatings was chosen as the response characteristic for the present study. The optimum values of the process variables were predicted by employing analysis of variance based on raw data and the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Based on analysis of the experimental results, the effect of each parameter level on the coating thickness is discussed. It is observed that the sintering temperature had a strong influence on the maximum coating thickness of the slurry-sprayed coating. The as-sprayed coatings fabricated using SST demonstrated splat morphology with continuous interface, suggesting good adherence to the substrate.

  19. Parametric Appraisal of Slurry-Sprayed Mullite Coatings for Coating Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, R.; Suri, N. M.; Kant, S.

    2016-07-01

    The slurry spray technique (SST) has been employed to deposit mullite-based coatings on ASTM 1018 low-carbon steel substrate for environmental barrier coating applications. A Taguchi L18 orthogonal array is adopted for optimization of the identified process variables and material parameters, namely stamping pressure, fly-ash content, and sintering additive, time, and temperature. The measured thickness of the produced coatings was chosen as the response characteristic for the present study. The optimum values of the process variables were predicted by employing analysis of variance based on raw data and the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Based on analysis of the experimental results, the effect of each parameter level on the coating thickness is discussed. It is observed that the sintering temperature had a strong influence on the maximum coating thickness of the slurry-sprayed coating. The as-sprayed coatings fabricated using SST demonstrated splat morphology with continuous interface, suggesting good adherence to the substrate.

  20. Method of protecting a surface with a silicon-slurry/aluminide coating. [coatings for gas turbine engine blades and vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Young, S. G. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low cost coating for protecting metallic base system substrates from high temperatures, high gas velocity oxidation, thermal fatigue and hot corrosion is described. The coating is particularly useful for protecting vanes and blades in aircraft and land based gas turbine engines. A lacquer slurry comprising cellulose nitrate containing high purity silicon powder is sprayed onto the superalloy substrates. The silicon layer is then aluminized to complete the coating. The Si-Al coating is less costly to produce than advanced aluminides and protects the substrate from oxidation and thermal fatigue for a much longer period of time than the conventional aluminide coatings. While more expensive Pt-Al coatings and physical vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings may last longer or provide equal protection on certain substrates, the Si-Al coating exceeded the performance of both types of coatings on certain superalloys in high gas velocity oxidation and thermal fatigue. Also, the Si-Al coating increased the resistance of certain superalloys to hot corrosion.

  1. Method of producing nickel electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, Y.; Ohira, T.; Kumano, Y.; Nakao, T.

    1982-01-01

    A large capacity nickel electrode is provided in which the charging efficiency and discharge utilization coefficient are improved in comparison to nickel electrodes which are produced by the conventional method. Nickel electrodes retaining nickel active material or nickel active material and cobalt compounds on a porous nickel substrate are immersed in a cobalt sulfate aqueous solution whose pH is adjusted in the range of 3.5 to 6.0, followed by crystallization of the hydroxide or oxide by pyrolysis or immersion in alkali, thereby coating the surface of the nickel active material with cobalt crystals and simultaneously promoting alloying of the nickel-cobalt.

  2. Plastic Deformation in Profile-Coated Elliptical KB Mirrors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Chian; Conley, R.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C. M.; Liu, W.; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, A. T.; Ice, G. E.; Tischler, J. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Profile coating has been successfully applied to produce elliptical Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors using both cylindrical and flat Si substrates. Previously, focusing widths of 70 nm with 15-keV monochromatic and 80 nm with white beam were achieved using a flat Si substrate. Now, precision elliptical KB mirrors with sub-nm figure errors are produced with both Au and Pt coatings on flat substrates. Recent studies of bare Si-, Au-, and Pt-coated KB mirrors under prolonged synchrotron X-ray radiation and low-temperature vacuum annealing will be discussed in terms of film stress relaxation and Si plastic deformation.

  3. Plastic Deformation in Profile-Coated Elliptical KB Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chian; Conley, R.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C. M.; Liu, W.; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, A. T.; Ice, G. E.; Tischler, J. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Profile coating has been successfully applied to produce elliptical Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors using both cylindrical and flat Si substrates. Previously, focusing widths of 70 nm with 15-keV monochromatic and 80 nm with white beam were achieved using a flat Si substrate. Now precision elliptical KB mirrors with sub-nm figure errors are produced with both Au and Pt coatings on flat substrates. Recent studies of bare Si, Au-, and Pt-coated KB mirrors under prolonged synchrotron x-ray radiation and low-temperature vacuum annealing will be discussed in terms of film-stress relaxation and Si plastic deformation.

  4. Deposition and characterization of alumina-titania coating by multi-chamber gas-dynamic sprayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, M.; Prozorova, M.; Arseenko, M.; Tyurin, Yu.; Kolisnichenko, O.; Vasilik, N.; Sirota, V.; Pavlenko, I.

    In this paper, alumina-titania coatings have been formed on aluminium substrate by multi-chamber detonation sprayer. The coatings were investigated using SEM, EDS, XRD and Vickers microhardness tester. The results show that the alumina-titania coatings consist of both fully melted regions and partially melted regions, and the fully melted region has a lamellar-like structure. The multi-chamber detonation sprayer produced the dense layers of coating with a high hardness.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF STRIPPABLE COATINGS FOR DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Strippable coatings are polymer mixtures, such as water-based organic polymers, that are applied to a surface by paintbrush, roller, or spray applicator. As the polymer reacts, it attracts, absorbs, and chemically binds the contaminants; then, during the curing process, it mechanically locks the contaminants into the polymer matrix. Incorporating fiber reinforcement (such as a cotton scrim) into the coating may enhance the strength of these coatings. Once the coating dries, it can be stripped manually from the surface, In the case of auto-release coatings, the mixture cracks, flakes, and is collected by vacuuming. The surface properties of these coatings may be modified by applying a thin top coat (e.g., polyvinyl alcohol), which may provide a smoother, less permeable surface that would become less severely contaminated. In such a duplex, the thicker basis layer provides the required mechanical properties (e.g., strength and abrasion resistance), while the top layer provides protection from contamination. Once the strippable coating is removed, the loose surface contamination is removed with the coating, producing a dry, hard, non-airborne waste product. The use of strippable coatings during D&D operations has proved a viable option. These coatings can be used in the following three functions: As a protective coating, when applied to an uncontaminated surface in an area where contamination is present, so that on its removal the surface remains uncontaminated; As a decontamination agent, when applied to a contaminated surface, so that on its removal a significant decontamination of loose particulate activity is achieved; and As a fixative or tie-down coating, when applied to a contaminated surface, so that any loose contamination is tied down, thus preventing the spread of contamination during subsequent handling.

  6. Method of producing amorphous thin films

    DOEpatents

    Brusasco, Raymond M.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing thin films by sintering which comprises: a. coating a substrate with a thin film of an inorganic glass forming parulate material possessing the capability of being sintered, and b. irridiating said thin film of said particulate material with a laser beam of sufficient power to cause sintering of said material below the temperature of liquidus thereof. Also disclosed is the article produced by the method claimed.

  7. Dual cure solventless coating process

    SciTech Connect

    DeVoe, R.J.; Palazzotto, M.C.; Chambers, W.L.; Brown-Wensley, K.A.; Holmes, G.L.; Keipert, S.J.; Mathis, M.D.; McCormick, F.B.; Spurgeon, K.M.; Williams, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The objective is to determine the feasibility of using the Dual Cure Photocatalyst technology for reduction of gaseous waste emissions through the minimization of coating solvent use. This is to be accomplished by developing a photocuring technology that would allow the use of solvent free (100% solids) formulations while preserving or improving upon the performance of conventional solvent based materials. Four Dual Cure Photocatalyst systems and one conventional catalyst system were investigated for use in curing combinations of epoxies with acrylates and acrylates with polyurethane precursors (polyol/polyisocyanate mixtures). Photocatalyst screening results showed that Dual Cure Photocatalyst Systems based upon cationic organometallic compounds alone or in combination with free radical photoinitiators or oxidants provide significantly better processing performance than systems based upon conventional catalysts or neutral organometallic compounds in combination with oxidants. Mechanical testing of materials prepared with the five catalyst systems showed that: (1) Dual Cure compositions can produce materials with better properties than the component parts and (2) Compositions cured with Dual Cure Photocatalysts produce materials superior to those cured with conventional catalyst systems in a number of cases. Cost, economic and energy analyses are presented based upon laboratory scale coating and curing studies.

  8. Flexible fluoropolymer filled protective coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Sovey, James S.; Nahra, Henry; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1991-01-01

    Metal oxide films such as SiO2 are known to provide an effective barrier to the transport of moisture as well as gaseous species through polymeric films. Such thin film coatings have a tendency to crack upon flexure of the polymeric substrate. Sputter co-deposition of SiO2 with 4 to 15 percent fluoropolymers was demonstrated to produce thin films with glass-like barrier properties that have significant increases in strain to failure over pure glass films which improves their tolerance to flexure on polymeric substrates. Deposition techniques capable of producing these films on polymeric substrates are suitable for durable food packaging and oxidation/corrosion protection applications.

  9. Isomolybdate conversion coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minevski, Zoran (Inventor); Maxey, Jason (Inventor); Nelson, Carl (Inventor); Eylem, Cahit (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A conversion coating solution and process forms a stable and corrosion-resistant layer on metal substrates or layers or, more preferably, on a boehmite layer or other base conversion coating. The conversion coating process involves contacting the substrate, layer or coating with an aqueous alkali metal isomolybdate solution in order to convert the surface of the substrate, layer or coating to a stable conversion coating. The aqueous alkali metal molybdates are selected from sodium molybdate (Na.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), lithium molybdate (Li.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), potassium molybdate (K.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), or combinations thereof, with the most preferred alkali metal molybdate being sodium molybdate. The concentration of alkali metal molybdates in the solution is preferably less than 5% by weight. In addition to the alkali metal molybdates, the conversion coating solution may include alkaline metal passivators selected from lithium nitrate (LiNO.sub.3), sodium nitrate (NaNO.sub.3), ammonia nitrate (NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3), and combinations thereof; lithium chloride, potassium hexafluorozirconate (K.sub.2 ZrF.sub.6) or potassium hexafluorotitanate (K.sub.2 TiF.sub.6).

  10. Phenol-formaldehyde intumescent coating composition and coating prepared therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salyer, Ival O. (Inventor); Fox, Bernard L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Intumescent coatings which form a thick, uniform, fine celled, low density foam upon exposure to a high intensity heat flux or flame are disclosed, the invention coatings comprise phenolic resin prepolymer containing a blowing agent and a nucleating agent; in the preferred embodiments the coatings also contains a silicone surfactant, the coatings are useful in thermal and fire protection systems.

  11. Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

    2004-03-31

    Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

  12. COATING URANIUM FROM CARBONYLS

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Storrs, S.S.

    1959-07-14

    Methods are described for making adherent corrosion resistant coatings on uranium metal. According to the invention, the uranium metal is heated in the presence of an organometallic compound such as the carbonyls of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, niobium, and tungsten at a temperature sufficient to decompose the metal carbonyl and dry plate the resultant free metal on the surface of the uranium metal body. The metal coated body is then further heated at a higher temperature to thermally diffuse the coating metal within the uranium bcdy.

  13. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Saito, Tomonori; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production.

  14. Influence of octacalcium phosphate coating on osteoinductive properties of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Habibovic, P; van der Valk, C M; van Blitterswijk, C A; De Groot, K; Meijer, G

    2004-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) coating on osteoinductive behaviour of the biomaterials. Porous titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), hydroxyapatite (HA), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and polyethylene glyco terephtalate/polybuthylene terephtalate (PEGT-PBT) copolymer, all uncoated and coated with biomimetically produced OCP, were implanted in back muscles of 10 goats for 6 and 12 weeks. Uncoated Ti6Al4Vand HA did not show any bone formation after intramuscular implantation. All OCP coated implants, except PEGT-PBT, did induce bone in the soft tissue. The reason for the non-inductive behaviour of the copolymer is probably its softness, that makes it impossible to maintain its porous shape after implantation. Both uncoated and OCP coated BCP induced bone. However, the amount of animals in which the bone was induced was higher in the coated BCP implants in comparison to the uncoated ones. Osteoinductive potential of biomaterials is influenced by various material characteristics, such as chemical composition, crystallinity, macro- and microstructure. OCP coating has a positive effect on osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. The combination of the advantages of biomimetic coating method above traditional methods, and a good osteoinductivity of OCP coating that is produced by using this method, opens new possibilities for designing more advanced orthopaedic implants. PMID:15332602

  15. Making silica rock coatings in the lab: synthetic desert varnish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Kolb, Vera M.; Philip, Ajish I.; Lynne, Bridget Y.; McLoughlin, Nicola; Sephton, Mark; Wacey, David; Green, Owen R.

    2005-09-01

    Desert varnish and silica rock coatings have perplexed investigators since Humboldt and Darwin. They are found in arid regions and deserts on Earth but the mechanism of their formation remains challenging (see Perry et al. this volume). One method of researching this is to investigate natural coatings, but another way is to attempt to produce coatings in vitro. Sugars, amino acids, and silicic acid, as well as other organic and (bio)organic compounds add to the complexity of naturally forming rock coatings. In the lab we reduced the complexity of the natural components and produced hard, silica coatings on basaltic chips obtained from the Mojave Desert. Sodium silicate solution was poured over the rocks and continuously exposed to heat and/or UV light. Upon evaporation the solutions were replenished. Experiments were performed at various pH's. The micro-deposits formed were analyzed using optical, SEM-EDAX, and electron microprobe. The coatings formed are similar in hardness and composition to silica glazes found on basalts in Hawaii as well as natural desert varnish found in US southwest deserts. Thermodynamic mechanisms are presented showing the theoretical mechanisms for overcoming energy barriers that allow amorphous silica to condense into hard coatings. This is the first time synthetic silica glazes that resemble natural coatings in hardness and chemical composition have been successfully reproduced in the laboratory, and helps to support an inorganic mechanism of formation of desert varnish as well as manganese-deficient silica glazes.

  16. Figure correction of multilayer coated optics

    DOEpatents

    Chapman; Henry N. , Taylor; John S.

    2010-02-16

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

  17. Hard implant coatings with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Moseke, Claus; Gbureck, Uwe; Elter, Patrick; Drechsler, Peter; Zoll, Andreas; Thull, Roger; Ewald, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Infection of orthopaedic implants often leads to inflammation immediately after surgery and increases patient morbidity due to repetitive operations. Silver ions have been shown to combine good biocompatibility with a low risk of inducing bacterial resistance. In this study a physical vapour deposition system using both arc deposition and magnetron sputtering has been utilized to produce silver ion doped TiN coatings on Ti substrates. This biphasic system combines the advantages of silver induced bactericidity with the good mechanical properties of TiN. Crystallographic analysis by X-ray diffraction showed that silver was deposited as well in its elementary form as it was incorporated into the crystal lattice of TiN, which resulted in increasing hardness of the TiN-coatings. Elution experiments revealed a continuous release of Ag ions in phosphate buffered saline. The coatings showed significant inhibitory effects on the growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus and practically no cell-toxicity in cytocompatibility tests.

  18. Condensing Heat Exchanger with Hydrophilic Antimicrobial Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-layer antimicrobial hydrophilic coating is applied to a substrate of anodized aluminum, although other materials may form the substrate. A silver layer is sputtered onto a thoroughly clean anodized surface of the aluminum to about 400 nm thickness. A layer of crosslinked, silicon-based macromolecular structure about 10 nm thickness overlies the silver layer, and the outermost surface of the layer of crosslinked, silicon-based macromolecular structure is hydroxide terminated to produce a hydrophilic surface with a water drop contact angle of less than 10.degree.. The coated substrate may be one of multiple fins in a condensing heat exchanger for use in the microgravity of space, which has narrow channels defined between angled fins such that the surface tension of condensed water moves water by capillary flow to a central location where it is pumped to storage. The antimicrobial coating prevents obstruction of the capillary passages.

  19. High-Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA PS400 is a solid lubricant coating invented for high-temperature tribological applications. This plasma-sprayed coating is a variant of the previously patented PS304 coating, and has been formulated to provide higher density, smoother surface finish, and better dimensional stability. This innovation is a new composite material that provides a means to reduce friction and wear in mechanical components. PS400 is a blend of a nickel-molybdenum binder, chrome oxide hardener, silver lubricant, and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic lubricant that can either be sprayed or deposited by other means, such as powder metallurgy. The resulting composite material is then finished by grinding and polishing to produce a smooth, self-lubricating surface.

  20. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Neumann, J. F.; Liu, A.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for turbine airfoils in high-performance engines represent an advanced materials technology with both performance and durability benefits. The foremost TBC benefit is the reduction of heat transferred into air-cooled components, which yields performance and durability benefits. This program focuses on predicting the lives of two types of strain-tolerant and oxidation-resistant TBC systems that are produced by commercial coating suppliers to the gas turbine industry. The plasma-sprayed TBC system, composed of a low-pressure plasma-spray (LPPS) or an argon shrouded plasma-spray (ASPS) applied oxidation resistant NiCrAlY (or CoNiCrAlY) bond coating and an air-plasma-sprayed yttria (8 percent) partially stabilized zirconia insulative layer, is applied by Chromalloy, Klock, and Union Carbide. The second type of TBC is applied by the electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process by Temescal.

  1. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH METALLIC CARBIDES

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.A.

    1960-03-22

    A method for producing refractory coatings of metallic carbides on graphite was developed. In particular, the graphite piece to be coated is immersed in a molten solution of 4 to 5% by weight of zirconium, titanium, or niobium dissolved in tin. The solution is heated in an argon atmosphere to above 1400 deg C, whereby the refractory metal reacts with the surface of the graphite to form a layer of metalic carbide. The molten solution is cooled to 300 to 400 deg C, and the graphite piece is removed. Excess tin is wiped from the graphite, which is then heated in vacuum to above 2300 deg C. The tin vaporizes from the graphite surface, leaving the surface coated with a tenacious layer of refractory metallic carbide.

  2. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1999-04-27

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition. 3 figs.

  3. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1999-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition.

  4. Hybrid calcium phosphate coatings for implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malchikhina, Alena I.; Shesterikov, Evgeny V.; Bolbasov, Evgeny N.; Ignatov, Viktor P.; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I.

    2016-08-01

    Monophasic biomaterials cannot provide all the necessary functions of bones or other calcined tissues. It is necessary to create for cancer patients the multiphase materials with the structure and composition simulating the natural bone. Such materials are classified as hybrid, obtained by a combination of chemically different components. The paper presents the physical, chemical and biological studies of coatings produced by hybrid technologies (HT), which combine primer layer and calcium phosphate (CaP) coating. The first HT type combines the method of vacuum arc titanium primer layer deposition on a stainless steel substrate with the following micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in phosphoric acid solution with addition of calcium compounds to achieve high supersaturated state. MAO CaP coatings feature high porosity (2-8%, pore size 5-7 µm) and surface morphology with the thickness greater than 5 µm. The thickness of Ti primer layer is 5-40 µm. Amorphous MAO CaP coating micro-hardness was measured at maximum normal load Fmax = 300 mN. It was 3.1 ± 0.8 GPa, surface layer elasticity modulus E = 110 ± 20 GPa, roughness Ra = 0.9 ± 0.1 µm, Rz = 7.5 ± 0.2 µm, which is less than the titanium primer layer roughness. Hybrid MAO CaP coating is biocompatible, able to form calcium phosphates from supersaturated body fluid (SBF) solution and also stimulates osteoinduction processes. The second HT type includes the oxide layer formation by thermal oxidation and then CaP target radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS). Oxide-RFMS CaP coating is a thin dense coating with good adhesion to the substrate material, which can be used for metal implants. The RFMS CaP coating has thickness 1.6 ± 0.1 µm and consists of main target elements calcium and phosphorus and Ca/P ratio 2.4. The second HT type can form calcium phosphates from SBF solution. In vivo study shows that hybrid RFMS CaP coating is biocompatible and produces fibrointegration processes.

  5. 'Mazatzal's' Many Coats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This close-up image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's microscopic imager shows a section of the hole drilled into the rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' after the hole was ground for a second time. The first drilling by the rover's rock abrasion tool left an incomplete hole, so a second one was performed. The blue arrow points to leftover portions of the dark rind that coats Mazatzal and the scrape marks left by the rock abrasion tool. The yellow arrow highlights the bright edges surrounding the leftover rind. The crack in the rock may have once contained fluids out of which minerals precipitated along its walls (red arrows). Mazatzal is a highly coated rock, containing at least four 'cake layers': a top coat of dust, a pinking coating, a dark rind and its true interior. The observed area is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. This image was taken on sol 85.

  6. Multilayer optical dielectric coating

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.

    1990-01-01

    A highly damage resistant, multilayer, optical reflective coating includes alternating layers of doped and undoped dielectric material. The doping levels are low enough that there are no distinct interfaces between the doped and undoped layers so that the coating has properties nearly identical to the undoped material. The coating is fabricated at high temperature with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques to eliminate defects, reduce energy-absorption sites, and maintain proper chemical stoichiometry. A number of differently-doped layer pairs, each layer having a thickness equal to one-quarter of a predetermined wavelength in the material are combined to form a narrowband reflective coating for a predetermined wavelength. Broadband reflectors are made by using a number of narrowband reflectors, each covering a portion of the broadband.

  7. Super Thin Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Video Gallery

    New technology being developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center creates super thin ceramic coatings on engine components. The Plasma Spray – Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) rig uses a powerful ...

  8. Aluminum phosphate coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sambasivan, Sankar; Steiner, Kimberly A.; Rangan, Krishnaswamy K.

    2007-12-25

    Aluminophosphate compounds and compositions as can be used for substrate or composite films and coating to provide or enhance, without limitation, planarization, anti-biofouling and/or anti-microbial properties.

  9. POWDER COAT APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses an investigation of critical factors that affect the use of powder coatings on the environment, cost, quality, and production. The investigation involved a small business representative working with the National Defense Center for Environmental Excellence (ND...

  10. Coated particle waste form development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oma, K. H.; Buckwalter, C. Q.; Chick, L. A.

    1981-12-01

    Coated particle waste forms were developed as part of the multibarrier concept. Primary efforts were to coat simulated nuclear waste glass marbles and ceramic pellets with low temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings via the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Fluidized bed coaters, screw agitated coaters, and rotating tube coaters were used. Coating temperatures were reduced by using catalysts and plasma activation. In general, the LT-PyC coatings did not provide the expected high leach resistance as previously measured for carbon alone. The coatings were friable and often spalled off the substrate. A totally different concept, thermal spray coating, was investigated as an alternative to CVD coating. Flame spray, wire gun, and plasma gun systems were evaluated using glass, ceramic, and metallic coating materials. Metal plasma spray coatings (Al, Sn, Zn, Pb) provided a two to three orders of magnitude increase in chemical durability.

  11. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  12. Preventing Cracking of Anodized Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Charles C.; Heslin, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Anodized coatings have been used as optical and thermal surfaces in spacecraft. Particulate contamination from cracked coatings is a concern for many applications. The major cause for the cracking is the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide coatings and the aluminum substrate. The loss of water when the coating is exposed to a vacuum also could induce cracking of the coating. Hot-water sealing was identified as the major cause for the cracking of the coatings because of the large temperature change when the parts were immersed in boiling water and the water was absorbed in the coating. when the hot-water sealing process was eliminated, the cracking resistance of the anodized coatings was greatly improved. Also, it was found that dyed black coatings were more susceptible than clear coatings to cracking during thermo-vacuum cyclings.

  13. Ceramic electrolyte coating methods

    DOEpatents

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2004-10-12

    Processes for preparing aqueous suspensions of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material such as yttrium-stabilized zirconia. The invention also includes a process for preparing an aqueous coating slurry of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material. The invention further includes a process for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material on pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  14. Intumescent coating development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayler, I. O.; Griffen, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    A program was completed at the University of Dayton Research Institute in which polyimide and phenolic intumescent coatings were evaluated as supplemental thermal insulation for the sprayed-on foam insulation on the aft bulkhead of the space shuttle external tank. The purpose of the intumescent coating was to provide additional thermal protection during lift-off in order to replace the ablative heat resistant layer with a lighter weight material for increased payload in the shuttle.

  15. Spin coating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

  16. Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that deals with the nanostructured superhydrophobic (SH) powders developed at ORNL. This project seeks to (1) improve powder quality; (2) identify binders for plastics, fiberglass, metal (steel being the first priority), wood, and other products such as rubber and shingles; (3) test the coated product for coating quality and durability under operating conditions; and (4) application testing and production of powders in quantity.

  17. METAL COATING BATHS

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

  18. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.L.; Sarin, V.K.

    1997-12-01

    For the first time, crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited on SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion and oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments.

  19. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  20. Postharvest treatments of fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, P V; Caleb, O J; Singh, Z; Watkins, C B; Geyer, M

    2014-06-13

    Postharvest technologies have allowed horticultural industries to meet the global demands of local and large-scale production and intercontinental distribution of fresh produce that have high nutritional and sensory quality. Harvested products are metabolically active, undergoing ripening and senescence processes that must be controlled to prolong postharvest quality. Inadequate management of these processes can result in major losses in nutritional and quality attributes, outbreaks of foodborne pathogens and financial loss for all players along the supply chain, from growers to consumers. Optimal postharvest treatments for fresh produce seek to slow down physiological processes of senescence and maturation, reduce/inhibit development of physiological disorders and minimize the risk of microbial growth and contamination. In addition to basic postharvest technologies of temperature management, an array of others have been developed including various physical (heat, irradiation and edible coatings), chemical (antimicrobials, antioxidants and anti-browning) and gaseous treatments. This article examines the current status on postharvest treatments of fresh produce and emerging technologies, such as plasma and ozone, that can be used to maintain quality, reduce losses and waste of fresh produce. It also highlights further research needed to increase our understanding of the dynamic response of fresh produce to various postharvest treatments. PMID:24797137

  1. Postharvest treatments of fresh produce

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, P. V.; Caleb, O. J.; Singh, Z.; Watkins, C. B.; Geyer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Postharvest technologies have allowed horticultural industries to meet the global demands of local and large-scale production and intercontinental distribution of fresh produce that have high nutritional and sensory quality. Harvested products are metabolically active, undergoing ripening and senescence processes that must be controlled to prolong postharvest quality. Inadequate management of these processes can result in major losses in nutritional and quality attributes, outbreaks of foodborne pathogens and financial loss for all players along the supply chain, from growers to consumers. Optimal postharvest treatments for fresh produce seek to slow down physiological processes of senescence and maturation, reduce/inhibit development of physiological disorders and minimize the risk of microbial growth and contamination. In addition to basic postharvest technologies of temperature management, an array of others have been developed including various physical (heat, irradiation and edible coatings), chemical (antimicrobials, antioxidants and anti-browning) and gaseous treatments. This article examines the current status on postharvest treatments of fresh produce and emerging technologies, such as plasma and ozone, that can be used to maintain quality, reduce losses and waste of fresh produce. It also highlights further research needed to increase our understanding of the dynamic response of fresh produce to various postharvest treatments. PMID:24797137

  2. Coated particle waste form development

    SciTech Connect

    Oma, K.H.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Chick, L.A.

    1981-12-01

    Coated particle waste forms have been developed as part of the multibarrier concept at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the Alternative Waste Forms Program for the Department of Energy. Primary efforts were to coat simulated nuclear waste glass marbles and ceramic pellets with low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings via the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Fluidized bed (FB) coaters, screw agitated coaters (SAC), and rotating tube coaters were used. Coating temperatures were reduced by using catalysts and plasma activation. In general, the LT-PyC coatings did not provide the expected high leach resistance as previously measured for carbon alone. The coatings were friable and often spalled off the substrate. A totally different concept, thermal spray coating, was investigated at PNL as an alternative to CVD coating. Flame spray, wire gun, and plasma gun systems were evaluated using glass, ceramic, and metallic coating materials. Metal plasma spray coatings (Al, Sn, Zn, Pb) provided a two to three orders-of-magnitude increase in chemical durability. Because the aluminum coatings were porous, the superior leach resistance must be due to either a chemical interaction or to a pH buffer effect. Because they are complex, coated waste form processes rank low in process feasibility. Of all the possible coated particle processes, plasma sprayed marbles have the best rating. Carbon coating of pellets by CVD ranked ninth when compared with ten other processes. The plasma-spray-coated marble process ranked sixth out of eleven processes.

  3. Influence of polishing and coating techniques on laser induced damage on AR-coated ceramic Yb:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vido, Mariastefania; Phillips, P. J.; Hein, Joachim; Körner, Jörg; Smith, Jodie M.; Ertel, Klaus; Mason, Paul D.; Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Cheklov, Oleg; Butcher, Thomas J.; Tomlinson, Stephanie; Lintern, Andrew; Greenhalgh, Justin; Shaikh, Waseem; Hawkes, Steve J.; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Kaluza, Malte C.; Collier, John L.

    2014-10-01

    Yb3+ doped YAG is one of the most promising materials for high energy, high repetition rate laser systems producing nanosecond pulses. YAG as the host medium offers good thermo-mechanical and thermo-optical properties and, if it is used in ceramic form, it can be produced in large sizes with laser-grade optical properties. Large sized, laser-grade gain media are pivotal for the development of high energy kJ-class laser systems. Much effort has been devoted to the development of advanced polishing and coating techniques in order to produce optical materials able to withstand high fluence levels at different environmental conditions. In this paper, we present experimental results for 1 on 1 laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) tests in the nanosecond regime following ISO standards on anti-reflective coated ceramic Yb:YAG samples. Experimental results show that, generally, Ion Beam Sputtering (IBS) coatings perform better than Ion Assisted Deposition (IAD) coatings on low roughness substrates, while IAD and IBS coatings deposited on substrates characterised by higher surface roughness values offer a comparable performance. Performance of IBS coatings improves as substrate roughness decreases, whereas performance of IAD coatings improves as substrate roughness increases. No clear correlation has been observed between LIDT values and temperature or pressure. However, an inspection of damage sites allowed to conclude that both temperature and pressure have an impact on damage morphology.

  4. Influence of Nickel-Coated Nanostructured WC-Co Powders on Microstructural and Tribological Properties of HVOF Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, M.; Enayati, M. H.; Salehi, M.; Nahvi, S. M.; Hosseini, S. N.; Park, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    In this research, a novel nickel-coated nanostructured WC-12Co powder (Ni/nc-WC) was developed and used as feedstock material for high velocity oxygen fuel process. The Ni/nc-WC powders with average WC grain size of ~15 nm were produced by mechanical milling and electroless plating processes. The microstructural and tribological characteristics of Ni/nc-WC coating were investigated and compared with those of microcrystalline WC-12Co (mc-WC) and nanostructured WC-12Co (nc-WC) coatings. X-ray diffractometry, high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of the powders and coatings. A ball-on-disk technique was used to probe the wear behavior of the coatings. The Ni/nc-WC coating showed negligible decarburization of ~5.4%, while mc-WC and nc-WC coatings suffered from higher decarburization levels of 16.3 and 36.8%. The wear rate of Ni/nc-WC coating was 2.5 × 10-4 mg/m indicating ~ 75 and 82% increase in wear resistance compared with mc-WC and nc-WC coatings. The wear track analysis of mc-WC and nc-WC coatings showed evidences of delamination mechanism. Besides, a severe carbide pullout mechanism was operative in wear of nc-WC coating. As for Ni/nc-WC coating, individual carbide pullout following the elimination of Ni(Co) matrix was the predominant wear mechanism.

  5. Thermal Cycling Assessment of Steel-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings for Al Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Dominique; Lamarre, Jean-Michel; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong interest from the transportation industry to achieve vehicle weight reduction through the replacement of steel components by aluminum parts. For some applications, aluminum requires protective coatings due to its limited wear and lower temperature resistance compared to steel. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of amorphous-type plasma-sprayed steel coatings and conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings as thermal barrier coatings, mainly through the evaluation of their spalling resistance under thermal cycling. The microstructures of the different coatings were first compared via SEM. The amorphicity of the coatings produced via plasma spraying of specialized alloyed steel and the crystalline phases of the conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings were confirmed through x-ray diffraction. The thermal diffusivity of all coatings produced was measured to be about a third of that of bulk stainless steel. Conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings typically offered better spalling resistance under thermal cycling than steel-based amorphous coatings due probably to their higher initial bond strength. However, the presence of vertical cracks in the steel-based amorphous coatings was found to have a beneficial effect on their thermal cycling resistance. The amorphous plasma-sprayed steel coatings presented indications of recrystallization after their exposure to high temperature.

  6. Advanced polymer-inorganic hybrid hard coatings utilizing in situ polymerization method.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Toshihiko; Nishiura, Katsunori; Mizuta, Yasushi; Itou, Yuichi

    2006-12-01

    Hard coatings are frequently used to give plastics high scratch resistance. Coating hardness and adhesion to the substrate are considered to be key factors influencing scratch resistance, but it is difficult to produce coatings that have both properties. Hybridization of polymers and inorganic materials is a promising approach for solving this problem. We prepared polymer-silica hybrid coatings by using in situ polymerization to carry out radical polymerization of vinyl monomers in a sol-gel solution of alkoxysilanes, and measured the abrasion resistance of the coatings. However, the expected properties were not obtained because the sol-gel reaction did not perfectly proceed on the surface of the coatings under the N2 conditions. We found that curing the hybrid coatings by UV irradiation in air promoted the sol-gel reaction on the surface, resulting in coatings having excellent abrasion resistance.

  7. Silicon-slurry/aluminide coating. [protecting gas turbine engine vanes and blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Young, S. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low cost coating protects metallic base system substrates from high temperatures, high gas velocity ovidation, thermal fatigue and hot corrosion and is particularly useful fo protecting vanes and blades in aircraft and land based gas turbine engines. A lacquer slurry comprising cellulose nitrate containing high purity silicon powder is sprayed onto the superalloy substrates. The silicon layer is then aluminized to complete the coating. The Si-Al coating is less costly to produce than advanced aluminides and protects the substrates from oxidation and thermal fatigue for a much longer period of time than the conventional aluminide coatings. While more expensive Pt-Al coatings and physical vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings may last longer or provide equal protection on certain substrates, the Si-Al coating exceeded the performance of both types of coatings on certain superalloys in high gas velocity oxidation and thermal fatigue and increased the resistance of certain superalloys to hot corrosion.

  8. Irradiation-induced permeability in pyrocarbon coatings. Final report of work conducted under PWS FD-12

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, M.J.; Thiele, B.A.; Homan, F.J.

    1982-10-01

    Two US irradiation experiments were planned to provide information to supplement data from the German program on irradiation-induced permeability in pyrocarbon coatings. Hopefully, the data from both programs could be combined to define the onset of neutron-induced permeability in a variety of Biso coatings produced with different process variables (coating temperature, coating gases, and coating rates). The effort was not successful. None of the preirradiation characterization procedures were able to adequately predict irradiation performance. A large amount of within-batch scatter was observed in the fission gas and cesium release data along with significant within-batch variation in coating properties. Additional preirradiation characterization might result in a procedure that could successfully predict irradiation performance, but little can be done about the within-batch variation in coating properties. This variation is probably the result of random movement of particles within the coating furnace during pyrocarbon deposition. 19 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Corrosion behavior of rare earth modified WC-12Co coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Hui; Ceng, Shengbo; Gou, Guoqing; Tu, Mingjing

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth has been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this paper, conventional, nano-modified and CeO2 modified WC-12Co coatings are produced by using high speed oxygen flaming (HVOF) spraying technology. Long-term immersion and electrochemical tests of these coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution are conducted. The surface morphologies were observed to investigate the corrosion mechanisms. The results show CeO2 modified WC-12Co coatings to possess the best corrosion resistance but the nano-modified WC-12Co coating has the worst performance. Results suggest that the improvement of corrosion resistance for CeO2 modified WC-12Co coating can be attributed to the enhancement of interfacial strength between Co binder phase and WC particles.

  10. Designing transparent superamphiphobic coatings directed by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaotao; Zhang, Zhaozhu; Ren, Guina; Men, Xuehu; Ge, Bo; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2014-05-01

    Creating surfaces with superamphiphobic property and optical transparency simultaneously would have fundamental and practical significance but has been proven extremely challenging. Herein, we develop a transparent superamphiphobic coating using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the template by a facile approach. CNTs enwrapped with SiO2 coating was produced by a sol-gel method and then sprayed onto the glass slides to form coatings. Subsequent thermal treatment and surface fluoration allowed the sprayed coating to exhibit enhanced transparency across a broad spectrum of ultraviolet and visible wavelengths and also display superrepellency toward water and a number of organic liquids, such as dodecane. The obtained transparent coating can sustain its superamphiphobicity even after thermal treatment at 400 °C. Separate experiment demonstrated that the CNTs-directed geometrical structure played a key role in establishing superamphiphobicity.

  11. Deposition Technique For Chemical Free Black Coatings On Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, J. G.; Cobbe, N.; O'Donoghue, J.; Pambaguian, L.; Norman, A.; Liedtke, V.; McCaul, T.

    2012-07-01

    Coatings having specific thermo-optical properties are necessary to manage the temperature equilibrium in space hardware. Incumbent black body coatings have a need to extend their operating temperature as well as increase the range of substrate materials that can be coated; in addition, issues relating to outgassing can limit the application of black body coatings. In this paper a relatively new coating technology, CoBlast, is used to deposit material on to titanium substrates, to produce a black body surface; SolarBlack. CoBlast, replaces the oxide layer of reactive metals with a fused thin surface. The process is uniquely non-complex, requiring no thermal input, no wet chemistry and is performed in an ambient temperature and pressure environment. Thermo optical and micro-structure analysis of SolarBlack was completed and the characterisation results including thermo cycling, up to 700°C, are discussed.

  12. Degradation of protective organic coatings after cupping test

    SciTech Connect

    Deflorian, F.; Fedrizzi, L.; Rossi, S.

    1999-11-01

    Coil coating products generally are shaped by deforming and bending after coating. These deformations can produce defects inducing a significant deterioration of the protective properties of the organic coating. An empirical method for the evaluation of the deformation effects is the cupping test. in the present work, effects of the cupping test were studied by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements to study the influence of deformation conditions on the mechanisms of degradation of the protective properties. The materials studied were environmentally friendly coatings based on ion exchange pigments. In addition to the electrochemical characterizations, a finite element model was developed for the estimation of the strain after the cupping test and some adhesion measurements were performed. The cupping test with an electrochemical characterization with EIS is a valid method for the evaluation of the protective behavior of coil coating products after deformation.

  13. Thermal barrier coating system with intermetallic overlay bond coat

    SciTech Connect

    Duderstadt, E.C.; Nagaraj, B A.

    1993-08-24

    A superalloy article is described having a thermal barrier coating system thereon, comprising: a substrate made of a material selected from the group consisting of a nickel-based superalloy and a cobalt-based superalloy; and a thermal barrier coating system on the substrate, the thermal barrier coating system including an intermetallic bond coat overlying the substrate, the bond coat being selected from the group consisting of a nickel aluminide and a platinum aluminide intermetallic compound, a thermally grown aluminum oxide layer overlying the intermetallic bond coat, and a ceramic topcoat overlying the aluminum oxide layer.

  14. Ultrasound-assisted pulse electrodeposition and characterization of Co-W/MWCNTs nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fenghua; Liu, Cansen; Huang, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Co-W/MWCNTs nanocomposite coatings were synthesized by pulse electrodeposition with help of ultrasound agitation. Effect of agitation techniques of electrolyte on the microstructure and morphology of the nanocomposite coatings were evaluated. The Co-W/MWCNTs composite coating produced by mechanical agitation shows rough surface and has large and poorly dispersed CNT agglomerates in its layer and surface, resulting in this coating displaying low hardness and inferior wear resistance and friction reduction. Ultrasound agitation is much better than mechanical stirring to evenly distribute MWCNTs in the layer and surface of the composite coatings. The nanocomposite coatings produced with ultrasound agitation exhibits smoother surface, higher hardness and better tribological properties than the one produced with mechanical agitation. In addition, the ultrasonic power greatly affects the morphology and properties of the as-prepared composite coatings. As the ultrasonic power of 400 W was applied, a large number of MWCNTs are successfully incorporated and evenly distributed in the as-prepared composite coating, which result in this composite coating exhibiting the highest hardness and the best friction-reducing and anti-wear ability. In general, the differences of the friction and wear behaviors and the corresponding mechanisms of these coatings produced under different conditions are attributed to their different hardness and microstructures.

  15. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  16. The hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance of coatings developed for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wilson, W.L.

    2000-05-01

    One potential approach for reducing the level of nuclear plant radiation exposure that results from activated cobalt wear debris is the use of a wear resistant coating. However, large differences in stiffness between a coating/substrate can result in high interfacial stresses that produce coating de-adhesion when a coated substrate is subjected to high stress wear contact. Scratch adhesion and indentation tests have been used to identify four promising coating processes [1,2]: (1) the use of a thin Cr-nitride coating with a hard and less-stiff interlayer, (2) the use of a thick, multilayered Cr-nitride coating with graded layers, (3) use of the duplex approach, or nitriding to harden the material subsurface followed by application of a multilayered Cr-nitride coating, and (4) application of nitriding alone. The processing, characterization, and adhesion of these coating systems are discussed. The wear resistance and performance has been evaluated using laboratory pin-on-disc, 4-ball, and high stress rolling contact tests. Based on the results of these tests, the best coating candidate from the high-stress rolling contact wear test was the thin duplex coating, which consists of ion nitriding followed deposition of a thin Cr-nitride coating, while the thin Cr-nitride coating exhibited the best results in the 4-ball wear test.

  17. Protective coatings for concrete

    SciTech Connect

    NAGY, KATHRYN L.; CYGAN, RANDALL T.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY; SELLINGER, ALAN

    2000-05-01

    The new two-layer protective coating developed for monuments constructed of limestone or marble was applied to highway cement and to tobermorite, a component of cement, and tested in batch dissolution tests. The goal was to determine the suitability of the protective coating in retarding the weathering rate of concrete construction. The two-layer coating consists of an inner layer of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) applied as a 25% solution in methanol and an outer layer of A2** sol-gel. In previous work, this product when applied to calcite powders, had resulted in a lowering of the rate of dissolution by a factor of ten and was shown through molecular modeling to bind strongly to the calcite surface, but not too strongly so as to accelerate dissolution. Batch dissolution tests at 22 C of coated and uncoated tobermorite (1.1 nm phase) and powdered cement from Gibson Blvd. in Albuquerque indicated that the coating exhibits some protective behavior, at least on short time scales. However, the data suggest that the outer layer of sol-gel dissolves in the high-pH environment of the closed system of cement plus water. Calculated binding configuration and energy of AEAPS to the tobermorite surface suggests that AEAPS is well-suited as the inner layer binder for protecting tobermorite.

  18. Coatings for directional eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Coatings developed to provide oxidation protection for the directionally-solidified eutectic alloy NiTaC-B (4.4 weight percent Cr) were evaluated. Of seven Co-, Fe- and Ni-base coatings that were initially investigated, best resistance to cyclic oxidation was demonstrated by duplex coatings fabricated by depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam source followed by deposition of an Al overlayer using the pack cementation process. It was found that addition of carbon to the coating alloy substantially eliminated the problem of fiber denudation in TaC-type eutectic alloys. Burner rig cycled NiTaC-B samples coated with Ni-20Cr-5Al-0.1C-0.1Y+Al and rupture-tested at 1100 deg C performed as well as or better than uncoated, vacuum cycled and air-tested NiTaC-13; however, a slight degradation with respect to uncoated material was noted in air-stress rupture tests at 870 deg C for both cycled and uncycled samples.

  19. Based Adaptive Nanocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazani, M.; Ashrafizadeh, F.; Mozaffarinia, R.

    2014-08-01

    A promising Ni(Al)-Cr2O3-Ag-CNT-WS2 self-lubricating wear-resistant coating was deposited via atmospheric plasma spray of Ni(Al), nano Cr2O3, nano silver and nano WS2 powders, and CNTs. Feedstock powders with various compositions prepared by spray drying were plasma sprayed onto carbon steel substrates. The tribological properties of coatings were tested by a high temperature tribometer in a dry environment from room temperature to 400 °C, and in a natural humid environment at room temperature. It was found that all nanocomposite coatings have better frictional behavior compared with pure Ni(Al) and Ni(Al)-Cr2O3 coatings; the specimen containing aproximately 7 vol.% Ag, CNT, and WS2 had the best frictional performance. The average room temperature friction coefficient of this coating was 0.36 in humid atmosphere, 0.32 in dry atmosphere, and about 0.3 at high temperature.

  20. Corrosion resistant coatings. (Latest citations from World Surface Coatings abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning anticorrosive protective coatings. Patents include surface treatments, paints, antistatic coatings, silicate coatings, fatty acids, organic and inorganic materials, and techniques for applying various coatings. Citations concerning epoxy coatings, acrylic and acrylate coatings, urethane coatings, and water-borne coatings are excluded and examined in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Thin, uniform coats of titanium carbide, deposited on graphite fibers by chemical vapor deposition with thicknesses up to approximately 0.1 microns were shown to improve fiber strength significantly. For greater thicknesses, strength was degraded. The coats promote wetting of the fibers and infiltration of the fiber yarns with aluminum alloys, and act as protective barriers to inhibit reaction between the fibers and the alloys. Chemical vapor deposition was used to produce silicon carbide coats on graphite fibers. In general, the coats were nonuniform and were characterized by numerous surface irregularities. Despite these irregularities, infiltration of these fibers with aluminum alloys was good. Small graphite-aluminum composite samples were produced by vacuum hot-pressing of aluminum-infiltrated graphite yarn at temperatures above the metal liquidus.

  2. Anti-reflection coatings applied by acid leaching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastirik, E.

    1980-09-01

    The Magicote C process developed by S.M. Thompsen was evaluated for use in applying an antireflective coating to the cover plates of solar panels. The process uses a fluosilicic acid solution supersaturated with silica at elevated temperature to selectively attack the surface of soda-lime glass cover plates and alter the physical and chemical composition of a thin layer of glass. The altered glass layer constitutes an antireflective coating. The process produces coatings of excellent optical quality which possess outstanding resistance to soiling and staining. The coatings produced are not resistant to mechanical abrasion and are attacked to some extent by glass cleansers. Control of the filming process was found to be difficult.

  3. Anti-reflection coatings applied by acid leaching process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastirik, E.

    1980-01-01

    The Magicote C process developed by S.M. Thompsen was evaluated for use in applying an antireflective coating to the cover plates of solar panels. The process uses a fluosilicic acid solution supersaturated with silica at elevated temperature to selectively attack the surface of soda-lime glass cover plates and alter the physical and chemical composition of a thin layer of glass. The altered glass layer constitutes an antireflective coating. The process produces coatings of excellent optical quality which possess outstanding resistance to soiling and staining. The coatings produced are not resistant to mechanical abrasion and are attacked to some extent by glass cleansers. Control of the filming process was found to be difficult.

  4. Oxidation resistant coatings for ceramic matrix composite components

    SciTech Connect

    Vaubert, V.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Hirschfeld, D.A.

    1998-11-01

    Corrosion resistant Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CMZP) and Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CS-50) coatings for fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchanger tubes have been developed. Aqueous slurries of both oxides were prepared with high solids loading. One coating process consisted of dipping the samples in a slip. A tape casting process has also been created that produced relatively thin and dense coatings covering a large area. A processing technique was developed, utilizing a pre-sintering step, which produced coatings with minimal cracking.

  5. Laser fabrication nanocrystalline coatings using simultaneous powders/wire feed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianing; Zhai, Tongguang; Zhang, Yuanbin; Shan, Feihu; Liu, Peng; Ren, Guocheng

    2016-07-01

    Laser melting deposition (LMD) fabrication is used to investigate feasibilty of simultaneously feeding TC17 wire and the Stellite 20-Si3N4-TiC-Sb mixed powders in order to increase the utilization ratio of materials and also quality of LMD composite coatings on the TA1 substrate. SEM images indicated that such LMD coating with metallurgical joint to substrate was formed free of the obvious defects. Lots of the ultrafine nanocrystals (UNs) were produced, which distributed uniformly in some coating matrix location, retarding growth of the ceramics in a certain extent; UNs were intertwined with amorphous, leading the yarn-shape materials to be produced. Compared with substrate, an improvement of wear resistance was achieved for such LMD coating.

  6. METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

  7. Direct morphological comparison of vacuum plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates were produced using two thermal spray techniques vacuum plasma spraying and detonation gun spraying. X-ray diffraction was used to compare crystallinity and residual stresses in the coatings. Porosity was measured using optical microscopy in conjunction with an image analysis system. Scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness measurements were used to characterise the surface morphologies of the coatings. The vacuum plasma sprayed coatings were found to have a lower residual stress, a higher crystallinity and a higher level of porosity than the detonation gun coatings. It is concluded that consideration needs to be given to the significance of such variations within the clinical context.

  8. Method of depositing a coating on Si-based ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Lau, Yuk-Chiu (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene (Inventor); Henry, Arnold T. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process of depositing a coating system suitable for use as an environmental barrier coating on various substrate materials, particularly those containing silicon and intended for high temperature applications such as the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The process comprises depositing a first coating layer containing mullite, and preferably a second coating layer of an alkaline earth aluminosilicate, such as barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS), by thermal spraying while maintaining the substrate at a temperature of 800.degree. C. or less, preferably 500.degree. C. or less, by which a substantially crack-free coating system is produced with desirable mechanical integrity.

  9. Development of high reflectance coatings for ground-based astronomical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, S. D.; Jacobson, M. R.; MacLeod, H. A.; Potoff, R. H.; Song, D. J.; van Milligen, F.

    1982-10-01

    Theoretical and experimental research has been conducted with a view to developing multilayer coatings for astronomical telescope mirrors. Conventional thin-film multilayer techniques have been employed to produce multilayer coatings in which part of the performance is achieved by interference. The advantage of this approach is that existing design techniques and coating technology can be used. The thickness tolerances, however, are more demanding than for single metal layers. Test results for experimental coatings with an Al2O3 overcoat on silver and a thin silver layer on aluminum suggest that performance superior to that of a single-layer aluminum coating should be possible.

  10. Workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry

    SciTech Connect

    Courtright, E.L.

    1993-05-01

    New lightweight materials continue to be of great interest to the automotive industry. Compared to 20 years ago, the average vehicle weight has been reduced by almost a fourth, and fuel economy has nearly doubled. While continued improvements are both desirable and possible, materials choices are narrowing and the manufacturing methods needed to produce advanced materials systems are much more costly. The incentives remain high, however; particularly in view of large payoffs associated with minimizing structural weight in electric and hybrid-type vehicles. One generic solution is to develop coatings that will enable the use of lower cost materials. A workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry was held in Detroit, Michigan on October 27 and 28, 1992 with the objective of identifying research needs where coatings could enhance the use of energy efficient lightweight materials for automotive applications. Four generic areas had previously been identified auto manufacturers and industry suppliers. These were: Wear Coatings, Hard Protective Coatings for Plastics, Solar Control Coatings, and Process Manufacturing Issues. The development of coatings and coating technologies for lightweight metals and metal matrix composites emerged as the number one research needs. This need underscores the interest in making better use of existing lightweight metals, e.g. magnesium, aluminum, and their alloys. Coatings to protect plastics and reinforced plastic composites were also identified as a major area of importance. Protection from automotive liquids and gases. Coatings that will improve mar resistance, resist UV degradation, or eliminate degradation due to moisture absorption are also needed. Accordingly, manufacturability issues associated with coating light metals, e.g. aluminum, magnesium, and metal matrix composites with wear and corrosion resistant materials, were identified as a high priority research need.

  11. Polymeric ionic liquid coatings versus commercial solid-phase microextraction coatings for the determination of volatile compounds in cheeses.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Rodríguez, María J; Yu, Honglian; Cole, William T S; Ho, Tien D; Pino, Verónica; Anderson, Jared L; Afonso, Ana M

    2014-04-01

    The extraction performance of four polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coatings has been studied and compared to that of commercial SPME coatings for the extraction of 16 volatile compounds in cheeses. The analytes include 2 free fatty acids, 2 aldehydes, 2 ketones and 10 phenols and were determined by headspace (HS)-SPME coupled to gas chromatography (GC) with flame-ionization detection (FID). The PIL-based coatings produced by UV co-polymerization were more efficient than PIL-based coatings produced by thermal AIBN polymerization. Partition coefficients of analytes between the sample and the coating (Kfs) were estimated for all PIL-based coatings and the commercial SPME fiber showing the best performance among the commercial fibers tested: carboxen-polydimethylsyloxane (CAR-PDMS). For the PIL-based fibers, the highest K(fs) value (1.96 ± 0.03) was obtained for eugenol. The normalized calibration slope, which takes into account the SPME coating thickness, was also used as a simpler approximate tool to compare the nature of the coating within the determinations, with results entirely comparable to those obtained with estimated K(fs) values. The PIL-based materials obtained by UV co-polymerization containing the 1-vinyl-3-hexylimidazolium chloride IL monomer and 1,12-di(3-vinylimiazolium)dodecane dibromide IL crosslinker exhibited the best performance in the extraction of the select analytes from cheeses. Despite a coating thickness of only 7 µm, this copolymeric sorbent coating was capable of quantitating analytes in HS-SPME in a 30 to 2000 µg L(-1) concentration range, with correlation coefficient (R) values higher than 0.9938, inter-day precision values (as relative standard deviation in %) varying from 6.1 to 20%, and detection limits down to 1.6 µg L(-1). PMID:24607122

  12. Strippable coating used for the TMI-2 reactor building decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.W.; Dougherty, D.R.; Barletta, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Strippable coating material used in the TMI-2 reactor building decontamination has been tested for Sr, Cs, and Co leachability, for radiation stability, thermal stability, and for resistance to biodegradation. It was also immersion tested in water, a water solution saturated with toluene and xylene, toluene, xylene, and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) cocktail. Leach testing resulted in all of the Cs and Co activity and most of the Sr activity being released from the coating in just a few days. Immersion resulted in swelling of the coating in all of the liquids tested. Gamma irradiation and heating of the coating did not produce any apparent physical changes in the coating to 1 x 10/sup 8/ rad and 100/sup 0/C; however, gas generation of H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/ was observed in both cases. Biodegradation of the coating occurred readily in soils as indicated by monitoring CO/sub 2/ produced from microbial respiration. These test results indicate that strippable coating radwaste would have to be stabilized to meet the requirements for Class B waste outlined in 10 CFR Part 61 and the NRC Draft Technical Position on Waste Form.

  13. Reactive oxygen species inhibited by titanium oxide coatings.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Richard; Muyco, Julie; McKittrick, Joanna; Frangos, John A

    2003-08-01

    Titanium is a successful biomaterial that possesses good biocompatibility. It is covered by a surface layer of titanium dioxide, and this oxide may play a critical role in inhibiting reactive oxygen species, such as peroxynitrite, produced during the inflammatory response. In the present study, titanium dioxide was coated onto silicone substrates by radio-frequency sputtering. Silicone coating with titanium dioxide enhanced the breakdown of peroxynitrite by 79%. At physiologic pH, the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine-N-ethylcarbamide (SIN-1) was used to nitrate 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA) to form 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetic acid (NHPA). Titanium dioxide-coated silicone inhibited the nitration of 4-HPA by 61% compared to aluminum oxide-coated silicone and 55% compared to uncoated silicone. J774A.1 mouse macrophages were plated on oxide-coated silicone and polystyrene and stimulated to produce superoxide and interleukin-6. Superoxide production was measured by the chemiluminescent reaction with 2-methyl-6-[p-methoxyphenyl]-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-one (MCLA). Titanium dioxide-coated silicone exhibited a 55% decrease in superoxide compared to uncoated silicone and a 165% decrease in superoxide compared to uncoated polystyrene. Titanium dioxide-coated silicone inhibited IL-6 production by 77% compared to uncoated silicone. These results show that the anti-inflammatory properties of titanium dioxide can be transferred to the surfaces of silicone substrates.

  14. The cost of waste: Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, S.

    1996-06-01

    Some of the greatest opportunities for tapping into hidden profit potential at industrial coatings manufacturing plants may be in their waste or, rather, in their ability to eliminate the root causes of waste generation. This occurs because the total cost of waste (TCOW) does not appear only in a plant`s cost to dispose or recycle its waste. TCOW has four principal components, each of which are shown in different lines in the monthly financial accounting report. An additional potential component--the production plant capacity and personnel that are utilized producing controllable waste instead of product for sale and profit--fails to show up at all. Expanding the focus of waste reduction from merely reducing an individual component`s costs to eliminating the root causes of controllable waste generation provides significant additional profits and frees plant production equipment and people to: make more product for sale and profit, and reduce per-unit manufacturing costs.

  15. Carbon coating of simulated nuclear-waste material

    SciTech Connect

    Blocher, J.M. Jr.; Browning, M.F.; Kidd, R.W.

    1982-03-01

    The development of low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings as described in this report was initiated to reduce the release of volatile waste form components and to permit the coating of larger glass marbles that have low temperature softening points (550 to 600/sup 0/C). Fluidized bed coaters for smaller particles (<2mm) and newly developed screw-agitated coaters for larger particles (>2mm) were used. Coating temperatures were reduced from >1000/sup 0/C for conventional CVD high temperature PyC to approx. 500/sup 0/C by using a catalyst. The coating gas combination that produced the highest quality coatings was found to be Ni(CO)/sub 4/ as the catalyst, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ as the carbon source gas, and H/sub 2/ as a diluent. Carbon deposition was found to be temperature dependent with a maximum rate observed at 530/sup 0/C. Coating rates were typically 6 to 7 ..mu..m/hour. The screw-agitated coater approach to coating large-diameter particles was demonstrated to be feasible. Clearances are important between the auger walls and coater to eliminate binding and attrition. Coatings prepared in fluidized bed coaters using similar parameters are better in quality and are deposited at two to three times the rate as in screw-agitated coaters.

  16. Electrospun Fibro-porous Polyurethane Coatings for Implantable Glucose Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Burugapalli, Krishna; Song, Wenhui; Halls, Justin; Moussy, Francis; Ray, Asim; Zheng, Yudong

    2012-01-01

    This study reports methods for coating miniature implantable glucose biosensors with electrospun polyurethane (PU) membranes, their effects on sensor function and efficacy as mass-transport limiting membranes. For electrospinning fibres directly on sensor surface, both static and dynamic collector systems, were designed and tested. Optimum collector configurations were first ascertained by FEA modelling. Both static and dynamic collectors allowed complete covering of sensors, but it was the dynamic collector that produced uniform fibro-porous PU coatings around miniature ellipsoid biosensors. The coatings had random fibre orientation and their uniform thickness increased linearly with increasing electrospinning time. The effects of coatings having an even spread of submicron fibre diameters and sub-100μm thicknesses on glucose biosensor function were investigated. Increasing thickness and fibre diameters caused a statistically insignificant decrease in sensor sensitivity for the tested electrospun coatings. The sensors’ linearity for the glucose detection range of 2 to 30mM remained unaffected. The electrospun coatings also functioned as mass-transport limiting membranes by significantly increasing the linearity, replacing traditional epoxy-PU outer coating. To conclude, electrospun coatings, having controllable fibro-porous structure and thicknesses, on miniature ellipsoid glucose biosensors were demonstrated to have minimal effect on pre-implantation sensitivity and also to have mass-transport limiting ability. PMID:23146433

  17. Self-assembled hemocompatible coating on poly (vinyl chloride) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Zhengbao; Ma, Yan; Yue, Xiuli; Liu, Meng; Dai, Zhifei

    2009-11-01

    A stable hemocompatible coating was fabricated by consecutive alternating adsorption of iron (III) and two kinds of polysaccharides, heparin (Hep) and dextran sulfate (DS), onto poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) surfaces via electrostatic interaction. The fluctuation of contact angles with the alternative deposition of iron (III) and polysaccharides verified the progressive buildup of the mulitilayer coating onto the PVC surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis revealed that the PVC surfaces were completely masked by iron-polysaccharides multilayer coatings. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay showed that both Hep/Fe 3+/Hep and DS/Fe 3+/Hep coated PVC were less thrombogenic than the uncoated one. Chromogenic assay for heparin activity proved definitively that the inhibition of locally produced thrombin was ascribed to the thromboresistance of the surface-bound heparin. Compared with the unmodified PVC surfaces, iron-polysaccharide multilayer coating presented a drastically reduced adhesion in vitro of platelets, polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Interestingly, the DS/Fe 3+/Hep coating was found to exhibit higher hydrophilicity and stability, hence lower non-specific protein adsorption in comparison with Hep/Fe 3+/Hep coating due to the incorporation of dextran sulfate into the multilayer coating.

  18. Application of advanced coating techniques to rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The materials problem in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) is reviewed. Potential coatings and the method of their application for improved life of SSME components are discussed. A number of advanced coatings for turbine blade components and disks are being developed and tested in a multispecimen thermal fatigue fluidized bed facility at IIT Research Institute. This facility is capable of producing severe strains of the degree present in blades and disk components of the SSME. The potential coating systems and current efforts at IITRI being taken for life extension of the SSME components are summarized.

  19. High rate sputter deposition of wear resistant tantalum coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, D.W.; Merz, M.D.; McClanahan, E.D.

    1991-11-01

    The refractory nature and high ductility of body centered cubic (bcc) phase tantalum makes it a suitable material for corrosion- and wear-resistant coatings on surfaces which are subjected to high stresses and harsh chemical and erosive environments. Sputter deposition can produce thick tantalum films but is prone to forming the brittle tetragonal beta phase of this material. Efforts aimed at forming thick bcc phase tantalum coatings in both flat plate and cylindrical geometries by high-rate triode sputtering methods are discussed. In addition to substrate temperature, the bcc-to-beta phase ratio in sputtered tantalum coatings is shown to be sensitive to other substrate surface effects.

  20. Debye series for light scattering by a coated nonspherical particle

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng; Lock, James A.

    2010-06-15

    By using the extended boundary condition method, the Debye series is developed for light scattered by a coated nonspherical particle in order to interpret the angular dependence of the scattered intensity in terms of various physical processes. Numerical calculations are performed to study the influence of the coating thickness and the ellipticity of a coated spheroid on the angular position of the {alpha} and {beta} primary rainbows, which are produced by partial waves experiencing one internal reflection. The hyperbolic umbilic focal section is demonstrated and is analyzed for both the {alpha} and the {beta} rainbows.

  1. Debye series for light scattering by a coated nonspherical particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Lock, James A.

    2010-06-01

    By using the extended boundary condition method, the Debye series is developed for light scattered by a coated nonspherical particle in order to interpret the angular dependence of the scattered intensity in terms of various physical processes. Numerical calculations are performed to study the influence of the coating thickness and the ellipticity of a coated spheroid on the angular position of the α and β primary rainbows, which are produced by partial waves experiencing one internal reflection. The hyperbolic umbilic focal section is demonstrated and is analyzed for both the α and the β rainbows.

  2. Seal coats and asphalt recycling. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers in this volume deal with various facets of seal coats and asphalt recycling; they should be of interest to state and local construction, design, materials, maintenance, and research engineers as well as contractors and material producers. Authors describe their work related to the design, construction, and performance of seal coats. The relationship between asphalt mixture characteristics and design and the frictional resistance of bituminous wearing course mixtures is reported, and research efforts related to asphalt recycling are explained.

  3. Gemini's protected silver coatings: first two years in operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucina, Tomislav; Boccas, Maxime; Araya, Claudio; Ahhee, Clayton

    2006-06-01

    The Gemini twins were the first large modern telescopes to receive protected Silver coatings on their mirrors in 2004. We report the performance evolution of these 4-layer coatings in terms of reflectivity and emissivity. We evaluate the durability of these thin films by comparison to the evolution of some samples that we have produced and exposed since 2002. Finally, we will explain our maintenance plan.

  4. Synthesis of Ni-Mo-W sulfide nanorods as catalyst for hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene.

    PubMed

    Paraguay-Delgado, F; García-Alamilla, R; Lumbreras, J A; Cizniega, E; Alonso-Núñez, G

    2008-12-01

    Two trimetallic sulfurs, MoWNiS and MoWSNi, were synthesized to be used as a catalyst in hydrodesulfurization reactions. The mixed oxide mesoporous nanostructured MoO3 -WO3 with an Mo:W atomic ratio of 1:1 was used as the precursor. The first catalyst was prepared by impregnating nickel in the oxide precursor and then subsequent sulfiding with an H2S/H2 mix at 400 degrees C for 2 hours. The second catalyst was prepared by sulfiding the precursor and then impregnating the nickel, and finally reducing the material with a H2/N2 at 350 degrees C. In both catalysts the Mo:W:Ni atomic ratio was maintained at 1:1:0.5. The materials obtained were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the materials obtained were evaluated by a dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfuration reaction. The diffraction patterns show that both materials are polycrystalline and mainly of MoS2 and WS2 phases.

  5. Materials Data on NiMoP2 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. H10[NiMo12O40][Ni(H2O)3]4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villars, P.; Cenzual, K.; Daams, J.; Gladyshevskii, R.; Shcherban, O.; Dubenskyy, V.; Kuprysyuk, V.; Savysyuk, I.

    This document is part of Subvolume A9 `Structure Types. Part 9: Space Groups (148) R-3 - (141) I41' of Volume 43 `Crystal Structures of Inorganic Compounds' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'.

  7. A study of aluminophosphate supported Ni-Mo catalysts for hydrocracking bitumen

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.J.; Lewkowicz, L.; Oballa, M.C.; Krzywicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    H-Oil and LC-Fining processes utilize a combination of thermal and catalytic hydroprocessing reactions to achieve high yields of distillate in upgrading bitumen or heavy oil residua. The processes are based on a well mixed (ebullated bed) reactor from which deactivated catalyst is continuously withdrawn and fresh catalyst is added to maintain yields. Catalyst activity and lifetime are two key factors controlling the economics of these processes. Catalyst deactivation occurs due to the deposition of coke and metals on the catalyst surface. The choice of catalyst is usually a compromise between two extremes: small pore catalyst with low metals capacity but higher activity that deactivates rapidly because of metals deposition and wide pore catalyst that has high metals deposition capacity but lower activity due to low surface area. Recently, aluminophosphate materials with large pores (< 10 nm--1,000 nm) and high surface areas (100--500 m{sup 2}/g) have been reported. The actual pore size distribution and surface area obtained depend on the Al/P ratio, preparation method and the calcination procedure. These materials are also thermally stable. The purpose of the present work was to determine if such materials, as a result of their pore size distribution and surface area, could decrease the rate of catalyst deactivation, increase catalyst activity and provide sufficient pore volume for high capacity of metals deposition during the upgrading of heavy oil residue.

  8. Development of thermally-sprayed Al-Cu-Fe-Cr quasicrystal coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiamarga, Budi Hartono

    A class of quasicrystal alloys that has drawn a lot of attention is aluminum based quasicrystal alloys because they are hard, light weight, wear resistant, and have a non-stick property. Quasicrystalline materials in the form of coatings produced by thermal spray techniques have been developed to utilize their properties. The goal of this research has been to develop the knowledge necessary to produce good thermally sprayed Al-Cu-Fe-Cr quasicrystal coatings. Boron has been found to improve ductility, reduce porosity and increase hardness when added to other thermally sprayed powders, therefore, as part of this research, quasicrystal coatings containing boron will also be produced and evaluated. The first phase of this research utilized a fine QC-1 quasicrystal powder of Alsb{70.5}Cusb{10.1}Fesb{8.8}Crsb{10.6}. The addition of boron was done using mechanical mixing. The addition of boron in fused QC-1 powders shows that boron can reduce porosity and increase hardness. Due to difficulties with thermal spraying the fine QC-1 powder and evaporation of aluminum, a coarser QC-2 powder with similar composition to QC-1 powder was produced. QC-2 and boron modified QC-2 coatings have similar hardness and levels of porosity, around 11%, although boron modified QC-2 coatings proved to be more wear resistant than plain QC-2 coatings. Both coatings demonstrated a weak coating-substrate interface bonding. Laser heat treatment was used to reduce the porosity and strengthen the coating-substrate interface bonding. Laser treatment of QC-2 quasicrystal coatings resulted in harder and lower porosity coatings with better coating-substrate interface bonding. Unfortunately, hot-cracks in the coatings were also produced. Hot-cracks are undesireable because they decrease the coating's corrosion resistance. Thermal spraying using High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) technique was done. It was used on QC-2 powder and QC-3 powder of composition Alsb{68.6}Cusb{10.8}Fesb{8.9}Crsb{9.7}Bsb{2.0}. This

  9. Preparation of hydrophobic coatings

    DOEpatents

    Branson, Eric D.; Shah, Pratik B.; Singh, Seema; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2009-02-03

    A method for preparing a hydrophobic coating by preparing a precursor sol comprising a metal alkoxide, a solvent, a basic catalyst, a fluoroalkyl compound and water, depositing the precursor sol as a film onto a surface, such as a substrate or a pipe, heating, the film and exposing the film to a hydrophobic silane compound to form a hydrophobic coating with a contact angle greater than approximately 150.degree.. The contact angle of the film can be controlled by exposure to ultraviolet radiation to reduce the contact angle and subsequent exposure to a hydrophobic silane compound to increase the contact angle.

  10. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  11. Tribology and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The future use of fuel-efficient, low-emission, advanced transportation systems (for example, those using low-heat-rejection diesel engines or advanced gas turbines) presents new challenges to tribologists and materials scientists. High service temperatures, corrosive environments, and extreme contact pressures are among the concerns that make necessary new tribological designs, novel materials, and effective lubrication concepts. Argonne is working on methods to reduce friction, wear and corrosion, such as soft metal coatings on ceramics, layered compounds, diamond coatings, and hard surfaces.

  12. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  13. Fiber coating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2003-04-15

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  14. Fiber coating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2001-01-01

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  15. Templated biomimetic multifunctional coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chih-Hung; Gonzalez, Adriel; Linn, Nicholas C.; Jiang, Peng; Jiang, Bin

    2008-02-01

    We report a bioinspired templating technique for fabricating multifunctional optical coatings that mimic both unique functionalities of antireflective moth eyes and superhydrophobic cicada wings. Subwavelength-structured fluoropolymer nipple arrays are created by a soft-lithography-like process. The utilization of fluoropolymers simultaneously enhances the antireflective performance and the hydrophobicity of the replicated films. The specular reflectivity matches the optical simulation using a thin-film multilayer model. The dependence of the size and the crystalline ordering of the replicated nipples on the resulting antireflective properties have also been investigated by experiment and modeling. These biomimetic materials may find important technological application in self-cleaning antireflection coatings.

  16. Influence of Bond Coat Roughness on Life Time of APS Thermal Barrier Coating Systems under Thermo-Mechanical Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Andreas; Aleksanoglu, Herman; Mao, Tongsheng; Scholz, Alfred; Berger, Christina

    The influence of the bond coat roughness on the life time of air plasma-sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) was investigated under thermo-mechanical (TMF) load. The TBC system was applied on hollow cylindrical specimens made of the single crystal super alloy CMSX-4 in the orientation <001> with a MCrAlY-bond coat. Two different values of the bond coat roughness were investigated. In order to study the influence of the thicknesses of the thermally grown oxide layer (TGO), the specimens were isothermally oxidized at 1000 °C for a long term prior to the TMF experiments. The thermo-mechanical experiments show a higher number of cycles-to-failure for TBCs corresponding to an increase of the bond coat roughness. Furthermore, it could be demonstrated that a certain TGO thickness is needed to produce a total delamination of the top coat in the TMF experiments. This minimum thickness varies with the surface roughness of the bond coat and the TMF cycle's phase shift and strain range. Crack initiation and crack propagation were investigated by microscopical analyses, for example, SEM and EDX. Therefore most of the experiments were completed before a total delamination of the top coat occurred. On the basis of these investigations, crack initiation and crack propagation under thermo-mechanical load were described systematically.

  17. Review of Research Work on Ti-BASED Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbitas, Brian; Salman, Asma; Zhang, Deliang; Cao, Peng

    The service life of industrial components is limited predominantly by Chemical corrosion/mechanical wear. The project is concerned with the investigation of the capability of Ti(Al,O)/Al2O3 coatings to improve the service life of tool steel (H13) used for dies in aluminium high pressure die casting. This paper gives a general review on the research work conducted at the University of Waikato on producing and evaluating the titanium/alumina based composite coatings. The powder feedstocks for making the composite coatings were produced by high energy mechanical milling of a mixture of Al and TiO2 powders in two different molar ratios followed by a thermal reaction process. The feedstocks were then thermally sprayed using a high velocity air-fuel (HVAF) technique on H13 steel substrates to produce a Ti(Al,O)/Al2O3 composite coatings. The performance of the coating was assessed in terms of thermal shock resistance and reaction kinetics with molten aluminium. The composite powders and coatings were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD).

  18. Parylene coating for circuit components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkebile, M. J.; Holbrook, R. J.; Oberin, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive internal coating improves reliability of plastic-packaged parts. Coating protects device from effects of humidity and heat and acts as barrier between device and harmful substances generated by plastic-packaging material.

  19. Multilayer coatings on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.; Coronado, C.A.; Bennett, W.D.; Stewart, D.C.

    1995-04-01

    Thin-film optical and non-optical multilayer coatings are deposited onto flexible substrates using a vacuum web coater developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The coater`s primary application is rapid prototyping of multilayer (1) polymer coatings, (2) polymer/metal coatings, (3) ceramic/metal coatings, and (4) hybrid polymer, ceramic, and metal coatings. The coater is fully automated and incorporates polymer evaporation and extrusion heads, high-rate magnetron sputtering cathodes, and e-beam evaporation sources. Polymer electrolytes are deposited by extrusion techniques. Flexible plastic, metal, and ceramic substrates can be coated using roll-to-roll or closed-loop configurations. Examples of multilayer optical coatings demonstrated to date are solar reflectors, heat mirrors, Fabry-Perot filters, and alpha particle sensors. Nonoptical coatings include multilayer magnetic metal/ceramic and lamellar composites.

  20. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  1. Protective coating for ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Churchward, Rex A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A protective coating for ceramic materials such as those made of silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, aluminoborosilicate and silicon dioxide, and a thermal control structure comprising a ceramic material having coated thereon the protective coating. The protective coating contains, in admixture, silicon dioxide powder, colloidal silicon dioxide, water, and one or more emittance agents selected from silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, silicon carbide, molybdenum disilicide, tungsten disilicide and zirconium diboride. In another aspect, the protective coating is coated on a flexible ceramic fabric which is the outer cover of a composite insulation. In yet another aspect, a metallic foil is bonded to the outer surface of a ceramic fabric outer cover of a composite insulation via the protective coating. A primary application of this invention is as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in a heat shield for space vehicles subjected to very high aero-convective heating environments.

  2. water-soluble fluorocarbon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanelli, P.

    1979-01-01

    Water-soluble fluorocarbon proves durable nonpolluting coating for variety of substrates. Coatings can be used on metals, masonry, textiles, paper, and glass, and have superior hardness and flexibility, strong resistance to chemicals fire, and weather.

  3. Pulsed laser deposition: the road to hybrid nanocomposites coatings and novel pulsed laser adaptive technique.

    PubMed

    Serbezov, Valery

    2013-01-01

    The applications of Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for producing nanoparticles, nanostructures and nanocomposites coatings based on recently developed laser ablating techniques and their convergence are being reviewed. The problems of in situ synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposites coatings by these techniques are being discussed. The novel modification of PLD called Pulsed Laser Adaptive Deposition (PLAD) technique is presented. The in situ synthesized inorganic/organic nanocomposites coatings from Magnesium (Mg) alloy/Rhodamine B and Mg alloy/ Desoximetasone by PLAD are described. The trends, applications and future development of discussed patented methods based on the laser ablating technologies for producing hybrid nanocomposite coatings have also been discussed in this review.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Electrodeposition of nanostructured coatings and their characterization—a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrappa, Injeti; Binder, Leo

    2008-12-01

    Nanostructured materials have gained importance in recent years due to their significantly enhanced properties. In particular, electrochemistry has a special role in producing a variety of nanostructured materials. In the current review, we discuss the superiority of electrochemical deposition techniques in synthesizing various nanomaterials that exhibit improved characteristics compared with materials produced by conventional techniques, as well as their classification, synthesis routes, properties and applications. The superior properties of a nanostructured nickel coating produced by electrochemical deposition are outlined. The properties of various nanostructured coating materials produced by electrochemical techniques are also described. Finally, the importance of nanostructured coatings in industrial applications as well as their potential in future technologies is emphasized.

  5. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.

    2000-01-01

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  6. Suspension High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (SHVOF)-Sprayed Alumina Coatings: Microstructure, Nanoindentation and Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.; Ang, A. S. M.; Pala, Z.; Shaw, E. C.; Hussain, T.

    2016-10-01

    Suspension high velocity oxy-fuel spraying can be used to produce thermally sprayed coatings from powdered feedstocks too small to be processed by mechanical feeders, allowing formation of nanostructured coatings with improved density and mechanical properties. Here, alumina coatings were produced from submicron-sized feedstock in aqueous suspension, using two flame combustion parameters yielding contrasting microstructures. Both coatings were tested in dry sliding wear conditions with an alumina counterbody. The coating processed with high combustion power of 101 kW contained 74 wt.% amorphous phase and 26 wt.% crystalline phase (95 wt.% gamma and 3 wt.% alpha alumina), while the 72-kW coating contained lower 58 wt.% amorphous phase and 42 wt.% crystalline phases (73 wt.% was alpha and 26 wt.% gamma). The 101-kW coating had a dry sliding specific wear rate between 4 and 4.5 × 10-5 mm3/Nm, 2 orders of magnitude higher than the 72-kW coating wear rate of 2-4.2 × 10-7 mm3/Nm. A severe wear regime dominated by brittle fracture and grain pullout of the coating was responsible for the wear of the 101-kW coating, explained by mean fracture toughness three times lower than the 72-kW coating, owing to the almost complete absence of alpha alumina.

  7. Experimental observation of rainbow scattering by a coated cylinder: twin primary rainbows and thin-film interference.

    PubMed

    Adler, C L; Lock, J A; Nash, J K; Saunders, K W

    2001-03-20

    We experimentally examine the primary rainbow created by the illumination of a coated cylinder. We present a simple technique for varying the coating thickness over a wide range of values, and we see evidence for two different scattering regimes. In one, where the coating thickness is large, twin rainbows are produced. In the second, where the coating is thin enough to act as a thin film, a single rainbow is produced whose intensity varies periodically as the coating thickness varies. We find good agreement with previous theoretical predictions. PMID:18357147

  8. Coated article and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Lee, Kang Neung (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An article includes a silicon-containing substrate and a modified mullite coating. The modified mullite coating comprises mullite and a modifier component that reduces cracks in the modified mullite coating. The article can further comprise a thermal barrier coating applied to the modified mullite coating. The modified mullite coating functions as a bond coating between the external environmental/thermal barrier coating and the silicon-containing substrate. In a method of forming an article, a silicon-containing substrate is formed and a modified mullite coating is applied. The modified mullite coating comprises mullite and a modifier component that reduces cracks in the modified mullite coating.

  9. Coated article and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Lee, Kang Neung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An article includes a silicon-containing substrate and a modified mullite coating. The modified mullite coating comprises mullite and a modifier component that reduces cracks in the modified mullite coating. The article can further comprise a thermal barrier coating applied to the modified mullite coating. The modified mullite coating functions as a bond coating between the external environmental/thermal barrier coating and the silicon-containing substrate. In a method of forming an article, a silicon-containing substrate is formed and a modified mullite coating is applied. The modified mullite coating comprises mullite and a modifier component that reduces cracks in the modified mullite coating.

  10. [Preparation and antithrombogenicity of oxidated low molecular weight heparin-antithrombin complex coated-polyvinyl chloride tubing].

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; Liu, Weiyong; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Hua; Cao, Ruijun; Yang, Jian

    2011-02-01

    Based on non-enzymatic protein glycated reaction, the sodium periodate-oxidated low molecular weight heparin-antithrombin covalent complex (SPLMWATH) was produced. By using polyethyleneimine-glutaraldehyde bonding technique, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubings were coated with SPLMWATH, heparin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Spectrophotometry and dynamic clotting time experiment were used to determine the synthetic ratio of SPLMWATH, graft density, coating leaching ratio and to evaluate the antithrombogenicity of different coating on the PVC tubings. The results showed that the synthetic ratio of SPLMWATH was approximately 55%, and compared with heparin coating and LMWH coating, the graft density of SPLMWATH coating on the PVC tubing was smaller, but its coating stability and antithrombogenicity were significantly better than that of heparin coating and LMWH coating on the PVC tubings.

  11. Analysis of laser damage tests on a coating for broad bandwidth high reflection of femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellum, John; Winstone, Trevor; Lamaignere, Laurent; Sozet, Martin; Kimmel, Mark; Rambo, Patrick; Field, Ella; Kletecka, Damon

    2015-07-01

    We have designed and produced an optical coating suitable for broad bandwidth high reflection (BBHR) at 45° angle of incidence (AOI), P polarization (Ppol) of petawatt (PW) class fs laser pulses of ~ 900 nm center wavelength. We have produced such BBHR coatings consisting of TiO2/SiO2 layer pairs deposited by ion assisted e-beam evaporation using the large optics coater at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper focuses on laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) tests of these coatings. LIDT is difficult to measure for such coatings due to the broad range of wavelengths over which they can operate. An ideal test would be in the vacuum environment of the fs-pulse PW use laser using fs pulses identical to of the PW laser. Short of this ideal testing would be tests over portions of the HR band of the BBHR coating using ns or sub-ps pulses produced by tunable lasers. Such tests could be over ~ 10 nm wide wavelength intervals whose center wavelengths could be tuned over the BBHR coating's operational band. Alternatively, the HR band of the BBHR coating could be adjusted by means of wavelength shifts due to changing the AOI of the LIDT tests or due to absorbed moisture by the coating under ambient conditions. We conduct LIDT tests on the BBHR coatings at selected AOIs to gain insight into the coatings' laser damage properties, and analyze how the results of the different LIDT tests compare.

  12. Evaluation of waveguide coating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. C. J.; Baker, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    Waveguide coating materials were tested at 8470 MHz for insertion loss. Samples of these coatings on waveguide pieces without flanges were tested in an environmental chamber to simulate the effects of high power microwave heating. Test results indicated that three types of coating materials are acceptable with regard to insertion loss. However, simulated microwave heating caused debonding of Metcot 7 and BD-991 coatings, resulting in peelings in the waveguide. The higher cost Chemglaze R104 does not exhibit this problem.

  13. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains papers from the 1997 Thermal Barrier Coatings Workshop, sponsored by the TBC Interagency Coordination Committee. The Workshop was held in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky, May 19-21, 1997. The papers cover the topics of heat transfer and conductivity of thermal barrier coatings, failure mechanisms and characterization of the coatings as well as characterization of coating deposition methods. Speakers included research, development and user groups in academia, industry and government.

  14. Coatings for mullite insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolinger, P. N.; Rauch, H. W., Sr.

    1976-01-01

    Series of coatings provides hard, impermeable, waterproof layer. Inclusion of color oxides imparts high emittance to surface. Refractory fillers investigated include TiO2, BaO.ZrO2, SrO.TiO2 ziron, spodumene, petalite, and kryptonite. Colorants include Cr2O3, NiO, and CoO.

  15. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  16. Thin-film coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Thin, adherent, high density films are discussed with respect to their application in two plasma physics techniques (ion plating and sputtering). The operation of each technique is described as well as what surfaces can be coated, and what kind of materials can be applied. The effects of these films on the mechanical properties of solid surfaces are also discussed.

  17. Waterborne coatings for videotape

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Fan, H.; Gogineni, N.; Jacobs, B.; Harrell, J.W.; Jefcoat, I.A.; Lane, A.M.; Nikles, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic tape provides a low-cost, high-density information storage medium. There is a problem, however, because current manufacturing technology uses organic solvents to apply the magnetic wailing to the film. Here the authors describe a waterborne formulation that shows promise as a technology for pollution prevention. The organic solvents used in magnetic tape coating formulations include 2-butanone (methylethyl ketone [MEK]), 4-methyl-2-pentanone (methyl-iso-butyl ketone [MIBK]), tetrahydrofuran, toluene, and cyclohexanone. These solvents present an occupational hazard to the workers and emissions hazard to the environment. The authors developed a new waterborne coating formulation and prepared magnetic tape in a pilot coating trial. The tape has mechanical and magnetic properties comparable to those of the commercial VHS tape. There is a clear economic and environmental incentive to consider adopting this waterborne process for magnetic tape manufacture. This process is not commercial, and a development effort by a tape manufacturer is required to bring it to commercial reality. They have not addressed the important issue of long-term reliability of the materials package, an object of current research. However, they have made a case for a reexamination of the use of waterborne coating formulations by the magnetic tape industry.

  18. Coating method for graphite

    DOEpatents

    Banker, John G.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided comprising coating the graphite surface with a suspension of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4% by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  19. Coating method for graphite

    DOEpatents

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  20. Advanced protective coating for superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, R. C.; Talboom, F. P.; Wilson, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    Superior oxidation protection for nickel-base alloys at temperatures up to 1367 K was obtained with cobalt-base alloy coating. Coating had 25 Cr, 14 Al, and 0.5 Y weight percent composition. Coating was applied by electron beam vapor deposition to thickness of 76 to 127 microns.