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Sample records for nickel-based alloy machining

  1. Tool wear mechanisms in the machining of Nickel based super-alloys: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Waseem; Sun, Jianfei; Sun, Pengfei; Chen, Wuyi; Saleem, Zawar

    2014-06-01

    Nickel based super-alloys are widely employed in aircraft engines and gas turbines due to their high temperature strength, corrosion resistance and, excellent thermal fatigue properties. Conversely, these alloys are very difficult to machine and cause rapid wear of the cutting tool, frequent tool changes are thus required resulting in low economy of the machining process. This study provides a detailed review of the tool wear mechanism in the machining of nickel based super-alloys. Typical tool wear mechanisms found by different researchers are analyzed in order to find out the most prevalent wear mechanism affecting the tool life. The review of existing works has revealed interesting findings about the tool wear mechanisms in the machining of these alloys. Adhesion wear is found to be the main phenomenon leading to the cutting tool wear in this study.

  2. Development of Advanced Carbide for Nickel-Based Alloy Machining for Turbine Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-20

    based alloys such as Inconel 718 with 40% higher machining productivity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NCDMM; Success Stories; Kennametal, Inc.; Inconel 718 ...Inc. involved developing an advanced coated carbide cutting tool for turning nickel-based alloys such as Inconel 718 with 40% higher machining...nd DOC constant for the ng of six (6) cutting tools t 180 and 250 SFM led to l performance goal. It was r resulting from premature e in Inconel

  3. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  4. Development of an Advanced Carbide Cutting Tool for Nickel-based Alloy Machining

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-28

    Inconel 718 utilizing state-of-the-market and state-of-the-art methods. The goal of increasing machining productivity by 40% was achieved with the...project is turning of Inconel 718 alloy. 1.3 Funding The total NCDMM funding for the project was $150,000 ($120,000 for labor and $30,000 for workpiece...tasks Task 1: Review current Inconel machining practice Task 2: Establish the current state of the art in Inconel 718 turning  Establish baseline data

  5. Influence of surface modifications on pitting corrosion behavior of nickel-base alloy 718. Part 1: Effect of machine hammer peening

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    The effect of surface modifications induced by machine hammer peening on pitting corrosion behavior of nickel-base alloy 718 in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution is investigated. Severe work hardening and high compressive residual stress are generated with surface smoothing and microstructure evolution in terms of formation of nano-grains and nano-twins in the near surface region after machine hammer peening. Electrochemical tests results show that machine hammer peening has a beneficial influence on the corrosion resistance, indicated by a significant increase of the critical pitting potential (+134 mV) accompanied with lower corrosion current density and higher polarization resistance.

  6. Physics-based simulation modeling and optimization of microstructural changes induced by machining and selective laser melting processes in titanium and nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisoy, Yigit Muzaffer

    Manufacturing processes may significantly affect the quality of resultant surfaces and structural integrity of the metal end products. Controlling manufacturing process induced changes to the product's surface integrity may improve the fatigue life and overall reliability of the end product. The goal of this study is to model the phenomena that result in microstructural alterations and improve the surface integrity of the manufactured parts by utilizing physics-based process simulations and other computational methods. Two different (both conventional and advanced) manufacturing processes; i.e. machining of Titanium and Nickel-based alloys and selective laser melting of Nickel-based powder alloys are studied. 3D Finite Element (FE) process simulations are developed and experimental data that validates these process simulation models are generated to compare against predictions. Computational process modeling and optimization have been performed for machining induced microstructure that includes; i) predicting recrystallization and grain size using FE simulations and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model, ii) predicting microhardness using non-linear regression models and the Random Forests method, and iii) multi-objective machining optimization for minimizing microstructural changes. Experimental analysis and computational process modeling of selective laser melting have been also conducted including; i) microstructural analysis of grain sizes and growth directions using SEM imaging and machine learning algorithms, ii) analysis of thermal imaging for spattering, heating/cooling rates and meltpool size, iii) predicting thermal field, meltpool size, and growth directions via thermal gradients using 3D FE simulations, iv) predicting localized solidification using the Phase Field method. These computational process models and predictive models, once utilized by industry to optimize process parameters, have the ultimate potential to improve performance of

  7. Corrosion of nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scarberry, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The volume consists of three tutorial lectures and 18 contributed papers. The three tutorial lectures provide state-of-the-art background on the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys as it relates to corrosion. Also featured are the mechanisms and applications of these alloys and an insight into the corrosion testing techniques. The three tutorial lecture papers will help acquaint newcomers to this family of alloys with a thorough overview. The contributed papers are categorized into four major topics: general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, fatigue and localized corrosion. Each topic is key-noted by one invited lecture followed by several contributed papers. The papers in the general corrosion section are wide ranging and cover the aspects of material selection, development of galvanic series in corrosive environments, corrosion resistance characteristics, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement of nickel and some nickel-base alloys.

  8. Welding and brazing of nickel and nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortland, J. E.; Evans, R. M.; Monroe, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The joining of four types of nickel-base materials is described: (1) high-nickel, nonheat-treatable alloys, (2) solid-solution-hardening nickel-base alloys, (3) precipitation-hardening nickel-base alloys, and (4) dispersion-hardening nickel-base alloys. The high-nickel and solid-solution-hardening alloys are widely used in chemical containers and piping. These materials have excellent resistance to corrosion and oxidation, and retain useful strength at elevated temperatures. The precipitation-hardening alloys have good properties at elevated temperature. They are important in many aerospace applications. Dispersion-hardening nickel also is used for elevated-temperature service.

  9. The Effect of Heat Treatment on Residual Stress and Machining Distortions in Advanced Nickel Base Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an extension of NASA's AST and IDPAT Programs which sought to predict the effect of stabilization heat treatments on residual stress and subsequent machining distortions in the advanced disk alloy, ME-209. Simple "pancake" forgings of ME-209 were produced and given four heat treats: 2075F(SUBSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/NO AGE; 2075F/OIL QUENCH/1400F@8HR;2075F/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/l400F@8HR; and 2160F(SUPERSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/ 1400F@8HR. The forgings were then measured to obtain surface profiles in the heat treated condition. A simple machining plan consisting of face cuts from the top surface followed by measurements of the surface profile opposite the cut were made. This data provided warpage maps which were compared with analytical results. The analysis followed the IDPAT methodology and utilized a 2-D axisymmetric, viscoplastic FEA code. The analytical results accurately tracked the experimental data for each of the four heat treatments. The 1550F stabilization heat treatment was found to significantly reduce residual stresses and subsequent machining distortions for fine grain (subsolvus) ME209, while coarse grain (supersolvus) ME209 would require additional time or higher stabilization temperatures to attain the same degree of stress relief.

  10. Nickel-base alloys for severe environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.K.; Flower, H.L.; Hack, G.A.J.; Isobe, S.

    1996-03-01

    Inconel alloys MA754 and MA758 are nickel-base, oxide dispersion-strengthened superalloys made by mechanical alloying. The simple nickel-chromium matrix, when combined with the strengthening effect of the yttrium oxide dispersoid during mechanical alloys, provides excellent creep properties, resistance to thermal fatigue, and surface stability suitable for operation without protective coatings. Gas turbine engine components are primary applications for alloy MA754, but this aerospace alloy has been applied in many other products that operate in severe conditions, and alloy MA758 was developed specifically for aggressive, elevated temperature industrial environments. Billets for large bar and plate are typically consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), because this technology allows production of forms suitable for a variety of industrial components. Material consolidated by HIP and conventionally worked by extrusion and hot rolling generally exhibits properties that are more isotropic than those of material consolidated by extrusion. However, the degree of anisotropy depends strongly on the specific processing of the consolidated billet. This article describes production of new mill shapes from HIP billets, and reviews current and potential applications such as skid rails for high-temperature walking-beam furnaces, heat treating furnace parts, equipment for handling molten glass, and furnace tubes.

  11. DISPERSION STRENGTHENED NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The swaged cone of extruded Nichrome-thoria alloys prepared by the thermal decomposition of thorium nitrate onto alloy powder indicated descreased... swaging of these dispersion-strengthened Nichrome alloys was dependent on the presence of a mild steel jacket on the alloy rod as a result of the canned...extrusion practice. Efforts to cold swage the alloy materials without this jacket were unsuccessful. (Author)

  12. Nickel base alloy. [for gas turbine engine stator vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A nickel base superalloy for use at temperatures of 2000 F (1095 C) to 2200 F (1205 C) was developed for use as stator vane material in advanced gas turbine engines. The alloy has a nominal composition in weight percent of 16 tungsten, 7 aluminum, 1 molybdenum, 2 columbium, 0.3 zirconium, 0.2 carbon and the balance nickel.

  13. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  14. The metallography of a nickel base casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-10-01

    Three groups of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy and employing induction fusion in each case. The first group was produced fro new metal, the second from metal which had been recast four times, and the third from new overheated metal. Samples of alloy were cut from each group, and together with a piece from an original ingot, were mounted, polished, etched, and examined under a metallurgical microscope.

  15. Nickel-base alloy GTD-222, a new gas turbine nozzle alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Seaver, D.W.; Beltran, A.M. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes the key properties of GTD-222 (Wood and Haydon, 1989), a new cast nickel-base nozzle alloy developed by GE for use in land-based gas turbines. GTD-222 is being introduced as a replacement for FSX-414 in second and third-stage nozzles of certain machines. Presented in this paper are comparisons of the tensile, creep-rupture, and fatigue properties of GTD-222 versus FSX-414. In addition, the results of a long-term thermal stability study, high-temperature oxidation, and hot corrosion evaluation as well as weldability results will be discussed.

  16. Recrystallization characteristics of oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotzler, R. K.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopy was employed to study the process of recrystallization in two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) mechanically alloyed nickel-base alloys, MA 754 and MA 6000E. MA 754 contained both fine, uniformly dispersed particles and coarser oxides aligned along the working direction. Hot rolled MA 754 had a grain size of 0.5 microns and high dislocation densities. After partial primary recrystallization, the fine grains transformed to large elongated grains via secondary (or abnormal) grain growth. Extruded and rolled MA 6000E contained equiaxed grains of 0.2 micron diameter. Primary recrystallization occurring during working eliminated virtually all dislocations. Conversion from fine to coarse grains was triggered by gamma prime dissolution; this was also a process of secondary or abnormal grain growth. Comparisons were made to conventional and oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys.

  17. Hydrogen transport in nickel-base alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, A.; Ballinger, R. G.; Hwang, I. S.; Morra, M. M.; Psaila-Dombrowski, M.; Gates, R. M.

    1992-12-01

    The electrochemical permeation technique has been used to characterize hydrogen transport and trapping in pure nickel and in alloys 600, X-750, and 718 at a temperature of 80 °C. The “effective diffusivity ” of hydrogen atoms in alloy 600 is reduced by a factor of about 5 compared to pure nickel. This is attributed to both compositional changes and the presence of [(Ti, Nb)C] carbides. Aging of alloy 600, with subsequent M23C6 carbide precipitation, does not significantly influence the measured “effective diffusivity,” which is explained by the dominant effect of preexisting [(Ti, Nb)C] carbides. The “effective diffusivity” of hydrogen atoms in solution-annealed alloy X-750 is reduced by a factor of about 9 compared to that of pure nickel. This is also attributed to compositional changes and [(Ti,Nb)C] carbides. Aging of alloy X-750, which causes precipitation of γ'[Ni3(Al, Ti)], reduces the “effective diffusivity” by an additional factor of 5 or more. Double aging at 885 °C/24 hours, 704 °C/20 hours following hot working yields the greatest reduction in “effective diffusivity.” Analysis of permeation transients using a diffusion- trapping model indicates a binding energy associated with trapping due to the γ phase of be- tween -31 and -37 kJ/mol. The “effective diffusivity” of hydrogen in alloy 718 is about 40 pct greater than for alloy X-750 for the same double and direct aging treatments. The average “effective diffusivities” of the double-aged and direct-aged alloy 718 are comparable, but the permeation transients for the double-aged treatment are significantly steeper. The double-aged treatment with predominantly δ phase (orthorhombic Ni3Nb) yields a binding energy of about -30 kJ/mol. Analysis of the direct aged-treated 718, which contains predominantly γ″ phase (body-centered tetragonal Ni3Nb) gave a binding energy between -23 and -27 kJ/mol. Seg- regation of hydrogen atoms to the γ matrix interface, combined with a

  18. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  19. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  20. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  1. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  2. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  3. Surface modification of nickel based alloys for improved oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2005-02-01

    The present research is aimed at the evaluation of a surface modification treatment to enhance the high temperature stability of nickel-base superalloys. A low Coefficient Thermal Expansion (CTE ~12.5x10-6/°C) alloy based on the composition (in weight %) of Ni-22Mo-12.5Cr was produced by Vacuum Induction Melting and Vacuum Arc Melting and reduced to sheet by conventional thermal-mechanical processing. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the oxidation resistance of the alloys at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in dry and wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted 800°C to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the alloys. The results were compared to the behavior of Haynes 230 (Ni-22Cr) in the treated and untreated conditions. The treatment was not very effective for Haynes 230, as this alloy had similar oxidation behavior in both the treated and untreated conditions. However, the treatment had a significant effect on the behavior of the low CTE alloy. At 800°C, the untreated Ni-12.5Cr alloy was 5 times less oxidation resistant than Haynes 230. However, in the treated condition, the Ni-12.5Cr alloy had comparable oxidation resistance to the Haynes 230 alloy.

  4. Exploratory Investigation of Advanced-Temperature Nickel-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, John C.; Waters, William J.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy with properties suitable for aircraft turbine blades as well as for possible space vehicle applications. An entire series of alloys that do not require vacuum melting techniques and that generally provide good stress-rupture and impact properties was evolved. The basic-alloy composition of 79 percent nickel, 8 percent molybdenum, 6 percent chromium, 6 percent aluminum, and 1 percent zirconium was modified by a series of element additions such as carbon, titanium, and boron, with the nickel content adjusted to account for the additives. Stress-rupture, impact, and swage tests were made with all the alloys. The strongest composition (basic alloy plus 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon) displayed 384- and 574-hour stress-rupture lives at 1800 F and 15,000 psi in the as-cast and homogenized conditions, respectively. All the alloys investigated demonstrated good impact resistance. Several could not be broken in a low-capacity Izod impact tester and, on this basis, all compared favorably with several high-strength high-temperature alloys. Swaging cracks were encountered with all the alloys. In several cases, however, these cracks were slight and could be detected only by zyglo examination. Some of these compositions may become amenable to hot working on further development. On the basis of the properties indicated, it appears that several of the alloys evolved, particularly the 1.5 percent titanium plus 0.125 percent carbon basic-alloy modification, could be used for advanced- temperature turbine blades, as well as for possible space vehicle applications.

  5. Tungsten wire-nickel base alloy composite development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Moracz, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Further development and evaluation of refractory wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites is described. Emphasis was placed on evaluating thermal fatigue resistance as a function of matrix alloy composition, fabrication variables and reinforcement level and distribution. Tests for up to 1,000 cycles were performed and the best system identified in this current work was 50v/o W/NiCrAlY. Improved resistance to thermal fatigue damage would be anticipated for specimens fabricated via optimized processing schedules. Other properties investigated included 1,093 C (2,000 F) stress rupture strength, impact resistance and static air oxidation. A composite consisting of 30v/o W-Hf-C alloy fibers in a NiCrAlY alloy matrix was shown to have a 100-hour stress rupture strength at 1,093 C (2,000 F) of 365 MN/square meters (53 ksi) or a specific strength advantage of about 3:1 over typical D.S. eutectics.

  6. Elevated temperature fretting fatigue of nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gean, Matthew C.

    This document details the high temperature fretting fatigue of high temperature nickel based alloys common to turbine disk and blade applications. The research consists of three area of focus: Experiments are conducted to determine quantitatively the fretting fatigue lives of advanced nickel based alloys; Analytical tools are developed and used to investigate the fretting fatigue response of the material; Fractographic analysis of the experimental results is used to improve the analytical models employed in the analysis of the experiments. Sixty three fretting fatigue experiments were conducted at 649 °C using a polycrystalline Nickel specimen in contact with directionally solidified and single crystal Nickel pads. Various influences on the fretting fatigue life are investigated. Shot peened Rene' 95 had better fretting fatigue life compared to shot peened Rene' 88. Shot peening produced a 2x increase in life for Rene' 95, but only a marginal improvement in the fretting fatigue life for Rene' 88. Minor cycles in variable amplitude loading produces significant damage to the specimen. Addition of occasional overpeaks in load produces improvements in fretting fatigue life. Contact tractions and stresses are obtained through a variety of available tools. The contact tractions can be efficiently obtained for limited geometries, while FEM can provide the contact tractions for a broader class of problems, but with the cost of increased CPU requirements. Similarly, the subsurface contact stresses can be obtained using the contact tractions as a boundary condition with either a semi-analytical FFT method or FEM. It is found that to calculate contact stresses the FFT was only marginally faster than FEM. The experimental results are combined with the analysis to produce tools that are used to design against fretting fatigue. Fractographic analysis of the fracture surface indicates the nature of the fretting fatigue crack behavior. Interrupted tests were performed to analyze

  7. HIP clad nickel base Alloy 625 for deep sour wells

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, W.K.; Pendley, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    The hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process was used to clad nickel base Alloy 625 to AISI 4130 low alloy steel. The performance of the HIP clad material in the corrosive environment characteristic of deep, sour oil and gas wells was evaluated in laboratory tests. Included in the test program were NACE TM-01-77 sulfide stress cracking tests, chloride stress corrosion cracking tests in boiling MgCl /SUB 2'/ , and pitting and crevice corrosion tests. The HIP clad 625 performed excellently, displaying essentially the same corrosion resistance as wrought 625. Specifically the HIP clad 625 resisted sulfide stress cracking at applied stresses as high as 120% of yield strength and resisted chloride stress corrosion cracking at stresses exceeding 100% of yield. The HIP clad 625 also displayed immunity to pitting and crevice corrosion, with corrosion rates of <0.025 mm/y (1 mil/y). The 4130 base metal, however, was attacked severly in all tests. SEM/EDX analysis of the 625/4130 interface demonstrated that dilution of the cladding by the base metal was essentially eliminated.

  8. Mechanical properties of white layers formed by different machining processes on nickel-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, Edouard

    Nickel-based superalloys are widely used in the aerospace industry in the production of turbine discs and blades because of their good mechanical properties and great corrosion resistance at high temperature. Although very useful, these alloys are hard to machine. Their structure is responsible for rapid wear of cutting tools. Moreover, under certain machining conditions, near-surface regions of the material undergo a phase transformation resulting in the formation of a thin layer called "white etching layer" at the surface of the machined workpiece. Because turbine discs are safety critical components, no defects can be tolerated on the workpiece. Therefore, efforts should be made to ensure that this white etching layer can't influence the operating life of the workpiece and make its operation unsafe. Even if the existence of the white etching layer is well known, its mechanical properties have never been assessed in detail. In this thesis, we present a study of the mechanical (hardness and Young's modulus) and microstructural properties of white etching layers formed at the surface of nickel-based superalloy IN100 turbine discs fabricated by different machining processes. This work aims at evaluating the impact of the machining process and of fatigue on the properties of the white etching layers under study. The originality of this study primarily lies in the employed characterization technique. Using nanoindentation has allowed us to very precisely assess the variations of both the hardness and the Young's modulus along the white etching layers. Also, the use of a sophisticated indentation system has enabled the acquisition of very precise surface images of the samples and therefore to study the microstructure of the white etching layers. This research has demonstrated that the mechanical and microstructural properties of the white etching layers are closely linked to the machining conditions of the material. Therefore, our study will help researchers gain a

  9. The effect of aluminium on the metallography of a nickel base removable partial denture casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1978-12-01

    Three special nickel-chromium alloys were prepared in which the aluminum levels were adjusted both above and below that of a commercial nickel base dental casting alloy. Tensile and metallographic evaluation of representative samples of the alloys were made and the changes in the properties of the alloys are reported.

  10. Coarsening in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1990-01-01

    The coarsening behavior of the gamma-prime precipitate has been examined in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys aged at elevated temperatures for times of up to 5000 h. Although the cube rate law was observed during coarsening, none of the presently available coarsening theories showed complete agreement with the experimental particle size distributions (PSDs). These discrepancies were thought to be due to elastic coherency strains which were not considered by the available models. Increasing the Mo content significantly influenced the PSDs and decreased the coarsening rate of the gamma-prime cubes, as a result of increasing the magnitude of the lattice mismatch. After extended aging times, the gamma-prime cubes underwent massive coalescence into plates at a rate which was much faster than the cuboidal coarsening rate. Once the gamma-prime plates were formed, further coarsening was not observed, and this stabilization of the microstructure was attributed to the development of dislocation networks at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces.

  11. Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment of a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2002-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic aircraft will require nickel-base disk alloys that can be used at temperatures in excess of 1300 F. Smaller turbine engines, with higher rotational speeds, also require disk alloys with high strength. To address these challenges, NASA funded a series of disk programs in the 1990's. Under these initiatives, Honeywell and Allison focused their attention on Alloy 10, a high-strength, nickel-base disk alloy developed by Honeywell for application in the small turbine engines used in regional jet aircraft. Since tensile, creep, and fatigue properties are strongly influenced by alloy grain size, the effect of heat treatment on grain size and the attendant properties were studied in detail. It was observed that a fine grain microstructure offered the best tensile and fatigue properties, whereas a coarse grain microstructure offered the best creep resistance at high temperatures. Therefore, a disk with a dual microstructure, consisting of a fine-grained bore and a coarse-grained rim, should have a high potential for optimal performance. Under NASA's Ultra-Safe Propulsion Project and Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, a disk program was initiated at the NASA Glenn Research Center to assess the feasibility of using Alloy 10 to produce a dual-microstructure disk. The objectives of this program were twofold. First, existing dual-microstructure heat treatment (DMHT) technology would be applied and refined as necessary for Alloy 10 to yield the desired grain structure in full-scale forgings appropriate for use in regional gas turbine engines. Second, key mechanical properties from the bore and rim of a DMHT Alloy 10 disk would be measured and compared with conventional heat treatments to assess the benefits of DMHT technology. At Wyman Gordon and Honeywell, an active-cooling DMHT process was used to convert four full-scale Alloy 10 disks to a dual-grain microstructure. The resulting microstructures are illustrated in the

  12. Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Fine-Grain Nickel-Based Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Constant-Kmax fatigue crack growth tests were performed on two finegrain nickel-base alloys Inconel 718 (DA) and Ren 95 to determine if these alloys exhibit near-threshold time-dependent crack growth behavior observed for fine-grain aluminum alloys in room-temperature laboratory air. Test results showed that increases in K(sub max) values resulted in increased crack growth rates, but no evidence of time-dependent crack growth was observed for either nickel-base alloy at room temperature.

  13. Fracture behavior of nickel-based alloys in water

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Brown, C.M.

    1999-08-01

    The cracking resistance of Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and their welds, EN82H and EN52, was characterized by conducting J{sub IC} tests in air and hydrogenated water. All test materials displayed excellent toughness in air and high temperature water, but Alloy 690 and the two welds were severely embrittled in low temperature water. In 54 C water with 150 cc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O, J{sub IC} values were typically 70% to 95% lower than their air counterparts. The toughness degradation was associated with a fracture mechanism transition from microvoid coalescence to intergranular fracture. Comparison of the cracking response in water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that susceptibility to low temperature cracking is due to hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries. The effects of water temperature, hydrogen content and loading rate on low temperature crack propagation were studied. In addition, testing of specimens containing natural weld defects and as-machined notches was performed to determine if low temperature cracking can initiate at these features. Unlike the other materials, Alloy 600 is not susceptible to low temperature cracking as the toughness in 54 C water remained high and a microvoid coalescence mechanism was operative in both air and water.

  14. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Robert M.; Cohen, Isadore

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  15. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  16. Fundamental Understanding of the Intrinsic Ductility in Nickel-Base L1 sub 2 Type Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    tantalum and niobium modified ternary alloys as published in the literature (References 9 and 16), in both cases here the > orientation is observed to be...applied to a nickel-base Llz phase compound. Large single crystals of binary and tantalum -modified V. Ni3Al alloys with various stoichiometry were...ductility of the tantalum -modified ternary alloys shows a rather different 0. OISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21 ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  17. Investigation on the primary creep of a nickel based alloy. [Nimonic 75 type alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Q.P.; Wang, X. )

    1993-07-01

    It is widely accepted that dislocation climb is involved in the steady state (i.e. secondary) creep at high temperatures, which is characterized by the formation and evolution of substructures. In current theories of steady state creep, dislocation climb is regarded as the rate controlling process. However, the role of dislocation climb in the primary (i.e. transient) creep at high temperatures is not clear. The present paper is to report the observations by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on high temperature creep of a nickel based alloy. It will be shown that dislocation climb plays an important role not only in the steady state creep, but also in the primary creep.

  18. Thermogravimetric study of reduction of oxides present in oxidized nickel-base alloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon, hydrogen, and hydrogen plus carbon reduction of three oxidized nickel-base alloy powders (a solid solution strengthened alloy both with and without the gamma prime formers aluminum and titanium and the solid solution strengthened alloy NiCrAlY) were evaluated by thermogravimetry. Hydrogen and hydrogen plus carbon were completely effective in reducing an alloy containing chromium, columbium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. However, with aluminum and titanium present the reduction was limited to a weight loss of about 81 percent. Carbon alone was not effective in reducing any of the alloys, and none of the reducing conditions were effective for use with NiCrAlY.

  19. The metallography of heat treatment effects in a nickel-base casting alloy. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Goodall, T G; Lewis, A J

    1979-08-01

    A series of standard tensile specimens produced from a nickel-base removable partial denture casting alloy were subjected to heat treatments at three temperatures and three periods at each temperature. The microstructures developed within the castings disclose changes in both the matrix and interdendritic zones.

  20. The strengthening mechanism of a nickel-based alloy after laser shock processing at high temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinghong; Zhou, Liucheng; He, Weifeng; He, Guangyu; Wang, Xuede; Nie, Xiangfan; Wang, Bo; Luo, Sihai; Li, Yuqin

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the strengthening mechanism of laser shock processing (LSP) at high temperatures in the K417 nickel-based alloy. Using a laser-induced shock wave, residual compressive stresses and nanocrystals with a length of 30–200 nm and a thickness of 1 μm are produced on the surface of the nickel-based alloy K417. When the K417 alloy is subjected to heat treatment at 900 °C after LSP, most of the residual compressive stress relaxes while the microhardness retains good thermal stability; the nanocrystalline surface has not obviously grown after the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, which shows a comparatively good thermal stability. There are several reasons for the good thermal stability of the nanocrystalline surface, such as the low value of cold hardening of LSP, extreme high-density defects and the grain boundary pinning of an impure element. The results of the vibration fatigue experiments show that the fatigue strength of K417 alloy is enhanced and improved from 110 to 285 MPa after LSP. After the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, the fatigue strength is 225 MPa; the heat treatment has not significantly reduced the reinforcement effect. The feature of the LSP strengthening mechanism of nickel-based alloy at a high temperature is the co-working effect of the nanocrystalline surface and the residual compressive stress after thermal relaxation. PMID:27877617

  1. A crystallographic model for nickel base single crystal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel-base single-crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components. This objective is achieved by developing a rate-dependent anisotropic constitutive model and implementing it in a nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurgical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. An extension of Schmid's law is combined with the Bodner-Partom equations to model the inelastic tension/compression asymmetry and orientation-dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is used to approximate the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response and strain-rate sensitivity of the single-crystal superalloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are also discussed. The model is implemented in a finite-element code, and the computed and experimental results are compared for several orientations and loading conditions.

  2. The elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloy in molten salt corrosion by using nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qiantao; Liu, Ke; Gao, Jie; Li, Xiaolin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Nickel-based alloys as candidate materials for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR), need to be used under high temperature in molten salt environment. In order to ensure the safety of the reactor running, it is necessary to study the elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloys in the high temperature molten salts. In this work, the scanning nuclear microprobe at Fudan University was applied to study the elemental move. The Nickel-based alloy samples were corroded by molten salt at different temperatures. The element concentrations in the Nickel-based alloys samples were determined by the scanning nuclear microprobe. Micro-PIXE results showed that the element concentrations changed from the interior to the exterior of the alloy samples after the corrosion.

  3. The effects of remelting on the mechanical properties of a nickel base partial denture casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-04-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third, an oxy-acetylene torch. In each series the same metal was cast sequentially a number of times and all test pieces so produced were subjected to mechanical testing. The mechanical properties were found to vary according to both the number of times the alloy was cast and the method of heating used to render the alloy molten.

  4. Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment of a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    Existing Dual Microstructure Heat Treat (DMHT) technology was successfully applied to Alloy 10, a high strength, nickel-base disk alloy, to produce a disk with a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim. Specimens were extracted from the DMHT disk and tested in tension, creep, fatigue, and crack growth using conditions pertinent to disk applications. These data were then compared with data from "traditional" subsolvus and supersolvus heat treatments for Alloy 10. The results showed the DMHT disk to have a high strength, fatigue resistant bore comparable to that of subsolvus Alloy 10. Further, creep resistance of the DMHT rim was comparable to that of supersolvus Alloy 10. Crack growth resistance in the DMHT rim, while better than that for subsolvus, was inferior to that of supersolvus Alloy 10. The slow cool at the end of the DMHT conversion and/or the subsolvus resolution step are thought to be responsible for degrading rim DMHT crack growth resistance.

  5. Analyzing the effect of cutting parameters on surface roughness and tool wear when machining nickel based hastelloy - 276

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khidhir, Basim A.; Mohamed, Bashir

    2011-02-01

    Machining parameters has an important factor on tool wear and surface finish, for that the manufacturers need to obtain optimal operating parameters with a minimum set of experiments as well as minimizing the simulations in order to reduce machining set up costs. The cutting speed is one of the most important cutting parameter to evaluate, it clearly most influences on one hand, tool life, tool stability, and cutting process quality, and on the other hand controls production flow. Due to more demanding manufacturing systems, the requirements for reliable technological information have increased. For a reliable analysis in cutting, the cutting zone (tip insert-workpiece-chip system) as the mechanics of cutting in this area are very complicated, the chip is formed in the shear plane (entrance the shear zone) and is shape in the sliding plane. The temperature contributed in the primary shear, chamfer and sticking, sliding zones are expressed as a function of unknown shear angle on the rake face and temperature modified flow stress in each zone. The experiments were carried out on a CNC lathe and surface finish and tool tip wear are measured in process. Machining experiments are conducted. Reasonable agreement is observed under turning with high depth of cut. Results of this research help to guide the design of new cutting tool materials and the studies on evaluation of machining parameters to further advance the productivity of nickel based alloy Hastelloy - 276 machining.

  6. A nickel base alloy, NASA WAZ-16, with potential for gas turbine stator vane application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A nickel-base superalloy based on the nickel-aluminum-tungsten system designated WAZ-16 was developed for high strength in the 1095 C (2000 F) to 1205 C (2200 F) range. Its tensile strength at the latter temperature is approximately 186 MN/m2 (27,000 psi). The combination of properties of the alloy suggest that it has potential as a stator vane material in advanced gas turbine engines.

  7. Corrosion behavior of iron and nickel base alloys under solid oxide fuel cell exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.

    2006-03-01

    Topography and phase composition of the scales formed on commercial ferritic stainless steels and experimental low CTE nickel-based alloys were studied in atmospheres simulating solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) environments. The materials were studied under dual environment conditions with air on one side of the sample and carbon monoxide on the other side at 750°C. Surface characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used in this study.

  8. Combined thermodynamic study of nickel-base alloys. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, C. R.; Meschter, P. J.

    1981-02-15

    Achievements during this period are the following: (1) initiation of a high-temperature study of the Ni-Ta system using the galvanic cell technique, (2) emf study of high-temperature thermodynamics in the Ni-Mo system, (3) measured heat capacity data on ordered and disordered Ni/sub 4/Mo, (4) heat capacities of Ni and disordered Ni/sub 3/Fe, and (5) computer correlation of thermodynamic and phase diagram data in binary Ni-base alloys. (MOW)

  9. Dendritic growth and structure of undercooled nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Shiohara, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objectives of this overall investigation are to: study means for obtaining high undercooling in levitation melted droplets, and study structures produced upon the solidification of these undercooled specimens. Thermal measurements are made of the undercooling, and of the rapid recalescence, to develop an understanding of the solidification mechanism. Comparison of results is made with the modeling studies. Characterization and metallographic work is done to gain an understanding of the relationship between rapid solidification variables and the structures so produced. In ground based work to date, solidification of undercooled Ni-25 wt percent Sn alloy was observed by high-speed cinematography and the results compared with optical temperature measurements. Also in ground based work, high-speed optical temperature measurements were made of the solidification behavior of levitated metal samples within a transparent glass medium. Two undercooled Ni-Sn alloys were examined. Measurements were carried out on samples at undercoolings up to 330 K. Microstructures of samples produced in ground based work were determined by optical metallography and by SEM, and microsegregation by electron microprobe measurements. A series of flight tests were planned to conduct experiments similar to the ground based experiments. The Space Shuttle Columbia carried an alloy undercooled experiment in the STS 61-C mission in January 1986. A sample of Ni-32.5 wt percent Sn eutectic was melted and solidified under microgravity conditions.

  10. Development of a Mathematical Model of Crevice Corrosion Propagation on Nickel Base Alloys in Natural and Chlorinated Sea Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-30

    then bromamines and chloramines are formed and the processes become even more complicated. [10]. 0 From the point of view of crevice corrosion ... Corrosion Propagation on Nickel Base Alloys in Natural and Chlorinated Sea Water Thi! os 7 -= n %:ý 7e~~r: :-ppcved tor piU&* : e --I . " dcktr!u-,J...Summary Crevice corrosion initiation and propagation of nickel base alloys Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276 and Hastelloy 22 in sea water and chlorinated sea

  11. Ignition characteristics of the nickel-based alloy UNS N07718 in pressurized oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, James W.; Billiard, Phillip A.; Hurley, James A.; Mcdermott, Kathleen M.; Vazquez, Isaura

    1989-01-01

    The development of ignition and combustion in pressurized oxygen atmospheres was studied for the nickel based alloy UNS N07718. Ignition of the alloy was achieved by heating the top. It was found that the alloy would autoheat to destruction from temperatures below the solidus temperature. In addition, endothermic events occurred as the alloy was heated, many at reproducible temperatures. Many endothermic events occurred prior to abrupt increases in surface temperature and appeared to accelerate the rate of increase in specimen temperature. It appeared that the source of some endotherms may increase the oxidation rate of the alloy. Ignition parameters are defined and the temperatures at which these parameters occur are given for the oxygen pressure range of 1.72 to 13.8 MPa (250 to 2000 psia).

  12. Application of an alternative current in the processing of cobalt-containing nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, O. G.; Bryukvin, V. A.; Ermuratskii, P. V.; Paretskii, V. M.

    2010-06-01

    The versions of electrochemical processing of multialloyed nickel-based alloys are studied. These are the processing of the compositions (wt %) 57.0-70.0 Ni, 5.0-10.5 Co, 8.0-20.0 Cr, 1.2-5.0 Mo, 5.0-11.0 W, 2.0-2.9 Ti, 0.8-1.2 Nb, and 5.1-6.0 Al using an industrial-frequency alternating current and sulfuric acid electrolytes, namely, the dissolution of Ni-(10.0-15.0 wt %) Co alloys resulting from primary pyrometallurgical refining and direct dissolution. The rates of electrochemical dissolution of multialloyed nickel-based alloys under the action of a direct current and an industrial frequency (50 Hz) alternating current and the current efficiencies of the processes as functions of the temperatures and concentrations of sulfuric acid in electrolytes are compared. The optimum conditions of alloy dissolution are determined, and large laboratory studies are performed. A principal scheme of ac processing of the alloys is suggested.

  13. Helium-3 behavior in some nickel-based amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Unlu, K.; Vincent, D.H. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, helium trapping and release are studied for the nickel-rich amorphous alloys Ni{sub 75.1}Cr{sub 14.0}P{sub 10.1}C{sub 0.08}, Ni{sub 63.5}Zr{sub 36.5}, and Ni{sub 87.7}P{sub 12.3}. Helium-3 is introduced into the samples by implantation at 150-kev energy. The depth distribution of the implanted helium is observed by neutron depth profiling employing he reaction {sup 3}He(n,p){sup 3}H. Two implantation doses are used: 1 {times} 10{sup 16} and 5 {times} 10{sup 16} {sup 3}He/cm{sup 2}. Both implantation doses were chosen to be low enough to avoid blistering or flaking of the surface of the samples. The helium release behavior of the samples is studied by taking depth profiles after each annealing stage. At the same time, electron diffraction is used on parallel samples to observe the microstructure of the samples as a function of annealing. The annealing sequence for each material is broken off when electron diffraction indicated the existence of relatively large crystals in a sample. Only a small fraction of the implanted helium is released in most cases, and a clear correlation between helium release and recrystallization can be found in only one case.

  14. Effects of neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of nickel-base fastener alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Kammenzind, B.F.; Burke, M.G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture behavior and deformation microstructure of high-strength nickel-base alloy fastener materials, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625. Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition, and Alloy 625 in the direct aged condition were irradiated to a fluence of 2.4x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} at 264 C in the Advanced Test Reactor. Deformation structures at low strains were examined. It was previously shown that Alloy X-750 undergoes hardening, a significant degradation in ductility and an increase in intergranular fracture. In contrast, Alloy 625 had shown softening with a concomitant increase in ductility and transgranular failure after irradiation. The deformation microstructures of the two alloys were also different. Alloy X-750 deformed by a planar slip mechanism with fine microcracks forming at the intersections of slip bands with grain boundaries. Alloy 625 showed much more homogeneous deformation with fine, closely spaced slip bands and an absence of microcracks. The mechanism(s) of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) are discussed.

  15. Metallurgical investigation into ductility dip cracking in nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noecker, Fredrick F., II

    A690 is a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy with excellent resistance to general corrosion, localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. However, the companion filler metal for A690, EN52, has been shown by several researchers to be susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC), which limits its widespread use in joining applications. The Gleeble hot ductility test was used to evaluate the DDC susceptibility of A600 and A690, along with their filler metals, EN82H and EN52, throughout the heating and cooling portions of a simulated weld reheat thermal cycle. Both macroscopic mechanical measures and microscopic measures of DDC were quantified and compared. Water quenching was conducted at select temperatures for subsequent microstructural characterization. Microstructural and microchemical characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques. The greatest resistance to DDC was observed in A600 and A690 during heating, where no DDC cracks formed even when the samples were fractured. Both A690 and EN52 were found to form an intermediate on-cooling dip in ductility and UTS, which corresponded to an increase in ductility dip crack length. The hot ductility and cracking resistance of EN82H remained high throughout the entire thermal cycle. DDC susceptibility in both EN52 and EN82H decreased when the thermal cycle was modified to promote coarsening/precipitation of intergranular carbides prior to straining. AEM analysis did not reveal any sulfur or phosphorous intergranular segregation in EN52 at 1600°F on-heating, on-cooling or after a 60 second hold. The ductility dip cracks were preferentially oriented at a 45° to the tensile axis and were of a wedge type appearance, both of which are characteristic of grain boundary sliding (GBS). Samples with microstructures that consisted of coarsened carbides and/or serrated grain boundaries, which are expected to decrease GBS, were found to be

  16. The effect of alloying on gamma and gamma prime in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Wallace, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the compositional limits of gamma and gamma prime phases in nickel-base superalloys. Fifty-one nickel-base alloys were melted under vacuum and heat treated for 4 hours at 1190 C followed by 1008 hours at 850 C. The alloys had the following composition ranges: A1 4.0 to 13 atomic percent, Cr 6.5 to 20.5 percent, Ti 0.25 to 4.75 percent, Mo 0.0 to 6.0 percent, and W 0.0 to 4.0 percent. The residues from the ammonium sulfate electrolytic extraction for the two-phase alloys were analyzed chemically and by X-ray diffraction. The results of the investigation were used to assemble a mathematical model of the gamma-gamma prime region of the Ni-Al-Cr-Ti-Mo-W system. A computer program was written to analyze the model of the phase diagram. Some of these results are also presented graphically. The resulting model is capable of satisfactorily predicting the compositions of conjugate gamma-gamma prime phases in the alloys investigated and twelve of fifteen commercial superalloys studied.

  17. High-temperature microstructural stability in iron- and nickel-base alloys from rapid solidification processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E. ); Bae, J.C.; Kelly, T.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The properties and performance of metallic alloys for heat resistant applications depend on the fineness, homogeneity, and stability of their microstructures, particularly after high temperature exposures. Potential advantages of rapid solidification processing (RSP) of alloys for such applications are the homogeneity in composition and fine microstructural features derived from the nature of the RSP process. The main RSP product form is powder, is which obtained by atomizing a narrow melt stream into fine molten droplets. Rapid cooling of the droplets is typically achieved through convective cooling with noble gases such as argon or helium. Consolidation of RSP powder, either using near-net-shape methods or into forms that can be converted to final product shapes, requires exposures to fairly high temperatures, usually 900 to 1200{degrees}C for iron- and nickel-base alloys. Full consolidation, i.e., complete densification with accompanying particle bonding, usually requires pressure or stress assistance. Consolidation, as well as any subsequent thermal-mechanical processing, may affect the chemical homogeneity and fine microstructures. A study has been performed on a series of RSP iron- and nickel-base alloys. The results of microstructure examinations and mechanical properties tests of the consolidated powders, and their correlation, will be covered in this paper. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The corrosion performance of nickel-based alloys in a reverse osmosis plant utilizing seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashem, A.; Carew, J.; Al-Odwani, A.

    1998-12-31

    Four nickel-based alloys, UNS N06625, UNS N08825, UNS N10276, and UNS N05500, were evaluated in terms of their corrosion performance in a seawater reverse osmosis plant using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open circuit potential (OCP) and linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements. Slight changes in the EIS spectra were observed for UNS N06625, UNSN10276 and UNS N05500 at low frequencies. However, UNS N08825 EIS spectra exhibited more changes than the other alloys at low frequencies. The OCP of UNS N10276 was more noble than the other alloys under the same conditions. The LPR measurements indicated that UNS N10276 and UNS N05500 exhibited lower corrosion rates than UNS NO6625 and UNS N08825.

  19. Thermal and mechanical treatments for nickel and some nickel-base alloys: Effects on mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. M.; Beuhring, V. F.

    1972-01-01

    This report deals with heat treating and working nickel and nickel-base alloys, and with the effects of these operations on the mechanical properties of the materials. The subjects covered are annealing, solution treating, stress relieving, stress equalizing, age hardening, hot working, cold working, combinations of working and heat treating (often referred to as thermomechanical treating), and properties of the materials at various temperatures. The equipment and procedures used in working the materials are discussed, along with the common problems that may be encountered and the precautions and corrective measures that are available.

  20. Laser-Aided Direct Writing of Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Super Alloy (N5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yichen; Choi, Jeongyoung; Mazumder, Jyoti

    2016-12-01

    This communication reports direct writing of René N5 nickel-based Super alloy. N5 powder was deposited on (100) single-crystal substrate of René N5, for epitaxial growth, using laser and induction heating with a specially designed closed-loop thermal control system. A thin wall (1 mm width) of René N5 single crystal of 22.1 mm (including 3 mm SX substrate) in height was successfully deposited within 100 layers. SEM and EBSD characterized the single-crystal nature of the deposit.

  1. Ion irradiation induced disappearance of dislocations in a nickel-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. C.; Li, D. H.; Lui, R. D.; Huang, H. F.; Li, J. J.; Lei, G. H.; Huang, Q.; Bao, L. M.; Yan, L.; Zhou, X. T.; Zhu, Z. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Under Xe ion irradiation, the microstructural evolution of a nickel based alloy, Hastelloy N (US N10003), was studied. The intrinsic dislocations are decorated with irradiation induced interstitial loops and/or clusters. Moreover, the intrinsic dislocations density reduces as the irradiation damage increases. The disappearance of the intrinsic dislocations is ascribed to the dislocations climb to the free surface by the absorption of interstitials under the ion irradiation. Moreover, the in situ annealing experiment reveals that the small interstitial loops and/or clusters induced by the ion irradiation are stable below 600 °C.

  2. Comparison of joining processes for Haynes 230 nickel based super alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williston, David Hugh

    Haynes 230 is a nickel based, solid-solution strengthened alloy that is used for high-temperature applications in the aero-engine and power generation industries. The alloy composition is balanced to avoid precipitation of undesirable topologically closed-packed (TCP) intermetallic phases, such as Sigma, Mu, or Laves-type, that are detrimental to mechanical and corrosion properties. This material is currently being used for the NASA's J2X upper stage rocket nozzle extension. Current fabrication procedures use fusion welding processes to join blanks that are subsequently formed. Cracks have been noted to occur in the fusion welded region during the forming operations. Use of solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding are being proposed to eliminate the fusion weld cracks. Of interest is a modified friction stir welding process called thermal stir welding. Three welding process: Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Thermal Stir Welding (TSWing) are compared in this study.

  3. The Effect of Solution Heat Treatment on an Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Kantzos, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    Five heat treat options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, LSHR, have been investigated. These included two conventional solution heat treat cycles, subsolvus/oil quench and supersolvus/fan cool, which yield fine grain and coarse grain microstructure disks respectively, as well as three advanced dual microstructure heat treat (DMHT) options. The DMHT options produce disks with a fine grain bore and a coarse grain rim. Based on an overall evaluation of the mechanical property data, it was evident that the three DMHT options achieved a desirable balance of properties in comparison to the conventional solution heat treatments for the LSHR alloy. However, one of the DMHT options, SUB/DMHT, produced the best set of properties, largely based on dwell crack growth data. Further evaluation of the SUB/DMHT option in spin pit experiments on a generic disk shape demonstrated the advantages and reliability of a dual grain structure at the component level.

  4. Vapor phase strengthening of nickel-based alloys for actively-cooled thermostructural panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Bergquist, Sara Jane

    Actively cooled thermostructural panels for use in emerging hypersonic flight systems require the use of advanced materials able to support substantial loads at elevated temperatures. A major challenge in this advancing technology is identifying formable structural materials that are strong, tough and oxidation resistant. For thermostructural panels to be optimized for low mass with an appropriate combination of mechanical strength and cooling capacity, the panel is required to have a thin-walled geometry. Advanced, high strength cast Ni-based alloys have attractive properties, but the fabrication of sub-millimeter walls with conventional casting processes would be extremely challenging. The purpose of this study is to develop a new processing path that would result in a rectangular channeled panel made of a nickel-based precipitation strengthened alloy in a previously unobtainable thin-walled geometry suitable for active cooling. Beginning with thin sheets of Ni-based solid-solution alloys and subsequently strengthening the material by vapor phase aluminization combined with an annealing treatment, this objective is accomplished. This study includes selecting a wrought nickel-based alloy as the base substrate for panel fabrication, determining a goal gamma + gamma' microstructure, fabricating rectangular channeled panels, and testing the actively cooled panels at high temperature. Thermodynamic, yield strength, and panel geometry modeling was integrated to determine an optimized geometry and microstructure for the strengthened panel. Panels were fabricated with the optimized geometry and tested at high temperature with active cooling in both the as-fabricated and strengthened states. The strengthened panel was able to withstand a temperature 478°C higher than the as-fabricated panel indicating the increase in strengthening and temperature capability possible with this process.

  5. Changes in the composition of a nickel-base partial denture casting alloy upon fusion and casting.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-02-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel-base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed for melting the alloy, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third an oxy-acetylene torch. In each series the same metal was cast sequentially five times, following which samples of the alloy were subjected to a ten element quantitative analysis to ascertain compositional changes associated with the three methods of fusion.

  6. Oral keratinocyte responses to nickel-based dental casting alloys in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wylie, C M; Davenport, A J; Cooper, P R; Shelton, R M

    2010-09-01

    Adverse reactions of oral mucosa to nickel-based dental casting alloys are probably due to corrosion metal ion release. We exposed H400 oral keratinocytes to two Ni-based dental alloys (Matchmate and Dsign10) as well as NiCl( 2) (1-40 microg/mL Ni(2+)). Alloy derived Ni(2+) media concentrations were determined. Direct culture on both alloys resulted in inhibited growth with a greater effect observed for Dsign10 (higher ion release). Indirect exposure of cells to conditioned media from Dsign10 negatively affected cell numbers (approximately 64% of control by 6 days) and morphology while Matchmate-derived media did not. Exposure to increasing NiCl(2) negatively affected cell growth and morphology, and the Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) transcript was significantly up-regulated in cells following direct and indirect exposure to Dsign10. NiCl(2) exposure up-regulated all cytokine transcripts at 1 day. At day 6, IL-1beta and IL-8 transcripts were suppressed while GM-CSF and IL-11 increased with Ni(2+) dose. Accumulation of Ni(2+) ions from alloys in oral tissues may affect keratinocyte viability and chronic inflammation.

  7. Hot Corrosion of Nickel-Base Alloys in Biomass-Derived Fuel Simulated Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Leyens, C.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1999-02-28

    Biomass fuels are considered to be a promising renewable source of energy. However, impurities present in the fuel may cause corrosion problems with the materials used in the hot sections of gas turbines and only limited data are available so far. As part of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy, the present study provides initial data on the hot corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys against sodium sulfate-induced corrosion as a baseline, and against salt compositions simulating biomass-derived fuel deposits. Single crystal nickel-superalloy Rene N5, a cast NiCrAlY alloy, a NiCoCrAlY alloy representing industrially used overlay compositions, and a model {beta}NiAl+Hf alloy were tested in 1h thermal cycles at 950 C with different salt coatings deposited onto the surfaces. Whereas the NiCoCrAlY alloy exhibited reasonable resistance against pure sodium sulfate deposits, the NiCrAiY alloy and Rene N5 were attacked severely. Although considered to be an ideal alumina former in air and oxygen at higher temperatures, {beta}NiAl+Hf also suffered from rapid corrosion attack at 950 C when coated with sodium sulfate. The higher level of potassium present in biomass fuels compared with conventional fuels was addressed by testing a NiCoCrAlY alloy coated with salts of different K/Na atomic ratios. Starting at zero Na, the corrosion rate increased considerably when sodium was added to potassium sulfate. In an intermediate region the corrosion rate was initially insensitive to the K/Na ratio but accelerated when very Na-rich compositions were deposited. The key driver for corrosion of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was sodium sulfate rather than potassium sulfate, and no simple additive or synergistic effect of combining sodium and potassium was found.

  8. Interaction of lead with nickel-base Alloys 600 and 690

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, D.; Talah, H.; Marcus, P.; Calvar, M. Le; Gelpi, A.

    1995-12-31

    The results of a combined electrochemical and (X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS)) study of the effects of lead on the passivation of nickel, chromium and nickel-based alloys with compositions close to Alloy 600 and 690 in acidic solutions at room temperature are reported. Lead was present as soluble PbO in 0.1M HClO{sub 4} and PbSO{sub 4} in 0.05M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or as controlled amounts of metallic lead deposited on the surface of the samples. Lead enhances the anodic dissolution of nickel (in perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions) and of Alloy 600 (in perchloric acid solution) whereas it has no effect on Cr and on Alloy 690. Pb{sup 2+} does not interact with an already formed passive film. The XPS study showed that the increased dissolution observed is caused by the formation of a Ni-Pb-anion (ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) complex on the metallic surface. Such a species is not produced on an oxidized surface.

  9. Ignition characteristics of the nickel-based alloy UNS N07001 in pressurized oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Billiard, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of ignition and combustion in pressurized oxygen atmospheres was studied for the nickel-based alloy UNS N07001. Ignition of the alloy was achieved by heating the top surface of a cylindrical specimen with a continuous-wave CO2 laser. Two heating procedures were used. In the first, laser power was adjusted to maintain an approximately linear increase in surface temperature. In the second, laser power was periodically increased until autoheating (self-heating) was established. It was found that the alloy would autoheat to combustion from temperatures below the solidus temperature. In addition, the alloy had a tendency to develop combustion zones (hot spots) at high oxygen pressures when the incremental (step) heating test mode was used. Unique points on the temperature-time curves that describe certain events are defined and the temperatures at which these events occur are given for the oxygen pressure range of 1.72 to 13.8 MPa (250 to 2000 psia).

  10. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results obtained in a program to evaluate dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys for use in a metallic radiative thermal protection system operating at surface temperatures to 1477 K for the space shuttle were presented. Vehicle environments having critical effects on the thermal protection system are defined; TD Ni-20Cr characteristics of material used in the current study are compared with previous results; cyclic load, temperature, and pressure effects on sheet material residual strength are investigated; the effects of braze reinforcement in improving the efficiency of spotwelded joints are evaluated; parametric studies of metallic radiative thermal protection systems are reported; and the design, instrumentation, and testing of full scale subsize heat shield panels in two configurations are described. Initial tests of full scale subsize panels included simulated meteoroid impact tests, simulated entry flight aerodynamic heating, programmed differential pressure loads and temperatures simulating mission conditions, and acoustic tests simulating sound levels experienced during boost flight.

  11. Corrosion of Nickel-Based Alloys in Ultra-High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2017-03-01

    MgCl2-KCl binary system has been proposed to be used as high temperature reactor coolant. Due to its relatively low melting point, good heat capacity and excellent thermal stability, this system can also be used in high operation temperature concentrating solar power generation system as heat transfer fluid (HTF). The corrosion behaviors of nickel based alloys in MgCl2-KCl molten salt system at 1,000 °C were determined based on long-term isothermal dipping test. After 500 h exposure tests under strictly maintained high purity argon gas atmosphere, the weight loss and corrosion rate analysis were conducted. Among all the tested samples, Ni-201 demonstrated the lowest corrosion rate due to the excellent resistance of Ni to high temperature element dissolution. Detailed surface topography and corrosion mechanisms were also determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS).

  12. Infrared repair brazing of 403 stainless steel with a nickel-based braze alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiue, R. K.; Wu, S. K.; Hung, C. M.

    2002-06-01

    Martensitic stainless steel (403SS) is extensively used for intermediate and low-pressure steam turbine blades in fossil-fuel power plants. The purpose of this investigation is to study the repair of shallow cracks on the surface of 403SS steam turbine blades by infrared repair brazing using rapid thermal cycles. A nickel-based braze alloy (NICROBRAZ LM) is used as filler metal. The braze alloy after brazing is primarily comprised of borides and an FeNi3 matrix with different amounts of alloying elements, especially B and Si. As the brazing temperature increases, more Fe atoms are dissolved into the molten braze. Some boron atoms diffuse into the 403SS substrate primarily via grain boundary diffusion and form B-Cr-Fe intermetallic precipitates along the grain boundaries. The LM filler metal demonstrates better performance than 403SS in both microhardness and wear tests. It is also noted that specimens brazed in a vacuum have less porosity than those brazed in an Ar atmosphere. The shear strength of the joint is around 300 MPa except for specimens brazed in short time periods, e.g., 5 seconds in Ar flow and 30 seconds in vacuum. The fractographs mainly consist of brittle fractures and no ductile dimple fractures observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination.

  13. The erosion-corrosion of copper-based and nickel-based alloys in warm polluted Arabian Gulf seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.A.; Islam, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of the erosion-corrosion behavior of copper-nickel alloys (90:10 Cu/Ni and 7030 Cu/Ni), nickel-copper alloy UNS N04400 and nickel-based alloys (UNS N06022, N06030 and UNS S32550) used as heat exchanger tubes, in warm flowing Arabian Gulf seawater containing up to 5 ppm of sulphide ions. Visual and optical examinations of the internal surfaces of the tubes were carried out to compare the susceptibilities to erosion-corrosion attack of the different alloys, taking into consideration the nature of the product films formed.

  14. Effect of alloy additions on wear resistance of nickel based hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.L.; Chen, K.Y.

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the influence of the microstructure and hardness of the nickel based hardfacing alloy on wear resistance of deposit layers when different alloy elements are added. Different deposit layers were obtained by SMAW in which AWS RNiCr bare electrodes were coated by fluxes, to which different measures of ferro-niobium, ferro-chromium, and carbon had been added. The result of the experiment showed that when subject to abrasive wear, if the abrasive particles were silicon carbide, the increase of the volume fraction of the hard phase had only a slight effect on improving the wear resistance of the deposit layers. On adhesive wear, the niobium added specimens formed some spherical niobium carbide particles in the matrix of the deposit layer which reduced the friction coefficient of the specimens. The addition of carbon and chromium can enhance macrohardness and wear resistance of the welding deposit significantly. This same addition will also aid wear resistance by forming a continuous phase in the microstructure of the deposit metal. While there was no significant difference between the macrohardnesses of the metals, the form of this precipitate in the deposit metals was actually the most important factor in their wear resistance.

  15. Effect of Alloy 625 Buffer Layer on Hardfacing of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using Nickel Base Hardfacing Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Dashpot piston, made up of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, is a part of diverse safety rod used for safe shutdown of a nuclear reactor. This component was hardfaced using nickel base AWS ER NiCr-B alloy and extensive cracking was experienced during direct deposition of this alloy on dashpot piston. Cracking reduced considerably and the component was successfully hardfaced by application of Inconel 625 as buffer layer prior to hardface deposition. Hence, a separate study was undertaken to investigate the role of buffer layer in reducing the cracking and on the microstructure of the hardfaced deposit. Results indicate that in the direct deposition of hardfacing alloy on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, both heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed and the deposit layer are hard making the thickness of the hard layer formed equal to combined thickness of both HAZ and deposit. This hard layer is unable to absorb thermal stresses resulting in the cracking of the deposit. By providing a buffer layer of Alloy 625 followed by a post-weld heat treatment, HAZ formed in the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is effectively tempered, and HAZ formed during the subsequent deposition of the hardfacing alloy over the Alloy 625 buffer layer is almost completely confined to Alloy 625, which does not harden. This reduces the cracking susceptibility of the deposit. Further, unlike in the case of direct deposition on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, dilution of the deposit by Ni-base buffer layer does not alter the hardness of the deposit and desired hardness on the deposit surface could be achieved even with lower thickness of the deposit. This gives an option for reducing the recommended thickness of the deposit, which can also reduce the risk of cracking.

  16. The impact of carbon on single crystal nickel-base superalloys: Carbide behavior and alloy performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Andrew Jay

    Advanced single crystal nickel-base superalloys are prone to the formation of casting grain defects, which hinders their practical implementation in large gas turbine components. Additions of carbon (C) have recently been identified as a means of reducing grain defects, but the full impact of C on single crystal superalloy behavior is not entirely understood. A study was conducted to determine the effects of C and other minor elemental additions on the behavior of CMSX-4, a commercially relevant 2nd generation single crystal superalloy. Baseline CMSX-4 and three alloy modifications (CMSX-4 + 0.05 wt. % C, CMSX-4 + 0.05 wt. % C and 68 ppm boron (B), and CMSX-4 + 0.05 wt. % C and 23 ppm nitrogen (N)) were heat treated before being tested in high temperature creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF). Select samples were subjected to long term thermal exposure (1000 °C/1000 hrs) to assess microstructural stability. The C modifications resulted in significant differences in microstructure and alloy performance as compared to the baseline. These variations were generally attributed to the behavior of carbide phases in the alloy modifications. The C modification and the C+B modification, which both exhibited script carbide networks, were 25% more effective than the C+N modification (small blocky carbides) and 10% more effective than the baseline at preventing grain defects in cast bars. All C-modified alloys exhibited reduced as-cast gamma/gamma' eutectic and increased casting porosity as compared to baseline CMSX-4. The higher levels of porosity (volume fractions 0.002 - 0.005 greater than the baseline) were attributed to carbides blocking molten fluid flow during the final stages of solidification. Although the minor additions resulted in reduced solidus temperature by up to 16 °C, all alloys were successfully heat treated without incipient melting by modifying commercial heat treatment schedules. In the B-containing alloy, heat treatment resulted in the transformation of

  17. Processing Map and Mechanism of Hot Deformation of a Corrosion-Resistant Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, F.; Zuo, Q.; Cheng, J. J.; Chen, C. F.

    2017-01-01

    Hot deformation behavior of a corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy was studied in temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.001-10 s-1 by employing hot compression tests. An approach of processing map was used to reveal the hot workability and microstructural evolution during the hot deformation. The results show that different stable domains in the processing map associated with the microstructure evolution can be ascribed to different dynamic recrystallization (DRX) mechanisms. The discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) grains evolved by the necklace mechanism are finer than those evolved by the ordinary mechanism, respectively, arising from the strong nucleation process and the growth process. If subjected to low temperature and high strain rate, the flow instability domain occurs, due to the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) based on the evolution of deformation micro-bands within the deformed grains. Based on the processing map, a DRX mechanism map is established, which can provide an idea for designing desired microstructure.

  18. Anisotropic constitutive model for nickel base single crystal alloys: Development and finite element implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    A tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel base single crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components is developed. This is achieved by a rate dependent anisotropic constitutive model implemented in a nonlinear three dimensional finite element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurigical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. A non Schmid's law formulation is used to model the tension/compression asymmetry and orientation dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is a good approximation to the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response, and strain rate sensitivity of these alloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are presented. The finite element implementation utilizes an initial strain method and twenty noded isoparametric solid elements. The ability to model piecewise linear load histories is included in the finite element code. The constitutive equations are accurately and economically integrated using a second order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method with a dynamic time incrementing procedure. Computed results from the finite element code are compared with experimental data for tensile, creep and cyclic tests at 760 deg C. The strain rate sensitivity and stress relaxation capabilities of the model are evaluated.

  19. Mass Transfer of Nickel-Base Alloy Covered Electrode During Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; He, Guo

    2013-03-01

    The mass transfer in shielded metal arc welding of a group of nickel-base alloy covered electrodes according to AWS specification A5.11-A5.11M was investigated by directly measuring their deposited metal compositions. The results indicate that the chromium mass-transfer coefficient is in the range of 86 to 94 pct, iron in the range of 82 to 89 pct, manganese in the range of 60 to 73 pct, niobium in the range of 44 to 56 pct, and silicon in the range of 41 to 47 pct. The metal mass-transfer coefficient from the core wire is markedly higher than that from the coating. The basicity of slag, the metal contents in the flux coating, and the welding current together affect the mass transfer. As the basicity of slag increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of Mn, Fe, and Cr slightly increase, but those of Nb and Si decrease significantly. As the niobium and manganese contents increase in the coating, their mass-transfer coefficients also increase. However, iron is different. The content of iron in the coating in the range of 8 to 20 wt pct results in the optimal effective mass transfer. The lower, or higher, iron content leads to lower mass-transfer coefficient. As the welding current increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of niobium and manganese decrease, but chromium and silicon increase. Iron has the lowest mass-transfer coefficient when welded under the operating current of 100 A.

  20. Analysis of the ductility dip cracking in the nickel-base alloy 617mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilers, A.; Nellesen, J.; Zielke, R.; Tillmann, W.

    2017-03-01

    While testing steam leading power plant components made of the nickel-base alloy A617mod at elevated temperatures (700 °C), ductility dip cracking (DDC) was observed in welding seams and their surroundings. In order to clarify the mechanism of crack formation, investigations were carried out on welded specimens made of A617mod. Interrupted tensile tests were performed on tensile specimens taken from the area of the welding seam. To simulate the conditions, the tensile tests were conducted at a temperature of 700 °C and with a low strain rate. Local strain fields at grain boundaries and inside single grains were determined at different deformation states by means of two-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC). Besides the strain fields, local hardnesses (nanoindentation), energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed. Besides information concerning the grain orientation, the EBSD measurement provides information on the coincidence site lattice (CSL) at grain boundaries as well as the Schmid factor of single grains. All results of the analysis methods mentioned above were correlated and compared to each other and related to the crack formation. Among other things, correlations between strain fields and Schmid factors were determined. The investigations show that the following influences affect the crack formation: orientation of the grain boundaries to the direction of the loading, the orientation of the grains to each other (CSL), and grain boundary sliding.

  1. Analysis of thermoelectric properties of high-temperature complex alloys of nickel-base, iron-base and cobalt-base groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties alloys of the nickel-base, iron-base, and cobalt-base groups containing from 1% to 25% 106 chromium were compared and correlated with the following material characteristics: atomic percent of the principle alloy constituent; ratio of concentration of two constituents; alloy physical property (electrical resistivity); alloy phase structure (percent precipitate or percent hardener content); alloy electronic structure (electron concentration). For solid-solution-type alloys the most consistent correlation was obtained with electron concentration, for precipitation-hardenable alloys of the nickel-base superalloy group, the thermoelectric potential correlated with hardener content in the alloy structure. For solid-solution-type alloys, no problems were found with thermoelectric stability to 1000; for precipitation-hardenable alloys, thermoelectric stability was dependent on phase stability. The effects of the compositional range of alloy constituents on temperature measurement uncertainty are discussed.

  2. Microstructural study of the nickel-base alloy WAZ-20 using qualitative and quantitative electron optical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.

    1973-01-01

    The NASA nickel-base alloy WAZ-20 was analyzed by advanced metallographic techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize its phases and stability. The as-cast alloy contained primary gamma-prime, a coarse gamma-gamma prime eutectic, a gamma-fine gamma prime matrix, and MC carbides. A specimen aged at 870 C for 1000 hours contained these same constituents and a few widely scattered high W particles. No detrimental phases (such as sigma or mu) were observed. Scanning electron microscope, light metallography, and replica electron microscope methods are compared. The value of quantitative electron microprobe techniques such as spot and area analysis is demonstrated.

  3. High gas velocity oxidation and hot corrosion testing of oxide dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) nickel-base alloys were tested in high velocity gases for cyclic oxidation resistance at temperatures to 1200 C and times to 500 hours and for hot corrosion resistance at 900 C for 200 hours. Nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS alloys were found to have superior resistance to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to bare and coated nickel-chromium ODS alloys. The best of the alloys tested had compositions of nickel - 15.5 to 16 weight percent chromium with aluminum weight percents between 4.5 and 5.0. All of the nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS materials experienced small weight losses (less than 16 mg/sq cm).

  4. A probabilistic-based approach to monitoring tool wear state and assessing its effect on workpiece quality in nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan Niaki, Farbod

    The objective of this research is first to investigate the applicability and advantage of statistical state estimation methods for predicting tool wear in machining nickel-based superalloys over deterministic methods, and second to study the effects of cutting tool wear on the quality of the part. Nickel-based superalloys are among those classes of materials that are known as hard-to-machine alloys. These materials exhibit a unique combination of maintaining their strength at high temperature and have high resistance to corrosion and creep. These unique characteristics make them an ideal candidate for harsh environments like combustion chambers of gas turbines. However, the same characteristics that make nickel-based alloys suitable for aggressive conditions introduce difficulties when machining them. High strength and low thermal conductivity accelerate the cutting tool wear and increase the possibility of the in-process tool breakage. A blunt tool nominally deteriorates the surface integrity and damages quality of the machined part by inducing high tensile residual stresses, generating micro-cracks, altering the microstructure or leaving a poor roughness profile behind. As a consequence in this case, the expensive superalloy would have to be scrapped. The current dominant solution for industry is to sacrifice the productivity rate by replacing the tool in the early stages of its life or to choose conservative cutting conditions in order to lower the wear rate and preserve workpiece quality. Thus, monitoring the state of the cutting tool and estimating its effects on part quality is a critical task for increasing productivity and profitability in machining superalloys. This work aims to first introduce a probabilistic-based framework for estimating tool wear in milling and turning of superalloys and second to study the detrimental effects of functional state of the cutting tool in terms of wear and wear rate on part quality. In the milling operation, the

  5. Development, processing and fabrication of a nickel based nickel-chromium-iron alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinlade, Dotun Adebayo

    An optimal powder metallurgy (P/M) approach to produce a nickel base Superalloy similar in composition to INCONEL(TM) 600 was carried out utilising a simple uniaxial pressing process. The efficiencies of a lubricant addition, binder, sintering times and temperatures were measured in terms of green and sintered densities as well as microstructural changes that occurred during processing. It was observed that with increasing % polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), an overall decrease in density of compact was obtained and that using 0.75wt % of lubricant (microwax) green densities in excess of 70% can be obtained. The samples were subsequently sintered in air at 1270°C for times ranging from 0.5h to 5h and also in vacuum (6 millitorr) with temperatures ranging from 1260 through to 1400°C. The air sintering was carried out to optimize sintering time, whereas the vacuum sintering was employed to optimize sintering temperature. On sintering for 5h in air, chromium enrichment occurred at the grain boundaries with subsequent depletion of nickel and iron; this was not noted for 2h sintering or for sintering under vacuum. The optimum sintering conditions were determined to be at 1300°C sintering for 2h in vacuum. The samples processed under the optimum conditions were successfully cold rolled to 40% of the original thickness without cracking. An investigation was also undertaken to determine the effect of Al concentration (1-12w/o) on the microstructure of the powder metallurgically (P/M) processed Ni-Cr-Fe ternary alloy, with a view to determine the concentration of aluminium that would yield a homogenously distributed and optimum volume fraction of the intermetallic-gamma'(Ni3Al) phase without the formation of topologically closed packed phases in the ternary alloy. The phases that were likely to form with the variation in concentration of Al were first simulated by JMatPro(TM) thermodynamic software package, and then Ni-Cr-Fe alloys with varying concentration of aluminum were

  6. Probability of Occurrence of Life-Limiting Fatigue Mechanism in P/M Nickel-Based Alloys (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-30

    1) has to be greater than 1 for initiation of a life -limiting failure. After rearranging, this criterion can be represented by: 1 1 \\μΜ\\μ + μ·ψΛ...be used to assess the likelihood of the life -limiting mechanism in other specimen geometries by accounting for the total stressed volume after ...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0146 PROBABILITY OF OCCURRENCE OF LIFE -LIMITING FATIGUE MECHANISM IN P/M NICKEL-BASED ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) M.J

  7. UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS CONTROLLING ENVIRONMENTALLY-ASSISTED INTERGRANULAR CRACKING OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2004-02-13

    Creep and IG cracking of nickel-base alloys depend principally on two factors--the deformation behavior and the effect of the environment. We have shown that both contribute to the observed degradation in primary water. The understanding of cracking does not lie wholly within the environmental effects arena, nor can it be explained only by intrinsic mechanical behavior. Rather, both processes contribute to the observed behavior in primary water. In this project, we had three objectives: (1) to verify that grain boundaries control deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C, (2) to identify the environmental effect on IGSCC, and (3) to combine CSLBs and GBCs to maximize IGSCC resistance in Ni-Cr-Fe in 360 C primary water. Experiments performed in hydrogen gas at 360 C confirm an increase in the primary creep rate in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C due to hydrogen. The creep strain transients caused by hydrogen are proposed to be due to the collapse of dislocation pile-ups, as confirmed by observations in HVEM. The observations only partially support the hydrogen-enhanced plasticity model, but also suggest a potential role of vacancies in the accelerate creep behavior in primary water. In high temperature oxidation experiments designed to examine the potential for selective internal oxidation in the IGSCC process, cracking is greatest in the more oxidizing environments compared to the low oxygen potential environments where nickel metal is stable. In Ni-Cr-Fe alloys, chromium oxides form preferentially along the grain boundaries, even at low oxygen potential, supporting a potential role in grain boundary embrittlement due to preferential oxidation. Experiments designed to determine the role of grain boundary deformation on intergranular cracking have established, for the first time, a cause-and-effect relationship between grain boundary deformation and IGSCC. That is, grain boundary deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe in 360 C primary water leads to IGSCC of the deformed boundaries. As well

  8. Brushing-Induced Surface Roughness of Two Nickel Based Alloys and a Titanium Based Alloy: A Comparative Study - In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, B L Guruprasanna; Nadiger, Ramesh; Shetty, Bharathraj; Gururaj, G; Kumar, K Naveen; Darshan, D D

    2014-01-01

    be given to the selection of the toothbrushes and toothpastes with the medium abrasives in patients with these restorations. How to cite the article: Acharya BL, Nadiger R, Shetty B, Gururaj G, Kumar KN, Darshan DD. Brushing induced surface roughness of two nickel based alloys and a titanium based alloy: A comparative study - In vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):36-49. PMID:25083031

  9. Clarification of stress corrosion cracking mechanism on nickel base alloys in steam generators for their long lifetime assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Nagano, Hiroo; Kajimura, Haruhiko

    1995-12-31

    Thermally treated (TT) Alloys 600 (16%Cr-8%Fe-bal.Ni) and 690 (30%Cr-10%Fe-bal.Ni) have been successfully used in the steam generators of operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This paper deals with intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mechanisms in Ni-base alloys in various corrosive environments such as deaerated water, air-saturated chloride medium, and caustic solutions at high temperatures with focus on Cr content and Cr carbide precipitation at grain boundaries in the alloys. Nickel base alloys of high purity, or with different Cr, C, and B contents with different heat treatments were put to various corrosion tests. SCC resistance of Alloy 600 is affected differently by water chemistry of environments, while Alloy 690 is almost immune to the environments investigated: (1) Cr depletion at grain boundaries is clearly detrimental to IGSCC resistance of Alloy 600 in air-saturated water containing Cl{sup {minus}} ions at 300 C. (2) High purity Alloy 600 has weaker SCC resistance in deaerated water at 360 C than commercially available Alloy 600. Cr depletion along grain boundaries is detrimental to the IGSCC resistance, however its detrimental effect disappears when Cr carbides precipitate at grain boundaries in semi-continuous or continuous way. The NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} film formed on the metal surfaces enhances the IGSCC resistance. Similar relationship between Cr depletion and Cr carbide precipitation is also observed in Alloy 600 in deaerated caustic solutions at high temperatures. (3) Concerning intergranular attack (IGA), which occurs in oxidizing caustic solutions at high temperature, existence of semi-continuous or continuous Cr carbides improves the IGA resistance regardless of Cr depletion. A dual layer corrosion protective film composed of an upper layer of NiO and lower layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed on metal surfaces, of which formation is accelerated by selective Cr carbide dissolution, may be responsible for the IGA resistance.

  10. Modelling of the dynamic behaviour of hard-to-machine alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokka, M.; Leemet, T.; Shrot, A.; Bäker, M.; Kuokkala, V.-T.

    2012-08-01

    Machining of titanium alloys and nickel based superalloys can be difficult due to their excellent mechanical properties combining high strength, ductility, and excellent overall high temperature performance. Machining of these alloys can, however, be improved by simulating the processes and by optimizing the machining parameters. The simulations, however, need accurate material models that predict the material behaviour in the range of strains and strain rates that occur in the machining processes. In this work, the behaviour of titanium 15-3-3-3 alloy and nickel based superalloy 625 were characterized in compression, and Johnson-Cook material model parameters were obtained from the results. For the titanium alloy, the adiabatic Johnson-Cook model predicts softening of the material adequately, but the high strain hardening rate of Alloy 625 in the model prevents the localization of strain and no shear bands were formed when using this model. For Alloy 625, the Johnson-Cook model was therefore modified to decrease the strain hardening rate at large strains. The models were used in the simulations of orthogonal cutting of the material. For both materials, the models are able to predict the serrated chip formation, frequently observed in the machining of these alloys. The machining forces also match relatively well, but some differences can be seen in the details of the experimentally obtained and simulated chip shapes.

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Oxidation Characteristics of Boride-Strengthend Microcrystalline Iron and Nickel Based Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-22

    through subsequent thermomechanical treatments make this class of alloy attractive for many applications. One such relatively new class of alloys based...crystallizing it in the solid state) using controlled thermal or thermomechanical treatments. Preliminary evaluations of the Fe, Ni, and Co-based micrystalline...and iron in alloys 3 and 4). Each of the four microcrystalline alloys was processed in similar ways. Each alloy was induction melted and chill block

  12. A Comparative Study of Microstructures and Properties of Two Types of Nickel-Base Alloy Covered Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huang; He, Guo

    2017-01-01

    Two types of nickel-base alloy covered electrodes, ENiCrMo-6 and ENiCrFe-9, were investigated and compared among their deposited metal compositions, microstructures, strengths, and cryogenic impact values. They all exhibited dendritic microstructures which were composed of dendritic fcc nickel-base solid solution, interdendritic phases, and grain boundary carbides. The molybdenum in the deposited metals tended to migrate and aggregate toward the edges of the dendrite arms during solidification. The niobium preferred to form oxide and/or carbide and aggregate in the interdendritic regions. The grain boundaries were filled with the continuous carbides and oxides. The differences in the tensile mechanical properties of the deposited metals of the two types of electrodes were relatively minor. The impact values of ENiCrMo-6 at -196 °C were above 80 J; while that of ENiCrFe-9 were in the range of 54-66 J. The relatively high level of carbon and sulfur and more grain boundary precipitates should be responsible for the lower cryogenic impact value of the ENiCrFe-9 covered electrode.

  13. A Comparative Study of Microstructures and Properties of Two Types of Nickel-Base Alloy Covered Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huang; He, Guo

    2016-11-01

    Two types of nickel-base alloy covered electrodes, ENiCrMo-6 and ENiCrFe-9, were investigated and compared among their deposited metal compositions, microstructures, strengths, and cryogenic impact values. They all exhibited dendritic microstructures which were composed of dendritic fcc nickel-base solid solution, interdendritic phases, and grain boundary carbides. The molybdenum in the deposited metals tended to migrate and aggregate toward the edges of the dendrite arms during solidification. The niobium preferred to form oxide and/or carbide and aggregate in the interdendritic regions. The grain boundaries were filled with the continuous carbides and oxides. The differences in the tensile mechanical properties of the deposited metals of the two types of electrodes were relatively minor. The impact values of ENiCrMo-6 at -196 °C were above 80 J; while that of ENiCrFe-9 were in the range of 54-66 J. The relatively high level of carbon and sulfur and more grain boundary precipitates should be responsible for the lower cryogenic impact value of the ENiCrFe-9 covered electrode.

  14. Effects of prior deformation and annealing process on microstructure and annealing twin density in a nickel based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhigang; Zhang, Lanting; Sun, Nairong; Sun, Yanle; Shan, Aidang

    2014-09-15

    The nickel based alloys with different Σ3 boundary density were achieved by cold-rolling and subsequent annealing treatment. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis showed that the grain size distribution changed with the processing parameters, and the discontinuous Σ3 boundary became continuous with the increase of prior deformation level. Furthermore, the Σ3 boundary density was found to be manipulated by both grain size distribution and Σ3 boundary density per grain which showed an increasing trend with prior deformation level and annealing temperature. - Highlights: • The prior deformation amount influenced the morphology of Σ3 boundary. • The grain size was not the only factor influencing Σ3 boundary density. • The fact that grain size distribution had an important effect on Σ3 boundary density was confirmed. • The nature of grain size distribution on Σ3 boundary density was revealed. • There was a great deviation in Σ3 boundary density between experimental results and predictions.

  15. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-12-14

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures.

  16. Nickel-based alloy/austenitic stainless steel dissimilar weld properties prediction on asymmetric distribution of laser energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Siyu; Ma, Guangyi; Chai, Dongsheng; Niu, Fangyong; Dong, Jinfei; Wu, Dongjiang; Zou, Helin

    2016-07-01

    A properties prediction method of Nickel-based alloy (C-276)/austenitic stainless steel (304) dissimilar weld was proposed and validated based on the asymmetric distribution of laser energy. Via the dilution level DC-276 (the ratio of the melted C-276 alloy), the relations between the weld properties and the energy offset ratio EC-276 (the ratio of the irradiated energy on the C-276 alloy) were built, and the effects of EC-276 on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds were analyzed. The element distribution Cweld and EC-276 accorded with the lever rule due to the strong convention of the molten pool. Based on the lever rule, it could be predicted that the microstructure mostly consists of γ phase in each weld, the δ-ferrite phase formation was inhibited and the intermetallic phase (P, μ) formation was promoted with the increase of EC-276. The ultimate tensile strength σb of the weld joint could be predicted by the monotonically increasing cubic polynomial model stemming from the strengthening of elements Mo and W. The corrosion potential U, corrosion current density I in the active region and EC-276 also met the cubic polynomial equations, and the corrosion resistance of the dissimilar weld was enhanced with the increasing EC-276, mainly because the element Mo could help form a steady passive film which will resist the Cl- ingress.

  17. Low cycle fatigue life of two nickel-base casting alloys in a hydrogen environment. [for high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of two nickel-base casting alloys, Mar-M-246 (a Martin Company alloy) and 713LC (a low-carbon modification of the alloy 713C developed by International Nickel Company) were tested as candidate materials for the high-pressure fuel and high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles. The samples were subjected to tensile tests and to low cycle fatigue tests in high-pressure hydrogen to study the influence of the hydrogen environment. The Mar-M-246 material was found to have a three times higher cyclic life in hydrogen than the 713LC alloy, and was selected as the nozzle material.

  18. Low cycle fatigue life of two nickel-base casting alloys in a hydrogen environment. [for high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of two nickel-base casting alloys, Mar-M-246 (a Martin Company alloy) and 713LC (a low-carbon modification of the alloy 713C developed by International Nickel Company) were tested as candidate materials for the high-pressure fuel and high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles. The samples were subjected to tensile tests and to low cycle fatigue tests in high-pressure hydrogen to study the influence of the hydrogen environment. The Mar-M-246 material was found to have a three times higher cyclic life in hydrogen than the 713LC alloy, and was selected as the nozzle material.

  19. Fundamental Understanding of the Intrinsic Ductility in Nickel-Base L12 Type Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-12

    strain field around the distortions. The convergent beam electron diffraction technique (CBEB), which is extremely sensitive to localized lattice...COSATI CO0ES I L SUBJE CT TIE RMS (Conue an eo e eee it necessary and identify by blb .un bPe) . ". Eo GROUP SUB. G. Nickel Aluminide , Single...Ni3Al alloys, three series of alloys were formulated and produced as singl’e--crtals. The alloying additions selected include tantalum, tin and titanium

  20. Effect of preconditioning cobalt and nickel based dental alloys with Bacillus sp. extract on their surface physicochemical properties and theoretical prediction of Candida albicans adhesion.

    PubMed

    Balouiri, Mounyr; Bouhdid, Samira; Sadiki, Moulay; Ouedrhiri, Wessal; Barkai, Hassan; El Farricha, Omar; Ibnsouda, Saad Koraichi; Harki, El Houssaine

    2017-02-01

    Biofilm formation on dental biomaterials is implicated in various oral health problems. Thus the challenge is to prevent the formation of this consortium of microorganisms using a safe approach such as antimicrobial and anti-adhesive natural products. Indeed, in the present study, the effects of an antifungal extract of Bacillus sp., isolated from plant rhizosphere, on the surface physicochemical properties of cobalt and nickel based dental alloys were studied using the contact angle measurements. Furthermore, in order to predict the adhesion of Candida albicans to the treated and untreated dental alloys, the total free energy of adhesion was calculated based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek approach. Results showed hydrophobic and weak electron-donor and electron-acceptor characteristics of both untreated dental alloys. After treatment with the antifungal extract, the surface free energy of both dental alloys was influenced significantly, mostly for cobalt based alloy. In fact, treated cobalt based alloy became hydrophilic and predominantly electron donating. Those effects were time-dependent. Consequently, the total free energy of adhesion of C. albicans to this alloy became unfavorable after treatment with the investigated microbial extract. A linear relationship between the electron-donor property and the total free energy of adhesion has been found for both dental alloys. Also, a linear relationship has been found between this latter and the hydrophobicity for the cobalt based alloy. However, the exposure of nickel based alloy to the antifungal extract failed to produce the same effect.

  1. Influence of Chromium and Molybdenum on the Corrosion of Nickel Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J R; Gray, J; Szmodis, A W; Orme, C A

    2005-08-02

    The addition of chromium and molybdenum to nickel creates alloys with exceptional corrosion resistance in a diverse range of environments. This study examines the complementary roles of Cr and Mo in Ni alloy passivation. Four nickel alloys with varying amounts of chromium and molybdenum were studied in 1 molar salt solutions over a broad pH range. The passive corrosion and breakdown behavior of the alloys suggests that chromium is the primary element influencing general corrosion resistance. The breakdown potential was nearly independent of molybdenum content, while the repassivation potential is strongly dependant on the molybdenum content. This indicates that chromium plays a strong role in maintaining the passivity of the alloy, while molybdenum acts to stabilize the passive film after a localized breakdown event.

  2. Braze Alloy Development for Fast Epitaxial High-Temperature Brazing of Single-Crystalline Nickel-Based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, B.; Piegert, S.; Rösler, J.

    2009-01-01

    For the repair of single-crystalline turbine components, fabricated from nickel-based superalloys, a new high-temperature brazing technology has been developed. Cracks in single-crystalline parts can be repaired by reproducing the single-crystalline microstructure over the complete gap width within very short brazing times. Nickel-manganese-based alloys were identified as systems that provide very high, epitaxial solidification rates. In contrast to commonly used braze alloys, such as nickel-boron or nickel-silicon systems, the process is not completely diffusion controlled but works with consolute systems. For brazing experiments 300- μm-wide parallel gaps as well as V-shaped gaps with a maximum width of 250 μm were used. A complete epitaxial solidification, that is, the absence of large-angle grain boundaries, could be achieved within brazing times, being up to 100 times shorter compared to commonly used transient-liquid-phase bonding technologies. To quantify the misorientation relative to the base material and the composition within and near the filled gaps, the results of the brazing experiments were visualized by means of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses were conducted.

  3. Determination of Trace Elements in Nickel Base Alloys by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    elements such as silver (Ag), bismuth (Bi), cadmium (Cd), lead ( Pb ), phosphorus (P), and arsenic (As) in nickel alloys such as Udimet 500 without interference of other constituent elements. (Author)

  4. Mechanical and Microstructure Study of Nickel-Based ODS Alloys Processed by Mechano-Chemical Bonding and Ball Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amare, Belachew N.

    Due to the need to increase the efficiency of modern power plants, land-based gas turbines are designed to operate at high temperature creating harsh environments for structural materials. The elevated turbine inlet temperature directly affects the materials at the hottest sections, which includes combustion chamber, blades, and vanes. Therefore, the hottest sections should satisfy a number of material requirements such as high creep strength, ductility at low temperature, high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance. Such requirements are nowadays satisfied by implementing superalloys coated by high temperature thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems to protect from high operating temperature required to obtain an increased efficiency. Oxide dispersive strengthened (ODS) alloys are being considered due to their high temperature creep strength, good oxidation and corrosion resistance for high temperature applications in advanced power plants. These alloys operating at high temperature are subjected to different loading systems such as thermal, mechanical, and thermo-mechanical combined loads at operation. Thus, it is critical to study the high temperature mechanical and microstructure properties of such alloys for their structural integrity. The primary objective of this research work is to investigate the mechanical and microstructure properties of nickel-based ODS alloys produced by combined mechano-chemical bonding (MCB) and ball milling subjected to high temperature oxidation, which are expected to be applied for high temperature turbine coating with micro-channel cooling system. Stiffness response and microstructure evaluation of such alloy systems was studied along with their oxidation mechanism and structural integrity through thermal cyclic exposure. Another objective is to analyze the heat transfer of ODS alloy coatings with micro-channel cooling system using finite element analysis (FEA) to determine their feasibility as a stand-alone structural

  5. Computational design of precipitation-strengthened titanium-nickel-based shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Matthew D.

    Motivated by performance requirements of future medical stent applications, experimental research addresses the design of novel TiNi-based, superelastic shape-memory alloys employing nanoscale precipitation strengthening to minimize accommodation slip for cyclic stability and to increase output stress capability for smaller devices. Using a thermodynamic database describing the B2 and L21 phases in the Al-Ni-Ti-Zr system, Thermo-Calc software was used to assist modeling the evolution of phase composition during 600°C isothermal evolution of coherent L21 Heusler phase precipitation from supersaturated TiNi-based B2 phase matrix in an alloy experimentally characterized by atomic-scale Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP) microanalysis. Based on measured evolution of the alloy hardness (under conditions stable against martensitic transformation) a model for the combined effects of solid solution strengthening and precipitation strengthening was calibrated, and the optimum particle size for efficient strengthening was identified. Thermodynamic modeling of the evolution of measured phase fractions and compositions identified the interfacial capillary energy enabling thermodynamic design of alloy microstructure with the optimal strengthening particle size. Extension of alloy designs to incorporate Pt and Pd for reducing Ni content, enhancing radiopacity, and improving manufacturability were considered using measured Pt and Pd B2/L2 1 partitioning coefficients. After determining that Pt partitioning greatly increases interphase misfit, full attention was devoted to Pd alloy designs. A quantitative approach to radiopacity was employed using mass attenuation as a metric. Radiopacity improvements were also qualitatively observed using x-ray fluoroscopy. Transformation temperatures were experimentally measured as a function of Al and Pd content. Redlich-Kister polynomial modeling was utilized for the dependence of transformation reversion Af temperature on B2 matrix phase

  6. The effect of carbon on the metallography of a nickel base removable partial denture casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1979-04-01

    This study has demonstrated the pattern of carbide development associated with progressive increases in carbon content in a series of six nickel chromium alloys. The carbon content is critical since it influences the production and distribution of carbides, which have been shown to alter the mechanical properties, of the nickel chromium alloys, that are dependent upon the development of gamma prime. Furthermore, it has been shown that the attainment of suitable strength is invariably associated with an unacceptable level of ductility.

  7. Superplasticity of nickel-based alloys with micro- and sub-microcrystalline structures

    SciTech Connect

    Valitov, V.A.; Bewlay, B.P.; Mukhtarov, S.K.; Kaibyshev, O.A.; Gigliotti, M.F.X.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the generation of micro- and sub-microcrystalline structures in two Ni-based alloys that are typically strengthened by phases, such as {gamma}{prime} and {gamma}{double_prime}+{delta}. The relationship between the superplastic behavior and microstructure is discussed. High strain deformation processing in the temperature range of 0.9T{sub m} to 0.6T{sub m} results in reduction of the initial coarse-grained structure (> 100 {micro}m) to a range of structures including microcrystalline (MC) (grain size < 10 {micro}m) and sub-microcrystalline (SMC) (grain size < 1 {micro}m) with increasing deformation. The influence of alloy chemistry and constituent phases on dynamic and static recrystallization is considered, and their effect on grain refinement is described. Low-temperature and high strain rate superplasticity can be observed in dispersion-strengthened alloys with SMC structures. it was established that in dispersion-hardened Ni alloys with SMC structures, superplasticity can be observed at temperatures 200--250 C lower than in alloys with MC structure.

  8. Interdiffusional effects between tungsten fibers and an iron-nickel-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caulfield, T.; Bellows, R. S.; Tien, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Tungsten fibers in the INCOLOY 903 alloy were annealed for over 100 hours at 1038 C and 1200 C. It was found that interdiffusion results in the formation of a reaction zone. SEM-EDS probe analysis showed that the chemistries across this zone were constant, suggesting the zone was a compound phase. The composition of the compound was estimated to be that of a mu-type phase. The local chemistry (in atomic percent) at the reaction zone/alloy matrix interface was found to be approximately 8 pct W, 1.2 pct Nb, 40 pct Fe, 14 pct Co, and 36 pct Ni. In addition, recrystallization was observed in both the remaining tungsten fiber and the nearby INCOLOY 903 matrix after annealing at 1200 C, but not at 1038 C. The results of this study suggest that reaction zone growth kinetics can be minimized by the reduction of Co and Fe and the increase of W in the matrix alloy.

  9. Interdiffusional effects between tungsten fibers and an iron-nickel-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caulfield, T.; Bellows, R. S.; Tien, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Tungsten fibers in the INCOLOY 903 alloy were annealed for over 100 hours at 1038 C and 1200 C. It was found that interdiffusion results in the formation of a reaction zone. SEM-EDS probe analysis showed that the chemistries across this zone were constant, suggesting the zone was a compound phase. The composition of the compound was estimated to be that of a mu-type phase. The local chemistry (in atomic percent) at the reaction zone/alloy matrix interface was found to be approximately 8 pct W, 1.2 pct Nb, 40 pct Fe, 14 pct Co, and 36 pct Ni. In addition, recrystallization was observed in both the remaining tungsten fiber and the nearby INCOLOY 903 matrix after annealing at 1200 C, but not at 1038 C. The results of this study suggest that reaction zone growth kinetics can be minimized by the reduction of Co and Fe and the increase of W in the matrix alloy.

  10. Growth Stresses in Thermally Grown Oxides on Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Luke H.; Laux, Britta; He, Ming Y.; Hovis, David; Heuer, Arthur H.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2016-03-01

    Growth stresses that develop in α-Al2O3 scale that form during isothermal oxidation of three Ni-based single crystal alloys have been studied to elucidate their role in coating and substrate degradation at elevated temperatures. Piezospectroscopy measurements at room temperature indicate large room temperature compressive stresses in the oxides formed at 1255 K or 1366 K (982 °C or 1093 °C) on the alloys, ranging from a high of 4.8 GPa for René N4 at 1366 K (1093 °C) to a low of 3.8 GPa for René N5 at 1255 K (982 °C). Finite element modeling of each of these systems to account for differences in coefficients of thermal expansion of the oxide and substrate indicates growth strains in the range from 0.21 to 0.44 pct at the oxidation temperature, which is an order of magnitude higher than the growth strains measured in the oxides on intermetallic coatings that are typically applied to these superalloys. The magnitudes of the growth strains do not scale with the parabolic oxidation rate constants measured for the alloys. Significant spatial inhomogeneities in the growth stresses were observed, due to (i) the presence of dendritic segregation and (ii) large carbides in the material that locally disrupts the structure of the oxide scale. The implications of these observations for failure during cyclic oxidation, fatigue cycling, and alloy design are considered.

  11. Transient Liquid Phase Bonding of Nickel-Base Single Crystal Alloy with a Novel Ni-Cr-Co-Mo-W-Ta-Re-B Amorphous Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Haiyan; Jia, Qiang; Peng, Peng; Zhu, Ying

    2017-07-01

    A novel Ni-Cr-Co-W-Mo-Ta-Re-B alloy consisting of plate γ and M23B6 phases was prepared as interlayer for the transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of Rene' N5 nickel-base single crystal superalloy. The molten Ni-Cr-Co-W-Mo-Ta-Re-B alloy exhibited an excellent wettability on the nickel-base superalloy. The TLP bonding experiment has been carried out in vacuum furnace at 1,240 ° for 12 h and followed by post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1,305 ° for 4 h. PWHT eliminated the intermetallic compounds and promoted the formation of γ´ precipitates in the bonding region. A more uniform microhardness profile of TLP joint was found after PWHT. The shear strength of the joint after PWHT significantly increased to 533.4 MPa compared with the value of 437.2 MPa without PWHT.

  12. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  13. The Effect of Stabilization Heat Treatments on the Tensile and Creep Behavior of an Advanced Nickel-Based Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    As part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a study of stabilization heat treatment options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, ME 209, was performed. Using a simple, physically based approach, the effect of stabilization heat treatments on tensile and creep properties was analyzed in this paper. Solutions temperature, solution cooling rate, and stabilization temperature/time were found to have a significant impact on tensile and creep properties. These effects were readily quantified using the following methodology. First, the effect of solution cooling rate was assessed to determine its impact on a given property. The as-cooled property was then modified by using two multiplicative factors which assess the impact of solution temperature and stabilization parameters. Comparison of experimental data with predicted values showed this physically based analysis produced good results that rivaled the statistical analysis employed, which required numerous changes in the form of the regression equation depending on the property and temperature in question. As this physically based analysis uses the data for input, it should be noted that predictions which attempt to extrapolate beyond the bounds of the data must be viewed with skepticism. Future work aimed at expanding the range of the stabilization/aging parameters explored in this study would be highly desirable, especially at the higher solution cooling rates.

  14. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  15. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2016-12-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  16. Nickel-based Gadolinium Alloy for Neutron Adsorption Application in Ram Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg Wachs; James Sterbentz; William Hurt; P. E. McConnell; C. V. Robino; F. Tovesson; T. S. Hill

    2007-10-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy and chromium-nickel (Cr-Ni) stainless steel, modified by the addition of boron. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the materials at specific gadolinium and boron dopant levels. The Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy is envisioned to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). For these transmission experiments, test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy and 1.16 wt% boron in stainless steel. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using total neutron cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium and boron elements and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy and borated stainless steel test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the size and distribution of the gadolinium in both the hot-top (as-cast) and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd converted to plate was not a discriminator related to neutron absorption. Moreover, the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF VII) total neutron cross section data were accurate.

  17. Nickel-based (Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be) alloys used in dental restorations may be a potential cause for immune-mediated hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Chen, Weiqing; Ke, Wei; Wu, Shaohua

    2009-11-01

    Although nickel-based (Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be) alloy prothesis is widely used in orthodontics, its potential biologic hazards, hypersensitivity in particular, are still uncertain as yet. And only a few studies in vivo have considered the biocompatibility. However, several case reports show adverse effects of immunologic alterations, such as urticaria, respiratory disease, nickel contact dermatitis, microscopic hematuria and proteinuria, and even exacerbated to hepatocyte injury and renal injury. So nickel-based alloy used in dental restorations may be a potential cause for immune-mediated hypersensitivity. The metal surface would occur electrochemical corrosion as metal edge of porcelain-fused-to-nichrome crown exposed to oral cavity rich in electrolytes after restoration, and metal ion would release to oral cavity then come into contact with cells and tissues in the immediate environment, or be distributed throughout the body, mainly to the intestine canal. Once these ions are not biocompatible, the human system may be injured (toxicity and risk of sensitization) if they are absorbed in sufficient quantity. Thus, it is necessary to determine the long-term biocompatibility properties of nickel-based alloy, reduce sensitization, and grasp the information of individual differences in the appearance of adverse reactions in further research.

  18. Lubricating Properties of Ceramic-Bonded Calcium Fluoride Coatings on Nickel-Base Alloys from 75 to 1900 deg F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1962-01-01

    The endurance life and the friction coefficient of ceramic-bonded calcium fluoride (CaF2) coatings on nickel-base alloys were determined at temperatures from 75 F to 1900 F. The specimen configuration consisted of a hemispherical rider (3/16-in. rad.) sliding against the flat surface of a rotating disk. Increasing the ambient temperature (up to 1500 F) or the sliding velocity generally reduced the friction coefficient and improved coating life. Base-metal selection was critical above 1500 F. For instance, cast Inconel sliding against coated Inconel X was lubricated effectively to 1500 F, but at 1600 F severe blistering of the coatings occurred. However, good lubrication and adherence were obtained for Rene 41 sliding against coated Rene 41 at temperatures up to 1900 F; no blisters developed, coating wear life was fairly good, and the rider wear rate was significantly lower than for the unlubricated metals. Friction coefficients were 0.12 at 1500 F, 0.15 at 1700 F, and 0.17 at 1800 F and 1900 F. Because of its ready availability, Inconel X appears to be the preferred substrate alloy for applications in which the temperature does not exceed 1500 F. Rene 41 would have to be used in applications involving higher temperatures. Improved coating life was derived by either preoxidizing the substrate metals prior to the coating application or by applying a very thin (less than 0.0002 in.) burnished and sintered overlay to the surface of the coating. Preoxidation did not affect the friction coefficient. The overlay generally resulted in a higher friction coefficient than that obtained without the overlay. The combination of both modifications resulted in longer coating life and in friction coefficients intermediate between those obtained with either modification alone.

  19. Establishment of a Plasma Melting Manufacturing Process for Production of Nickel-Base Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    surrounding the arc with cold walls capable of wi thstanc’ing high heat flux and/or surrounding the arc with a cold liquid or gas. The gas is forced to flow...considerations, contractural obligations, or notice on a specific document. This final report was submitted by Carnegie-Mellon Institute of Research...argon gas plasmarc has been shown to be a useful high heat source for melt-consolidatm i of super alloy and types of scrap including reactive metal

  20. Rupture Strength of Several Nickel-base Alloys in Sheet Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dance, James H; Clauss, Francis J

    1957-01-01

    The 100-hour rupture strengths of Inconel X, Inconel 700, Incoloy 901, Refractaloy 26, and R-235 at 1200 and 1350 F. in both the annealed and heat-treated conditions were determined. Inconel 700 had the highest rupture strength at both temperatures; Incoloy 901 was second strongest at 1200 F, and R-235 second strongest at 1350 F. With the exception of Incoloy 901, ductility was low. Photomicrographs show that fractures are through the grain boundaries. Results are compared with published data for other sheet alloys and bar stock.

  1. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-, iron- and nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. H. M. Esfakur

    The operating temperature of land-based gas turbines and jet engines are ever-increasing to increase the efficiency, decrease the emissions and minimize the cost. Within the engines, complex-shaped parts experience extreme temperature, fatigue and corrosion conditions. Ti-based, Ni-based and Fe-based alloys are commonly used in gas turbines and jet engines depending on the temperatures of different sections. Although those alloys have superior mechanical, high temperature and corrosion properties, severe operating conditions cause fast degradation and failure of the components. Repair of these components could reduce lifecycle costs. Unfortunately, conventional fusion welding is not very attractive, because Ti reacts very easily with oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures, Ni-based superalloys show heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking, and stainless steels show intergranular corrosion and knife-line attack. On the other hand, transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding method has been considered as preferred joining method for those types of alloys. During the initial phase of the current work commercially pure Ti, Fe and Ni were diffusion bonded using commercially available interlayer materials. Commercially pure Ti (Ti-grade 2) has been diffusion bonded using silver and copper interlayers and without any interlayer. With a silver (Ag) interlayer, different intermetallics (AgTi, AgTi2) appeared in the joint centerline microstructure. While with a Cu interlayer eutectic mixtures and Ti-Cu solid solutions appeared in the joint centerline. The maximum tensile strengths achieved were 160 MPa, 502 MPa, and 382 MPa when Ag, Cu and no interlayers were used, respectively. Commercially pure Fe (cp-Fe) was diffusion bonded using Cu (25 m) and Au-12Ge eutectic interlayer (100 microm). Cu diffused predominantly along austenite grain boundaries in all bonding conditions. Residual interlayers appeared at lower bonding temperature and time, however, voids were observed in the joint

  2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 µm making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360°C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50°C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by

  3. Multiphase wide gap braze alloys for the repair of nickel-base superalloy turbine components: Development and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Scott David

    Gas turbine components made of nickel-base superalloys experience cracking after service in extreme environments. As these cracks can be wide, brazing or fusion welding is typically used to repair them. Properly designed and applied, brazing filler metal will help extend the useful life of damaged turbine components. During repair of defective OEM parts, brazing is also considered, provided that proper filler metals with enhanced ductility and improved resistance to low-cycle fatigue are available. This research strives to develop the brazing technique and alloys to achieve a repair with acceptable mechanical properties. Additionally, the effects of silicon and boron, as fast diffusing and melting point suppressing elements on the braze microstructure and mechanical properties were examined in detail to help guide future alloy development. Three commercially available "low-temperature" brazing powders were mixed with an additive superalloy powder to prepare a series of filler metals for wide gap brazing used to repair OEM gas turbine components. BNi-2 (Ni-7Cr-4.2Si-3B-3Fe), BNi-5 (Ni-19Cr-10Si) and BNi-9 (Ni-15Cr-3.5B) were mixed with MARM247 (Ni-10W-10Co-8.25Cr-5.5Al-3Ta-1Ti-0.7Mo-0.5Fe-0.015B) at ratios of 40, 50, and 60 wt. pct. creating a total of nine experimental filler alloys. The brazes were applied to a 0.06 inch gap in a Rene 108(TM) substrate for mechanical and microstructural analysis. The wettability and flow of each of the experimental alloys were analyzed to determine the required brazing temperature through isothermal spreadability experiments. Bend testing was performed on brazed joints to determine their mechanical properties and maximum angular deflection. The metallurgical driving factors, such as solidification behavior and compositional effects, were analyzed to correlate the resulting microstructural constituents to the mechanical properties developed through experimentation. It was found that because of the solid solubility of silicon into

  4. Laser cladding of nickel-based alloy coatings on copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu; Rea, Edward; Deng, Justin

    2015-07-01

    The wear resistance of high-value copper components used in the metal casting, automotive, aerospace and electrical equipment industries can be improved by applying nickel (Ni)-based coatings through laser cladding. A high-power diode laser array providing continuous power levels up to 10 kilowatts with beam-shaping optics providing a rectangular focal region of various dimensions was used to deposit Ni-based alloy coatings with controlled thickness ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.6 mm in a single pass on copper (Cu) substrates. Slotted powder feeding plates with various discrete widths delivered uniform streams of powdered metal particles entrained in a carrier gas, matching the selected focal spot dimensions. To enhance laser beam coupling with the substrate and to avoid defects such as cracks, delamination and porosity, Cu substrates were preheated to a temperature of 300°C. The effect of heat input on microstructure of the cladding and extent of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was evaluated using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Excessive heat input with longer interaction time increased dilution, porosity and expanded HAZ that significantly reduced the hardness of both the clad and the Cu substrates. Average microhardness of the Ni-C-B-Si-W alloy coating was 572 HV, which was almost 7 times greater than the hardness of the Cu substrate (84 HV).

  5. Production of Al-Co-Ni Ternary Alloys by the SHS Method for Use in Nickel Based Superalloys Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Murat; Sonmez, M. Seref; Derin, Bora; Yücel, Onuralp; Andreev, Dmitrii E.; Sanin, Vladimir N.; Yukhvid, Vladimir I.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, Al-Co-Ni ternary alloys were synthesized, in order to obtain low-cost starting material for Ni-based superalloy production, by a self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) both under normal gravity conditions (a = 9.81 m/s2) and under high gravity conditions (up to 1000 g-force) by using a centrifugal machine. The mixture of Co3O4-NiO powder were reduced by Al powder for the production of SHS alloys with the estimated compositions of 5-10 mass% Al, 20-65 mass% Co, 25-75 mass% Ni. The effect of green mixture compositions and centrifugal overload on combustion temperature, alloy/slag separations, chemical composition and microstructure of final alloys were investigated. The chemical analysis results showed that production of SHS alloys were achieved by having up to 86.12% of Co and 92.32% of Ni recoveries. The highest metal recovery value was obtained in SHS alloy with the estimated composition of 10%Al-65%Co-25%Ni by the addition of 20% Al2O3 into the green mixture. The metal/slag separation efficiency increased by increasing the centrifugal overload.

  6. The codeposition of chromium and aluminum on nickel-based alloys by pack cementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinner, Charles Paul

    Several variables of the pack cementation process were studied to determine their effect on the codeposition of chromium and aluminum on Ni270 and PWA1484. Specifically, the amount and composition of the master alloy (95Cr 5Al and 90Cr 10Al) and activator (NHsb4Cl and CrClsb2) were varied to determine their effect on the composition of the coatings produced. It was found that for coatings on Ni270, three deposition regimes exist, aluminizing, chromizing, and codepositing, which are produced by specific combinations of these variables. The conditions used to produce these coatings are summarized in the form of deposition maps. Corresponding coatings were also produced using PWA1484 as the substrate. In order to elucidate the effect of the amount of master alloy and the composition of the activator, several pack compositions were studied as a function of time. The pack composition as a function of coating time and pack position relative to the sample surface was studied by vacuum impregnating the pack and sample in epoxy resin and analyzing individual particles by microprobe analysis. It was found that decreasing the amount of master alloy increases the overall rate of depletion of aluminum from the pack, which leads to an increase in chromium deposition. An aluminum depletion zone was formed adjacent to the sample at short times for all conditions studied, and was thus not a function of the pack variables studied. Use of CrClsb2 as the activator led to a decrease in the depletion of aluminum relative to NHsb4Cl activated packs containing the same amount of master alloy, which was found to be due to the condensed nature of the CrClsb2 activator. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations were used to support the claims of this study. Three types of coatings on PWA1484, an aluminide, chromide, and codeposited, were developed and evaluated for oxidation and corrosion resistance. Two industrial coatings, PWA73 and PWA70/73, were also evaluated for comparison. The conditions

  7. Comparison of experimental and theoretical thermal fatigue lives for five nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The alloys Nimonic 90, IN 100, coated IN 100, B 1900, coated B 1900, MAR M200, and MAR M200DS (directionally solidified) were studied. Maximum temperatures ranged from 770 C to 1120 C (1420 F to 2050 F). Specimen geometries included tapered disks, double-edged wedges, and cambered airfoils. The disks and wedges were heated and cooled in fluidized beds. The airfoil specimens were heated by a Mach 1 natural gas burner and rapid-air-cooled, with and without spanwise loading. Life calculations included two distinct failure modes: conventional low cycle fatigue and cyclic creep. Required material properties were limited to conventional thermal, tensile, and creep rupture data. The complete life calculation system included the calculation of transient temperature distributions, thermal strains, stresses, creep damage, fatigue damage, and cycles to first crack. Calculated lives were within a factor of two for 76 of the 86 data points analyzed. Cyclic creep accounted for 81% of all the calculated damage.

  8. Fiber laser cladding of nickel-based alloy on cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-González, F.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Penide, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Gray cast iron is a ferrous alloy characterized by a carbon-rich phase in form of lamellar graphite in an iron matrix while ductile cast iron presents a carbon-rich phase in form of spheroidal graphite. Graphite presents a higher laser beam absorption than iron matrix and its morphology has also a strong influence on thermal conductivity of the material. The laser cladding process of cast iron is complicated by its heterogeneous microstructure which generates non-homogeneous thermal fields. In this research work, a comparison between different types of cast iron substrates (with different graphite morphology) has been carried out to analyze its impact on the process results. A fiber laser was used to generate a NiCrBSi coating over flat substrates of gray cast iron (EN-GJL-250) and nodular cast iron (EN-GJS-400-15). The relationship between processing parameters (laser irradiance and scanning speed) and geometry of a single laser track was examined. Moreover, microstructure and composition were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The hardness and elastic modulus were analyzed by means of micro- and nanoindentation. A hardfacing coating was generated by fiber laser cladding. Suitable processing parameters to generate the Ni-based alloy coating were determined. For the same processing parameters, gray cast iron samples present higher dilution than cast iron samples. The elastic modulus is similar for the coating and the substrate, while the Ni-based coating obtained presents a significantly superior hardness than cast iron.

  9. Development of improved low-strain creep strength in Cabot alloy R-41 sheet. [nickel base sheet alloy for reentry shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of improving the low-strain creep properties of a thin gauge nickel base sheet alloy through modified heat treatment or through development of a preferred crystal-lographic texture was investigated. The basic approach taken to improve the creep strength of the material by heat treatment was to increase grain size by raising the solution treatment temperature for the alloy to the range of 1420 K to 1475 K (2100 F to 2200 F). The key technical issue involved was maintenance of adequate tensile ductility following the solutioning of M6C primary carbides during the higher temperature solution treatment. The approach to improve creep properties by developing a sheet texture involved varying both annealing temperatures and the amount of prior cold work. Results identified a heat treatment for alloy R-14 sheet which yields a substantial creep-life advantage at temperatures above 1090 K (1500 F) when compared with material given the standard heat treatment. At the same time, this treatment provides reasonable tensile ductility over the entire temperature range of interest. The mechanical properties of the material given the new heat treatment are compared with those for material given the standard heat treatment. Attempts to improve creep strength by developing a sheet texture were unsuccessful.

  10. Dissimilar welding of nickel-based Alloy 690 to SUS 304L with Ti addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. T.; Jeng, S. L.; Yen, C. H.; Kuo, T. Y.

    2004-10-01

    This study investigates the effects of Ti addition on the weldability, microstructure and mechanical properties of a dissimilar weldment of Alloy 690 and SUS 304L. Shielding metal arc welding (SMAW) is employed to butt-weld two plates with three welding layers, where each layer is deposited in a single pass. To investigate the effects of Ti addition, the flux coatings of the electrodes used in the welding process are modified by varying additions of either a Ti-Fe compound or a Ti powder. The results indicate that the microstructure of the fusion zone (FZ) is primarily dendritic. With increasing Ti content, it is noted that the microstructure changes from a columnar dendritic to an equiaxed dendritic, in which the primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS) becomes shorter. Furthermore, it is observed that the amount of Al-Ti oxide phase increases in the inter-dendritic region, while the amount of Nb-rich phase decreases. Moreover, the average hardness of the FZ increases slightly. The results indicate that Ti addition prompts a significant increase in the elongation of the weldment (i.e. 36.5%, Ti: 0.41 wt%), although the tensile strength remains relatively unchanged. However, at an increased Ti content of 0.91 wt%, an obvious reduction in the tensile strength is noted, which can be attributed to a general reduction in the weldability of the joint.

  11. Online monitoring of thermo-cycles and its correlation with microstructure in laser cladding of nickel based super alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muvvala, Gopinath; Patra Karmakar, Debapriya; Nath, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding, basically a weld deposition technique, is finding applications in many areas including surface coatings, refurbishment of worn out components and generation of functionally graded components owing to its various advantages over conventional methods like TIG, PTA etc. One of the essential requirements to adopt this technique in industrial manufacturing is to fulfil the increasing demand on product quality which could be controlled through online process monitoring and correlating the signals with the mechanical and metallurgical properties. Rapid thermo-cycle i.e. the fast heating and cooling rates involved in this process affect above properties of the deposited layer to a great extent. Therefore, the current study aims to monitor the thermo-cycles online, understand its variation with process parameters and its effect on different quality aspects of the clad layer, like microstructure, elemental segregations and mechanical properties. The effect of process parameters on clad track geometry is also studied which helps in their judicious selection to deposit a predefined thickness of coating. In this study Inconel 718, a nickel based super alloy is used as a clad material and AISI 304 austenitic steel as a substrate material. The thermo-cycles during the cladding process were recorded using a single spot monochromatic pyrometer. The heating and cooling rates were estimated from the recorded thermo-cycles and its effects on microstructures were characterised using SEM and XRD analyses. Slow thermo-cycles resulted in severe elemental segregations favouring Laves phase formation and increased γ matrix size which is found to be detrimental to the mechanical properties. Slow cooling also resulted in termination of epitaxial growth, forming equiaxed grains near the surface, which is not preferred for single crystal growth. Heat treatment is carried out and the effect of slow cooling and the increased γ matrix size on dissolution of segregated elements in

  12. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  13. Structural evaluation of a nickel base super alloy metal foam via NDE and finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Abumeri, G.; Garg, Mohit; Young, P. G.

    2008-03-01

    Cellular materials are known to be useful in the application of designing light but stiff structures. This applies to various components used in various industries such as rotorcraft blades, car bodies or portable electronic devices. Structural application of the metal foam is typically confined to light weight sandwich panels, made up of thin solid face sheets and a metallic foam core. The resulting high-stiffness structure is lighter than that constructed only out of the solid metal material. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads and the role of the foam core is separate the face sheets to carry some of the shear stresses, while remaining integral with the face sheet. Many challenges relating to the fabrication and testing of these metal foam panels continue to exist due to some mechanical properties falling short of their theoretical potential. Hence in this study, a detailed three dimensional foam structure is generated using series of 2D Computer Tomography (CT) scans, on Haynes 25 metal foam. Series of the 2D images are utilized to construct a high precision solid model including all the fine details within the metal foam as detected by the CT scanning technique. Subsequently, a finite element analysis is then performed on an as fabricated metal foam microstructures to evaluate the foam structural durability and behavior under tensile and compressive loading conditions. The analysis includes a progressive failure analysis (PFA) using GENOA code to further assess the damage initiation, propagation, and failure. The open cell metal foam material is a cobalt-nickel-chromium-tungsten alloy that combines excellent high-temperature strength with good resistance to oxidizing environments up to 1800 °F (980 °C) for prolonged exposures. The foam is formed by a powder metallurgy process with an approximate 100 pores per inch (PPI).

  14. Effects of alloy composition on cyclic flame hot-corrosion attack of cast nickel-base superalloys at 900 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, Ta, Nb, and W content on the hot corrosion of nickel base alloys were investigated. The alloys were tested in a Mach 0.3 flame with 0.5 ppmw sodium at a temperature of 900 C. One nondestructive and three destructive tests were conducted. The best corrosion resistance was achieved when the Cr content was 12 wt %. However, some lower-Cr-content alloys ( 10 wt%) exhibited reasonable resistance provided that the Al content alloys ( 10 wt %) exhibited reasonable resistance provided that the Al content was 2.5 wt % and the Ti content was Aa wt %. The effect of W, Ta, Mo, and Nb contents on the hot-corrosion resistance varied depending on the Al and Ti contents. Several commercial alloy compositions were also tested and the corrosion attack was measured. Predicted attack was calculated for these alloys from derived regression equations and was in reasonable agreement with that experimentally measured. The regression equations were derived from measurements made on alloys in a one-quarter replicate of a 2(7) statistical design alloy composition experiment. These regression equations represent a simple linear model and are only a very preliminary analysis of the data needed to provide insights into the experimental method.

  15. Design of an Eta-Phase Precipitation-Hardenable Nickel-Based Alloy with the Potential for Improved Creep Strength Above 1023 K (750 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Matthew J.; Sanders, Paul G.; Shingledecker, John P.; White, Calvin L.

    2015-07-01

    In a number of nickel-based superalloy systems strengthened by gamma prime ( γ'), eta-phase (Ni3Ti, η) forms during prolonged high-temperature exposure, but its effect on mechanical properties is not well characterized. Using thermodynamic modeling and design-of-experiments techniques, three modifications of the nickel-based superalloy Nimonic (Nimonic® is a trademark of Special Metals Corporation group of companies.) 263 were identified that yield increased volume fractions of the eta-phase (Ni3Ti, η) at temperatures above 1023 K (750 °C). Volume fractions of η-phase were evaluated for each alloy and heat-treatment condition using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Compared to Nimonic 263, small additions of V and Ta were found to increase the volume fraction of η-phase above 1023 K (750 °C) from approximately 5 pct to above 15 pct, thus providing a route for future mechanical behavior experimental studies, which was not in the scope of this work.

  16. Machining of low percentage beryllium copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habermeyer, J. G.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne beryllium sampling during machining of low percentage beryllium-copper alloys shows that normal dry machining creates 45.2 microgram/cu m of airborne beryllium in the casting operators breathing zone and 2.3 microgram/cu m in an adjacent machine working area. A small vacuum system placed over the tool effectively removes airborne beryllium in the breathing zone sample to 0.2 microgram/cu m.

  17. Corrosion behavior of experimental and commercial nickel-base alloys in HCl and HCl containing Fe3+

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    The effects of ferric ions on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of a series of Ni-based alloys in 20% HCl at 30ºC were investigated. The alloys studied were those prepared by the Albany Research Center (ARC), alloys J5, J12, J13, and those sold commercially, alloys 22, 242, 276, and 2000. Tests included mass loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and linear polarization.

  18. Microstructure-mechanical property relationships in transient liquid phase bonded nickel-based superalloys and iron-based ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluru, Sreenivasa Charan Rajeev

    The research work presented here discusses the microstructure-mechanical property relationships in wide gap transient liquid phase (TLP) bonds, between the single crystal nickel-base superalloy CMSX-4 and two polycrystalline superalloys, IN 738 and IN 939, using wide-gap style composite interlayers. Fabrication of complicated geometries and successful repair development of gas turbine engine components made of superalloys requires a high performance metallurgical joining technique and a complete understanding of microstructure-mechanical property relationships. A number of joining processes have been investigated, but all of them have significant disadvantages that limit their ability to produce sound joints. TLP bonding has proved to be a successful method and is the most preferred joining method for nickel-based superalloys, with microstructures and compositions of the joint similar to that of the bulk substrates resulting in mechanical properties close to that of the parent metal. The current joining process used two proprietary wide-gap style composite interlayers, Niflex-110 and Niflex-115, consisting of a nickel-based core with boron-rich surfaces, and a conventional rapidly solidified metallic glass foil interlayer BNi-3 was chosen for comparison. When composite interlayers were employed, competition between wetting of the faying surfaces and formation of the eutectic along the grain boundaries was observed to lead to non-bonded regions at the faying surfaces, unless a boron-rich interlayer was employed. Composite interlayers resulted in the suppression of bondline boride formation. With the exception of this competition, adequate wetting of the substrates occurred for all interlayers. Two factors dominated the room temperature mechanical properties of the wide-gap bonds. The first was the extent of gamma-prime formation at the bondline. Results from shear testing and fractography of the bonds indicated ductile shear failure at the bondline. This was due to

  19. Deformation mechanisms and strain storage during forging of powder-metallurgy nickel-base turbine disk alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wen J.

    Nickel-based superalloys account for 50% of the total weight of high temperature gas turbine engines. Increasing the lifespan and temperature capabilities of superalloy turbine blades and disks can significantly increase the efficiency and cost of the engines. The properties of superalloy disk materials, including strength and fatigue resistance, are sensitive to the grain structure at the end of a series of thermomechanical processing. To date, there have been few fundamental studies on deformation mechanisms and microstructural evolution under conditions relevant to forging of superalloy disk materials. In this study, high temperature compression testing combined with high resolution Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis has been used to analyze microstructural-scale straining processes that occur during high temperature deformation of a powder-consolidated nickel-based superalloy, Rene 88DT. Orientation imaging has been employed to study grain-level straining and strain storage at temperatures, strains, and strain rates of interest. Two distinct deformation mechanisms were observed using these techniques. At strain rates below 0.001/s, superplastic deformation dominates at temperature between 1241K (968°C) and 1323K (1050°C). At strain rates above 0.001/s, a combination of superplastic and power-law creep deformation mechanisms is evident. At the highest strain rates, power-law creep deformation dominates. Using experimental evidence along with previous studies, constitutive models of deformation mechanisms and microstructure evolution during high temperature compression are proposed. The proposed models predict the boundaries of deformation mechanisms along with the material response to imposed deformation conditions such as superplasticity-enhanced grain growth and dynamic recrystallization.

  20. Intergranular tellurium cracking of nickel-based alloys in molten Li, Be, Th, U/F salt mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexander; Gnidoy, Ivan; Kulakov, Alexander; Uglov, Vadim; Vasiliev, Alexander; Presniakov, Mikhail

    2013-09-01

    In Russia, R&D on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) are concentrated now on fast/intermediate spectrum concepts which were recognized as long term alternative to solid fueled fast reactors due to their attractive features: strong negative feedback coefficients, easy in-service inspection, and simplified fuel cycle. For high-temperature MSR corrosion of the metallic container alloy in primary circuit is the primary concern. Key problem receiving current attention include surface fissures in Ni-based alloys probably arising from fission product tellurium attack. This paper summarizes results of corrosion tests conducted recently to study effect of oxidation state in selected fuel salt on tellurium attack and to develop means of controlling tellurium cracking in the special Ni-based alloys recently developed for molten salt actinide recycler and tranforming (MOSART) system. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys was tested at temperatures up to 750 °C in stressed and unloaded conditions in molten LiF-BeF2 salt mixture fueled by about 20 mol% of ThF4 and 2 mol% of UF4 at different [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratios: 0.7, 4, 20, 100 and 500. Following Ni-based alloys (in mass%): HN80М-VI (Mo—12, Cr—7.6, Nb—1.5), HN80МТY (Mo—13, Cr—6.8, Al—1.1, Ti—0.9), HN80МТW (Mo—9.4, Cr—7.0, Ti—1.7, W—5.5) and ЕМ-721 (W—25.2, Cr—5.7, Ti—0.17) were used for the study in the corrosion facility. If the redox state the fuel salt is characterized by uranium ratio [U(IV)]/[U(III)] < 1 the alloys' specimens get a more negative stationary electrode potential than equilibrium electrode potentials of some uranium intermetallic compounds and alloys with nickel and molybdenum. This leads to spontaneous behavior of alloy formation processes on the specimens' surface and further diffusion of uranium deep into the metallic phase. As consequence of this films of intermetallic compounds and alloys of nickel, molybdenum, tungsten with uranium are formed on the alloys specimens' surface

  1. Creep and tensile properties of several oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys at 1365 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The tensile properties at room temperature and at 1365 K and the tensile creep properties at low strain rates at 1365 K were measured for several oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys. The alloys examined included ODS Ni, ODS Ni-20Cr, and ODS Ni-16Cr-Al. Metallography of creep tested, large grain size ODS alloys indicated that creep of these alloys is an inhomogeneous process. All alloys appear to possess a threshold stress for creep. This threshold stress is believed to be associated with diffusional creep in the large grain size ODS alloys and normal dislocation motion in perfect single crystal (without transverse low angle boundaries) ODS alloys. Threshold stresses for large grain size ODS Ni-20Cr and Ni-16Cr-Al type alloys are dependent on the grain aspect ratio. Because of the deleterious effect of prior creep on room temperature mechanical properties of large grain size ODS alloys, it is speculated that the threshold stress may be the design limiting creep strength property.

  2. Grinding as an approach to the production of high-strength, dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, N. W.; Quatinetz, M.; Weeton, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanical process produces dispersion-strengthened metal alloys. Power surface contamination during milling is removed by a cleaning method that involves heating thin shapes or partially-compacted milled powder blends in hydrogen to carefully controlled temperature schedules.

  3. Analysis and Elimination of High Temperature Notch Induced Microcrack Initiation in Inconel 718 Nickel-Based Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    10) the particle will be sheared. I . . 22 B-2 APPLICATION TO INCONEL 718 ALLOY Taking an actual case of Inconel 718 alloy tested at 10000 F, the...stress static test at 1000OF on unnotched tensile specimens of inconel 718 *, show a tensile yield point of 135 ksice. This is in direct agreement with...energy distribution of solution treated* and aged**. Inconel 718 specimens that were stress rupture tested below the yield stress, at elevated

  4. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    graphite inserts at the bottom of the Rheocaster to eliminate ’hot spots’. Large quantities of 304 and 440C stainless steel alloys were cast during this...period (approximately 800 pounds of 304 and 2000 pounds of 440C ) and smaller quantities of other materials were also Rheocast including M2 tool steel, and

  5. Dry machinability of aluminum alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Shareef, I.; Natarajan, M.; Ajayi, O. O.; Energy Technology; Department of IMET

    2005-01-01

    Adverse effects of the use of cutting fluids and environmental concerns with regard to cutting fluid disposability is compelling industry to adopt Dry or near Dry Machining, with the aim of eliminating or significantly reducing the use of metal working fluids. Pending EPA regulations on metal cutting, dry machining is becoming a hot topic of research and investigation both in industry and federal research labs. Although the need for dry machining may be apparent, most of the manufacturers still consider dry machining to be impractical and even if possible, very expensive. This perception is mainly due to lack of appropriate cutting tools that can withstand intense heat and Built-up-Edge (BUE) formation during dry machining. The challenge of heat dissipation without coolant requires a completely different approach to tooling. Special tooling utilizing high-performance multi-layer, multi-component, heat resisting, low friction coatings could be a plausible answer to the challenge of dry machining. In pursuit of this goal Argonne National Labs has introduced Nano-crystalline near frictionless carbon (NFC) diamond like coatings (DLC), while industrial efforts have led to the introduction of composite coatings such as titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN), tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) and others. Although, these coatings are considered to be very promising, they have not been tested either from tribological or from dry machining applications point of view. As such a research program in partnership with federal labs and industrial sponsors has started with the goal of exploring the feasibility of dry machining using the newly developed coatings such as Near Frictionless Carbon Coatings (NFC), Titanium Aluminum Nitride (TiAlN), and multi-layer multicomponent nano coatings such as TiAlCrYN and TiAlN/YN. Although various coatings are under investigation as part of the overall dry machinability program, this extended abstract deals with a systematic investigation of dry

  6. Application of powder metallurgy to an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy, NASA-TRW 6-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ashbrook, R. L.; Waters, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Bar stock of the NASA-TRW 6-A alloy was made by prealloyed powder techniques and its properties evaluated over a range of temperatures. Room temperature ultimate tensile strength was 1894 MN/sq m (274 500 psi). The as-extruded powder product showed substantial improvements in strength over the cast alloy up to 649 C (1200 F) and superplasticity at 1093 C (2000 F). Both conventional and autoclave heat treatments were applied to the extruded powder product. The conventional heat treatment was effective in increasing rupture life at 649 and 704 C (1200 and 1300 F); the autoclave heat treatment, at 760 and 816 C (1400 and 1500 F).

  7. High temperature and high pressure corrosion of nickel-based alloys and stainless steels in ammoniacal sulphate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Edouard

    The corrosion characteristics of Alloy 625 (UNS 00625, Ni-22 Cr-10 Mo) in oxygenated ammoniacal sulphate environments are determined at room temperature and pressure and up to high temperatures and pressures (673 K, 250 bar) commensurate with the process of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO). Electrochemical methods such as linear polarization, potentiodynamic polarization and impedance spectroscopy are used. It is found that the electrochemical and morphological response is dictated by the alloying element Cr and the formation of a Cr(III) oxide. Mo and, to a lesser extent Ni, are found to dissolve readily. Thermodynamic analysis of the Ni-NH3-H2O system, including new Pourbaix diagrams at temperatures as high as 653 K, has shown that Ni-ammine formation is possible at moderate temperatures but that the stability of these complexes decreases substantially with temperature. According to one of the models investigated, which is based on the only available high temperature equilibrium constant data, Ni-ammines become unstable above approximately 473 K. Impedance spectroscopy has shown that transpassive dissolution of the alloy's p-type, cation conducting, Cr(III) oxide occurs at temperatures as low as 373 K and total pressure (oxygen saturated) as low as 40 bar. As temperature and pressure are increased the corrosion process is increasingly diffusion controlled. Transpassive dissolution results in the thinning and eventual total removal of the alloy's protective semiconductor barrier layer. Cation ejection from the barrier layer into the solution and porous outer layer phase results in precipitation of a Cr(III) scale (oxide or hydroxyl-oxide) at the alloy surface which acts as a diffusion barrier. It is hypothesized that the outer layer is either physically removed at supercritical conditions due to rapid dissolution and grain boundary attack of the alloy or chemically removed by solution acidification due to the formation of sulphuric acid at high density

  8. Design and development of hot corrosion-resistant nickel-base single-crystal superalloys by the d-electrons alloy design theory: Part I--Characterization of the phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S. . Inst. of Metal Research Beijing Univ. of Science and Technology, . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Hu, Z.Q. . Inst. of Metal Research); Murata, Y.; Morinaga, M.; Yukawa, N. . Dept. of Production Systems Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    As the first step to design the new hot corrosion-resistant nickel-base single-crystal superalloys by the d-electrons alloy design theory (or the New PHACOMP), an evaluation of the phase stability of the modified hot corrosion-resistant IN738LC nickel-base superalloys (Ni-16Cr-9.5Al-4.0Ti-8.0-Co-0.55Nb-0.06Zr-0.05B-0.47C-(0 [approximately]3) Ta-(0 [approximately] 3)W-(0 [approximately] 3) Mo (in atomic percent)) was conducted with the alloy design theory. The critical conditions for suppressing the precipitation of the brittle [sigma] phase can be described by the electronic parameters [ovr Mdt] [le] 0.991 and [ovr Md[gamma

  9. Effect of the pre-existing carbides on the grain boundary network during grain boundary engineering in a nickel based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tingguang; Xia, Shuang; Li, Hui; Zhou, Bangxin; Bai, Qin

    2014-05-01

    Grain boundary engineering was carried out on an aging-treated nickel based Alloy 690, which has precipitated carbides at grain boundaries. Electron backscatter diffraction technique was used to investigate the grain boundary networks. Results show that, compared with the solution-annealed samples, the aging-treated samples with pre-existing carbides at grain boundaries need longer duration or higher temperature during annealing after low-strain tensile deformation for forming high proportion of low-Σ coincidence site lattice grain boundaries (more than 75%). The reason is that the primary recrystallization is inhibited or retarded owing to that the pre-existing carbides are barriers to grain boundaries migration. - Highlights: • Study of GBE as function of pre-existing GB carbides, tensile strain and annealing • Recrystallization of GBE is inhibited or retarded by the pre-existing carbides. • Retained carbides after annealing show the original GB positions. • More than 80% of special GBs were formed after the modification of GBE processing. • Multiple twinning during recrystallization is the key process of GBE.

  10. Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 718 Powders onto AISI 4140 Alloy Steel Substrates: Interface Bond and Fracture Failure Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoyeol; Cong, Weilong; Zhang, Hong-Chao; Liu, Zhichao

    2017-01-01

    As a prospective candidate material for surface coating and repair applications, nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN718) was deposited on American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 4140 alloy steel substrate by laser engineered net shaping (LENS) to investigate the compatibility between two dissimilar materials with a focus on interface bonding and fracture behavior of the hybrid specimens. The results show that the interface between the two dissimilar materials exhibits good metallurgical bonding. Through the tensile test, all the fractures occurred in the as-deposited IN718 section rather than the interface or the substrate, implying that the as-deposited interlayer bond strength is weaker than the interfacial bond strength. From the fractography using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS), three major factors affecting the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part are (i) metallurgical defects such as incompletely melted powder particles, lack-of-fusion porosity, and micropores; (ii) elemental segregation and Laves phase, and (iii) oxide formation. The fracture failure mechanism is a combination of all these factors which are detrimental to the mechanical properties and structural integrity by causing premature fracture failure of the as-deposited IN718. PMID:28772702

  11. Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 718 Powders onto AISI 4140 Alloy Steel Substrates: Interface Bond and Fracture Failure Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoyeol; Cong, Weilong; Zhang, Hong-Chao; Liu, Zhichao

    2017-03-25

    As a prospective candidate material for surface coating and repair applications, nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN718) was deposited on American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 4140 alloy steel substrate by laser engineered net shaping (LENS) to investigate the compatibility between two dissimilar materials with a focus on interface bonding and fracture behavior of the hybrid specimens. The results show that the interface between the two dissimilar materials exhibits good metallurgical bonding. Through the tensile test, all the fractures occurred in the as-deposited IN718 section rather than the interface or the substrate, implying that the as-deposited interlayer bond strength is weaker than the interfacial bond strength. From the fractography using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS), three major factors affecting the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part are (i) metallurgical defects such as incompletely melted powder particles, lack-of-fusion porosity, and micropores; (ii) elemental segregation and Laves phase, and (iii) oxide formation. The fracture failure mechanism is a combination of all these factors which are detrimental to the mechanical properties and structural integrity by causing premature fracture failure of the as-deposited IN718.

  12. Influence of Laser Cladding Parameters on the Distribution of Elements in the Beads of Nickel-Based Ni-Cr-B-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoyno, O. G.; Drozdov, P. S.; Dovoretskiy, Y. B.; Kardapolova, M. A.; Lutsko, N. I.; Tamanis, E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors explore the beads obtained by laser cladding with nickel-based self-fluxing alloy (grain size 20-80 μm) at different laser beam travel rates against the sample and different cladding distances. They examined the iron, nickel, chrome and silicon content of the coating in dependence on the cladding rate and the microstructure in each zone of a bead. As a result, it was established that the beads after laser cladding have a similar structure morphology in all the examined zones, which confirms that there is intense mixing of the molten-metal pool. A distinct correlation has been found between the distribution of coating elements and the modes of laser cladding: the nickel, chrome, and silicon contents of the coating are decreasing while the iron content is increasing with increased cladding rate. The authors point out a strong effect of radiation shielding caused by the vapours generated during the process of melting the powder particles in the area exposed to laser radiation.

  13. Friction and wear of oxide-ceramic sliding against IN-718 nickel base alloy at 25 to 800 C in atmospheric air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    The friction and wear of oxide-ceramics sliding against the nickel base alloy IN-718 at 25 to 800 C were measured. The oxide materials tested were mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2); lithium aluminum silicate (LiAlSi(x)O(y)); polycrystalline monolithic alpha alumina (alpha-Al2O3); single crystal alpha-Al2O3 (sapphire); zirconia (ZrO2); and silicon carbide (SiC) whisker-reinforced Al2O3 composites. At 25 C the mullite and zirconia had the lowest friction and the polycrystalline monolithic alumina had the lowest wear. At 800 C the Al2O3-8 vol/percent SiC whisker composite had the lowest friction and the Al2O3-25 vol/percent SiC composite had the lowest wear. The friction of the Al2O3-SiC whisker composites increased with increased whisker content while the wear decreased. In general, the wear-resistance of the ceramics improve with their hardness.

  14. The role of grain boundary chemistry and structure in the environmentally-assisted intergranular cracking of nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests in constant extension rate tensile (CERT) and constant load tensile (CLT) tests were conducted on Ni-xCr- 9Fe-yC in Ar, water, and a LiOH-boric acid solution. Cr and C improve the resistance of Ni-base alloys to IG cracking in both Ar and water at 360C. Since creep plays a role in IG cracking, one possible explanation for the role of the environment involves its effect on the creep. Experiments were conducted on the role of C in the deformation behavior and failure mode of Ni-16Cr-9Fe. Constant load experiments were conducted on Ni-16Cr-9Fe to determine if the CLT test is more aggressive than CERT. The electron backscattering technique in a SEM is being developed in order to extend the IG cracking studies to grain sizes typical of commercial alloys, 20-30 microns.

  15. Effect of rare earth cerium on microstructure and wear-resistance of nickel-base alloy laser cladded coating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qingbo; Wang Kunlin; Sun Manlong; Wei Xiangguo

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the effect of CeO{sub 2} on the cladded Ni-base alloy coatings was studied. Based on a comparison of the microstructure and properties of laser cladded coatings containing CeO{sub 2} or without it, it is clear that the addition of CeO{sub 2} can refine the microstructure, increase the microhardness, deduce the inclusion percentage and modify the friction and wear properties. A discussion was also offered in the paper.

  16. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  17. Shock compaction of rapidly solidified nickel based Mo--Al--W alloy powders with pressure up to 1. 2 mbar

    SciTech Connect

    Staudhammer, K.P.

    1988-01-01

    The alloy described in this paper is a high strength nickel alloy containing 10 wt% Mo, 6.8 wt% Al, and 6 wt% W. It cannot be easily prepared by conventional casting methods without gross segregation occurring in the form of massive dendrites. Gas atomization to form fine powders reduces the dendrite size and therefore, the segregation. The spacing of the secondary dendrite arm has been used to estimate the cooling rate of this powder. The experimental investigation of shock compaction is based in part on mach stem lens formation work. One of the fortuitous aspects of the cylindrical explosion design is its suitability as a screening tool with its very high success rate of recovery. Use of the radial implosion design has allowed for the determination of optimum pressures required for consolidation of RSR Ni--10Mo--6.8Al--6W alloy powders as a function of initial packing density. These sets of experiments are in line with previous work on other shock consolidated powders showed that an increase of initial density decreased the melt zone, and only required a slight increase in the pressure to consolidate. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    slurries are produced continu- ously by the machine shown in Figure 5. The crucible made from Vesuvius #235 (58% Al-CU, 26% C and 12% SiO_) is composed of...rotation assembly. . i„ ij i. »J ..-;■ ,nvj . .iSMlitÜ^^ ’•TW "JPW 1—r tr ’I 1TTJI W-I ^1 VWV.™ -"WM- 52 WMMMk « Mt _ ,_j J ü UJ Q UJ CO z ü CO...have same scale in the horizontal direction. w $®^&&#^ w* « 1. ■ ^.-w j »f ■ v mT -i 64 o- 300 200 en § a» 100 # As Rheocast O 5 hrs at

  19. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  20. A multiple linear regression analysis of hot corrosion attack on a series of nickel base turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine an equation for estimating hot corrosion attack for a series of Ni base cast turbine alloys. The U transform (i.e., 1/sin (% A/100) to the 1/2) was shown to give the best estimate of the dependent variable, y. A complete second degree equation is described for the centered" weight chemistries for the elements Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, W, Cb, Ta, and Co. In addition linear terms for the minor elements C, B, and Zr were added for a basic 47 term equation. The best reduced equation was determined by the stepwise selection method with essentially 13 terms. The Cr term was found to be the most important accounting for 60 percent of the explained variability hot corrosion attack.

  1. Prediction of pure water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

    1995-02-22

    The Ford/Andresen slip dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material condition. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip.

  2. Role of cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R.; Barefoot, J.; Tien, J.; Sanchez, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt or substituting for cobalt on the mechanical properties of nickel-based superalloys is discussed. Waspaloy, UDIMET 700, and NIMONIC 115, which are representative of Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Ti-Mo superalloys having different gamma prime contents which are strengthened by a heavily alloyed matrix, coherent gamma prime precipitates, and carbides at the grain boundaries. Microstructure and in situ and extracted phase STEM micro-analysis were used to evaluate the three alloys.

  3. Role of cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R.; Barefoot, J.; Tien, J.; Sanchez, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt or substituting for cobalt on the mechanical properties of nickel-based superalloys is discussed. Waspaloy, UDIMET 700, and NIMONIC 115, which are representative of Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Ti-Mo superalloys having different gamma prime contents which are strengthened by a heavily alloyed matrix, coherent gamma prime precipitates, and carbides at the grain boundaries. Microstructure and in situ and extracted phase STEM micro-analysis were used to evaluate the three alloys.

  4. The Effect of Alloying on Topologically Close Packed Phase Instability in Advanced Nickel-Based Superalloy Rene N6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Arenas, David; Keller, Dennis; Vasudevan, Vijay

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to describe topologically close packed (TCP) phase instability as a function of composition in the advanced Ni-base superalloy Rene N6. TCP phases are detrimental to overall high-temperature performance of Ni-base superalloys because of their brittle nature and because they deplete the Ni-rich matrix of potent solid solution strengthening elements. Thirty-four variations of polycrystalline Rene N6 determined from a design-of-experiments approach were cast and homogenized at 1315"C for 80 hours followed by exposure at 10930C for 400 hours to promote TCP formation. The alloys had the following composition ranges in atomic percent: Co 10.61 to 16.73%, Mo 0.32 to 1.34%, W 1.85 to 2.52%, Re 1.80 to 2.1 1 %, Ta 2.36 to 3.02%, Al 11.90 to 14.75%, and Cr 3.57 to 6.23%. Physical and chemical characteristics of all n-ticrostructures obtained were described using various analytical techniques. From these observations, a mathematical description of TCP occurrence (omega and P phase) was generated for polycrystalline Rene N6.

  5. Separating the Influence of Environment from Stress Relaxation Effects on Dwell Fatigue Crack Growth in a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Both environmental embrittlement and crack tip visco-plastic stress relaxation play a significant role in determining the dwell fatigue crack growth (DFCG) resistance of nickel-based disk superalloys. In the current study performed on the Low Solvus High Refractory (LSHR) disk alloy, the influence of these two mechanisms were separated so that the effects of each could be quantified and modeled. Seven different microstructural variations of LSHR were produced by controlling the cooling rate and the subsequent aging and thermal exposure heat treatments. Through cyclic fatigue crack growth testing performed both in air and vacuum, it was established that four out of the seven LSHR heat treatments evaluated, possessed similar intrinsic environmental resistance to cyclic crack growth. For these four heat treatments, it was further shown that the large differences in dwell crack growth behavior which still persisted, were related to their measured stress relaxation behavior. The apparent differences in their dwell crack growth resistance were attributed to the inability of the standard linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) stress intensity parameter to account for visco-plastic behavior. Crack tip stress relaxation controls the magnitude of the remaining local tensile stresses which are directly related to the measured dwell crack growth rates. It was hypothesized that the environmentally weakened grain boundary crack tip regions fail during the dwells when their strength is exceeded by the remaining local crack tip tensile stresses. It was shown that the classical creep crack growth mechanisms such as grain boundary sliding did not contribute to crack growth, but the local visco-plastic behavior still plays a very significant role by determining the crack tip tensile stress field which controls the dwell crack growth behavior. To account for the influence of the visco-plastic behavior on the crack tip stress field, an empirical modification to the LEFM stress

  6. Design and development of hot corrosion-resistant nickel-base single-crystal superalloys by the d-electrons alloy design theory: Part II--Effect of refractory metals Ti, Ta, and Nb on microstructures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S. . Inst. of Metal Research Beijing Univ. of Science and Technology, ); Hu, Z.Q. . Inst. of Metal Research); Murata, Y.; Morinaga, M.; Yukawa, N. . Dept. of Production Systems Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A systematic study of the effects of refractory metals Ti, Ta, and Nb on the microstructures and properties was conducted with a hot corrosion-resistant alloy system Ni-16Cr-9Al-4Co-2W-1Mo-(0 [approximately] 4)Ti-(0 [approximately] 4)Ta-(0 [approximately] 4)Nb (in atomic percent) which was selected based on the d-electrons alloy design theory and some basic considerations in alloying features of single-crystal nickel-base superalloys. The contour lines of solidification reaction temperatures and eutectic ([gamma] + [gamma][prime]) volume fraction in the Ti-Ta-Nb compositional triangle were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and imaging analyzer. Compared with the reference alloy IN738LC, in most of the compositional ranges studied, the designed alloys show very low amounts of eutectic ([gamma] + [gamma][prime]) ([le]0.4 vol pct), narrow solidification ranges ([le]65 C), and wide heat-treatment windows'' (> 100 C). This indicates that the alloys should have the promising microstructural stability, single-crystal castability, and be easier for complete solution treatment. In a wide compositional range, the designed alloys showed good hot corrosion resistance (weight loss less than 20 mg/cm[sup 2] after 24 hours kept in molten salt at 900 C). By summarizing the results, the promising alloy compositional ranges of the alloys with balanced properties were determined for the final step of the alloy design, i.e., to grow single crystal and characterize mechanical properties of the alloys selected from the previously mentioned regions.

  7. Oxidation in oxygen at 900 deg and 1000 deg C of four nickel-base cast superalloys: NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, alloy 713C, and IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The oxidation at 900 and 1,000 C of four nickel-base superalloys in 1 atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen was investigated. Thermogravimetric rate data were obtained for periods to 100 hours. The morphology and composition of the oxide scales formed after 100 hours were studied by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA). Alloys B-1900 and VIA were found to be primarily alumina formers, though probably 25 percent of their surface was covered by CR2O3-containing oxides at 900 C. Alloys 713C and IN-738 were primarily chromia formers, though the surface of 713C at 1,000 C was covered with NiO, and the surface of IN-738 at both temperatures was covered with a thin layer of TiO2.

  8. Use of the CSA to Calculate Phase Diagrams and Coherent Inter-Phase Boundary Energies of Multi-Component Nickel-Based Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-02

    in the Ni-based superalloys are the Ni solid solution with the fcc structure, referred to as y and the Ni3Al solution with the L1 2 structure, an...instance, between y and y’ in multicomponent Ni-based superalloys . These quantities are essential for describing microstructure evolution when an...quaternary system for nickel-based superalloys since the addition of Re improves the mechanical properties of Ni-based superalloys [93Qui], (ii) extensive

  9. A Review on High-Speed Machining of Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafizur; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Wong, Yoke-San

    Titanium alloys have been widely used in the aerospace, biomedical and automotive industries because of their good strength-to-weight ratio and superior corrosion resistance. However, it is very difficult to machine them due to their poor machinability. When machining titanium alloys with conventional tools, the tool wear rate progresses rapidly, and it is generally difficult to achieve a cutting speed of over 60m/min. Other types of tool materials, including ceramic, diamond, and cubic boron nitride (CBN), are highly reactive with titanium alloys at higher temperature. However, binder-less CBN (BCBN) tools, which do not have any binder, sintering agent or catalyst, have a remarkably longer tool life than conventional CBN inserts even at high cutting speeds. In order to get deeper understanding of high speed machining (HSM) of titanium alloys, the generation of mathematical models is essential. The models are also needed to predict the machining parameters for HSM. This paper aims to give an overview of recent developments in machining and HSM of titanium alloys, geometrical modeling of HSM, and cutting force models for HSM of titanium alloys.

  10. Strength of inserts in titanium alloy machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V.; Huang, Z.; Zhang, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a stressed state of a non-worn cutting wedge in a machined titanium alloy (Ti6Al2Mo2Cr) is analyzed. The distribution of contact loads on the face of a cutting tool was obtained experimentally with the use of a ‘split cutting tool’. Calculation of internal stresses in the indexable insert made from cemented carbide (WC8Co) was carried out with the help of ANSYS 14.0 software. Investigations showed that a small thickness of the cutting insert leads to extremely high compressive stresses near the cutting edge, stresses that exceed the ultimate compressive strength of cemented carbide. The face and the base of the insert experience high tensile stresses, which approach the ultimate tensile strength of cemented carbide and increase a probability of cutting insert destruction. If the thickness of the cutting insert is bigger than 5 mm, compressive stresses near the cutting edge decrease, and tensile stresses on the face and base decrease to zero. The dependences of the greatest normal and tangential stresses on thickness of the cutting insert were found. Abbreviation and symbols: m/s - meter per second (cutting speed v); mm/r - millimeter per revolution (feed rate f); MPa - mega Pascal (dimension of specific contact loads and stresses); γ - rake angle of the cutting tool [°] α - clearance angle of the sharp cutting tool [°].

  11. Effect of casting geometry on mechanical properties of two nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.; Collins, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine mechanical properties of two rhenium-free modifications of alloy TRW, and to evaluate the suitability of the alloy for use in a small integrally cast turbine rotor. The two alloys were initially developed using stress rupture properties of specimens machined from solid gas turbine blades. Properties in this investigation were determined from cast to size bars and bars cut from 3.8 by 7.6 by 17.8 cm blocks. Specimens machined from blocks had inferior tensile strength and always had markedly poorer rupture lives than cast to size bars. At 1,000 C the cast to size bars had shorter rupture lives than those machined from blades. Alloy R generally had better properties than alloy S in the conditions evaluated. The results show the importance of casting geometry on mechanical properties of nickel base superalloys and suggest that the geometry of a component can be simulated when developing alloys for that component.

  12. Nickel Base Superalloy Turbine Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P. (Inventor); Gauda, John (Inventor); Telesman, Ignacy (Inventor); Kantzos, Pete T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low solvus, high refractory alloy having unusually versatile processing mechanical property capabilities for advanced disks and rotors in gas turbine engines. The nickel base superalloy has a composition consisting essentially of, in weight percent, 3.0-4.0 N, 0.02-0.04 B, 0.02-0.05 C, 12.0-14.0 Cr, 19.0-22.0 Co, 2.0-3.5 Mo, greater than 1.0 to 2.1 Nb, 1.3 to 2.1 Ta,3.04.OTi,4.1 to 5.0 W, 0.03-0.06 Zr, and balance essentially Ni and incidental impurities. The superalloy combines ease of processing with high temperature capabilities to be suitable for use in various turbine engine disk, impeller, and shaft applications. The Co and Cr levels of the superalloy can provide low solvus temperature for high processing versatility. The W, Mo, Ta, and Nb refractory element levels of the superalloy can provide sustained strength, creep, and dwell crack growth resistance at high temperatures.

  13. Nickel-Based Superalloy Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Chen, PoShou

    2008-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy that resists embrittlement by hydrogen more strongly than does nickel alloy 718 has been developed. Nickel alloy 718 is the most widely used superalloy. It has excellent strength and resistance to corrosion as well as acceptably high ductility, and is recognized as the best alloy for many high-temperature applications. However, nickel alloy 718 is susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and to delayed failure and reduced tensile properties in gaseous hydrogen. The greater resistance of the present nickel-based superalloy to adverse effects of hydrogen makes this alloy a superior alternative to nickel alloy 718 for applications that involve production, transfer, and storage of hydrogen, thereby potentially contributing to the commercial viability of hydrogen as a clean-burning fuel. The table shows the composition of the present improved nickel-based superalloy in comparison with that of nickel alloy 718. This composition was chosen to obtain high resistance to embrittlement by hydrogen while maintaining high strength and exceptional resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The most novel property of this alloy is that it resists embrittlement by hydrogen while retaining tensile strength greater than 175 kpsi (greater than 1.2 GPa). This alloy exhibits a tensile elongation of more than 20 percent in hydrogen at a pressure of 5 kpsi (approximately equal to 34 MPa) without loss of ductility. This amount of elongation corresponds to 50 percent more ductility than that exhibited by nickel alloy 718 under the same test conditions.

  14. Considerations on the performance and fabrication of candidate materials for the Yucca Mountain repository waste packages highly corrosion resistant nickel-base and titanium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E; Goldberg, A

    1995-11-30

    Among the metallurgical factors that affect the performance of a material in a given environment are alloy composition, alloy segregation, depletion of alloying elements, non-uniform microstructures, precipitation leading to an increase in susceptibility to corrosion as well as decreases in ductility, residual plastic deformation, and residual stresses. Precipitation often occurs preferentially at grain boundaries, causing depletion of critical elements in regions adjacent to these boundaries. Continuous grain-boundary precipitates can lead to drops in ductility and toughness. The presence of non-metallic inclusions, if excessive and/or segregated, can also cause embrittlement. Segregation of alloying elements can result in localized galvanic action. Depletion of alloying elements as well as segregation can result in reductions in the concentrations of critical elements below those necessary to resist localized corrosion. Segregation and alloy depletion can also facilitate precipitation that could lead to embrittlement.

  15. Sample preparation of metal alloys by electric discharge machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. B., II; Gordon, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electric discharge machining was investigated as a noncontaminating method of comminuting alloys for subsequent chemical analysis. Particulate dispersions in water were produced from bulk alloys at a rate of about 5 mg/min by using a commercially available machining instrument. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by results obtained when acidified dispersions were substituted for true acid solutions in an established spectrochemical method. The analysis results were not significantly different for the two sample forms. Particle size measurements and preliminary results from other spectrochemical methods which require direct aspiration of liquid into flame or plasma sources are reported.

  16. Effects of Machining on the Microstructure of Aluminum Alloy 7075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabei, A.; Liang, S. Y.; Garmestani, H.

    Experimental investigations show that depending on the parameters, aggressive machining of aluminum alloy 7075 can trigger several microstructural phenomena including recrystallization, grain growth and crystallographic texture modifications below the machined surface. Increasing the depth of cut will lead to a significant recrystallization and consequently grain refinement. On the other hand, increasing the feed rate will result into development of a unique crystallographic texture. The mechanical and thermal loads imposed to the material experiences by machining leads to such microstructural phenomena. Finite element analysis is used to determine these loads.

  17. Cytocompatibility of a free machining titanium alloy containing lanthanum.

    PubMed

    Feyerabend, Frank; Siemers, Carsten; Willumeit, Regine; Rösler, Joachim

    2009-09-01

    Titanium alloys like Ti6Al4V are widely used in medical engineering. However, the mechanical and chemical properties of titanium alloys lead to poor machinability, resulting in high production costs of medical products. To improve the machinability of Ti6Al4V, 0.9% of the rare earth element lanthanum (La) was added. The microstructure, the mechanical, and the corrosion properties were determined. Lanthanum containing alloys exhibited discrete particles of cubic lanthanum. The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance were slightly decreased but are still sufficient for many applications in the field of medical engineering. In vitro experiments with mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7) and human bone-derived cells (MG-63, HBDC) were performed and revealed that macrophages showed a dose response below and above a LaCl3 concentration of 200 microM, while MG-63 and HBDC tolerated three times higher concentrations without reduction of viability. The viability of cells cultured on disks of the materials showed no differences between the reference and the lanthanum containing alloy. We therefore propose that lanthanum containing alloy appears to be a good alternative for biomedical applications, where machining of parts is necessary.

  18. Dynamic oxidation behavior at 1000 and 1100 C of four nickel-base cast alloys, NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    The superalloys NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X were tested cyclically and isothermally for resistance to oxidation in high velocity gas streams for 100 hours at specimen temperatures of 1000 C and 1100 C. Alloys VIA and B-1900, which were the most oxidation resistant, displayed slight and very similar weight changes and metal losses. Alloy 713C also sustained only slight metal losses, but it exhibited some tendency to spall. Alloy 738X was found to be the most susceptible to cyclic oxidation; this resulted in heavy spalling, which in turn caused high weight losses and high metal losses. Oxidation test results are related to the amounts of chromium aluminum, and the refractory metals in the alloys investigated.

  19. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation at 1000 and 1100 deg C of four nickel-base alloys: NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Santoro, G. J.; Lowell, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation resistance of four cast Ni-base gamma + gamma prime alloys, NASA-TRW Via, B-1900, 713C, and 738X, was determined in still air at 1000 and 1100 C. The oxidation process was evaluated by specific sample weight change with time, sample thickness change, X-ray diffraction of the scales, and sample metallography. The behavior is discussed in terms of the Cr, Al, and refractory metal contents of the alloys.

  20. High weldability nickel-base superalloy

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, Robert C.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1980-01-01

    This is a nickel-base superalloy with excellent weldability and high strength. Its composition consists essentially of, by weight percent, 10-20 iron, 57-63 nickel, 7-18 chromium, 4-6 molybdenum, 1-2 niobium, 0.2-0.8 silicon, 0.01-0.05 zirconium, 1.0-2.5 titanium, 1.0-2.5 aluminum, 0.02-0.06 carbon, and 0.002-0.015 boron. The weldability and strength of this alloy give it a variety of applications. The long-time structural stability of this alloy together with its low swelling under nuclear radiation conditions, make it especially suitable for use as a duct material and controlling element cladding for sodium-cooled nuclear reactors.

  1. Process capability improvement through DMAIC for aluminum alloy wheel machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G. V. S. S.; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Babu, B. Surendra

    2017-07-01

    This paper first enlists the generic problems of alloy wheel machining and subsequently details on the process improvement of the identified critical-to-quality machining characteristic of A356 aluminum alloy wheel machining process. The causal factors are traced using the Ishikawa diagram and prioritization of corrective actions is done through process failure modes and effects analysis. Process monitoring charts are employed for improving the process capability index of the process, at the industrial benchmark of four sigma level, which is equal to the value of 1.33. The procedure adopted for improving the process capability levels is the define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) approach. By following the DMAIC approach, the C p, C pk and C pm showed signs of improvement from an initial value of 0.66, -0.24 and 0.27, to a final value of 4.19, 3.24 and 1.41, respectively.

  2. Effect of alloy composition on the sodium-sulfate induced hot corrosion attack of cast nickel-base superalloys at 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Deadmore, D. L.; Barrett, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, Ta, Nb, and W content on the hot corrosion of Ni-base alloys were examined experimentally. The superalloys were tested for 300 1-hr cycles at 900 C in a Mach 0.3 burner rig flame containing 0.5 ppmw sodium. The data reveal that the best corrosion resistance is obtained when the Cr content is greater than 12 percent; however, good resistance is detected in some alloys with Cr content less than 10 percent provided that the Al content is less than 2.5 wt pct and the Ti content is less than 4 wt pct. It is observed that the influence of W, Ta, Mo, and Nb content on resistance is dependent on Al and Ti contents. The derivation of an equation for estimating hot corrosion attack as a function of alloy composition using multiple linear regression analysis is described. The applicability of the equation is tested using various data sets of alloys. It is noted that the equation can be used to explain the effects of alloy composition on attack rates.

  3. Effect of alloy composition on the sodium-sulfate induced hot corrosion attack of cast nickel-base superalloys at 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Deadmore, D. L.; Barrett, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, Ta, Nb, and W content on the hot corrosion of Ni-base alloys were examined experimentally. The superalloys were tested for 300 1-hr cycles at 900 C in a Mach 0.3 burner rig flame containing 0.5 ppmw sodium. The data reveal that the best corrosion resistance is obtained when the Cr content is greater than 12 percent; however, good resistance is detected in some alloys with Cr content less than 10 percent provided that the Al content is less than 2.5 wt pct and the Ti content is less than 4 wt pct. It is observed that the influence of W, Ta, Mo, and Nb content on resistance is dependent on Al and Ti contents. The derivation of an equation for estimating hot corrosion attack as a function of alloy composition using multiple linear regression analysis is described. The applicability of the equation is tested using various data sets of alloys. It is noted that the equation can be used to explain the effects of alloy composition on attack rates.

  4. Ultrashort pulse laser machining of metals and alloys

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2003-09-16

    The invention consists of a method for high precision machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of metals and alloys. By using pulses of a duration in the range of 10 femtoseconds to 100 picoseconds, extremely precise machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. Because the pulses are so short, there is negligible thermal conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond approximately 0.1-1 micron (dependent upon the particular material) from the laser machined surface. Due to the short duration, the high intensity (>10.sup.12 W/cm.sup.2) associated with the interaction converts the material directly from the solid-state into an ionized plasma. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces with negligible redeposition either within the kerf or on the surface. Since there is negligible heating beyond the depth of material removed, the composition of the remaining material is unaffected by the laser machining process. This enables high precision machining of alloys and even pure metals with no change in grain structure.

  5. A Model for High-Temperature Pitting Corrosion in Nickel-Based Alloys Involving Internal Precipitation of Carbides, Oxides, and Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertsen, J. Z.; Grong, Ø.; Walmsley, J. C.; Mathiesen, R. H.; van Beek, W.

    2008-06-01

    The present investigation is concerned with fundamental studies of the mechanisms of pitting corrosion in the Ni-based alloys 602 and 693, following long-term exposure to syngas at 540 °C and a 35-bar total pressure. The 4-years’ plant-exposed alloys were examined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is concluded that the pitting corrosion attacks start when carbon diffuses into the bulk of the alloys following the breakdown of the protective Cr2O3-Al2O3 surface oxide layer. During the incubation period, this oxide layer provides an effective barrier against carbon intrusion by virtue of its ability to restore cracks and flaws through diffusion. The corrosion pits then grow by a process of internal carburization and oxidation, in which carbides, oxides, and graphite form separately within an approximately 30- μm-thick belt in front of the pits (referred to as the white zone). In particular, the oxidation of the internal Cr3C2 carbides occurring close to the white zone/pit interface is associated with large volume changes. This volume expansion results in the buildup of high mechanical stresses within the white zone and, eventually, to the complete disintegration of the original alloy matrices into a layered pit microstructure consisting of Ni + Fe and Cr2O3 + Al2O3 + graphite. The observed microstructural changes have been rationalized through detailed modeling of the physical reactions involved, leading to the development of new and comprehensive models for high-temperature pitting corrosion in Ni-based alloys.

  6. The role of grain boundary chemistry and structure in the environmentally-assisted intergranular cracking of nickel-base alloys. Progress report, August 1, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests in constant extension rate tensile (CERT) and constant load tensile (CLT) tests were conducted on Ni-xCr- 9Fe-yC in Ar, water, and a LiOH-boric acid solution. Cr and C improve the resistance of Ni-base alloys to IG cracking in both Ar and water at 360C. Since creep plays a role in IG cracking, one possible explanation for the role of the environment involves its effect on the creep. Experiments were conducted on the role of C in the deformation behavior and failure mode of Ni-16Cr-9Fe. Constant load experiments were conducted on Ni-16Cr-9Fe to determine if the CLT test is more aggressive than CERT. The electron backscattering technique in a SEM is being developed in order to extend the IG cracking studies to grain sizes typical of commercial alloys, 20-30 microns.

  7. Multicomponent interdiffusion in austenitic nickel-, iron-nickel-base alloys and L1(2)-nickel-aluminum intermetallic for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Narayana

    Interdiffusion in multicomponent-multiphase alloys is commonly encountered in many materials systems. The developments of multicomponent-multiphase alloys require control of microstructure through appropriate heat treatment, involving solid-state transformations, precipitation processes, and surface modification, where the interdiffusion processes play a major role. In addition, interdiffusion processes often control degradation and failure of these materials systems. Enhanced performance and reliable durability always requires a detailed understanding of interdiffusion. In this study, ternary and quaternary interdiffusion in Ni-Cr-X (X = Al, Si, Ge, Pd) at 900°C and 700°C, Fe-Ni-Cr-X (X = Si, Ge) at 900°C, and Ni3Al alloyed with Ir, Ta and Re at 1200°C were examined using solid-to-solid diffusion couples. Interdiffusion fluxes of individual components were calculated directly from experimental concentration profiles determined by electron probe microanalysis. Moments of interdiffusion fluxes were examined to calculate main and cross interdiffusion coefficients averaged over selected composition ranges from single diffusion couple experiments. Consistency in the magnitude and sign of ternary and quaternary interdiffusion coefficient were verified with interdiffusion coefficients determined by Boltzmann-Matano analysis that requires multiple diffusion couples with intersecting compositions. Effects of alloying additions, Al, Si, Ge and Pd, on the interdiffusion in Ni-Cr-X and Fe-Ni-Cr-X alloys were examined with respect to Cr2O 3-forming ability at high temperature. Effects of Ir, Ta and Re additions on interdiffusion in Ni3Al were examined with respect to phase stability and site-preference. In addition, a numerically refined approach to determine average ternary interdiffusion coefficients were developed. Concentrations and moments of interdiffusion fluxes are employed to generate multiple combinations of multicomponent interdiffusion coefficient as a function

  8. Distribution Behavior of Aluminum and Titanium Between Nickel-Based Alloys and Molten Slags in the Electro Slag Remelting (ESR) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun Gil; Park, Joo Hyun

    2017-08-01

    The equilibrium reaction between Ni alloys and CaO-Al2O3-CaF2-TiO2 system electroslag remelting (ESR) slags was investigated in the temperature range of 1773 K to 1873 K (1500 °C to 1600 °C) at p(O2) = 10-16 atm in order to obtain the optimized composition of the slags for producing Ni alloys with various Al and Ti ratios. In addition, the temperature dependence of the reaction equilibria between the ESR slags and Ni alloys was also evaluated. The stable ionic species of titanium in the ESR slag under the present experimental conditions was experimentally confirmed to be mainly Ti4+ ( i.e., TiO2) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the quenched samples. The activity-composition relationship of TiO2 and Al2O3 in the ESR slag was determined as a function of the Al/Ti ratio of the alloys and the CaF2 content of the slags in conjunction with the activity ratio of Al to Ti in the alloys calculated from the FactSageTM 7.0 software. The temperature dependence of the activity-composition relationship of TiO2 and Al2O3 in the slag showed good linear correlations, and the equilibrium content ratio of TiO2 to Al2O3 at a fixed activity ratio increased with increasing temperature, which was expected based on the standard enthalpy change of the reaction. Thus, higher amounts of TiO2 should be added at higher operation temperatures in the ESR process. A 120 kg scale pilot ESR test (2000 A and 16 V) was performed to produce a commercial grade Ni-based superalloy based on the activity-composition relationship of the slag components obtained in the present study. Consequently, the contents of Al and Ti in the solidified ESR ingot were nearly the same as that of the original electrode throughout the entire length (280 mm) after the ESR process.

  9. Casting behavior of titanium alloys in a centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Miyakawa, O; Takada, Y; Okuno, O; Okabe, T

    2003-05-01

    Since dental casting requires replication of complex shapes with great accuracy, this study examined how well some commercial titanium alloys and experimental titanium-copper alloys filled a mold cavity. The metals examined were three types of commercial dental titanium [commercially pure titanium (hereinafter noted as CP-Ti), Ti-6Al-4V (T64) and Ti-6Al-7Nb (T67)], and experimental titanium-copper alloys [3%, 5% and 10% Cu (mass %)]. The volume percentage filling the cavity was evaluated in castings prepared in a very thin perforated sheet pattern and cast in a centrifugal casting machine. The flow behavior of the molten metal was also examined using a so-called "tracer element technique." The amounts of CP-Ti and all the Ti-Cu alloys filling the cavity were similar; less T64 and T67 filled the cavity. However, the Ti-Cu alloys failed to reach the end of the cavities due to a lower fluidity compared to the other metals. A mold prepared with specially designed perforated sheets was effective at differentiating the flow behavior of the metals tested. The present technique also revealed that the more viscous Ti-Cu alloys with a wide freezing range failed to sequentially flow to the end of the cavity.

  10. A lifetime-prediction approach to understanding corrosion: The corrosion-fatigue and corrosion behavior of a nickel-based superalloy and a nanocrystalline alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, Rejanah Vernice

    Lifetime-prediction models are useful for simulating a material's in-service behavior or outcome. Perhaps the greatest advantage of these models is the ability to use the predicted results to help optimize engineering designs and reduce costs. The HastelloyRTM C-2000RTM superalloy is a single-phase material and face-centered cubic in structure at all temperatures. The C-2000RTM alloy is a commercially designed alloy manufactured to function in both reducing and oxidizing solutions. C-2000RTM is used as a fabrication material for heat exchangers, piping for chemical refineries, and storage repositories. The corrosion properties of C-2000RTM are excellent, and the ductility and fatigue properties are good. In this study, C-2000RTM is used to verify the theoretical basis of an electrochemical-micromechanical crack-initiation corrosion-fatigue model for materials under passive electrochemical conditions. The results from electrochemical and mechanical experiments, along with the findings from the conventional electron microscopy and a laser interferometer will be presented. A nanocrystalline Ni-18 weight percent (wt.%) Fe alloy is examined to investigate its electrochemical behavior in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Three Ni-18 wt.% Fe samples were annealed at 400°C for 3, 8, and 24 hours (hrs.) to study the effects of grain sizes on the electrochemical properties of bulk Ni-18 wt.% Fe. The electrochemical results from the annealed samples are compared with those measured for the as-received Ni-18 wt.% Fe material consisting of an average grain size of 23 nanometers (nm). The samples annealed for times longer than 8 hrs. appear to have undergone an abnormal grain growth, where nanometer and micrometer (mum) grain sizes are present. Unlike the electrochemical results for the as-received material, the annealed nanocrystalline materials appear to be susceptible to localized corrosion. Consequently, these larger grains within the nanoncrystalline-grain matrix are

  11. Steam effects on oxidation behavior of alumina-scale forming nickel-based alloys and a kinetics analysis of complex scale evolution during isothermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei

    The first part of this study investigated steam effects on the oxidation behavior of Al2O3-scale forming Ni-based alloys. This effect was assessed in the context of Giggins and Pettit's oxidation map1 for the Ni-Cr-Al system, which was determined under dry oxidizing conditions. Of particular relevance to the design of high-temperature alloys and coatings is the location in the oxide map of the kinetically-dictated critical Al content (NAl*) in a given alloy to form a continuous Al2O3-scale. It was found that NAl* increases when the air contains 30% steam. A rigorous quantitative analysis based on Maak's modification2 of Wagner's theory3 was carried out to determine the key parameter affecting an increase in NAl* under wet oxidizing conditions. By checking the sensitivity of NAl* with respect to each parameter in the theory, it was deduced that the only parameter which can give the necessarily large change in NAl * found in wet-air oxidation is the critical volume fraction of internal oxide, fv*, a parameter that is usually assumed to be a constant and independent of the reacting conditions. From experimental observation, it was found that the surface of NiO scale became unstable in wet oxidizing conditions. Unlike the dense and uniform surface formed scale in dry air, finger-like protrusions or a powder-like porous structure could form under wet conditions. The experimental conditions and possible mechanisms for this observed instability were assessed. In the second part of this study, a novel kinetics analysis method was established to quantify the kinetics of scale evolution based on analyzing the instantaneous growth rate constant ki and the time exponent ni determined from thermogravimetric (TG) data. A methodology is proposed to ascertain whether the oxidation kinetics has come to a steady state from a transient stage, and to accurately determine the growth rate constant. Both a fundamental analysis and an experimental validation of this methodology are

  12. The continuing battle against defects in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the six decades since the identification of age hardenable nickel-base superalloys their compositions and microstructures have changed markedly. Current alloys are tailored for specific applications. Thus their microstructures are defined for that application. This paper briefly reviews the evolution of superalloy microstructures and comments on the appearance and implications of microstructural defects in high performance superalloys. It is seen that new alloys and proceses have generated new types of defects. Thus as the industry continues to develop new alloys and processes it must remain vigilant toward the identification and control of new types of defects.

  13. Mechanism of competitive grain growth in a curvilinear channel of crystal-sorter during the orientational solidification of nickel-based heat-resistant alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrskiy, V. P.; Pozdnyakov, A. N.; Ershov, M. Yu.; Monastyrskiy, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    Using numerical simulation in the ProCAST program complex, the conditions of the solidification of heat-resistant nickel alloy in curvilinear channels of a ceramic mold have been investigated. It has been shown that, in practically important cases, the vector of the temperature gradient is oriented along the axis of the curvilinear channel. In a spiral crystal selector, a cyclic change in the preferred direction of growth occurs because of the cyclic change in the direction of the vector of the temperature gradient. The fact that the vector of the temperature gradient is almost always directed along the axis of the curvilinear channel makes it possible to govern the orientation of the vector of the temperature gradient in space and, therefore, to obtain a grain with the preferred crystallographic orientation. Based on the results of this investigation, a method of the grain selection with a desired azimuthal orientation is proposed.

  14. Formation enthalpies for transition metal alloys using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaru, Shashanka; Miedlar, Agnieszka; Saad, Yousef; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2017-06-01

    The enthalpy of formation is an important thermodynamic property. Developing fast and accurate methods for its prediction is of practical interest in a variety of applications. Material informatics techniques based on machine learning have recently been introduced in the literature as an inexpensive means of exploiting materials data, and can be used to examine a variety of thermodynamics properties. We investigate the use of such machine learning tools for predicting the formation enthalpies of binary intermetallic compounds that contain at least one transition metal. We consider certain easily available properties of the constituting elements complemented by some basic properties of the compounds, to predict the formation enthalpies. We show how choosing these properties (input features) based on a literature study (using prior physics knowledge) seems to outperform machine learning based feature selection methods such as sensitivity analysis and LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) based methods. A nonlinear kernel based support vector regression method is employed to perform the predictions. The predictive ability of our model is illustrated via several experiments on a dataset containing 648 binary alloys. We train and validate the model using the formation enthalpies calculated using a model by Miedema, which is a popular semiempirical model used for the prediction of formation enthalpies of metal alloys.

  15. Precious-metal-modified nickel-based superalloys: Motivation and potential industry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcavage, A.; Helmink, R. C.

    2010-10-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are extensively used in the hot sections of gas turbine engines and other propulsive power machines because they possess an excellent combination of high-temperature strength and resistance to oxidation and hot corrosion degradation. The γ-γ' microstructure inherent in nickel-based superalloys is designed with respect to composition and morphology so as to achieve a balance of strength versus environmental resistance. Often, aluminide and platinum-modified aluminide coatings are applied to the component surface to further improve the resistance to environmental degradation by supporting the formation of a protective aluminum oxide scale. The potential exists to utilize alloying concepts from novel platinum and hafnium-modified γ-γ' diffusion coatings so as to create in-situ a new class of superalloy that combines enhanced environmental resistance while maintaining sufficient strength at high temperatures. This paper describes how precious-metal-modified superalloys can offer advantages for structural applications in gas turbine engines. Several examples that illustrate component performance benefits are also presented.

  16. Welding and Weldability of Directionally Solidified Single Crystal Nickel-Base Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J M; David, S A; Reed, R W; Burke, M A; Fitzgerald, T J

    1997-09-01

    Nickel-base superalloys are used extensively in high-temperature service applications, and in particular, in components of turbine engines. To improve high-temperature creep properties, these alloys are often used in the directionally-solidified or single-crystal form. The objective of this CRADA project was to investigate the weldability of both experimental and commercial nickel-base superalloys in polycrystalline, directionally-solidified, and single-crystal forms.

  17. Overcoming residual stresses and machining distortion in the production of aluminum alloy satellite boxes.

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Mandy S.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall

    2007-11-01

    Distortion frequently occurs during machining of age hardening aluminum alloys due to residual stresses introduced during the quenching step in the heat treatment process. This report quantifies, compares, and discusses the effectiveness of several methods for minimizing residual stresses and machining distortion in aluminum alloys 7075 and 6061.

  18. Determination of Trace Elements in Nickel Base Gas Turbine Parts by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    elements such as silver (Ag), bismuth (Bi), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in nickel base alloys such as IN100, B1900 and 713C , without interference from...the constituent elements. Failed and nonfailed gas turbine parts made of the above alloys were tested to ascertain whether trace amounts of these

  19. Minimum quantity lubrication machining of aluminum and magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Sukanta

    2011-12-01

    The use of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) machining, i.e. drilling and tapping of aluminum and magnesium alloys using very low quantities of cutting fluids was studied and the MQL machining performance was compared to dry and conventional flooded conditions. An experimental drilling station with an MQL system was built to measure torque and thrust force responses. Uncoated and diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated HSS drills were tested against 319 Al and AZ91 alloys using 10--50 ml/h of distilled water (H 2O-MQL) and a fatty acid based MQL agent (FA-MQL). The results indicated that H2O-MQL used in conjunction with non-hydrogenated DLC (NH-DLC) coatings reduced the average torque and thrust-force compared to dry cutting and achieved a performance comparable with conventional flooded drilling. At least 103 holes could be drilled using NH-DLC in H2O-MQL and uncoated HSS in FA-MQL in drilling of both 319 Al and AZ91. MQL drilling and tapping provided a stable machining performance, which was evident from the uniform torque and force patterns and also resulted in desirable hole surface, thread quality and chip segments. The maximum temperature generated in the workpiece during MQL machining was lower than that observed in dry drilling and tapping, and comparable to flooded conditions. The mechanical properties of the material adjacent to drilled holes, as evaluated through plastic strain and hardness measurements, revealed a notable softening in case of dry drilling, with magnesium alloys exhibiting a recrystallized grain zone, but not for MQL drilling. Softened aluminum and magnesium promoted adhesion to the tools resulted built-up edge formation and consequently high torques and thrust-forces were generated. NH-DLC coatings' low COF in H 2O-MQL against 319 Al (0.10) and AZ91 (0.12) compared to uncoated HSS (0.63 and 0.65) limited the temperature increase during NH-DLC in H2 O-MQL drilling and hence both torques and thrust forces were effectively reduced.

  20. Aluminide coatings for nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, H. C.; Sieraski, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The metalliding process was used to aluminide IN-100 and TD NiCr. Aluminum was deposited over a broad range of deposition rates, with two types of coating structures resulting. Chromium, silicon, titanium and yttrium were also individually deposited simutaneously with aluminum on IN-100. None of these had a marked effect on the oxidation resistance of the aluminide coating. Porosity-free aluminide coatings with good oxidation resistance were formed on TD NiCr providing the aluminum concentration did not exceed 8 percent, the limit of solubility in the gamma phase.

  1. Experimental evaluation of machining parameters in machining of 7075 aluminium alloy with cryogenic liquid nitrogen coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuraman, V.; Arunkumar, S.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental results on investigation on the turning of 7075 aluminium alloy, using Cryogenic Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) as a coolant was analyzed in this paper. The influence of the cryogenic LN2 coolant compared with that of the conventional coolant on the cuting performance parameters, such as the cutting force, cutting temperature, andbsurface finish was analysed and investigated. The use of the cryogenic liquid nitrogen coolant influenced the cutting temperature and the cutting force by about 17 to 29% and 11 to 20% reduction respectively. The surface finish value of the machined workpiece is about 15 to 23% better than that of the conventional coolant.

  2. Surface recrystallization of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Jin, Tao; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Hu, Zhuang-Qi

    2011-04-01

    The recrystallization behavior of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy was investigated by shot peening and subsequent annealing. Two kinds of recrystallization microstructures, which are intensively dependent on the annealing temperature, are shown in the nickel-base superalloy after shot peening and subsequent annealing. Surface recrystallized grains are obtained when the superalloy is annealed at solution treatment temperature. The nucleation of recrystallization originates from the dendritic core, where rapid dissolution of γ' particles occurs. Cellular recrystallization is observed after annealing at lower temperatures. Cellular structures induced by high diffusivity of the moving boundary and more γ' particles dissolution led by residual stress are developed from the surface region. Recrystallized kinetics of the shot-peened alloy annealed at 1050°C accords with the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation. The low Avrami exponent is caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of stored energy, the decreasing of stored energy during recovery, and the strong resistance of boundary migration by γ' particles.

  3. The Effects of Different Electrode Types for Obtaining Surface Machining Shape on Shape Memory Alloy Using Electrochemical Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. G.; Kim, S. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, G. C.; Lee, E. S.

    2017-06-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) is important material used for the medicine and aerospace industry due to its characteristics called the shape memory effect, which involves the recovery of deformed alloy to its original state through the application of temperature or stress. Consumers in modern society demand stability in parts. Electrochemical machining is one of the methods for obtained these stabilities in parts requirements. These parts of shape memory alloy require fine patterns in some applications. In order to machine a fine pattern, the electrochemical machining method is suitable. For precision electrochemical machining using different shape electrodes, the current density should be controlled precisely. And electrode shape is required for precise electrochemical machining. It is possible to obtain precise square holes on the SMA if the insulation layer controlled the unnecessary current between electrode and workpiece. If it is adjusting the unnecessary current to obtain the desired shape, it will be a great contribution to the medical industry and the aerospace industry. It is possible to process a desired shape to the shape memory alloy by micro controlling the unnecessary current. In case of the square electrode without insulation layer, it derives inexact square holes due to the unnecessary current. The results using the insulated electrode in only side show precise square holes. The removal rate improved in case of insulated electrode than others because insulation layer concentrate the applied current to the machining zone.

  4. Influence of machining parameters on cutting tool life while machining aluminum alloy fly ash composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. R. Prakash; chandra, Poorna; Kiran, R.; Asha, P. B.

    2016-09-01

    Metal matrix composites containing fly ash as reinforcement are primarily preferred because these materials possess lower density and higher strength to weight ratio. The metal matrix composites possess hetrogeneous microstructure which is due to the presence of hard ceramic particles. While turning composites, the catastrophic failure of cutting tools is attributed to the presence of hard particles. Selection of optimal cutting conditions for a given machining process and grade of cutting tools are of utmost importance to enhance the tool life during turning operation. Thus the research work was aimed at the experimental investigation of the cutting tool life while machining aluminum alloy composite containing 0-15% fly-ash. The experiments carried out following ISO3685 standards. The carbide inserts of grade K10 and style CGGN120304 were the turning tools. The cutting speed selected was between 200m/min to 500m/min in step of 100m/min, feed of 0.08 & 0.16 mm/revolution and constant depth of cut of 1.0 mm. The experimental results revealed that the performance of K10 grade carbide insert found better while machining composite containing 5% filler, at all cutting speeds and 0.08mm/revolution feed. The failures of carbide tools are mainly due to notch wear followed by built up edge and edge chipping.

  5. Understanding the roles of the strategic element cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The United States imports over 90% of its cobalt, chromium, columbium, and tantalum, all key elements in high temperature nickel base superalloys for aircraft gas turbine disks and airfoils. Research progress in understanding the roles of cobalt and some possible substitutes effects on microstructure, mechanical properties, and environmental resistance of turbine alloys is discussed.

  6. Machining and Phase Transformation Response of Room-Temperature Austenitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynak, Yusuf

    2014-09-01

    This experimental work reports the results of a study addressing tool wear, surface topography, and x-ray diffraction analysis for the finish cutting process of room-temperature austenitic NiTi alloy. Turning operation of NiTi alloy was conducted under dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) and cryogenic cooling conditions at various cutting speeds. Findings revealed that cryogenic machining substantially reduced tool wear and improved surface topography and quality of the finished parts in comparison with the other two approaches. Phase transformation on the surface of work material was not observed after dry and MQL machining, but B19' martensite phase was found on the surface of cryogenically machined samples.

  7. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The role of cobalt in a representative wrought nickel-base superalloy was determined. The results show cobalt affecting the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, resulting in enhanced gamma' volume fraction, in the stabilization of MC-type carbides, and in the stabilization of sigma phase. In the particular alloy studied, these microstructural and microchemistry changes are insufficient in extent to impact on tensile strength, yield strength, and in the ductilities. Depending on the heat treatment, creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt sensitive. In the coarse grain, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17% cobalt can be replaced by nickel without deleteriously affecting this resistance. In the fine grain, partially solutioned and aged condition, this resistance is deleteriously affected only when one-half or more of the initial cobalt content is removed. The structure and property results are discussed with respect to existing theories and with respect to other recent and earlier findings on the impact of cobalt, if any, on the performance of nickel-base superalloys.

  8. Aluminum alloys for satellite boxes : engineering guidelines for obtaining adequate strength while minimizing residual stresses and machining distortion.

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Mandy S.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall

    2007-11-01

    This report provides strategies for minimizing machining distortion in future designs of aluminum alloy satellite boxes, based in part on key findings from this investigation. The report outlines types of aluminum alloys and how they are heat treated, how residual stresses develop during heat treatment of age hardening alloys, ways residual stresses can be minimized, and the design of machining approaches to minimize distortion in parts that contain residual stresses. Specific recommendations are made regarding alloy selection, heat treatment, stress relieving, and machining procedures for boxes requiring various strength levels with emphasis on 6061 and 7075 aluminum alloys.

  9. The Effect of Active Phase of the Work Material on Machining Performance of a NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynak, Yusuf; Karaca, Haluk E.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Jawahir, I. S.

    2015-06-01

    Poor machinability with conventional machining processes is a major shortcoming that limits the manufacture of NiTi components. To better understand the effects of phase state on the machining performance of NiTi alloys, cutting temperature, tool-wear behavior, cutting force components, tool-chip contact length, chip thickness, and machined surface quality data were generated from a NiTi alloy using precooled cryogenic, dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL), and preheated machining conditions. Findings reveal that machining NiTi in the martensite phase, which was achieved through precooled cryogenic machining, profoundly improved the machining performance by reducing cutting force components, notch wear, and surface roughness. Machining in the austenite state, achieved through preheating, did not provide any benefit over dry and MQL machining, and these processes were, in general, inferior to cryogenic machining in terms of machining performance, particularly at higher cutting speeds.

  10. Machinability evaluation of titanium alloys (Part 2)--Analyses of cutting force and spindle motor current.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-12-01

    To establish a method of determining the machinability of dental materials for CAD/CAM systems, the machinability of titanium, two titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb), and free-cutting brass was evaluated through cutting force and spindle motor current. The metals were slotted using a milling machine and square end mills at four cutting conditions. Both the static and dynamic components of the cutting force represented well the machinability of the metals tested: the machinability of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb was worse than that of titanium, while that of free-cutting brass was better. On the other hand, the results indicated that the spindle motor current was not sensitive enough to detect the material difference among the titanium and its alloys.

  11. Quench Crack Behavior of Nickel-base Disk Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete; Miller, Jason

    2002-01-01

    There is a need to increase the temperature capability of superalloy turbine disks to allow higher operating temperatures in advanced aircraft engines. When modifying processing and chemistry of disk alloys to achieve this capability, it is important to preserve the ability to use rapid cooling during supersolvus heat treatments to achieve coarse grain, fine gamma prime microstructures. An important step in this effort is an understanding of the key variables controlling the cracking tendencies of nickel-base disk alloys during quenching from supersolvus heat treatments. The objective of this study was to investigate the quench cracking tendencies of several advanced disk superalloys during simulated heat treatments. Miniature disk specimens were rapidly quenched after solution heat treatments. The responses and failure modes were compared and related to the quench cracking tendencies of actual disk forgings. Cracking along grain boundaries was generally observed to be operative. For the alloys examined in this study, the solution temperature not alloy chemistry was found to be the primary factor controlling quench cracking. Alloys with high solvus temperatures show greater tendency for quench cracking.

  12. A progressive method of machining parts of sintered metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kvasov, E.P.; Prokhnenko, I.G.

    1983-09-01

    Progressive production operations for machining such parts of cemented carbides as liners and pistons have been introduced. Because of the problem of high accuracy of the machined bore in machining sintered carbide liners, several forms of machining were investigated. Data on productivity, surface finish, accuracy, and specific diamond consumption, for electromechanical, grinding, lapping, diamond honing, diamond-cathodic honing, electrolytic honing, and honing with laps methods are given. Production by electrolytic honing and honing with laps combined is the most economical. The preparation of the plunger pairs of the lubricators, and the machining of deep holes are also discussed. The results of the described developments have been introduced into six plants.

  13. Machining characteristics and fracture morphologies in a copper-beryllium (Cu-2Be) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, K. V.; Cisneros, J. C.; Cervantes, Hector; Pineda, Cosme Gomez

    2006-02-01

    The technology of materials removal is improved greatly by the introduction of advanced cutting tools like cubic boron nitride, ceramics, polycrystalline diamond and the more recent whisker-reinforced materials. In this paper, the influence of cutting temperature on machinability, mechanical properties, microstructure, and fracture morphology of Cu-2Be alloy using a polycrystalline diamond cutter is investigated. The information on machining, microstructure, and fracture morphology of Cu-2Be alloy are very useful to understand their fabrication characteristics and the basic mechanisms of its deformation and fracture. The machinability (in terms of surface finish) of Cu-2Be alloy is evaluated as a function of cutting temperature, resulting from wet and dry cutting. Machining is carried out on a Hardinge Cobra 42 CNC machine (Hardinge Inc., Elmira, NY), and the machining parameters used—cutting speed, depth of cut, and feed rate—are kept constant during both wet and dry cutting. The machined surface finish on Cu-2Be alloy is measured using a surface finish analyzer (Surftest 401, series 178) technique. The machined specimens are examined for their strength and hardness properties using a standard Universal Testing Machine and Rockwell hardness tester, respectively. Wet cutting (using coolants) produced a smooth surface finish when compared with dry cutting of the Cu-2Be alloy. The machined specimens are examined for their microstructural features using a Nikon optical microscope. The specimens are etched using a suitable etchant solution for revealing such microstructure constituents as grain size, phase proportions, and the possible overheated areas (especially in dry cutting). The fractured surfaces from the tensile and impact toughness tests are investigated for their fracture morphologies (dry and wet cutting) using a microprocessor-controlled scanning electron microscope (Jeol Model JSM 5910 LV). A detailed analysis is also made to understand and interpret

  14. Investigation of Machine-ability of Inconel 800 in EDM with Coated Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, K.; Chandrasekaran, M.

    2017-03-01

    The Inconel 800 is a high temperature application alloy which is classified as a nickel based super alloy. It has wide scope in aerospace engineering, gas Turbine etc. The machine-ability studies were found limited on this material. Hence This research focuses on machine-ability studies on EDM of Inconel 800 with Silver Coated Electrolyte Copper Electrode. The purpose of coating on electrode is to reduce tool wear. The factors pulse on Time, Pulse off Time and Peck Current were considered to observe the responses of surface roughness, material removal rate, tool wear rate. Taguchi Full Factorial Design is employed for Design the experiment. Some specific findings were reported and the percentage of contribution of each parameter was furnished

  15. Evaluation of coatings for cobalt- and nickel-base superalloys, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, V. S.; Brentnall, W. D.; Stetson, A. R.

    1970-01-01

    The final results of an oxidation-reduction rig evaluation of aluminide coatings are presented, as applied to 1N-100 and B1900 nickel-base and X-10 and WI-52 cobalt-base alloys. Burner rigs were used which operated on JP-5 fuel and air, producing a gas velocity of 0.85 (2000 to 2500 ft/sec) at the specimen's leading edge. One-hour heating cycles were used with three minutes of air blast cooling. Results of testing at temperatures ranging from T sub max of 1850 to 2050 F indicate that coated B1900 has the longest oxidation life at all temperatures, followed by IN-100X-40WI-52, based on a weight change criterion. Coatings on nickel-base alloys provided more than twice the life of coating on cobalt-base alloys at comparable temperatures. The coatings with higher aluminum content and comparable thickness had longer lives. Silicon appeared to be a beneficial additive in the nickel-base alloy coatings for long term, low temperature life, but not for short term, high temperature performance. Chromium was identified in all coatings. Extrapolating the life results obtained to 1600 F, all the selected coatings on the four alloys would be protective for at least 10,000 hours.

  16. Comparison Between Cemented Carbide and PCD Tools on Machinability of a High Silicon Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, R. B.; de Jesus, A. M. P.; Neto, R. J. L.; Chirita, B.; Rosa, P. A. R.; Reis, A.

    2017-08-01

    The high content of silicon of aluminum casting alloys challenges the tool life of conventional cemented carbide inserts, and polycrystalline diamond (PCD) tools appear as an interesting material to machine these alloys because they improve substantially the durability of cutting tools and consequently the productivity of machining. However, the surface roughness, cutting forces and chip morphology are equally important factors in machining evaluation. Therefore, an experimental study is performed aiming at comparing the performance of cemented carbide and PCD tools taking into account cutting forces, surface roughness and chip morphology, under dry longitudinal turning, performed for the AlSi9Cu3 alloy produced by permanent mold casting process. Different chip breaker geometries were also considered, and their influence on the referred parameters was also investigated. Analysis of variance was employed to study the different contributions of inserts, cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut and their interactions in machinability performance. The results show low cutting forces and better results for surface roughness for uncoated cemented carbide tools, with simpler chip breakers and flat rake face PCD tool, but an efficient chip control was obtained for inserts with small grooves with high cutting forces and power consumption. Nevertheless, the feed rate and depth of cut have the highest influence on the machinability performance of the alloy under investigation.

  17. Mechanical properties of nanostructured nickel based superalloy Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtarov, Sh; Ermachenko, A.

    2010-07-01

    This paper will describe the investigations of a nanostructured (NS) state of nickel based INCONEL® alloy 718. This structure was generated in bulk semiproducts by severe plastic deformation (SPD) via multiple isothermal forging (MIF) of a coarse-grained alloy. The initial structure consisted of γ-phase grains with disperse precipitations of γ"-phase in the forms of discs, 50-75 nm in diameter and 20 nm in thickness. The MIF generated structures possess a large quantity of non-coherent plates and rounded precipitations of δ-phase, primarily along grain boundaries. In the duplex (γ+δ) structure the grains have high dislocation density and a large number of nonequilibrium boundaries. Investigations to determine mechanical properties of the alloy in a nanostructured state were carried out. Nanocrystalline Inconel 718 (80 nm) possesses a very high room-temperature strength after SPD. Microcrystalline (MC) and NS states of the alloy were subjected to strengthening thermal treatment, and the obtained results were compared in order to determine their mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures.

  18. The influence of cooling techniques on cutting forces and surface roughness during cryogenic machining of titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wstawska, Iwona; Ślimak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Titanium alloys are one of the materials extensively used in the aerospace industry due to its excellent properties of high specific strength and corrosion resistance. On the other hand, they also present problems wherein titanium alloys are extremely difficult materials to machine. In addition, the cost associated with titanium machining is also high due to lower cutting velocities and shorter tool life. The main objective of this work is a comparison of different cooling techniques during cryogenic machining of titanium alloys. The analysis revealed that applied cooling technique has a significant influence on cutting force and surface roughness (Ra parameter) values. Furthermore, in all cases observed a positive influence of cryogenic machining on selected aspects after turning and milling of titanium alloys. This work can be also the starting point to the further research, related to the analysis of cutting forces and surface roughness during cryogenic machining of titanium alloys.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of nickel and nickel-base alloy surface alterations in simulated hot corrosion conditions with emphasis on eventual application to turbine blade corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateescu, G. D.; Smith, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the high temperature oxidation and Na2SO4 induced hot corrosion of some nickel base superalloys was accomplished by using ESCA to determine the surface composition of the oxidized or corroded samples. Oxidation was carried out at 900 or 1000 C in slowly flowing O2 for samples of B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C, and IN-738. Oxidation times ranged from 0.5 to 100 hr. Hot corrosion of B-1900 was induced applying a coating of Na2SO4 to peroxidized samples, the heating to 900 C in slowly flowing O2. For oxidized samples, the predominant type of scale formed by each superalloy was determined, and a marked surface enrichment of Ti was found in each case. For corroded samples, the transfer of significant amounts of material from the oxide layer to the surface of the salt layer was observed to occur long before the onset of accelerating weight-gain. Changes in surface composition were observed to coincide with the beginning of accelerating corrosion, the most striking of which was a tenfold decrease in the sulfur to sodium ration and an increase in the Cr(VI) ratio.

  20. Effects of cobalt on the hot workability of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Collier, J. P.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the workability of nickel-base superalloys is examined with reference to experimental results for four heats of alloys based on the Nimonic 115 composition with varying amounts of nickel substituted for the nominal 14 percent cobalt. It is shown that Co lowers the gamma-prime solvus, which in turn lowers the Cr23C6 carbide solvus. It is further shown that these solvus temperatures bracket the hot working range for the alloys. However, thermomechanical processing modifications reflecting the effect of Co on the gamma-prime and carbide solvi are shown to restore the workability and the properties of alloys with little or no cobalt.

  1. Effects of cobalt on the hot workability of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Collier, J. P.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the workability of nickel-base superalloys is examined with reference to experimental results for four heats of alloys based on the Nimonic 115 composition with varying amounts of nickel substituted for the nominal 14 percent cobalt. It is shown that Co lowers the gamma-prime solvus, which in turn lowers the Cr23C6 carbide solvus. It is further shown that these solvus temperatures bracket the hot working range for the alloys. However, thermomechanical processing modifications reflecting the effect of Co on the gamma-prime and carbide solvi are shown to restore the workability and the properties of alloys with little or no cobalt.

  2. Machinability Study of Stir Cast Hypoeutectic Aluminum-Silicon Alloys During Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, P. K.; Sehgal, Rakesh; Dwivedi, D. K.

    2013-02-01

    The influence of Be and Cd (iron correctors) on mechanical properties and machining behavior of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloy (Al-7Si-0.5Mg-1.2Fe) processed by conventional and semi-solid metal (SSM) processing (stir casting) techniques is investigated. The alloys under investigation were prepared by controlling melt in an induction melting furnace. The stirring of SSM was carried out at a constant stirring speed of 400 rpm under constant cooling conditions from liquidus temperature. The turning operations were carried out under dry conditions on a CNC turning center using coated-carbide insert by varying cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut, and approaching angle. An orthogonal array, the signal-to-noise ratio, and analysis of variance were employed to study the machining performance characteristics. The results indicate that Be/Cd modification of the alloy and selected cutting parameters significantly affect the machining characteristics. The feed rate, cutting speed, and Cd as an iron corrector have more effect on the machining behavior of the alloys under study.

  3. Machinability Evaluation of Ti-5Nb- xFe Alloys for Dental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsueh-Chuan; Wu, Shih-Ching; Hsu, Shih-Kuang; Hsu, Kuan-Huang; Ho, Wen-Fu

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the machinability of a series of Ti-5Nb- xFe alloys with an Fe content ranging from 1 to 5 mass% and compared the results to those of commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V. The alloys were slotted using a milling machine and end mills under four cutting conditions. Machinability was evaluated using cutting force which was measured using a dynamometer. The experimental results indicate that the addition of Fe significantly affected the machinability of the Ti alloys in terms of cutting force under the present cutting conditions. Under certain conditions, the cutting force of Ti-5Nb-4Fe was lower than that of c.p. Ti and Ti-6Al-4V, a result which can be explained by a higher degree of hardness and greater amounts of ω phase. Ti-5Nb-4Fe also had a better surface finish: cutting marks were less apparent and metal chips did not adhere to the cut surfaces under cutting condition C (cutting speed: 1.83 m/s, feed rate: 0.0005 m/s, and depth of cut: 0.0002 m). Ti-5Nb-4Fe had the lowest average surface roughness ( R a) after machining (approximately 0.27 μm under cutting condition C).

  4. Effect of Machining Parameters on Surface Integrity in Machining Nimonic C-263 Super Alloy Using Whisker-Reinforced Ceramic Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezilarasan, C.; Senthil kumar, V. S.; Velayudham, A.

    2013-06-01

    Whisker-reinforced ceramic inserts were used to conduct turning trials on nimonic C-263 super alloy to study the effect of different combinations of cutting parameters on surface integrity (roughness, microhardness, and residual stress) by employing energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vicker's microhardness test. Abrasion, adhesion and diffusion were found to be the main tool wear mechanisms in turning nimonic C-263 alloy. Based on characterization of surface roughness, a combination of 190 m/min cutting speed and 0.102 mm/rev feed rate was found to be the critical condition for turning nimonic C-263 alloy. Microhardness varied between 550 and 690 HV at the feed rates of 0.102-0.143 mm/rev for a cutting speed of 250 m/min after 9 min of turning. A tensile residual stress of 725-850 MPa on the machined surface was recorded at the preceding combination of cutting parameters. Cutting speed and cutting time had a dominant effect on the magnitude of the residual stress. No evidence of thermal relaxation and reduction in the degree of work hardening was noted during machining at high cutting speed.

  5. Optical driving of a miniature machine composed of temperature-sensitive ferrite and shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Toru; Hayashi, Daisuke; Otani, Yukitoshi

    2001-02-01

    12 Optically driven small machines have such features as easily miniaturized in fabrication and as controlled by optical energy supplied remotely in wireless. We report on an optically controlled machine which moves like a caterpillar on the basis of optomechatronic principle. This miniaturized machine consists of two parts; a body made of shape memory alloys and springs and feet made of a magnet, a temperature- sensitive ferrite. The feet can hold the steel-made floor using magnetic force balance caused by projected beam, and the body repeats expansion and contraction using deformation of shape memory alloys caused by switching of projected beam. A prototype is fabricated in trial with a size of 35 mm X 12 mm. As an experimental result, it proved that they could move at the speed of 8.7 mm per cycle on a ceiling as well as a horizontal steel floor and it could ascend a slope as steep as 50 degree.

  6. Welding of nickel-base superalloys having a nil-ductility range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An article made of a nickel-base superalloy having a nil-ductility range from the solidus temperature of the alloy to about 600.degree. F. below the solidus temperature is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, adjusting the temperature of the article to a welding temperature of from about 1800.degree. F. to about 2100.degree. F., welding a preselected area in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected area so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected area, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the nickel-based superalloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  7. New approach for assessing the weldability of precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavy, Homam Naffakh; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein; Khodabakhshi, Meisam; Mapelli, Carlo

    2013-12-01

    A new procedure was proposed for evaluating the weldability of nickel-base superalloys. The theory is on the basis of two microstructural patterns. In pattern I, the weld microstructure exhibits severe alloying segregation, many low-melting eutectic structures, and low weldability. The weld requires a weaker etchant and a shorter time for etching. In pattern II, the weld microstructure displays less alloying segregation, low quantity of eutectic structures, and high weldability. The weld needs a stronger etchant and a longer time for etching. Five superalloys containing different amounts of Nb and Ti were designed to verify the patterns. After welding operations, the welds were etched by four etchants with different corrosivities. The weldability was determined by TG-DSC measurements. The metallography and weldability results confirmed the theoretic patterns. Finally, the etchant corrosivity and etching time were proposed as new criteria to evaluate the weldability of nickel-base superalloys.

  8. Machinability of an experimental Ti-Ag alloy in terms of tool life in a dental CAD/CAM system.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Ryoichi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Takada, Yukyo; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is difficult to machine because of its intrinsic properties. In a previous study, the machinability of titanium was improved by alloying with silver. This study aimed to evaluate the durability of tungsten carbide burs after the fabrication of frameworks using a Ti-20%Ag alloy and titanium with a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing system. There was a significant difference in attrition area ratio between the two metals. Compared with titanium, the ratio of the area of attrition of machining burs was significantly lower for the experimental Ti-20%Ag alloy. The difference in the area of attrition for titanium and Ti-20%Ag became remarkable with increasing number of machining operations. The results show that the same burs can be used for a longer time with Ti-20%Ag than with pure titanium. Therefore, in terms of tool life, the machinability of the Ti-20%Ag alloy is superior to that of titanium.

  9. Establish the CNC machining strategy in relation with geometric complexity of the parts made from aluminum alloy extruded profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, Ş. A.; Cosma, M.; Năsui, V.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present a technological problem encountered in the machining accuracy of the parts for aerospace made of aluminum alloy extruded profile with length up to 10 meters. Those parts have very tight tolerances and on milling process appear several factors that influence the repeatability of machining processes. Several factors must be considered when developing the machining process for a specific part, including: establishing the machining strategy in relation with piece geometric complexity, analysis of machined parts through coordinate measuring machine and statistical analysis, to determinate the proper machining strategy for obtaining parts in tolerance. Through several tests and recording all dimensions changes during the milling process, will be modified the machining strategy. By analysing the machining strategy at different lengths of extrusions and records of dimensions fluctuations along the processing chain has been created a proper machine strategy which will obtain a repeatability of the machining process.

  10. A radiographic evaluation of microporosity in a nickel base casting allow.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-08-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third an oxy-acetylene torch. All specimens were radiographed and a classification developed to indicate the radiographic soundness of each specimen. Radiographic soundness was subsequently related to the results obtained from mechanical testing.

  11. Metals and Alloys; Machine Shop Work 3: 9557.03.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline has been prepared as a guide to assist the instructor in systematically planning and presenting a variety of meaningful lessons to facilitate the necessary training for the machine shop student. The materials are designed to enable the student to learn the manipulative skills and related knowledge necessary to understand…

  12. Optimizing cutting conditions on sustainable machining of aluminum alloy to minimize power consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, Rusdi; Suyuti, Muhammad Arsyad; Susanto, Tri Agus

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum is widely utilized in the industrial sector. There are several advantages of aluminum, i.e. good flexibility and formability, high corrosion resistance and electrical conductivity, and high heat. Despite of these characteristics, however, pure aluminum is rarely used because of its lacks of strength. Thus, most of the aluminum used in the industrial sectors was in the form of alloy form. Sustainable machining can be considered to link with the transformation of input materials and energy/power demand into finished goods. Machining processes are responsible for environmental effects accepting to their power consumption. The cutting conditions have been optimized to minimize the cutting power, which is the power consumed for cutting. This paper presents an experimental study of sustainable machining of Al-11%Si base alloy that was operated without any cooling system to assess the capacity in reducing power consumption. The cutting force was measured and the cutting power was calculated. Both of cutting force and cutting power were analyzed and modeled by using the central composite design (CCD). The result of this study indicated that the cutting speed has an effect on machining performance and that optimum cutting conditions have to be determined, while sustainable machining can be followed in terms of minimizing power consumption and cutting force. The model developed from this study can be used for evaluation process and optimization to determine optimal cutting conditions for the performance of the whole process.

  13. Tool life modeling and computer simulation of tool wear when nickel-based material turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebala, W.

    2016-09-01

    Paper presents some tool life investigations, concerning modeling and simulation of tool wear when turning a difficult-to-cut material like nickel based sintered powder workpiece. A cutting tool made of CBN has its special geometry. The workpiece in the form of disc is an aircraft engine part. The aim of researches is to optimize the cutting data for the purpose to decrease the tool wear and improve the machined surface roughness.

  14. Surface Characteristics of Machined NiTi Shape Memory Alloy: The Effects of Cryogenic Cooling and Preheating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynak, Y.; Huang, B.; Karaca, H. E.; Jawahir, I. S.

    2017-07-01

    This experimental study focuses on the phase state and phase transformation response of the surface and subsurface of machined NiTi alloys. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and differential scanning calorimeter techniques were utilized to measure the phase state and the transformation response of machined specimens, respectively. Specimens were machined under dry machining at ambient temperature, preheated conditions, and cryogenic cooling conditions at various cutting speeds. The findings from this research demonstrate that cryogenic machining substantially alters austenite finish temperature of martensitic NiTi alloy. Austenite finish ( A f) temperature shows more than 25 percent increase resulting from cryogenic machining compared with austenite finish temperature of as-received NiTi. Dry and preheated conditions do not substantially alter austenite finish temperature. XRD analysis shows that distinctive transformation from martensite to austenite occurs during machining process in all three conditions. Complete transformation from martensite to austenite is observed in dry cutting at all selected cutting speeds.

  15. Bond strength and interactions of machined titanium-based alloy with dental cements.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The most appropriate luting agent for restoring cement-retained implant restorations has yet to be determined. Leachable chemicals from some types of cement designed for teeth may affect metal surfaces. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and interactions of machined titanium-based alloy with dental luting agents. Eight dental luting agents representative of 4 different compositional classes (resin, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, and zinc oxide-based cements) were used to evaluate their effect on machined titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy surfaces. Ninety-six paired disks were cemented together (n=12). After incubation in a 37°C water bath for 7 days, the shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine (Instron) and a custom fixture with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Differences were analyzed statistically with 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α=.05). The debonded surfaces of the Ti alloy disks were examined under a light microscope at ×10 magnification to record the failure pattern, and the representative specimens were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The mean ±SD of shear failure loads ranged from 3.4 ±0.5 to 15.2 ±2.6 MPa. The retention provided by both polycarboxylate cements was significantly greater than that of all other groups (P<.05). The scanning electron microscope examination revealed surface pits only on the bonded surface cemented with the polycarboxylate cements. Cementation with polycarboxylate cement obtained higher shear bond strength. Some chemical interactions occurred between the machined Ti-6Al-4V alloy surface and polycarboxylate cements during cementation. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental Investigation of process parameters influence on machining Inconel 800 in the Electrical Spark Eroding Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, K.; Chandrasekaran, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Electrical Spark Eroding Machining is an entrenched sophisticated machining process for producing complex geometry with close tolerances in hard materials like super alloy which are extremely difficult-to-machine by using conventional machining processes. It is sometimes offered as a better alternative or sometimes as an only alternative for generating accurate 3D complex shapes of macro, micro and nano-features in such difficult-to-machine materials among other advanced machining processes. The accomplishment of such challenging task by use of Electrical Spark Eroding Machining or Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) is depending upon selection of apt process parameters. This paper is about analyzing the influencing of parameter in electrical eroding machining for Inconel 800 with electrolytic copper as a tool. The experimental runs were performed with various input conditions to process Inconel 800 nickel based super alloy for analyzing the response of material removal rate, surface roughness and tool wear rate. These are the measures of performance of individual experimental value of parameters such as pulse on time, Pulse off time, peak current. Taguchi full factorial Design by using Minitab release 14 software was employed to meet the manufacture requirements of preparing process parameter selection card for Inconel 800 jobs. The individual parameter's contribution towards surface roughness was observed from 13.68% to 64.66%.

  17. Wire electrical discharge machining of E110 zirconium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, N. V.; Fedorov, A. A.; Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with the results of experimental research carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) to define, how the modes of wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM) influence on the elemental and the phase composition of E110 zirconium alloy’s surface layer.Investigation of the phase composition allowed us to determine the main α and δ phase’s distribution through the depth of zirconium surface layer, in common with phases of oxygen, copper, zirconium, and niobium specific compounds. It was also established the maximum depth of the defect level containing amorphous phase for all of WEDM modes, and proposed the grinding and polishing as potential mechanical methods of its removal.

  18. Effect of the Machining Processes on Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of a Powder Metallurgy Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Kantzos, P.; Gabb, T. P.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2010-01-01

    A study has been performed to investigate the effect of various machining processes on fatigue life of configured low cycle fatigue specimens machined out of a NASA developed LSHR P/M nickel based disk alloy. Two types of configured specimen geometries were employed in the study. To evaluate a broach machining processes a double notch geometry was used with both notches machined using broach tooling. EDM machined notched specimens of the same configuration were tested for comparison purposes. Honing finishing process was evaluated by using a center hole specimen geometry. Comparison testing was again done using EDM machined specimens of the same geometry. The effect of these machining processes on the resulting surface roughness, residual stress distribution and microstructural damage were characterized and used in attempt to explain the low cycle fatigue results.

  19. Finite Element Simulation of Machining of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzuti, S.; Umbrello, D.

    2011-05-04

    Titanium and its alloys are an important class of materials, especially for aerospace applications, due to their excellent combination of strength and fracture toughness as well as low density. However, these materials are generally regarded as difficult to machine because of their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. Moreover, the low thermal conductivity of Titanium inhibits dissipation of heat within the workpiece causing an higher temperature at the cutting edge and generating for higher cutting speed a rapid chipping at the cutting edge which leads to catastrophic failure. In addition, chip morphology significantly influences the thermo-mechanical behaviour at the workpiece/tool interface, which also affects the tool life.In this paper a finite element analysis of machining of TiAl6V4 is presented. In particular, cutting force, chip morphology and segmentation are taken into account due to their predominant roles to determine machinability and tool wear during the machining of these alloys. Results in terms of residual stresses are also presented. Moreover, the numerical results are compared with experimental ones.

  20. Finite Element Simulation of Machining of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuti, S.; Umbrello, D.

    2011-05-01

    Titanium and its alloys are an important class of materials, especially for aerospace applications, due to their excellent combination of strength and fracture toughness as well as low density. However, these materials are generally regarded as difficult to machine because of their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. Moreover, the low thermal conductivity of Titanium inhibits dissipation of heat within the workpiece causing an higher temperature at the cutting edge and generating for higher cutting speed a rapid chipping at the cutting edge which leads to catastrophic failure. In addition, chip morphology significantly influences the thermo-mechanical behaviour at the workpiece/tool interface, which also affects the tool life. In this paper a finite element analysis of machining of TiAl6V4 is presented. In particular, cutting force, chip morphology and segmentation are taken into account due to their predominant roles to determine machinability and tool wear during the machining of these alloys. Results in terms of residual stresses are also presented. Moreover, the numerical results are compared with experimental ones.

  1. Cutting Speed Dependent Microstructure and Transformation Behavior of NiTi Alloy in Dry and Cryogenic Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynak, Y.; Karaca, H. E.; Jawahir, I. S.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cutting speed in cryogenic and dry machining on the surface integrity characteristics (the affected layer, microhardness, transformation response, transformation temperature, and latent heat for transformation) of NiTi shape memory alloys are investigated. It has been found that the cutting speed has remarkable effects on the surface and subsurface properties of machined NiTi alloys. Increased cutting speed results in decreased subsurface hardness and increased latent heat for phase transformation. In general, the depth of affected layers decreases with increased cutting speed in dry and cryogenic machining. Chips show a similar behavior as affected layer in terms of transformation response and microhardness. Cryogenic machining is found to have greater effects on the surface and subsurface properties of the machined work material in comparison with dry machining at all given cutting speeds.

  2. Compositional Effects on Nickel-Base Superalloy Single Crystal Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Garg,Anita; Rogers, Richard B.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Fourteen nickel-base superalloy single crystals containing 0 to 5 wt% chromium (Cr), 0 to 11 wt% cobalt (Co), 6 to 12 wt% molybdenum (Mo), 0 to 4 wt% rhenium (Re), and fixed amounts of aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta) were examined to determine the effect of bulk composition on basic microstructural parameters, including gamma' solvus, gamma' volume fraction, volume fraction of topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, phase chemistries, and gamma - gamma'. lattice mismatch. Regression models were developed to describe the influence of bulk alloy composition on the microstructural parameters and were compared to predictions by a commercially available software tool that used computational thermodynamics. Co produced the largest change in gamma' solvus over the wide compositional range used in this study, and Mo produced the largest effect on the gamma lattice parameter and the gamma - gamma' lattice mismatch over its compositional range, although Re had a very potent influence on all microstructural parameters investigated. Changing the Cr, Co, Mo, and Re contents in the bulk alloy had a significant impact on their concentrations in the gamma matrix and, to a smaller extent, in the gamma' phase. The gamma phase chemistries exhibited strong temperature dependencies that were influenced by the gamma and gamma' volume fractions. A computational thermodynamic modeling tool significantly underpredicted gamma' solvus temperatures and grossly overpredicted the amount of TCP phase at 982 C. Furthermore, the predictions by the software tool for the gamma - gamma' lattice mismatch were typically of the wrong sign and magnitude, but predictions could be improved if TCP formation was suspended within the software program. However, the statistical regression models provided excellent estimations of the microstructural parameters based on bulk alloy composition, thereby demonstrating their usefulness.

  3. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  4. Effect of Electrical Discharge Machining on Stress Concentration in Titanium Alloy Holes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Chien, Wan-Ting

    2016-11-24

    Titanium alloys have several advantages, such as a high strength-to-weight ratio. However, the machinability of titanium alloys is not as good as its mechanical properties. Many machining processes have been used to fabricate titanium alloys. Among these machining processes, electrical discharge machining (EDM) has the advantage of processing efficiency. EDM is based on thermoelectric energy between a workpiece and an electrode. A pulse discharge occurs in a small gap between the workpiece and electrode. Then, the material from the workpiece is removed through melting and vaporization. However, defects such as cracks and notches are often detected at the boundary of holes fabricated using EDM and the irregular profile of EDM holes reduces product quality. In this study, an innovative method was proposed to estimate the effect of EDM parameters on the surface quality of the holes. The method combining the finite element method and image processing can rapidly evaluate the stress concentration factor of a workpiece. The stress concentration factor was assumed as an index of EDM process performance for estimating the surface quality of EDM holes. In EDM manufacturing processes, Ti-6Al-4V was used as an experimental material and, as process parameters, pulse current and pulse on-time were taken into account. The results showed that finite element simulations can effectively analyze stress concentration in EDM holes. Using high energy during EDM leads to poor hole quality, and the stress concentration factor of a workpiece is correlated to hole quality. The maximum stress concentration factor for an EDM hole was more than four times that for the same diameter of the undamaged hole.

  5. Effect of Electrical Discharge Machining on Stress Concentration in Titanium Alloy Holes

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Chien, Wan-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Titanium alloys have several advantages, such as a high strength-to-weight ratio. However, the machinability of titanium alloys is not as good as its mechanical properties. Many machining processes have been used to fabricate titanium alloys. Among these machining processes, electrical discharge machining (EDM) has the advantage of processing efficiency. EDM is based on thermoelectric energy between a workpiece and an electrode. A pulse discharge occurs in a small gap between the workpiece and electrode. Then, the material from the workpiece is removed through melting and vaporization. However, defects such as cracks and notches are often detected at the boundary of holes fabricated using EDM and the irregular profile of EDM holes reduces product quality. In this study, an innovative method was proposed to estimate the effect of EDM parameters on the surface quality of the holes. The method combining the finite element method and image processing can rapidly evaluate the stress concentration factor of a workpiece. The stress concentration factor was assumed as an index of EDM process performance for estimating the surface quality of EDM holes. In EDM manufacturing processes, Ti-6Al-4V was used as an experimental material and, as process parameters, pulse current and pulse on-time were taken into account. The results showed that finite element simulations can effectively analyze stress concentration in EDM holes. Using high energy during EDM leads to poor hole quality, and the stress concentration factor of a workpiece is correlated to hole quality. The maximum stress concentration factor for an EDM hole was more than four times that for the same diameter of the undamaged hole. PMID:28774078

  6. Effects of cobalt on structure, microchemistry and properties of a wrought nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Tien, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the basic mechanical properties and microstructure of wrought nickel-base superalloys has been investigated experimentally by systematically replacing cobalt by nickel in Udimet 700 (17 wt% Co) commonly used in gas turbine (jet engine) applications. It is shown that the room temperature tensile yield strength and tensile strength only slightly decrease in fine-grained (disk) alloys and are basically unaffected in coarse-grained (blading) alloys as cobalt is removed. Creep and stress rupture resistances at 760 C are found to be unaffected by cobalt level in the blading alloys and decrease sharply only when the cobalt level is reduced below 8 vol% in the disk alloys. The effect of cobalt is explained in terms of gamma prime strengthening kinetics.

  7. Thermal stability of the nickel-base superalloy B-1900 + Hf with tantalum variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. S.; Pletka, B. J.; Janowski, G. M.

    1987-01-01

    The microstructure of the solutionized and aged nickel-base superalloy B-1900 + Hf was examined after additional aging at 982 C for 72, 250, and 1000 hours. Alloy compositions that were examined contained the normal 1.34 at. pct (4.3 wt pct) Ta as well as 0.67 at. pct and zero Ta levels. The gamma-prime phase agglomerated, became platelike in morphology, and decreased in volume fraction for all three alloys throughout the aging treatments. Changes which occurred in the gamma and gamma-prime phase compositions were nearly complete after 72 hours of aging while changes in the MC carbide composition continued throughout the aging. Blocky M6C carbides precipitated along the grain boundaries of all three alloys in the first 72 hours of aging. In addition, an acicular form of this Mo/Cr/Ni-rich carbide developed in the intragranular regions of the Ta-containing alloys.

  8. Galling wear of cobalt-free hardfacing alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vikstroem, J.

    1994-05-01

    Cobalt-base alloys have been used as hardfacing materials for nuclear power plant valves, turbines and pumps. In nuclear power plants cobalt is transported to reactor core region due to wear of valves and pumps; it is transmuted to Co{minus}60. Objective of this work was to find a cobalt-free hardfacing material that has better wear-resistance than the widely used cobalt-base alloy Stellite 6{sup TM} Six iron-base and four nickel-base alloys were compared to Stellite 6. The alloys were deposited on austenitic stainless steel by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), PTAW (Plasma Transferred Arc Welding), plasma spray fuse and laser processes. One alloy was in HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressed) condition. All alloys were tested for galling resistance in air at room temperature at applied stresses were 140, 275 and 415 MPa. Alloy microstructure and hardness values were post-test wear surfaces, were examined using a light and scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness measurements. Crack-free deposits can be manufactured from all of the alloys, and no problems were encountered during machining of the deposits. Self-mated galling resistance of Stellite 6 was comparable to galling resistance in earlier studies for this alloy. Self-mated iron-base Elmax, APM 2311, NOREM A, Nelsit, Everit 50 So alloys and Ni-/Fe-base alloy combination showed significantly better galling behaviour than Stellite 6, especially Elmax and APM 2311 alloys. Nickel-base Deloro alloys showed galling resistance inferior to Stellite 6. No correlation was observed between the microstructural characteristics and galling resistance. Further, the galling resistance is not related to the hardness of the deposit.

  9. Methodology Developed for Modeling the Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Single-Crystal, Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Because of their superior high-temperature properties, gas generator turbine airfoils made of single-crystal, nickel-base superalloys are fast becoming the standard equipment on today's advanced, high-performance aerospace engines. The increased temperature capabilities of these airfoils has allowed for a significant increase in the operating temperatures in turbine sections, resulting in superior propulsion performance and greater efficiencies. However, the previously developed methodologies for life-prediction models are based on experience with polycrystalline alloys and may not be applicable to single-crystal alloys under certain operating conditions. One of the main areas where behavior differences between single-crystal and polycrystalline alloys are readily apparent is subcritical fatigue crack growth (FCG). The NASA Lewis Research Center's work in this area enables accurate prediction of the subcritical fatigue crack growth behavior in single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys at elevated temperatures.

  10. Optimization of the Machining parameter of LM6 Alminium alloy in CNC Turning using Taguchi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, S.; Muthuraman, V.; Baskaralal, V. P. M.

    2017-03-01

    Due to widespread use of highly automated machine tools in the industry, manufacturing requires reliable models and methods for the prediction of output performance of machining process. In machining of parts, surface quality is one of the most specified customer requirements. In order for manufactures to maximize their gains from utilizing CNC turning, accurate predictive models for surface roughness must be constructed. The prediction of optimum machining conditions for good surface finish plays an important role in process planning. This work deals with the study and development of a surface roughness prediction model for machining LM6 aluminum alloy. Two important tools used in parameter design are Taguchi orthogonal arrays and signal to noise ratio (S/N). Speed, feed, depth of cut and coolant are taken as process parameter at three levels. Taguchi’s parameters design is employed here to perform the experiments based on the various level of the chosen parameter. The statistical analysis results in optimum parameter combination of speed, feed, depth of cut and coolant as the best for obtaining good roughness for the cylindrical components. The result obtained through Taguchi is confirmed with real time experimental work.

  11. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the role of cobalt in Udimet 700, a representative nickel-base superalloy containing 17 percent or more cobalt. The study spans the spectrum of microstructural, microchemical, and mechanical behavior aspects which together form a basis for superalloy performance in jet engines. The results suggest that cobalt affects the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, which leads to enhanced gamma-prime volume fraction and to the stabilization of MC-type carbides and sigma phase. However, these microstructural and microchemical changes are too slight to significantly affect the strength and ductile properties. Depending on the heat treatment, the creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt-sensitive. In the coarse-grained, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17 percent Co can be replaced by nickel without decreasing the creep and stress rupture resistance. These findings are discussed with reference to existing theories and experimental data obtained by other workers.

  12. Picosecond laser ablation of nickel-based superalloy C263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Perrie, W.; Cheng, J.; French, P.; Sharp, M.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.

    2010-02-01

    Picosecond laser (10.4 ps, 1064 nm) ablation of the nickel-based superalloy C263 is investigated at different pulse repetition rates (5, 10, 20, and 50 kHz). The two ablation regimes corresponding to ablation dominated by the optical penetration depth at low fluences and of the electron thermal diffusion length at high fluences are clearly identified from the change of the surface morphology of single pulse ablated craters (dimples) with fluence. The two corresponding thresholds were measured as F {th(D1)/1}=0.68±0.02 J/cm2 and F {th(D2)/1}=2.64±0.27 J/cm2 from data of the crater diameters D 1,2 versus peak fluence. The surface morphology of macroscopic areas processed with a scanning laser beam at different fluences is characterised by ripples at low fluences. As the fluence increases, randomly distributed areas among the ripples are formed which appear featureless due to melting and joining of the ripples while at high fluences the whole irradiated surface becomes grainy due to melting, splashing of the melt and subsequent resolidification. The throughput of ablation becomes maximal when machining at high pulse repetition rates and with a relatively low fluence, while at the same time the surface roughness is kept low.

  13. Cryogenic machining and burnishing of AZ31B magnesium alloy for enhanced surface integrity and functional performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zhengwen

    Surface integrity of manufactured components has a critical impact on their functional performance. Magnesium alloys are lightweight materials used in the transportation industry and are also emerging as a potential material for biodegradable medical implants. However, the unsatisfactory corrosion performance of Mg alloys limits their application to a great extent. Surface integrity factors, such as grain size, crystallographic orientation and residual stress, have been proved to remarkably influence the functional performance of magnesium alloys, including corrosion resistance, wear resistance and fatigue life. In this dissertation, the influence of machining conditions, including dry and cryogenic cooling (liquid nitrogen was sprayed to the machined surface during machining), cutting edge radius, cutting speed and feed rate, on the surface integrity of AZ31B Mg alloy was investigated. Cryogenic machining led to the formation of a "featureless layer" on the machined surface where significant grain refinement from 12 microm to 31 nm occurred due to dynamic recrystallization (DRX), as well as increased intensity of basal plane on the surface and more compressive residual stresses. Dry and cryogenic burnishing experiments of the same material were conducted using a fixed roller setup. The thickness of the processed-influenced layer, where remarkable microstructural changes occurred, was dramatically increased from the maximum value of 20 microm during machining to 3.4 mm during burnishing. The burnishing process also produced a stronger basal texture on the surface than the machining process. Preliminary corrosion tests were conducted to evaluate the corrosion performance of selected machined and burnished AZ31B Mg samples in 5% NaCl solution and simulated body fluid (SBF ). Cryogenic cooling and large edge radius tools were found to significantly improve the corrosion performance of machined samples in both solutions. The largest improvement in the material

  14. Some implications of the particle and climb geometry on the climb resistance in nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherji, D.; Wahi, R.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various dislocation climb models were developed for modeling the deformation processes in precipitation hardened alloys at elevated temperatures and low applied stresses. These models have been applied to alloy systems containing spherical, cubic and other precipitate shapes. However, in applying these models to alloys containing cubic precipitates, the particle orientation with respect to the slip plane and the slip geometry relevant to the nickel-base superalloys was not considered. In this paper the authors show that by taking into account the realistic climb and glide geometries, the value of the climb resistances considerably differ from those reported earlier on the basis of simplified geometries.

  15. Study on mild and severe wear of 7075 aluminum alloys by high-speed wire electrical discharge machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinkai; Qiu, Rongxian; Xia, Kui; Wang, Zhichao; Xu, Lining; Yu, Huadong

    2017-01-01

    The recast and the carbon layers were fabricated on 7075Al alloys surface by the high-speed wire electrical discharge machining (HS-WEDM) technologyunder various working parameters. The mechanical properties and friction behaviors of the layers were investigated by UMT. 7075 Al alloys were used to do dry sliding wear tests on a pin-ondisk wear tester at room temperature under various contact pressures. 7075 Al alloys had almost the same wear regularity as a function of sliding velocity and rated frequency. The hardness of recast layer was improved. And this method can enhance durability of 7075 Al alloy effectively.The transition to severe wear occurred at a higher load (12N) for asmachined samples, compared with 7075 matrix (9N), the as-machined samples exhibited lower wear rates within the tested loading range.

  16. Analysis of Nickel Based Hardfacing Materials Manufactured by Laser Cladding for Sodium Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, P.; Blanc, C.; Demirci, I.; Dal, M.; Malot, T.; Maskrot, H.

    For improving the operational capacity, the maintenance and the decommissioning of the future French Sodium Fast Reactor ASTRID which is under study, it is asked to find or develop a cobalt free hardfacing alloy and the associated manufacturing process that will give satisfying wear performances. This article presents recent results obtained on some selected nickel-based hardfacing alloys manufactured by laser cladding, particularly on Tribaloy 700 alloy. A process parameter search is made and associated the microstructural analysis of the resulting clads. A particular attention is made on the solidification of the main precipitates (chromium carbides, boron carbides, Laves phases,…) that will mainly contribute to the wear properties of the material. Finally, the wear resistance of some samples is evaluated in simple wear conditions evidencing promising results on tribology behavior of Tribaloy 700.

  17. Microstructure of the Nickel-Base Superalloy CMSX-4 Fabricated by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsperger, Markus; Singer, Robert F.; Körner, Carolin

    2016-03-01

    Powder bed-based additive manufacturing (AM) processes are characterized by very high-temperature gradients and solidification rates. These conditions lead to microstructures orders of magnitude smaller than in conventional casting processes. Especially in the field of high performance alloys, like nickel-base superalloys, this opens new opportunities for homogenization and alloy development. Nevertheless, the high susceptibility to cracking of precipitation-hardenable superalloys is a challenge for AM. In this study, electron beam-based AM is used to fabricate samples from gas-atomized pre-alloyed CMSX-4 powder. The influence of the processing strategy on crack formation is investigated. The samples are characterized by optical and SEM microscopy and analyzed by microprobe analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to demonstrate the effect of the fine microstructure on characteristic temperatures. In addition, in situ heat treatment effects are investigated.

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of near-surface residual stress in shot-peened nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feng

    Surface enhancement methods, which produce beneficial compressive residual stresses and increased hardness in a shallow near-surface region, are widely used in a number of industrial applications, including gas-turbine engines. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress gradients in surface-enhanced materials has great significance for turbine engine component life extension and their reliability in service. It has been recently found that, in sharp contrast with most other materials, shot-peened nickel-base superalloys exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies, which can be exploited for nondestructive residual stress assessment. The primary goal of this research is to develop a quantitative eddy current method for nondestructive residual stress profiles in surface-treated nickel-base superalloys. Our work have been focused on five different aspects of this issue, namely, (i) validating the noncontacting eddy current technique for electroelastic coefficients calibration, (ii) developing inversion procedures for determining the subsurface residual stress profiles from the measured apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC), (iii) predicting the adverse effect of surface roughness on the eddy current characterization of shot-peened metals, (iv) separating excess AECC caused by the primary residual stress effect from intrinsic conductivity variations caused by material inhomogeneity, and (v) investigating different mechanisms through which cold work could influence the AECC in surface-treated nickel-base superalloys. The results of this dissertation have led to a better understanding of the underlying physical phenomenon of the measured excess AECC on nickel-base engine alloys, and solved a few critical applied issues in eddy current nondestructive residual stress assessment in surface-treated engine components and, ultimately, contributed to the better utilization and safer operation of the Air Force's aging

  19. Metallurgical instabilities during the high temperature low cycle fatigue of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, S. D.; Jayaraman, N.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation is made of the microstructural instabilities that affect the high temperature low cycle fatigue (LCF) life of nickel-base superalloys. Crack initiation processes, provoked by the formation of carbides and the coarsening of the grains of the material at high temperatures are discussed. Experimental results are examined, and it is concluded that LCF behavior can be understood more fully only if details of the material and its dynamic behavior at high temperatures are considered. The effects of high stress, dislocation debris, and increasing environmental damage on the life of the alloy are discussed.

  20. Metallurgical instabilities during the high temperature low cycle fatigue of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, S. D.; Jayaraman, N.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation is made of the microstructural instabilities that affect the high temperature low cycle fatigue (LCF) life of nickel-base superalloys. Crack initiation processes, provoked by the formation of carbides and the coarsening of the grains of the material at high temperatures are discussed. Experimental results are examined, and it is concluded that LCF behavior can be understood more fully only if details of the material and its dynamic behavior at high temperatures are considered. The effects of high stress, dislocation debris, and increasing environmental damage on the life of the alloy are discussed.

  1. Understanding the roles of the strategic element cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research progress in understanding the effects of cobalt and some possible substitute on microstructure, mechanical properties, and environmental resistance of turbine alloys is discussed. The United States imports over 90 percent of its cobalt, chromium, tantalum and columbium, all key elements in high temperature nickel base superalloys for aircraft gas turbine disks and airfoils. NASA, through joint government/industry/university teams, undertook a long range research program aimed at reducing or eliminating these strategic elements by examining their basic roles in superalloys and identifying viable substitutes.

  2. Understanding the roles of the strategic element cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research progress in understanding the effects of cobalt and some possible substitute on microstructure, mechanical properties, and environmental resistance of turbine alloys is discussed. The United States imports over 90 percent of its cobalt, chromium, tantalum and columbium, all key elements in high temperature nickel base superalloys for aircraft gas turbine disks and airfoils. NASA, through joint government/industry/university teams, undertook a long range research program aimed at reducing or eliminating these strategic elements by examining their basic roles in superalloys and identifying viable substitutes.

  3. Key improvements in machining of Ti6al4v alloy: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katta, Sivakoteswararao; Chaitanya, G.

    2017-07-01

    Now a days the use of ti-6al-4v alloy is high in demand in many industries like aero space, bio medical automobile, space, military etc. the production rates in the industries are not sufficient because the machiniability of ti-6al-4v is the main problem, there are several cutting tools available for metal cutting operations still there is a gap in finding the proper cutting tool material for machining of ti-6al-4v. because the properties of titanium like high heat resistant, low thermal conductivity, low weight ratio, less corrosiveness, and more many properties attracting the industrialists to use titanium as their material for their products, many researchers done the research on machininbility of ti-6al-4v by using different tool materials. but as for my literature survey there is still lot of scope is available, to find better cutting tool with techniques for machining ti-6al-4v. in this paper iam discussing the work done by various researchers on ti-6al-4v alloy with different techniques.

  4. On the optimisation of machining parameters for dry drilling of aeronautic aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, G.; Girot, F.

    2003-09-01

    Machining aluminium alloys without lubrication seriously increases the tool wear because of the severe tribological conditions at the tool/chip interface. Indeed, metal cutting generates high temperatures and pressures due to the high strain rate (ge104 s^{-1}) and the friction between the tool and the chip. Thus, it is very important to be able to clearly identify the parameters influencing the machining quality. In order to study dry drilling with W-Co carbide tools, experiments were conducted using different drill geometries and varying cutting conditions. The workpiece material used in this work is the aluminium alloy 2024 T-351. Optimise drill geometries can be deducted from experimental results to obtain holes with an aerospace quality. The following parameters were used to evaluate the holes quality : the minimum and maximum diameter deviations, the burr height and the surface roughness. The microscope observation of the tool rake face shows that the main damage is adhesion and diffusion wear revealing the presence of high temperature. Cutting conditions were tested and chosen to limit the tool damage and by consequence to increase the tool life.

  5. Extrusion machining: A thermo-mechanical process for producing strips of alloys having limited workability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efe, Mert

    Deformation processing of alloys with limited workability is one of the principal technological challenges for the metal manufacturing industry. Traditional processes (rolling, extrusion) are usually performed at high temperatures (0.5 Tm) for increased plasticity and crack-free products, which makes them costly, energy intensive and raw material inefficient. In this thesis, extrusion machining (EM) a shear-type deformation process is applied to alloys with limited workability for sheet and foil production from bulk forms in a single step. EM is shown to have a narrowly confined deformation zone with much wider control of deformation than in conventional deformation processing (e.g., severe plastic deformation). Controllable deformation parameters include strain, strain rate, hydrostatic pressure, temperature and deformation path. These attributes are highlighted in deformation processing of two classes of limited workability alloys: 1) Alloys with intrinsic susceptibility to cracking (and segmentation) due to flow localization and shear band formation and 2) Alloys with extrinsic susceptibility to cracking due to macroscopic defects such as porosity, casting defects and weak second phases. Magnesium AZ31 alloy is selected as a model material for the first class and sintered copper, cast brass alloy 360 and cast Mg AZ31 are selected for the second class. Noteworthy features of the process are: suppression of segmentation by combinations of high hydrostatic pressures (p/2k > 1.2) and deformation temperatures (T > 0.5 Tm) realized by in-situ plastic heating, realization of a range of strains and deformation rates, engineering of microstructures ranging from conventional to ultrafine grained, shear type deformation textures (non-basal in the case of Mg AZ31) and creation of sheet from the bulk in a single step of deformation without pre-heating . The thermo-mechanical conditions and microstructural processes (e.g. continuous dynamic recrystallization for Mg AZ31) that

  6. Research of influence of electric conditions of the combined electro-diamond machining on quality of grinding of hard alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanyushkin, A. S.; Lobanov, D. V.; Arkhipov, P. V.

    2015-09-01

    Improvement of production engineering of finishing machining of the hard alloys providing set parameters of quality and exactitude of products is an actual problem in the conditions of the modern industry. To reach objectives it is possible only at the expense of the solution of a complex of questions of fundamental and applied nature. Basic researches are directed on identification of main factors and the reasons of inefficient use of diamond grinding wheel at finishing machining of products from high-strength hard alloys materials. The applied party of research consists in development of recommendations about implementation of offered solutions under production conditions. In paper the problems connected with effective machining of modern high-strength materials are observed. The reasons of limited application of diamond grinding wheels on a metallic binder are noted when machining hard alloys. The carried researches allowed to establish advantages of a method of the combined electro-diamond machining of hard alloys and to define the rational modes providing high quality of products.

  7. Temporal Evolution of Non-equilibrium Gamma’ Precipitates in a Rapidly Quenched Nickel Base Superalloy (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    González-Carrasco, Phase separation in PM 2000™ Fe-base ODS alloy: Experimental study at the atomic level, Materials Science and Engineering: A. 490 (2008... Simmons , Y. Wang, M. Mills, Formation of multimodal size distributions of γ′ in a nickel-base superalloy during interrupted continuous cooling, Scr...diffraction method, Materials Science and Engineering: A. 528 (2010) 32-36. [28] Y. Wen, J. Simmons , C. Shen, C. Woodward, Y. Wang, Phase-field modeling of

  8. Micrographic detection of plastic deformation in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    1980-09-20

    A method for detecting low levels of plastic deformation in metal articles comprising electrolytically etching a flow free surface of the metal article with nital at a current density of less than about 0.1 amp/cm/sup 2/ and microscopically examining the etched surface to determine the presence of alternating striations. The presence of striations indicates plastic deformation in the article.

  9. Hydrogen Induced Intergranular Cracking of Nickel-Base Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    locations as being an important step in the embrittle- ment mechanism. It was first suggested by Bastien and Azou (1) that mobile dislocations carry...W-7405-ENG-48 and the Office of Naval Research under contract number N00014-78-C-0002/NR 036-127. References 1. P. Bastien and P. Azou , C.R. Acad. Sci

  10. Hydrogen Induced Intergranular Cracking of Nickel-Base Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    propagating crack according to Rice [38]. 75 FIGURE 32. Evan’s diagram [39]. 80 FIGURE 33. Diagram showing schematically the effect of promoter...increase in permeability at -470mV SCE but no effect at -580mV SCE? One could consider this with the help of the Evans’ diagram shown in Figure 32...Cathode) ’corr A I Mixed 7corrosion (Anode) Aoj Polarization 109 current density FIGURE 32. Evans’ diagram 1391. grain boundaries can not dissolve

  11. Micrographic detection of plastic deformation in nickel base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Bibb, Albert E.

    1984-01-01

    A method for detecting low levels of plastic deformation in metal articles comprising electrolytically etching a flow free surface of the metal article with nital at a current density of less than about 0.1 amp/cm.sup.2 and microscopically examining the etched surface to determine the presence of alternating striations. The presence of striations indicates plastic deformation in the article.

  12. Computer modeling of heat treating austenitic and nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickstein, S. S.; Friedman, E.; Berman, R. M.

    1982-05-01

    The adequacy of the heat treating process depends upon the thermal cycle experienced by the material during heat treating in the furnace and quenching. While thermocouples placed at the surface of the material during heat treating can assure the adequacy of the process for the material at the surface, assurance that inner regions of the material are experiencing the proper temperature transient is not guaranteed. To assess present process standards for heat treating 17-4 PH stainless steel and air quenching Inoconel X after solution treatment, computer models of the heat transfer within the material were developed. Sensitivity studies were conducted to determine the effects of material bar diameter, peak temperature, material properties, heat transfer coefficients, and neighboring bar stock. The computer modeling provided an easy and inexpensive technique for determining the adequacy of present heat treating process standards and for ensuring that future standards will provide the desired requirements. Details of these sensitivity studies are presented.

  13. The effect of interface properties on nickel base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, M.; Grossman, T.; Senemeier, M.; Wright, K.

    1995-01-01

    This program was performed to assess the extent to which mechanical behavior models can predict the properties of sapphire fiber/nickel aluminide matrix composites and help guide their development by defining improved combinations of matrix and interface coating. The program consisted of four tasks: 1) selection of the matrices and interface coating constituents using a modeling-based approach; 2) fabrication of the selected materials; 3) testing and evaluation of the materials; and 4) evaluation of the behavior models to develop recommendations. Ni-50Al and Ni-20AI-30Fe (a/o) matrices were selected which gave brittle and ductile behavior, respectively, and an interface coating of PVD YSZ was selected which provided strong bonding to the sapphire fiber. Significant fiber damage and strength loss was observed in the composites which made straightforward comparison of properties with models difficult. Nevertheless, the models selected generally provided property predictions which agreed well with results when fiber degradation was incorporated. The presence of a strong interface bond was felt to be detrimental in the NiAI MMC system where low toughness and low strength were observed.

  14. Process of welding gamma prime-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Speigel, Lyle B.; White, Raymond Alan; Murphy, John Thomas; Nowak, Daniel Anthony

    2003-11-25

    A process for welding superalloys, and particularly articles formed of gamma prime-strengthened nickel-base superalloys whose chemistries and/or microstructures differ. The process entails forming the faying surface of at least one of the articles to have a cladding layer of a filler material. The filler material may have a composition that is different from both of the articles, or the same as one of the articles. The cladding layer is machined to promote mating of the faying surfaces, after which the faying surfaces are mated and the articles welded together. After cooling, the welded assembly is free of thermally-induced cracks.

  15. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  16. Machinability of hastelloy C-276 using Hot-pressed sintered Ti(C7N3)-based cermet cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kaitao; Zou, Bin; Huang, Chuanzhen; Yao, Yang; Zhou, Huijun; Liu, Zhanqiang

    2015-05-01

    C-276 nickel-based alloy is a difficult-to-cut material. In high-speed machining of Hastelloy C-276, notching is a prominent failure mode due to high mechanical properties of work piece, which results in the short tool life and low productivity. In this paper, a newly developed Ti(C7N3)-based cermet insert manufactured by a hot-pressing method is used to machine the C-276 nickel-based alloy, and its cutting performances are studied. Based on orthogonal experiment method, the influence of cutting parameters on tool life, material removal rates and surface roughness are investigated. Experimental research results indicate that the optimal cutting condition is a cutting speed of 50 m/min, depth of cut of 0.4 mm and feed rate of 0.15 mm/r if the tool life and material removal rates are considered comprehensively. In this case, the tool life is 32 min and material removal rates are 3000 mm3/min, which is appropriate to the rough machining. If the tool life and surface roughness are considered, the better cutting condition is a cutting speed of 75 m/min, depth of cut of 0.6 mm and feed rate of 0.1 mm/r. In this case, the surface roughness is 0.59μm. Notch wear, flank wear, chipping at the tool nose, built-up edge(BUE) and micro-cracks are found when Ti(C7N3)-based cermet insert turned Hastelloy C-276. Oxidation, adhesive, abrasive and diffusion are the wear mechanisms, which can be investigated by the observations of scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. This research will help to guide studies on the evaluation of machining parameters to further advance the productivity of nickel based alloy Hastelloy C-276 machining.

  17. Characterization and modeling of grain coarsening in powder metallurgical nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payton, Eric John

    2009-08-01

    Accurate prediction of grain size as a function of processing conditions is highly sought after in many advanced alloy systems because specific grain sizes must be obtained to meet mechanical property requirements. In powder metallurgical nickel-based superalloys for turbine disk applications, physics-based modeling of grain coarsening is needed to accelerate alloy and process development and to meet demands for higher jet engine operating temperatures. Materials characterization and simulation techniques were integrated and applied simultaneously to enable quantitative representation of the microstructure, to clarify experimental results, and to validate mean-field descriptions of microstructural evolution. The key parameters controlling grain coarsening behavior were identified. A statistical-analytical mean-field model of grain coarsening with an adaptive spatio-temporal mesh was developed to enable rapid physics-based simulation of microstructural evolution. Experimental results were used as initial conditions and the model was then evaluated in the context of experimental results. Deviations of model predictions from experimental observations were then used to recommend future work to resolve remaining issues related to the microstructral evolution of powder metallurgical nickel-based superalloys, the mean-field modeling of microstructural evolution, and the quantitative characterization of materials.

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Warpage in Laminated Aluminium Alloy Plates for Machining of Primary Aeronautic Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, A. C.; Moreira Filho, L. A.; Menezes, M. A.

    2007-04-07

    The aim of this paper consists in presenting a method of simulating the warpage in 7xxx series aluminium alloy plates. To perform this simulation finite element software MSC.Patran and MSC.Marc were used. Another result of this analysis will be the influence on material residual stresses induced on the raw material during the rolling process upon the warpage of primary aeronautic parts, fabricated through machining (milling) at Embraer. The method used to determinate the aluminium plate residual stress was Layer Removal Test. The numerical algorithm Modified Flavenot Method was used to convert layer removal and beam deflection in stress level. With such information about the level and profile of residual stresses become possible, during the step that anticipate the manufacturing to incorporate these values in the finite-element approach for modelling warpage parts. Based on that warpage parameter surely the products are manufactured with low relative vulnerability propitiating competitiveness and price.

  19. Anisotropy of high temperature strength in precipitation-hardened nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Y. G.; Terashima, H.; Yoshizawa, H.; Ohta, Y.; Murakami, K.

    1986-01-01

    The anisotropy of high temperature strength of nickel-base superalloy, Alloy 454, in service for advanced jet engine turbine blades and vanes, was investigated. Crystallographic orientation dependence of tensile yield strength, creep and creep rupture strength was found to be marked at about 760C. In comparison with other single crystal data, a larger allowance in high strength off-axial orientation from the 001 axis, and relatively poor strength at near the -111 axis were noted. From transmission electron microscopy the anisotropic characteristics of this alloy were explained in terms of available slip systems and stacking geometries of gamma-prime precipitate cuboids which are well hardened by a large tantalum content. 100 cube slip was considered to be primarily responsible for the poor strength of the -111 axis orientation replacing the conventional 111 plane slip systems.

  20. Weldability of a Nickel-based Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1994-01-01

    The electron beam welding process is used to investigate the weldability of the Ni-based superalloy Udimet 720LI. This is a modified form of the alloy Udimet 720, which has reduced concentrations of interstitial elements such as boron, silicon, and carbon. The history of high strength superalloys like this one suggests that welding will be difficult because of their tendency towards hot cracking during the welding process, or strain-age cracking during the post-weld aging process. Studies were done on several sizes of weldability test specimens to determine if Udimet 720LI will exhibit cracking tendencies. It was found that the alloy was not susceptible to hot cracking unless it had received the four-step aging heat treatment that is recommended by the manufacturer. It was also found that a restrained weldment is susceptible to strain-age cracking; however, if the weldment is allowed to deform then warpage can occur instead of cracking.

  1. Advanced microcharacterization of nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.; Miller, M.K.; Pike, L.M.; Klarstrom, D.L.

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to characterize the microstructural and microchemical effects of a process revision on HAYNES{reg{underscore}sign} 242{trademark}, a polycrystalline Ni-base superalloy used principally for high temperature applications, such as seal and containment rings in gas turbine engines. The process revision from the current one-step heat treating cycle to a two-step heat treatment would result in savings of energy and ultimately cost to the consumer. However, the proposed process revision could give rise to unforeseen microstructural modifications, such as a change in the size distribution of the ordered particles responsible for alloy strength or the formation of additional phases, which could affect alloy properties and hence performance. Advanced microcharacterization methods that allow images of the microstructure to be acquired at length scales from one micrometer down to the atomic level were used to reveal the effect of the process revision on alloy microstructure. Energy filtered imaging was used to characterize the size distribution and morphology of ordered precipitates and other phases, as well as the partitioning behavior of major elements (Ni, Mo, Cr) among these phases. The compositions of individual ordered particles, including fine-scale compositional variations at precipitate-matrix interfaces, and solute segregation behavior at grain boundaries were characterized at the atomic level by atom probe tomography. The atomic site distributions of selected elements in the ordered precipitates were characterized by atom-location by channeling-enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI). The results of these advanced microcharacterization methods were correlated with mechanical testing of similar alloys to address structure-property relationships.

  2. The effect of electric discharge machined notches on the fracture toughness of several structural alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    Recent computational studies of the stress and strain fields at the tip of very sharp notches have shown that the stress and strain fields are very weakly dependent on the initial geometry of the notch once the notch has been blunted to a radius that is 6 to 10 times the initial root radius. It follows that if the fracture toughness of a material is sufficiently high so that fracture initiation does not occur in a specimen until the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) reaches a value from 6 to 10 times the size of the initial notch tip diameter, then the fracture toughness will be independent of whether a fatigue crack or a machined notch served as the initial crack. In this experimental program the fracture toughness (J{sub Ic} and J resistance (J-R) curve, and CTOD) for several structure alloys was measured using specimens with conventional fatigue cracks and with EDM machined notches. The results of this program have shown, in fact, that most structural materials do not achieve initiation CTOD values on the order of 6 to 10 times the radius of even the smallest EDM notch tip presently achievable. It is found furthermore that tougher materials do not seem to be less dependent on the type of notch tip present. Some materials are shown to be much more dependent on the type of notch tip used, but no simple pattern is found that relates this observed dependence to the material strength toughness, or strain hardening rate.

  3. Effect of microstructure on high-temperature mechanical behavior of nickel-base superalloys for turbine disc applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Heather Joan

    2007-05-01

    Engineers constantly seek advancements in the performance of aircraft and power generation engines, including, lower costs and emissions, and improved fuel efficiency. Nickel-base superalloys are the material of choice for turbine discs, which experience some of the highest temperatures and stresses in the engine. Engine performance is proportional to operating temperatures. Consequently, the high-temperature capabilities of disc materials limit the performance of gas-turbine engines. Therefore, any improvements to engine performance necessitate improved alloy performance. In order to take advantage of improvements in high-temperature capabilities through tailoring of alloy microstructure, the overall objectives of this work were to establish relationships between alloy processing and microstructure, and between microstructure and mechanical properties. In addition, the projected aimed to demonstrate the applicability of neural network modeling to the field of Ni-base disc alloy development and behavior. The first phase of this work addressed the issue of how microstructure varies with heat treatment and by what mechanisms these structures are formed. Further it considered how superalloy composition could account for microstructural variations from the same heat treatment. To study this, four next-generation Ni-base disc alloys were subjected to various controlled heat-treatments and the resulting microstructures were then quantified. These quantitative results were correlated to chemistry and processing, including solution temperature, cooling rate, and intermediate hold temperature. A complex interaction of processing steps and chemistry was found to contribute to all features measured; grain size, precipitate distribution, grain boundary serrations. Solution temperature, above a certain threshold, and cooling rate controlled grain size, while cooling rate and intermediate hold temperature controlled precipitate formation and grain boundary serrations. Diffusion

  4. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  5. Experimental Design for Evaluation of Co-extruded Refractory Metal/Nickel Base Superalloy Joints

    SciTech Connect

    ME Petrichek

    2005-12-16

    Prior to the restructuring of the Prometheus Program, the NRPCT was tasked with delivering a nuclear space reactor. Potential NRPCT nuclear space reactor designs for the Prometheus Project required dissimilar materials to be in contact with each other while operating at extreme temperatures under irradiation. As a result of the high reactor core temperatures, refractory metals were the primary candidates for many of the reactor structural and cladding components. They included the tantalum-base alloys ASTAR-811C and Ta-10W, the niobium-base alloy FS-85, and the molybdenum base alloys Moly 41-47.5 Rhenium. The refractory metals were to be joined to candidate nickel base alloys such as Haynes 230, Alloy 617, or Nimonic PE 16 either within the core if the nickel-base alloys were ultimately selected to form the outer core barrel, or at a location exterior to the core if the nickel-base alloys were limited to components exterior to the core. To support the need for dissimilar metal joints in the Prometheus Project, a co-extrusion experiment was proposed. There are several potential methods for the formation of dissimilar metal joints, including explosive bonding, friction stir welding, plasma spray, inertia welding, HIP, and co-extrusion. Most of these joining methods are not viable options because they result in the immediate formation of brittle intermetallics. Upon cooling, intermetallics form in the weld fusion zone between the joined metals. Because brittle intermetallics do not form during the initial bonding process associated with HIP, co-extrusion, and explosive bonding, these three joining procedures are preferred for forming dissimilar metal joints. In reference to a Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory report done under a NASA sponsored program, joints that were fabricated between similar materials via explosive bonding had strengths that were directly affected by the width of the diffusion barrier. It was determined that the diffusion zone should not exceed

  6. Simulated Single Tooth Bending of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert, F.; Burke, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Future unmanned space missions will require mechanisms to operate at extreme conditions in order to be successful. In some of these mechanisms, very high gear reductions will be needed to permit very small motors to drive other components at low rotational speed with high output torque. Therefore gearing components are required that can meet the mission requirements. In mechanisms such as this, bending fatigue strength capacity of the gears is very important. The bending fatigue capacity of a high temperature, nickel-based alloy, typically used for turbine disks in gas turbine engines and two tool steel materials with high vanadium content, were compared to that of a typical aerospace alloy-AISI 9310. Test specimens were fabricated by electro-discharge machining without post machining processing. Tests were run at 24 and at 490 C. As test temperature increased from 24 to 490 C the bending fatigue strength was reduced by a factor of five.

  7. Influence of dynamic strain aging on the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of a new single crystal nickel-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, A.; Putatunda, S.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    In recent years, the design requirements of advanced gas turbine engines have led to the development of directionally solidified single crystal nickel-based superalloys. Among these alloys, CMSX-4 is a new second-generation single crystal nickel-based superalloy containing rhenium. This alloy has been developed from the first-generation CMSX alloys. It has superior hot corrosion resistance and higher creep-rupture strength than first-generation single crystal nickel-based superalloys and is an attractive candidate for complex components that require continuous exposure to very high temperatures. Due to its potential applications in turbine blades, rotors and nuclear reactors, etc., the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) and fatigue threshold (FT) data of this material are extremely important for safe life prediction as well as failure safe design at elevated temperatures. Preliminary studies by these authors have indicated that this material is probably undergoing dynamic strain aging (DSA) in the temperature range of 260 to 800 C. However, the effect of DSA on FCGR and FT is not well known or established for single crystal nickel-based superalloys. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of DSA on FCGR and FT of CMSX-4 at the temperature range of 650 and 800 C.

  8. Solidification phenomena in nickel base brazes containing boron and silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, S.K.; Lim, L.C.; Lai, M.O.

    1996-03-01

    Nickel base brazes containing boron and/or silicon as melting point depressants are used extensively in the repair and joining of aero-engine hot-section components. These melting point depressants form hard and brittle intermetallic compounds with nickel which are detrimental to the mechanical properties of brazed joints. The present investigation studied the microstructural evolution in nickel base brazes containing boron and/or silicon as melting point depressant(s) in simple systems using nickel as the base metal. The basic metallurgical reactions and formation of intermetallic compounds uncovered in these systems will be useful as a guide in predicting the evolution of microstructures in similar brazes in more complex systems involving base metals of nickel base superalloys. The four filler metal systems investigated in this study are: Ni-Cr-Si; Ni-Cr-B; Ni-Si-B and Ni-Cr-Fe-Si-B.

  9. First principles calculations of the site substitution behavior in gamma prime phase in nickel based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Mrunalkumar

    Nickel based superalloys have superior high temperature mechanical strength, corrosion and creep resistance in harsh environments and found applications in the hot sections as turbine blades and turbine discs in jet engines and gas generator turbines in the aerospace and energy industries. The efficiency of these turbine engines depends on the turbine inlet temperature, which is determined by the high temperature strength and behavior of these superalloys. The microstructure of nickel based superalloys usually contains coherently precipitated gamma prime (gamma') Ni3Al phase within the random solid solution of the gamma (gamma) matrix, with the gamma' phase being the strengthening phase of the superalloys. How the alloying elements partition into the gamma and gamma' phases and especially in the site occupancy behaviors in the strengthening gamma' phases play a critical role in their high temperature mechanical behaviors. The goal of this dissertation is to study the site substitution behavior of the major alloying elements including Cr, Co and Ti through first principles based calculations. Site substitution energies have been calculated using the anti-site formation, the standard defect formation formalism, and the vacancy formation based formalism. Elements such as Cr and Ti were found to show strong preference for Al sublattice, whereas Co was found to have a compositionally dependent site preference. In addition, the interaction energies between Cr-Cr, Co-Co, Ti-Ti and Cr-Co atoms have also been determined. Along with the charge transfer, chemical bonding and alloy chemistry associated with the substitutions has been investigated by examining the charge density distributions and electronic density of states to explain the chemical nature of the site substitution. Results show that Cr and Co atoms prefer to be close by on either Al sublattice or on a Ni-Al mixed lattice, suggesting a potential tendency of Cr and Co segregation in the gamma' phase.

  10. Experimental investigation of micro-channels produced in aluminum alloy (AA 2024) through laser machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Alahmari, Abdulrahman M.; Darwish, Saied; Khan, Awais Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are growingly used in various applications including micro-channel heat exchangers and heat sinks to facilitate heat transfer though micro-fluidic flows. Micro-channels with precise control over geometrical features are very important in order to design micro-fluidic flow dynamics and its characteristics. In this research, Nd:YAG laser beam micro-milling has been utilized to produce micro-channels in aluminum alloy (AA 2024) having cross-sectional size of 400 × 200 µm2. The objective was to control the material removal rate (MRR) of the process in order to get the micro-channels' geometries (width, depth and taperness of sidewalls) close to the designed geometries. In this context, parametric effects of predominant laser parameters on the process performance have been categorically studied. Quadratic mathematical models have further been developed to estimate the MRR and each geometrical aspect of micro-channels over different levels of laser parameters. Additionally, multi-objective optimization has been performed to get an optimized set of laser parameters generating the accurate machining geometries with appropriate material removal per laser scan. Finally, the models and optimization results were validated through confirmatory experimental tests. The results reveal that the précised micro-channel geometries can be obtained through laser beam micro-milling by selecting the appropriate combination of laser parameters (lamp current intensity of 84.48 %, laser pulse frequency of 35.70 kHz and laser scanning speed of 300 mm/s) that can collectively remove a required amount of material thickness per laser scan.

  11. Effect of Microstructure on Electrical Conductivity of Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Balasubramanian; Castagne, Sylvie; Annamalai, Swaminathan; Fan, Zheng; Chan, Wai Luen

    2017-08-01

    Eddy current spectroscopy is one of the promising non-destructive methods for residual stress evaluation along the depth of subsurface-treated nickel-base superalloys, but it is limited by its sensitivity to microstructure. This paper studies the influence of microstructure on the electrical conductivity of two nickel-base alloys, RR1000 and IN100. Different microstructures were attained using heat treatment cycles ranging from solution annealing to aging, with varying aging time and temperature. Eddy current conductivity was measured using conductivity probes of frequencies ranging between 1 and 5 MHz. Qualitative and quantitative characterization of the microstructure was performed using optical and scanning electron microscopes. For the heat treatment conditions between the solution annealing and the peak aging, the electrical conductivity of RR1000 increased by 6.5 pct, which is duly substantiated by the corresponding increase in hardness (12 pct) and the volume fraction of γ' precipitates (41 pct). A similar conductivity rise of 2.6 pct for IN100 is in agreement with the increased volume fraction of γ' precipitates (12.5 pct) despite an insignificant hardening between the heat treatment conditions. The observed results with RR1000 and IN100 highlight the sensitivity of electrical conductivity to the minor microstructure variations, especially the volume fraction of γ' precipitates, within the materials.

  12. Study of PVD AlCrN Coating for Reducing Carbide Cutting Tool Deterioration in the Machining of Titanium Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Cadena, Natalia L.; Cue-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Siller, Héctor R.; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana M.; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I.; Di-Nardo, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    The manufacture of medical and aerospace components made of titanium alloys and other difficult-to-cut materials requires the parallel development of high performance cutting tools coated with materials capable of enhanced tribological and resistance properties. In this matter, a thin nanocomposite film made out of AlCrN (aluminum–chromium–nitride) was studied in this research, showing experimental work in the deposition process and its characterization. A heat-treated monolayer coating, competitive with other coatings in the machining of titanium alloys, was analyzed. Different analysis and characterizations were performed on the manufactured coating by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the coating was evaluated through hardness test and tribology with pin-on-disk to quantify friction coefficient and wear rate. Finally, machinability tests using coated tungsten carbide cutting tools were executed in order to determine its performance through wear resistance, which is a key issue of cutting tools in high-end cutting at elevated temperatures. It was demonstrated that the specimen (with lower friction coefficient than previous research) is more efficient in machinability tests in Ti6Al4V alloys. Furthermore, the heat-treated monolayer coating presented better performance in comparison with a conventional monolayer of AlCrN coating. PMID:28809266

  13. Study of PVD AlCrN Coating for Reducing Carbide Cutting Tool Deterioration in the Machining of Titanium Alloys.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Natalia L; Cue-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Siller, Héctor R; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana M; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I; Di-Nardo, Santiago

    2013-05-24

    The manufacture of medical and aerospace components made of titanium alloys and other difficult-to-cut materials requires the parallel development of high performance cutting tools coated with materials capable of enhanced tribological and resistance properties. In this matter, a thin nanocomposite film made out of AlCrN (aluminum-chromium-nitride) was studied in this research, showing experimental work in the deposition process and its characterization. A heat-treated monolayer coating, competitive with other coatings in the machining of titanium alloys, was analyzed. Different analysis and characterizations were performed on the manufactured coating by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the coating was evaluated through hardness test and tribology with pin-on-disk to quantify friction coefficient and wear rate. Finally, machinability tests using coated tungsten carbide cutting tools were executed in order to determine its performance through wear resistance, which is a key issue of cutting tools in high-end cutting at elevated temperatures. It was demonstrated that the specimen (with lower friction coefficient than previous research) is more efficient in machinability tests in Ti6Al4V alloys. Furthermore, the heat-treated monolayer coating presented better performance in comparison with a conventional monolayer of AlCrN coating.

  14. The stability of lamellar gamma-gamma-prime structures. [nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The stability of stress-annealed gamma/gamma-prime lamellar structures were investigated using three nickel-base single-crystal alloys (the NASAIR 100 and two similar alloys, E and F, containing 5 and 10 wt pct Co, respectively) stress-annealed at 1000 C to form lamellae perpendicular to the applied stress. The rate of the lamellar thickening under various thermal and creep exposures was examined by SEM. For unstressed aging at 1100 C, the lamellar structures of the NASAIR and the E alloys exhibited continuous but slow lamellar coarsening, whereas the lamellae of the alloy F showed pronounced thickening plus spheroidization. Resistance to lamellar thickening was correlated with high magnitudes of lattice mismatch, which promoted a more regular lamellar structure and a finer spacing of misfit dislocations. Specimens which were tension-annealed prior to compressive creep testing exhibited an earlier onset of tertiary creep in comparison with only heat-treated specimens. This was associated with accelerated lamellar coarsening in the stress-annealed specimens.

  15. Laser-Machined Shape Memory Alloy Sensors for Position Feedback in Active Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Alexander T.; Park, Byong-Ho; Liang, David H.; Niemeyer, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-based interventions are a form of minimally invasive surgery that can decrease hospitalization time and greatly lower patient morbidity compared to traditional methods. However, percutaneous catheter procedures are hindered by a lack of precise tip manipulation when actuation forces are transmitted over the length of the catheter. Active catheters with local shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuation can potentially provide the desired manipulation of a catheter tip, but hysteresis makes it difficult to control the actuators. A method to integrate small-volume, compliant sensors on an active catheter to provide position feedback for control would greatly improve the viability of SMA-based active catheters. In this work, we describe the design, fabrication, and performance of resistance-based position sensors that are laser-machined from superelastic SMA tubing. Combining simple material models and rapid prototyping, we can develop sensors of appropriate stiffness and sensitivity with simple modifications in sensor geometry. The sensors exhibit excellent linearity over the operating range and are designed to be easily integrated onto an active catheter substrate. PMID:19759806

  16. Dynamic Process Analysis In Cutting Zone During Machining Of Nickel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czán, Andrej; Šajgalík, Michal; Martikáň, Anton; Mrázik, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    To generally improve effectivity of parts production and metal cutting process, there are used process models of super alloys together with finite element modeling simulations. Advanced measurement methods of the process could improve and verify the accuracy of these models. These methods cause many error sources when using empiric or exact methods such as infrared radiation thermography to measure the temperature distribution of the tool, workpiece, and chip during metal cutting. Measuring of metal machining is challenging due to factors such as the high magnification required, high surface speeds and deformations, micro-blackbody effects, changing emissivity and deformations present at metal cutting. As part of an ongoing effort to improve our understanding of uncertainties associated with these measurement methods, multimeasurement sets of experiments were performed. First set of measurements observed connection between surface temperature and the internal temperature of the cutting tool. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature using a thermal camera in cutting zone. Second set performed high-speed scan of dynamic processes such as formation of elastic and plastic deformation. During this operation was applied high-speed scannning system using macro conversion lens for monitoring of micro-structural changes in deformation areas. Next necessary applied set is recording of dynamic processes by implementation of piezoelectric measurement device for monitoring of cutting forces. The outputs from multimeasuring system are the basis for verification of theoretical knowledge from this field and elimination of uncertainties, which arise by using computer simulation systems.

  17. Microstructural, mechanical and weldability assessments of the dissimilar welds between γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Naffakh Moosavy, Homam; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein; Mapelli, Carlo

    2013-08-15

    Dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys has been investigated to identify the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and weldability characteristics. γ′-Strengthened nickel-base Alloy 500 and γ″-strengthened nickel-base Alloy 718 were used for dissimilar welding. Gas tungsten arc welding operations were utilized for performing the autogenous dissimilar welding. Alloy 500 and Alloy 718 base metals showed various types of phases, carbides, intermetallics and eutectics in their microstructure. The results for Alloy 500 weld metal showed severe segregation of titanium to the interdendritic regions. The Alloy 718 weld metal compositional analysis confirmed the substantial role of Nb in the formation of low-melting eutectic-type morphologies which can reduce the weldability. The microstructure of dissimilar weld metal with dilution level of 65% wt.% displayed semi-developed dendritic structure. The less segregation and less formation of low-melting eutectic structures caused to less susceptibility of the dissimilar weld metal to the solidification cracking. This result was confirmed by analytic modeling achievements. Dissolution of γ″-Ni{sub 3}Nb precipitations took place in the Alloy 718 heat-affected zone leading to sharp decline of the microhardness in this region. Remelted and resolidified regions were observed in the partially-melted zone of Alloy 500 and Alloy 718. Nevertheless, no solidification and liquation cracking happened in the dissimilar welds. Finally, this was concluded that dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys can successfully be performed. - Highlights: • Dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys is studied. • Microstructural, mechanical and weldability aspects of the welds are assessed. • Microstructure of welds, bases and heat-affected zones is characterized in detail. • The type

  18. High precision batch mode micro-electro-discharge machining of metal alloys using DRIE silicon as a cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Bai, Qing; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports recent advances in batch mode micro-electro-discharge machining (µEDM) for high precision micromachining of metal alloys such as stainless steel. High-aspect-ratio silicon microstructures with fine feature sizes formed by deep reactive ion etching are used as cutting tools. To machine workpiece features with widths ≤10 µm, a silicon dioxide coating is necessary to passivate the sidewalls of the silicon tools from spurious discharges. In the machined workpieces, a minimum feature size of ≈7 µm and an aspect ratio up to 3.2 are demonstrated by the batch mode µEDM of stainless steel 304 and titanium (Grade 1) substrates. Machining rates up to ≈5 µm min-1 in feature depth are achieved in batch mode micromachining of typical microfluidic structures, including arrays of channels and cavities of different sizes. The machined features are uniform across a die-scale area of 5 × 5 mm2. Other machining characteristics are also discussed.

  19. On the Detection of Creep Damage in a Directionally Solidified Nickel Base Superalloy Using Nonlinear Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jidong; Qu, Jianmin; Saxena, Ashok; Jacobs, Larry

    2004-02-01

    A limited experimental study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using nonlinear ultrasonic technique for assessing the remaining creep life of a directionally solidified (DS) nickel base superalloy. Specimens of this alloy were subjected to creep testing at different stress levels. Creep tests were periodically interrupted at different creep life fractions to conduct transmission ultrasonic tests to explore if a correlation exists between the higher order harmonics and the accumulated creep damage in the samples. A strong and unique correlation was found between the third order harmonic of the transmitted wave and the exhausted creep life fraction. Preliminary data also show an equally strong correlation between plastic deformation accumulated during monotonic loading and the second harmonic of the transmitted ultrasonic wave while no correlation was found between plastic strain and the third order harmonic. Thus, the nonlinear ultrasonic technique can potentially distinguish between damage due to plastic deformation and creep deformation.

  20. Microstructure-property relationships in directionally solidified single-crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, Rebecca A.; Nathal, Michael V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the microstructural features which influence the creep properties of directionally solidified and single-crystal nickel-base superalloys. Gamma prime precipitate size and morphology, gamma-gamma (prime) lattice mismatch, phase instability, alloy composition, and processing variations are among the factors considered. Recent experimental results are reviewed and related to the operative deformation mechanisms and to the corresponding mechanical properties. Special emphasis is placed on the creep behavior of single-crystal superalloys at high temperatures, where directional gamma (prime) coarsening is prominent, and at lower temperatures, where gamma (prime) coarsening rates are significantly reduced. It can be seen that very subtle changes in microstructural features can have profound effects on the subsequent properties of these materials.

  1. Yielding and deformation behavior of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy PWA 1480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, W. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Interrupted tensile tests were conducted to fixed plastic strain levels in 100 ordered single crystals of the nickel based superalloy PWA 1480. Testing was done in the range of 20 to 1093 C, at strain rate of 0.5 and 50%/min. The yield strength was constant from 20 to 760 C, above which the strength dropped rapidly and became a stong function of strain rate. The high temperature data were represented very well by an Arrhenius type equation, which resulted in three distinct temperature regimes. The deformation substructures were grouped in the same three regimes, indicating that there was a fundamental relationship between the deformation mechanisms and activation energies. Models of the yielding process were considered, and it was found that no currently available model was fully applicable to this alloy. It was also demonstrated that the initial deformation mechanism (during yielding) was frequently different from that which would be inferred by examining specimens which were tested to failure.

  2. Microstructure-property relationships in directionally solidified single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the microstructural features which influence the creep properties of directionally solidified and single crystal nickel-base superalloys are discussed. Gamma precipitate size and morphology, gamma-gamma lattice mismatch, phase instability, alloy composition, and processing variations are among the factors considered. Recent experimental results are reviewed and related to the operative deformation mechanisms and to the corresponding mechanical properties. Special emphasis is placed on the creep behavior of single crystal superalloys at high temperatures, where directional gamma coarsening is prominent, and at lower temperatures, where gamma coarsening rates are significantly reduced. It can be seen that very subtle changes in microstructural features can have profound effects on the subsequent properties of these materials.

  3. Evaluation of high- temperature behavior of CMSX4 + yttrium single- crystal nickel- base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchionni, M.; Goldschmidt, D.; Maldini, M.

    1993-08-01

    CMSX4 + Y, a highly strengthened rhenium-containing second-generation single-crystal nickel-base su-peralloy, has been studied by creep, low-cycle, and thermomechanical fatigue in the temperature range 500 to 1100 °C. The alloy exhibits good high-temperature mechanical properties that are superior or com-parable to other single-crystal superalloys. Thermomechanical fatigue resistance is equivalent to low-cy-cle fatigue and is cycle-shape dependent. High-temperature mechanical properties have been studied using life prediction relationships that are frequently used for creep and low-cycle fatigue data evalu-ation. Examination of fracture surfaces revealed that fracture induced by creep damage is internal and starts from pore-initiated cracks; however, fatigue damage starts on the external surface and propagates inward in stage II mode.

  4. Determination of emissivity coefficient of heat-resistant super alloys and cemented carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieruj, Piotr; Przestacki, Damian; Chwalczuk, Tadeusz

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the analysis of emissivity engineering materials according to temperature. Experiment is concerned on difficult to machine materials, which may be turned with laser assisting. Cylindrical samples made of nickel-based alloys Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Waspaloy and tungsten-carbides based on cobalt matrix were analyzed. The samples' temperature in contact method was compared to the temperature measured by non-contact pyrometers. Based on this relative, the value of the emissivity coefficient was adjusted to the right indication of pyrometers.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF HOT CORROSION OF NICKEL BASE SUPERALLOYS USED IN GAS TURBINE ENGINES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GAS TURBINES, CORROSION), (*NICKEL ALLOYS , CORROSION RESISTANCE), CHROMIUM ALLOYS , ALUMINUM ALLOYS , TUNGSTEN ALLOYS , MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , COBALT... ALLOYS , TITANIUM ALLOYS , NIOBIUM ALLOYS , IRON ALLOYS , TANTALUM ALLOYS , VANADIUM ALLOYS , MANGANESE ALLOYS , HIGH TEMPERATURE.

  6. Analysis of the Influence of Laser Welding on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in a Newly Developed Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckson, R. A.; Ojo, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of laser welding on fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a newly developed nickel-base superalloy, Haynes 282 was studied. Laser welding resulted in cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the alloy during welding and FCG test results show that this produces deleterious effect on the fatigue crack growth behavior of Haynes 282. However, two post weld heat treatments, including a new thermal treatment schedule developed in this work, are used to significantly improve the resistance of the Haynes 282 fatigue crack growth after laser welding. The effects of laser welding and thermal treatments are discussed in terms of HAZ cracking and heterogeneity of slip, respectively.

  7. Computational Thermodynamic Study to Predict Complex Phase Equilibria in the Nickel-Base Superalloy Rene N6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Ritzert, Frank J.

    2001-01-01

    A previous study by Ritzert et al. on the formation and prediction of topologically closed packed (TCP) phases in the nickel-base superalloy Rene' N6 is re-examined with computational thermodynamics. The experimental data on phase distribution in forty-four alloys with a composition within the patent limits of the nickel-base superalloy Rene' N6 provide a good basis for comparison to and validation of a commercial nickel superalloy database used with ThermoCalc. Volume fraction of the phases and partitioning of the elements are determined for the forty-four alloys in this dataset. The baseline heat treatment of 400 h at 1366 K was used. This composition set is particularly interesting since small composition differences lead to dramatic changes in phase composition. In general the calculated values follow the experimental trends. However, the calculations indicated no TCP phase formation when the experimental measurements gave a volume percent of TCP phase less than 2 percent. When TCP phases were predicted, the calculations under-predict the volume percent of TCP phases by a factor of 2 to 8. The calculated compositions of the gamma and gamma' phases show fair agreement with the measurements. However, the calculated compositions of the P Phase do not agree with those measured. This may be due to inaccuracies in the model parameters for P phase and/or issues with the microprobe analyses of these phases. In addition, phase fraction diagrams and sigma and P phase solvus temperatures are calculated for each of the alloys. These calculations indicate that P phase is the primary TCP phase formed for the alloys considered here at 1366 K. Finally, a series of isopleths are calculated for each of the seven alloying elements. These show the effect of each alloying element on creating TCP phases.

  8. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Tobias; Rommel, Daniel; Scherm, Florian; Gorywoda, Marek; Glatzel, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co–28Cr–9W–1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE) study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable. PMID:28772639

  9. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Tobias; Rommel, Daniel; Scherm, Florian; Gorywoda, Marek; Glatzel, Uwe

    2017-03-10

    Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co-28Cr-9W-1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE) study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  10. Tensile Behavior of Long-term Aged Nickel-base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, P. C.; Chen, F. W.; Xie, K.; Yu, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    The microstructural change of directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy which was aged at 900 °C for 1500 hours and tensile behavior at different temperatures were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). γ' phase of the alloy coarsens and rafts in the course of aged treatment. The driving force of rafting is the decrease of interface energy and elastic strain energy. The stress of aged alloy increases slightly with the testing temperature. This arises from a few dislocations shearing the γ' precipitates. There is a peak stress value at 760 °C, which is attributed to the high strength of the γ' phase, the homogeneous deformation structure, and dislocation-γ' precipitate and dislocation-dislocation interactions. The stress then decreases rapidly with increased temperature. The low stress of the γ' phase and γ' rafting at high temperature contribute to the drop of alloy strength. The change of elongation is inverse to that of the stress.

  11. Development of Novel Pre-alloyed PM Steels for Optimization of Machinability and Fatigue Resistance of PM Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardan, Milad; Blais, Carl

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that a large proportion of ferrous PM components require secondary machining operations for dimensional conformance or for producing geometrical features that cannot be generated during die compaction. Nevertheless, the machining behavior of PM parts is generally characterized as being "difficult" due to the presence of residual porosity that lowers thermal conductivity and induces interrupted cutting. Several admixed additives such as MnS and BN-h can be used to improve the machining behavior of PM steels. Nevertheless, their negative effect on mechanical properties, especially fatigue resistance, makes their utilization uninteresting for the fabrication of high-performance PM steel components. This article summarizes the work carried out to develop a novel PM steel that was especially engineered to form machinability enhancing precipitates. This new material is pre-alloyed with tin (Sn) in order to form Cu-Sn (Cu(α)) precipitates during transient liquid phase sintering. The newly developed material presents machinability improvement of 165% compared to reference material used in the PM industry as well as increases in toughness and fatigue resistance of 100% and 13%, respectively.

  12. Requirements of constitutive models for two nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflen, J. H.; Cook, T. S.

    1983-01-01

    The constitutive behavior of two nickel-base superalloys, Rene '80 and Inconel 718, utilized in gas turbine blade and disk components, respectively, is presented. In turbine blade applications, the high homologous temperatures result in strain-rate effects dominating behavior. In turbine disks, the temperatures are cooler so that mean stress effects become important. The impact of these two variables on the overall crack initiation lifetime and analysis methodology is discussed.

  13. The Effect of the Heat Treatment on the Dust Emission During Machining of an Al-7Si-Mg Cast Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebara, A.; Zedan, Y.; Kouam, J.; Songmene, V.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on the effect of artificial aging on the machinability of Al-7Si-Mg (A356) cast alloys for the as-received alloy, solution heat-treated (SHT) alloy and then aged SHT alloy at 155, 180, and 220 °C, respectively. The influence of heat treatment on the machinability of the alloys studied was considered using innovative criteria such as dust emission. The effect of various lubrication modes including dry, mist, and wet process, as well as cutting speed and feed rate, was also investigated. The results obtained from the statistically designed experiments indicate that at the same cutting conditions, the A356-T7 heat treatment generates less dust emission level compared to other various heat treatments (there is 32% less airborne swarf produced than with A356-T6). Aging at low temperature was observed to produce the greatest level of the dust emission while the aging at higher temperatures is accompanied by a reduction in the dust emission level. Fracture surface analysis using scanning electron microscope, has shown that dust emission levels were strongly dependent on the nature of the fracture surface of the alloys studied, with different heat treatments. A change in chip formation was also found to be a function of age hardening and dust emission during machining of the tested aluminum alloy. A correlation was established between the cutting speed, the feed rate, and the dust emission, which is useful for determining the conditions required for minimal dust emission.

  14. Microporosity in casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-06-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third an oxy-acetylene torch. Samples from each series were sectioned longitudinally, mounted, polished and examined microscopically for evidence of microporosity.

  15. Fatigue and creep-fatigue deformation of several nickel-base superalloys at 650 °c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miner, R. V.; Gayda, J.; Maier, R. D.

    1982-10-01

    Specimens of seven nickel-base superalloys for gas turbine disk application that had been failed in fatigue and creep-fatigue at 650 °C were examined by transmission electron microscopy to observe the effects of composition and microstructure on the deformation characteristics of the alloys. The alloys were Waspaloy, HIP Astroloy, H+F Astroloy, H+F René 95, IN 100, MERL 76, and NASA IIB-7. The amount of bulk deformation observed in all the alloys was low. At inelastic strain amplitudes less than about 10-3 only favorably oriented grains exhibited yielding, and the majority of those had <110> near the tensile axis. Deformation occurred on octahedral systems for all the alloys except MERL 76, which also exhibited primary cube slip. The difference in slip behavior between MERL 76 and its parent composition, IN 100, was attributed to the addition of Nb. Deformation occurred in well-defined slip bands in the alloys that contained only fine aging γ', 0.01 to 0.06 μm in size. Alloys which also contained a population of larger aging γ' particles, 0.1 to 0.3 μm, exhibited more homogeneous deformation. Deformation in the creep-fatigue cycle, which employed a 15 minute dwell at the maximum tensile strain of the cycle, was not greatly different from fatigue deformation except that a few extended faults were formed.

  16. Multi-objective constrained design of nickel-base superalloys using data mining- and thermodynamics-driven genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menou, Edern; Ramstein, Gérard; Bertrand, Emmanuel; Tancret, Franck

    2016-06-01

    A new computational framework for systematic and optimal alloy design is introduced. It is based on a multi-objective genetic algorithm which allows (i) the screening of vast compositional ranges and (ii) the optimisation of the performance of novel alloys. Alloys performance is evaluated on the basis of their predicted constitutional and thermomechanical properties. To this end, the CALPHAD method is used for assessing equilibrium characteristics (such as constitution, stability or processability) while Gaussian processes provide an estimate of thermomechanical properties (such as tensile strength or creep resistance), based on a multi-variable non-linear regression of existing data. These three independently well-assessed tools were unified within a single C++ routine. The method was applied to the design of affordable nickel-base superalloys for service in power plants, providing numerous candidates with superior expected microstructural stability and strength. An overview of the metallurgy of optimised alloys, as well as two detailed examples of optimal alloys, suggest that improvements over current commercial alloys are achievable at lower costs.

  17. Effects of Cobalt on Structure, Microchemistry and Properties of a Wrought Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, Robert N.; Tien, John K.

    1982-06-01

    Cobalt in a 17 pct cobalt containing wrought nickel-base superalloy is systematically substituted for by nickel in order to determine the role of cobalt. The eventual goal is to reduce the levels of cobalt, a critical strategic element, in superalloys. It is found that the strengthening γ microstructure is highly heat treatment sensitive. Reducing cobalt did not result in a reduction of the fine γ precipitates after a coarse grain type (blading) heat treatment, but did after a fine grain type (disk) heat treatment. Representative mechanical properties were determined for each case to isolate microstructural and microchemistry effects. Ambient yield strength and tensile strength were seen to decrease by no more than 15 pct and 7 pct, respectively, even when all the cobalt was removed. The decrease in strength is quantitatively discussed and shown to be consistent with the observed microstructural results and microchemistry results obtained using STEM/EDS. Elevated temperature creep and stress rupture resistances were concluded to be affected by alloy cobalt content through its effect on strengthening γ volume fraction. Significant decreases in these properties were observed for the lower cobalt content alloys. Long term aging, precipitate coarsening, and carbide stability results are also presented and discussed.

  18. Welding Metallurgy of Nickel-Based Superalloys for Power Plant Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, David C.

    Increasing the steam temperature and pressure in coal-fired power plants is a perpetual goal driven by the pursuit of increasing thermal cycle efficiency and reducing fuel consumption and emissions. The next target steam operating conditions, which are 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi) are known as Advanced Ultra Supercritical (AUSC), and can reduce CO2 emissions up to 13% but this cannot be achieved with traditional power plant construction materials. The use of precipitation-strengthened Nickel-based alloys (superalloys) is required for components which will experience the highest operating temperatures. The leading candidate superalloys for power plant construction are alloys 740H, 282, and 617. Superalloys have excellent elevated temperature properties due to careful microstructural design which is achieved through very specific heat treatments, often requiring solution annealing or homogenization at temperatures of 1100 °C or higher. A series of postweld heat treatments was investigated and it was found that homogenization steps before aging had no noticeable effect on weld metal microhardness, however; there were clear improvements in weld metal homogeneity. The full abstract can be viewed in the document itself.

  19. Method of improving fatigue life of cast nickel based superalloys and composition

    DOEpatents

    Denzine, Allen F.; Kolakowski, Thomas A.; Wallace, John F.

    1978-03-14

    The invention consists of a method of producing a fine equiaxed grain structure (ASTM 2-4) in cast nickel-base superalloys which increases low cycle fatigue lives without detrimental effects on stress rupture properties to temperatures as high as 1800.degree. F. These superalloys are variations of the basic nickel-chromium matrix, hardened by gamma prime [Ni.sub.3 (Al, Ti)] but with optional additions of cobalt, tungsten, molybdenum, vanadium, columbium, tantalum, boron, zirconium, carbon and hafnium. The invention grain refines these alloys to ASTM 2 to 4 increasing low cycle fatigue life by a factor of 2 to 5 (i.e. life of 700 hours would be increased to 1400 to 3500 hours for a given stress) as a result of the addition of 0.01% to 0.2% of a member of the group consisting of boron, zirconium and mixtures thereof to aid heterogeneous nucleation. The alloy is vacuum melted and heated to 250.degree.-400.degree. F. above the melting temperature, cooled to partial solidification, thus resulting in said heterogeneous nucleation and fine grains, then reheated and cast at about 50.degree.-100.degree. F. of superheat. Additions of 0.1% boron and 0.1% zirconium (optional) are the preferred nucleating agents.

  20. Isothermal oxidation behavior and mechanism of a nickel-based superalloy at 1000°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhi-yuan; Cai, Yuan-fei; Gong, You-jun; Shen, Guo-ping; Tu, Yu-guo; Zhang, Guo-fu

    2017-07-01

    The oxidation behavior of a nickel-based superalloy at 1000°C in air was investigated through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis. A series of oxides, including external oxide scales (Cr2O3, (TiO2 + MnCr2O4)) and internal oxides (Al2O3,TiN), were formed on the surface or sub-surface of the substrate at 1000°C in experimental still air. The oxidation resistance of the alloy was dependent on the stability of the surface oxide layer. The continuity and density of the protective Cr2O3 scale were affected by minor alloying elements such as Ti and Mn. The outermost oxide scale was composed of TiO2 rutile and MnCr2O4 spinel, and the growth of TiO2 particles was controlled by the outer diffusion of Ti ions through the pre-existing oxide layer. Severe internal oxidation occurred beneath the external oxide scale, consuming Al and Ti of the strength phase γ' (Ni3(Al,Ti)) and thereby severely deteriorating the surface mechanical properties. The depth of the internal oxidation region was approximately 35 μm after exposure to experimental air at 1000°C for 80 h.

  1. Hot corrosion studies of four nickel-base superalloys - B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C and IN738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel-base superalloys has been studied at 900 and 1000 C in one atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen. Hot corrosion was induced by coating the samples with known doses of Na2SO4 and oxidizing the coated samples isothermally on a sensitive microbalance. In order of decending susceptibility to hot corrosion, these alloys were ranked: B-1900, 713C, NASA-TRW VIA, IN738. This order corresponds to the order of decreasing molybdenum content of the alloys. Chemical evidence for B-1900 indicates that hot corrosion is instigated by acid fluxing of the protective Al2O3 coating by MoO3.

  2. Preferred growth orientation and microsegregation behaviors of eutectic in a nickel-based single-crystal superalloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu; Ma, Dexin; Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    A nickel-based single-crystal superalloy was employed to investigate the preferred growth orientation behavior of the (γ + γ') eutectic and the effect of these orientations on the segregation behavior. A novel solidification model for the eutectic island was proposed. At the beginning of the eutectic island's crystallization, the core directly formed from the liquid by the eutectic reaction, and then preferably grew along [100] direction. The crystallization of the eutectic along [110] always lagged behind that in [100] direction. The eutectic growth in [100] direction terminated on impinging the edge of the dendrites or another eutectic island. The end of the eutectic island's solidification terminates due to the encroachment of the eutectic liquid/solid interface at the dendrites or another eutectic island in [110] direction. The distribution of the alloying elements depended on the crystalline axis. The degree of the alloying elements' segregation was lower along [100] than [110] direction with increasing distance from the eutectic island's center.

  3. A Coupled Creep Plasticity Model for Residual Stress Relaxation of a Shot Peened Nickel-Base Superalloy (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    titanium - and nickel-base alloys [1- 2,5- 6 ]. For applications that utilize aluminum and titanium alloys, subjected to moderate temperatures and...reaching the target stress for creep. 1e-9 1e-8 1e-7 1e- 6 1e-5 1e- 4 1e-3 1e-2 1e-1 1e-3 1e-2 1e-1 -1% Prestrain 0% Prestrain +1% Prestrain +5...was adapted to a rate-independent nonlinear isotropic-kinematic hardening model described by Dodds [30]. 10-9 10-8 10-7 10- 6 10-5 10- 4 10-3 10-2 10

  4. High temperature low-cycle fatigue mechanisms in single crystals of nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, W. W.; Jayaraman, N.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty three high temperature low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200. Tests were conducted at 760 and 870 C. SEM fractography and transmission electron microscopy were used to determine mechanisms responsible for the observed orientation dependent fatigue behavior. It has been concluded that the plastic characteristics of the alloy lead to orientation-dependent strain hardening and fatigue lives at 760 C. At 870 C, the elastic characteristics of the alloy dominated the behavior, even though the plastic strain ranges were about the same as they were at 760 C. This led to orientation-dependent fatigue lives, but the trends were not the same as they were at 760 C.

  5. Hot corrosion studies of four nickel-base superalloys - B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C and IN738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel-base superalloys has been studied at 900 and 1000 C in one atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen. Hot corrosion was induced by coating the samples with known doses of Na2SO4 and oxidizing the coated samples isothermally on a sensitive microbalance. In order of decending susceptibility to hot corrosion, these alloys were ranked: B-1900, 713C, NASA-TRW VIA, IN738. This order corresponds to the order of decreasing molybdenum content of the alloys. Chemical evidence for B-1900 indicates that hot corrosion is instigated by acid fluxing of the protective Al2O3 coating by MoO3.

  6. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of a nickel-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Perrie, W.; French, P.; Sharp, M.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.

    2008-12-01

    Femtosecond laser (180 fs, 775 nm, 1 kHz) surface modification of the nickel-based superalloy C263 is investigated. The laser beam was scanned onto areas on the substrate with macroscopic dimensions using different fluences ( F = 0.28-30 J/cm 2), speeds ( υ = 1-10 mm/s) and number of overscans (5-90). The evolution of surface morphology, roughness, ablation depth and volume ablation rate with laser micromachining parameters were determined. The surface morphology is characterized by ripples for low average powers while for high average powers the surface becomes porous.

  7. Effect of Quenching Medium on Mechanical Properties of Alloy Al7049-T6 and Lowering of its After-Machining Warpage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Saeed Aliakbari; Feizabadi, Javad; Pourgharibshahi, Mohammad; Hashemi, Seyed Hamidreza

    2017-07-01

    Aluminum alloy Al 7049 is studied in state T6. Heat treatment of the specimens is performed in different quenching media (cold water, boiling water, aqueous polymer solutions). The mechanical properties and the Brinell hardness of the alloy are determined after different modes of heat treatment. Comparative analysis is used to find the maximum residual stresses responsible for warpage of the alloy after machining. The relation between the warpage and the dimensionless Biot number is obtained. Quenching modes removing the warpage in billets of Al7049 are determined.

  8. Automated Identification and Characterization of Secondary & Tertiary gamma’ Precipitates in Nickel-Based Superalloys (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    METHODOLOGY A nickel-based superalloy sample (Rene88DT) was cut from a forged disc developed under a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency funded...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4064 AUTOMATED IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SECONDARY & TERTIARY γ’ PRECIPITATES IN NICKEL-BASED SUPERALLOYS ...AUTOMATED IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SECONDARY & TERTIARY γ’ PRECIPITATES IN NICKEL-BASED SUPERALLOYS (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In

  9. Weldability and microstructure development in nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.; Vitek, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    The integrity of nickel-base superalloy single-crystal welds depends on the weld cracking tendency, weld metal dendrite selection process, stray crystal formation, and macro- and microstructure development. These phenomena have been investigated in commercial nickel-base superalloy single crystal welds. During electron beam and laser beam welding, transverse and longitudinal weld cracking occurred. However, the weld cracking tendency was reduced with preheating. Most of the dendritic growth pattern development in these welds can be explained by a geometric model. However, the welds also contained misoriented stray crystals, which were frequently associated with weld cracks. The formation of stray crystals was related to thermal and constitutional supercooling effects. Fine-scale elemental partitioning between {gamma} and {gamma}{prime} phase was measured with atom-probe field-ion microscopy. Marked differences in partitioning characteristics in two welds were observed and are related to differences in cooling rates. In this paper, the modeling tools available to describe the above are reviewed.

  10. Corrosion Behavior of Arc Sprayed Nickel-Base Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dingyong; Dong, Na; Jiang, Jianmin

    2007-12-01

    In this study, nickel-base cored wires were prepared by using NiCr strip to wrap metal powders of nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), and chromium boron (CrB). Nickel-base coatings were prepared by electric arc spraying. Microstructures of Ni-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-B coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive analysis (EDAX), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coatings have a compact surface and presented a bonding strength higher than 40 MPa. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements and salt-spray test were carried out to determine the corrosion behavior of the coatings. The results showed that Ni-base coatings containing Mo (5%) or B (2-4%) had better antichlorine ion corrosion performance than that of Ni-base coatings without Mo element, and PS45 (Ni-Cr-Ti) coating. The antichlorine ion corrosion coatings could be used for resolving the corrosion protection problem of the equipment and piping contacting sour, alkali, salt liquid in petrochemical engineering applications.

  11. Properties of Nickel-Based Hydrogen-Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, D. P.; Warren, J. P.; Cowles, B. A.; Shoemaker, D.; Teel, J. R. J.; Pearson, D. L.; Annis, C. G. J.; Wilson, D. A.; Schwartz, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    120 page report presents data on mechanical properties of cast nickelbased alloys for turbine blades operating in hydrogen and steam at high temperatures. Tests on alloys for hydrogen-burning engines of future are described.

  12. Influence of gaseous hydrogen on the mechanical properties of high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Tensile tests of six nickel-base and one cobalt-base alloy were conducted in 34.5 MN/sq m helium and hydrogen environments at temperatures from 297 K to 1,088 K. Mechanical properties tests of the nickel-base alloy MAR M-246 (Hf modified), in two cast conditions, were conducted in gaseous environments at temperatures from 297 K to 1,144 K and pressures from one atmosphere to 34.5 MN/sq m. The objective of this program was to obtain the mechanical properties of the various alloys proposed for use in space propulsion systems in a pure hydrogen environment at different temperatures and to compare with the mechanical properties in helium at the same conditions. All testing was conducted on solid specimens exposed to external gaseous pressure. Smooth and notched tensile properties were determined using ASTM tensile testing techniques, and creep-rupture life was determined using ASTM creep-rupture techniques. Low-cycle fatigue life was established by constant total strain and constant stress testing using smooth specimens and a closed-loop test machine.

  13. Influence of composition on microstructural parameters of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    MacKay, R.A.; Gabb, T.P.; Garg, A.; Rogers, R.B.; Nathal, M.V.

    2012-08-15

    Fourteen nickel-base superalloy single crystals containing a range of chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), and rhenium (Re) levels, and fixed amounts of aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta), were examined to determine the effect of bulk composition on basic microstructural parameters, including {gamma} Prime solvus, {gamma} Prime volume fraction, topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phase chemistries, and {gamma}-{gamma} Prime lattice mismatch. Regression models describing the influence of bulk alloy composition on each of the microstructural parameters were developed and compared to predictions by a commercially-available software tool that used computational thermodynamics. Co produced the largest change in {gamma} Prime solvus over the wide compositional range explored and Mo produced the biggest effect on the {gamma} lattice parameter over its range, although Re had a very potent influence on all microstructural parameters investigated. Changing the Cr, Co, Mo, and Re contents in the bulk alloy had an impact on their concentrations in the {gamma} matrix and to a smaller extent in the {gamma} Prime phase. The software tool under-predicted {gamma} Prime solvus temperatures and {gamma} Prime volume fractions, and over-predicted TCP phase volume fractions at 982 Degree-Sign C. However, the statistical regression models provided excellent estimations of the microstructural parameters and demonstrated the usefulness of such formulas. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of Cr, Co, Mo, and Re on microstructure in new low density superalloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co produced a large change in {gamma} Prime solvus; Mo had a large effect on lattice mismatch. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Re exhibited very potent influence on all microstructural parameters was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phase chemistries both varied with temperature and alloy composition. Black

  14. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines.

  15. Alloys developed for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuki, Eddy Agus; Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Muhammad, Fadhli

    2017-01-01

    Alloys used for high temperatures applications require combinations of mechanical strength, microstructural stability and corrosion/oxidation resistance. Nickel base superalloys have been traditionally the prime materials utilized for hot section components of aircraft turbine engines. Nevertheless, due to their limited melting temperatures, alloys based on intermetallic compounds, such as TiAl base alloys, have emerged as high temperature materials and intensively developed with the main aim to replace nickel based superalloys. For applications in steam power plants operated at lower temperatures, ferritic high temperature alloys still attract high attention, and therefore, development of these alloys is in progress. This paper highlights the important metallurgical parameters of high temperature alloys and describes few efforts in the development of Fe-Ni-Al based alloys containing B2-(Fe,Ni)Al precipitates, oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) ferritic steels and titanium aluminide based alloys include important protection system of aluminide coatings.

  16. Effect of Mo on the High-Temperature Creep Resistance and Machinability of a Recycled Al-Alloy with High Iron Impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain, W. Q.; Faisal, M. K.; Talari, M. K.; Darham, W.; Ratnam, M. M.; Kwon, Y.; Kim, N. J.; Prasada Rao, A. K.

    2016-10-01

    Reported work focuses on the effect of morphology of the Fe-rich intermetallic phases on the machinability of Al-alloy containing >2wt.% Fe, obtained from automotive scrap. Effect of Mo addition on the microstructure, high-temperature impression creep and thereby the machinability of the Al-recycled alloy were studied. The machinability of the recycled alloy was estimated by investigating the built-up-edge (BUE) and surface roughness ( R a). SEM-EDS and TEM-SADP studies have shown that the crystal structure (BCC) of the Al8Fe2Si phase remained unchanged; however, Mo replaced few Fe atoms with little effect on the lattice dimension. It has been found that the addition of Mo to the recycled alloy suppresses the formation of β-phase (Al5FeSi) by suppressing the peritectic transformation of α (Al8Fe2Si) phase. Such suppression is found to improve the high-temperature creep resistance and the machinability with the increase in the Mo addition level.

  17. Hot corrosion behavior of low pressure plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY+Ta coatings on nickel base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Frances, M.; Steinmetz, P.; Steinmetz, J.; Duret, C.; Mevrel, R.

    1985-11-01

    The hot corrosion behavior of NiCoCrAlY+Ta coatings obtained by low-pressure plasma spraying has been investigated (type I hot corrosion with T = 850/sup 0/C). These coatings have been deposited on two nickel-base superalloys and on a cast alloy of the same composition as the coating. Comparison of the cyclic oxidation behavior at 850/sup 0/C between the sprayed coating and the cast alloy shows that the sprayed material exhibits a satisfactory and higher resistance than the cast alloy. In the latter case, repeated spalling of the oxide scale results from fractures often associated with Y-rich oxide protrusions. Hot corrosion experiments (salt-spraying test with T = 850/sup 0/C and thermal cycling in air every hour) have been conducted on two cast alloys, NiCoCrAl+Ta and NiCoCrAlY+Ta. The Y-containing alloy has a better corrosion resistance than the other alloy which is subject to extensive oxide spallation. In both cases, morphologies typical of basic fluxing processes, involving Cr, Al, Y, and Ta can be observed in highly attacked zones. Finally, tests on plasma sprayed coatings show a high resistance to hot corrosion of these coatings, regardless of the substrate used: a fine adherent alumina layer is formed, and only a limited fluxing of Cr, Al, and Y takes place. The quite different results obtained on cast and sprayed alloys imply that data relative to cast alloys can be unreliable when one wants to predict high temperature behavior and especially lifetimes of overlay coatings.

  18. Thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelloux, R. M.; Marchand, N.

    1986-01-01

    The main achievements of a 36-month research program are presented. The main objective was to gain more insight into the problem of crack growth under thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. This program was conducted at M.I.T. for the period of September 1982 to September 1985. The program was arranged into five technical tasks. Under Task I, the literature of TMF data was reviewed. The goal was to identify the crack propagation conditions in aircraft engines (hot section) and to assess the validity of conventional fracture mechanics parameters to address TMF crack growth. The second task defined the test facilities, test specimen and the testing conditions needed to establish the effectiveness of data correlation parameters identified in Task I. Three materials (Inconel X-750, Hastelloy-X, and B-1900) were chosen for the program. Task II was accomplished in collaboration with Pratt & Whitney Aircraft engineers. Under Task III, a computerized testing system to measure the TMF behavior (LCF and CG behaviors) of various alloys systems was built. The software used to run isothermal and TMF tests was also developed. Built around a conventional servohydraulic machine, the system is capable of push-pull tests under stress or strain and temperature controlled conditions in the temperature range of 25C to 1050C. A crack propagation test program was defined and conducted under Task IV. The test variables included strain range, strain rate (frequency) and temperature. Task V correlated and generalized the Task IV data for isothermal and variable temperature conditions so that several crack propagation parameters could be compared and evaluated. The structural damage (mode of cracking and dislocation substructure) under TMF cycling was identified and contrasted with the isothermal damage to achieve a sound fundamental mechanistic understanding of TMF.

  19. Alloy 10: A 1300F Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2000-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic transports will probably have higher pressure ratios which will require nickel-base superalloy disks with 13000 to 1400 F temperature capability. Several advanced disk alloys are being developed to fill this need. One of these, Allied Signal's Alloy 10, is a promising candidate for gas turbine engines to be used on smaller, regional aircraft. For this application, compressor/turbine disks must withstand temperatures of 1300 F for several hundred hours over the life of the engine. In this paper, three key properties of Alloy 10--tensile, 0.2% creep, and fatigue crack growth--will be assessed at 1300 F.

  20. Pulsed laser-assisted machining of Inconel 718 superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhdari Tadavani, Soheila; Shoja Razavi, Reza; Vafaei, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-based superalloys including Inconel 718(IN718) are widely used in aerospace industries due to their superior high temperature strength, toughness, and corrosion resistance. These alloys are difficult to machine mainly because of their low thermal conductivity and high work hardening rate, which cause steep temperature gradient and high cutting forces at the tool edge. The application of laser assisted machining is the subject of many new researches since shear forces; surface coarsening and tool wear are reduced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate laser assisted machining behavior of a 718 Inconel superalloy from the view point of machining specific energy, surface roughness, tool wear and chip appearance. Experimental apparatuses used included optical and scanning electron microscopy, spark emission spectroscopy, and EDS analysis. The results indicated that increasing the temperature to about 540 °C just ahead of primary shear zone, can result in 35% reduction of machining specific energy, in comparison with conventional machining. Furthermore, surface coarsening and tool wear were reduced by 22% and 23% respectively. Flank wear was the main deteriorating factor on cutting tools during laser assisted machining. SEM micrographs indicated that increase in temperature has no noticeable effect on finished workpiece surface. Analysis of variance obtained from regression analysis indicated that frequency of laser beam has the most influential effect on temperature. The optimum conditions for laser assisted machining of 718 superalloy is suggested as follows: 80 Hz frequency, 400 W power, 24 m/min cutting speed, and 0.052 mm/rev feed rate along with 540 °C temperature, 2.51 J/mm2 machining specific energy and 130 N cutting force.

  1. Bonding titanium to Rene 41 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pair of intermediate materials joined by electron beam welding method welds titanium to Rene 41 alloy. Bond is necessary for combining into one structure high strength-to-density ratio titanium fan blades and temperature resistant nickel-base alloy turbine-buckets in VTOL aircraft lift-fan rotor.

  2. Microstructure, Mechanical and Wear Behaviors of Hot-Pressed Copper-Nickel-Based Materials for Diamond Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, G.; Ferreira, P.; Buciumeanu, M.; Cabral, A.; Fredel, M.; Silva, F. S.; Henriques, B.

    2017-08-01

    The current trend to replace cobalt in diamond cutting tools (DCT) for stone cutting has motivated the study of alternative materials for this end. The present study characterizes several copper-nickel-based materials (Cu-Ni; Cu-Ni-10Sn, Cu-Ni-15Sn, Cu-Ni-Sn-2WC and Cu-Ni-Sn-10WC) for using as matrix material for diamond cutting tools for stone. Copper-nickel-based materials were produced by hot pressing, at a temperature of 850 °C during 15 min and under an applied pressure of 50 MPa. The mechanical properties were evaluated though the shear strength and hardness values. The microstructures and fracture surfaces were analyzed by SEM. The wear behavior of all specimens was assessed using a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer. The hot pressing produced compacts with good densification. Sn and WC promoted enhanced mechanical properties and wear performance to Cu-Ni alloys. Cu-Ni-10Sn and Cu-Ni-10Sn-2WC displayed the best compromise between mechanical and wear performance.

  3. The effect of tensile stress on hydrogen diffusion in metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of tensile stress on hydrogen diffusion has been determined for Type 303 stainless steel, A286 CRES, and Waspaloy and IN100 nickel-base alloys. It was found that hydrogen diffusion coefficients are not significantly affected by stress, while the hydrogen permeabilities are greatly affected in Type 303 stainless steel and A286 CRES (iron-based alloys), but are affected little in Waspaloy (nickel-base) and not affected in all in IN100 (nickel base). These observations might be taken as an indication that hydrogen permeabilities are affected by stress in iron-based alloys, but only slightly affected in nickel-based alloys. However, it is too early to make such a generalization based on the study of only these four alloys.

  4. Elevated temperature creep-rupture behavior of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy NASAIR 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The creep and rupture behavior of 001-line-oriented single crystals of the nickel-base superalloy NASAIR 100 was investigated at temperatures of 925 and 1000 C. In the stress and temperature ranges studied, the steady state creep rate, time to failure, time to the onset of secondary creep, and the time to the onset of tertiary creep all exhibited power law dependencies on the applied stress. The creep rate exponents for this alloy were between seven and eight, and the modulus-corrected activation energy for creep was approximately 350 kjoule/mole, which was comparable to the measured activation energy for Ostwald ripening of the gamma-prime precipitates. Oriented gamma-prime coarsening to form lamellae perpendicular to the applied stress was very prominent during creep. At 1000 C, the formation of a continuous gamma-gamma-prime lamellar structure was completed during the primary creep stage. Shear through the gamma-gamma-prime interface is considerd to be the rate limiting step in the deformation process. Gradual thickening of the lamellae appeared to be the cause of the onset of tertiary creep. At 925 C, the fully developed lamellar structure was not achieved until the secondary or tertiary creep stages. At this temperature, the gamma-gamma-prime lamellar structure did not appear to be as beneficial for creep resistance as at the higher temperature.

  5. The structure and properties of a nickel-base superalloy produced by osprey atomization-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricknell, Rodger H.

    1986-04-01

    The production of a nickel-base superalloy, René* 80, by the Osprey atomization-deposition process has been investigated. Dense (>99 pct) material with a fine-grained equiaxed microstructure was deposited using either argon or nitrogen as the atomizing gas. Defects present in the material included a chill region at the collector plate interface, entrapped recirculated particles, porosity, and ceramic particles from the melting and dispensing system. In contrast to other rapid solidification techniques, low oxygen pick-ups are noted in the current technique. Tensile strengths above those displayed by castings are found in both nitrogen and argon atomized material, and in both the as-deposited and heat treated conditions. In addition, no profound mid-temperature ductility loss is displayed by this low oxygen material, in contrast to results on other rapidly solidified material with high oxygen contents. These results are explained in terms of oxygen embrittlement. In view of the excellent properties measured, the attractive economics of the process, and the fact that fine control of the gas/metal flow ratio is shown to be unnecessary, it is concluded that atomization-deposition presents an attractive potential production route for advanced alloys.

  6. Effects of composition and testing conditions on oxidation behavior of four cast commercial nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Four cast nickel-base superalloys were oxidized at 1000 and 1100 C for times up to 100 hr in static air and a Mach 1 gas stream. The oxidation resistance was judged by weight change, metal thickness loss, depletion-zone formation, and oxide formation and morphology. The alloys which formed mostly nickel aluminate (NiAl2O4) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) (B-1900, VIA, and to a lesser extent 713C) were more oxidation resistant. Poorer oxidation resistance was associated with the appearance of chromium sesquioxide (Cr2O3) and chromite spinel (738X). Refractory metal content had little effect on oxidation resistance. Refractory metals appeared in the scale as tapiolite (NiM2O6, where M represents the refractory metal). Thermal cycling in static air appeared to supply sufficient data for the evaluation of oxidation resistance, especially for alloys which form oxides of low volatility. For alloys of higher chromium levels with high propensities toward forming a chromium-bearing scale of higher volatility, testing under conditions of high gas velocity is necessary to assess fully the behavior of the alloy.

  7. Interfacial Dislocation Networks and Creep in Directional Coarsened Ru-Containing Nickel-Base Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, L. J.; Feng, Q.; Pollock, T. M.

    2008-06-01

    Mechanisms of creep deformation in nickel-base superalloy single crystals in the directional coarsening regime have been studied in alloys with large variations in γ- γ' lattice misfit and phase composition, achieved by Ru additions and variable levels of Cr and Co. Interfacial dislocation spacings established by long-term annealing experiments under no externally applied stress indicate that the experimental alloys have high-temperature lattice misfits ranging from near-zero to as large as -0.65 pct. Variation in misfit influences the stress-induced directional coarsening (rafting) behavior during creep deformation at 950 °C and 290 MPa. In postcreep deformed material, the density of excess dislocations (defined as the dislocations beyond those necessary to relieve the lattice misfit) at the γ- γ' interfaces varied with alloy composition, with the most creep-resistant alloy containing the highest excess interfacial dislocation density. In the directional coarsening creep regime, continued deformation requires shearing of the γ' rafts and is strongly influenced by the resistance of the precipitates to shearing as well as the interfacial dislocation structure. A preliminary model for creep in the rafting regime is developed.

  8. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of composition on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys was investigated. Co was replaced by Ni, and Ta was replaced by either Ni or W, according to a matrix of compositions based on MAR-M247. Substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in gamma-prime solvus temperature, an increase in gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, and the precipitation of W-rich phases in the alloys with high refractory metal levels. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large decreases in gamma-prime solvus temperature, gamma-prime volume fraction, and gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, whereas substitution of W for Ta resulted in smaller decreases in these features. For the alloys with gamma-prime particles that remained coherent, substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in gamma-prime coarsening rate. The two alloys with the largest magnitude of lattice mismatch possessed gamma-prime particles which lost coherency during unstressed aging and exhibited anomalously low coarsening rates. Creep exposure at 1000 C resulted in the formation of gamma-prime lamellae oriented perpendicular to the applied stress axis in all alloys.

  9. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-10-01

    The influence of composition on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys was investigated. Co was replaced by Ni, and Ta was replaced by either Ni or W, according to a matrix of compositions based on MAR-M247. Substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in γ' solvus temperature, an increase in γ-γ' lattice mismatch, and the precipitation of W-rich phases in the alloys with high refractory metal levels. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large decreases in γ' solvus temperature, γ' volume fraction, and γ-γ' lattice mismatch, whereas substitution of W for Ta resulted in smaller decreases in these features. For the alloys with γ' particles that remained coherent, substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in γ' coarsening rate. The two alloys with the largest magnitude of lattice mismatch possessed γ' particles which lost coherency during unstressed aging and exhibited anomalously low coarsening rates. Creep exposure at 1000 °C resulted in the formation of γ' lamellae oriented perpendicular to the applied stress axis in all alloys.

  10. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of composition on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys was investigated. Co was replaced by Ni, and Ta was replaced by either Ni or W, according to a matrix of compositions based on MAR-M247. Substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in gamma-prime solvus temperature, an increase in gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, and the precipitation of W-rich phases in the alloys with high refractory metal levels. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large decreases in gamma-prime solvus temperature, gamma-prime volume fraction, and gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, whereas substitution of W for Ta resulted in smaller decreases in these features. For the alloys with gamma-prime particles that remained coherent, substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in gamma-prime coarsening rate. The two alloys with the largest magnitude of lattice mismatch possessed gamma-prime particles which lost coherency during unstressed aging and exhibited anomalously low coarsening rates. Creep exposure at 1000 C resulted in the formation of gamma-prime lamellae oriented perpendicular to the applied stress axis in all alloys.

  11. Effect of Thermal Annealing on Machining-Induced Residual Stresses in Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madariaga, A.; Aperribay, J.; Arrazola, P. J.; Esnaola, J. A.; Hormaetxe, E.; Garay, A.; Ostolaza, K.

    2017-08-01

    Nickel-based alloys are widely employed in the manufacturing of aero-engines. These alloys are difficult to machine, and tensile residual stresses are generated during machining. These tensile residual stresses can negatively affect the performance of aero-engine components. Nevertheless, residual stresses can vary due to thermal or mechanical loading. These variations must be considered to evaluate the real influence of residual stresses on component behavior. This paper studies the effect of thermal loads on machining-induced residual stresses in the alloy Inconel 718. A ring-shaped Inconel 718 part was face-turned, and specimens were extracted from it. Specimens were exposed at 550 and 650 °C for 10 min, 1 and 10 h. Residual stresses were measured, and microstructure was observed before and after thermal exposure. Residual stress variations found after thermal exposure were the consequence of two factors: relaxation of strain bands during the early stage of exposure and diffusion-controlled creep. In addition, a modified Zener-Wert-Avrami model is proposed to predict residual stress relaxation caused by the diffusion-controlled creep. Once having fitted the modified Zener-Wert-Avrami model, the study was extended for a wider range of temperatures (400-650 °C). This analysis showed that surface residual stresses do not relax significantly at temperatures below 500 °C.

  12. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Fatigue Failure of Single Crystal Nickel Base Turbine Blade Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2000-01-01

    High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) induced failures in aircraft gas-turbine engines is a pervasive problem affecting a wide range of components and materials. HCF is currently the primary cause of component failures in gas turbine aircraft engines. Turbine blades in high performance aircraft and rocket engines are increasingly being made of single crystal nickel superalloys. Single-crystal Nickel-base superalloys were developed to provide superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys previously used in the production of turbine blades and vanes. Currently the most widely used single crystal turbine blade superalloys are PWA 1480/1493 and PWA 1484. These alloys play an important role in commercial, military and space propulsion systems. PWA1493, identical to PWA1480, but with tighter chemical constituent control, is used in the NASA SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) alternate turbopump, a liquid hydrogen fueled rocket engine. Objectives for this paper are motivated by the need for developing failure criteria and fatigue life evaluation procedures for high temperature single crystal components, using available fatigue data and finite element modeling of turbine blades. Using the FE (finite element) stress analysis results and the fatigue life relations developed, the effect of variation of primary and secondary crystal orientations on life is determined, at critical blade locations. The most advantageous crystal orientation for a given blade design is determined. Results presented demonstrates that control of secondary and primary crystallographic orientation has the potential to optimize blade design by increasing its resistance to fatigue crack growth without adding additional weight or cost.

  13. Microstructural development and segregation effects in directionally solidified nickel-based superalloy PWA 1484

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lichun

    2002-09-01

    These studies were performed to investigate the effects of thermal gradient (G) and growth velocity (V) on the microstructure development and solidification behavior of directionally solidified nickel-based superalloy PWA 1484. Directional solidification (DS) experiments were conducted using a Bridgman crystal growth facility. The solidification velocity ranged from 0.00005 to 0.01 cm/sec and thermal gradients ranged from 12 to 108°C/cm. The as-cast microstructures of DS samples were characterized by using conventional metallography; chemical composition and segregation of directionally solidified samples were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy in SEM. A range of aligned solidification microstructures is exhibited by the alloy when examined as-cast at room temperature: dendrites, flanged cells, cells. The microstructure transitions from cellular to dendritic as the growth velocity increases. The experimental data for PWA1484 exhibits excellent agreement with the well-known exponential equation (lambda1 ∝ G -1/2V-1/4). However, the constant of proportionality is different depending upon the solidification microstructure: (1) dendritic growth with secondary arms leads to a marked dependence of lambda1 on G-1/2 V-1/4; (2) flanged cellular growth with no secondary arms leads to much lower dependence of lambda 1 on G-1/2V -1/4. The primary dendritic arm spacing results were also compared to recent theoretical models. The model of Hunt and Lu and the model of Ma and Sahm provided excellent agreement at medium to high thermal gradients and a wide range of solidification velocities. The anomalous behavior of lambda 1 with high growth velocity V at low G is analyzed based on the samples' microstructures. Off-axis heat flows were shown to cause radial non-uniformity in the dendrite arm spacing data for low thermal gradients and large withdrawal velocities. Various precipitates including gamma', (gamma ' + gamma) eutectic pool or divorced eutectic gamma ', and

  14. Influence of high pressure water-jet-assisted machining on surface residual stresses on the work-piece of Ti-6AL-4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosough, Manouchehr; Svenningsson, Inge

    2005-04-01

    Titanium alloys are used in aerospace industry owing to their high strength to weight ratio. These alloys are considered to be difficult to machine due to their rigidity and poor thermal conductivity. High-pressure jet-assisted machining of titanium alloys is beneficial. It not only increases production efficiency, by increasing the cutting speed and lowering temperature both in cutting zone and the cutting tool, but also improves chip control and increases tool life. It also produces better surface integrity and compress residual stress, which improves the properties of work-piece. Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64) rod was machined by turning in two different manners, finishing and roughing. Tests were conducted on a lathe using the same cutting data and different cooling systems, high pressure and conventional. In order to illustrate the effect of high-pressure jet-assisted machining on the properties of the work-piece of Ti-6Al-4V and its residual stress, x-ray defractometery was used. The present study revealed that there were compressive residual stresses in the transversal and longitudinal directions of the cut and the residual stresses in both directions were nearly of the same magnitude. The depth profile of residual stress was measured as well after removing the material by etching. The shear stress was very low, almost negligible. High pressure cooling affected residual stresses in finishing more than in roughing.

  15. Effects of sigma-phase formation on some mechanical properties of a wrought nickel-base superalloy (IN-100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Ashbrook, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of sigma phase formation on an extruded and forged nickel base superalloy with the composition of the casting alloy IN-100 was studied. By adding only aluminum and titanium to remelt stock, three compositions were produced which had varying propensities for sigma formation. These compositions were given a four step heat treatment and were stress-ruptured or tensile tested. The very sigma prone composition had a shorter rupture life than the sigma-free or moderately sigma prone compositions when tested at 843 and 885 C. Elongation in room temperature tensile tests was considerably lower for the very sigma prone composition than for the other two wrought compositions after prolonged exposure at 732 or 843 C.

  16. The influence of cobalt on the microstructure of the nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Maier, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    Nickel was substituted for Co to produce 0, 5, and the standard 10% versions of MAR-M247, a cast nickel-base superalloy. The microstructures of the alloys were examined in as-cast, heat treated, aged, and stress-rupture tested conditions using a variety of metallographic techniques and differential thermal analysis. As cobalt concentration was reduced from 10 to 0 wt %, the gamma-prime weight fraction decreased from 59 to 41%; W and Ti concentrations in the gamma-prime phase increased from 5 to 8 and 2 to 3 at.%, respectively; the mean gamma-prime particle size increased from 0.6 to 0.8 micron; Cr and Al concentrations in the gamma matrix decreased from 17 to 13 and 15 to 12 at.%, respectively; and the weight fraction of carbides increased by approximately 1%.

  17. Polycrystal plasticity modeling of nickel-based superalloy IN 617 subjected to cyclic loading at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Oskay, Caglar

    2016-06-01

    A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model considering isothermal, large deformation and cyclic loading conditions has been formulated and employed to investigate the mechanical response of a nickel-based alloy at high temperature. The investigations focus on fatigue and creep-fatigue hysteresis response of IN 617 subjected to fatigue and creep-fatigue cycles. A new slip resistance evolution equation is proposed to account for cyclic transient features induced by solute drag creep that occur in IN 617 at 950 °C. The crystal plasticity model parameters are calibrated against the experimental fatigue and creep-fatigue data based on an optimization procedure that relies on a surrogate modeling (i.e. Gaussian process) technique to accelerate multi-parameter optimizations. The model predictions are validated against experimental data, which demonstrates the capability of the proposed model in capturing the hysteresis behavior for various hold times and strain ranges in the context of fatigue and creep-fatigue loading.

  18. The Influence of Cobalt on the Microstructure of the Nickel-Base Superalloy MAR-M247

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Maier, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1982-10-01

    The influence of cobalt on the microstructure of MAR-M247, a cast nickel-base superalloy, was investigated. Nickel was substituted for Co to produce 0, 5, and the standard 10 pct Co versions of MAR-M247. The microstructures of the alloys were examined using optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, phase extraction, and differential thermal analysis. Samples were examined in as-cast, heat treated, long-time aged, and stress-rupture tested conditions. As Co was removed from MAR-M247, the γ' volume fraction decreased, the mean γ' particle size increased, the W and Ti concentrations in the γ' increased, the Cr and Al concentrations in the γ phase decreased, and the amount of carbides increased. This increase in carbide precipitation caused a change from discrete grain boundary carbides to a grain boundary film as Co level decreased.

  19. The influence of cobalt on the microstructure of the nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Maier, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    Nickel was substituted for Co to produce 0, 5, and the standard 10% versions of MAR-M247, a cast nickel-base superalloy. The microstructures of the alloys were examined in as-cast, heat treated, aged, and stress-rupture tested conditions using a variety of metallographic techniques and differential thermal analysis. As cobalt concentration was reduced from 10 to 0 wt %, the gamma-prime weight fraction decreased from 59 to 41%; W and Ti concentrations in the gamma-prime phase increased from 5 to 8 and 2 to 3 at.%, respectively; the mean gamma-prime particle size increased from 0.6 to 0.8 micron; Cr and Al concentrations in the gamma matrix decreased from 17 to 13 and 15 to 12 at.%, respectively; and the weight fraction of carbides increased by approximately 1%.

  20. Hot corrosion studies of four nickel-base superalloys: B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C and IN738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel base superalloys has been studied at 900 deg and 1000 deg C in one atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen. Hot corrosion was induced by coating the samples with known doses of NaSO4 and oxidizing the coated samples isothermally on a sensitive microbalance. In general, the order of susceptibility found was: B-1900 is greater than 713C is greater than NASA-TRW VIA and is greater than IN738. This order corresponds to the order of decreasing molybdenum content of the alloys. Chemical evidence for B-1900 indicates that hot corrosion is instigated by acid fluxing of the protective Al2O3 coating by MoO3.

  1. Effects of silicon on the oxidation, hot-corrosion, and mechanical behavior of two cast nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Cast specimens of nickel-base superalloys 713C and Mar-M200 with nominal additions of 0, 0.5, and 1 wt% Si were evaluated for oxidation and corrosion resistance, tensile and stress-rupture properties, microstructure, and phase relations. Results are compared with those of an earlier study of the effects of Si in B-1900. Si had similar effects on all three superalloys. It improves oxidation resistance but the improvement in 713C and Mar-M200 was considerably less than in B-1900. Hot-corrosion resistance is also improved somewhat. Si is, however, detrimental to mechanical properties, in particular, rupture strength and tensile ductility. Si has two obvious microstructural effects. It increases the amount of gamma-prime precipitated in eutectic nodules and promotes a Mo(Ni,Si)2 Laves phase in the alloys containing Mo. These microstructural effects do not appear responsible for the degradation of mechanical properties, however.

  2. Evaluation of high-temperature behavior of CMSX4 + yttrium single-crystal nickel-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Marchionni, M.; Maldini, M. ); Goldschmidt, D. )

    1993-08-01

    CMSX4 + Y, a highly strengthened rhenium-containing second-generation single-crystal nickel-base superalloy, has been studied by creep, low-cycle, and thermomechanical fatigue in the temperature range 500 to 1,100 C. The alloy exhibits good high-temperature mechanical properties that are superior or comparable to other single-crystal superalloys. Thermomechanical fatigue resistance is equivalent to low-cycle fatigue and is cycle-shape dependent. High-temperature mechanical properties have been studied using life prediction relationships that are frequently used for creep and low-cycle fatigue data evaluation. Examination of fracture surfaces revealed that fracture induced by creep damage is internal and starts from pore-initiated cracks; however, fatigue damage starts on the external surface and propagates inward in stage 2 mode.

  3. Effects of silicon on the oxidation, hot-corrosion, and mechanical behavior of two cast nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Cast specimens of nickel-base superalloys 713C and Mar-M200 with nominal additions of 0, 0.5, and 1 wt% Si were evaluated for oxidation and corrosion resistance, tensile and stress-rupture properties, microstructure, and phase relations. Results are compared with those of an earlier study of the effects of Si in B-1900. Si had similar effects on all three superalloys. It improves oxidation resistance but the improvement in 713C and Mar-M200 was considerably less than in B-1900. Hot-corrosion resistance is also improved somewhat. Si is, however, detrimental to mechanical properties, in particular, rupture strength and tensile ductility. Si has two obvious microstructural effects. It increases the amount of gamma-prime precipitated in eutectic nodules and promotes a Mo(Ni,Si)2 Laves phase in the alloys containing Mo. These microstructural effects do not appear responsible for the degradation of mechanical properties, however.

  4. Microstructural Analysis of Machined Surface Integrity in Drilling a Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varote, Nilesh; Joshi, Suhas S.

    2017-08-01

    Severe mechanical deformation coupled with high heat generation prevails during drilling. Establishing correlations between microstructure and surface integrity has always been a challenge, which is the main focus of this work. High-speed drilling experiments were performed by varying speed, feed rate and machining environments (dry and wet). The changes in microhardness, residual stresses and microstructure on the drilled surfaces were analyzed. A dominant mechanical deformation is found to lower grain size and increase grain boundary misorientation angle, whereas under a dominant thermal deformation higher grain size and lower grain boundary misorientation angle was evident. In dry drilling, a combined effect of temperature and mechanical deformation, the deformed and then recrystallized grains are observed to have < {0001} > orientation. The drilling parameters that increase strain rate aggravate machining-affected zone, whereas heat accumulation increases heat-affected zone, only in dry drilling. An empirical model for predicting grain size has been developed.

  5. Static Electropulsing-Induced Microstructural Changes and Their Effect on the Ultra-Precision Machining of Cold-Rolled AZ91 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duo; To, Suet; Zhu, Yao Hua; Wang, Hao; Tang, Guo Yi

    2012-04-01

    The effects of electropulsing on the phase transformations of a cold-rolled Mg-9Al-1Zn alloy were studied using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and optical microscopy techniques. The results indicated that with increasing frequency of electropulsing, the decomposition and precipitation of β phase were tremendously accelerated sequentially. Electropulsing accelerated the decomposition of β phase by a factor of approximately 3600 times. The effects of the electropulsing-induced microstructural changes on machinability of the alloy, by single-point diamond turning, was discussed.

  6. A study of reduced chromium content in a nickel-base superalloy via element substitution and rapid solidification processing. Ph.D. ThesisFinal Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, William O.

    1987-01-01

    A study of reduced chromium content in a nickel base superalloy via element substitution and rapid solidification processing was performed. The two elements used as partial substitutes for chromium were Si and Zr. The microstructure of conventionally solidified materials was characterized using microscopy techniques. These alloys were rapidly solidified using the chill block melt spinning technique and the rapidly solidified microstructures were characterized using electron microscopy. The spinning technique and the rapidly solidified microstructures was assessed following heat treatments at 1033 and 1272 K. Rapidly solidified material of three alloys was reduced to particulate form and consolidated using hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The consolidated materials were also characterized using microscopy techniques. In order to evaluate the relative strengths of the consolidated alloys, compression tests were performed at room temperature and 1033 K on samples of as-HIPed and HIPed plus solution treated material. Yield strength, porosity, and oxidation resistance characteristics are given and compared.

  7. A study of reduced chromium content in a nickel-base superalloy via element substitution and rapid solidification processing. Ph.D. ThesisFinal Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, William O.

    1987-01-01

    A study of reduced chromium content in a nickel base superalloy via element substitution and rapid solidification processing was performed. The two elements used as partial substitutes for chromium were Si and Zr. The microstructure of conventionally solidified materials was characterized using microscopy techniques. These alloys were rapidly solidified using the chill block melt spinning technique and the rapidly solidified microstructures were characterized using electron microscopy. The spinning technique and the rapidly solidified microstructures was assessed following heat treatments at 1033 and 1272 K. Rapidly solidified material of three alloys was reduced to particulate form and consolidated using hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The consolidated materials were also characterized using microscopy techniques. In order to evaluate the relative strengths of the consolidated alloys, compression tests were performed at room temperature and 1033 K on samples of as-HIPed and HIPed plus solution treated material. Yield strength, porosity, and oxidation resistance characteristics are given and compared.

  8. Effect of minor carbon additions on the high-temperature creep behavior of a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. Wang, D.; Liu, T.; Li, X.W.; Jiang, W.G.; Zhang, G.; Lou, L.H.

    2015-06-15

    Different amounts of carbon were added to a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy. The microstructural evolution of these alloys before and after high-temperature creep tests was investigated by employing scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Upon increasing the carbon contents, the volume fraction and diameter of the carbides increased gradually: however, the creep lives of the alloys increased slightly at first and subsequently decreased. The formation of second-phase particles, such as the nano-sized M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, blocky and needle-shaped μ phase, was observed in the creep samples, which was closely related to the high-temperature creep behaviors. - Highlights: • Creep behaviors of alloys with different amounts of carbon were investigated. • The creep rupture lives increased and later decreased with more carbon. • Second-phase particles were responsible for the different creep behaviors.

  9. Bithermal fatigue of a nickel-base superalloy single crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    The thermomechanical fatigue behavior of a nickel-base superalloy single crystal was investigated using a bithermal test technique. The bithermal fatigue test was used as a simple alternative to the more complex thermomechanical fatigue test. Both in-phase and out-of-phase bithermal tests were performed on (100)-oriented coated and bare Rene N4 single crystals. In out-of-plane bithermal tests, the tensile and compressive halves of the cycle were applied isothermally at 760 and 982 C, respectively, while for the in-phase bithermal tests the temperature-loading sequence was reversed. The bithermal fatigue lives of bare specimens were shorter than the isothermal fatigue lives at either temperature extreme when compared on an inelastic strain basis. Both in-phase and out-of-phase bithermal fatigue life curves converged in the large strain regime and diverged in the small strain regime, out-of-phase resulting in the shortest lives. The coating had no effect on life for specimens cycled in-phase; however, the coating was detrimental for isothermal fatigue at 760 C and for out-of-phase fatigue under large strains.

  10. Anisotropy of nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Maier, R. D.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of crystal orientation on the mechanical properties of single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M247 are investigated. Tensile tests at temperatures from 23 to 1093 C and stress rupture tests at temperatures from 760 to 1038 C were performed for 52 single crystals at various orientations. During tensile testing between 23 and 760 C, single crystals with high Schmid factors were found to be favorably oriented for slip and to exhibit lower strength and higher ductility than those with low Schmid factors. Crystals which required large rotations to become oriented for cross slip were observed to have the shortest stress rupture lives at 760 C, while those which required little or no rotation had the longest lives. In addition, stereographic triangles obtained for Mar-M247 and Mar-M200 single crystals reveal that crystals with orientations near the -111 had the highest lives, those near the 001 had high lives, and those near the 011 had low lives.

  11. Anisotropy of nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Maier, R. D.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of crystal orientation on the mechanical properties of single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M247 are investigated. Tensile tests at temperatures from 23 to 1093 C and stress rupture tests at temperatures from 760 to 1038 C were performed for 52 single crystals at various orientations. During tensile testing between 23 and 760 C, single crystals with high Schmid factors were found to be favorably oriented for slip and to exhibit lower strength and higher ductility than those with low Schmid factors. Crystals which required large rotations to become oriented for cross slip were observed to have the shortest stress rupture lives at 760 C, while those which required little or no rotation had the longest lives. In addition, stereographic triangles obtained for Mar-M247 and Mar-M200 single crystals reveal that crystals with orientations near the -111 had the highest lives, those near the 001 had high lives, and those near the 011 had low lives.

  12. On thermal fatigue of nickel-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Olbersleben, F.; Engler-Pinto, C.C. Jr.; Rezaie-Aria, F.

    1996-12-31

    The thermal fatigue (TF) behavior of two single crystal nickel-based superalloys, SRR99 and CMSX-4, is reported. Single edge wedge specimens are rapidly heated by induction heating of the wedge tip to a maximum temperature between 1,000 C and 1,175 C and cooled to 200 C by forced air. A constant cycle period is employed for all experiments. The strain distribution along the edge of the TF specimens is measured. Changing the induction frequency leads to different strain ranges. CMSX-4 shows crack initiation always on cast microporosities. SRR99 presents an additional oxidation/spalling/re-oxidation mechanism under low strain loading. An integrated approach combining TF and TMF (thermo-mechanical fatigue) is proposed. The applied TMF temperature-strain cycle is deduced from the measured TF-cycle. Under this new temperature-strain cycle the crack initiation life and the total life in TMF for SRR99 are compared with the TF results.

  13. Deformation Twin Nucleation and Growth Characterization in Magnesium Alloys Using Novel EBSD Pattern Analysis and Machine Learning Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampton, Travis M.

    Deformation twinning in Magnesium alloys both facilitates slip and forms sites for failure. Currently, basic studies of twinning in Mg are facilitated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) which is able to extract a myriad of information relating to crystalline microstructures. Although much information is available via EBSD, various problems relating to deformation twinning have not been solved. This dissertation provides new insights into deformation twinning in Mg alloys, with particular focus on AZ31. These insights were gained through the development of new EBSD and related machine learning tools that extract more information beyond what is currently accessed. The first tool relating to characterization of deformed and twinned materials focuses on surface topography crack detection. The intensity map across EBSD images contains vital information that can be used to detect evolution of surface roughness and crack formation, which typically occurs at twin boundaries. The method of topography recovery resulted in reconstruction errors as low as 2% over a 500 microm length. The method was then applied to a 3 microm x 3 microm area of twinned Tantalum which experienced topographic alterations. The topography of Ta correlated with other measured changes in the microstructure. Additionally, EBSD images were used to identify the presence of cracks in Nickel microstructures. Several cracks were identified on the Ni specimen, demonstrating that cracks as thin as 34 nm could be measured. A further EBSD based tool developed for this study was used to identify thin compression twins in Mg; these are often missed in a traditional EBSD scan due to their size relative to the electron probe. This tool takes advantage of crystallographic relationships that exist between parent and twinned grains; common planes that exist in both grains lead to bands of consistent intensity as a scan crosses a twin. Hence, twin boundaries in a microstructure can be recognized, even when

  14. The fracture morphology of nickel-base superalloys tested in fatigue and creep-fatigue at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of compact tension specimens from seven nickel-base superalloys fatigue tested at 650 C were studied by scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography to determine the nature and morphology of the crack surface in the region of stable growth. Crack propagation testing was performed as part of an earlier study at 650 C in air using a 0.33 Hz fatigue cycle and a creep-fatigue cycle incorporating a 900 second dwell at maximum load. In fatigue, alloys with a grain size greater than 20 micrometers, HIP Astroloy, Waspaloy, and MERL 76, exhibited transgranular fracture. MERL 76 also displayed numerous fracture sites which were associated with boundaries of prior powder particles. The two high strength, fine grain alloys, IN 100 and NASA IIB-7, exhibited intergranular fracture. Rene 95 and HIP plus forged Astroloy displayed a mixed failure mode that was transgranular in the coarse grains and intergranular in the fine grains. Under creep-fatigue conditions, fracture was found to be predominantly intergranular in all seven alloys.

  15. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the elevated temperature mechanical properties of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of composition on the tensile and creep strength of 001-line oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals at temperatures near 1000 C was investigated. Cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten concentrations were varied according to a matrix of compositions based on the single crystal version of MAR-M247. For alloys with the baseline refractory metal level of 3 wt pct Ta and 10 wt pct W, decreases in Co level from 10 to 0 wt pct resulted in increased tensile and creep strength. Substitution of 2 wt pct W for 3 wt pct Ta resulted in decreased creep life at high stresses, but improved life at low stresses. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large reductions in tensile strength and creep resistance, and corresponding increases in ductility. For these alloys with low Ta-plus-W totals, strength was independent of Co level. The effects of composition on properties were related to the microstructural features of the alloys. In general, high creep strength was associated with high levels of gamma-prime volume fraction, gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, and solid solution hardening.

  16. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the elevated temperature mechanical properties of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-10-01

    The influence of composition on the tensile and creep strength of [001] oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals at temperatures near 1000 °C was investigated. Cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten concentrations were varied according to a matrix of compositions based on the single crystal version of MAR-M247.* For alloys with the baseline refractory metal level of 3 wt pct Ta and 10 wt pct W, decreases in Co level from 10 to 0 wt pct resulted in increased tensile and creep strength. Substitution of 2 wt pct W for 3 wt pct Ta resulted in decreased creep life at high stresses, but improved life at low stresses. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large reductions in tensile strength and creep resistance, and corresponding increases in ductility. For these alloys with low Ta plus W totals, strength was independent of Co level. The effects of composition on properties were related to the microstructural features of the alloys. In general, high creep strength was associated with high levels of γ' volume fraction, γ-γ' lattice mismatch, and solid solution hardening.

  17. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the elevated temperature mechanical properties of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of composition on the tensile and creep strength of 001-line oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals at temperatures near 1000 C was investigated. Cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten concentrations were varied according to a matrix of compositions based on the single crystal version of MAR-M247. For alloys with the baseline refractory metal level of 3 wt pct Ta and 10 wt pct W, decreases in Co level from 10 to 0 wt pct resulted in increased tensile and creep strength. Substitution of 2 wt pct W for 3 wt pct Ta resulted in decreased creep life at high stresses, but improved life at low stresses. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large reductions in tensile strength and creep resistance, and corresponding increases in ductility. For these alloys with low Ta-plus-W totals, strength was independent of Co level. The effects of composition on properties were related to the microstructural features of the alloys. In general, high creep strength was associated with high levels of gamma-prime volume fraction, gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, and solid solution hardening.

  18. Application of electrochemical techniques for machining titanium aluminide-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Su, W; Alman, David E.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    1997-01-01

    Intermetallic materials with excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation have been considered as potential replacements for superalloys used as aerospace materials. Titanium aluminides are especially attractive for this role. However, further commercialization of titanium aluminides requires the development of non-conventional machining, such as electrochemical machining (ECM). As a first attempt in the development of the ECM process, the corrosion behavior of arc-melted gamma TiAl and alpha 2 Ti3Al was investigated along with pure titanium and aluminum in deaerated and non-deaerated solutions of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, and sodium hydroxide. Two types of electrochemical experiments were carried out, namely, potentiodynamic and potentiostatic. In the Na2SO4 solution, the highest current was found for Al and the lowest for TiAl. The shape of the polarization curves indicates that the intermetallics show similar behavior to that of Ti. It has been found that, in sulfuric acid, current values decrease with increasing titanium content. In the sodium sulfate and sodium hydroxide solutions, current values initially decrease with increasing titanium content and remain unchanged for higher concentrations of titanium.

  19. Effect of Abrasive Machining on the Electrical Properties Cu86Mn12Ni2 Alloy Shunts

    PubMed Central

    Misti, Siti Nabilah; Bell, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of abrasive trimming on the electrical properties of Cu86Mn12Ni2 Manganin alloy shunt resistors. A precision abrasive trimming system for fine tuning the resistance tolerance of high current Manganin shunt resistors is proposed. The system is shown to be capable of reducing the resistance tolerance of 100 μΩ shunts from their standard value of ±5% to <±1% by removing controlled amounts of Manganin material using a square cut trim geometry. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), high current, and high temperature performance of the trimmed shunts was compared to that of untrimmed parts to determine if trimming had any detrimental effect on these key electrical performance parameters of the device. It was shown that the TCR value was reduced following trimming with typical results of +106 ppm/°C and +93 ppm/°C for untrimmed and trimmed parts respectively. When subjected to a high current of 200 A the trimmed parts showed a slight increase in temperature rise to 203 °C, as compared to 194 °C for the untrimmed parts, but both had significant temporary increases in resistance of up to 1.3 μΩ. The results for resistance change following high temperature storage at 200 °C for 168 h were also significant for both untrimmed and trimmed parts with shifts of 1.85% and 2.29% respectively and these results were related to surface oxidation of the Manganin alloy which was accelerated for the freshly exposed surfaces of the trimmed part. PMID:28773236

  20. Effect of Abrasive Machining on the Electrical Properties Cu86Mn12Ni₂ Alloy Shunts.

    PubMed

    Misti, Siti Nabilah; Birkett, Martin; Penlington, Roger; Bell, David

    2017-07-29

    This paper studies the effect of abrasive trimming on the electrical properties of Cu86Mn12Ni₂ Manganin alloy shunt resistors. A precision abrasive trimming system for fine tuning the resistance tolerance of high current Manganin shunt resistors is proposed. The system is shown to be capable of reducing the resistance tolerance of 100 μΩ shunts from their standard value of ±5% to <±1% by removing controlled amounts of Manganin material using a square cut trim geometry. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), high current, and high temperature performance of the trimmed shunts was compared to that of untrimmed parts to determine if trimming had any detrimental effect on these key electrical performance parameters of the device. It was shown that the TCR value was reduced following trimming with typical results of +106 ppm/°C and +93 ppm/°C for untrimmed and trimmed parts respectively. When subjected to a high current of 200 A the trimmed parts showed a slight increase in temperature rise to 203 °C, as compared to 194 °C for the untrimmed parts, but both had significant temporary increases in resistance of up to 1.3 μΩ. The results for resistance change following high temperature storage at 200 °C for 168 h were also significant for both untrimmed and trimmed parts with shifts of 1.85% and 2.29% respectively and these results were related to surface oxidation of the Manganin alloy which was accelerated for the freshly exposed surfaces of the trimmed part.

  1. Fatigue Characterization of Alloy 10: a 1300F Disk Alloy for Small Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2000-01-01

    A detailed fatigue characterization of Alloy 10, a high strength nickel-based disk alloy, was conducted on test coupons machined from a 'pancake' forging. Smooth bar, strain controlled fatigue testing at various R-ratios was run at representative bore, 750 F, and rim, 1300 F, temperatures. This was followed by notch fatigue testing (Kt=2) run under load control. Analysis of the fatigue data using a Smith-Watson-Topper approach and finite element analysis of the notch root was employed to understand material behavior in these tests. Smooth bar fatigue data showed a significant R-ratio dependence at either test temperature which could be accounted for using a Smith-Watson-Topper parameter (SWT). In general, fatigue life was longer at 750 F than 1300 F for a given SWT. For notch fatigue tests, life was longer at 750 F than 1300 F but only at higher stresses. This was attributed to differences in alloy strength. At lower stresses, finite element analysis suggested that convergence of fatigue life at both temperatures resulted from relaxation of stresses at the notch root in the 1300 F tests.

  2. Experimental Investigation and Optimization of Cutting Parameters in Machining of Ti6Al4V Alloy by an MT-CVD Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V. S. S.; Ezilarasan, C.; Kumaran, S. S.

    2013-04-01

    Titanium alloys find wide applications in aerospace, defence, and surgical industries due to their unique high strength- to- weight ratio which is maintained even at high temperatures and also their exceptional corrosion resistance. The machining of these materials is a thermally dominant process. At high temperature, they become chemically active and tend to react with tool materials. In the present study an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of cutting parameters (cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut) on surface roughness in turning a Ti6Al4V Titanium alloy with a medium temperature chemical vapor deposition tool insert. Experiments have been conducted using Taguchi's experimental design technique. Optimum cutting parameters for minimizing surface roughness have been determined by using the desirability function based approach. A second order model has been established between the cutting parameters and the surface roughness, using the response surface methodology. Predicted values and measured values fairly tally and it indicates that the developed model can be effectively used to predict the surface roughness in the machining of Ti6Al4V Titanium alloy. Experimental results reveal that among the cutting parameters, the feed rate is the most significant machining parameter for surface roughness, followed by depth of cut and cutting speed.

  3. On the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tool for the effective machining of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Rao, Balkrishna C.

    2017-01-01

    This work is focused on the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tungsten carbide tool for machining titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. A hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique was used to synthesize diamond films on tungsten carbide tools. A boron-doped diamond interlayer was added to a microcrystalline diamond layer in an attempt to improve the interface adhesion strength. The dual-layered diamond-coated tool was employed in machining at cutting speeds in the range of 70 to 150 m min-1 with a lower feed and a lower depth of cut of 0.5 mm rev-1 and 0.5 mm, respectively, to operate in the transition from adhesion- to diffusion-tool-wear and thereby arrive at suitable conditions for enhancing tool life. The proposed tool was then compared, on the basis of performance under real-time cutting conditions, with commercially available microcrystalline diamond, nanocrystalline diamond, titanium nitride and uncoated tungsten carbide tools. The life and surface finish of the proposed dual-layered tool and uncoated tungsten carbide were also investigated in interrupted cutting such as milling. The results of this study show a significant improvement in tool life and finish of Ti-6Al-4V parts machined with the dual-layered diamond-coated tool when compared with its uncoated counterpart. These results pave the way for the use of a low-cost tool, with respect to, polycrystalline diamond for enhancing both tool life and machining productivity in critical sectors fabricating parts out of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The application of this coating technology can also be extended to the machining of non-ferrous alloys owing to its better adhesion strength.

  4. Choosing An Alloy For Automotive Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes study of chemical compositions and microstructures of alloys for automotive Stirling engines. Engines offer advantages of high efficiency, low pollution, low noise, and ability to use variety of fuels. Twenty alloys evaluated for resistance to corrosion permeation by hydrogen, and high temperature. Iron-based alloys considered primary candidates because of low cost. Nickel-based alloys second choice in case suitable iron-based alloy could not be found. Cobalt-based alloy included for comparison but not candidate, because it is expensive strategic material.

  5. Surface treatment by electric discharge machining of Ti-6Al-4V alloy for potential application in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Harcuba, Petr; Bačáková, Lucie; Stráský, Josef; Bačáková, Markéta; Novotná, Katarína; Janeček, Miloš

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy after surface treatment by the electric discharge machining (EDM) process. The EDM process with high peak currents proved to induce surface macro-roughness and to cause chemical changes to the surface. Evaluations were made of the mechanical properties by means of tensile tests, and of surface roughness for different peak currents of the EDM process. The EDM process with peak current of 29 A was found to induce sufficient surface roughness, and to have a low adverse effect on tensile properties. The chemical changes were studied by scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyser (EDX). The surface of the benchmark samples was obtained by plasma-spraying a titanium dioxide coating. An investigation of the biocompatibility of the surface-treated Ti-6Al-4V samples in cultures of human osteoblast-like MG 63 cells revealed that the samples modified by EDM provided better substrates for the adhesion, growth and viability of MG 63 cells than the TiO2 coated surface. Thus, EDM treatment can be considered as a promising surface modification to orthopaedic implants, in which good integration with the surrounding bone tissue is required.

  6. Metallic materials for structural applications beyond nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmaier, M.; Krüger, M.; Saage, H.; Rösler, J.; Mukherji, D.; Glatzel, U.; Völkl, R.; Hüttner, R.; Eggeler, G.; Somsen, Ch.; Depka, T.; Christ, H.-J.; Gorr, B.; Burk, S.

    2009-07-01

    This paper reviews our current research activities on developing new multiphase metallic materials for structural applications with a temperature capability beyond 1,200°C. Two promising material systems have been chosen: first, alloys in the system Mo-Si-B which have demonstrated potential due to their high melting point of around 2,000°C and due to the formation of a protecting borosilicate glass layer on the surface at temperatures exceeding 900°C; and second, novel Co-Re-based alloys which have been chosen as a model system for complete miscibility between the elements cobalt and rhenium, offering the possibility of continuous increases of the melting point of the alloy through rhenium additions.

  7. Very high cycle fatigue behavior of nickel-based superalloy Rene 88 DT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jiashi

    The fatigue behavior of the polycrystalline nickel-based superalloy Rene 88 DT has been investigated at 593°C up to the very high cycle fatigue regime using ultrasonic fatigue techniques. Conventional damage tolerant methods failed to predict the fatigue life nor the large fatigue life viability of two orders of magnitude observed in the very high cycle regime. Fatigue crack initiation rather than fatigue crack growth is the life determining process in this alloy in the very high cycle regime. At 593°C, all fatigue failures have subsurface origins. Most fatigue crack initiation sites consist of a large crystallographic facet or a cluster of several large crystallographic facets. By combining electron backscatter diffraction, metallographic serial sectioning and SEM-stereo-image-based quantitative fractographic analysis, critical microstructure features associated with subsurface crystallographic fatigue crack initiation were identified. Subsurface fatigue cracks formed by the localization of cyclic plastic deformation on {111} slip planes in the region close to and parallel to twin boundaries in favorably oriented large grains. The facet plane in the crack initiation grain is parallel to the slip plane with the highest resolved shear stresses. Analytical calculations show that twin boundary elastic incompatibility stresses contribute to the onset of cyclic plastic strain localization in the fatigue crack initiation grains. Favorably oriented neighbor grains also can assist with fatigue crack initiation and especially early small crack propagation. Environment may play an important role in the shift of fatigue crack initiation sites from surface to subsurface at elevated temperature. The fatigue behavior of Rene 88 DT was also investigated under fully reversed loading at room temperature using ultrasonic fatigue techniques. Cyclic plastic strain localization and microcrack formation on specimen surfaces were quantitatively studied by EBSD. All microcracks examined

  8. Derivation of Process Path Functions in Machining of Al Alloy 7075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabei, A.; Shih, D. S.; Garmestani, H.; Liang, S. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of micro-texture below the machined surface is computationally modeled and experimentally verified. The orientation distribution functions of the grains below the surface were represented in spectral form. The microstructure descriptor coefficients were derived, and their change with respect to the change in the cutting feed rate was computationally calculated and monitored. Micro-texture experimental observations conducted by electron back-scatter diffraction technique verify the modeling outputs. Continuation of changing the process parameter was done by finite element method, and the evolution in texture was investigated by computational modeling. The process path function which correlates micro-texture evolution and cutting feed rate, was obtained by applying the principle of orientation conservation in the Euler space. As a result of the major finding of this work, i.e., derivation of process path functions, the evolution of texture as a function of the material feed rate is numerically determined without any need to texture modeling or finite element analyses.

  9. Corrosion of selected metal alloys in Utah geothermal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Y.K.; Pitt, C.H.

    1983-09-01

    A potentiodynamic polarization technique has been applied to characterize the corrosion behavior of AISI 316L stainless steel, an iron-based alloy (9Cr-1Mo), a nickel-based alloy (INCONEL/SUP R/ alloy 625), and mild steel ASTM A-36. Corrosion rate was affected greatly by temperature. The pitting potentials decreased with increasing temperature. The nickel-based alloywas resistant to the geothermal water and did not undergo pitting corrosion. All measurements of corrosion--corrosion rate, pit density, maximum pit depth, charge consumed, and polarization resistance--corroborate the decrease in corrosion rate at tested temperatures.

  10. Metal dusting behavior of high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.

    1999-11-01

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic, stainless steel, iron-nickel-chromium and nickel-base alloys was investigated in H{sub 2}-80 % CO at 621 C. Mass change and rate of mass loss, pit depth progression rate and pit distribution were monitored and recorded. It was found that wastage rates and pit depth progression rates were generally much lower for nickel-base alloys than iron-base alloys. Pit depth did not necessarily correlate with area averaged mass change rate, Chromium, silicon and aluminum additions were found to be beneficial in producing an oxide scale which reduced or prevented wastage due to metal dusting.

  11. An investigation of the initiation stage of hot corrosion in Ni-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. T.; Meier, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The commercial nickel base alloy, IN-738, and high purity laboratory alloys were prepared to simulate the effects of the major elements in IN-738. Results indicate that the initiation of hot corrosion attack of IN-738 and other similar alloys is the result of local penetration of molten salt through the protective oxide scale.

  12. High-temperature cyclic oxidation data. Part 2: Turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.

    1989-01-01

    Specific-weight-change-versus-time data and x ray diffraction results are presented derived from high temperature cyclic tests on high temperature, high strength nickel-base gamma/gamma prime and cobalt-base turbine alloys. Each page of data summarizes a complete test on a given alloy sample.

  13. High temperature cyclic oxidation data. Part 1: Turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.; Lowell, Carl E.

    1989-01-01

    Specific-weight-change-versus-time data and x ray diffraction results are presented derived from high temperature cyclic tests on high temperature, high strength nickel-base gamma/gamma prime and cobalt-base turbine alloys. Each page of data summarizes a complete test on a given alloy sample.

  14. Microstructure and deformation behavior of nickel based superalloy Inconel 740 prepared by electron beam smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Yi You, Xiaogang; You, Qifan; Li, Jiayan; Shi, Shuang; Li, Pengting

    2016-04-15

    activation energy Q. The EBS technology shows encouraging potential in preparation of nickel-based superalloys. Morphologies of γ′ precipitates and Vickers hardness as well as hot compression curves for electron beam smelting 740 superalloy. - Highlights: • Electron beam smelting, a novel method, was used to prepare the Inconel 740 superalloy. • The average size of the γ′ precipitates after aging treatment is < 30 nm. • The shearing mode generates a stronger strengthening effect than the traditional 740. • At low Zener-Hollomon parameter, the EBS 740 shows higher flow stress than 740H.

  15. Preferred growth orientation and microsegregation behaviors of eutectic in a nickel-based single-crystal superalloy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dexin; Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A nickel-based single-crystal superalloy was employed to investigate the preferred growth orientation behavior of the (γ + γ′) eutectic and the effect of these orientations on the segregation behavior. A novel solidification model for the eutectic island was proposed. At the beginning of the eutectic island’s crystallization, the core directly formed from the liquid by the eutectic reaction, and then preferably grew along [100] direction. The crystallization of the eutectic along [110] always lagged behind that in [100] direction. The eutectic growth in [100] direction terminated on impinging the edge of the dendrites or another eutectic island. The end of the eutectic island’s solidification terminates due to the encroachment of the eutectic liquid/solid interface at the dendrites or another eutectic island in [110] direction. The distribution of the alloying elements depended on the crystalline axis. The degree of the alloying elements’ segregation was lower along [100] than [110] direction with increasing distance from the eutectic island’s center. PMID:27877773

  16. Coarsening Kinetics of gamma-prime Precipitates in the Commercial Nickel Base Superalloy Rene88DT (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2009-4211 COARSENING KINETICS OF γ’ PRECIPITATES IN THE COMMERCIAL NICKEL BASE SUPERALLOY RENE88DT (PREPRINT) J. Tiley, G.B...IN THE COMMERCIAL NICKEL BASE SUPERALLOY RENE88DT (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F...between the analytically derived and experimentally observed values, of these rate constants. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Rene88DT, nickel base superalloy

  17. Susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel-base superalloys, NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C and IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel-base, cast superalloys has been studied at 900 and 1000 C. The test consisted of coating alloy samples with known amounts of Na2SO4 and oxidizing the coated samples isothermally in 1 atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen, the weight-gain being monitored on a sensitive recording microbalance. Susceptibility to hot corrosion decreased in the order of decreasing molybdenum content of the alloys. Preoxidation of samples before hot-corrosion testing markedly increased the induction period observed prior to the inception of hot corrosion for all alloys tested. X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxide scales were made. All samples that underwent hot corrosion showed the presence of a (Ni,Co)MoO4 layer near the alloy-oxide interface. Several specimens displayed resistance to hot corrosion and these showed NaTaO3 as a prominent feature in their oxide scale. Our results may be interpreted as indicating that molybdenum in an alloy is detrimental, with respect to hot corrosion, while tantalum is beneficial.

  18. Recent progress in nickel based materials for high performance pseudocapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liangdong; Zhu, Yufu; Ding, Hongyan; Ni, Chaoying

    2014-12-01

    Nickel based materials have been intensively investigated and considered as good potential electrode materials for pseudocapacitors due to their high theoretical specific capacity values, high chemical and thermal stability, ready availability, environmentally benign nature and lower cost. This review firstly examines recent progress in nickel oxides or nickel hydroxides for high performance pseudocapacitor electrodes. The advances of hybrid electrodes are then assessed to include hybrid systems of nickel based materials with compounds such as carbonaceous materials, metal and transition metal oxides or hydroxides, in which various strategies have been adopted to improve the electrical conductivity of nickel oxides or hydroxides. Furthermore, the energy density and power density of some recently reported NiO, nickel based composites and NiCo2O4 are summarized and discussed. Finally, we provide some perspectives as to the future directions of this intriguing field.

  19. Microstructural studies of carbides in MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczotok, A.; Rodak, K.

    2012-05-01

    Carbides play an important role in the strengthening of microstructures of nickel-based superalloys. Grain boundary carbides prevent or retard grain-boundary sliding and make the grain boundary stronger. Carbides can also tie up certain elements that would otherwise promote phase instability during service. Various types of carbides are possible in the microstructure of nickel-based superalloys, depending on the superalloy composition and processing. In this paper, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of carbides occurring in the microstructure of polycrystalline MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy were carried out. In the present work, MC and M23C6 carbides in the MAR-M247 microstructure were examined.

  20. Experimental Investigation Nano Particles Influence in NPMEDM to Machine Inconel 800 with Electrolyte Copper Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, K.; Chandrasekaran, M.

    2017-05-01

    The recent technology of machining hard materials is Powder mix dielectric electrical Discharge Machining (PMEDM). This research investigates nano sized (about 5Nm) powders influence in machining Inconel 800 nickel based super alloy. This work is motivated for a practical need for a manufacturing industry, which processes various kinds of jobs of Inconel 800 material. The conventional EDM machining also considered for investigation for the measure of Nano powders performances. The aluminum, silicon and multi walled Carbon Nano tubes powders were considered in this investigation along with pulse on time, pulse of time and input current to analyze and optimize the responses of Material Removal Rate, Tool Wear Rate and surface roughness. The Taguchi general Full Factorial Design was used to design the experiments. The most advance equipments employed in conducting experiments and measuring equipments to improve the accuracy of the result. The MWCNT powder mix was out performs than other powders which reduce 22% to 50% of the tool wear rate, gives the surface roughness reduction from 29.62% to 41.64% and improved MRR 42.91% to 53.51% than conventional EDM.

  1. On Electro Discharge Machining of Inconel 718 with Hollow Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesha, S.; Sharma, A. K.; Kumar, Pradeep

    2012-06-01

    Inconel 718 is a nickel-based alloy designed for high yield, tensile, and creep-rupture properties. This alloy has been widely used in jet engines and high-speed airframe parts in aeronautic application. In this study, electric discharge machining (EDM) process was used for machining commercially available Inconel 718. A copper electrode with 99.9% purity having tubular cross section was employed to machine holes of 20 mm height and 12 mm diameter on Inconel 718 workpieces. Experiments were planned using response surface methodology (RSM). Effects of five major process parameters—pulse current, duty factor, sensitivity control, gap control, and flushing pressure on the process responses—material removal rate (MRR) and surface roughness (SR) have been discussed. Mathematical models for MRR and SR have been developed using analysis of variance. Influences of process parameters on tool wear and tool geometry have been presented with the help of scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. Analysis shows significant interaction effect of pulse current and duty factor on MRR yielding a wide range from 14.4 to 22.6 mm3/min, while pulse current remains the most contributing factor with approximate changes in the MRR and SR of 48 and 37%, respectively, corresponding to the extreme values considered. Interactions of duty factor and flushing pressure yield a minimum surface roughness of 6.2 μm. The thickness of the sputtered layer and the crack length were found to be functions of pulse current. The hollow tool gets worn out on both the outer and the inner edges owing to spark erosion as well as abrasion due to flow of debris.

  2. Competing fatigue mechanisms in Nickel-base superalloy Rene 88DT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul N.

    Nickel base superalloys exhibit superior high temperature mechanical properties required for aircraft engine components. It has been known that the processing of these alloys by the powder metallurgy route introduces inclusions inside the material. The presence of such inclusions often leads to competing failure modes in fatigue that is described by a step-wise or two distinct S-N curves involving both the surface and internally-initiated cracks, resulting in large uncertainties of fatigue life. A clear understanding of such behavior is yet to be established. The principal objective of this research is to examine the effect of inclusions on the extent of fatigue failure competition from surface and internal initiators at two different specimen test volumes. Experimental fatigue testing has been performed to explore how the presence of inclusions affects the competing fatigue failure modes. In addition, how the competing failure modes will behave with changes in the specimen size was also studied. Two groups of material each with two different specimen sizes were used in this study. It has been shown that the two crack initiation mechanisms occurred in the small unseeded Rene 88DT specimens tested at 650ºC over the stress range tested. Additionally, the fatigue lives were reduced with increase in specimen volume. All fatigue failures in seeded material occurred due to crack initiations from the seeded inclusions. In the fatigue life of seeded material, two competing and separate S-N curves were found in small test volume, whereas, in the large test volume, the regions were separated by a "step" in S-N curve. It has been found that the largest inclusion size observed in metallographic surfaces was smaller than the size determined from the fatigue failure origin. An analysis method based on extreme value statistics developed by Murakami was used to predict the largest size of inclusion in the test volume. The results of this study clearly show that competition for

  3. Lattice parameter variations during aging in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.; Garlick, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The importance of the state of coherency on measurements of gamma/gamma-prime lattice mismatch has been experimentally demonstrated during aging at 1000 C of specimens of an alloy with composition Ni-(8.6)Cr-(5.3)Al-(10.1)Co-(11.7)W-(1.2)Ti-(0.7)Mo (wt pct). Lattice parameter measurements are given as a function of aging time, and the corresponding sample microstructures are presented. The results show that changes of the two phases during aging did not influence the lattice parameter measurements, indicating that aging specimens to produce a semicoherent gamma/gamma-prime structure provides a good approximation of the true, unconstrained lattice mismatch.

  4. Machinability of Stellite 6 hardfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benghersallah, M.; Boulanouar, L.; Le Coz, G.; Devillez, A.; Dudzinski, D.

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports some experimental findings concerning the machinability at high cutting speed of nickel-base weld-deposited hardfacings for the manufacture of hot tooling. The forging work involves extreme impacts, forces, stresses and temperatures. Thus, mould dies must be extremely resistant. The aim of the project is to create a rapid prototyping process answering to forging conditions integrating a Stellite 6 hardfacing deposed PTA process. This study talks about the dry machining of the hardfacing, using a two tips machining tool and a high speed milling machine equipped by a power consumption recorder Wattpilote. The aim is to show the machinability of the hardfacing, measuring the power and the tip wear by optical microscope and white light interferometer, using different strategies and cutting conditions.

  5. Microstructure of selective laser melted CM247LC nickel-based superalloy and its evolution through heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Divya, V.D.; Muñoz-Moreno, R.; Messé, O.M.D.M.; Barnard, J.S.; Baker, S.; Illston, T.; Stone, H.J.

    2016-04-15

    The selective laser melting of high temperature alloys is of great interest to the aerospace industry as it offers the prospect of producing more complex geometries than can be achieved with other manufacturing methods. In this study, the microstructure of the nickel-based superalloy, CM247LC, has been characterised following selective laser melting and after a post deposition heat treatment below the γ′ solvus temperature. In the as-deposited state, scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction revealed a fine, cellular microstructure with preferential alignment of 〈001〉 along the build direction. A high dislocation density was seen at the periphery of the cells, indicating substantial localised deformation of the material. Fine primary MC carbides were also observed in the inter-cellular regions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy identified the occurrence of very fine γ′ precipitates, approximately 5 nm in diameter, dispersed within the gamma phase. After heat treatment, the elongated cell colonies were observed to partially coalesce, accompanied by a decrease in dislocation density, producing columnar grains along the build direction. Cuboidal γ′ precipitates approximately 500 nm in diameter were observed to form in the recrystallised grains, accompanied by larger γ′ precipitates on the grain boundaries.

  6. Strain Amount Dependent Grain Size and Orientation Developments during Hot Compression of a Polycrystalline Nickel Based Superalloy

    PubMed Central

    He, Guoai; Tan, Liming; Liu, Feng; Huang, Lan; Huang, Zaiwang; Jiang, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Controlling grain size in polycrystalline nickel base superalloy is vital for obtaining required mechanical properties. Typically, a uniform and fine grain size is required throughout forging process to realize the superplastic deformation. Strain amount occupied a dominant position in manipulating the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process and regulating the grain size of the alloy during hot forging. In this article, the high-throughput double cone specimen was introduced to yield wide-range strain in a single sample. Continuous variations of effective strain ranging from 0.23 to 1.65 across the whole sample were achieved after reaching a height reduction of 70%. Grain size is measured to be decreased from the edge to the center of specimen with increase of effective strain. Small misorientation tended to generate near the grain boundaries, which was manifested as piled-up dislocation in micromechanics. After the dislocation density reached a critical value, DRX progress would be initiated at higher deformation region, leading to the refinement of grain size. During this process, the transformations from low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) to high angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) and from subgrains to DRX grains are found to occur. After the accomplishment of DRX progress, the neonatal grains are presented as having similar orientation inside the grain boundary. PMID:28772514

  7. Strain Amount Dependent Grain Size and Orientation Developments during Hot Compression of a Polycrystalline Nickel Based Superalloy.

    PubMed

    He, Guoai; Tan, Liming; Liu, Feng; Huang, Lan; Huang, Zaiwang; Jiang, Liang

    2017-02-10

    Controlling grain size in polycrystalline nickel base superalloy is vital for obtaining required mechanical properties. Typically, a uniform and fine grain size is required throughout forging process to realize the superplastic deformation. Strain amount occupied a dominant position in manipulating the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process and regulating the grain size of the alloy during hot forging. In this article, the high-throughput double cone specimen was introduced to yield wide-range strain in a single sample. Continuous variations of effective strain ranging from 0.23 to 1.65 across the whole sample were achieved after reaching a height reduction of 70%. Grain size is measured to be decreased from the edge to the center of specimen with increase of effective strain. Small misorientation tended to generate near the grain boundaries, which was manifested as piled-up dislocation in micromechanics. After the dislocation density reached a critical value, DRX progress would be initiated at higher deformation region, leading to the refinement of grain size. During this process, the transformations from low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) to high angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) and from subgrains to DRX grains are found to occur. After the accomplishment of DRX progress, the neonatal grains are presented as having similar orientation inside the grain boundary.

  8. Nickel-based anodic electrocatalysts for fuel cells and water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dayi

    Our world is facing an energy crisis, so people are trying to harvest and utilize energy more efficiently. One of the promising ways to harvest energy is via solar water splitting to convert solar energy to chemical energy stored in hydrogen. Another of the options to utilize energy more efficiently is to use fuel cells as power sources instead of combustion engines. Catalysts are needed to reduce the energy barriers of the reactions happening at the electrode surfaces of the water-splitting cells and fuel cells. Nickel-based catalysts happen to be important nonprecious electrocatalysts for both of the anodic reactions in alkaline media. In alcohol fuel cells, nickel-based catalysts catalyze alcohol oxidation. In water splitting cells, they catalyze water oxidation, i.e., oxygen evolution. The two reactions occur in a similar potential range when catalyzed by nickel-based catalysts. Higher output current density, lower oxidation potential, and complete substrate oxidation are preferred for the anode in the applications. In this dissertation, the catalytic properties of nickel-based electrocatalysts in alkaline medium for fuel oxidation and oxygen evolution are explored. By changing the nickel precursor solubility, nickel complex nanoparticles with tunable sizes on electrode surfaces were synthesized. Higher methanol oxidation current density is achieved with smaller nickel complex nanoparticles. DNA aggregates were used as a polymer scaffold to load nickel ion centers and thus can oxidize methanol completely at a potential about 0.1 V lower than simple nickel electrodes, and the methanol oxidation pathway is changed. Nickel-based catalysts also have electrocatalytic activity towards a wide range of substrates. Experiments show that methanol, ethanol, glycerol and glucose can be deeply oxidized and carbon-carbon bonds can be broken during the oxidation. However, when comparing methanol oxidation reaction to oxygen evolution reaction catalyzed by current nickel-based

  9. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness of alloy X-750 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Douglas M.

    Ni-Cr-Fe alloys are widely used in pressurized water nuclear reactors (PWR). These alloys are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in PWR environments. There have been numerous mechanisms of crack advance proposed to describe the SCC of the nickel-base alloys in a PWR environment including slip/film rupture/oxidation and hydrogen embrittlement. It has also been suggested that there is not sufficient evidence to implicate hydrogen in the PWR SCC of nickel-base alloys. This program evaluated the effect of hydrogen on the embrittlement of a nickel-base alloy, alloy X-750, at elevated temperatures with a hydrogen concentration typical of what may be developed from the corrosion reaction. Fracture toughness values and the tearing resistance of alloy X-750 were evaluated in hydrogen gas and in air 260°C and 338°C. It was shown that at 260°C and 338°C alloy X-750 was severely embrittled in high pressure hydrogen gas. Further, the fracture morphology changed from predominantly transgranular ductile dimple fracture in air to predominantly intergranular fracture in hydrogen. The fracture morphology in hydrogen was similar to that found for PWR SCC of this material. This work supports a hydrogen-enhanced fracture mechanism contributing to the SCC of nickel-base alloys at elevated temperatures.

  10. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and electrochemistry of the iron and nickel base alloys in caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, R.; Beck, F. H.; Agrawal, A. K.; Soendjasmono, B.; Staehle, R. W.

    1980-02-01

    The electrochemical behavior of high purity (99.95% to 99.99%) iron in 0.6M NaCl and 1.0M Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ containing H/sub 2/S (50 ppM to 34,000 ppM) was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and slow scan rate polarization. Results have indicated that iron does undergo passivation in sulfate solutions containing H/sub 2/S. Iron dissolution depends on the presence of Cl/sup -/, the concentration of H/sub 2/S and solution pH. An equation is given that describes the anodic Tafel current densities. The slow strain rate test was used to evaluate the effect of electrode potential on the susceptibility of 2-1/4Cr, Mo steel to stress corrosion cracking in boiling 50% NaOH solution. Susceptibility decreased and general corrosion increased with increasing potentials. Failures contained a combination of ductile and brittle fracture. Time-to-failure was longest for controlled potentials of -700 and -600mV (Hg/HgO reference) in the -1100 to -400mV range used in this study.

  11. Recent Advances in Creep Modelling of the Nickel Base Superalloy, Alloy 720Li

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William; Whittaker, Mark; Williams, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Recent work in the creep field has indicated that the traditional methodologies involving power law equations are not sufficient to describe wide ranging creep behaviour. More recent approaches such as the Wilshire equations however, have shown promise in a wide range of materials, particularly in extrapolation of short term results to long term predictions. In the aerospace industry however, long term creep behaviour is not critical and more focus is required on the prediction of times to specific creep strains. The current paper illustrates the capability of the Wilshire equations to recreate full creep curves in a modern nickel superalloy. Furthermore, a finite-element model based on this method has been shown to accurately predict stress relaxation behaviour allowing more accurate component lifing. PMID:28809360

  12. Burner Rig Evaluation of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems for Nickel-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Eight plasma sprayed bond coatings were evaluated for their potential use with ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TECs) which are being developed for coal derived fuel fired gas turbines. Longer TBC lives in cyclic burner rig oxidation to 1050 C were achieved with the more oxidation resistant bond coatings. These were Ni-14.1Cr-13.4A1-0.10Ar, Ni-14.1C4-14.4Al-0.16Y, and Ni-15.8Cr-12.8Al-0.36Y on Rene 41. The TBC systems performed best when 0.015-cm thick bond coatings were employed that were sprayed at 20 kW using argon 3.5v/o hydrogen. Cycling had a more life limiting influence on the TBC than accumulated time at 1050 C.

  13. A Study of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Powder Metallurgy Hot Isotatically Pressed Nickel-Base Alloy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-31

    strength of delay cycles after an overload, an attempt was made to normalize the delay results published recently by Antolovich and Jayaraman.3 They noted...343 2. R. S. Vecchio, Master’s Thesis, Lehigh University, 1983. 3. S. D. Antolovich and N. Jayaraman, Fatigue, Environment and Temperature Effects, J...2.0 5.0 10 20 50 O.L. Plastic Zone Size /I Fig. 1. Normalized data from Antolovich and Jayaraman3 revealing influence of grain size on overload

  14. Recent Advances in Creep Modelling of the Nickel Base Superalloy, Alloy 720Li.

    PubMed

    Harrison, William; Whittaker, Mark; Williams, Steve

    2013-03-20

    Recent work in the creep field has indicated that the traditional methodologies involving power law equations are not sufficient to describe wide ranging creep behaviour. More recent approaches such as the Wilshire equations however, have shown promise in a wide range of materials, particularly in extrapolation of short term results to long term predictions. In the aerospace industry however, long term creep behaviour is not critical and more focus is required on the prediction of times to specific creep strains. The current paper illustrates the capability of the Wilshire equations to recreate full creep curves in a modern nickel superalloy. Furthermore, a finite-element model based on this method has been shown to accurately predict stress relaxation behaviour allowing more accurate component lifing.

  15. In-Situ Electrochemical Investigations of a Nickel-Based Alloy Subjected to Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, R. V.; Wang, G.; Buchanan, R. A.; Liaw, P. K.; Saleh, T. A.; Klarstrom, D. L.; Meck, S. N.

    2007-09-01

    The HASTELLOY C2000 superalloy is a commercially designed superalloy manufactured to function in reducing and oxidizing corrosive solutions. The industrial applications have tremendous potential in automotive, structural, aviation, and storage components. Although C2000 demonstrates good reducing and oxidizing traits in extremely aggressive media (which are attractive features of its chemistry), changes in the mechanical properties are believed to be insignificant due to its strong propensity to passivate under corrosive conditions. The ductility behavior and corrosion properties of C2000 are superior to those of stainless steels. The objective of the present study is to examine the corrosion-fatigue behavior of C2000 in a 3.5 wt pct sodium-chloride (NaCl) solution. C2000 submerged in 3.5 wt pct NaCl at room temperature is not susceptible to localized corrosion, such as pitting, during fatigue. At an accelerated potential of 350 mV, the current responses show an increase in the current due to slip steps emerging to the surface as a result of fatigue. The crack-initiation site and the examination of the fracture morphology are discussed.

  16. Burner-rig evaluation of thermal barrier coating systems for nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gedwill, M.A.

    1981-02-01

    Eight plasma-sprayed bond coatings were evaluated for their potential use with ZrO/sub 2/-Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) which are being developed for coal-derived-fuel-fired gas turbines. Longer TBC liver in cyclic burner rig oxidation to 1050/sup 0/C were achieved with the more oxidation resistant bond coatings. These were Ni-14.1Cr-13.4A1-0.10Zr, Ni-14.1Cr-14.4A1-0.16Y, and Ni-15.8Cr-12.8A1-0.36Y on Rene 41. The TBC systems performed best when 0.015-cm thick bond coatings were employed that were sprayed at 20 kW using argon - 3.5 v/o hydrogen. Cycling had a more life limiting influence on the TBC than accumulated time at 1050/sup 0/C.

  17. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a full-size, full-scale TD Ni-20Cr heat shield test array in simulated mission environments is described along with the design and fabrication of two additional full-size, full-scale test arrays to be tested in flowing gas test facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. Cost and reusability evaluations of TD Ni-20Cr heat shield systems are presented, and weight estimates of a TD Ni-20Cr heat shield system for use on a shuttle orbiter vehicle are made. Safe-line expectancy of a TD Ni-20Cr heat shield system is assessed. Non-destructive test techniques are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in quality assurance checks of TD Ni-20Cr components such as heat shields, heat shield supports, close-out panels, formed cover strips, and edge seals. Results of tests on a braze reinforced full-scale, subsize panel are included. Results show only minor structural degradation in the main TD Ni-20Cr heat shields of the test array during simulated mission test cycles.

  18. Analysis of Crystallographic High Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth in a Nickel Base Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-22

    characteristic of superalloys can be seen in the figure. he adequately described by the linear elastic parameter. That these twin boundaries form...between the twin boundaries , cracks and the precipi- acteristic of the ductile mode of crack growth, and tates. It has been well established 45 41 for this

  19. Alloying-Element Loss during High-Temperature Processing of a Nickel-Base Superalloy (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    led to the development of gamma-prime-depleted zones [4]. Despite these prior efforts, the precise effects of environment on the observed subsurface ...composition uniformity. For example, at such small thicknesses, finish grinding to eliminate gage irregularities or surface contamination may be...phenomena are relatively unexplored. The objective of the present work was to establish the effect of environment on the mechanism and

  20. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    The work reported constitutes the first phase of a two-phase program. Vehicle environments having critical effects on the thermal protection system are defined; TD Ni-20Cr material characteristics are reviewed and compared with TD Ni-20Cr produced in previous development efforts; cyclic load, temperature, and pressure effects on TD Ni-20Cr sheet material are investigated; the effects of braze reinforcement in improving the efficiency of spotwelded, diffusion-bonded, or seam-welded joints are evaluated through tests of simple lap-shear joint samples; parametric studies of metallic radiative thermal protection systems are reported; and the design, instrumentation, and testing of full-scale subsize heat shield panels are described. Tests of full-scale subsize panels included simulated meteoroid impact tests; simulated entry flight aerodynamic heating in an arc-heated plasma stream; programmed differential pressure loads and temperatures simulating mission conditions; and acoustic tests simulating sound levels experienced by heat shields during about boost flight. Test results are described, and the performances of two heat shield designs are compared and evaluated.

  1. Wear-dependent specific coefficients in a mechanistic model for turning of nickel-based superalloy with ceramic tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López de Lacalle, Luis Norberto; Urbicain Pelayo, Gorka; Fernández-Valdivielso, Asier; Alvarez, Alvaro; González, Haizea

    2017-09-01

    Difficult to cut materials such as nickel and titanium alloys are used in the aeronautical industry, the former alloys due to its heat-resistant behavior and the latter for the low weight - high strength ratio. Ceramic tools made out alumina with reinforce SiC whiskers are a choice in turning for roughing and semifinishing workpiece stages. Wear rate is high in the machining of these alloys, and consequently cutting forces tends to increase along one operation. This paper establishes the cutting force relation between work-piece and tool in the turning of such difficult-to-cut alloys by means of a mechanistic cutting force model that considers the tool wear effect. The cutting force model demonstrates the force sensitivity to the cutting engagement parameters (ap, f) when using ceramic inserts and wear is considered. Wear is introduced through a cutting time factor, being useful in real conditions taking into account that wear quickly appears in alloys machining. A good accuracy in the cutting force model coefficients is the key issue for an accurate prediction of turning forces, which could be used as criteria for tool replacement or as input for chatter or other models.

  2. Mechanisms of ordered gamma prime precipitation in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Antariksh Rao Pratap

    Commercial superalloys like Rene88DT are used in high temperature applications like turbine disk in aircraft jet engines due to their excellent high temperature properties, including strength, ductility, improved fracture toughness, fatigue resistance, enhanced creep and oxidation resistance. Typically this alloy's microstructure has L12-ordered precipitates dispersed in disordered face-centered cubic gamma matrix. A typical industrially relevant heat-treatment often leads to the formation of multiple size ranges of gamma¢ precipitates presumably arising from multiple nucleation bursts during the continuous cooling process. The morphology and distribution of these gamma' precipitates inside gamma matrix influences the mechanical properties of these materials. Therefore, the study of thermodynamic and kinetic factors influencing the evolution of these precipitates and subsequent effects is both relevant for commercial applications as well as for a fundamental understanding of the underlying phase transformations. The present research is primarily focused on understanding the mechanism of formation of different generations of gamma' precipitates during continuous cooling by coupling scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy filtered TEM and atom probe tomography (APT). In addition, the phase transformations leading to nucleation of gamma' phase has been a topic of controversy for decades. The present work, for the first time, gives a novel insight into the mechanism of order-disorder transformations and associated phase separation processes at atomistic length scales, by coupling high angle annular dark field (HAADF)--STEM imaging and APT. The results indicate that multiple competing mechanisms can operate during a single continuous cooling process leading to different generations of gamma' including a non-classical mechanism, operative at large undercoolings.

  3. Evaluation of Fatigue Behavior and Surface Characteristics of Aluminum Alloy 2024 T6 After Electric Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Shahid; Shah, Masood; Pasha, Riffat Asim; Sultan, Amir

    2017-09-01

    The effect of electric discharge machining (EDM) on surface quality and consequently on the fatigue performance of Al 2024 T6 is investigated. Five levels of discharge current are analyzed, while all other electrical and nonelectrical parameters are kept constant. At each discharge current level, dog-bone specimens are machined by generating a peripheral notch at the center. The fatigue tests are performed on four-point rotating bending machine at room temperature. For comparison purposes, fatigue tests are also performed on the conventionally machined specimens. Linearized SN curves for 95% failure probability and with four different confidence levels (75, 90, 95 and 99%) are plotted for each discharge current level as well as for conventionally machined specimens. These plots show that the electric discharge machined (EDMed) specimens give inferior fatigue behavior as compared to conventionally machined specimen. Moreover, discharge current inversely affects the fatigue life, and this influence is highly pronounced at lower stresses. The EDMed surfaces are characterized by surface properties that could be responsible for change in fatigue life such as surface morphology, surface roughness, white layer thickness, microhardness and residual stresses. It is found that all these surface properties are affected by changing discharge current level. However, change in fatigue life by discharge current could not be associated independently to any single surface property.

  4. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  5. The effects of tantalum on the microstructure of two polycrystalline nickel-base superalloys - B-1900 + Hf and MAR-M247

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Janowski, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of changing the content of Ta on the gamma/gamma-prime carbide microstructure was investigated in two crystalline nickel-base superalloys: conventionally cast B-1900 + Hf, and both conventionally cast and directionally solidified MAR-M247. The changes occurring in the microstructure effects were similar in both alloys. The gamma-prime and carbide volume fractions increased linearly with Ta additions, while the gamma-prime phase compositions did not change. Bulk Ta additions increased the levels of Cr and Co (in addition to that of Ta) of the gamma phase, a result of the approximately constant partitioning ratios for these two elements. The addition of Ta led to a partial replacement of Hf in the MC carbides. In addition, Cr-rich M(23)C(6) carbides formed as a result of MC carbide decomposition during heat treatment.

  6. The influence of cobalt on the tensile and stress-rupture properties of the nickel-base superalloy mar-m247

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Maier, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1982-10-01

    The influence of cobalt on the mechanical properties of MAR-M247, a cast nickel-base superalloy, was investigated. Nickel was substituted for cobalt to produce 0, 5, and the standard 10 pct cobalt versions of MAR-M247. Tensile tests were performed between 649 and 982 dgC; stress-rupture tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 760 to 982 dgC. The tensile properties were not significantly affected by cobalt level, but a slight peak in strength at 5 pct Co was apparent. A -80 °C shift in the peak yield strength temperature as Co level was reduced from 10 to 0 pct was also evident. This behavior was related to a reduction in the γ' volume fraction, an increase in γ' particle size, an increase in W and Ti concentrations in the γ', and a decrease in Cr and Al concentrations in the γ as Co level in MAR-M247 was reduced. Stress-rupture properties, however, were more significantly affected by Co level. The 10 pct Co alloy exhibited rupture lives typically 1.2 times greater than that of the 5 pct Co alloy and 3 times greater than that of the 0 pct Co alloy. The steady state creep rate of the 10 pct Co alloy was generally equal to that of the 5 pct Co alloy, but was only one third as large as the creep rate of the 0 pct Co alloy. This behavior was associated with a decrease in γ' volume fraction and the formation of a grain boundary carbide film as cobalt level was reduced.

  7. Development of a high strength hot isostatically pressed /HIP/ disk alloy, MERL 76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.; Eng, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A nickel-based powder metal disk alloy developed for use in advanced commercial gas turbines is described. Consideration is given to final alloy chemistry modifications made to achieve a desirable balance between tensile strength and stress rupture life and ductility. The effects of post-consolidation heat treatment are discussed, the preliminary mechanical properties obtained from full-scale turbine disks are presented.

  8. Diffusion welding of MA 6000 and a conventional nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    A feasibility study of diffusion welding the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy MA 6000 to itself and to conventional Ni-base superalloy Udimet 700 was conducted. Butt joints between MA 6000 pieces and lap joints between Udimet 700 and the ODS alloy were produced by hot pressing for 1.25 hr at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1200 C (1832-2192 F) in vacuum. Following pressing, all weldments were heat treated and machined into mechanical property test specimens. While three different combinations of recrystallized and unrecrystallized MA 6000 butt joints were produced, the unrecrystallized to unrecrystallized joint was most successful as determined by mechanical properties and microstructural examination. Failure to weld the recrystallized material probably related to a lack of adequate deformation at the weld interface. While recrystallized MA 6000 could be diffusion welded to Udimet 700 in places, complete welding over the entire lap joint was not achieved, again due to the lack of sufficient deformation at the faying surfaces. Several methods are proposed to promote the intimate contact necessary for diffusion welding MA 6000 to itself and to superalloys.

  9. Influence of shooting angle of polishing particle on surface roughness of a cobalt-chromium alloy using a centrifugal shooting type polishing machine.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Kaori; Yamaba, Osamu; Nokubi, Takashi

    2004-12-01

    The centrifugal shooting type polishing machine is a recently developed apparatus that seeks to improve the efficiency and environment of polishing removable prostheses. In an attempt to optimize the effectiveness of this apparatus, this study examined the influence of the shooting angle of polishing particle on the surface roughness of cobalt-chromium alloy casting specimens. Polishing was performed for three minutes under five shooting angle conditions: 90 degrees, 60 degrees, 45 degrees, 30 degrees, and 15 degrees. Surface roughness (Ra, Sm) was measured after each polishing stage. There were significant differences (p < 0.01) in Ra between shooting angle of 90 degrees (0.95 microm) and shooting angles of 45 degrees (0.62 microm) or less, and in Sm between 90 degrees (207 microm), 60 degrees (350 microm), and shooting angles of 45 degrees (868 microm) or less. These findings indicated that excellent surface texture was produced when shooting angle was 45 degrees or less.

  10. The effects of tantalum on the microstructure of two polycrystalline nickel-base superalloys: B-1900 + Hf and MAR-M247

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowski, G. M.; Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.

    1986-11-01

    Changes in the γ/γ'/carbide microstructure as a function of Ta content were studied in conventionally cast B-1900 + Hf and both conventionally cast and directionally solidified MAR-M247.* The effects of tantalum on the microstructure were found to be similar in both nickel-base superalloys. In particular, the γ' and carbide volume fractions increased approximately linearly with tantalum additions in both alloys. The γ' phase compositions did not change as tantalum additions were made with the exception of an increase in the tantalum level. Bulk tantalum additions increased the tantalum, chromium, and cobalt levels of the γ phase in both alloy series. The increase in the concentrations of the latter two elements was attributed to a decrease in the γ phase fraction with increasing bulk tantalum level and nearly constant γ' /γ partitioning ratios. It was demonstrated that the large increase in the γ ' volume fraction was a result of tantalum not affecting the partitioning ratios of the other alloying elements. The addition of tantalum led to a partial replacement of the hafnium in the MC carbides, although the degree of replacement was reduced by the solutionizing and aging heat treat-ment. In addition, chromium-rich M23C6 carbides formed as a result of MC carbide decomposition during heat treatment.

  11. Strainrange partitioning behavior of the nickel-base superalloys, Rene' 80 and in 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Nachtigall, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study was made to assess the ability of the method of Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) to both correlate and predict high-temperature, low cycle fatigue lives of nickel base superalloys for gas turbine applications. The partitioned strainrange versus life relationships for uncoated Rene' 80 and cast IN 100 were also determined from the ductility normalized-Strainrange Partitioning equations. These were used to predict the cyclic lives of the baseline tests. The life predictability of the method was verified for cast IN 100 by applying the baseline results to the cyclic life prediction of a series of complex strain cycling tests with multiple hold periods at constant strain. It was concluded that the method of SRP can correlate and predict the cyclic lives of laboratory specimens of the nickel base superalloys evaluated in this program.

  12. Preparation and testing of nickel-based superalloy/sodium heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qin; Han, Haitao; Hu, Longfei; Chen, Siyuan; Yu, Jijun; Ai, Bangcheng

    2017-08-01

    In this work, a kind of uni-piece nickel-based superalloy/sodium heat pipe is proposed. Five models of high temperature heat pipe were prepared using GH3044 and GH4099 nickel-based superalloys. And their startup performance and ablation resistance were investigated by quartz lamp calorifier radiation and wind tunnel tests, respectively. It is found that the amount of charging sodium affects the startup performance of heat pipes apparently. No startup phenomenon was found for insufficient sodium charged model. In contrast, the models charged with sufficient sodium startup successfully, displaying a uniform temperature distribution. During wind tunnel test, the corresponding models experienced a shorter startup time than that during quartz lamp heating. GH4099/sodium heat pipe shows excellent ablation resistance, being better than that of GH3044/sodium heat pipe. Therefore, it is proposed that this kind of heat pipe has a potential application in thermal protection system of hypersonic cruise vehicles.

  13. Method of Making a Nickel Fiber Electrode for a Nickel Based Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The general purpose of the invention is to develop a high specific energy nickel electrode for a nickel based battery system. The invention discloses a method of producing a lightweight nickel electrode which can be cycled to deep depths of discharge (i.e., 40% or greater of electrode capacity). These deep depths of discharge can be accomplished by depositing the required amount of nickel hydroxide active material into a lightweight nickel fiber substrate.

  14. Method of Making a Nickel Fiber Electrode for a Nickel Based Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The general purpose of the invention is to develop a high specific energy nickel electrode for a nickel based battery system. The invention discloses a method of producing a lightweight nickel electrode which can be cycled to deep depths of discharge (i.e., 40% or greater of electrode capacity). These deep depths of discharge can be accomplished by depositing the required amount of nickel hydroxide active material into a lightweight nickel fiber substrate.

  15. A Study of the Fatigue Behavior of Small Cracks in Nickel-Base Superalloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-24

    later successfully used in a study of stress corrosion crack initiation in a nickel-base superalloy tested under monotonic loading in a PWR environment...growth ratcs were measured over crack lengths ranging from AI lOom to lmni. Mos’ of the testing was performed in load control. with stress ranges...elevated temperatures in the elastic-plastic regime where the maximum cyclic stress reaches the macroscopki yield stress , the fatigue crack growth rates

  16. Mechanism of beneficial effect of tantalum in hot corrosion of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses were used to examine a prominent NaTaO3 pattern formed in a number of nickel-base superalloys. It is found that a beneficial effect of tantalum with respect to hot corrosion attack arises from the ability of Ta2O5 to tie up Na2O and prevent the formation of a molten Na2MoO4 phase.

  17. Assessment of high temperature performance of a cast nickel base superalloy in corrosive environment

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, D.; Iyer, S.R.; Radhakrishnan, V.M.

    1996-10-15

    Turbine blades are subjected to creep deformation through their continuous centrifugal loading during operation. In addition to this, hot corrosion in gas turbines limits the durability of even the best blade materials at present available. In this article, an attempt has been made to evaluate the effect of hot corrosion due to sodium sulphate, sodium chloride and sodium metavanadate salt mixture on creep rupture of a cast nickel base turbine blade superalloy.

  18. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Nickel Alloys - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R

    2004-07-12

    Nickel can dissolve a large amount of alloying elements while still maintaining its austenitic structure. That is, nickel based alloys can be tailored for specific applications. The family of nickel alloys is large, from high temperature alloys (HTA) to corrosion resistant alloys (CRA). In general, CRA are less susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) than stainless steels. The environments where nickel alloys suffer EAC are limited and generally avoidable by design. These environments include wet hydrofluoric acid and hot concentrated alkalis. Not all nickel alloys are equally susceptible to cracking in these environments. For example, commercially pure nickel is less susceptible to EAC in hot concentrated alkalis than nickel alloyed with chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo). The susceptibility of nickel alloys to EAC is discussed by family of alloys.

  19. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  20. Cold machining of high density tungsten and other materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1969-01-01

    Cold machining process, which uses a sub-zero refrigerated cutting fluid, is used for machining refractory or reactive metals and alloys. Special carbide tools for turning and drilling these alloys further improve the cutting performance.

  1. An Investigation of the Hot Corrosion Protectivity Behavior of Platinum Modified Aluminide Coatings on Nickel-Based Superalloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    MODIFIED ALUMINIDE COATINGS ON NICKEL-BASED SUPERALLOYS by Rudolph E. Malush March 1987 Thesis Advisor: D.H. Boone Approved for public release; distribution... Aluminide Coatings on Nickel-Based Superalloys by Rudolph E. Malush Lieutenant, United States Navy B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1978 Submitted...less attractive. [Ref. 16] Diffusion aluminide coatings are most commonly applied to superalloy components by an inexpensive method called pack

  2. Elemental Partitioning Associated with Different Generations of Gamma Prime Precipitates in Rene 88DT Nickel Base Superalloy (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    SUPERALLOY (PREPRINT) J.Y. Hwang, S. Nag, R. Srinivasan, J. Tiley, G.B. Viswanathan, H.L. Fraser, and R. Banerjee University of North Texas...SUBTITLE ELEMENTAL PARTITIONING ASSOCIATED WITH DIFFERENT GENERATIONS OF GAMMA PRIME PRECIPITATES IN RENE 88DT NICKEL BASE SUPERALLOY (PREPRINT) 5a...commercial nickel base superalloy , Rene 88DT, has been characterized by three dimensional atom probe tomography (3DAP) coupled with energy-filtered

  3. Mechanisms of Precipitation of Different Generations of Gamma-Prime Precipitates During Continuous Cooling of a Nickel Base Superalloy (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    SUPERALLOY (PREPRINT) J. Tiley and G. B. Viswanathan Metals Branch Structural Materials Division S. Nag, R. Banerjee, and A.R.P. Singh...MECHANISMS OF PRECIPITATION OF DIFFERENT GENERATIONS OF γ’ PRECIPITATES DURING CONTINUOUS COOLING OF A NICKEL BASE SUPERALLOY (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT...cooling of a commercially used nickel base superalloy . This mechanistic understanding has been developed based on a number of critical experimental

  4. An Industrial Perspective on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Some Commercially Used Carbon Steels and Corrosion-Resistant Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Yugo; Daigo, Yuzo; Sugahara, Katsuo

    2017-08-01

    Commercial metals and alloys like carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-based super alloys frequently encounter the problem of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) and resulting failure in engineering components. This article aims to provide a perspective on three critical industrial applications having EAC issues: (1) corrosion and cracking of carbon steels in automotive applications, (2) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in salt production and processing, and (3) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water. The review focuses on current industrial-level understanding with respect to corrosion fatigue, hydrogen-assisted cracking, or stress corrosion cracking, as well as the dominant factors affecting crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, some ongoing industrial studies and directions of future research are also discussed.

  5. Quantitative analytical electron microscopy of multiphase alloys.

    PubMed

    Prybylowski, J; Ballinger, R; Elliott, C

    1989-02-01

    In this paper, we present a technique for analysis of composition gradients, using an analytical electron microscope, within the primary phase of a two-phase alloy for the case where the second-phase particle size is similar to the size of the irradiated volume. If the composition difference between the two phases is large, the detected compositional fluctuations associated with varying phase fractions may mask any underlying composition gradient of the primary phase. The analysis technique was used to determine grain boundary chromium concentration gradients in a nickel-base superalloy, alloy X-750. The technique may also be of use in other alloy systems.

  6. Hot Corrosion of Cobalt-Base Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    Cast Alloys : NASA VIA, B-1900, 713C and 738X", Report NASA TN D-7682, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, August 1974. 36. Giggins, C.S. and...resistance of cobalt-base and nickel-base alloys . The contract was accomplished under the technical direction of Dr. H. C. Graham of the Aerospace Research...Interpretation of Results 3. SODIUM SULFATE INDUCED HOT CORROSION OF Co-25Al AND Co-35Cr ALLOYS a. Introduction b. Experimental Co-25Al c. Experimental

  7. Dual-Alloy Disks are Formed by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.; Miner, R. V.; Kortovich, C. S.; Marder, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    High-performance disks have widely varying properties from hub to rim. Dual property disk is fabricated using two nickel-base alloys, AF-115 for rim and Rene 95 for hub. Dual-alloy fabrication may find applications in automobiles, earth-moving equipment, and energy conversion systems as well as aircraft powerplants. There is potential for such applications as shafts, gears, and blades.

  8. Low cycle fatigue of a cast nickel alloy in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, B. A.; Warren, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experimental system used for obtaining low cycle fatigue data on structural alloys in a high pressure gaseous hydrogen environment at test temperatures from ambient to 870 C. In addition, LCF results for a cast nickel based alloy are presented illustrating the potentially severe effects of a hydrogen environment on the cyclic life of a material, and consequently, the importance of performing such tests.

  9. Method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a metallic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D [Salem, OR; Alman, David E [Benton, OR

    2009-06-30

    A method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a preferred nickel base alloy substrate has been discovered. A cerium oxide paste containing a halide activator is applied to the polished substrate and then dried. The workpiece is heated in a non-oxidizing atmosphere to diffuse cerium into the substrate. After cooling, any remaining cerium oxide is removed. The resulting cerium diffusion coating on the nickel base substrate demonstrates improved resistance to oxidation. Cerium coated alloys are particularly useful as components in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC).

  10. Quantitative experimental determination of the solid solution hardening potential of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum in single-crystal nickel-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmann, Ernst; Miller, Michael K.; Affeldt, Ernst; Glatzel, Uwe

    2015-01-31

    Here, the solid-solution hardening potential of the refractory elements rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum in the matrix of single-crystal nickel-based superalloys was experimentally quantified. Single-phase alloys with the composition of the nickel solid-solution matrix of superalloys were cast as single crystals, and tested in creep at 980 °C and 30–75 MPa. The use of single-phase single-crystalline material ensures very clean data because no grain boundary or particle strengthening effects interfere with the solid-solution hardening. This makes it possible to quantify the amount of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum necessary to reduce the creep rate by a factor of 10. Rhenium is more than two times more effective for matrix strengthening than either tungsten or molybdenum. The existence of rhenium clusters as a possible reason for the strong strengthening effect is excluded as a result of atom probe tomography measurements. If the partitioning coefficient of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum between the γ matrix and the γ' precipitates is taken into account, the effectiveness of the alloying elements in two-phase superalloys can be calculated and the rhenium effect can be explained.

  11. Quantitative experimental determination of the solid solution hardening potential of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum in single-crystal nickel-based superalloys

    DOE PAGES

    Fleischmann, Ernst; Miller, Michael K.; Affeldt, Ernst; ...

    2015-01-31

    Here, the solid-solution hardening potential of the refractory elements rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum in the matrix of single-crystal nickel-based superalloys was experimentally quantified. Single-phase alloys with the composition of the nickel solid-solution matrix of superalloys were cast as single crystals, and tested in creep at 980 °C and 30–75 MPa. The use of single-phase single-crystalline material ensures very clean data because no grain boundary or particle strengthening effects interfere with the solid-solution hardening. This makes it possible to quantify the amount of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum necessary to reduce the creep rate by a factor of 10. Rhenium is moremore » than two times more effective for matrix strengthening than either tungsten or molybdenum. The existence of rhenium clusters as a possible reason for the strong strengthening effect is excluded as a result of atom probe tomography measurements. If the partitioning coefficient of rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum between the γ matrix and the γ' precipitates is taken into account, the effectiveness of the alloying elements in two-phase superalloys can be calculated and the rhenium effect can be explained.« less

  12. [Influence of different surface machining treatments of resorbable implants made from different magnesium-calcium alloys on their degradation--a pilot study in rabbit models].

    PubMed

    von der Höh, N; Krause, A; Hackenbroich, C; Bormann, D; Lucas, A; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2006-12-01

    To examine the influence of different surface machining treatments of resorbable implants 3x5 mm cylinders of magnesium-calcium-alloys with plane, rough or sand blasted surface and different concentrations of calcium (0.4 %, 0.8 %, 1.2 % und 2.0 %) were implanted into the distal femur condylus of 18 New Zealand White Rabbits. They were placed into the spongy-cortical passage. During six weeks the animals were examined daily and x-rayed weekly. After euthanasia the bone was explanted and scanned in a microcomputed tomograph. The implants were well tolerated by the rabbits, neither lameness nor signs of pain occured. Wound healing was mostly without complications. Eight of 36 implants (22 %) showed dehiscence of suture within first ten days, whereby implants made of 1,2 % MgCa were mainly affected (six of 12 cases, 50 %). At the place of insertion all implants induced obvious callus genesis which could be seen in MgCa 1,2-cylinders with plane surface and MgCa 0,8-cylinders with rough and sand blasted surface the most. Influence of different calcium concentrations on degradation behaviour could not be discovered. They showed different stages of resorption. Concerning the different surface machining treatments sand blasted implants showed the highest degree of degradation which could be seen by the totally loss of structure in micro-computed examinations. These implants also showed in six of 36 cases a clinical occurrence of gas production. Rough implants showed an irregular degradation with high degree of resorption of some implants and signs of degradation only in the border area of others. Cylindricity maintained in plane implants. They showed loss of structure only in border areas.

  13. Hydrogen effects in 001-line oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. L.; Chene, J.; Bernstein, I. M.; Williams, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    The entry and subsequent interaction of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy CMSX-2 has been studied. Significant amounts of hydrogen were introduced by high temperature hydrogen charging in molten salts which led to an increased lattice parameter and microhardness and to a degradation in tensile elongation to failure whose extent scales with the depth of the hydrogenated zone. In this region a fracture mode change from a 111 to a 100 plane type also occurred. The values of the binding energy of hydrogen to solidification voids and the effective hydrogen pressure in the voids were estimated.

  14. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of a Transient Liquid Phase Bonded Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebajo, O. J.; Ojo, O. A.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical analysis of corrosion performance of a transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded nickel-based superalloy was performed. The TLP bonding process resulted in significant reduction in corrosion resistance due to the formation of non-equilibrium solidification reaction micro-constituents within the joint region. The corrosion resistance degradation is completely eliminated through a new application of composite interlayer that had been previously considered unusable for joining single-crystal superalloys. The effectiveness of the new approach becomes more pronounced as the severity of environment increases.

  15. Manufacturing of nickel-base superalloys with improved high-temperature performance

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; George, E.P.; Liu, C.T.; Horton, J.A.; Carmichael, C.A.; Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of research conducted as part of CRADA ORNL95-0327 between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Teledyne Allvac (now Allvac, an Allegheny Teledyne Co.). The objective was to gain a better understanding of the role of trace elements in nickel-based superalloys, with the ultimate goal of enhancing performance without significantly increasing production cost. Two model superalloys, IN 718 and Waspaloy, were selected for this study, and the synergistic effects of P and B additions on creep and stress rupture properties were determined. Wherever possible the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the observed effects were investigated.

  16. Thickening behavior of {gamma}{prime} precipitates in nickel base superalloys during rafting

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Immarigeon, J.P.

    1998-06-12

    Directional coarsening (rafting) OF {gamma}{prime} precipitates in nickel base superalloys occurs when these materials are subjected to stresses at high temperature. The mechanisms responsible for this coarsening have been extensively studied in recent years. None of the models distinguish the effects of Ostwald ripening from those caused by directional coalescence. In this paper, both mechanisms are considered to contribute to the rafting process in separate ways, and a phenomenological description of the thickening behavior of {gamma}{prime} precipitates during rafting is formulated to explain experimental data reported in the literature. The practical implications are briefly discussed.

  17. Controlled Temperature Gradient Improves Freezing Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Deborah; Alter, Wendy S.; Hamilton, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Controlled gradient of temperature in advancing zone of solidification increases fatigue life of directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy. Improved solidification process eliminates, reduces, or controls microstructure of deleterious brittle phases, including carbides and gamma/gamma prime eutectic. Also reduces microsegregation and makes discrete carbides (if present) become fine and blocky. Expected to improve properties of other alloys, of both directionally-solidified polycrystalline and single-crystal forms.

  18. Fourteenth Report of the Machinability Data Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    machining. The materials index has been revised and restructured to include the Unified Numbering System for alloys where possible. Chemical...compositions of alloys are listed by material group. The composition of an alloy that is new or not listed in the new handbook can be compared to those listed...to determine which material group is comparable in order to estimate the approximate machinability of the new alloy . The state-of-the-art report Low

  19. Aero engine test experience with CMSX-4{reg_sign} alloy single-crystal turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Fullagar, K.P.L.; Broomfield, R.W.; Hulands, M.; Harris, K.; Erickson, G.L.; Sikkenga, S.L.

    1996-04-01

    A team approach involving a turbine engine company (Rolls-Royce), its single-crystal casting facilities, and a superalloy developer and ingot manufacturer (Cannon-Muskegon), utilizing the concepts of simultaneous engineering, has been used to develop CMSX-4 alloy successfully for turbine blade applications. CMSX-4 alloy is a second-generation nickel-base single-crystal superalloy containing 3 percent (wt) rhenium (Re) and 70 percent volume fraction of the coherent {gamma}{prime} precipitate strengthening phase. The paper details the single-crystal casting process and heat treatment manufacturing development for turbine blades in CMSX-4 alloy. Competitive single-crystal casting yields are being achieved in production and extensive vacuum heat treatment experience confirms CMSX-4 alloy to have a practical production solution heat treat/homogenization ``window.`` The creep-rupture data-base on CMSX-4 alloy now includes 325 data points from 17 heats including 3,630 kg (8,000 lb) production size heats. An appreciable portion of this data was machined-from-blade (MFB) properties, which indicate turbine blade component capabilities based on single-crystal casting process, component configuration, and heat treatment. The use of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been shown to eliminate single-crystal casting micropores, which along with the essential absence of {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} eutectic phase, carbides, stable oxide, nitride and sulfide inclusions, results in remarkably high mechanical fatigue properties, with smooth and particularly notched specimens. The Re addition has been shown not only to benefit creep and mechanical fatigue strength, but also bare oxidation, hot corrosion, and coating performance. The high level of balanced properties determined by extensive laboratory evaluation has been confirmed during engine testing of the Rolls-Royce Pegasus turbofan.

  20. Hydrogen induced fracture characteristics of single crystal nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Wilcox, Roy C.

    1990-01-01

    A stereoscopic method for use with x ray energy dispersive spectroscopy of rough surfaces was adapted and applied to the fracture surfaces single crystals of PWA 1480E to permit rapid orientation determinations of small cleavage planes. The method uses a mathematical treatment of stereo pair photomicrographs to measure the angle between the electron beam and the surface normal. One reference crystal orientation corresponding to the electron beam direction (crystal growth direction) is required to perform this trace analysis. The microstructure of PWA 1480E was characterized before fracture analysis was performed. The fracture behavior of single crystals of the PWA 1480E nickel-based superalloy was studied. The hydrogen-induced fracture behavior of single crystals of the PWA 1480E nickel-based superalloy was also studied. In order to understand the temperature dependence of hydrogen-induced embrittlement, notched single crystals with three different crystal growth orientations near zone axes (100), (110), and (111) were tensile tested at 871 C (1600 F) in both helium and hydrogen atmospheres at 34 MPa. Results and conclusions are given.

  1. Underwater wet flux-cored arc welding development of stainless steel and nickel-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Findlan, S.J.; Frederick, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    The inaccessibility and high radiation fields of components in the lower two thirds of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) has generated the need for an automated underwater wet welding process to address repair applications. Mechanical methods presently employed for this type of repair application produce crevices, which promote concerns of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), crevice corrosion and pitting. To address these concerns, the EPRI Repair and Replacement Applications Center (RRAC) has developed underwater wet flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) technology for the welding of stainless steel and nickel based materials. The benefits of underwater wet welding include: (1) provides a permanent repair; (2) offers crevice-five conditions; (3) reduces future inspection requirements (4) eliminates the potential for ``loose parts`` (5) can be performed in a timely approach. Underwater wet shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) has been successfully used to repair components in radiation areas of the upper section of the RPV, although this process is a manual operation and is impractical for remote applications. The developmental work at the EPRI RRAC is directed towards remote repair applications of nickel-based and stainless steel components, which are inaccessible with normal manual repair techniques, e.g., access hole covers. The flux-cored arc welding process (FCAW) was considered a viable option for underwater development, due to the ease of automation, out of position welding proficiency and self-shielding capabilities.

  2. The effect of refractory elements on the hot corrosion resistance of nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Verdonik, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    The superalloy B 1900, an alumina former, is known to possess reasonable oxidation resistance but less adequate resistance to hot corrosion. Superalloys IN 738 and U 710, chromia formers, are know to possess oxidation and corrosion resistance. Experimental alloys based on these existing superalloys are designed by mutually substituting the refractory elements Mo, W, Nb and Ta. The effects of these substitutions were tested for hot corrosion resistance. The experiments were carried out at 800, 900 and 1000{degree}C and activation energies were determined from the rate constants in the different regimes. Consistent with previous results, U 710 is the most hot corrosion-resistant standard alloy, ranked second is IN 738, and lastly is B 1900. Within the entire series of alloys, the U 710 based alloys are the most hot corrosion resistant exhibiting only the initial regime. The B 1900 based alloys with only Ta or Nb (no Mo) are the next best showing only up to accelerated attack. The IN 738 alloys rank third. Within these derivative alloys, the alloys without Nb are the best, exhibiting the smallest accelerated attack and the longest initial regime. The B 1900 based alloys containing Mo are the worst of the entire series. Within these substitutions, the alloys with Ta are the best. The alloys with Mo and Nb, and with just Mo are nearly equivalent, being the least corrosion resistant of all the alloys tested.

  3. Scale formation on Ni-based alloys in simulated solid oxide fuel cell interconnect environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Singh, P.; Windisch, C.F.; Johnson, C.D.; Schaeffer, C.

    2004-11-01

    Recent publications suggest that the environment on the fuel side of the bi-polar stainless steel SOFC interconnects changes the oxidation behavior and morphology of the scale formed on the air side. The U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center (ARC), has examined the role of such exposure conditions on advanced nickel base alloys. Alloy formulations developed at ARC and commercial alloys were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical property of oxide scales formed on selected alloys was determined in terms of areaspecific resistance (ASR). The corrosion behavior of ARC nickel-based alloys exposed to a dual environment of air/ H2 were compared to those of Crofer 22APU and Haynes 230.

  4. Constitutive modeling for Ti-6Al-4V alloy machining based on the SHPB tests and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Ke, Zhihong; Ren, Chengzu; Li, Jun

    2016-09-01

    A constitutive model is critical for the prediction accuracy of a metal cutting simulation. The highest strain rate involved in the cutting process can be in the range of 104-106 s-1. Flow stresses at high strain rates are close to that of cutting are difficult to test via experiments. Split Hopkinson compression bar (SHPB) technology is used to study the deformation behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at strain rates of 10-4-104s-1. The Johnson Cook (JC) model was applied to characterize the flow stresses of the SHPB tests at various conditions. The parameters of the JC model are optimized by using a genetic algorithm technology. The JC plastic model and the energy density-based ductile failure criteria are adopted in the proposed SHPB finite element simulation model. The simulated flow stresses and the failure characteristics, such as the cracks along the adiabatic shear bands agree well with the experimental results. Afterwards, the SHPB simulation is used to simulate higher strain rate(approximately 3×104 s-1) conditions by minimizing the size of the specimen. The JC model parameters covering higher strain rate conditions which are close to the deformation condition in cutting were calculated based on the flow stresses obtained by using the SHPB tests (10-4-104 s-1) and simulation (up to 3×104 s-1). The cutting simulation using the constitutive parameters is validated by the measured forces and chip morphology. The constitutive model and parameters for high strain rate conditions that are identical to those of cutting were obtained based on the SHPB tests and simulation.

  5. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened turbine blade alloy by mechanical alloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, H. F.; Curwick, L. R. R.; Kim, Y. G.

    1977-01-01

    There were three nickel-base alloys containing up to 18 wt. % of refractory metal examined initially for oxide dispersion strengthening. To provide greater processing freedom, however, a leaner alloy was finally selected. This base alloy, alloy D, contained 0.05C/15Cr / 2Mo/4W/2Ta/4.5Al/2.Ti/015Zr/0.01-B/Bal. Ni. Following alloy selection, the effect of extrusion, heat treatment, and oxide volume fraction and size on microstructure and properties were examined. The optimum structure was achieved in zone annealed alloy D which contained 2.5 vol. % of 35 mm Y2O3 and which was extruded 16:1 at 1038 C.

  6. The Effect of Tungsten and Niobium on the Stress Relaxation Rates of Disk Alloy CH98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic transports will probably have higher pressure ratios which will require nickel-base superalloy disks with 1300 to 1400 F temperature capability. Several advanced disk alloys are being developed to fill this need. One of these, CH98, is a promising candidate for gas turbine engines and is being studied in NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program. For large disks, residual stresses generated during quenching from solution heat treatment are often reduced by a stabilization heat treatment, in which the disk is heated to 1500 to 1600 F for several hours followed by a static air cool. The reduction in residual stress levels lessens distortion during machining of disks. However, previous work on CH98 has indicated that stabilization treatments decrease creep capability. Additions of the refractory elements tungsten and niobium improve tensile and creep properties after stabilization, while maintaining good crack growth resistance at elevated temperatures. As the additions of refractory elements increase creep capability, they might also effect stress relaxation rates and therefore the reduction in residual stress levels obtained for a given stabilization treatment. To answer this question, the stress relaxation rates of CH98 with and without tungsten and niobium additions are compared in this paper for temperatures and times generally employed in stabilization treatments on modern disk alloys.

  7. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  8. Structure-property effects of tantalum additions to nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Koss, D. A.; Jackson, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The characterization of the effect of Ta on the structure of Ni base superalloys, the determination of the effects of Ta (structure) variations on the mechanical, thermal, and oxidation behavior, and the identification of alloying elements which have potential as substitutes for Ta are investigated. Mar M247 type alloys are emphasized; nominal and analyzed compositions of ten alloys under study are given. X-ray and composition analysis are being used to determine the partitioning of alloying elements between gamma, gamma primes, and MC (cubic) as a function of Ta content. The diffusional interactions of the Mar M247-type alloys with as cast beta + gamma alloys are studied to determine the effects of Ta on alloy/coating degradation.

  9. [Effects of thermal and mechanical cycling on the metal-ceramic bond strength of machine-milled Ti2448 alloy and pure titanium].

    PubMed

    Yong, Tan; Bo, Gao

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of thermal and mechanical cycling on the metal-ceramic bond strength of machine-milled Ti2448 alloy and commercial pure titanium (cp Ti). Ceramic-cp Ti (n = 30) specimens and ceramic-Ti2448 combinations (n = 30) were prepared in accordance with ISO 9693. The specimens from each metal-ceramic combination were randomly divided into three subgroups. In group A or the control group, the specimens were only stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C; in groups B and C, the specimens were subjected to 3,000 cycles of thermal cycling between 5 and 55 °C for a dwell time of 60 s and to mechanical cycling of 20,000 or 40,000 cycles with 50 N load and 4 Hz in distilled water at 37 °C. A crack initiation test was performed using a universal testing machine in accordance with ISO 9693. Failure types at the metal-ceramic interface and the morphological and elemental composition of this interface were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope and an energy dispersive spectrometer. Statistical analysis was performed via two-way ANOVA and Tukey's adjustment test (α = 0.05). The bond strength of the ceramic-Ti2448 combination was significantly higher than that of the ceramic-cp Ti combination regardless of fatigue conditions (44.86 MPa ± 1.75 MPa and 29.21 MPa ± 2.20 MPa for Ti2448 and cp Ti, respectively; P < 0.01). The mean bond strengths of ceramic-cp Ti and ceramic-Ti2448 combinations in group C were significantly lower than that of group A (P < 0.01). Although ceramic-cp Ti combination failed adhesively at the metal-ceramic interface without the ceramic on the substrate surface, Ti2448 frameworks exhibited cohesive failure; as a result, large amounts of residual porcelain were retained on the specimens. The metal-ceramic bond strength of cp Ti and Ti2448 is decreased by thermal and mechanical cycling.

  10. Evaluation of corrosion testing techniques for selection of corrosion resistant alloys for sour gas service

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B.; Hibner, E.L.

    1996-08-01

    Slow strain rate (SSR) and C-ring stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests have historically been used to screen alloys for sour gas environments. The relevance of these testing techniques in predicting actual field corrosion behavior was evaluated for age-hardenable nickel base alloy 925 (UNS N09925) and alloy 718 (UNS N07718). While SSR testing provides an acceptable accelerated screening tool for ranking alloys in sour oil field environments, C-ring SCC testing ranks alloys higher in sour environments than SSR testing.

  11. Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Annealed and Heat Treated Alloy 625 Castings and Forgings in Sea Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Harris , J. A., "Effect of Metallurgical Reactions in Inconel Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum Alloy 625 on Corrosion Resistance in Nitric Acid", Journal of...Alloy 625, hnolls Atomic Poter Laboratory, Schenectady, Nev York, 1981. 37. Heady, R. B., "-valu-ticn of Sulfide torrosion Cracking Resi .tance )n...Richards, E. G., Heat Treatment Aspects of Welded Nickel-Based Superalloys, International Nickel Ltd., 1972. 47. Lemke, T. F., Harris , J. A., High-Alloy

  12. Adaptive-passive vibration isolation between nonrigid machines and nonrigid foundations using a dual-beam periodic structure with shape memory alloy transverse connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfang; Mak, Cheuk-Ming

    2014-11-01

    This paper examines the problem of broadband vibration control of nonrigid systems employing periodic structures with tunable parameters. It investigates this by using a semi-two-dimensional model that applies a dual-beam periodic structure with transverse branches as a parameter-tunable isolator. Conventional study of vibration control problems, including the problem of vibration control by periodic structures, usually reduces systems to equivalent single- or multi-mount models with only a unidirectional translation at a mounting point. This assumption of decoupling leads to the erroneous prediction of vibratory power transmission when designing an isolator for a nonrigid system. Such a periodic structure involves the coupling of vibrations between different mounting points and different directions of motion and is therefore a reasonable simulation of the real-life problem. However, its application as a periodic isolator has not been proposed previously. The configuration of shape memory alloy (SMA) branches and non-SMA dual beams is proposed in order that this structure can effectively exploit the advantages of SMA materials, namely their significantly varying Young's moduli which can be tuned to adjust and widen the stop bands, and can prevent the associated limitation of hysteresis. Equations are derived governing the vibration transmitted through any number of periodic mounts between nonrigid machines and foundations. Based on the derived results, two methodologies are developed to determine the proper Young's moduli of the SMA branches and minimize the transmitted power. The numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive SMA branches at the proper temperatures are able to attenuate broadband vibration by adjusting the locations and broadening the widths of stop bands. With the application of a semi-two-dimensional periodic structure to broadband vibration isolation, this paper provides an approach and supporting methodologies for broadband vibration control

  13. Calibration approach to electron probe microanalysis: A study with PWA-1480, a nickel base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terepka, F. M.; Vijayakumar, M.; Tewari, S. N.

    1989-01-01

    The utility of an indirect calibration approach in electron probe microanalysis is explored. The methodology developed is based on establishing a functional relationship between the uncorrected k-ratios and the corresponding concentrations obtained using one of the ZAF correction schemes, for all the desired elements in the concentration range of interest. In cases where a very large number of analyses are desired, such a technique significantly reduces the total time required for the microprobe analysis without any significant loss of precision in the data. A typical application of the method in the concentration mapping of the transverse cross-section of a dendrite in directionally solidified PWA-1480, a nickel-based superalloy, is described.

  14. Temperature dependence of gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.; Garlick, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    High temperature X-ray diffraction techniques were used to determine the gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch of three different nickel-base superalloys at temperatures between 18 and 1000 C. The measurements were performed on oriented single-crystal disks which had been aged to produce a semicoherent gamma-gamma prime structure. The thermal expansion of the lattice parameters of the gamma and gamma-prime phases was described by a second-order polynomial expression. The expansion of the gamma-prime phase was consistently smaller than that of the gamma phase, which caused the lattice mismatch to become more negative at higher temperatures. It was also shown that high values of lattice mismatch resulted in increased rates of directional gamma-prime coarsening during elevated temperature creep exposure.

  15. Microstructures induced by a stress gradient in a nickel-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, M.; Buffiere, J.Y.; Chaix, J.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The evolution of the microstructure of single crystals of a nickel-based superalloy during high temperature (1,323 K, 1,050 C) creep in bending has been studied. Bending provides both tensile and compressive stress gradients, consequently the effects of varying stress conditions on the evolution of the morphology of the [gamma][prime] precipitates can be determined from a single specimen. The morphological changes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy using image analysis techniques and by transmission electron microscopy, then described by dimensionless parameters. The authors discuss the dependence of the morphological changes in the superalloy on the stresses acting in the sample (magnitude and sign). The authors also discuss the driving mechanisms for the observed morphological changes.

  16. TCP suppression in a ruthenium-bearing single-crystal nickel-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, R. A.; Zhang, L.; Rae, C. M. F.; Tin, S.

    2008-07-01

    Ruthenium suppresses the precipitation of deleterious topologically close-packed (TCP) phases in high refractory content single-crystal nickel-based superalloys. The effectiveness of ruthenium as a TCP suppressant appears to be the net effect of its limited solubility in the TCP phase, a lower density of structural growth ledges for atomic attachment at the TCP/matrix interface, and destabilization of the γ' phase at elevated temperatures. These characteristics combine to limit the growth rates of TCP precipitates and decrease the driving force for their precipitation. Destabilization of the γ' phase upon the addition of ruthenium is particularly potent due to the sensitivity of the rhenium content in the γ matrix to changes in the γ' volume fraction.

  17. In-Situ Resistivity Monitoring of Microstructure Evolution in IN718 Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhi, E.; Nagy, P. B.

    2009-03-01

    This work is aimed at characterizing the irreversible changes in electrical resistivity caused by microstructure evolution in IN718 nickel-base superalloy. Of course, the electric resistivity also exhibits a strong reversible change that is a function of the instantaneous temperature, therefore realtime assessment of microstructure evolution also requires accurate monitoring of temperature. In-situ resistivity monitoring was conducted throughout various heating cycles using the Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) technique. Using thermocouple wires for connections, measurement of the DC potential difference between the connecting electrodes without current injection allows parallel monitoring of the local temperature. It was found that this method can be readily used both to record the thermal history experienced by the material and to assess the resulting irreversible microstructural changes.

  18. Replacing critical and strategic refractory metal elements in nickel-base superalloys. [NASA's COSAM program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.; Nathal, M. V.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the import status and essential nature of their use, cobalt, chromium, tantalum, and niobium were identified as strategic and critical in the aerospace industry. NASA's Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM) program aims to reduce the need for strategic materials used in gas turbine engines. Technological thrusts in two major areas are under way to meet the primary objective of conserving the use of strategic materials in nickelbase superalloys. These thrusts consist of strategic element substitution and alternative material identification. The program emphasizes cooperative research teams involving NASA Lewis Research Center, universities, and industry. The adoption of refractory metals in nickel-base superalloys is summarized including their roles in mechanical strengthening and environmental resistance; current research activities under way in the COSAM Program are presented as well as research findings to date.

  19. The high temperature deformation in cyclic loading of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Welsch, G.

    1989-01-01

    The high temperature cyclic stress softening response of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy PWA 1480 was investigated. Specimens oriented near the 001- and 111-lines were tested at 1050 C in low-cycle fatigue and then microstructurally evaluated. The 001- and 111-line specimens had dissimilar flow behavior in monotonic tensile tests, but comparable softening in low-cycle fatigue. This softening was accompanied by rapid generation of dislocation networks at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces and by a slower time-dependent coarsening of gamma-prime precipitates. Due to the rapid formation of a dislocation substructure at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces, the cyclic stress softening could be modeled with an existing theory which related cyclic stress to the evolving microstructure and dislocation structure.

  20. The cyclic stress-strain behavior of a nickel-base superalloy at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Welsch, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that examinations of the monotonic tensile and fatigue behaviors of single crystal nickel-base superalloys have disclosed orientation-dependent tension-compression anisotropies and significant differences in the mechanical response of octahedral and cube slip at intermediate temperatures. An examination is conducted of the cyclic hardening response of the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 at 650 C. In the considered case, tension-compression anisotropy is present, taking into account primarily conditions under which a single slip system is operative. Aspects of a deformation by single slip are considered along with cyclic hardening anisotropy in tension and compression. It is found that specimens deforming by octahedral slip on a single slip system have similar hardening responses in tensile and low cycle fatigue loading. Cyclic strain hardening is very low for specimens displaying single slip.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of carbides in nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczotok, A.

    2011-05-01

    It has been established that carbides in superalloys serve three functions. Fine carbides precipitated in the matrix give strengthening results. Carbides also can tie up certain elements that would otherwise promote phase instability during service. Grain boundary carbides prevent or retard grain-boundary sliding and strengthen the grain boundary, which depends significantly on carbide shape, size and distribution. Various types of carbides are possible, depending on superalloy composition and processing. In the paper optical and scanning electron microscopy investigations of carbides occurring in specimens of the polycrystalline nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247 were carried out. Conditions of carbides revealing and microstructure images acquisition have been described. Taking into consideration distribution and morphology of the carbides in matrix a method of quantitative description of Chinese script-like and blocky primary carbides on the basis of image analysis was proposed.

  2. Shock wave loading of Nickel based superalloy and microstructural features of the compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. D.; Sharma, A. K.; Thakur, N.

    2015-02-01

    Explosive shock wave loading has been employed to consolidate micro-sized nickel based IN718 superalloy powder. Cylindrical geometry configuring the various critical parameters with optimized detonation pressure has been used to consolidate the powder with desirable means. The thrust on the work is to compact the powder nearer to theoretical density having almost negligible density gradient and without melting the core of the specimen. XRD study indicates that the crystal structure of the post compacts remains the same. Shock wave loading deformed the particles as has been inferred from SEM. The variation in particle size has been measured from Laser Diffraction based Particle Size Analyzer (LDPSA). It is found that this is a rapid fast technique to produce larger and crack free compacts of metal powders without their melting and with less particle size variation.

  3. Hot corrosion behavior of the spray-formed nickel-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Min; Gu, Tian-Fu; Jia, Chong-Lin; Ge, Chang-Chun

    2016-12-01

    An investigation of low temperature hot corrosion is carried out on a spray-formed nickel-based superalloy FGH100 pre-coated with Na2SO4-NaCl at 700 °C for 100 h. Mass gain measurement, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are used to study the corrosion behavior. Results reveal that corrosion behavior follows a sequence, that is, first rapidly proceeding, then gradually slowing down, and finally forming an outer layer composed of different types of oxides and an inner layer mainly comprised of sulfides. In-depth analysis reveals that the hot corrosion of FGH100 is a combined effect of oxidation-sulfidation and transfer of oxides.

  4. Development of a unified constitutive model for an isotropic nickel base superalloy Rene 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaswamy, V. G.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    Accurate analysis of stress-strain behavior is of critical importance in the evaluation of life capabilities of hot section turbine engine components such as turbine blades and vanes. The constitutive equations used in the finite element analysis of such components must be capable of modeling a variety of complex behavior exhibited at high temperatures by cast superalloys. The classical separation of plasticity and creep employed in most of the finite element codes in use today is known to be deficient in modeling elevated temperature time dependent phenomena. Rate dependent, unified constitutive theories can overcome many of these difficulties. A new unified constitutive theory was developed to model the high temperature, time dependent behavior of Rene' 80 which is a cast turbine blade and vane nickel base superalloy. Considerations in model development included the cyclic softening behavior of Rene' 80, rate independence at lower temperatures and the development of a new model for static recovery.

  5. Influence of picosecond laser irradiation on nickel-based superalloy surface microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronić, S.; Milovanovic, D.; Milosavljević, A.; Momcilovic, M.; Petrusko, D.

    2012-05-01

    The investigation presented in this paper was carried out on the nickel-based superalloy, Nimonic 263, a material widely used at elevated temperatures and pressures. The samples were exposed to a Nd3+:YAG pulsed laser, at a wavelength of 1064 nm and a pulse duration of 170 ps, and the estimated threshold damage was 2 mJ. Different pulse energies and numbers of pulses were applied in air and helium-enriched atmospheres. Spots obtained by the laser interaction with the material were observed by optical and scanning electron microscopes and analyzed by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Vickers microhardness tests were performed. In this paper, the changes that had occurred at the sample surface microstructure as a result of laser-material interaction are discussed with the aim of contributing to the determination of optimal laser parameters in the laser surface treatment process.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Vacuum Heat Treatment of Nickel-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, Francesco; Warnken, Nils; Gebelin, Jean-Christophe; Reed, Roger C.

    2013-11-01

    Numerical modeling is carried out of the heat transfer effects arising during heat treatment of single-crystal nickel-based superalloys, of the type used for high pressure turbine blades in jet engines. For these components, fine control of the thermal history during processing is needed to avoid incipient melting and to develop the properties needed for service applications. Computational fluid dynamics methods are employed for the analysis. The modeling is used to predict the temporal evolution of the temperature distribution inside the treated component, to calculate heat transfer coefficients, and to analyze the homogeneity of heat transfer. The impact of the boundary conditions is investigated with particular emphasis on the temperature of the heating elements. Its value was derived from an analytical model of the furnace using effective view factors. The predictions of the modeling are tested against measurements made on laboratory-scale apparatus containing features of production-scale equipment.

  7. Directional solidification processing of alloys using an applied electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKannan, Eugene C. (Inventor); Schmidt, Deborah D. (Inventor); Ahmed, Shaffiq (Inventor); Bond, Robert W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for obtaining an alloy having an ordered microstructure which comprises the steps of heating the central portion of the alloy under uniform temperature so that it enters a liquid phase while the outer portions remain solid, applying a constant electric current through the alloy during the heating step, and solidifying the liquid central portion of the alloy by subjecting it to a temperature-gradient zone so that cooling occurs in a directional manner and at a given rate of speed while maintaining the application of the constant electric current through the alloy. The method is particularly suitable for use with nickel-based superalloys. The method of the present invention produces an alloy having superior characteristics such as reduced segregation. After subsequent precipitation by heat-treatment, the alloys produced by the present invention will have excellent strength and high-temperature resistance.

  8. Surface nano-hardness and microstructure of a single crystal nickel base superalloy after laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G. X.; Liu, J. D.; Qiao, H. C.; Zhou, Y. Z.; Jin, T.; Zhao, J. B.; Sun, X. F.; Hu, Z. Q.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoindention tests and SEM microstructure observations were conducted on a single crystal nickel base superalloy after laser shock peening (LSP). Distinct surface hardening behavior was found to occur under the selected LSP technology. A large discrepancy in γʹ areas happened on laser shocked regions and the large plastic deformation embodied in γʹ phases' deformation brought a significant hardening effect.

  9. Progress in Synthesis of Highly Active and Stable Nickel-Based Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Sibudjing; Kathiraser, Yasotha; Ni, Jun; Oemar, Usman; Li, Ziwei; Saw, Eng Toon

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CH4 ) have increased alarm due to escalating effects of global warming. The dry carbon dioxide reforming of methane (DRM) reaction is a sustainable way to utilize these notorious greenhouse gases. This paper presents a review of recent progress in the development of nickel-based catalysts for the DRM reaction. The enviable low cost and wide availability of nickel compared with noble metals is the main reason for persistent research efforts in optimizing the synthesis of nickel-based catalysts. Important catalyst features for the rational design of a coke-resistant nickel-based nanocatalyst for the DRM reaction are also discussed. In addition, several innovative developments based on salient features for the stabilization of nickel nanocatalysts through various means (which include functionalization with precursors, synthesis by plasma treatment, stabilization/confinement on mesoporous/microporous/carbon supports, and the formation of metal oxides) are highlighted. The final part of this review covers major issues and proposed improvement strategies pertaining to the rational design of nickel-based catalysts with high activity and stability for the DRM reaction.

  10. Orientation and temperature dependence of some mechanical properties of the single-crystal nickel-base superalloy Rene N4. II - Low cycle fatigue behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) properties of a single-crystal nickel-base superalloy Rene N4, have been examined at 760 and 980 C in air. Specimens having crystallographic orientations near the 001, 011, -111, 023, -236, and -145 lines were tested in fully reversed, total-strain-controlled LCF tests at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. At 760 C, this alloy exhibited orientation dependent tension-compression anisotropies of yielding which continued to failure. Also at 760 C, orientations exhibiting predominately single slip exhibited serrated yielding for many cycles. At 980 C, orientation dependencies of yielding behavior were smaller. In spite of the tension-compression anisotropies, cyclic stress range-strain range behavior was not strongly orientation dependent for either test temperature. Fatigue life on a total strain range basis was highly orientation dependent at 760 and 980 C and was related chiefly to elastic modulus, low modulus orientations having longer lives. Stage I crack growth on 111 planes was dominant at 760 C, while Stage II crack growth occurred at 980 C. Crack initiation generally occurred at near-surface micropores, but occasionally at oxidation spikes in the 980 C tests.

  11. An investigation into the effects of hydrogen on the fracture and deformation of Alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, Douglas M.

    1994-11-01

    this study investigated the effect of hydrogen on the fracture of a nickel-base superalloy, Alloy X-750 in the solution treated and aged (HTH) condition. The effect of hydrogen was examined through tensile testing and fracture toughness testing incorporating observations from scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy.

  12. Properties and microstructures for dual alloy combinations of three superalloys with alloy 901

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Dual alloy combinations have potential for use in aircraft engine components such as turbine disks where a wide range of stress and temperature regimes exists during operation. Such alloy combinations may directly result in the conservation of elements which are costly or not available domestically. Preferably, a uniform heat treatment yielding good properties for both alloys should be used. Dual alloy combinations of iron rich Alloy 901 with nickel base superalloys Rene 95, Astroloy, or MERL 76 were not isostatically pressed from prealloyed powders. Individual alloys, alloy mixtures, and layered alloy combinations were given the heat treatments specified for their use in turbine disks or appropriate for Alloy 901. Selected specimens were overaged for 1500 hr at 650 C. Metallographic examinations revealed the absence of phases not originally present in either alloy of a combination. Mechanical tests showed adequate properties in combinations of Rene 95 or Astroloy with Alloy 901 when given the Alloy 901 heat treatment. Combinations with MERL 76 had better properties when given the MERL 76 heat treatment. The results indicate that these combinations are promising candidates for use in turbine disks.

  13. Alloy and structural optimization of a directionally solidified lamellar eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1976-01-01

    Mechanical property characterization tests of a directionally solidified Ni-20 percent Cb-2.5 percent Al-6 percent Cr cellular eutectic turbine blade alloy demonstrated excellent long time creep stability and indicated intermediate temperature transverse tensile ductility and shear strength to be somewhat low for turbine blade applications. Alloy and structural optimization significantly improves these off-axis properties with no loss of longitudinal creep strength or stability. The optimized alloy-structure combination is a carbon modified Ni-20.1 percent Cb-2.5 percent Al-6.0 percent Cr-0.06 percent C composition processed under conditions producing plane front solidification and a fully-lamellar microstructure. With current processing technology, this alloy exhibits a creep-rupture advantage of 39 C over the best available nickel base superalloy, directionally solidified MAR M200+ Hf. While improved by about 20 percent, shear strength of the optimized alloy remains well below typical superalloy values.

  14. Resistance of a directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-delta eutectic alloy to recrystallization. [Ni-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Scheuermann, C. M.; Andrews, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    A lamellar nickel-base directionally-solidified eutectic gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy has potential as an advanced gas turbine blade material. The microstructural stability of this alloy was investigated. Specimens were plastically deformed by uniform compression or Brinell indentation, then annealed between 750 and 1120 C. Microstructural changes observed after annealing included gamma prime coarsening, pinch-off and spheroidization of delta lamellae, and appearance of an unidentified blocky phase in surface layers. All but the first of these was localized in severely deformed regions, suggesting that microstructural instability may not be a serious problem in the use of this alloy.

  15. A thermomechanical analysis of sticking-sliding zones at the tool-chip interface in dry high-speed machining of aluminium alloy A2024-T351: A hybrid Analytical-Fe model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avevor, Y.; Moufki, A.; Nouari, M.

    2016-10-01

    In high speed dry machining of aluminium alloy (A2024-T351), the tribological conditions at the tool-chip interface strongly affect the thermomechanical process of chip formation, the tool wear and the surface integrity. In order to contribute to the understanding of the effect of friction conditions, a hybrid Analytical-FE model is presented. The transient nonlinear thermal problem in the tool-chip-workpiece system is solved by using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element model. To illustrate the model results, the relationship between the local friction coefficient, in the sliding zone, and the apparent friction coefficient, which takes into account the whole tool-chip contact, is presented.

  16. Effects of conventional machining on the high cycle fatigue strength and crack initiation sites of the gamma titanium aluminide alloy Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr (at%) at 23 and 760 C

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.E.; Eylon, D.

    1999-07-01

    Effects of a deformed surface layer, created by conventional machining, on the high cycle fatigue strength (10e6 cycles) and fatigue initiation sites of Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr (at%) were examined above and below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. All samples were tested to failure under the same step loading profile. Comparisons were made between samples having the same load history. At room temperature, fatigue strength and initiation sites were equivalent for turned and electropolished surface conditions. At the anticipated service temperature, 760 C, the work hardened layer created by turning quickly recrystallized. This fine recrystallized surface enhanced the fatigue crack initiation resistance of turned specimens when compared to coarse grained electropolished samples which did not recrystallize during the test. The severe surface deformation resulting from conventional machining did not impair the high cycle fatigue behavior of this intermetallic alloy under the conditions evaluated.

  17. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  18. Use of Precious Metal-Modifed Nickel-Base Superalloys for Thin Gage Applications (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    surface in the intermediate and final rolled products. Future work will include evaluating alloys with a combination of rhenium and tantalum (up to 2...final rolled products. Future work will include evaluating alloys with a combination of rhenium and tantalum (up to 2 atomic % total) in place of

  19. A new nickel-base wrought superalloy for applications up to 1033 K (1400 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, W. B.; Black, H. L.; Harf, F. H.; Young, S. G.

    1974-01-01

    Alloy was melted from high purity raw materials and cast ingots extruded at 1422 K. Material was hot rolled to 0.013 m diameter bar stock. Partial solution heat-treatment followed by aging produced structure of fine gamma prime precipitate reinforcing gamma matrix containing coarser blocky gamma prime particles. Alloy can be processed by powder metallurgy.

  20. The correlation between the temperature dependence of the CRSS and the formation of superlattice-intrinsic stacking faults in the nickel-base superalloy PWA 1480. [critical resolved shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    The PWA 1480 nickel-base superalloy is known to exhibit a unique minimum in the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) at about 400 C. This paper reports an observation of a deformation mechanism whose temperature dependence correlates exactly with the reduction in the CRSS. It was found that, after monotonic or cyclic deformation of PWA 1480 at 20 C, the deformation substructures typically contain high density of superlattice-intrinsic stacking faults (S-ISFs) within the gamma-prime precipitates. As the temperature of deformation is increased, the density of S-ISFs is reduced, until finally no faults are observed after deformation in the range from 400 to 705 C. The reduction in the fault density corresponds exactly to the reduction in the CRSS, and the temperature at which the fault density is zero corresponds with the minimum in the CRRS. Two possible mechanisms related to the presence of the S-ISFs in the alloy are considered.