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  1. Silencing Nicotiana attenuata LHY and ZTL alters circadian rhythms in flowers.

    PubMed

    Yon, Felipe; Joo, Youngsung; Cortés Llorca, Lucas; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2016-02-01

    The rhythmic opening/closing and volatile emissions of flowers are known to attract pollinators at specific times. That these rhythms are maintained under constant light or dark conditions suggests a circadian clock involvement. Although a forward and reverse genetic approach has led to the identification of core circadian clock components in Arabidopsis thaliana, the involvement of these clock components in floral rhythms has remained untested, probably because of the weak diurnal rhythms in A. thaliana flowers. Here, we addressed the role of these core clock components in the flowers of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, whose flowers open at night, emit benzyl acetone (BA) scents and move vertically through a 140° arc. We first measured N. attenuata floral rhythms under constant light conditions. The results suggest that the circadian clock controls flower opening, BA emission and pedicel movement, but not flower closing. We generated transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in the homologous genes of Arabidopsis LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and ZEITLUPE (ZTL), which are known to be core clock components. Silencing NaLHY and NaZTL strongly altered floral rhythms in different ways, indicating that conserved clock components in N. attenuata coordinate these floral rhythms. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Silencing Nicotiana attenuata LHY and ZTL alters circadian rhythms in flowers

    PubMed Central

    Yon, Felipe; Joo, Youngsung; Cortés Llorca, Lucas; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T.; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The rhythmic opening/closing and volatile emissions of flowers is known to attract pollinators at specific times. That these rhythms are maintained under constant light or dark conditions suggests a circadian clock involvement. Although a forward and reverse genetic approach led to the identification of core circadian clock components in Arabidopsis thaliana, involvement of these clock components for floral rhythms remained untested likely due to weak diurnal rhythms in A. thaliana flowers.Here we addressed the role of these core clock components in the flowers of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, whose flowers open at night, emit benzyl acetone (BA) scents, and move vertically through a 140° arc.We first measured N. attenuata floral rhythms under constant light conditions. The results suggest that the circadian clock controls flower opening, BA emission, and pedicel movement, but not flower closing.We generated transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in the homologous genes of Arabidopsis LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and ZEITLUPE (ZTL), which are known as a core clock component. Silencing NaLHY and NaZTL strongly altered floral rhythms in different ways, indicating that conserved clock components in N. attenuata coordinate these floral rhythms. PMID:26439540

  3. Changes in cytokinins are sufficient to alter developmental patterns of defense metabolites in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Brütting, Christoph; Schäfer, Martin; Vanková, Radomíra; Gase, Klaus; Baldwin, Ian T; Meldau, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Plant defense metabolites are well known to be regulated developmentally. The optimal defense (OD) theory posits that a tssue's fitness values and probability of attack should determine defense metabolite allocations. Young leaves are expected to provide a larger fitness value to the plant, and therefore their defense allocations should be higher when compared with older leaves. The mechanisms that coordinate development with defense remain unknown and frequently confound tests of the OD theory predictions. Here we demonstrate that cytokinins (CKs) modulate ontogeny-dependent defenses in Nicotiana attenuata. We found that leaf CK levels highly correlate with inducible defense expressions with high levels in young and low levels in older leaves. We genetically manipulated the developmental patterns of two different CK classes by using senescence- and chemically inducible expression of CK biosynthesis genes. Genetically modifying the levels of different CKs in leaves was sufficient to alter ontogenic patterns of defense metabolites. We conclude that the developmental regulation of growth hormones that include CKs plays central roles in connecting development with defense and therefore in establishing optimal patterns of defense allocation in plants. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Silencing an N-Acyltransferase-Like Involved in Lignin Biosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata Dramatically Alters Herbivory-Induced Phenolamide Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Onkokesung, Nawaporn; Galis, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    In a transcriptomic screen of Manduca sexta-induced N-acyltransferases in leaves of Nicotiana attenuata, we identified an N-acyltransferase gene sharing a high similarity with the tobacco lignin-biosynthetic hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) gene whose expression is controlled by MYB8, a transcription factor that regulates the production of phenylpropanoid polyamine conjugates (phenolamides, PAs). To evaluate the involvement of this HCT-like gene in lignin production as well as the resulting crosstalk with PA metabolism during insect herbivory, we transiently silenced (by VIGs) the expression of this gene and performed non-targeted (UHPLC-ESI/TOF-MS) metabolomics analyses. In agreement with a conserved function of N. attenuata HCT-like in lignin biogenesis, HCT-silenced plants developed weak, soft stems with greatly reduced lignin contents. Metabolic profiling demonstrated large shifts (up to 12% deregulation in total extracted ions in insect-attacked leaves) due to a large diversion of activated coumaric acid units into the production of developmentally and herbivory-induced coumaroyl-containing PAs (N′,N′′-dicoumaroylspermidine, N′,N′′-coumaroylputrescine, etc) and to minor increases in the most abundant free phenolics (chlorogenic and cryptochlorogenic acids), all without altering the production of well characterized herbivory-responsive caffeoyl- and feruloyl-based putrescine and spermidine PAs. These data are consistent with a strong metabolic tension, exacerbated during herbivory, over the allocation of coumaroyl-CoA units among lignin and unusual coumaroyl-containing PAs, and rule out a role for HCT-LIKE in tuning the herbivory-induced accumulation of other PAs. Additionally, these results are consistent with a role for lignification as an induced anti-herbivore defense. PMID:23704878

  5. Ectopic Terpene Synthase Expression Enhances Sesquiterpene Emission in Nicotiana attenuata without Altering Defense or Development of Transgenic Plants or Neighbors1[W

    PubMed Central

    Schuman, Meredith C.; Palmer-Young, Evan C.; Schmidt, Axel; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Sesquiterpenoids, with approximately 5,000 structures, are the most diverse class of plant volatiles with manifold hypothesized functions in defense, stress tolerance, and signaling between and within plants. These hypotheses have often been tested by transforming plants with sesquiterpene synthases expressed behind the constitutively active 35S promoter, which may have physiological costs measured as inhibited growth and reduced reproduction or may require augmentation of substrate pools to achieve enhanced emission, complicating the interpretation of data from affected transgenic lines. Here, we expressed maize (Zea mays) terpene synthase10 (ZmTPS10), which produces (E)-α-bergamotene and (E)-β-farnesene, or a point mutant ZmTPS10M, which produces primarily (E)-β-farnesene, under control of the 35S promoter in the ecological model plant Nicotiana attenuata. Transgenic N. attenuata plants had specifically enhanced emission of target sesquiterpene(s) with no changes detected in their emission of any other volatiles. Treatment with herbivore or jasmonate elicitors induces emission of (E)-α-bergamotene in wild-type plants and also tended to increase emission of (E)-α-bergamotene and (E)-β-farnesene in transgenics. However, transgenics did not differ from the wild type in defense signaling or chemistry and did not alter defense chemistry in neighboring wild-type plants. These data are inconsistent with within-plant and between-plant signaling functions of (E)-β-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene in N. attenuata. Ectopic sesquiterpene emission was apparently not costly for transgenics, which were similar to wild-type plants in their growth and reproduction, even when forced to compete for common resources. These transgenics would be well suited for field experiments to investigate indirect ecological effects of sesquiterpenes for a wild plant in its native habitat. PMID:25187528

  6. Fitness consequences of a clock pollinator filter in Nicotiana attenuata flowers in nature.

    PubMed

    Yon, Felipe; Kessler, Danny; Joo, Youngsung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T

    2017-08-19

    Nicotiana attenuata flowers, diurnally open, emit scents and move vertically to interact with nocturnal hawkmoth and day-active hummingbird pollinators. To examine the fitness consequences of these floral rhythms, we conducted pollination trials in the plant's native habitat with phase-shifted flowers of plants silenced in circadian clock genes. The results revealed that some pollination benefits observed under glasshouse conditions were not reproduced under natural field conditions. Floral arrhythmicity increased pollination success by hummingbirds, while reducing those by hawkmoths in the field. Thus floral circadian rhythms may influence a plant's fitness by filtering pollinators leading to altered seed set from outcrossed pollen. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional specialization of Nicotiana attenuata phytochromes in leaf development and flowering time.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Variluska; Oh, Youngjoo; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Gase, Klaus; Baldwin, Ian Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Phytochromes mainly function in photoautotrophic organisms to adjust growth in response to fluctuating light signals. The different isoforms of plant phytochromes often display both conserved and divergent roles, presumably to fine-tune plant responses to environmental signals and optimize fitness. Here we describe the distinct, yet partially redundant, roles of phytochromes NaPHYA, NaPHYB1 and NaPHYB2 in a wild tobacco species, Nicotiana attenuata using RNAi-silenced phytochrome lines. Consistent with results reported from other species, silencing the expression of NaPHYA or NaPHYB2 in N. attenuata had mild or no influence on plant development as long as NaPHYB1 was functional; whereas silencing the expression of NaPHYB1 alone strongly altered flowering time and leaf morphology. The contribution of NaPHYB2 became significant only in the absence of NaPHYB1; plants silenced for both NaPHYB1 and NaPHYB2 largely skipped the rosette-stage of growth to rapidly produce long, slender stalks that bore flowers early: hallmarks of the shade-avoidance responses. The phenotyping of phytochrome-silenced lines, combined with sequence and transcript accumulation analysis, suggest the independent functional diversification of the phytochromes, and a dominant role of NaPHYB1 and NaPHYB2 in N. attenuata's vegetative and reproductive development. © 2016 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. Ecophysiological comparison of direct and indirect defenses in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Halitschke, R; Keßler, A; Kahl, J; Lorenz, A; Baldwin, I T

    2000-08-01

    After herbivore attack, plants launch a suite of direct and indirect defense responses that must be coordinated if plants are to realize a fitness benefit from these responses. Here we characterize the volatile emissions in the native tobacco plant, Nicotiana attenuata Torr. ex Wats., that are elicited by tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta L.) attack and are known to function as attractants for parasitoids. To provide the first ecophysiological comparison of examples of both types of defense in the same species, we characterize the elicitation and signaling mechanisms, the resources required, and the potential costs and benefits of the volatile release and compare these traits with those of the well-described induced direct defense in this species, nicotine production. The release of (E)-β-ocimene, cis-α-bergamotene and linalool is dramatically induced within 24 h by application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), caterpillar feeding, and the treatment of mechanical wounds with larval oral secretions (OS), but not by mechanical damage alone. Plants from different geographic locations produce volatile blends that differ in composition. The most consistently released component from all genotypes, cis-α-berga-motene, is positively related to the amount of MeJA and the level of wounding if OS are applied to the wounds. The volatile release is strongly light dependent, dropping to undetectable quantities during dark periods, even when temperatures are elevated to match those of the light period. Inhibitors of wound-induced jasmonate accumulation (salicylates and auxins), which are known to inhibit wound-induced nicotine production, do not inhibit the release of volatiles. By individually inducing different leaf positions with OS and, on other plants, excising them after induction, we demonstrate that the emission is largely a systemic, whole-plant response, which is maximally triggered when the second fully expanded leaf is induced. We conclude that while both are whole

  9. Multiple interactions of NaHER1 protein with abscisic acid signaling in Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Son Truong; Baldwin, Ian T; Gális, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    Previously, we identified a novel herbivore elicitor-regulated protein in Nicotiana attenuata (NaHER1) that is required to suppress abscisic acid (ABA) catabolism during herbivore attack and activate a full defense response against herbivores. ABA, in addition to its newly defined role in defense activation, mainly controls seed germination and stomatal function of land plants. Here we show that N. attenuata seeds silenced in the expression of NaHER1 by RNA interference (irHER1) accumulated less ABA during germination, and germinated faster on ABA-containing media compared to WT. Curiously, epidermal cells of irHER1 plants were wrinkled, possibly due to the previously demonstrated increase in transpiration of irHER1 plants that may affect turgor and cause wrinkling of the cells. We conclude that NaHER1 is a highly pleiotropic regulator of ABA responses in N. attenuata plants.

  10. Multiple interactions of NaHER1 protein with abscisic acid signaling in Nicotiana attenuata plants

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Son Truong; Baldwin, Ian T; Gális, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we identified a novel herbivore elicitor-regulated protein in Nicotiana attenuata (NaHER1) that is required to suppress abscisic acid (ABA) catabolism during herbivore attack and activate a full defense response against herbivores. ABA, in addition to its newly defined role in defense activation, mainly controls seed germination and stomatal function of land plants. Here we show that N. attenuata seeds silenced in the expression of NaHER1 by RNA interference (irHER1) accumulated less ABA during germination, and germinated faster on ABA-containing media compared to WT. Curiously, epidermal cells of irHER1 plants were wrinkled, possibly due to the previously demonstrated increase in transpiration of irHER1 plants that may affect turgor and cause wrinkling of the cells. We conclude that NaHER1 is a highly pleiotropic regulator of ABA responses in N. attenuata plants. PMID:24022276

  11. A Jasmonate ZIM-Domain Protein NaJAZd Regulates Floral Jasmonic Acid Levels and Counteracts Flower Abscission in Nicotiana attenuata Plants

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.; Galis, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is an important regulator of plant growth, development and defense. The jasmonate-ZIM domain (JAZ) proteins are key regulators in jasmonate signaling ubiquitously present in flowering plants but their functional annotation remains largely incomplete. Recently, we identified 12 putative JAZ proteins in native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, and initiated systematic functional characterization of these proteins by reverse genetic approaches. In this report, Nicotiana attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaJAZd (irJAZd) by RNA interference were used to characterize NaJAZd function. Although NaJAZd transcripts were strongly and transiently up-regulated in the rosette leaves by simulated herbivory treatment, we did not observe strong defense-related phenotypes, such as altered herbivore performance or the constitutive accumulation of defense-related secondary metabolites in irJAZd plants compared to wild type plants, both in the glasshouse and the native habitat of Nicotiana attenuata in the Great Basin Desert, Utah, USA. Interestingly, irJAZd plants produced fewer seed capsules than did wild type plants as a result of increased flower abscission in later stages of flower development. The early- and mid-developmental stages of irJAZd flowers had reduced levels of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, while fully open flowers had normal levels, but these were impaired in NaMYB305 transcript accumulations. Previously, NaMYB305-silenced plants were shown to have strong flower abscission phenotypes and contained lower NECTARIN 1 transcript levels, phenotypes which are copied in irJAZd plants. We propose that the NaJAZd protein is required to counteract flower abscission, possibly by regulating jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine levels and/or expression of NaMYB305 gene in Nicotiana attenuata flowers. This novel insight into the function of JAZ proteins in flower and seed development highlights the diversity of functions played by jasmonates

  12. The chemistry of defense and apparency in the corollas ofNicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Euler, Michael; Baldwin, Ian T

    1996-03-01

    The morphological and chemical characteristics of flowers which attract pollinators present a dilemma for plants; advertising may increase the "apparency" of plants to their predators and some pollinators are also predators. We explore how a self-compatible disturbance species,Nicotiana attenuata, copes with this potential dilemma by examining the changes in emission of chemicals from flowers in response to pollination and herbivory. We propose that chemical changes induced by herbivory and pollination reflect the function of the chemicals in the plant. The emission of a single compound, benzyl acetone (BA, 4-phenyl-2-butanone), by flowers increases dramatically (50x) in the evening, peaking just after dark -a pattern of emission characteristic of moth-pollinated flowers. Pools of BA were found only in the outer lip of the corolla where pollinators come in contact with the flower, and diurnal changes in the size of the corolla pool closely paralleled the amount emitted by intact flowers throughout the day, as determined by headspace sampling. Pollination dramatically decreases both the pools of BA in the corolla and its emission from flowers. Similarly, nicotine, a broadly biocidal defense metabolite and an induced defense in vegetative and reproductive tissues, is also found in the headspace of flowers and is principally localized in the basal parts of the corolla below the attachment of the filaments and the nectar reward. Moreover, the dynamics of the corolla pools of BA and nicotine throughout the day are consistent with their roles in advertisement and defense, respectively. The corolla pools of nicotine are stable throughout the day except during the period of peak BA production and emission when nicotine pools decrease significantly. The coordinated increase in BA emission and decline in nicotine pools are not inexorably linked, because herbivory or mechanical damage to corolla tissue rapidly increases corolla nicotine pools without affecting the increase in

  13. Herbivore induction of jasmonic acid and chemical defences reduce photosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Nabity, Paul D; Zavala, Jorge A; DeLucia, Evan H

    2013-01-01

    Herbivory initiates a shift in plant metabolism from growth to defence that may reduce fitness in the absence of further herbivory. However, the defence-induced changes in carbon assimilation that precede this reallocation in resources remain largely undetermined. This study characterized the response of photosynthesis to herbivore induction of jasmonic acid (JA)-related defences in Nicotiana attenuata to increase understanding of these mechanisms. It was hypothesized that JA-induced defences would immediately reduce the component processes of photosynthesis upon attack and was predicted that wild-type plants would suffer greater reductions in photosynthesis than plants lacking JA-induced defences. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and thermal spatial patterns were measured together with the production of defence-related metabolites after attack and through recovery. Herbivore damage immediately reduced electron transport and gas exchange in wild-type plants, and gas exchange remained suppressed for several days after attack. The sustained reductions in gas exchange occurred concurrently with increased defence metabolites in wild-type plants, whereas plants lacking JA-induced defences suffered minimal suppression in photosynthesis and no increase in defence metabolite production. This suppression in photosynthesis occurred only after sustained defence signalling and defence chemical mobilization, whereas a short bout of feeding damage only transiently altered components of photosynthesis. It was identified that lipoxygenase signalling interacted with photosynthetic electron transport and that the resulting JA-related metabolites reduced photosynthesis. These data represent a metabolic cost to mounting a chemical defence against herbivory and link defence-signalling networks to the differential effects of herbivory on photosynthesis in remaining leaf tissues in a time-dependent manner.

  14. Priming of anti-herbivore defence in Nicotiana attenuata by insect oviposition: herbivore-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Bandoly, Michele; Grichnik, Roland; Hilker, Monika; Steppuhn, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Oviposition by Spodoptera exigua on Nicotiana attenuata primes plant defence against its larvae that consequently suffer reduced performance. To reveal whether this is a general response of tobacco to insect oviposition or species-specific, we investigated whether also Manduca sexta oviposition primes N. attenuata's anti-herbivore defence. The plant response to M. sexta and S. exigua oviposition overlapped in the egg-primed feeding-induced production of the phenylpropanoid caffeoylputrescine. While M. sexta larvae were unaffected in their performance, they showed a novel response to the oviposition-mediated plant changes: a reduced antimicrobial activity in their haemolymph. In a cross-resistance experiment, S. exigua larvae suffered reduced performance on M. sexta-oviposited plants like they did on S. exigua-oviposited plants. The M. sexta oviposition-mediated plant effects on the S. exigua larval performance and on M. sexta larval immunity required expression of the NaMyb8 transcription factor that is governing biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids such as caffeoylputrescine. Thus, NaMyb8-dependent defence traits mediate the effects that oviposition by both lepidopteran species exerts on the plant's anti-herbivore defence. These results suggest that oviposition by lepidopteran species on N. attenuata leaves may generally prime the feeding-induced production of certain plant defence compounds but that different herbivore species show different susceptibility to egg-primed plant effects.

  15. Unpredictability of nectar nicotine promotes outcrossing by hummingbirds in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Danny; Bhattacharya, Samik; Diezel, Celia; Rothe, Eva; Gase, Klaus; Schöttner, Matthias; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-08-01

    Many plants use sophisticated strategies to maximize their reproductive success via outcrossing. Nicotiana attenuata flowers produce nectar with nicotine at concentrations that are repellent to hummingbirds, increasing the number of flowers visited per plant. In choice tests using native hummingbirds, we show that these important pollinators learn to tolerate high-nicotine nectar but prefer low-nicotine nectar, and show no signs of nicotine addiction. Nectar nicotine concentrations, unlike those of other vegetative tissues, are unpredictably variable among flowers, not only among populations, but also within populations, and even among flowers within an inflorescence. To evaluate whether variations in nectar nicotine concentrations increase outcrossing, polymorphic microsatellite markers, optimized to evaluate paternity in native N. attenuata populations, were used to compare outcrossing in plants silenced for expression of a biosynthetic gene for nicotine production (Napmt1/2) and in control empty vector plants, which were antherectomized and transplanted into native populations. When only exposed to hummingbird pollinators, seeds produced by flowers with nicotine in their nectar had a greater number of genetically different sires, compared to seeds from nicotine-free flowers. As the variation in nectar nicotine levels among flowers in an inflorescence decreased in N. attenuata plants silenced in various combinations of three Dicer-like (DCL) proteins, small RNAs are probably involved in the unpredictable variation in nectar nicotine levels within a plant.

  16. Constraints to herbivore-induced systemic responses: bidirectional signaling along orthostichies in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Schittko, Ursula; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-03-01

    We investigated the impact of leaf vascular connections on systemically transmitted herbivore-induced gene expression in Nicotiana attenuata. Although systemic signaling is clearly associated with the plant vascular system, few studies consider vascular architecture when measuring systemically induced defenses. N. attenuata is a plant with dispersed phyllotaxis approximating 3/8 in the rosette stage of growth. We mimicked Manduca sexta herbivory by introducing larval regurgitant to wounds produced with a standardized continuous mechanical wounding and investigated mRNA accumulation of genes. Herbivory in N. attenuata induces the expression of genes coding for a proteinase inhibitor protein (PI), threonine deaminase (TD, EC 4.3.1.19), a luminal-binding protein (BiP), and an alpha-dioxygenase (alpha-DOX). We measured the systemic response of sink leaves when orthostichous (growing at an angular distance of 0 degrees) source leaves were treated, and vice versa, and compared it to the systemic response of leaves growing at the maximum angular distance of 180 degrees. Vascular architecture clearly controlled the intensity of systemic mRNA accumulation within the 4-hr time frame of the experiment. In addition, we found signal translocation to be bidirectional, travelling from source to sink as well as from sink to source leaves, which argues against a phloem-based assimilate-linked signal identity.

  17. Silencing of a germin-like gene in Nicotiana attenuata improves performance of native herbivores.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yonggen; Baldwin, Ian T

    2006-03-01

    Germins and germin-like proteins (GLPs) are known to function in pathogen resistance, but their involvement in defense against insect herbivores is poorly understood. In the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, attack from the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta or elicitation by adding larval oral secretions (OS) to wounds up-regulates transcripts of a GLP. To understand the function of this gene, which occurs as a single copy, we cloned the full-length NaGLP and silenced its expression in N. attenuata by expressing a 250-bp fragment in an antisense orientation with an Agrobacterium-based transformation system and by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Homozygous lines harboring a single insert and VIGS plants had significantly reduced constitutive (measured in roots) and elicited NaGLP transcript levels (in leaves). Silencing NaGLP improved M. sexta larval performance and Tupiocoris notatus preference, two native herbivores of N. attenuata. Silencing NaGLP also attenuated the OS-induced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), diterpene glycosides, and trypsin proteinase inhibitor responses, which may explain the observed susceptibility of antisense or VIGS plants to herbivore attack and increased nicotine contents, but did not influence the OS-elicited jasmonate and salicylate bursts, or the release of the volatile organic compounds (limonene, cis-alpha-bergamotene, and germacrene-A) that function as an indirect defense. This suggests that NaGLP is involved in H(2)O(2) production and might also be related to ethylene production and/or perception, which in turn influences the defense responses of N. attenuata via H(2)O(2) and ethylene-signaling pathways.

  18. Methyl jasmonate as an allelopathic agent: sagebrush inhibits germination of a neighboring tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Preston, Catherine A; Betts, Hazel; Baldwi, Ian T

    2002-11-01

    Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata is the dominant and defining shrub in the Great Basin Desert, with well-documented allelopathic tendencies that have generally been ascribed to its most abundantly released secondary metabolites. However, as a minor component, sagebrush releases a highly biologically active substance, methyljasmonate (MeJA), which is known to function as both a germination inhibitor and promoter in laboratory studies. Nicotiana attenuata is a tobacco species native to the Great Basin Desert and grows in newly burned juniper-sagebrush habitats for 2-3 yr following a fire. With a combination of field and laboratory studies, we examined the role of MeJA release from sagebrush by both air and water transport in inhibiting N. attenuata seed germination. We demonstrated that sagebrush interacts allelopathically with the seed bank of N. attenuata through its release of MeJA. In the field, seeds buried 0-40 cm from sagebrush plants for 4 months in net bags had significantly reduced germination compared to seeds buried similarly but protected in plastic bags. Moreover, germination on soils collected from underneath sagebrush plants was reduced by 60% compared to seeds placed on soils collected between sagebrush plants or outside of the sagebrush population. Exposure to A. tridentata seeds and seedlings did not affect N. attenuata germination, suggesting that established sagebrush plants only influence the tobacco's seed bank. In the laboratory, exposure of seeds to sagebrush emissions resulted in germination delays of up to 6 d. Exposure to volatile and aqueous MeJA also inhibited germination of N. attenuata seeds at quantities that are released naturally by sagebrush: 3.5 microg/hr and 1.12 microg/seed cup (56 ng/seed), respectively. A. tridentata seeds were significantly more resistant to MeJA, being inhibited at 336 microg MeJA (16.8 microg/seed), 300 times greater than the level of aqueous MeJA required to inhibit N. attenuata seeds. MeJA inhibited N

  19. UVB radiation and 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides provide durable resistance against mirid (Tupiocoris notatus) attack in field-grown Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    PubMed

    Ðinh, So'n Tru'ò'ng; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T

    2013-03-01

    Depending on geographical location, plants are exposed to variable amounts of UVB radiation and herbivore attack. Because the role(s) of UVB in the priming and/or accumulation of plant defence metabolites against herbivores are not well understood, we used field-grown Nicotiana attenuata plants to explore the effects of UVB on herbivore performance. Consistent with previous reports, UVB-exposed plants accumulated higher levels of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (rutin, chlorogenic acid, crypto-chlorogenic acid and dicaffeoylspermidine). Furthermore, UVB increased the accumulation of jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine and abscisic acid, all phytohormones which regulate plant defence against biotic and abiotic stress. In herbivore bioassays, N. attenuata plants experimentally protected from UVB were more infested by mirids in three consecutive field seasons. Among defence metabolites measured, 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides (HGL-DTGs) showed strongly altered accumulation patterns. While constitutive HGL-DTGs levels were higher under UVB, N. attenuata plants exposed to mirid bugs (Tupiocoris notatus) had still more HGL-DTGs under UVB, and mirids preferred to feed on HGL-DTGs-silenced plants when other UVB protecting factors were eliminated by UVB filters. We conclude that UVB exposure not only stimulates UV protective screens but also affects plant defence mechanisms, such as HGL-DTGs accumulation, and modulates ecological interactions of N. attenuata with its herbivores in nature. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Unbiased Transcriptional Comparisons of Generalist and Specialist Herbivores Feeding on Progressively Defenseless Nicotiana attenuata Plants

    PubMed Central

    Govind, Geetha; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Griebel, Thasso; Allmann, Silke; Böcker, Sebastian; Baldwin, Ian Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background Herbivore feeding elicits dramatic increases in defenses, most of which require jasmonate (JA) signaling, and against which specialist herbivores are thought to be better adapted than generalist herbivores. Unbiased transcriptional analyses of how neonate larvae cope with these induced plant defenses are lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings We created cDNA microarrays for Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens separately, by spotting normalized midgut-specific cDNA libraries created from larvae that fed for 24 hours on MeJA-elicited wild-type (WT) Nicotiana attenuata plants. These microarrays were hybridized with labeled probes from neonates that fed for 24 hours on WT and isogenic plants progressively silenced in JA-mediated defenses (N: nicotine; N/PI: N and trypsin protease inhibitors; JA: all JA-mediated defenses). H. virescens neonates regulated 16 times more genes than did M. sexta neonates when they fed on plants silenced in JA-mediated defenses, and for both species, the greater the number of defenses silenced in the host plant (JA > N/PI > N), the greater were the number of transcripts regulated in the larvae. M. sexta larvae tended to down-regulate while H. virescens larvae up- and down-regulated transcripts from the same functional categories of genes. M. sexta larvae regulated transcripts in a diet-specific manner, while H. virescens larvae regulated a similar suite of transcripts across all diet types. Conclusions/Significance The observations are consistent with the expectation that specialists are better adapted than generalist herbivores to the defense responses elicited in their host plants by their feeding. While M. sexta larvae appear to be better adapted to N. attenuata's defenses, some of the elicited responses remain effective defenses against both herbivore species. The regulated genes provide novel insights into larval adaptations to N. attenuata's induced defenses, and represent potential targets for plant-mediated RNAi to

  1. Unbiased transcriptional comparisons of generalist and specialist herbivores feeding on progressively defenseless Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    PubMed

    Govind, Geetha; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Griebel, Thasso; Allmann, Silke; Böcker, Sebastian; Baldwin, Ian Thomas

    2010-01-15

    Herbivore feeding elicits dramatic increases in defenses, most of which require jasmonate (JA) signaling, and against which specialist herbivores are thought to be better adapted than generalist herbivores. Unbiased transcriptional analyses of how neonate larvae cope with these induced plant defenses are lacking. We created cDNA microarrays for Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens separately, by spotting normalized midgut-specific cDNA libraries created from larvae that fed for 24 hours on MeJA-elicited wild-type (WT) Nicotiana attenuata plants. These microarrays were hybridized with labeled probes from neonates that fed for 24 hours on WT and isogenic plants progressively silenced in JA-mediated defenses (N: nicotine; N/PI: N and trypsin protease inhibitors; JA: all JA-mediated defenses). H. virescens neonates regulated 16 times more genes than did M. sexta neonates when they fed on plants silenced in JA-mediated defenses, and for both species, the greater the number of defenses silenced in the host plant (JA > N/PI > N), the greater were the number of transcripts regulated in the larvae. M. sexta larvae tended to down-regulate while H. virescens larvae up- and down-regulated transcripts from the same functional categories of genes. M. sexta larvae regulated transcripts in a diet-specific manner, while H. virescens larvae regulated a similar suite of transcripts across all diet types. The observations are consistent with the expectation that specialists are better adapted than generalist herbivores to the defense responses elicited in their host plants by their feeding. While M. sexta larvae appear to be better adapted to N. attenuata's defenses, some of the elicited responses remain effective defenses against both herbivore species. The regulated genes provide novel insights into larval adaptations to N. attenuata's induced defenses, and represent potential targets for plant-mediated RNAi to falsify hypotheses about the process of adaptation.

  2. The Nicotiana attenuata LECTIN RECEPTOR KINASE 1 is involved in the perception of insect feeding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Nicotiana attenuata LECTIN RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (LecRK1) has been recently identified as a component of the mechanism used by plants to suppress the Manduca sexta-triggered accumulation of salicylic acid (SA). The suppression of the SA burst by LecRK1 allows for the unfettered induction of jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated defense responses against M. sexta herbivory. LecRK1 contains a multi-domain extracellular region composed of a G-type Lectin domain and a PAN-AP domain separated by a variable sequence with low similarity to an EGF domain. The LecRK1 intracellular region is composed of a single domain structure with predicted Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. The multi-domain structure of the extracellular region of LecRK1 adds a level of complexity in terms of the potential ligands that this receptor protein could recognize. PMID:22105024

  3. HSPRO controls early Nicotiana attenuata seedling growth during interaction with the fungus Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Stefan; Camehl, Iris; Gilardoni, Paola A; Oelmueller, Ralf; Baldwin, Ian T; Bonaventure, Gustavo

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study aimed at identifying regulators of Nicotiana attenuata responses against chewing insects, a 26-nucleotide tag matching the HSPRO (ORTHOLOG OF SUGAR BEET Hs1(pro)(-)(1)) gene was found to be strongly induced after simulated herbivory (Gilardoni et al., 2010). Here we characterized the function of HSPRO during biotic interactions in transgenic N. attenuata plants silenced in its expression (ir-hspro). In wild-type plants, HSPRO expression was not only induced during simulated herbivory but also when leaves were inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and roots with the growth-promoting fungus Piriformospora indica. Reduced HSPRO expression did not affect the regulation of direct defenses against Manduca sexta herbivory or P. syringae pv tomato DC3000 infection rates. However, reduced HSPRO expression positively influenced early seedling growth during interaction with P. indica; fungus-colonized ir-hspro seedlings increased their fresh biomass by 30% compared with the wild type. Grafting experiments demonstrated that reduced HSPRO expression in roots was sufficient to induce differential growth promotion in both roots and shoots. This effect was accompanied by changes in the expression of 417 genes in colonized roots, most of which were metabolic genes. The lack of major differences in the metabolic profiles of ir-hspro and wild-type colonized roots (as analyzed by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry) suggested that accelerated metabolic rates were involved. We conclude that HSPRO participates in a whole-plant change in growth physiology when seedlings interact with P. indica.

  4. Nicotiana attenuata Data Hub (NaDH): an integrative platform for exploring genomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic data in wild tobacco.

    PubMed

    Brockmöller, Thomas; Ling, Zhihao; Li, Dapeng; Gaquerel, Emmanuel; Baldwin, Ian T; Xu, Shuqing

    2017-01-13

    Nicotiana attenuata (coyote tobacco) is an ecological model for studying plant-environment interactions and plant gene function under real-world conditions. During the last decade, large amounts of genomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic data have been generated with this plant which has provided new insights into how native plants interact with herbivores, pollinators and microbes. However, an integrative and open access platform that allows for the efficient mining of these -omics data remained unavailable until now. We present the Nicotiana attenuata Data Hub (NaDH) as a centralized platform for integrating and visualizing genomic, phylogenomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic data in N. attenuata. The NaDH currently hosts collections of predicted protein coding sequences of 11 plant species, including two recently sequenced Nicotiana species, and their functional annotations, 222 microarray datasets from 10 different experiments, a transcriptomic atlas based on 20 RNA-seq expression profiles and a metabolomic atlas based on 895 metabolite spectra analyzed by mass spectrometry. We implemented several visualization tools, including a modified version of the Electronic Fluorescent Pictograph (eFP) browser, co-expression networks and the Interactive Tree Of Life (iTOL) for studying gene expression divergence among duplicated homologous. In addition, the NaDH allows researchers to query phylogenetic trees of 16,305 gene families and provides tools for analyzing their evolutionary history. Furthermore, we also implemented tools to identify co-expressed genes and metabolites, which can be used for predicting the functions of genes. Using the transcription factor NaMYB8 as an example, we illustrate that the tools and data in NaDH can facilitate identification of candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites. The NaDH provides interactive visualization and data analysis tools that integrate the expression and evolutionary history of genes in

  5. Root jasmonates signaling regulates folivore-induced shoot metabolites and increases Nicotiana attenuata resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fragoso, Variluska; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T.; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Summary While JA signaling is widely accepted as mediating plant resistance to herbivores, and the importance of the roots in plant defenses is recently being recognized, the function of root-JA production or perception in aboveground plant defense remains unstudied. To restrain JA impairment to the roots, we micrografted wild type Nicotiana attenuata shoots to the roots of transgenic plants impaired in JA signaling, and evaluated ecological relevant traits under glasshouse and field conditions. Root-JA synthesis, conjugation, and perception are involved in regulating nicotine production in roots. Strikingly, roots regulated leaf JA and ABA levels, which in turn, explain differences in nicotine transport from the roots to the shoot via the transpiration stream. Root-JA signaling also regulates the accumulation of other shoot metabolites; these account for plant resistance against a generalist, Spodoptera littoralis, and a specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. In N. attenuata’s native habitat, silencing root-JA synthesis increased the shoot damage inflicted by Empoasca leafhoppers, which are able to select natural jasmonate mutants. Silencing JA perception in roots also increased damage by Tupiocoris notatus. Thus, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts: root jasmonate signaling profoundly tailors leaf defense responses to aboveground attack. PMID:24580101

  6. Insect herbivory elicits genome-wide alternative splicing responses in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Wenwu; Baldwin, Ian T; Xu, Shuqing

    2015-10-01

    Changes in gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) are involved in many responses to abiotic and biotic stresses in eukaryotic organisms. In response to attack and oviposition by insect herbivores, plants elicit rapid changes in gene expression which are essential for the activation of plant defenses; however, the herbivory-induced changes in AS remain unstudied. Using mRNA sequencing, we performed a genome-wide analysis on tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) feeding-induced AS in both leaves and roots of Nicotiana attenuata. Feeding by M. sexta for 5 h reduced total AS events by 7.3% in leaves but increased them in roots by 8.0% and significantly changed AS patterns in leaves and roots of existing AS genes. Feeding by M. sexta also resulted in increased (in roots) and decreased (in leaves) transcript levels of the serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins that are involved in the AS machinery of plants and induced changes in SR gene expression that were jasmonic acid (JA)-independent in leaves but JA-dependent in roots. Changes in AS and gene expression elicited by M. sexta feeding were regulated independently in both tissues. This study provides genome-wide evidence that insect herbivory induces changes not only in the levels of gene expression but also in their splicing, which might contribute to defense against and/or tolerance of herbivory.

  7. Cytokinin levels and signaling respond to wounding and the perception of herbivore elicitors in Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Martin; Meza-Canales, Ivan D; Navarro-Quezada, Aura; Brütting, Christoph; Vanková, Radomira; Baldwin, Ian T; Meldau, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Nearly half a century ago insect herbivores were found to induce the formation of green islands by manipulating cytokinin (CK) levels. However, the response of the CK pathway to attack by chewing insect herbivores remains unclear. Here, we characterize the CK pathway of Nicotiana attenuata (Torr. ex S. Wats.) and its response to wounding and perception of herbivore-associated molecular patterns (HAMPs). We identified 44 genes involved in CK biosynthesis, inactivation, degradation, and signaling. Leaf wounding rapidly induced transcriptional changes in multiple genes throughout the pathway, as well as in the levels of CKs, including isopentenyladenosine and cis-zeatin riboside; perception of HAMPs present in the oral secretions (OS) of the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta amplified these responses. The jasmonate pathway, which triggers many herbivore-induced processes, was not required for these HAMP-triggered changes, but rather suppressed the CK responses. Interestingly CK pathway changes were observed also in systemic leaves in response to wounding and OS application indicating a role of CKs in mediating long distance systemic processes in response to herbivory. Since wounding and grasshopper OS elicited similar accumulations of CKs in Arabidopsis thaliana L., we propose that CKs are integral components of wounding and HAMP-triggered responses in many plant species. PMID:24924599

  8. Specificity of root microbiomes in native-grown Nicotiana attenuata and plant responses to UVB increase Deinococcus colonization.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Rakesh; Oh, Youngjoo; Kumar, Ramesh; Weinhold, Arne; Luu, Van Thi; Groten, Karin; Baldwin, Ian T

    2017-05-01

    Plants recruit microbial communities from the soil in which they germinate. Our understanding of the recruitment process and the factors affecting it is still limited for most microbial taxa. We analysed several factors potentially affecting root microbiome structure - the importance of geographic location of natural populations, the microbiome of native seeds as putative source of colonization and the effect of a plant's response to UVB exposure on root colonization of highly abundant species. The microbiome of Nicotiana attenuata seeds was determined by a culture-dependent and culture-independent approach, and the root microbiome of natural N. attenuata populations from five different locations was analysed using 454-pyrosequencing. To specifically address the influence of UVB light on root colonization by Deinococcus, a genus abundant and consistently present in N. attenuata roots, transgenic lines impaired in UVB perception (irUVR8) and response (irCHAL) were investigated in a microcosm experiment with/without UVB supplementation using a synthetic bacterial community. The seed microbiome analysis indicated that N. attenuata seeds are sterile. Alpha and beta diversities of native root bacterial communities differed significantly between soil and root, while location had only a significant effect on the fungal but not the bacterial root communities. With UVB supplementation, root colonization of Deinococcus increased in wild type, but decreased in irUVR8 and irCHAL plants compared to nontreated plants. Our results suggest that N. attenuata recruits a core root microbiome exclusively from soil, with fungal root colonization being less selective than bacterial colonization. Root colonization by Deinococcus depends on the plant's response to UVB. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Oviposition by Spodoptera exigua on Nicotiana attenuata primes induced plant defence against larval herbivory.

    PubMed

    Bandoly, Michele; Hilker, Monika; Steppuhn, Anke

    2015-08-01

    Plants exhibit multifarious defence traits against herbivory that are constitutively expressed or induced upon attack. Insect egg deposition often precedes impending larval attack, and several plants can increase their resistance against larvae after experiencing the oviposition by an herbivore. The nature of such oviposition-mediated resistance remains unknown, and here we aim to determine plant traits that explain it. We test whether oviposition on a host plant can induce plant defence responses or enhance (prime) the induction of defence traits in response to larval herbivory. We exposed Nicotiana attenuata plants to oviposition by moths of a generalist herbivore, Spodoptera exigua. Its larvae suffered higher mortality, retarded development and inflicted less feeding damage on oviposition-experienced than on oviposition-unexperienced plants. While oviposition alone did not induce any of the examined defence traits, oviposited plants exhibited a stronger inducibility of known defence traits, i.e. caffeoylputrescine (CP) and trypsin protease inhibitors (TPIs). We found no effects of oviposition on phytohormone levels, but on the feeding-inducible accumulation of the transcription factor NaMyb8 that is governing biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates, including CP. Comparison of larval performance on wild-type plants, CP-deficient plants (silenced NaMyb8 gene), and TPI-deficient plants (silenced NaPI gene) revealed that priming of plant resistance to larvae by prior oviposition required NaMyb8-mediated defence traits. Our results show that plants can use insect egg deposition as a warning signal to prime their feeding-induced defence.

  10. Jasmonic acid signalling mediates resistance of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata to its native Fusarium, but not Alternaria, fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Luu, Van Thi; Schuck, Stefan; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Weinhold, Arne; Baldwin, Ian T

    2015-03-01

    We recently characterized a highly dynamic fungal disease outbreak in native populations of Nicotiana attenuata in the southwestern United States. Here, we explore how phytohormone signalling contributes to the observed disease dynamics. Single inoculation with three native Fusarium and Alternaria fungal pathogens, isolated from diseased plants growing in native populations, resulted in disease symptoms characteristic for each pathogen species. While Alternaria sp.-infected plants displayed fewer symptoms and recovered, Fusarium spp.-infected plants became chlorotic and frequently spontaneously wilted. Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) levels were differentially induced after Fusarium or Alternaria infection. Transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in JA production or JA conjugation to isoleucine (JA-Ile), but not in JA perception, were highly susceptible to infection by F. brachygibbosum Utah 4, indicating that products derived from the JA-Ile biosynthetic pathway, but not their perception, is associated with increased Fusarium resistance. Infection assays using ov-nahG plants which were silenced in pathogen-induced SA accumulations revealed that SA may increase N. attenuata's resistance to Fusarium infection but not to Alternaria. Taken together, we propose that the dynamics of fungal disease symptoms among plants in native populations may be explained by a complex interplay of phytohormone responses to attack by multiple pathogens. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. PR-13/Thionin but not PR-1 mediates bacterial resistance in Nicotiana attenuata in nature, and neither influences herbivore resistance.

    PubMed

    Rayapuram, Cbgowda; Wu, Jianqiang; Haas, Christiane; Baldwin, Ian T

    2008-07-01

    Increases in pathogenesis-related (PR) transcripts are commonly interpreted as evidence of plants' resistance responses to pathogens; however, few studies have examined whether increases in PR proteins protect plants growing under natural conditions. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3,000, which is virulent and causes disease in Arabidopsis, is also pathogenic to the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata. N. attenuata responds to P. syringae pv. tomato DC3,000's challenges with increases in salicylic acid and transcripts of at least two PR genes, PR-1 and PR13/Thionin. To determine if either of these PR proteins functions in bacterial resistance, we independently silenced both genes by RNAi and found that only PR-13/Thionin mediates resistance to P. syringae pv. tomato DC3,000 in glasshouse experiments. When NaPR-1- and NaThionin-silenced plants were transplanted into the plant's native habitat in the Great Basin Desert of Utah, opportunistic Pseudomonas spp. performed better on NaThionin-silenced plants compared with NaPR-1-silenced and wild-type (WT) plants, and accounted for increased plant mortality. The native herbivore community of N. attenuata attacked both NaPR-1- and PR-13/NaThionin-silenced plants to the same degree as it did in WT plants, indicating that neither PR protein provides resistance to herbivores. Although PR-1 is generally considered a marker gene of disease resistance, we found no evidence that it has an antimicrobial function. In contrast, PR-13/NaThionin is clearly an ecologically relevant defense protein involved in resisting pathogens in N. attenuata.

  12. The HERBIVORE ELICITOR-REGULATED1 gene enhances abscisic acid levels and defenses against herbivores in Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Son Truong; Baldwin, Ian T; Galis, Ivan

    2013-08-01

    Nicotiana attenuata plants can distinguish the damage caused by herbivore feeding from other types of damage by perceiving herbivore-associated elicitors, such as the fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in oral secretions (OS) of Manduca sexta larvae, which are introduced into wounds during feeding. However, the transduction of FAC signals into downstream plant defense responses is still not well established. We identified a novel FAC-regulated protein in N. attenuata (NaHER1; for herbivore elicitor regulated) and show that it is an indispensable part of the OS signal transduction pathway. N. attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaHER1 by RNA interference (irHER1) were unable to amplify their defenses beyond basal, wound-induced levels in response to OS elicitation. M. sexta larvae performed 2-fold better when reared on irHER1 plants, which released less volatile organic compounds (indirect defense) and had strongly reduced levels of several direct defense metabolites, including trypsin proteinase inhibitors, 17-hydroxygeranyllinallool diterpene glycosides, and caffeoylputrescine, after real and/or simulated herbivore attack. In parallel to impaired jasmonate signaling and metabolism, irHER1 plants were more drought sensitive and showed reduced levels of abscisic acid (ABA) in the leaves, suggesting that silencing of NaHER1 interfered with ABA metabolism. Because treatment of irHER1 plants with ABA results in both the accumulation of significantly more ABA catabolites and the complete restoration of normal wild-type levels of OS-induced defense metabolites, we conclude that NaHER1 acts as a natural suppressor of ABA catabolism after herbivore attack, which, in turn, activates the full defense profile and resistance against herbivores.

  13. Pithy protection: Nicotiana attenuata's jasmonic acid-mediated defenses are required to resist stem-boring weevil larvae.

    PubMed

    Diezel, Celia; Kessler, Danny; Baldwin, Ian T

    2011-04-01

    Folivory is the best studied plant-herbivore interaction, but it is unclear whether the signaling and resistance traits important for the defense of leaves are also important for other plant parts. Larvae of the tobacco stem weevil, Trichobaris mucorea, burrow into stems of Nicotiana attenuata and feed on the pith. Transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in signaling and foliar defense traits were evaluated in a 2-year field study for resistance against attack by naturally occurring T. mucorea larva. Plants silenced in early jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis (antisense [as]-lipoxygenase3 [lox3]; inverted repeat [ir]-allene oxide cyclase), JA perception (as-coronatine insensitive1), proteinase inhibitors (ir-pi), and nicotine (ir-putrescine methyl-transferase) direct defenses and lignin (ir-cad) biosynthesis were infested more frequently than wild-type plants. Plants unable to emit C(6) aldehydes (as-hpl) had lower infestation rates, while plants silenced in late steps in JA biosynthesis (ir-acyl-coenzyme A oxidase, ir-opr) and silenced in diterpene glycoside production (ir-geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase) did not differ from wild type. Pith choice assays revealed that ir-putrescine methyl-transferase, ir-coronatine insensitive1, and ir-lox3 pith, which all had diminished nicotine levels, were preferred by larvae compared to wild-type pith. The lack of preference for ir-lox2 and ir-cad piths, suggest that oviposition attraction and vascular defense, rather than pith palatability accounts for the higher attack rates observed for these plants. We conclude that traits that influence a plant's apparency, stem hardness, and pith direct defenses all contribute to resistance against this herbivore whose attack can be devastating to N. attenuata's fitness.

  14. Polymorphism in jasmonate signaling partially accounts for the variety of volatiles produced by Nicotiana attenuata plants in a native population.

    PubMed

    Schuman, Meredith C; Heinzel, Nicolas; Gaquerel, Emmanuel; Svatos, Ales; Baldwin, Ian T

    2009-01-01

    Herbivore- and jasmonate-induced volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which mediate indirect defense, must provide reliable information for predators that frequently learn to associate their release with feeding herbivores. Yet little is known about variation of these cues within populations of native plants, on a scale encountered by predators. We examined variation in herbivore-elicited VOC emissions and patterns of herbivore-induced jasmonate signaling from accessions of Nicotiana attenuata co-occurring in a native population. VOC emissions elicited by herbivore oral secretions (OS) and by methyl jasmonate (MJ) were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high-resolution two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToF-MS) and micro-hydrolysis and micro-hydrogenation reactions. Accessions varied in emissions of abundant (trans-alpha-bergamotene, alpha-duprezianene, trans-beta-ocimene, and cis-3-hexenol) and total detectable VOCs, as well as the accumulation of jasmonates, the jasmonate antagonist salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonate signaling-related transcripts after OS elicitation. Yet MJ treatment exacerbated differences in VOC emission, suggesting that much variation in VOC emission is caused by processes downstream of jasmonate signaling. Co-occurring N. attenuata plants emit different VOCs following simulated herbivore elicitation as a result in part of differences in jasmonate production and responsiveness, which could reduce the effectiveness of induced indirect defense.

  15. Piriformospora indica and Sebacina vermifera increase growth performance at the expense of herbivore resistance in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Barazani, Oz; Benderoth, Markus; Groten, Karin; Kuhlemeier, Cris; Baldwin, Ian T

    2005-12-01

    A Sebacinales species was recovered from a clone library made from a pooled rhizosphere sample of Nicotiana attenuata plants from 14 native populations. Axenic cultures of the related species, Piriformospora indica and Sebacina vermifera, were used to examine their effects on plant performance. Inoculation of N. attenuata seeds with either fungus species stimulated seed germination and increased growth and stalk elongation. S. vermifera inoculated plants flowered earlier, produced more flowers and matured more seed capsules than did non-inoculated plants. Jasmonate treatment during rosette-stage growth, which slows growth and elicits herbivore resistance traits, erased differences in vegetative, but not reproductive performance resulting from S. vermifera inoculation. Total nitrogen and phosphorous contents did not differ between inoculated and control plants, suggesting that the performance benefits of fungal inoculation did not result from improvements in nutritional status. Since the expression of trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPI), defensive proteins which confer resistance to attack from Manduca sexta larvae, incur significant growth and fitness costs for the plant, we examined the effect of S. vermifera inoculation on herbivore resistance and TPI activity. After 10 days of feeding on S. vermifera-inoculated plants, larval mass was 46% higher and TPI activity was 48% lower than that on non-inoculated plants. These results suggest that Sebacina spp. may interfere with defense signaling and allow plants to increase growth rates at the expense of herbivore resistance mediated by TPIs.

  16. Jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine coordinates metabolic networks required for anthesis and floral attractant emission in wild tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata).

    PubMed

    Stitz, Michael; Hartl, Markus; Baldwin, Ian T; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Jasmonic acid and its derivatives (jasmonates [JAs]) play central roles in floral development and maturation. The binding of jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile) to the F-box of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) is required for many JA-dependent physiological responses, but its role in anthesis and pollinator attraction traits remains largely unexplored. Here, we used the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, which develops sympetalous flowers with complex pollination biology, to examine the coordinating function of JA homeostasis in the distinct metabolic processes that underlie flower maturation, opening, and advertisement to pollinators. From combined transcriptomic, targeted metabolic, and allometric analyses of transgenic N. attenuata plants for which signaling deficiencies were complemented with methyl jasmonate, JA-Ile, and its functional homolog, coronatine (COR), we demonstrate that (1) JA-Ile/COR-based signaling regulates corolla limb opening and a JA-negative feedback loop; (2) production of floral volatiles (night emissions of benzylacetone) and nectar requires JA-Ile/COR perception through COI1; and (3) limb expansion involves JA-Ile-induced changes in limb fresh mass and carbohydrate metabolism. These findings demonstrate a master regulatory function of the JA-Ile/COI1 duet for the main function of a sympetalous corolla, that of advertising for and rewarding pollinator services. Flower opening, by contrast, requires JA-Ile signaling-dependent changes in primary metabolism, which are not compromised in the COI1-silenced RNA interference line used in this study. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Root jasmonic acid synthesis and perception regulate folivore-induced shoot metabolites and increase Nicotiana attenuata resistance.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Variluska; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2014-06-01

    While jasmonic acid (JA) signaling is widely accepted as mediating plant resistance to herbivores, and the importance of the roots in plant defenses is recently being recognized, the role of root JA in the defense of above-ground parts remains unstudied. To restrict JA impairment to the roots, we micrografted wildtype Nicotiana attenuata shoots to the roots of transgenic plants impaired in JA signaling and evaluated ecologically relevant traits in the glasshouse and in nature. Root JA synthesis and perception are involved in regulating nicotine production in roots. Strikingly, systemic root JA regulated local leaf JA and abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations, which were associated with differences in nicotine transport from roots to leaves via the transpiration stream. Root JA signaling also regulated the accumulation of other shoot metabolites; together these account for differences in resistance against a generalist, Spodoptera littoralis, and a specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. In N. attenuata's native habitat, silencing root JA synthesis increased the shoot damage inflicted by Empoasca leafhoppers, which are able to select natural jasmonate mutants. Silencing JA perception in roots also increased damage by Tupiocoris notatus. We conclude that attack from above-ground herbivores recruits root JA signaling to launch the full complement of plant defense responses.

  18. New insights into mechanisms regulating differential accumulation of phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates (PPCs) in herbivore-attacked Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    PubMed

    Gális, Ivan; Onkokesung, Nawaporn; Baldwin, Ian T

    2010-05-01

    Ubiquitously occurring phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates (PPCs) in plants show both developmental and stress inducible patterns of accumulation. The presence of high PPC levels in reproductive organs of plants resulted in a long lasting controversy whether PPCs could play important roles in the development of reproductive tissues; their accumulation in response to stresses, suggested a potential defensive function. The discovery and use of a key regulator, MYB8 in jasmonic acid signal transduction pathway, that controls the accumulation of major PPCs in native tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata) plants, has now provided the first clear evidence of defense-related functions for PPCs in higher plants, and contributed to our understanding of how the perception of herbivore-associated elicitors can modulate anti-herbivore defenses in plants.

  19. Diverting the flux of the JA pathway in Nicotiana attenuata compromises the plant's defense metabolism and fitness in nature and glasshouse.

    PubMed

    Stitz, Michael; Baldwin, Ian T; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    A plant's inducible defenses against herbivores as well as certain developmental processes are known to be controlled by the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway. We have previously shown that ectopically expressing Arabidopsis thaliana JA O-methyltransferase in Nicotiana attenuata (35S-jmt) strongly reduces the herbivory-elicited jasmonate bursts by acting as metabolic sink that redirects free JA towards methylation; here we examine the consequences of this metabolic sink on N. attenuata's secondary metabolism and performance in nature. In the glasshouse, 35S-jmt plants produced fewer seed capsules due to shorter floral styles, which could be restored to wild type (WT) levels after hand-pollination, and were more susceptible to Manduca sexta larvae attack. When transplanted into the Great Basin Desert in Utah, 35S-jmt plants grew as well as WT empty vector, but were highly attacked by native herbivores of different feeding guilds: leaf chewers, miners, and single cell feeders. This greater susceptibility was strongly associated with reduced emissions of volatile organic compounds (hexenylesters, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) and profound alterations in the production of direct defenses (trypsin proteinase inhibitors [TPI], nicotine, diterpene glycosides [DTGs] and phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates) as revealed by a combination of targeted and metabolomics analyses of field collected samples. Complementation experiments with JA-Ile, whose formation is outcompeted in 35S-jmt plants by the methylation reaction, restored the local TPI activation to WT levels and partially complemented nicotine and DTG levels in elicited but not systemic leaves. These findings demonstrate that MeJA, the major JA metabolite in 35S-jmt plants, is not an active signal in defense activation and highlights the value of creating JA sinks to disrupt JA signaling, without interrupting the complete octadecanoid pathway, in order to investigate the regulation of plants' defense metabolism in nature.

  20. Diverting the Flux of the JA Pathway in Nicotiana attenuata Compromises the Plant's Defense Metabolism and Fitness in Nature and Glasshouse

    PubMed Central

    Stitz, Michael; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    A plant's inducible defenses against herbivores as well as certain developmental processes are known to be controlled by the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway. We have previously shown that ectopically expressing Arabidopsis thaliana JA O-methyltransferase in Nicotiana attenuata (35S-jmt) strongly reduces the herbivory-elicited jasmonate bursts by acting as metabolic sink that redirects free JA towards methylation; here we examine the consequences of this metabolic sink on N. attenuata's secondary metabolism and performance in nature. In the glasshouse, 35S-jmt plants produced fewer seed capsules due to shorter floral styles, which could be restored to wild type (WT) levels after hand-pollination, and were more susceptible to Manduca sexta larvae attack. When transplanted into the Great Basin Desert in Utah, 35S-jmt plants grew as well as WT empty vector, but were highly attacked by native herbivores of different feeding guilds: leaf chewers, miners, and single cell feeders. This greater susceptibility was strongly associated with reduced emissions of volatile organic compounds (hexenylesters, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) and profound alterations in the production of direct defenses (trypsin proteinase inhibitors [TPI], nicotine, diterpene glycosides [DTGs] and phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates) as revealed by a combination of targeted and metabolomics analyses of field collected samples. Complementation experiments with JA-Ile, whose formation is outcompeted in 35S-jmt plants by the methylation reaction, restored the local TPI activation to WT levels and partially complemented nicotine and DTG levels in elicited but not systemic leaves. These findings demonstrate that MeJA, the major JA metabolite in 35S-jmt plants, is not an active signal in defense activation and highlights the value of creating JA sinks to disrupt JA signaling, without interrupting the complete octadecanoid pathway, in order to investigate the regulation of plants' defense metabolism in nature

  1. Jasmonate and ppHsystemin regulate key Malonylation steps in the biosynthesis of 17-Hydroxygeranyllinalool Diterpene Glycosides, an abundant and effective direct defense against herbivores in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Heiling, Sven; Schuman, Meredith C; Schoettner, Matthias; Mukerjee, Purba; Berger, Beatrice; Schneider, Bernd; Jassbi, Amir R; Baldwin, Ian T

    2010-01-01

    We identified 11 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides (HGL-DTGs) that occur in concentrations equivalent to starch (mg/g fresh mass) in aboveground tissues of coyote tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata) and differ in their sugar moieties and malonyl sugar esters (0-2). Concentrations of HGL-DTGs, particularly malonylated compounds, are highest in young and reproductive tissues. Within a tissue, herbivore elicitation changes concentrations and biosynthetic kinetics of individual compounds. Using stably transformed N. attenuata plants silenced in jasmonate production and perception, or production of N. attenuata Hyp-rich glycopeptide systemin precursor by RNA interference, we identified malonylation as the key biosynthetic step regulated by herbivory and jasmonate signaling. We stably silenced N. attenuata geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (ggpps) to reduce precursors for the HGL-DTG skeleton, resulting in reduced total HGL-DTGs and greater vulnerability to native herbivores in the field. Larvae of the specialist tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) grew up to 10 times as large on ggpps silenced plants, and silenced plants suffered significantly more damage from herbivores in N. attenuata's native habitat than did wild-type plants. We propose that high concentrations of HGL-DTGs effectively defend valuable tissues against herbivores and that malonylation may play an important role in regulating the distribution and storage of HGL-DTGs in plants.

  2. Dimethyl disulfide produced by the naturally associated bacterium bacillus sp B55 promotes Nicotiana attenuata growth by enhancing sulfur nutrition.

    PubMed

    Meldau, Dorothea G; Meldau, Stefan; Hoang, Long H; Underberg, Stefanie; Wünsche, Hendrik; Baldwin, Ian T

    2013-07-01

    Bacillus sp B55, a bacterium naturally associated with Nicotiana attenuata roots, promotes growth and survival of wild-type and, particularly, ethylene (ET)-insensitive (35)S-ethylene response1 (etr1) N. attenuata plants, which heterologously express the mutant Arabidopsis thaliana receptor ETR1-1. We found that the volatile organic compound (VOC) blend emitted by B55 promotes seedling growth, which is dominated by the S-containing compound dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). DMDS was depleted from the headspace during cocultivation with seedlings in bipartite Petri dishes, and (35)S was assimilated from the bacterial VOC bouquet and incorporated into plant proteins. In wild-type and (35)S-etr1 seedlings grown under different sulfate (SO(4)(-2)) supply conditions, exposure to synthetic DMDS led to genotype-dependent plant growth promotion effects. For the wild type, only S-starved seedlings benefited from DMDS exposure. By contrast, growth of (35)S-etr1 seedlings, which we demonstrate to have an unregulated S metabolism, increased at all SO(4)(-2) supply rates. Exposure to B55 VOCs and DMDS rescued many of the growth phenotypes exhibited by ET-insensitive plants, including the lack of root hairs, poor lateral root growth, and low chlorophyll content. DMDS supplementation significantly reduced the expression of S assimilation genes, as well as Met biosynthesis and recycling. We conclude that DMDS by B55 production is a plant growth promotion mechanism that likely enhances the availability of reduced S, which is particularly beneficial for wild-type plants growing in S-deficient soils and for (35)S-etr1 plants due to their impaired S uptake/assimilation/metabolism.

  3. Differences in Nicotine Metabolism of Two Nicotiana attenuata Herbivores Render Them Differentially Susceptible to a Common Native Predator

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pavan; Rathi, Preeti; Schöttner, Matthias; Baldwin, Ian T.; Pandit, Sagar

    2014-01-01

    Background Nicotiana attenuata is attacked by larvae of both specialist (Manduca sexta) and generalist (Spodoptera exigua) lepidopteran herbivores in its native habitat. Nicotine is one of N. attenuata's important defenses. M. sexta is highly nicotine tolerant; whether cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative detoxification and/or rapid excretion is responsible for its exceptional tolerance remains unknown despite five decades of study. Recently, we demonstrated that M. sexta uses its nicotine-induced CYP6B46 to efflux midgut-nicotine into the hemolymph, facilitating nicotine exhalation that deters predatory wolf spiders (Camptocosa parallela). S. exigua's nicotine metabolism is uninvestigated. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the ability of these two herbivores to metabolize, tolerate and co-opt ingested nicotine for defense against the wolf spider. In addition, we analyzed the spider's excretion to gain insights into its nicotine metabolism. Contrary to previous reports, we found that M. sexta larvae neither accumulate the common nicotine oxides (cotinine, cotinine N-oxide and nicotine N-oxide) nor excrete them faster than nicotine. In M. sexta larvae, ingestion of nicotine as well as its oxides increases the accumulation of CYP6B46 transcripts. In contrast, S. exigua accumulates nicotine oxides and exhales less (66%) nicotine than does M. sexta. Spiders prefer nicotine-fed S. exigua over M. sexta, a preference reversed by topical or headspace nicotine supplementation, but not ingested or topically-coated nicotine oxides, suggesting that externalized nicotine but not the nicotine detoxification products deter spider predation. The spiders also do not accumulate nicotine oxides. Conclusions Nicotine oxidation reduces S. exigua's headspace-nicotine and renders it more susceptible to predation by spiders than M. sexta, which exhales unmetabolized nicotine. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that generalist herbivores incur costs of

  4. High levels of jasmonic acid antagonize the biosynthesis of gibberellins and inhibit the growth of Nicotiana attenuata stems.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Maria; Hettenhausen, Christian; Lange, Theo; Wünsche, Hendrik; Fang, Jingjing; Baldwin, Ian T; Wu, Jianqiang

    2013-02-01

    Hormones play pivotal roles in regulating plant development, growth, and stress responses, and cross-talk among different hormones fine-tunes various aspects of plant physiology. Jasmonic acid (JA) is important for plant defense against herbivores and necrotic fungi and also regulates flower development; in addition, Arabidopsis mutants over-producing JA usually have stunted stems and wound-induced jasmonates suppress Arabidopsis growth, suggesting that JA is also involved in stem elongation. Gibberellins (GAs) promote stem and leaf growth and modulate seed germination, flowering time, and the development of flowers, fruits, and seeds. However, little is known about the interaction between the JA and GA pathways. Two calcium-dependent protein kinases, CDPK4 and CDPK5, are important suppressors of JA accumulation in a wild tobacco species, Nicotiana attenuata. The stems of N. attenuata silenced in CDPK4 and CDPK5 (irCDPK4/5 plants) had dramatically increased levels of JA and exhibited stunted elongation and had very high contents of secondary metabolites. Genetic analysis indicated that the high JA levels in irCDPK4/5 stems accounted for the suppressed stem elongation and the accumulation of secondary metabolites. Supplementation of GA(3) to irCDPK4/5 plants largely restored normal stem growth to wild-type levels. Measures of GA levels indicated that over-accumulation of JA in irCDPK4/5 stems inhibited the biosynthesis of GAs. Finally, we show that JA antagonizes GA biosynthesis by strongly inhibiting the transcript accumulation of GA20ox and possibly GA13ox, the key genes in GA production, demonstrating that high JA levels antagonize GA biosynthesis in stems. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Antisense LOX expression increases herbivore performance by decreasing defense responses and inhibiting growth-related transcriptional reorganization in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Halitschke, Rayko; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-12-01

    Inhibition of jasmonic acid (JA) signaling has been shown to decrease herbivore resistance, but the responsible mechanisms are largely unknown because insect resistance is poorly understood in most model plant systems. We characterize three members of the lipoxygenase (LOX) gene family in the native tobacco plant Nicotiana attenuata and manipulate, by antisense expression, a specific, wound- and herbivory-induced isoform (LOX3) involved in JA biosynthesis. In three independent lines, antisense expression reduced wound-induced JA accumulation but not the release of green leaf volatiles (GLVs). The impaired JA signaling reduced two herbivore-induced direct defenses, nicotine and trypsin protease inhibitors (TPI), as well as the potent indirect defense, the release of volatile terpenes that attract generalist predators to feeding herbivores. All these defenses could be fully restored by methyl-JA (MeJA) treatment, with the exception of the increase in TPI activity, which was partially restored, suggesting the involvement of additional signals. The impaired ability to produce chemical defenses resulted in lower resistance to Manduca sexta attack, which could also be restored by MeJA treatment. Expression analysis using a cDNA microarray, specifically designed to analyze M. sexta-induced gene expression in N. attenuata, revealed a pivotal role for LOX3-produced oxylipins in upregulating defense genes (protease inhibitor, PI; xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase, XTH; threonine deaminase, TD; hydroperoxide lyase, HPL), suppressing both downregulated growth genes (RUBISCO and photosystem II, PSII) and upregulated oxylipin genes (alpha-dioxygenase, alpha-DOX). By genetically manipulating signaling in a plant with a well-characterized ecology, we demonstrate that the complex phenotypic changes that mediate herbivore resistance are controlled by a specific part of the oxylipin cascade.

  6. The two α-dox genes of Nicotiana attenuata: overlapping but distinct functions in development and stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant fatty acid α-dioxygenases (α-DOX) are oxylipin-forming enzymes induced by biotic and abiotic stresses, which also participate in developmental processes. In Nicotiana attenuata, herbivory strongly induces the expression of an α-dox1 gene. To determine its role, we silenced its expression using Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation with an inverted repeat construct. More than half of the transformed lines showed a severe dwarf growth phenotype that was very similar to the phenotype of tomato plants mutated at a second α-dox isoform. This led us to identify the corresponding α-dox2 gene in N. attenuata and examine the regulation of both α-dox genes as well as the consequences of their silencing in plant development and anti-herbivore defense. Results The transformed lines exhibiting a dwarf growth phenotype are co-silenced for both α-dox genes resulting in a nearly complete suppression of α-DOX activity, which is associated with increases in ABA, JA and anthocyanin levels, all metabolic signatures of oxidative stress. The other lines, only silenced for α-dox1, developed similarly to wild-type plants, exhibited a 40% reduction of α-DOX activity resulting in a 50% reduction of its main product in planta (2-HOT) and showed no signs of oxidative stress. In contrast to α-dox1, the expression of α-dox2 gene is not induced by wounding or elicitors in the oral secretions of Manduca sexta. Instead, α-dox2 is expressed in roots and flowers which lack α-dox1 expression, but both genes are equally regulated during leaf maturation. We transiently silenced α-dox gene copies with gene-specific constructs using virus induced gene silencing and determined the consequences for plant development and phytohormone and 2-HOT levels. While individual silencing of α-dox1 or α-dox2 had no effects on plant growth, the co-suppression of both α-dox genes decreased plant growth. Plants transiently silenced for both α-dox genes had increased constitutive

  7. Isolating Fungal Pathogens from a Dynamic Disease Outbreak in a Native Plant Population to Establish Plant-Pathogen Bioassays for the Ecological Model Plant Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Stefan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    The wild tobacco species Nicotiana attenuata has been intensively used as a model plant to study its interaction with insect herbivores and pollinators in nature, however very little is known about its native pathogen community. We describe a fungal disease outbreak in a native N. attenuata population comprising 873 plants growing in an area of about 1500 m2. The population was divided into 14 subpopulations and disease symptom development in the subpopulations was monitored for 16 days, revealing a waxing and waning of visible disease symptoms with some diseased plants recovering fully. Native fungal N. attenuata pathogens were isolated from diseased plants, characterized genetically, chemotaxonomically and morphologically, revealing several isolates of the ascomycete genera Fusarium and Alternaria, that differed in the type and strength of the disease symptoms they caused in bioassays on either detached leaves or intact soil-grown plants. These isolates and the bioassays will empower the study of N. attenuata-pathogen interactions in a realistic ecological context. PMID:25036191

  8. NaJAZh regulates a subset of defense responses against herbivores and spontaneous leaf necrosis in Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T; Gális, Ivan

    2012-06-01

    The JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins function as negative regulators of jasmonic acid signaling in plants. We cloned 12 JAZ genes from native tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata), including nine novel JAZs in tobacco, and examined their expression in plants that had leaves elicited by wounding or simulated herbivory. Most JAZ genes showed strong expression in the elicited leaves, but NaJAZg was mainly expressed in roots. Another novel herbivory-elicited gene, NaJAZh, was analyzed in detail. RNA interference suppression of this gene in inverted-repeat (ir)JAZh plants deregulated a specific branch of jasmonic acid-dependent direct and indirect defenses: irJAZh plants showed greater trypsin protease inhibitor activity, 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides accumulation, and emission of volatile organic compounds from leaves. Silencing of NaJAZh also revealed a novel cross talk in JAZ-regulated secondary metabolism, as irJAZh plants had significantly reduced nicotine levels. In addition, irJAZh spontaneously developed leaf necrosis during the transition to flowering. Because the lesions closely correlated with the elevated expression of programmed cell death genes and the accumulations of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the leaves, we propose a novel role of the NaJAZh protein as a repressor of necrosis and/or programmed cell death during plant development.

  9. Jasmonate signaling in the field, part I: elicited changes in jasmonate pools of transgenic Nicotiana attenuata populations.

    PubMed

    Gaquerel, Emmanuel; Stitz, Michael; Kallenbach, Mario; Baldwin, Ian T

    2013-01-01

    Nicotiana attenuata, a wild tobacco species native of the southwestern USA that grows in the immediate postfire environment, is one of the important host plants for herbivore populations recolonizing recently burned habitats in the Great Basin Desert. Based on more than 20 years of field research on this eco-genomics model system established in our group, we have developed a genetic and analytical toolbox that allows us to assess the importance of particular genes and metabolites for the survival of this plant in its native habitat. This toolbox has been extensively applied to study the activation of jasmonate signaling after the attack of different herbivore species. Here, we provide detailed guidelines for the analysis, under field conditions, of induced changes in jasmonate pools during insect herbivory. The procedures range from selection and field release of well-characterized transgenic lines for testing the physiological consequences of manipulating jasmonate biogenesis, metabolism, or perception to the metabolic elicitation of chewing herbivore attack and the quantification of the resulting changes in jasmonate fluxes.

  10. Making sense of nectar scents: the effects of nectar secondary metabolites on floral visitors of Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Danny; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-03-01

    Flowers produce a plethora of secondary metabolites but only nectar sugars, floral pigments and headspace volatiles have been examined in the context of pollinator behavior. We identify secondary metabolites in the headspace and nectar of glasshouse- and field-grown Nicotiana attenuata plants, infer within-flower origins by analyzing six flower parts, and compare the attractiveness of 16 constituents in standardized choice tests with two guilds of natural pollinators (Manducasexta moths and Archilochus alexandri and Selasphorus rufus hummingbirds) and one nectar thief (Solenopsis xyloni ants) to determine whether nectar metabolites can 'filter' flower visitors: only two could. Moths responded more strongly than did hummingbirds to headspace presentation of nicotine and benzylacetone, the most abundant repellent and attractant compounds, respectively. For both pollinators, nectar repellents decreased nectaring time and nectar volume removed, but increased visitation number, particularly for hummingbirds. Fewer ants visited if the nectar contained repellents. To determine whether nicotine reduced nectar removal rates in nature, we planted transformed, nicotine-silenced plants into native populations in Utah over 2 years. Plants completely lacking nicotine in their nectar had 68-70% more nectar removed per night by the native community of floral visitors than did wild-type plants. We hypothesize that nectar repellents optimize the number of flower visitors per volume of nectar produced, allowing plants to keep their nectar volumes small.

  11. Mechanisms of optimal defense patterns in Nicotiana attenuata: flowering attenuates herbivory-elicited ethylene and jasmonate signaling.

    PubMed

    Diezel, Celia; Allmann, Silke; Baldwin, Ian T

    2011-12-01

    To defend themselves against herbivore attack, plants produce secondary metabolites, which are variously inducible and constitutively deployed, presumably to optimize their fitness benefits in light of their fitness costs. Three phytohormones, jasmonates (JA) and their active forms, the JA-isoleucine (JA-Ile) and ethylene (ET), are known to play central roles in the elicitation of induced defenses, but little is known about how this mediation changes over ontogeny. The Optimal Defense Theory (ODT) predicts changes in the costs and benefits of the different types of defenses and has been usefully extrapolated to their modes of deployment. Here we studied whether the herbivore-induced accumulation of JA, JA-Ile and ET changed over ontogeny in Nicotiana attenuata, a native tobacco in which inducible defenses are particularly well studied. Herbivore-elicited ET production changed dramatically during six developmental stages, from rosette through flowering, decreasing with the elongation of the first corollas during flower development. This decrease was largely recovered within a day after flower removal by decapitation. A similar pattern was found for the herbivore-induced accumulation of JA and JA-Ile. These results are consistent with ODT predictions and suggest that the last steps in floral development control the inducibility of at least three plant hormones, optimizing defense-growth tradeoffs.

  12. Induced plant defenses in the natural environment: Nicotiana attenuata WRKY3 and WRKY6 coordinate responses to herbivory.

    PubMed

    Skibbe, Melanie; Qu, Nan; Galis, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T

    2008-07-01

    A plant-specific family of WRKY transcription factors regulates plant responses to pathogens and abiotic stresses. Here, we identify two insect-responsive WRKY genes in the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata: WRKY3, whose transcripts accumulate in response to wounding, and WRKY6, whose wound responses are significantly amplified when fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in larval oral secretions are introduced into wounds during feeding. WRKY3 is required for WRKY6 elicitation, yet neither is elicited by treatment with the phytohormone wound signal jasmonic acid. Silencing either WRKY3 or WRKY6, or both, by stable transformation makes plants highly vulnerable to herbivores under glasshouse conditions and in their native habitat in the Great Basin Desert, Utah, as shown in three field seasons. This susceptibility is associated with impaired jasmonate (JA) accumulation and impairment of the direct (trypsin proteinase inhibitors) and indirect (volatiles) defenses that JA signaling mediates. The response to wounding and herbivore-specific signals (FACs) demonstrates that these WRKYs help plants to differentiate mechanical wounding from herbivore attack, mediating a plant's herbivore-specific defenses. Differences in responses to single and multiple elicitations indicate an important role of WRKY3 and WRKY6 in potentiating and/or sustaining active JA levels during continuous insect attack.

  13. The hydroxyproline-rich glycopeptide systemin precursor NapreproHypSys does not play a central role in Nicotiana attenuata's anti-herbivore defense responses.

    PubMed

    Berger, Beatrice; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-11-01

    To determine whether the Nicotiana tabacum preproHypSys homolog in Nicotiana attenuata (NapreproHypSys) mediates anti-herbivore responses, we silenced (IRsys) and ectopically over-expressed (OVsys) NapreproHypSys in N. attenuata. Neither herbivore simulation nor methyl jasmonate (MeJA) application increased transcripts in wild-type (WT) or transformed lines. Compared to WT plants, OVsys plants had marginally higher constitutive levels but normally induced levels of trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPIs) and nicotine; IRsys plants did not differ from WT plants. Herbivory-associated signalling [salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) activity, jasmonic acid (JA), jasmonic acid-isoleucine/leucine (JA-Ile/Leu) and ethylene production or perception] did not differ strongly among the lines, but JA, JA-Ile/Leu and ethylene were marginally higher in OVsys plants. Manduca sexta larval performance did not differ among the lines, but feeding induced levels of TPI and nicotine in OVsys plants and decreased them in IRsys plants relative to WT. The secondary metabolite profiles of plants transplanted into N. attenuata's native habitat in the Great Basin Desert (UT, USA) mirrored those of glasshouse-grown plants, and compared to WT plants, OVsys plants suffered marginally less damage from grasshoppers, mirids and flea beetles but did not differ in their ability to attract Geocoris predators. We conclude that NapreproHypSys does not play a central role in anti-herbivore defense signalling in this native tobacco.

  14. The essential role of jasmonic acid in plant-herbivore interactions--using the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata as a model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wu, Jianqiang

    2013-12-20

    The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) plays a central role in plant defense against herbivores. Herbivore damage elicits a rapid and transient JA burst in the wounded leaves and JA functions as a signal to mediate the accumulation of various secondary metabolites that confer resistance to herbivores. Nicotiana attenuata is a wild tobacco species that inhabits western North America. More than fifteen years of study and its unique interaction with the specialist herbivore insect Manduca sexta have made this plant one of the best models for studying plant-herbivore interactions. Here we review the recent progress in understanding the elicitation of JA accumulation by herbivore-specific elicitors, the regulation of JA biosynthesis, JA signaling, and the herbivore-defense traits in N. attenuata. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. MAPK-dependent JA and SA signalling in Nicotiana attenuata affects plant growth and fitness during competition with conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Meldau, Stefan; Ullman-Zeunert, Lynn; Govind, Geetha; Bartram, Stefan; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-11-13

    Induced defense responses to herbivores are generally believed to have evolved as cost-saving strategies that defer the fitness costs of defense metabolism until these defenses are needed. The fitness costs of jasmonate (JA)-mediated defenses have been well documented. Those of the early signaling units mediating induced resistance to herbivores have yet to be examined. Early signaling components that mediate herbivore-induced defense responses in Nicotiana attenuata, have been well characterized and here we examine their growth and fitness costs during competition with conspecifics. Two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), salicylic acid (SA)-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) are rapidly activated after perception of herbivory and both kinases regulate herbivory-induced JA levels and JA-mediated defense metabolite accumulations. Since JA-induced defenses result in resource-based trade-offs that compromise plant productivity, we evaluated if silencing SIPK (irSIPK) and WIPK (irWIPK) benefits the growth and fitness of plants competiting with wild type (WT) plants, as has been shown for plants silenced in JA-signaling by the reduction of Lipoxygenase 3 (LOX3) levels. As expected, irWIPK and LOX3-silenced plants out-performed their competing WT plants. Surprisingly, irSIPK plants, which have the largest reductions in JA signaling, did not. Phytohormone profiling of leaves revealed that irSIPK plants accumulated higher levels of SA compared to WT. To test the hypothesis that these high levels of SA, and their presumed associated fitness costs of pathogen associated defenses in irSIPK plants had nullified the JA-deficiency-mediated growth benefits in these plants, we genetically reduced SA levels in irSIPK plants. Reducing SA levels partially recovered the biomass and fitness deficits of irSIPK plants. We also evaluated whether the increased fitness of plants with reduced SA or JA levels resulted from increased nitrogen or CO

  16. MAPK-dependent JA and SA signalling in Nicotiana attenuata affects plant growth and fitness during competition with conspecifics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induced defense responses to herbivores are generally believed to have evolved as cost-saving strategies that defer the fitness costs of defense metabolism until these defenses are needed. The fitness costs of jasmonate (JA)-mediated defenses have been well documented. Those of the early signaling units mediating induced resistance to herbivores have yet to be examined. Early signaling components that mediate herbivore-induced defense responses in Nicotiana attenuata, have been well characterized and here we examine their growth and fitness costs during competition with conspecifics. Two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), salicylic acid (SA)-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) are rapidly activated after perception of herbivory and both kinases regulate herbivory-induced JA levels and JA-mediated defense metabolite accumulations. Since JA-induced defenses result in resource-based trade-offs that compromise plant productivity, we evaluated if silencing SIPK (irSIPK) and WIPK (irWIPK) benefits the growth and fitness of plants competiting with wild type (WT) plants, as has been shown for plants silenced in JA-signaling by the reduction of Lipoxygenase 3 (LOX3) levels. Results As expected, irWIPK and LOX3-silenced plants out-performed their competing WT plants. Surprisingly, irSIPK plants, which have the largest reductions in JA signaling, did not. Phytohormone profiling of leaves revealed that irSIPK plants accumulated higher levels of SA compared to WT. To test the hypothesis that these high levels of SA, and their presumed associated fitness costs of pathogen associated defenses in irSIPK plants had nullified the JA-deficiency-mediated growth benefits in these plants, we genetically reduced SA levels in irSIPK plants. Reducing SA levels partially recovered the biomass and fitness deficits of irSIPK plants. We also evaluated whether the increased fitness of plants with reduced SA or JA levels resulted from

  17. Solar Ultraviolet-B Radiation and Insect Herbivory Trigger Partially Overlapping Phenolic Responses in Nicotiana attenuata and Nicotiana longiflora

    PubMed Central

    Izaguirre, Miriam M.; Mazza, Carlos A.; SvatoŠ, AleŠ; Baldwin, Ian T.; BallarÉ, Carlos L.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants exposed to solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280–315 nm) frequently suffer less insect herbivory than do plants that receive attenuated levels of UV-B. This anti-herbivore effect of solar UV-B exposure, which has been documented in several ecosystems, is in part mediated by changes in plant tissue quality. Exposure to UV-B can modify the abundance of a number of secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds with potential impacts on insect herbivores. The aim of this study is to assess the potential anti-herbivore role of UV-B-induced phenolic compounds by comparing the phenolic profiles induced by UV-B and simulated insect herbivory in two wild species of the genus Nicotiana. Methods Plants grown under field and glasshouse conditions were exposed to contrasting levels of UV-B. Half of the plants of the attenuated UV-B treatment were given a simulated herbivory treatment, where leaves were mechanically damaged and immediately treated with oral secretions of Manduca sexta caterpillars. This treatment is known to mimic the impact of real herbivory on the expression of plant defences in Nicotiana. Phenolic profiles induced by UV-B and simulated herbivory were characterized using high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS). Key Results UV-B induced the accumulation of several UV-absorbing phenolic compounds that are known to play a significant role in UV-B screening. Interestingly, there was a significant convergence in the phenolic profiles induced by UV-B and simulated herbivory: chlorogenic acid and dicaffeoylspermidine isomers, in particular, displayed a similar pattern of response to these stimuli. In contrast, rutin, the only flavonoid that accumulated in significant quantities in the experiments, was only induced by UV-B. Conclusions The results suggest that the anti-herbivory effect induced by UV-B may be mediated at least in part by the accumulation of phenylpropanoid derivatives that are

  18. Calcium-dependent protein kinases, CDPK4 and CDPK5, affect early steps of jasmonic acid biosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Hettenhausen, Christian; Yang, Da-Hai; Baldwin, Ian T; Wu, Jianqiang

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) modulate plant development and growth and are important regulators of biotic and abiotic stress responses. Recently it was found that simultaneously silencing Nicotiana attenuata NaCDPK4 and NaCDPK5 (IRcdpk4/5 plants) results in accumulation of exceptionally high JA levels after wounding or simulated herbivory treatments, which in turn induced high levels of defense metabolites that slowed the growth of Manduca sexta, a specialist insect herbivore. To investigate the mechanism by which NaCDPK4 and NaCDPK5 regulate JA accumulation, we analyzed the transcript levels of all important enzymes involved in JA biosynthesis, but these genes showed no differences between wild-type and IRcdpk4/5 plants. Moreover, the dynamics of JA were similar between these plants, excluding the possibility of decreased degradation rates in IRcdpk4/5 plants. To gain insight into the mechanism by which NaCDPK4 and NaCDPK5 regulate JA biosynthesis, free fatty acids, including C18:3, and (9S,13S)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), two important precursors of JA were quantified at different times before and after wounding and simulated herbivore feeding treatments. We show that after these treatments, IRcdpk4/5 plants have decreased levels of C18:3, but have enhanced OPDA and JA levels, suggesting that NaCDPK4 and NaCDPK5 have a role in the early steps of JA biosynthesis. The possible role of NaCDPK4 and NaCDPK5 regulating AOS and AOC enzymatic activity is discussed.

  19. Environmental stresses of field growth allow cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient Nicotiana attenuata plants to compensate for their structural deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-08-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants.

  20. Silencing of hydroperoxide lyase and allene oxide synthase reveals substrate and defense signaling crosstalk in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Halitschke, Rayko; Ziegler, Jörg; Keinänen, Markku; Baldwin, Ian T

    2004-10-01

    The fatty acid hydroperoxide (HP) substrates required for the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) and green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are supplied by separate lipoxygenases (LOX). We silenced the expression of two genes downstream of the LOX: allene oxide synthase (AOS) and HP lyase (HPL) by antisense expression of endogenous genes (NaAOS, NaHPL) in Nicotiana attenuata, in which the biosynthesis of JA is amplified by herbivore-specific elicitors. We report that these elicitors also amplify wound-induced GLV releases, but suppress the wound-induced increase of NaHPL transcripts, suggesting that substrate flux controls GLV biosynthesis. As expected, silencing of NaHPL and NaAOS reduced GLV release and JA accumulation, respectively. Surprisingly, HPL- and AOS-silenced plants had enhanced JA and GLV responses, suggesting substrate 'crosstalk' between these two oxylipin cascades. Plants with depleted GLVs (as-hpl) were less attractive than wild type (WT) or empty vector control plants in choice-tests with native lepidopteran herbivores. In feeding trials, Manduca sexta larvae developed slower on as-hpl plants. The reduced larval consumption and performance, which was not caused by increases in defense responses in as-hpl plants, could be restored to WT levels by the addition of synthetic GLVs, demonstrating that GLVs function as feeding stimulants. Gene expression profiling by cDNA microarray analysis and characterization of several induced defenses in herbivore-elicited as-hpl and as-aos plants revealed differential involvement of JA and GLVs in defense signaling. Elicitation of volatile terpenoids (an indirect defense) requires JA signaling, where as trypsin protease inhibitor elicitation (a direct defense) requires both functional JA and GLV cascades.

  1. Transcriptome profiling reveals differential gene expression of detoxification enzymes in a hemimetabolous tobacco pest after feeding on jasmonate-silenced Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    PubMed

    Crava, Cristina M; Brütting, Christoph; Baldwin, Ian T

    2016-12-08

    The evolutionary arms race between plants and insects has driven the co-evolution of sophisticated defense mechanisms used by plants to deter herbivores and equally sophisticated strategies that enable phytophagous insects to rapidly detoxify the plant's defense metabolites. In this study, we identify the genetic determinants that enable the mirid, Tupiocoris notatus, to feed on its well-defended host plant, Nicotiana attenuata, an outstanding model for plant-insect interaction studies. We used an RNAseq approach to evaluate the global gene expression of T. notatus after feeding on a transgenic N. attenuata line which does not accumulate jasmonic acid (JA) after herbivory, and consequently accumulates very low levels of defense metabolites. Using Illumina sequencing, we generated a de novo assembled transcriptome which resulted in 63,062 contigs (putative transcript isoforms) contained in 42,610 isotigs (putative identified genes). Differential expression analysis based on RSEM-estimated transcript abundances identified 82 differentially expressed (DE) transcripts between T. notatus fed on wild-type and the defenseless plants. The same analysis conducted with Corset-estimated transcript abundances identified 59 DE clusters containing 85 transcripts. In both analyses, a larger number of DE transcripts were found down-regulated in mirids feeding on JA-silenced plants (around 70%). Among these down-regulated transcripts we identified seven transcripts possibly involved in the detoxification of N. attenuata defense metabolite, specifically, one glutathione-S-transferase (GST), one UDP-glucosyltransferase (UGT), five cytochrome P450 (P450s), and six serine proteases. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed the down-regulation for six transcripts (encoding GST, UGT and four P450s) and revealed that their expression was only slightly decreased in mirids feeding on another N. attenuata transgenic line specifically silenced in the accumulation of diterpene glycosides, one of

  2. Co(i)-ordinating defenses: NaCOI1 mediates herbivore- induced resistance in Nicotiana attenuata and reveals the role of herbivore movement in avoiding defenses.

    PubMed

    Paschold, Anja; Halitschke, Rayko; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-07-01

    Arabidopsis and tomato plants mutated in the F-box protein COI1 mediating jasmonate (JA) responses are more susceptible to herbivores in laboratory trials, but the exact mechanisms of COI1-mediated resistance are not known. We silenced COI1 by transformation with an inverted repeat construct (ir-coi1) in Nicotiana attenuata, a plant the direct and indirect defenses of which against various herbivores have been well studied. ir-coi1 plants are male sterile and impaired in JA-elicited direct [nicotine, caffeoylputrescine and trypsin proteinase inhibitor (TPI) activity] and indirect (cis-alpha-bergamotene emission) defense responses; responses not elicited by JA treatment (ethylene production and flower TPI activity) were unaffected. Larvae of Manduca sexta, a common herbivore of N. attenuata, gained three times more mass feeding on ir-coi1 than on wild-type (WT) plants in glasshouse experiments. By regularly moving caterpillars to unattacked leaves of the same plant, we demonstrate that larvae on WT plants can grow and consume leaves as fast as those on ir-coi1 plants, a result that underscores the role of COI1 in mediating locally induced resistance in attacked leaves, and the importance of herbivore movement in avoiding the induced defenses of a plant. When transplanted into native habitats in the Great Basin Desert, ir-coi1 plants suffer greatly from damage by the local herbivore community, which includes herbivores not commonly found on N. attenuata WT plants. Choice assays with field-grown plants confirmed the increased attractiveness of ir-coi1 plants for both common and unusual herbivores. We conclude that NaCOI1 is essential for induced resistance in N. attenuata, and that ir-coi1 plants highlight the benefits of herbivore movement for avoiding induced defenses.

  3. SuperSAGE analysis of the Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome after fatty acid-amino acid elicitation (FAC): identification of early mediators of insect responses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants trigger and tailor defense responses after perception of the oral secretions (OS) of attacking specialist lepidopteran larvae. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in the OS of the Manduca sexta larvae are necessary and sufficient to elicit the herbivory-specific responses in Nicotiana attenuata, an annual wild tobacco species. How FACs are perceived and activate signal transduction mechanisms is unknown. Results We used SuperSAGE combined with 454 sequencing to quantify the early transcriptional changes elicited by the FAC N-linolenoyl-glutamic acid (18:3-Glu) and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) to examine the function of candidate genes in the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. The analysis targeted mRNAs encoding regulatory components: rare transcripts with very rapid FAC-elicited kinetics (increases within 60 and declines within 120 min). From 12,744 unique Tag sequences identified (UniTags), 430 and 117 were significantly up- and down-regulated ≥ 2.5-fold, respectively, after 18:3-Glu elicitation compared to wounding. Based on gene ontology classification, more than 25% of the annotated UniTags corresponded to putative regulatory components, including 30 transcriptional regulators and 22 protein kinases. Quantitative PCR analysis was used to analyze the FAC-dependent regulation of a subset of 27 of these UniTags and for most of them a rapid and transient induction was confirmed. Six FAC-regulated genes were functionally characterized by VIGS and two, a putative lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP) and a protein of unknown function, were identified as important mediators of the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. Conclusions The analysis of the early changes in the transcriptome of N. attenuata after FAC elicitation using SuperSAGE/454 has identified regulatory genes involved in insect-specific mediated responses in plants. Moreover, it has provided a foundation for the identification of additional novel regulators associated with this

  4. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry method for induced changes in Nicotiana attenuata leaves during simulated herbivory.

    PubMed

    Gaquerel, Emmanuel; Heiling, Sven; Schoettner, Matthias; Zurek, Gabriela; Baldwin, Ian T

    2010-09-08

    A liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-TOF-MS) procedure was developed to characterize changes induced in Nicotiana attenuata leaves 1 h and 5 days after wounding and application of Manduca sexta elicitors. The constancy of the measurement conditions was first confirmed for 22 selected analytes spanning the entire chromatogram. Using the Profile Analysis software, we extracted 367 buckets, which were analyzed by principal component analysis and two-factorial ANOVA. One hundred seventy-three buckets were found to be statistically regulated, 128 due to time effects, and 85 due to treatment effects. In vivo 15N-isotope labeling was used to facilitate the annotation and the interpretation of the fragmentation pattern of nitrogen-containing metabolites, and a correlation analysis was performed to test mathematical relationships existing among potential in-source fragments. Additionally, tandem MS measurements of the most regulated ions are presented. Altogether, this study defines a framework for the mining and annotation of major herbivory-elicited changes in Nicotiana attenuata.

  5. Alternative oxidase in resistance to biotic stresses: Nicotiana attenuata AOX contributes to resistance to a pathogen and a piercing-sucking insect but not Manduca sexta larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Oh, Youngjoo; Li, Hongyu; Baldwin, Ian T; Galis, Ivan

    2012-11-01

    The role of the alternative respiratory pathway in the protection of plants against biotic stress was examined in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata) plants (irAOX) silenced in the expression of ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE (AOX) gene. Wild-type and irAOX plants were independently challenged with (1) chewing herbivores (Manduca sexta), (2) piercing-sucking insects (Empoasca spp.), and (3) bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000), showing that all these treatments can strongly elicit accumulation of AOX gene transcripts in wild-type plants. When N. attenuata chemical defenses and resistance were examined, irAOX plants showed wild-type levels of defense-related phytohormones, secondary metabolites, and resistance to M. sexta. In contrast, piercing-sucking leafhoppers (Empoasca spp.) caused more leaf damage and induced significantly higher salicylic acid levels in irAOX compared with wild-type plants in the field and/or glasshouse. Subsequently, irAOX plants accumulated lower levels of defense metabolites, 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides, caffeoylputrescine, and nicotine compared with wild-type plants under prolonged attack of Empoasca spp. in the glasshouse. Finally, an accelerated cell death phenotype was observed in irAOX plants infected with P. syringae, which correlated with higher levels of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide levels in pathogen-infected irAOX compared with wild-type leaves. Overall, the AOX-associated changes in phytohormone and/or redox levels appear to support the resistance of N. attenuata plants against cell piercing-sucking insects and modulate the progression of cell death in pathogen-infected tissues but are not effective against rapidly feeding specialist herbivore M. sexta.

  6. The HERBIVORE ELICITOR-REGULATED1 Gene Enhances Abscisic Acid Levels and Defenses against Herbivores in Nicotiana attenuata Plants1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Son Truong; Baldwin, Ian T.; Galis, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Nicotiana attenuata plants can distinguish the damage caused by herbivore feeding from other types of damage by perceiving herbivore-associated elicitors, such as the fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in oral secretions (OS) of Manduca sexta larvae, which are introduced into wounds during feeding. However, the transduction of FAC signals into downstream plant defense responses is still not well established. We identified a novel FAC-regulated protein in N. attenuata (NaHER1; for herbivore elicitor regulated) and show that it is an indispensable part of the OS signal transduction pathway. N. attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaHER1 by RNA interference (irHER1) were unable to amplify their defenses beyond basal, wound-induced levels in response to OS elicitation. M. sexta larvae performed 2-fold better when reared on irHER1 plants, which released less volatile organic compounds (indirect defense) and had strongly reduced levels of several direct defense metabolites, including trypsin proteinase inhibitors, 17-hydroxygeranyllinallool diterpene glycosides, and caffeoylputrescine, after real and/or simulated herbivore attack. In parallel to impaired jasmonate signaling and metabolism, irHER1 plants were more drought sensitive and showed reduced levels of abscisic acid (ABA) in the leaves, suggesting that silencing of NaHER1 interfered with ABA metabolism. Because treatment of irHER1 plants with ABA results in both the accumulation of significantly more ABA catabolites and the complete restoration of normal wild-type levels of OS-induced defense metabolites, we conclude that NaHER1 acts as a natural suppressor of ABA catabolism after herbivore attack, which, in turn, activates the full defense profile and resistance against herbivores. PMID:23784463

  7. RNA-directed RNA polymerase 1 (RdR1) mediates the resistance of Nicotiana attenuata to herbivore attack in nature.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shree P; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-04-01

    Small RNAs are important regulators of plant development and resistance to viruses. To determine whether small RNAs mediate defense responses to herbivore attack, we silenced the expression of three RNA-directed RNA polymerases (RdRs) in the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata by virus-induced gene silencing. Larvae of the leaf-chewing solanaceous specialist Manduca sexta grew faster on the RdR1-silenced plants than on empty vector (EV) controls; silencing RdR3 and 2 had little to no effect on larval performance. NaRdR1 transcripts were strongly elicited when puncture wounds were treated with M. sexta oral secretions (OS) to simulate herbivore attack, and with SA and JA, phytohormones that are elicited by herbivore attack. Stably silencing RdR1 by transforming N. attenuata with an inverted-repeat RdR1 construct produced plants (irRdR1) that grew normally but were highly susceptible to both M. sexta larvae and the cell-content-feeder Tupiocoris notatus. When irRdR1 lines were planted into N. attenuata's native habitat in the Great Basin Desert (Utah, USA), they were highly susceptible to herbivore attack, due to deficiencies in direct rather than indirect defenses. Microarray analysis revealed the downregulation of ADC and ODC genes, which supply substrates for synthesizing the chemical defense compound nicotine; irRdR1 lines failed to accumulate nicotine after attack. We conclude that RdR1 mediates herbivore resistance, and infer that the small RNAs produced by RdR1 are probably involved in orchestrating some of the rapid metabolic adjustments required for plants to survive herbivore attack in their natural habitats. The experiment highlights the value of carrying out 'real-world' tests of gene function early in the discovery process.

  8. Plasticity in allocation of nicotine to reproductive parts inNicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, I T; Karb, M J

    1995-07-01

    Although little is known about the patterns of chemical defense allocation in reproductive tissues, optimal defense theory predicts a high constitutive allocation due to the tissues' high fitness value. To examine this prediction, we quantified the short- and long-term changes in the nicotine pools of reproductive tissues in response to both floral and leaf damage. Recently opened flowers (stage 5 capsules) do not alter their nicotine pools within a day in response to herbivory byManduca sexta larvae or mechanical damage to the corolla. Similarly, leaf damage during both vegetative and reproductive growth does not influence the nicotine pools of the first three stage-5 capsules produced. However, the nicotine pools of capsules produced later in reproductive growth were significantly larger (1.2- to 1.9-fold) on plants with leaf damage. These differences in floral nicotine pools were a result of both increases in nicotine pools of capsules on damaged plants and decreases in the nicotine pools of capsules on undamaged plants during reproductive growth. Leaf damage did not affect the rate of capsule maturation or the mass of stage-5 capsules at any time during reproductive growth. An allometric analysis of nicotine pools and biomass of reproductive parts in all stages of development from damaged and undamaged plants demonstrates that damaged plants allocated a significantly larger quantity of nicotine to reproductive parts in all stages of development than did undamaged plants. Given that nicotine is thought to be synthesized in the roots and transported to leaves and reproductive parts, nicotine could be allocated to reproductive parts in proportion to the number of developing capsules on a plant. We excised the first 27 stage-5 capsules on plants with and without leaf damage, with the expectation that plants with fewer capsules would allocate a larger amount of nicotine to the remaining capsules. In contrast to the prediction of this passive allocation model, floral

  9. Jasmonoyl-l-Isoleucine Coordinates Metabolic Networks Required for Anthesis and Floral Attractant Emission in Wild Tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata)[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Stitz, Michael; Hartl, Markus; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonic acid and its derivatives (jasmonates [JAs]) play central roles in floral development and maturation. The binding of jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile) to the F-box of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) is required for many JA-dependent physiological responses, but its role in anthesis and pollinator attraction traits remains largely unexplored. Here, we used the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, which develops sympetalous flowers with complex pollination biology, to examine the coordinating function of JA homeostasis in the distinct metabolic processes that underlie flower maturation, opening, and advertisement to pollinators. From combined transcriptomic, targeted metabolic, and allometric analyses of transgenic N. attenuata plants for which signaling deficiencies were complemented with methyl jasmonate, JA-Ile, and its functional homolog, coronatine (COR), we demonstrate that (1) JA-Ile/COR-based signaling regulates corolla limb opening and a JA-negative feedback loop; (2) production of floral volatiles (night emissions of benzylacetone) and nectar requires JA-Ile/COR perception through COI1; and (3) limb expansion involves JA-Ile-induced changes in limb fresh mass and carbohydrate metabolism. These findings demonstrate a master regulatory function of the JA-Ile/COI1 duet for the main function of a sympetalous corolla, that of advertising for and rewarding pollinator services. Flower opening, by contrast, requires JA-Ile signaling-dependent changes in primary metabolism, which are not compromised in the COI1-silenced RNA interference line used in this study. PMID:25326292

  10. HSPRO acts via SnRK1-mediated signaling in the regulation of Nicotiana attenuata seedling growth promoted by Piriformospora indica

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Stefan; Baldwin, Ian T.; Bonaventure, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Nicotiana attenuata HSPRO (NaHSPRO) is a negative regulator of seedling growth promoted by the fungus Piriformospora indica. Homologs of NaHSPRO in Arabidopsis thaliana (i.e., AtHSPRO1 and AtHSPRO2) are known to physically interact with the AKINβγ subunit of the SnRK1 complex.2 To investigate whether NaHSPRO is associated with SnRK1 function during the stimulation of seedling growth by P. indica, we studied N. attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaGAL83 (as-gal83 plants)—a gene that encodes for the regulatory β-subunit of SnRK1—and plants silenced in the expression of both NaHSPRO and NaGAL83 (ir-hspro/as-gal83 plants). The results showed that P. indica differentially stimulated the growth of both as-gal83 and ir-hspro/as-gal83 seedlings compared with control seedlings, with a magnitude similar to that observed in ir-hspro seedlings. Thus, we showed that, similar to NaHSPRO, NaGAL83 is a negative regulator of seedling growth stimulated by P. indica. We propose that the effect of NaHSPRO on seedling growth is associated with SnRK1 signaling. PMID:23333980

  11. SGT1 regulates wounding- and herbivory-induced jasmonic acid accumulation and Nicotiana attenuata's resistance to the specialist lepidopteran herbivore Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Meldau, Stefan; Baldwin, Ian T; Wu, Jianqiang

    2011-03-01

    • SGT1 (suppressor of G-two allele of SKP1) is a conserved protein in all eukaryotes and is crucial for resisting pathogens in humans and plants. We studied whether SGT1 is involved in the induced defense response of a native tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata) to its natural herbivore, Manduca sexta. • We diminished NaSGT1 transcription in N. attenuata using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and analysed the induced defense responses after wounding and M. sexta elicitation. • Silencing NaSGT1 highly attenuates wounding- and herbivory-induced amounts of jasmonic acid (JA) and JA-isoleucine but elevates the concentration of salicylic acid. Chemical profiling reveals that NaSGT1-silenced plants are also compromised in their ability to accumulate JA precursors produced in chloroplasts. We show that the reduced JA accumulation in NaSGT1-silenced plants is independent of the elevated salicylic acid levels. NaSGT1-silenced plants have decreased contents of defensive metabolites and have compromised resistance to M. sexta larvae. Transcript analyses after methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment revealed that NaSGT1 is important for the normal regulation of MeJA-induced transcriptional responses. • This work demonstrates the importance of SGT1 in the regulatory network that deploys defense responses against herbivores, and highlights the significance of SGT1 in plants' responses to JA.

  12. Jasmonate signaling in the field, part II: insect-guided characterization of genetic variations in jasmonate-dependent defenses of transgenic and natural Nicotiana attenuata populations.

    PubMed

    Gaquerel, Emmanuel; Stitz, Michael; Kallenbach, Mario; Baldwin, Ian T

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of genetically modified plants into natural habitats represents a valuable means to determine organismic level functions of a gene and its effects on a plant's interaction with other organisms. Nicotiana attenuata, a wild tobacco species native of the southwestern USA that grows in the immediate postfire environment, is one of the important host plants for herbivore populations recolonizing recently burned habitats in the Great Basin Desert. Here, we provide detailed guidelines for the analysis, under field conditions, of jasmonate-dependent defense and its impact on the plant's native herbivore community. The procedures are based on the field release of transgenic lines silenced for jasmonate biogenesis, metabolism, or perception to conduct association studies between defense trait expression (secondary metabolite and trypsin proteinase inhibitor accumulation) and insect infestations. Additionally, because some insects have evolved mechanisms to "eavesdrop" on jasmonate signaling when selecting their host plants, we describe how leafhoppers of the species Empoasca, which selectively colonize jasmonate-deficient plants, can be used as "bloodhounds" for identifying natural variations in jasmonate signaling among natural N. attenuata populations.

  13. Silencing ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase expression does not disrupt nitrogen allocation to defense after simulated herbivory in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Mariana A; Ullmann-Zeunert, Lynn; Wielsch, Natalie; Bartram, Stefan; Svatoš, Aleš; Baldwin, Ian T; Groten, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/ oxygenase (RuBisCO) is the most abundant protein on the planet and in addition to its central role in photosynthesis it is thought to function as a nitrogen (N)-storage protein and a potential source of N for defense biosynthesis in plants. In a recent study in the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, we showed that the decrease in absolute N invested in soluble proteins and RuBisCO elicited by simulated herbivory was much larger than the N-requirements of nicotine and phenolamide biosynthesis; (15)N flux studies revealed that N for defensive phenolamide synthesis originates from recently assimilated N rather than from RuBisCO turnover. Here we show that a transgenic line of N. attenuata silenced in the expression of RuBisCO (asRUB) invests similar or even larger amounts of N into phenolamide biosynthesis compared with wild type plants, consistent with our previous conclusion that recently assimilated N is channeled into phenolamide synthesis after elicitation. We suggest that the decrease in leaf proteins after simulated herbivory is a tolerance mechanism, rather than a consequence of N-demand for defense biosynthesis.

  14. Nicotiana attenuata LECTIN RECEPTOR KINASE1 Suppresses the Insect-Mediated Inhibition of Induced Defense Responses during Manduca sexta Herbivory[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Gilardoni, Paola A.; Hettenhausen, Christian; Baldwin, Ian T.; Bonaventure, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Nicotiana attenuata has the capacity to respond specifically to herbivory by its natural herbivore, Manduca sexta, through the perception of elicitors in larval oral secretions. We demonstrate that Lectin receptor kinase 1 (LecRK1) functions during M. sexta herbivory to suppress the insect-mediated inhibition of jasmonic acid (JA)–induced defense responses. Gene function analysis performed by reducing LecRK1 expression in N. attenuata by both virus-induced gene silencing and inverted repeated RNA interference (ir-lecRK1 plants) revealed that LecRK1 was essential to mount a full defense response against M. sexta folivory; larvae growing on ir-lecRK1 plants were 40 to 100% larger than those growing on wild-type plants. The insect-induced accumulation of nicotine, diterpene-glucosides, and trypsin protease inhibitors, as well as the expression of Thr deaminase, was severalfold reduced in ir-lecRK1 plants compared with the wild type. The accumulation of JA and JA-Ile was unaffected during herbivory in ir-lecRK1 plants; however, salicylic acid (SA) accumulation was increased by twofold. The expression of nahG in ir-lecRK1 plants prevented the increased accumulation of SA and restored the defense response against M. sexta herbivory. The results suggest that LecRK1 inhibits the accumulation of SA during herbivory, although other mechanisms may also be affected. PMID:21926334

  15. Nicotiana attenuata NaHD20 plays a role in leaf ABA accumulation during water stress, benzylacetone emission from flowers, and the timing of bolting and flower transitions.

    PubMed

    Ré, Delfina A; Dezar, Carlos A; Chan, Raquel L; Baldwin, Ian T; Bonaventure, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper type I (HD-Zip I) proteins are plant-specific transcription factors associated with the regulation of growth and development in response to changes in the environment. Nicotiana attenuata NaHD20 was identified as an HD-Zip I-coding gene whose expression was induced by multiple stress-associated stimuli including drought and wounding. To study the role of NaHD20 in the integration of stress responses with changes in growth and development, its expression was silenced by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), and control and silenced plants were metabolically and developmentally characterized. Phytohormone profiling showed that NaHD20 plays a positive role in abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in leaves during water stress and in the expression of some dehydration-responsive genes including ABA biosynthetic genes. Moreover, consistent with the high levels of NaHD20 expression in corollas, the emission of benzylacetone from flowers was reduced in NaHD20-silenced plants. Additionally, bolting time and the opening of the inflorescence buds was decelerated in these plants in a specific developmental stage without affecting the total number of flowers produced. Water stress potentiated these effects; however, after plants recovered from this condition, the opening of the inflorescence buds was accelerated in NaHD20-silenced plants. In summary, NaHD20 plays multiple roles in N. attenuata and among these are the coordination of responses to dehydration and its integration with changes in flower transitions.

  16. Up in smoke: I. Smoke-derived germination cues for postfire annual,Nicotiana attenuata torr. Ex. Watson.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, I T; Staszak-Kozinski, L; Davidson, R

    1994-09-01

    Some postfire annuals with dormant seeds use heat or chemical cues from charred wood to synchronize their germination with the postfire environment. We report that wood smoke and polar extracts of wood smoke, but not the ash of burned wood, contain potent cue(s) that stimulate germination in the postfire annual plant,Nicotiana attenuata. We examined the responses of seeds from six populations of plants from southwest Utah to extracts of smoke and found the proportion of viable seeds that germinated in the presence of smoke cues to vary between populations but to be consistent between generations. With the most dormant genotypes, we examine three mechanisms by which smoke-derived chemical cues may stimulate germination (chemical scarification of the seed coat and nutritive- and signal-mediated stimulation of germination) and report that the response is consistent with the signal-mediated mechanism. The germination cue(s) found in smoke are produced by the burning of hay, hardwood branches, leaves, and, to a lesser degree, cellulose. Moreover, the cues are found in the common food condiment, "liquid smoke," and we find no significant differences between brands. With a bioassay-driven fractionation of liquid smoke, we identified 71 compounds in active fractions by GC-MS and AA spectrometry. However, when these compounds were tested in pure form or in combinations that mimicked the composition of active fractions over a range of concentrations, they failed to stimulate germination to the same degree that smoke fractions did. Moreover, enzymatic oxidation of some of these compounds also failed to stimulate germination. In addition, we tested 43 additional compounds also reported from smoke, 85 compounds that were structurally similar to those reported from smoke and 34 compounds reported to influence germination in other species. Of the 233 compounds tested, 16 proved to inhibit germination at the concentrations tested, and none reproduced the activity of wood smoke. By

  17. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Using Tobacco Rattle Virus as a Tool to Study the Interaction between Nicotiana attenuata and Rhizophagus irregularis

    PubMed Central

    Groten, Karin; Pahari, Nabin T.; Xu, Shuqing; Miloradovic van Doorn, Maja; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    Most land plants live in a symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that belong to the phylum Glomeromycota. Although a number of plant genes involved in the plant-AMF interactions have been identified by analyzing mutants, the ability to rapidly manipulate gene expression to study the potential functions of new candidate genes remains unrealized. We analyzed changes in gene expression of wild tobacco roots (Nicotiana attenuata) after infection with mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus irregularis) by serial analysis of gene expression (SuperSAGE) combined with next generation sequencing, and established a virus-induced gene-silencing protocol to study the function of candidate genes in the interaction. From 92,434 SuperSAGE Tag sequences, 32,808 (35%) matched with our in-house Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome database and 3,698 (4%) matched to Rhizophagus genes. In total, 11,194 Tags showed a significant change in expression (p<0.05, >2-fold change) after infection. When comparing the functions of highly up-regulated annotated Tags in this study with those of two previous large-scale gene expression studies, 18 gene functions were found to be up-regulated in all three studies mainly playing roles related to phytohormone metabolism, catabolism and defense. To validate the function of identified candidate genes, we used the technique of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to silence the expression of three putative N. attenuata genes: germin-like protein, indole-3-acetic acid-amido synthetase GH3.9 and, as a proof-of-principle, calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK). The silencing of the three plant genes in roots was successful, but only CCaMK silencing had a significant effect on the interaction with R. irregularis. Interestingly, when a highly activated inoculum was used for plant inoculation, the effect of CCaMK silencing on fungal colonization was masked, probably due to trans-complementation. This study demonstrates that large

  18. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Using Tobacco Rattle Virus as a Tool to Study the Interaction between Nicotiana attenuata and Rhizophagus irregularis.

    PubMed

    Groten, Karin; Pahari, Nabin T; Xu, Shuqing; Miloradovic van Doorn, Maja; Baldwin, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    Most land plants live in a symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that belong to the phylum Glomeromycota. Although a number of plant genes involved in the plant-AMF interactions have been identified by analyzing mutants, the ability to rapidly manipulate gene expression to study the potential functions of new candidate genes remains unrealized. We analyzed changes in gene expression of wild tobacco roots (Nicotiana attenuata) after infection with mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus irregularis) by serial analysis of gene expression (SuperSAGE) combined with next generation sequencing, and established a virus-induced gene-silencing protocol to study the function of candidate genes in the interaction. From 92,434 SuperSAGE Tag sequences, 32,808 (35%) matched with our in-house Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome database and 3,698 (4%) matched to Rhizophagus genes. In total, 11,194 Tags showed a significant change in expression (p<0.05, >2-fold change) after infection. When comparing the functions of highly up-regulated annotated Tags in this study with those of two previous large-scale gene expression studies, 18 gene functions were found to be up-regulated in all three studies mainly playing roles related to phytohormone metabolism, catabolism and defense. To validate the function of identified candidate genes, we used the technique of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to silence the expression of three putative N. attenuata genes: germin-like protein, indole-3-acetic acid-amido synthetase GH3.9 and, as a proof-of-principle, calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK). The silencing of the three plant genes in roots was successful, but only CCaMK silencing had a significant effect on the interaction with R. irregularis. Interestingly, when a highly activated inoculum was used for plant inoculation, the effect of CCaMK silencing on fungal colonization was masked, probably due to trans-complementation. This study demonstrates that large

  19. Jasmonate and ppHsystemin Regulate Key Malonylation Steps in the Biosynthesis of 17-Hydroxygeranyllinalool Diterpene Glycosides, an Abundant and Effective Direct Defense against Herbivores in Nicotiana attenuata[W

    PubMed Central

    Heiling, Sven; Schuman, Meredith C.; Schoettner, Matthias; Mukerjee, Purba; Berger, Beatrice; Schneider, Bernd; Jassbi, Amir R.; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2010-01-01

    We identified 11 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides (HGL-DTGs) that occur in concentrations equivalent to starch (mg/g fresh mass) in aboveground tissues of coyote tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata) and differ in their sugar moieties and malonyl sugar esters (0-2). Concentrations of HGL-DTGs, particularly malonylated compounds, are highest in young and reproductive tissues. Within a tissue, herbivore elicitation changes concentrations and biosynthetic kinetics of individual compounds. Using stably transformed N. attenuata plants silenced in jasmonate production and perception, or production of N. attenuata Hyp-rich glycopeptide systemin precursor by RNA interference, we identified malonylation as the key biosynthetic step regulated by herbivory and jasmonate signaling. We stably silenced N. attenuata geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (ggpps) to reduce precursors for the HGL-DTG skeleton, resulting in reduced total HGL-DTGs and greater vulnerability to native herbivores in the field. Larvae of the specialist tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) grew up to 10 times as large on ggpps silenced plants, and silenced plants suffered significantly more damage from herbivores in N. attenuata's native habitat than did wild-type plants. We propose that high concentrations of HGL-DTGs effectively defend valuable tissues against herbivores and that malonylation may play an important role in regulating the distribution and storage of HGL-DTGs in plants. PMID:20081114

  20. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates are essential for systemic activation of salicylic acid-induced protein kinase and accumulation of jasmonic acid in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Hettenhausen, Christian; Heinrich, Maria; Baldwin, Ian T; Wu, Jianqiang

    2014-11-28

    Herbivory induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), the accumulation of jasmonates and defensive metabolites in damaged leaves and in distal undamaged leaves. Previous studies mainly focused on individual responses and a limited number of systemic leaves, and more research is needed for a better understanding of how different plant parts respond to herbivory. In the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, FACs (fatty acid-amino acid conjugates) in Manduca sexta oral secretions (OS) are the major elicitors that induce herbivory-specific signaling but their role in systemic signaling is largely unknown. Here, we show that simulated herbivory (adding M. sexta OS to fresh wounds) dramatically increased SIPK (salicylic acid-induced protein kinase) activity and jasmonic acid (JA) levels in damaged leaves and in certain (but not all) undamaged systemic leaves, whereas wounding alone had no detectable systemic effects; importantly, FACs and wounding are both required for activating these systemic responses. In contrast to the activation of SIPK and elevation of JA in specific systemic leaves, increases in the activity of an important anti-herbivore defense, trypsin proteinase inhibitor (TPI), were observed in all systemic leaves after simulated herbivory, suggesting that systemic TPI induction does not require SIPK activation and JA increases. Leaf ablation experiments demonstrated that within 10 minutes after simulated herbivory, a signal (or signals) was produced and transported out of the treated leaves, and subsequently activated systemic responses. Our results reveal that N. attenuata specifically recognizes herbivore-derived FACs in damaged leaves and rapidly send out a long-distance signal to phylotactically connected leaves to activate MAPK and JA signaling, and we propose that FACs that penetrated into wounds rapidly induce the production of another long-distance signal(s) which travels to all systemic leaves and activates TPI defense.

  1. Nicotiana attenuata NaHD20 plays a role in leaf ABA accumulation during water stress, benzylacetone emission from flowers, and the timing of bolting and flower transitions

    PubMed Central

    Ré, Delfina A.; Dezar, Carlos A.; Chan, Raquel L.; Baldwin, Ian T.; Bonaventure, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper type I (HD-Zip I) proteins are plant-specific transcription factors associated with the regulation of growth and development in response to changes in the environment. Nicotiana attenuata NaHD20 was identified as an HD-Zip I-coding gene whose expression was induced by multiple stress-associated stimuli including drought and wounding. To study the role of NaHD20 in the integration of stress responses with changes in growth and development, its expression was silenced by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), and control and silenced plants were metabolically and developmentally characterized. Phytohormone profiling showed that NaHD20 plays a positive role in abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in leaves during water stress and in the expression of some dehydration-responsive genes including ABA biosynthetic genes. Moreover, consistent with the high levels of NaHD20 expression in corollas, the emission of benzylacetone from flowers was reduced in NaHD20-silenced plants. Additionally, bolting time and the opening of the inflorescence buds was decelerated in these plants in a specific developmental stage without affecting the total number of flowers produced. Water stress potentiated these effects; however, after plants recovered from this condition, the opening of the inflorescence buds was accelerated in NaHD20-silenced plants. In summary, NaHD20 plays multiple roles in N. attenuata and among these are the coordination of responses to dehydration and its integration with changes in flower transitions. PMID:20713465

  2. Dimethyl Disulfide Produced by the Naturally Associated Bacterium Bacillus sp B55 Promotes Nicotiana attenuata Growth by Enhancing Sulfur Nutrition[W

    PubMed Central

    Meldau, Dorothea G.; Meldau, Stefan; Hoang, Long H.; Underberg, Stefanie; Wünsche, Hendrik; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus sp B55, a bacterium naturally associated with Nicotiana attenuata roots, promotes growth and survival of wild-type and, particularly, ethylene (ET)–insensitive 35S-ethylene response1 (etr1) N. attenuata plants, which heterologously express the mutant Arabidopsis thaliana receptor ETR1-1. We found that the volatile organic compound (VOC) blend emitted by B55 promotes seedling growth, which is dominated by the S-containing compound dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). DMDS was depleted from the headspace during cocultivation with seedlings in bipartite Petri dishes, and 35S was assimilated from the bacterial VOC bouquet and incorporated into plant proteins. In wild-type and 35S-etr1 seedlings grown under different sulfate (SO4−2) supply conditions, exposure to synthetic DMDS led to genotype-dependent plant growth promotion effects. For the wild type, only S-starved seedlings benefited from DMDS exposure. By contrast, growth of 35S-etr1 seedlings, which we demonstrate to have an unregulated S metabolism, increased at all SO4−2 supply rates. Exposure to B55 VOCs and DMDS rescued many of the growth phenotypes exhibited by ET-insensitive plants, including the lack of root hairs, poor lateral root growth, and low chlorophyll content. DMDS supplementation significantly reduced the expression of S assimilation genes, as well as Met biosynthesis and recycling. We conclude that DMDS by B55 production is a plant growth promotion mechanism that likely enhances the availability of reduced S, which is particularly beneficial for wild-type plants growing in S-deficient soils and for 35S-etr1 plants due to their impaired S uptake/assimilation/metabolism. PMID:23903320

  3. Silencing two herbivory-activated MAP kinases, SIPK and WIPK, does not increase Nicotiana attenuata's susceptibility to herbivores in the glasshouse and in nature.

    PubMed

    Meldau, Stefan; Wu, Jianqiang; Baldwin, Ian T

    2009-01-01

    Salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) are activated by Manduca sexta attack and elicitors to mediate defense signaling in Nicotiana attenuata. Here, the ecological consequences of SIPK and WIPK silencing for N. attenuata's resistance to M. sexta and its other native herbivores were analyzed. Stably transformed plants with reduced expression of NaSIPK (irNaSIPK) and NaWIPK(irNaWIPK) were generated and characterized in field and glasshouse experiments. Both irNaSIPK and irNaWIPK plants had reduced direct and indirect defenses but were not particularly susceptible in nature. In the glasshouse, M. sexta larvae consumed less and gained the same mass on irNaSIPK and irNaWIPK as on wild-type (WT) plants. Green leaf volatile (GLV) emission was highly attenuated in irNaSIPK and irNaWIPK plants, and complementation with synthetic GLVs increased M. sexta performance. To test the hypothesis that reduced GLV emissions account for the lack of herbivory phenotype, GLV emissions were attenuated by silencing NaHPL in jasmonate-deficient plants (asNaLOX3), which are highly susceptible to herbivores. Reducing GLV emissions in asNaLOX3 plants 'rescued' these plants from being heavily damaged by M. sexta. GLV emissions in irNaSIPK and irNaWIPK plants may compensate for the impaired defenses of NaSIPK- and NaWIPK-silenced plants in nature by reducing their apparency to herbivores.

  4. Herbivory-induced volatiles function as defenses increasing fitness of the native plant Nicotiana attenuata in nature.

    PubMed

    Schuman, Meredith C; Barthel, Kathleen; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-10-15

    From an herbivore's first bite, plants release herbivory-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) which can attract enemies of herbivores. However, other animals and competing plants can intercept HIPVs for their own use, and it remains unclear whether HIPVs serve as an indirect defense by increasing fitness for the emitting plant. In a 2-year field study, HIPV-emitting N. attenuata plants produced twice as many buds and flowers as HIPV-silenced plants, but only when native Geocoris spp. predators reduced herbivore loads (by 50%) on HIPV-emitters. In concert with HIPVs, plants also employ antidigestive trypsin protease inhibitors (TPIs), but TPI-producing plants were not fitter than TPI-silenced plants. TPIs weakened a specialist herbivore's behavioral evasive responses to simulated Geocoris spp. attack, indicating that TPIs function against specialists by enhancing indirect defense.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00007.001.

  5. Herbivory-induced volatiles function as defenses increasing fitness of the native plant Nicotiana attenuata in nature

    PubMed Central

    Schuman, Meredith C; Barthel, Kathleen; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-01-01

    From an herbivore's first bite, plants release herbivory-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) which can attract enemies of herbivores. However, other animals and competing plants can intercept HIPVs for their own use, and it remains unclear whether HIPVs serve as an indirect defense by increasing fitness for the emitting plant. In a 2-year field study, HIPV-emitting N. attenuata plants produced twice as many buds and flowers as HIPV-silenced plants, but only when native Geocoris spp. predators reduced herbivore loads (by 50%) on HIPV-emitters. In concert with HIPVs, plants also employ antidigestive trypsin protease inhibitors (TPIs), but TPI-producing plants were not fitter than TPI-silenced plants. TPIs weakened a specialist herbivore's behavioral evasive responses to simulated Geocoris spp. attack, indicating that TPIs function against specialists by enhancing indirect defense. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00007.001 PMID:23066503

  6. The Sesquiterpenes(E)-ß-Farnesene and (E)-α-Bergamotene Quench Ozone but Fail to Protect the Wild Tobacco Nicotiana attenuata from Ozone, UVB, and Drought Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Palmer-Young, Evan C.; Veit, Daniel; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schuman, Meredith C.

    2015-01-01

    Among the terpenes, isoprene (C5) and monoterpene hydrocarbons (C10) have been shown to ameliorate abiotic stress in a number of plant species via two proposed mechanisms: membrane stabilization and direct antioxidant effects. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (C15) not only share the structural properties thought to lend protective qualities to isoprene and monoterpene hydrocarbons, but also react rapidly with ozone, suggesting that sesquiterpenes may similarly enhance tolerance of abiotic stresses. To test whether sesquiterpenes protect plants against ozone, UVB light, or drought, we used transgenic lines of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata. The transgenic plants expressed a maize terpene synthase gene (ZmTPS10) which produced a blend of (E)-ß-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene, or a point mutant of the same gene (ZmTPS10M) which produced (E)-ß-farnesene alone,. (E)-ß-farnesene exerted a local, external, and transient ozone-quenching effect in ozone-fumigated chambers, but we found no evidence that enhanced sesquiterpene production by the plant inhibited oxidative damage, or maintained photosynthetic function or plant fitness under acute or chronic stress. Although the sesquiterpenes (E)-ß-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene might confer benefits under intermittent heat stress, which was not tested, any roles in relieving abiotic stress may be secondary to their previously demonstrated functions in biotic interactions. PMID:26030663

  7. Silencing a key gene of the common symbiosis pathway in Nicotiana attenuata specifically impairs arbuscular mycorrhizal infection without influencing the root-associated microbiome or plant growth.

    PubMed

    Groten, Karin; Nawaz, Ali; Nguyen, Nam H T; Santhanam, Rakesh; Baldwin, Ian T

    2015-11-01

    While the biochemical function of calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is well studied, and plants impaired in the expression of CCaMK are known not to be infected by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in glasshouse studies, the whole-plant and ecological consequences of CCaMK silencing are not well understood. Here we show that three independently transformed lines of Nicotiana attenuata plants silenced in CCaMK (irCCaMK) are neither infected by Rhizophagus irregularis in the glasshouse nor by native fungal inoculum in the field. The overall fungal community of field-grown roots did not differ significantly among empty vector (EV) and the transgenic lines, and the bacterial communities only showed minor differences, as revealed by the alpha-diversity parameters of bacterial OTUs, which were higher in EV plants compared with two of the three transformed lines, while beta-diversity parameters did not differ. Furthermore, growth and fitness parameters were similar in the glasshouse and field. Herbivory-inducible and basal levels of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and abscisic acid did not differ among the genotypes, suggesting that activation of the classical defence pathways are not affected by CCaMK silencing. Based on these results, we conclude that silencing of CCaMK has few, if any, non-target effects. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Deciphering Herbivory-Induced Gene-to-Metabolite Dynamics in Nicotiana attenuata Tissues Using a Multifactorial Approach1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Jyotasana; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    In response to biotic stresses, such as herbivore attack, plants reorganize their transcriptomes and reconfigure their physiologies not only in attacked tissues but throughout the plant. These whole-organismic reconfigurations are coordinated by a poorly understood network of signal transduction cascades. To explore tissue-based interdependencies in the resistance of Nicotiana attenuata to insect attack, we conducted time-series transcriptome and metabolome profiling of herbivory-elicited source leaves and unelicited sink leaves and roots. To probe the multidimensionality of these molecular responses, we designed a novel approach of combining an extended self-organizing maps-based dimensionality reduction method with bootstrap-based nonparametric analysis of variance models to identify the onset and context of signaling and metabolic pathway activations. We illustrate the value of this analysis by revisiting dynamic changes in the expression of regulatory and structural genes of the oxylipin pathway and by studying nonlinearities in gene-metabolite associations involved in the acyclic diterpene glucoside pathway after selectively extracting modules based on their dynamic response patterns. This novel dimensionality reduction approach is broadly applicable to capture the dynamic rewiring of gene and metabolite networks in experimental design with multiple factors. PMID:23656894

  9. NaJAZh Regulates a Subset of Defense Responses against Herbivores and Spontaneous Leaf Necrosis in Nicotiana attenuata Plants[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gális, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins function as negative regulators of jasmonic acid signaling in plants. We cloned 12 JAZ genes from native tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata), including nine novel JAZs in tobacco, and examined their expression in plants that had leaves elicited by wounding or simulated herbivory. Most JAZ genes showed strong expression in the elicited leaves, but NaJAZg was mainly expressed in roots. Another novel herbivory-elicited gene, NaJAZh, was analyzed in detail. RNA interference suppression of this gene in inverted-repeat (ir)JAZh plants deregulated a specific branch of jasmonic acid-dependent direct and indirect defenses: irJAZh plants showed greater trypsin protease inhibitor activity, 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides accumulation, and emission of volatile organic compounds from leaves. Silencing of NaJAZh also revealed a novel cross talk in JAZ-regulated secondary metabolism, as irJAZh plants had significantly reduced nicotine levels. In addition, irJAZh spontaneously developed leaf necrosis during the transition to flowering. Because the lesions closely correlated with the elevated expression of programmed cell death genes and the accumulations of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the leaves, we propose a novel role of the NaJAZh protein as a repressor of necrosis and/or programmed cell death during plant development. PMID:22496510

  10. Identification and profiling of miRNAs during herbivory reveals jasmonate-dependent and -independent patterns of accumulation in Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in the transcriptional responses to environmental stresses. However, the role of miRNAs in responses to insect herbivory has not been thoroughly explored. To identify herbivory-responsive miRNAs, we identified conserved miRNAs in the ecological model plant Nicotiana attenuata whose interactions with herbivores have been well-characterized in both laboratory and field studies. Results We identified 59 miRNAs from 36 families, and two endogenous trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNA) targeted by miRNAs. We characterized the response of the precursor and mature miRNAs to simulated attack from the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta by quantitative PCR analysis and used ir-aoc RNAi transformants, deficient in jasmonate biosynthesis, to identify jasmonate-dependent and -independent miRNA regulation. Expression analysis revealed that groups of miRNAs and tasiRNAs were specifically regulated by either mechanical wounding or wounding plus oral secretions from M. sexta larvae, and these small RNAs were accumulated in jasmonate-dependent or -independent manners. Moreover, cDNA microarray analysis indicated that the expression patterns of the corresponding target genes were correlated with the accumulation of miRNAs and tasiRNAs. Conclusions We show that a group of miRNAs and tasiRNAs orchestrates the expression of target genes involved in N. attenuata’s responses to herbivore attack. PMID:23134682

  11. The Sesquiterpenes(E)-ß-Farnesene and (E)-α-Bergamotene Quench Ozone but Fail to Protect the Wild Tobacco Nicotiana attenuata from Ozone, UVB, and Drought Stresses.

    PubMed

    Palmer-Young, Evan C; Veit, Daniel; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schuman, Meredith C

    2015-01-01

    Among the terpenes, isoprene (C5) and monoterpene hydrocarbons (C10) have been shown to ameliorate abiotic stress in a number of plant species via two proposed mechanisms: membrane stabilization and direct antioxidant effects. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (C15) not only share the structural properties thought to lend protective qualities to isoprene and monoterpene hydrocarbons, but also react rapidly with ozone, suggesting that sesquiterpenes may similarly enhance tolerance of abiotic stresses. To test whether sesquiterpenes protect plants against ozone, UVB light, or drought, we used transgenic lines of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata. The transgenic plants expressed a maize terpene synthase gene (ZmTPS10) which produced a blend of (E)-ß-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene, or a point mutant of the same gene (ZmTPS10M) which produced (E)-ß-farnesene alone,. (E)-ß-farnesene exerted a local, external, and transient ozone-quenching effect in ozone-fumigated chambers, but we found no evidence that enhanced sesquiterpene production by the plant inhibited oxidative damage, or maintained photosynthetic function or plant fitness under acute or chronic stress. Although the sesquiterpenes (E)-ß-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene might confer benefits under intermittent heat stress, which was not tested, any roles in relieving abiotic stress may be secondary to their previously demonstrated functions in biotic interactions.

  12. A Nicotiana attenuata cell wall invertase inhibitor (NaCWII) reduces growth and increases secondary metabolite biosynthesis in herbivore-attacked plants.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, Abigail P; Arce, Carla C M; Machado, Ricardo A R; Meza-Canales, Ivan D; Lima, Eraldo; Baldwin, Ian T; Erb, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Plant invertases are sucrolytic enzymes that are essential for the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism and source-sink relationships. While their activity has been well documented during abiotic and biotic stresses, the role of proteinaceous invertase inhibitors in regulating these changes is unknown. Here, we identify a putative Nicotiana attenuata cell wall invertase inhibitor (NaCWII) which is strongly up-regulated in a jasmonate (JA)-dependent manner following simulated attack by the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta. To understand the role of NaCWII in planta, we silenced its expression by RNA interference and measured changes in primary and secondary metabolism and plant growth following simulated herbivory. NaCWII-silenced plants displayed a stronger depletion of carbohydrates and a reduced capacity to increase secondary metabolite pools relative to their empty vector control counterparts. This coincided with the attenuation of herbivore-induced CWI inhibition and growth suppression characteristic of wild-type plants. Together our findings suggest that NaCWII may act as a regulatory switch located downstream of JA accumulation which fine-tunes the plant's balance between growth and defense metabolism under herbivore attack. Although carbohydrates are not typically viewed as key factors in plant growth and defense, our study shows that interfering with their catabolism strongly influences plant responses to herbivory. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. JA but not JA-Ile is the cell-nonautonomous signal activating JA mediated systemic defenses to herbivory in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Bozorov, Tohir A; Dinh, Son Truong; Baldwin, Ian T

    2017-08-01

    The whole-plant activation of defense responses to wounding and herbivory requires systemic signaling in which jasmonates (JAs) play a pivotal role. To examine the nature of the slower cell-nonautonomous as compared to the rapid cell-autonomous signal in mediating systemic defenses in Nicotiana attenuata, reciprocal stem grafting-experiments were used with plants silenced for the JA biosynthetic gene ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (irAOC) or plants transformed to create JA sinks by ectopically expressing Arabidopsis JA-O-methyltransferase (ovJMT). JA-impaired irAOC plants were defective in the cell-nonautonomous signaling pathway but not in JA transport. Conversely, ovJMT plants abrogated the production of a graft-transmissible JA signal. Both genotypes displayed unaltered cell-autonomous signaling. Defense responses (17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides, nicotine, and proteinase inhibitors) and metabolite profiles were differently induced in irAOC and ovJMT scions in response to graft-transmissible signals from elicited wild type stocks. The performance of Manduca sexta larvae on the scions of different graft combinations was consistent with the patterns of systemic defense metabolite elicitations. Taken together, we conclude that JA and possibly MeJA, but not JA-Ile, either directly functions as a long-distance transmissible signal or indirectly interacts with long distance signal(s) to activate systemic defense responses. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. [Procedure of running experiments on studying the effects of altered gas medium on culture of hydra Hydra attenuata].

    PubMed

    Ruzhichko, I R; Pavlov, B N

    2011-01-01

    Owing to the simple form and short gemmation, hydroid polyps have become a classic model object for studies into cell division and proliferation, and effects of changed environment on these processes. However, there is no procedure for studying of how altered gas composition of aqueous medium affects biological processes in hydroidpolyps. Testing of a procedure for objective studies with bioculture of Hydra attenuata resulted in determination of optimal hydra density in Petri dish. It was also stated that culture duplication takes minimal time at 25-30 degrees C. Tests verified efficiency of an incubator designed for experiment with Hydra attenuata in pressurized chambers enabling controlled ventilation by different gas mixtures. It was shown that time of culture duplication in normoxic and hypoxic nitrox is permanent and statistically different Therefore, the proposed procedure and incubator can be useful for fundamental and applied studies of the biological effects of altered gas medium on hydroid polyps.

  15. Tissue specific diurnal rhythms of metabolites and their regulation during herbivore attack in a native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Gyu; Yon, Felipe; Gaquerel, Emmanuel; Gulati, Jyotasana; Baldwin, Ian T

    2011-01-01

    Ecological performance is all about timing and the endogenous clock that allows the entrainment of rhythms and anticipation of fitness-determining events is being rapidly characterized. How plants anticipate daily abiotic stresses, such as cold in early mornings and drought at noon, as well as biotic stresses, such as the timing of pathogen infections, is being explored, but little is known about the clock's role in regulating responses to insect herbivores and mutualists, whose behaviors are known to be strongly diurnally regulated and whose attack is known to reconfigure plant metabolomes. We developed a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure and analyzed its output with model-based peak picking algorithms to identify metabolites with diurnal accumulation patterns in sink/source leaves and roots in an unbiased manner. The response of metabolites with strong diurnal patterns to simulated attack from the specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta larvae was analyzed and annotated with in-house and public databases. Roots and leaves had largely different rhythms and only 10 ions of 182 oscillating ions in leaves and 179 oscillating ions in roots were rhythmic in both tissues: root metabolites mainly peaked at dusk or night, while leaf metabolites peaked during the day. Many oscillating metabolites showed tissue-specific regulation by simulated herbivory of which systemic responses in unattacked tissues were particularly pronounced. Diurnal and herbivory-elicited accumulation patterns of disaccharide, phenylalanine, tyrosine, lyciumoside I, coumaroyl tyramine, 12-oxophytodienoic acid and jasmonic acid and those of their related biosynthetic transcripts were examined in detail. We conclude that oscillating metabolites of N. attenuata accumulate in a highly tissue-specific manner and the patterns reveal pronounced diurnal rhythms in the generalized and specialized metabolism that mediates the plant's responses to herbivores and mutualists. We propose that diurnal

  16. ISSR and AFLP analysis of the temporal and spatial population structure of the post-fire annual, Nicotiana attenuata, in SW Utah

    PubMed Central

    Bahulikar, Rahul A; Stanculescu, Dominic; Preston, Catherine A; Baldwin, Ian T

    2004-01-01

    Background The native annual tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, is found primarily in large ephemeral populations (typically for less than 3 growing seasons) after fires in sagebrush and pinyon-juniper ecosystems and in small persistent populations (for many growing seasons) in isolated washes typically along roadsides throughout the Great Basin Desert of the SW USA. This distribution pattern is due to its unusual germination behavior. Ephemeral populations are produced by the germination of dormant seeds from long-lived seed banks which are stimulated to germinate by a combination of unidentified positive cues found in wood smoke and the removal of inhibitors leached from the unburned litter of the dominant vegetation. Persistent populations may result where these inhibitors do not exist, as in washes or along disturbed roadsides. To determine if this germination behavior has influenced population structure, we conducted an AFLP (244 individuals), ISSR (175 individuals) and ISSR+ AFLP (175 individuals) analysis on plants originating from seed collected from populations growing in 11 wash and burns over 11 years from the SW USA. Results Genetic variance as measured by both ISSR and AFLP markers was low among sites and comparatively higher within populations. Cluster analysis of the Utah samples with samples collected from Arizona, California, and Oregon as out-groups also did not reveal patterns. AMOVA analysis of the combined AFLP and ISSR data sets yielded significantly low genetic differentiation among sites (Φct), moderate among populations within sites (Φsc) and higher genetic differentiation within populations (Φst). Conclusions We conclude that the seed dormancy of this post-fire annual and its resulting age structure in conjunction with natural selection processes are responsible for significantly low among sites and comparatively high within-population genetic variation observed in this species. PMID:15350209

  17. Environmental Stresses of Field Growth Allow Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Deficient Nicotiana attenuata Plants to Compensate for their Structural Deficiencies1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants. PMID:22645069

  18. Increased SA in NPR1-silenced plants antagonizes JA and JA-dependent direct and indirect defenses in herbivore-attacked Nicotiana attenuata in nature.

    PubMed

    Rayapuram, Cbgowda; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-11-01

    The phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) is known to mediate herbivore resistance, while salicylic acid (SA) and non-expressor of PR-1 (NPR1) mediate pathogen resistance in many plants. Herbivore attack on Nicotiana attenuata elicits increases in JA and JA-mediated defenses, but also increases SA levels and Na-NPR1 transcripts from the plant's single genomic copy. SA treatment of wild-type plants increases Na-NPR1 and Na-PR1 transcripts. Plants silenced in NPR1 accumulation by RNAi (ir-npr1) are highly susceptible to herbivore and pathogen attack when planted in their native habitat in Utah. They are also impaired in their ability to attract Geocorus pallens predators, due to their decreased ability to release cis-alpha-bergamotene, a JA-elicited volatile 'alarm call'. In the glasshouse, Spodoptera exigua larvae grew better on ir-npr1 plants, which had low levels of JA, JA-isoleucine/leucine, lipoxygenase-3 (LOX3) transcripts and JA-elicited direct defense metabolites (nicotine, caffeoyl putrescine and rutin), but high levels of SA and isochorismate synthase (ICS) transcripts, suggesting de novo biosynthesis of SA. A microarray analysis revealed downregulation of many JA-elicited genes and upregulation of SA biosynthetic genes. JA treatment restored nicotine levels and resistance to S. exigua in ir-npr1 plants. We conclude that, during herbivore attack, NPR1 negatively regulates SA production, allowing the unfettered elicitation of JA-mediated defenses; when NPR1 is silenced, the elicited increases in SA production antagonize JA and JA-related defenses, making the plants susceptible to herbivores.

  19. Nicotiana attenuata SIPK, WIPK, NPR1, and Fatty Acid-Amino Acid Conjugates Participate in the Induction of Jasmonic Acid Biosynthesis by Affecting Early Enzymatic Steps in the Pathway1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kallenbach, Mario; Alagna, Fiammetta; Baldwin, Ian Thomas; Bonaventure, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    Wounding and herbivore attack elicit the rapid (within minutes) accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) that results from the activation of previously synthesized biosynthetic enzymes. Recently, several regulatory factors that affect JA production have been identified; however, how these regulators affect JA biosynthesis remains at present unknown. Here we demonstrate that Nicotiana attenuata salicylate-induced protein kinase (SIPK), wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK), nonexpressor of PR-1 (NPR1), and the insect elicitor N-linolenoyl-glucose (18:3-Glu) participate in mechanisms affecting early enzymatic steps of the JA biosynthesis pathway. Plants silenced in the expression of SIPK and NPR1 were affected in the initial accumulation of 13-hydroperoxy-linolenic acid (13-OOH-18:3) after wounding and 18:3-Glu elicitation by mechanisms independent of changes in 13-lipoxygenase activity. Moreover, 18:3-Glu elicited an enhanced and rapid accumulation of 13-OOH-18:3 that depended partially on SIPK and NPR1 but was independent of increased 13-lipoxygenase activity. Together, the results suggested that substrate supply for JA production was altered by 18:3-Glu elicitation and SIPK- and NPR1-mediated mechanisms. Consistent with a regulation at the level of substrate supply, we demonstrated by virus-induced gene silencing that a wound-repressed plastidial glycerolipase (NaGLA1) plays an essential role in the induction of de novo JA biosynthesis. In contrast to SIPK and NPR1, mechanisms mediated by WIPK did not affect the production of 13-OOH-18:3 but were critical to control the conversion of this precursor into 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. These differences could be partially accounted for by reduced allene oxide synthase activity in WIPK-silenced plants. PMID:19897603

  20. Molecular Interactions between the Specialist Herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and Its Natural Host Nicotiana attenuata: V. Microarray Analysis and Further Characterization of Large-Scale Changes in Herbivore-Induced mRNAs1

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Dequan; Iqbal, Javeed; Lehmann, Katja; Gase, Klaus; Saluz, Hans Peter; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2003-01-01

    We extend our analysis of the transcriptional reorganization that occurs when the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, is attacked by Manduca sexta larvae by cloning 115 transcripts by mRNA differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subtractive hybridization using magnetic beads (SHMB) from the M. sexta-responsive transcriptome. These transcripts were spotted as cDNA with eight others, previously confirmed to be differentially regulated by northern analysis on glass slide microarrays, and hybridized with Cy3- and Cy5-labeled probes derived from plants after 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of continuous attack. Microarray analysis proved to be a powerful means of verifying differential expression; 73 of the cloned genes (63%) were differentially regulated (in equal proportions from differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and SHMB procedures), and of these, 24 (32%) had similarity to known genes or putative proteins (more from SHMB). The analysis provided insights into the signaling and transcriptional basis of direct and indirect defenses used against herbivores, suggesting simultaneous activation of salicylic acid-, ethylene-, cytokinin-, WRKY-, MYB-, and oxylipin-signaling pathways and implicating terpenoid-, pathogen-, and cell wall-related transcripts in defense responses. These defense responses require resources that could be made available by decreases in four photosynthetic-related transcripts, increases in transcripts associated with protein and nucleotide turnover, and increases in transcripts associated with carbohydrate metabolism. This putative up-regulation of defense-associated and down-regulation of growth-associated transcripts occur against a backdrop of altered transcripts for RNA-binding proteins, putative ATP/ADP translocators, chaperonins, histones, and water channel proteins, responses consistent with a major metabolic reconfiguration that underscores the complexity of response to herbivore attack

  1. Nicotiana attenuata MPK4 suppresses a novel jasmonic acid (JA) signaling-independent defense pathway against the specialist insect Manduca sexta, but is not required for the resistance to the generalist Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Hettenhausen, Christian; Baldwin, Ian T; Wu, Jianqiang

    2013-08-01

    How plants tailor their defense responses to attack from different insects remains largely unknown. Here, we studied the role of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), MPK4, in the resistance of a wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata to two herbivores, the specialist Manduca sexta and the generalist Spodoptera littoralis. Stably transformed N. attenuata plants silenced in MPK4 (irMPK4) were generated and characterized for traits important for defense against herbivores. Only the oral secretions (OS) from M. sexta, but not the OS from S. littoralis or mechanical wounding, induced elevated levels of jasmonic acid (JA) in irMPK4 plants relative to the wild-type plants. Moreover, silencing of MPK4 strongly increased the resistance of N. attenuata to M. sexta in a fashion that was independent of COI1 (CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1)-mediated JA signaling. Untargeted metabolomic screening identified several new MPK4-dependent putative defensive compounds against M. sexta. By contrast, silencing of MPK4 did not affect the growth of the generalist insect S. littoralis, and we propose that this was because of the very low levels of fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in S. littoralis OS. Thus, MPK4 is likely to be a key signaling element that enables plants to tailor defense responses to different attackers. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. R2R3-NaMYB8 Regulates the Accumulation of Phenylpropanoid-Polyamine Conjugates, Which Are Essential for Local and Systemic Defense against Insect Herbivores in Nicotiana attenuata1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Heinzel, Nicolas; Schöttner, Mathias; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gális, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Although phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates (PPCs) occur ubiquitously in plants, their biological roles remain largely unexplored. The two major PPCs of Nicotiana attenuata plants, caffeoylputrescine (CP) and dicaffeoylspermidine, increase dramatically in local and systemic tissues after herbivore attack and simulations thereof. We identified NaMYB8, a homolog of NtMYBJS1, which in BY-2 cells regulates PPC biosynthesis, and silenced its expression by RNA interference in N. attenuata (ir-MYB8), to understand the ecological role(s) of PPCs. The regulatory role of NaMYB8 in PPC biosynthesis was validated by a microarray analysis, which revealed that transcripts of several key biosynthetic genes in shikimate and polyamine metabolism accumulated in a NaMYB8-dependent manner. Wild-type N. attenuata plants typically contain high levels of PPCs in their reproductive tissues; however, NaMYB8-silenced plants that completely lacked CP and dicaffeoylspermidine showed no changes in reproductive parameters of the plants. In contrast, a defensive role for PPCs was clear; both specialist (Manduca sexta) and generalist (Spodoptera littoralis) caterpillars feeding on systemically preinduced young stem leaves performed significantly better on ir-MYB8 plants lacking PPCs compared with wild-type plants expressing high levels of PPCs. Moreover, the growth of M. sexta caterpillars was significantly reduced when neonates were fed ir-MYB8 leaves sprayed with synthetic CP, corroborating the role of PPCs as direct plant defense. The spatiotemporal accumulation and function of PPCs in N. attenuata are consistent with the predictions of the optimal defense theory: plants preferentially protect their most fitness-enhancing and vulnerable parts, young tissues and reproductive organs, to maximize their fitness. PMID:20089770

  3. Molecular Interactions between the Specialist Herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and Its Natural Host Nicotiana attenuata. IV. Insect-Induced Ethylene Reduces Jasmonate-Induced Nicotine Accumulation by Regulating Putrescine N-Methyltransferase Transcripts12

    PubMed Central

    Winz, Robert A.; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2001-01-01

    Attack by the specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta, on its native host Nicotiana attenuata Torr. ex Wats. produces a dramatic ethylene release, a jasmonate burst, and a suppression of the nicotine accumulation that results from careful simulations of the herbivore's damage. Methyl-jasmonate (MeJA) treatment induces nicotine biosynthesis. However, this induction can be suppressed by ethylene as pretreatment of plants with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), a competitive inhibitor of ethylene receptors, restores the full MeJA-induced nicotine response in herbivore attacked plants (J. Kahl, D.H. Siemens, R.J. Aerts, R. Gäbler, F. Kühnemann, C.A. Preston, I.T. Baldwin [2000] Planta 210: 336–342). To understand whether this herbivore-induced signal cross-talk occurs at the level of transcript accumulation, we cloned the putrescine methyltransferase genes (NaPMT1 and NaPMT2) of N. attenuata, which are thought to represent the rate limiting step in nicotine biosynthesis, and measured transcript accumulations by northern analysis after various jasmonate, 1-MCP, ethephon, and herbivory treatments. Transcripts of both root putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT) genes and nicotine accumulation increased dramatically within 10 h of shoot MeJA treatment and immediately after root treatments. Root ethephon treatments suppressed this response, which could be reversed by 1-MCP pretreatment. Moreover, 1-MCP pretreatment dramatically amplified the transcript accumulation resulting from both wounding and M. sexta herbivory. We conclude that attack from this nicotine-tolerant specialist insect causes N. attenuata to produce ethylene, which directly suppresses the nitrogen-intensive biosynthesis of nicotine. PMID:11299398

  4. Alternative Oxidase in Resistance to Biotic Stresses: Nicotiana attenuata AOX Contributes to Resistance to a Pathogen and a Piercing-Sucking Insect But Not Manduca sexta Larvae1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Oh, Youngjoo; Li, Hongyu; Baldwin, Ian T.; Galis, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The role of the alternative respiratory pathway in the protection of plants against biotic stress was examined in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata) plants (irAOX) silenced in the expression of ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE (AOX) gene. Wild-type and irAOX plants were independently challenged with (1) chewing herbivores (Manduca sexta), (2) piercing-sucking insects (Empoasca spp.), and (3) bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000), showing that all these treatments can strongly elicit accumulation of AOX gene transcripts in wild-type plants. When N. attenuata chemical defenses and resistance were examined, irAOX plants showed wild-type levels of defense-related phytohormones, secondary metabolites, and resistance to M. sexta. In contrast, piercing-sucking leafhoppers (Empoasca spp.) caused more leaf damage and induced significantly higher salicylic acid levels in irAOX compared with wild-type plants in the field and/or glasshouse. Subsequently, irAOX plants accumulated lower levels of defense metabolites, 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides, caffeoylputrescine, and nicotine compared with wild-type plants under prolonged attack of Empoasca spp. in the glasshouse. Finally, an accelerated cell death phenotype was observed in irAOX plants infected with P. syringae, which correlated with higher levels of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide levels in pathogen-infected irAOX compared with wild-type leaves. Overall, the AOX-associated changes in phytohormone and/or redox levels appear to support the resistance of N. attenuata plants against cell piercing-sucking insects and modulate the progression of cell death in pathogen-infected tissues but are not effective against rapidly feeding specialist herbivore M. sexta. PMID:22961128

  5. Molecular Interactions between the Specialist Herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and Its Natural Host Nicotiana attenuata. I. Large-Scale Changes in the Accumulation of Growth- and Defense-Related Plant mRNAs1

    PubMed Central

    Hermsmeier, Dieter; Schittko, Ursula; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2001-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivore attack with a dramatic functional reorganization that involves the activation of direct and indirect defenses and tolerance, which in turn make large demands on primary metabolism. Here we provide the first characterization of the transcriptional reorganization that occurs after insect attack in a model plant-herbivore system: Nicotiana attenuata Torr. ex Wats.-Manduca sexta. We used mRNA differential display to characterize one-twentieth of the insect-responsive transcriptome of N. attenuata and verified differential expression for 27 cDNAs. Northern analyses were used to study the effects of folivory and exposure to airborne methyl jasmonate and for kinetic analyses throughout a 16-h- light/8-h-dark cycle. Sequence similarity searches allowed putative functions to be assigned to 15 transcripts. Genes were related to photosynthesis, electron transport, cytoskeleton, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, signaling, and a group responding to stress, wounding, or invasion of pathogens. Overall, transcripts involved in photosynthesis were strongly down-regulated, whereas those responding to stress, wounding, and pathogens and involved in shifting carbon and nitrogen to defense were strongly up-regulated. The majority of transcripts responded similarly to airborne methyl jasmonate and folivory, and had tissue- and diurnal-specific patterns of expression. Transcripts encoding Thr deaminase (TD) and a putative retrotransposon were absent in control plants, but were strongly induced after herbivory. Full-length sequences were obtained for TD and the pathogen-inducible α-dioxygenase, PIOX. Effects of abiotic and biotic stimuli were investigated for transcripts encoding TD, importin α, PIOX, and a GAL83-like kinase cofactor. PMID:11161026

  6. Silencing MPK4 in Nicotiana attenuata enhances photosynthesis and seed production but compromises abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure and guard cell-mediated resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Hettenhausen, Christian; Baldwin, Ian T; Wu, Jianqiang

    2012-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play pivotal roles in development and environmental interactions in eukaryotes. Here, we studied the function of a MAPK, NaMPK4, in the wild tobacco species Nicotiana attenuata. The NaMPK4-silenced N. attenuata (irNaMPK4) attained somewhat smaller stature, delayed senescence, and greatly enhanced stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate, especially during late developmental stages. All these changes were associated with highly increased seed production. Using leaf epidermal peels, we demonstrate that guard cell closure in irNaMPK4 was strongly impaired in response to abscisic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and consistently, irNaMPK4 plants transpired more water and wilted sooner than did wild-type plants when they were deprived of water. We show that NaMPK4 plays an important role in the guard cell-mediated defense against a surface-deposited bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000; in contrast, when bacteria directly entered leaves by pressure infiltration, NaMPK4 was found to be less important in the resistance to apoplast-located Pst DC3000. Moreover, we show that salicylic acid was not involved in the defense against PstDC3000 in wild-type and irNaMPK4 plants once it had entered leaf tissue. Finally, we provide evidence that NaMPK4 functions differently from AtMPK4 and AtMPK11 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), despite their sequence similarities, suggesting a complex functional divergence of MAPKs in different plant lineages. This work highlights the multifaceted functions of NaMPK4 in guard cells and underscores its role in mediating various ecologically important traits.

  7. RuBPCase activase mediates growth-defense tradeoffs: Silencing RCA redirects JA flux from JA-Ile to MeJA to attenuate induced defense responses in Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sirsha; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary RuBPCase activase (RCA), an abundant photosynthetic protein is strongly down-regulated in response to Manduca sexta’s oral secretion (OS) in Nicotiana attenuata. RCA-silenced plants are impaired not only in photosynthetic capacity and growth, but also in jasmonic acid (JA)-isoleucine (Ile) signaling, and herbivore resistance mediated by JA-Ile dependent defense traits. These responses are consistent with a resource-based growth-defense trade-off. Since JA+Ile-supplementation of OS restored WT levels of JA-Ile, defenses and resistance to M. sexta, but OS supplemented individually with JA- or Ile did not, the JA-Ile deficiency of RCA-silenced plants could not be attributed to lower JA or Ile pools or JAR4/6 conjugating activity. Similar levels of JA-Ile derivatives after OS elicitation indicated unaltered JA-Ile turnover and lower levels of other JA-conjugates ruled out competition from other conjugation reactions. RCA-silenced plants accumulated more methyl jasmonate (MeJA) after OS elicitation, which corresponded with increased jasmonate methyltransferase (JMT) activity. RCA-silencing phenocopies JMT over-expression, wherein elevated JMT activity redirects OS-elicited JA flux towards inactive MeJA, creating a JA sink which depletes JA-Ile and its associated defense responses. Hence RCA plays an additional non-photosynthetic role in attenuating JA-mediated defenses and their associated costs potentially allowing plants to anticipate resource-based constraints on growth before they actually occur. PMID:24491116

  8. Shifting Nicotiana attenuata’s diurnal rhythm does not alter its resistance to the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Herden, Jasmin; Meldau, Stefan; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kunert, Grit; Joo, Youngsung; Baldwin, Ian T.; Schuman, Meredith C.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants are less resistant to attack by the generalist lepidopteran Trichoplusia ni when plants and herbivores are entrained to opposite, versus identical diurnal cycles and tested under constant conditions. This effect is associated with circadian fluctuations in levels of jasmonic acid, the transcription factor MYC2, and glucosinolate contents in leaves. We tested whether a similar effect could be observed in a different plant-herbivore system: the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata and its co-evolved specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. We measured larval growth on plants under both constant and diurnal conditions following identical or opposite entrainment, profiled the metabolome of attacked leaf tissue, quantified specific metabolites known to reduce M. sexta growth, and monitored M. sexta feeding activity under all experimental conditions. Entrainment did not consistently affect M. sexta growth or plant defense induction. However, both were reduced under constant dark conditions, as was M. sexta feeding activity. Our data indicate that the response induced by M. sexta in N. attenuata is robust to diurnal cues and independent of plant or herbivore entrainment. We propose that while the patterns of constitutive or general damage-induced defense may undergo circadian fluctuation, the orchestration of specific induced responses is more complex. PMID:26699809

  9. RNAi-mediated silencing of the HD-Zip gene HD20 in Nicotiana attenuata affects benzyl acetone emission from corollas via ABA levels and the expression of metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The N. attenuata HD20 gene belongs to the homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) type I family of transcription factors and it has been previously associated with the regulation of ABA accumulation in leaves and the emission of benzyl acetone (BA; 4-phenyl-2-butanone) from night flowers. In this study, N. attenuata plants stably reduced in the expression of HD20 (ir-hd20) were generated to investigate the mechanisms controlling the emission of BA from night flowers. Results The expression of HD20 in corollas of ir-hd20 plants was reduced by 85 to 90% compared to wild-type plants (WT) without affecting flower morphology and development. Total BA emitted from flowers of ir-hd20 plants was reduced on average by 60%. This reduction occurred mainly at the late phase of BA emission and it was correlated with 2-fold higher levels of ABA in the corollas of ir-hd20 plants. When a 2-fold decline in ABA corolla levels of these plants was induced by salt stress, BA emissions recovered to WT levels. Supplying ABA to WT flowers either through the cuticle or by pedicle feeding reduced the total BA emissions by 25 to 50%; this reduction occurred primarily at the late phase of emission (similar to the reduction observed in corollas of ir-hd20 plants). Gene expression profiling of corollas collected at 12 pm (six hours before the start of BA emission) revealed that 274 genes changed expression levels significantly in ir-hd20 plants compared to WT. Among these genes, more than 35% were associated with metabolism and the most prominent group was associated with the metabolism of aromatic compounds and phenylpropanoid derivatives. Conclusions The results indicated that regulation of ABA levels in corollas is associated with the late phase of BA emission in N. attenuata plants and that HD20 affects this latter process by mediating changes in both ABA levels and metabolic gene expression. PMID:22548747

  10. Profiling of Altered Metabolomic States in Nicotiana tabacum Cells Induced by Priming Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has developed into a valuable tool for advancing our understanding of plant metabolism. Plant innate immune defenses can be activated and enhanced so that, subsequent to being pre-sensitized, plants are able to launch a stronger and faster defense response upon exposure to pathogenic microorganisms, a phenomenon known as priming. Here, three contrasting chemical activators, namely acibenzolar-S-methyl, azelaic acid and riboflavin, were used to induce a primed state in Nicotiana tabacum cells. Identified biomarkers were then compared to responses induced by three phytohormones—abscisic acid, methyljasmonate, and salicylic acid. Altered metabolomes were studied using a metabolite fingerprinting approach based on liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Multivariate data models indicated that these inducers cause time-dependent metabolic perturbations in the cultured cells and revealed biomarkers of which the levels are affected by these agents. A total of 34 metabolites were annotated from the mass spectral data and online databases. Venn diagrams were used to identify common biomarkers as well as those unique to a specific agent. Results implicate 20 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to (i) quinic acid (chlorogenic acids), (ii) tyramine, (iii) polyamines, or (iv) glucose as discriminatory biomarkers of priming in tobacco cells. Functional roles for most of these metabolites in plant defense responses could thus be proposed. Metabolites induced by the activators belong to the early phenylpropanoid pathway, which indicates that different stimuli can activate similar pathways but with different metabolite fingerprints. Possible linkages to phytohormone-dependent pathways at a metabolomic level were indicated in the case of cells treated with salicylic acid and methyljasmonate. The results contribute to a better understanding of the priming phenomenon and advance our knowledge of cinnamic acid derivatives as versatile defense metabolites. PMID

  11. Antihyperglycemic activity of Caralluma attenuata.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, S; Reddy, G Dayanand; Reddy, B Madhava; Ramesh, M; Rao, A V N Appa

    2003-04-01

    Extracts of Caralluma attenuata are screened for their antihyperglycemic activity. Ethanol, chloroform and butanol extracts were tested on glucose loaded and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. In both tests, the butanol extract, at the oral dose of 250 mg/kg, has shown statistically significant and considerable antihyperglycemic activity.

  12. Leaf wounding or simulated herbivory in young N. attenuata plants reduces carbon delivery to roots and root tips.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lilian; Hummel, Grégoire M; Thiele, Björn; Schurr, Ulrich; Thorpe, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    In Nicotiana attenuata seedlings, simulated herbivo ry by the specialist Manduca sexta decreases root growth and partitioning of recent photoassimilates to roots in contrast to increased partitioning reported for older plants. Root elongation rate in Nicotiana attenuata has been shown to decrease after leaf herbivory, despite reports of an increased proportion of recently mobilized photoassimilate being delivered towards the root system in many species after similar treatments. To study this apparent contradiction, we measured the distribution of recent photoassimilate within root tissues after wounding or simulated herbivory of N. attenuata leaves. We found no contradiction: herbivory reduced carbon delivery to root tips. However, the speed of phloem transport in both shoot and root, and the delivery of recently assimilated carbon to the entire root system, declined after wounding or simulated herbivory, in contrast with the often-reported increase in root partitioning. We conclude that the herbivory response in N. attenuata seedlings is to favor the shoot and not bunker carbon in the root system.

  13. Phytoplasma SAP11 alters 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana by suppressing NbOMT1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Choon Meng; Li, Chia-Hua; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Su, Li-Wen; Lu, Yen-Ting; Chang, Shu Heng; Lin, Yi Yu; Liou, Jyun-Cyuan; Hsieh, Li-Ching; Yu, Jih-Zu; Sheue, Chiou-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Lee, Chin-Fa; Yang, Jun-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are bacterial phytopathogens that release virulence effectors into sieve cells and act systemically to affect the physiological and morphological state of host plants to promote successful pathogenesis. We show here that transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana lines expressing the secreted effector SAP11 from Candidatus Phytoplasma mali exhibit an altered aroma phenotype. This phenomenon is correlated with defects in the development of glandular trichomes and the biosynthesis of 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IBMP). IBMP is a volatile organic compound (VOC) synthesized by an O-methyltransferase, via a methylation step, from a non-volatile precursor, 3-isobutyl-2-hydroxypyrazine (IBHP). Based on comparative and functional genomics analyses, NbOMT1, which encodes an O-methyltransferase, was found to be highly suppressed in SAP11-transgenic plants. We further silenced NbOMT1 through virus-induced gene silencing and demonstrated that this enzyme influenced the accumulation of IBMP in N. benthamiana. In vitro biochemical analyses also showed that NbOMT1 can catalyse IBHP O-methylation in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Our study suggests that the phytoplasma effector SAP11 has the ability to modulate host VOC emissions. In addition, we also demonstrated that SAP11 destabilized TCP transcription factors and suppressed jasmonic acid responses in N. benthamiana. These findings provide valuable insights into understanding how phytoplasma effectors influence plant volatiles. PMID:27279277

  14. Lack of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complex I and alteration of the respiratory chain in Nicotiana sylvestris mitochondrial deletion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gutierres, Sophie; Sabar, Mohammed; Lelandais, Christine; Chetrit, Philippe; Diolez, Philippe; Degand, Hervé; Boutry, Marc; Vedel, Fernand; de Kouchkovsky, Yaroslav; De Paepe, Rosine

    1997-01-01

    We previously have shown that Nicotiana sylvestris cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) mutants I and II present large mtDNA deletions and that the NAD7 subunit of complex I (the main dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial respiratory chain) is absent in CMS I. Here, we show that, despite a large difference in size in the mtDNA deletion, CMS I and II display similar alterations. Both have an impaired development from germination to flowering, with partial male sterility that becomes complete under low light. Besides NAD7, two other complex I subunits are missing (NAD9 and the nucleus-encoded, 38-kDa subunit), identified on two-dimensional patterns of mitochondrial proteins. Mitochondria isolated from CMS leaves showed altered respiration. Although their succinate oxidation through complex II was close to that of the wild type, oxidation of glycine, a priority substrate of plant mitochondria, was significantly reduced. The remaining activity was much less sensitive to rotenone, indicating the breakdown of Complex I activity. Oxidation of exogenous NADH (coupled to proton gradient generation and partly sensitive to rotenone) was strongly increased. These results suggest respiratory compensation mechanisms involving additional NADH dehydrogenases to complex I. Finally, the capacity of the cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase pathway was enhanced in CMS, and higher amounts of enzyme were evidenced by immunodetection. PMID:9096412

  15. Drought stress alters water relations and expression of PIP-type aquaporin genes in Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Mahdieh, Majid; Mostajeran, Akbar; Horie, Tomoaki; Katsuhara, Maki

    2008-05-01

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), a type of aquaporins, mediate water transport in many plant species. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the functions of PIP-type water channels and water relations of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun) under drought stress. Drought stress treatments have led to reductions in the stomatal conductance, transpiration, water potential and turgor pressure in leaves, and also the sap flow rate and osmotic hydraulic conductance in roots. In contrast, leaf osmotic pressure was increased in response to drought stress. Interestingly, the accumulation of NtPIP1;1 and NtPIP2;1 transcripts was significantly decreased, but only that of the NtAQP1 transcript was increased under drought stress. Functional analysis using Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed that NtPIP2;1 shows marked water transport activity, but the activities of NtAQP1 and NtPIP1;1 are weak or almost negligible, respectively, when expressed alone. However, co-expression of NtPIP1;1 with NtPIP2;1 significantly enhanced water transport activity compared with that of NtPIP1;1- or NtPIP2;1-expressing oocytes, suggesting that these two aquaporins may function as a water channel, forming a heterotetramer. Heteromerization of NtPIP1;1 and NtPIP2;1 was also suggested by co-expression analyses of NtPIP1;1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and NtPIP2;1 in Xenopus oocytes. Re-watering treatments recovered water relation parameters and the accumulation of the three NtPIP transcripts to levels similar to control conditions. These results suggest that NtPIP1;1 and NtPIP2;1 play an important role in water transport in roots, and that expression of NtPIP1;1 and NtPIP2;1 is down-regulated in order to reduce osmotic hydraulic conductance in the roots of tobacco plants under drought stress.

  16. Antisense-mediated reduction in ADC activity causes minor alterations in the alkaloid profile of cultured hairy roots and regenerated transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chintapakorn, Yupyn; Hamill, John D

    2007-10-01

    In species of the genus Nicotiana, as in most plants, the important polyamine precursor putrescine can be derived from the amino acids ornithine and/or arginine via the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and/or arginine decarboxylase (ADC), respectively. Nicotiana species also utilize putrescine to provide the pyrollidine ring of the defensive alkaloid nicotine and its derivatives. Previous biochemical studies, involving callus tissues cultured in vitro, suggested that the ADC-mediated route to putrescine is used preferentially to provide the putrescine that is utilized for nicotine synthesis in N. tabacum. To ascertain if this is the case in N. tabacum plants, where nicotine synthesis takes place exclusively in roots, we used an antisense approach to diminish ADC activity in transformed roots which were cultured in vitro. Several independent lines were recovered possessing markedly reduced levels of ADC transcript and ADC activity compared to controls. Transcript levels of other genes in this general area of metabolism, including ODC, were not altered as a result of the antisense-mediated downregulation of ADC. Concentrations of nicotine were comparable in antisense-ADC and control hairy root lines throughout most of their respective culture cycles, except at the latter stages of growth when the nicotine content of antisense-ADC hairy root lines was observed to be approximately 20% lower than in controls. Levels of anatabine, the second most abundant alkaloid typically found in N. tabacum, which is not derived from putrescine, were slightly elevated in two antisense-ADC hairy root lines at the latter stages of their culture cycles compared to controls. Comparison of alkaloid levels in leaves of transgenic plants that were regenerated from separate antisense-ADC and control transformed root lines indicated that the former possessed slightly elevated levels of anatabine but did not contain average levels of leaf nicotine that were different from that of

  17. A new steroidal saponin from Agave attenuata.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Tatiana Paz; Silva, Graziela de Medeiros; da Silva, Bernadete Pereira; Parente, José Paz

    2004-04-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave attenuata. Its structure was established as (3beta,beta,25S)-spirostan-3-yl O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 3)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR, and COLOC) and chemical conversions. The hemolytic activity of the steroidal saponin was evaluated using an in vitro assay.

  18. Manipulation of the napin primary structure alters its packaging and deposition in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Scarafoni, A; Carzaniga, R; Harris, N; Croy, R R

    2001-08-01

    Napin is a 2S storage protein found in the seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and related species. Using protein structural prediction programs we have identified a region in the napin protein sequence which forms a 'hydrophilic loop' composed of amino acid residues located at the protein surface. Targeting this region, we have constructed two napin chimeric genes containing the coding sequence for the peptide hormone leucine-enkephalin as a topological marker. One version has a single enkephalin sequence of 11 amino acids including linkers and the second contains a tandem repeat of this peptide comprising 22 amino acids, inserted into the napin large subunit. The inserted peptide sequences alter the balance of hydrophilic to hydrophobic amino acids and introduce flexibility into this region of the polypeptide chain. The chimeric genes have been expressed in tobacco plants under the control of the seed-specific napA gene promoter. Analyses indicate that the engineered napin proteins are expressed, transported, post-translationally modified and deposited inside the protein bodies of the transgenic seeds demonstrating that the altered napin proteins behave in a similar fashion to the authentic napin protein. Detailed immunolocalisation studies indicate that the insertion of the peptide sequences has a significant effect on the distribution of the napin proteins within the tobacco seed protein bodies.

  19. Organophosphate nerve agent toxicity in Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    Lum, Karin T; Huebner, Henry J; Li, Yingchun; Phillips, Timothy D; Raushel, Frank M

    2003-08-01

    The toxicity for analogues of sarin (GB), soman (GD), and VX was evaluated using Hydra attenuata as a model organism. The organophosphate nerve agent analogue simulants used in this investigation included the following: isopropyl p-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate (for GB); pinacolyl p-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate (for GD); and diisopropyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate, diethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate, and diethyl S-(2-trimethylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate (for VX). The toxicity of each organophosphate nerve agent was assessed quantitatively by measuring the minimal effective concentration within 92 h in H. attenuata. There is a positive correlation between the molecular hydrophobicity of the compound and its ability to cause toxicity. Results from this study indicate the potential for application of this assay in the field of organophosphate chemical warfare agent detection, as well as for the prediction of toxicity of structurally similar organophosphate compounds. The minimal effective concentration for two of the VX analogues was 2 orders of magnitude more toxic than the analogue for GD and 4 orders of magnitude more toxic than the analogue for GB.

  20. Ectopic expression of class 1 KNOX genes induce and adventitious shoot regeneration and alter growth and development of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and plum (Prunus domestica L) were produced by transforming with apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKN1 and MdKN2) or corn KN1 gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were regenerated in vitro from transformed leaf discs cultured in a tissue medium lacking cytoki...

  1. Phytochemical and Biological Studies of Agave attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Rizwan, Komal; Zubair, Muhammad; Rasool, Nasir; Riaz, Muhammad; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; de Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine various biological activities of a methanol extract of Agave attenuata leaves. GC-MS analysis of the n-hexane fraction from the extract revealed the presence of 31 compounds, with mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (11.37%), 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (6.33%), n-docosane (6.30%) and eicosane (6.02%) as the major components. The leaves contained appreciable levels of total phenolic contents (10.541–39.35 GAE, mg/100 g) and total flavonoid contents (43.35–304.8 CE, mg/100 g). The extract and some of its fractions showed moderate antimicrobial effects. Leaves extract and fractions also exhibited a good antioxidant potential when measured by DPPH radical scavenging activity and inhibition of lipid peroxidation assays. The hemolytic effect of the plant was found to be in a range of 1.01%–2.64%. From the present study it is concluded that this plant could be used as a source of natural antioxidants and functional food nutraceutical applications. PMID:22754375

  2. Phytochemical and biological studies of Agave attenuata.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, Komal; Zubair, Muhammad; Rasool, Nasir; Riaz, Muhammad; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; de Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine various biological activities of a methanol extract of Agave attenuata leaves. GC-MS analysis of the n-hexane fraction from the extract revealed the presence of 31 compounds, with mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (11.37%), 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (6.33%), n-docosane (6.30%) and eicosane (6.02%) as the major components. The leaves contained appreciable levels of total phenolic contents (10.541-39.35 GAE, mg/100 g) and total flavonoid contents (43.35-304.8 CE, mg/100 g). The extract and some of its fractions showed moderate antimicrobial effects. Leaves extract and fractions also exhibited a good antioxidant potential when measured by DPPH radical scavenging activity and inhibition of lipid peroxidation assays. The hemolytic effect of the plant was found to be in a range of 1.01%-2.64%. From the present study it is concluded that this plant could be used as a source of natural antioxidants and functional food nutraceutical applications.

  3. Sex ratio of mirid populations shifts in response to hostplant co-infestation or altered cytokinin signaling .

    PubMed

    Adam, Nora; Erler, Theresa; Kallenbach, Mario; Kaltenpoth, Martin; Kunert, Grit; Baldwin, Ian T; Schuman, Meredith C

    2017-01-01

    Herbivore species sharing a host plant often compete. In this study, we show that host plant-mediated interaction between two insect herbivores - a generalist and a specialist - results in a sex ratio shift of the specialist's offspring. We studied demographic parameters of the specialist Tupiocoris notatus (Hemiptera: Miridae) when co-infesting the host plant Nicotiana attenuata (Solanaceae) with the generalist leafhopper Empoasca sp. (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). We show that the usually female-biased sex ratio of T. notatus shifts toward a higher male proportion in the offspring on plants co-infested by Empoasca sp. This sex ratio change did not occur after oviposition, nor is it due differential mortality of female and male nymphs. Based on pyrosequencing and PCR of bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons, we concluded that sex ratio shifts were unlikely to be due to infection with Wolbachia or other known sex ratio-distorting endosymbionts. Finally, we used transgenic lines of N. attenuata to evaluate if the sex ratio shift could be mediated by changes in general or specialized host plant metabolites. We found that the sex ratio shift occurred on plants deficient in two cytokinin receptors (irCHK2/3). Thus, cytokinin-regulated traits can alter the offspring sex ratio of the specialist T. notatus. © 2016 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Ectopic expression of class 1 KNOX genes induce adventitious shoot regeneration and alter growth and development of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L).

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, C; Liu, Zongrang; Scorza, Ralph

    2011-04-01

    Transgenic plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L) were produced by transforming with the apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKN1 and MdKN2) or corn KNOX1 gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were regenerated in vitro from transformed leaf discs cultured in a medium lacking cytokinin. Ectopic expression of KNOX genes retarded shoot growth by suppressing elongation of internodes in transgenic tobacco plants. Expression of each of the three KNOX1 genes induced malformation and extensive lobbing in tobacco leaves. In situ regeneration of adventitious shoots was observed from leaves and roots of transgenic tobacco plants expressing each of the three KNOX genes. In vitro culture of leaf explants and internode sections excised from in vitro grown MdKN1 expressing tobacco shoots regenerated adventitious shoots on MS (Murashige and Skoog 1962) basal medium in the absence of exogenous cytokinin. Transgenic plum plants that expressed the MdKN2 or corn KNOX1 gene grew normally but MdKN1 caused a significant reduction in plant height, leaf shape and size and produced malformed curly leaves. A high frequency of adventitious shoot regeneration (96%) was observed in cultures of leaf explants excised from corn KNOX1-expressing transgenic plum shoots. In contrast to KNOX1-expressing tobacco, leaf and internode explants of corn KNOX1-expressing plum required synthetic cytokinin (thidiazuron) in the culture medium to induce adventitious shoot regeneration. The induction of high-frequency regeneration of adventitious shoots in vitro from leaves and stem internodal sections of plum through the ectopic expression of a KNOX1 gene is the first such report for a woody perennial fruit trees.

  5. Cutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Caused by Exophiala attenuata in a Domestic Cat.

    PubMed

    Overy, David P; Martin, Chelsea; Muckle, Anne; Lund, Lorraine; Wood, Jill; Hanna, Paul

    2015-10-01

    A 7-year-old female-spayed, domestic short-haired cat was presented to her veterinarian with a mass on the hind paw. Histopathologic examination of a tissue biopsy revealed nodular pyogranulomatous panniculitis with intralesional pigmented fungal hyphae. A dematiaceous fungal isolate was isolated with a micromorphological phenotype consistent with the anamorphic genus Exophiala: budding cells, torulose mycelium and annellidic conidiogenesis from simple conidiophores consisting of terminal and lateral cells that tapered to a short beak at the apex. Sequence homology of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA gene confirmed the identification of the isolate as Exophiala attenuata. Reported here is the first confirmed case of feline phaeohyphomycosis caused by E. attenuata in North America. Similar to historical cases of feline phaeohyphomycosis caused by Exophiala spp., there was no history or postmortem evidence to suggest the patient was in an immunocompromised state (e.g., suffering from FeLV or FIV). Although aggressive surgical excision of local lesions is recommended prior to drug treatment when dealing with subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis, surgery followed by itraconazole treatment did not resolve the E. attenuata infection in this cat.

  6. Ectopic expression of Malus domestica class 1 knox genes altered growth and development of Nicotiana tabacum and Prunus domestica, and induced adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants without exogenous cytokinin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and plum (Prunus domestica L) plants were regenerated by transforming with apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKNP1 and MdKNP2) or a corn KN1 (ZmKN1) gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were produced in vitro from transformed leaf discs in the absence of cytokinin in th...

  7. A new bioactive steroidal saponin from Agave attenuata.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bernadete P; de Sousa, Allyne C; Silva, Graziela M; Mendes, Tatiana P; Parente, José P

    2002-01-01

    A new steroidal saponin was isolated from the leaves of Agave attenuata Salm-Dyck. Its structure was established as (3beta,5beta,22alpha,25S)-26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-22-methoxyfurostan-3-yl O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside. The structural identification was performed using detailed analyses of 1H and 13C NMR spectra including 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques (COSY, HETCOR and COLOC) and chemical conversions. The haemolytic potential of the steroidal saponin was evaluated and the anti-inflammatory activity was performed using the capillary permeability assay.

  8. Reference genomes and transcriptomes of Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis are members of the Solanaceae family that includes tomato, potato, eggplant and pepper. These two Nicotiana species originate from South America and exhibit different alkaloid and diterpenoid production. N. sylvestris is cultivated largely as an ornamental plant and it has been used as a diploid model system for studies of terpenoid production, plastid engineering, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis are considered to be modern descendants of the maternal and paternal donors that formed Nicotiana tabacum about 200,000 years ago through interspecific hybridization. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of these two Nicotiana species. Results Draft genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis were assembled to 82.9% and 71.6% of their expected size respectively, with N50 sizes of about 80 kb. The repeat content was 72-75%, with a higher proportion of retrotransposons and copia-like long terminal repeats in N. tomentosiformis. The transcriptome assemblies showed that 44,000-53,000 transcripts were expressed in the roots, leaves or flowers. The key genes involved in terpenoid metabolism, alkaloid metabolism and heavy metal transport showed differential expression in the leaves, roots and flowers of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. Conclusions The reference genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis represent a significant contribution to the SOL100 initiative because, as members of the Nicotiana genus of Solanaceae, they strengthen the value of the already existing resources by providing additional comparative information, thereby helping to improve our understanding of plant metabolism and evolution. PMID:23773524

  9. Reference genomes and transcriptomes of Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis.

    PubMed

    Sierro, Nicolas; Battey, James N D; Ouadi, Sonia; Bovet, Lucien; Goepfert, Simon; Bakaher, Nicolas; Peitsch, Manuel C; Ivanov, Nikolai V

    2013-06-17

    Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis are members of the Solanaceae family that includes tomato, potato, eggplant and pepper. These two Nicotiana species originate from South America and exhibit different alkaloid and diterpenoid production. N. sylvestris is cultivated largely as an ornamental plant and it has been used as a diploid model system for studies of terpenoid production, plastid engineering, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis are considered to be modern descendants of the maternal and paternal donors that formed Nicotiana tabacum about 200,000 years ago through interspecific hybridization. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of these two Nicotiana species. Draft genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis were assembled to 82.9% and 71.6% of their expected size respectively, with N50 sizes of about 80 kb. The repeat content was 72-75%, with a higher proportion of retrotransposons and copia-like long terminal repeats in N. tomentosiformis. The transcriptome assemblies showed that 44,000-53,000 transcripts were expressed in the roots, leaves or flowers. The key genes involved in terpenoid metabolism, alkaloid metabolism and heavy metal transport showed differential expression in the leaves, roots and flowers of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. The reference genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis represent a significant contribution to the SOL100 initiative because, as members of the Nicotiana genus of Solanaceae, they strengthen the value of the already existing resources by providing additional comparative information, thereby helping to improve our understanding of plant metabolism and evolution.

  10. Multi-scale biomarker evaluation of the toxicity of a commercial azo dye (Disperse Red 1) in an animal model, the freshwater cnidarian Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Laetitia; Pech, Nicolas; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Moreau, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Acute (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) and chronic (7 days) tests have been performed to evaluate the effects of the commercial azo dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) using various biomarkers in the freshwater invertebrate Hydra attenuata. Morphological changes have been selected to calculate ecotoxicological thresholds for sublethal and lethal DR1 concentrations. A multinomial logistic model showed that the probability of each morphological stage occurrence was function of concentration, time and interaction between both. Results of oxidative balance parameter measurements (72 h and 7 days) suggest that polyps set up defense mechanisms to limit lipid peroxidation caused by DR1. DR1 exposure at hormetic concentrations induces increase of asexual reproductive rates. This result suggests (1) an impact on the fitness-related phenotypical traits and (2) trade-offs between reproduction and maintenance to allow the population to survive harsher conditions. Changes in serotonin immuno-labeling in polyps showing alterations in feeding behavior suggest that chronic DR1 exposure impaired neuronal processes related to ingesting behavior in H. attenuata. This ecotoxicity study sheds light on the possible serotonin function in Hydra model and reports for the first time that serotonin could play a significant role in feeding behavior. This study used a multi-scale biomarker approach investigating biochemical, morphological, reproductive and behavioral endpoints in Hydra attenuata. This organism is proposed for a pertinent animal model to assess ecotoxicological impact of pollutant mixtures in freshwater environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of pesticide formulations and active ingredients on the coelenterate Hydra attenuata (Pallas, 1766).

    PubMed

    Demetrio, Pablo M; Bulus Rossini, Gustavo D; Bonetto, Carlos A; Ronco, Alicia E

    2012-01-01

    Lethal effects of active ingredients and formulations of widely used soybean pesticides were assessed with the Hydra attenuata toxicity test. Studied pesticides were insecticides chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin, and herbicide glyphosate. Results indicate the following toxicity trend: chlorpyrifos > cypermethrin > glyphosate. Tested active ingredients of insecticides and respective formulations did not significantly differ between them. Glyphosate formulation exhibited higher toxicity at low concentrations (LC(1-10)) respect to active ingredient, reversing this behavior at higher concentrations (LC(50-90)). Comparing H. attenuata sensitivity with existent toxicity data for aquatic organisms indicates that this species is poorly sensitive to tested insecticides and highly sensitive to the herbicide.

  12. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  13. Structure and expression of STK, a src-related gene in the simple metazoan Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, T C; Unger, T F; Fisher, D A; Steele, R E

    1989-01-01

    Both cDNA clones and a genomic DNA clone encoding a 509-amino-acid protein that is 64% similar to chicken pp60c-src were isolated from the simple metazoan Hydra attenuata. We have designated this gene STK, for src-type kinase. Features of the amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by the STK gene suggest that it is likely to be myristoylated and regulated by phosphorylation in a manner similar to that found for pp60c-src. The genomic sequence encoding the protein was found to be interrupted by at least two introns, one of which was located in a position identical to that of one of the introns in the chicken src gene. The STK gene was expressed during early development of H. attenuata and at high levels in the epithelial cells of adult polyps. Probing of Hydra proteins with an antibody to phosphotyrosine indicated that the major phosphotyrosine-containing protein in H. attenuata may be the STK protein itself. H. attenuata is the simplest organism from which a protein-tyrosine kinase gene has been isolated. The presence of such a gene in the evolutionarily ancient phylum Cnidaria suggests that protein-tyrosine kinase genes arose concomitantly with or shortly after the appearance of multicellular organisms. Images PMID:2479820

  14. Ecological divergence and evolutionary transition of resprouting types in Banksia attenuata.

    PubMed

    He, Tianhua

    2014-08-01

    Resprouting is a key functional trait that allows plants to survive diverse disturbances. The fitness benefits associated with resprouting include a rapid return to adult growth, early flowering, and setting seed. The resprouting responses observed following fire are varied, as are the ecological outcomes. Understanding the ecological divergence and evolutionary pathways of different resprouting types and how the environment and genetics interact to drive such morphological evolution represents an important, but under-studied, topic. In the present study, microsatellite markers and microevolutionary approaches were used to better understand: (1) whether genetic differentiation is related to morphological divergence among resprouting types and if so, whether there are any specific genetic variations associated with morphological divergence and (2) the evolutionary pathway of the transitions between two resprouting types in Banksia attenuata (epicormic resprouting from aerial stems or branch; resprouting from a underground lignotuber). The results revealed an association between population genetic differentiation and the morphological divergence of postfire resprouting types in B. attenuata. A microsatellite allele has been shown to be associated with epicormic populations. Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis revealed a likely evolutionary transition from epicormic to lignotuberous resprouting in B. attenuata. It is concluded that the postfire resprouting type in B. attenuata is likely determined by the fire's characteristics. The differentiated expression of postfire resprouting types in different environments is likely a consequence of local genetic adaptation. The capacity to shift the postfire resprouting type to adapt to diverse fire regimes is most likely the key factor explaining why B. attenuata is the most widespread member of the Banksia genus.

  15. Functional interactions in the use of direct and indirect defences in native Nicotiana plants.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, I T

    1999-01-01

    Nicotiana attenuata has both direct (induced nicotine production) and indirect (induced release of mono- and sesquiterpenes) defences induced by herbivore attack; both are activated by the jasmonate cascade, albeit in different tissues (roots and shoots, respectively). The fact that both types of defences are induced suggests that their benefits are conditional. Indeed, jasmonate treatment of roots to induce nicotine production increases plant fitness correlates (lifetime viable seed production) when plants are grown in environments with herbivores, but decreases fitness when they are not. Because inducing nicotine production can make 6% of a plant's nitrogen budget unavailable for seed production, it can exact a resource-based cost. Volatile production is likely to be less costly but could make plants more 'apparent' to herbivores and thereby exact an ecological cost. Direct defences could also have ecological costs if they are sequestered by specialist herbivores and used against their enemies. Herbivory by the nicotine-tolerant herbivore Manduca sexta dramatically amplifies the increase in jasmonates and the quantity of volatiles released, but decreases the nicotine response in comparison to mechanical simulations of the wounding that larval feeding causes. The apparent switching from nicotine production to the release of volatiles may reflect incompatibilities in the use of direct and indirect defences with specialist herbivores.

  16. Effect of Caralluma attenuata in normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jayakar, B; Rajkapoor, B; Suresh, B

    2004-01-01

    The hypoglycemic effect of aqueous and alcoholic extracts of whole plant Caralluma attenuata was investigated in both normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. The blood glucose levels were measured at 0, 1, 2 and 3 h after the treatment. The aqueous and alcoholic extracts of C. attenuata (100 mg/kg) reduced the blood glucose level of normal rat from 84.5 +/- 2.0 to 68.5 +/- 2.8 mg/dl and 82.6 +/- 1.8 to 67.4 +/- 2.8 mg/dl, respectively, 3h after oral administration (P < 0.001). Blood glucose levels in alloxan induced diabetic rats were also significantly lowered from 316 +/- 3.32 to 162 +/- 2.76 and 324 +/- 4.10 to 150 +/- 3.94 mg/dl, respectively, 3 h after oral administration (P < 0.001).

  17. How can plant virus satellite RNAs alter the effects of plant virus infection? A study of the changes in the Nicotiana benthamiana proteome after infection by peanut stunt virus in the presence or absence of its satellite RNA.

    PubMed

    Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra; Wieczorek, Przemysław; Budziszewska, Marta; Jeszke, Arnika; Renaut, Jenny

    2013-07-01

    Peanut stunt virus (PSV), which belongs to the Cucumovirus genus, is a pathogen of legumes. Certain PSV strains associated with a satellite RNA (satRNA) modify the symptoms of infected plants and interfere with plant metabolism. We used PSV-P genomic transcripts (GTs) with and without PSV-P satRNA and a comparative proteomic 2D-DIGE/MS study to assess their effects on Nicotiana benthamiana infection. When the proteomes of the PSV-P genomic transcripts-infected (no satRNA present) and mock-inoculated plants were compared 29 differentially regulated proteins were found. When comparisons were made for plants infected with PSV-P-GT in the presence or absence of satRNA, and for mock-infected plants and those infected with the satRNA-associated PSV-P-GT, 40 and 60 such proteins, respectively, were found. The presence of satRNA mostly decreased the amounts of the affected host proteins. Proteins involved in photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, for example ferredoxin-NADP-reductase and malate dehydrogenase, are among the identified affected proteins in all comparisons. Proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation were also affected. Such proteins include chaperonin 60β--whose abundance of the proteins changed for all comparisons--and aminopeptidase that is a satRNA- or PSV-P-GT/satRNA-responsive protein. Additionally, the levels of the stress-related proteins superoxide dismutase and acidic endochitinase Q increased in the PSV-P-GT- and PSV-P-GT/satRNA-infected plants. This study appears to be the first report on plant proteome changes in response to a satRNA presence during viral infection and, as such, may provide a reference for future studies concerning the influence of satRNAs during viral infections.

  18. Ulcer healing potential of ethanolic extract of Caralluma attenuata on experimental diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sunil; Srivastava, Sajal; Singh, Kisanpal; Sharma, Alok; Garg, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Available data indicated that diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the vulnerability of the gastric ulcers and the need of the hour is to develop effective agents to treat ulcer with diabetes for better patient compliance and cost effectiveness. The ulcer-healing properties of ethanolic extract of Caralluma attenuata (CAEt) against both chemically- and physically induced gastric ulcers in experimental rats are recently studied. Aim: To assess the ulcer healing potential of Ethanolic Extract of Caralluma attenuata on Experimental Diabetic Rats. Material and Methods: The current study aimed to evaluate ulcer healing properties of CAEt on the aspirin induced gastric ulcer in rats with streptozotocin induced DM. The hypothesis is based on the fact that DM results in compromising the mucosal defensive factors associated with delay in gastric ulcer healing, and if these changes can be corrected by using agents known for their antidiabetic and antiulcer properties. Experimental albino rats were divided into six groups. Except for Group I, other groups contained streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Group I (normal control) and Group II (diabetic control) were administered vehicle, Groups III and IV (diabetic experimental) were administered CAEt in dose of 100 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg, respectively, and Groups V and VI (positive controls) were respectively administered oral standard drugs omeprazole, 20 mg/kg, and tolbutamide 10 mg/kg. Result: The results confirmed that the CAEt significantly decreases the ulcer index (P < 0.05) in the aspirin-induced gastric ulcers and also significantly exhibit antioxidant and glucose lowering activity in the diabetic ulcer rats. The study showed that C. attenuata has the potential to be used as an antiulcer agent in experimental diabetic rats. PMID:27621520

  19. Ulcer healing potential of ethanolic extract of Caralluma attenuata on experimental diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sunil; Srivastava, Sajal; Singh, Kisanpal; Sharma, Alok; Garg, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Available data indicated that diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the vulnerability of the gastric ulcers and the need of the hour is to develop effective agents to treat ulcer with diabetes for better patient compliance and cost effectiveness. The ulcer-healing properties of ethanolic extract of Caralluma attenuata (CAEt) against both chemically- and physically induced gastric ulcers in experimental rats are recently studied. To assess the ulcer healing potential of Ethanolic Extract of Caralluma attenuata on Experimental Diabetic Rats. The current study aimed to evaluate ulcer healing properties of CAEt on the aspirin induced gastric ulcer in rats with streptozotocin induced DM. The hypothesis is based on the fact that DM results in compromising the mucosal defensive factors associated with delay in gastric ulcer healing, and if these changes can be corrected by using agents known for their antidiabetic and antiulcer properties. Experimental albino rats were divided into six groups. Except for Group I, other groups contained streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Group I (normal control) and Group II (diabetic control) were administered vehicle, Groups III and IV (diabetic experimental) were administered CAEt in dose of 100 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg, respectively, and Groups V and VI (positive controls) were respectively administered oral standard drugs omeprazole, 20 mg/kg, and tolbutamide 10 mg/kg. The results confirmed that the CAEt significantly decreases the ulcer index (P < 0.05) in the aspirin-induced gastric ulcers and also significantly exhibit antioxidant and glucose lowering activity in the diabetic ulcer rats. The study showed that C. attenuata has the potential to be used as an antiulcer agent in experimental diabetic rats.

  20. Underexpression of apoplastic polyamine oxidase improves thermotolerance in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Karamanoli, Katerina; Beris, Despoina; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Constantinidou, Helen-Isis A; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A

    2017-08-31

    Polyamines (PAs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the product of PA oxidation by polyamine oxidase (PAO), are potential players affecting plant growth, development and responses to abiotic/biotic stresses. Genetically modified Nicotiana tabacum plants with altered PA/H2O2 homeostasis due to over/underexpression of the ZmPAO gene (S-ZmPAO/AS-ZmPAO, respectively) were assessed under heat stress (HS). Underexpression of ZmPAO correlates with increased thermotolerance of the photosynthetic machinery and improved biomass accumulation, accompanied by enhanced levels of the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, whereas ZmPAO overexpressors exhibit significant impairment of thermotolerance. These data provide important clues on PA catabolism/H2O2/thermotolerance, which merit further exploitation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. Acute toxicity assessment of Polish (waste) water with a microplate-based Hydra attenuata assay: a comparison with the Microtox test.

    PubMed

    Pardos, M; Benninghoff, C; Guéguen, C; Thomas, R; Dobrowolski, J; Dominik, J

    1999-12-15

    The use of Hydra attenuata in acute toxicity assessment is a potentially useful tool in (waste) water biomonitoring. The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of H. attenuata with the extensively used Microtox test on 14 (waste) water samples from the Kraków region (South Poland). To this end, specific morphological changes displayed by the freshwater cnidarian Hydra attenuata (lethal LC50s and sublethal EC50s effects) and bioluminescence of the marine bacteria Vibrio fisheri (Microtox) were compared. Clearly, the Hydra assay was the more sensitive indicator of toxicity. No relationship was found among Hydra toxicological responses and water levels of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Pb and Zn. However, it appeared that toxicity to Hydra might be due to ammonia levels. Additional studies to better circumscribe the tolerance of H. attenuata to 'natural' water characteristics are needed.

  2. Pithy Protection: Nicotiana attenuata’s Jasmonic Acid-Mediated Defenses Are Required to Resist Stem-Boring Weevil Larvae1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Diezel, Celia; Kessler, Danny; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2011-01-01

    Folivory is the best studied plant-herbivore interaction, but it is unclear whether the signaling and resistance traits important for the defense of leaves are also important for other plant parts. Larvae of the tobacco stem weevil, Trichobaris mucorea, burrow into stems of Nicotiana attenuata and feed on the pith. Transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in signaling and foliar defense traits were evaluated in a 2-year field study for resistance against attack by naturally occurring T. mucorea larva. Plants silenced in early jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis (antisense [as]-lipoxygenase3 [lox3]; inverted repeat [ir]-allene oxide cyclase), JA perception (as-coronatine insensitive1), proteinase inhibitors (ir-pi), and nicotine (ir-putrescine methyl-transferase) direct defenses and lignin (ir-cad) biosynthesis were infested more frequently than wild-type plants. Plants unable to emit C6 aldehydes (as-hpl) had lower infestation rates, while plants silenced in late steps in JA biosynthesis (ir-acyl-coenzyme A oxidase, ir-opr) and silenced in diterpene glycoside production (ir-geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase) did not differ from wild type. Pith choice assays revealed that ir-putrescine methyl-transferase, ir-coronatine insensitive1, and ir-lox3 pith, which all had diminished nicotine levels, were preferred by larvae compared to wild-type pith. The lack of preference for ir-lox2 and ir-cad piths, suggest that oviposition attraction and vascular defense, rather than pith palatability accounts for the higher attack rates observed for these plants. We conclude that traits that influence a plant’s apparency, stem hardness, and pith direct defenses all contribute to resistance against this herbivore whose attack can be devastating to N. attenuata’s fitness. PMID:21300916

  3. Source parameter estimates of echolocation clicks from wild pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata) (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Kerr, I.; Payne, R.

    2004-10-01

    Pods of the little known pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata) in the northern Indian Ocean were recorded with a vertical hydrophone array connected to a digital recorder sampling at 320 kHz. Recorded clicks were directional, short (25 μs) transients with estimated source levels between 197 and 223 dB re. 1 μPa (pp). Spectra of clicks recorded close to or on the acoustic axis were bimodal with peak frequencies between 45 and 117 kHz, and with centroid frequencies between 70 and 85 kHz. The clicks share characteristics of echolocation clicks from similar sized, whistling delphinids, and have properties suited for the detection and classification of prey targeted by this odontocete. .

  4. Turritella attenuata (Kasinathan): as biological indicator of marine pollution--a trace metal analytical study.

    PubMed

    Paul, V I; Radhakrishnan, M V; Hemalatha, S

    1999-11-01

    A study to monitor marine pollution with reference to trace elements (Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu) on T. attenuata, commonly called as screw shell over a period of one year on the whole body and various organs, viz. digestive diverticula, foot, mantle and ovary was conducted from the sandy beach of Porto Novo Coast (Lat 11 degrees 29' N Long: 79 degrees 46' E) of Peninsular India using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). Higher concentration of all the four trace metals analysed were recorded in the digestive diverticula, whereas lower concentration of zinc and manganese were recorded in the ovary during the monsoon period. The higher level of trace metal concentration in the monsoon period may be due to the presence of these pollutants in large amounts in water. The accumulation of selected trace metals varies in different seasons according to the extent of pollution load in the marine environment.

  5. Development of the skull of the pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

    PubMed

    Moran, Meghan M; Nummela, Sirpa; Thewissen, J G M

    2011-10-01

    We describe the bony and cartilaginous structures of five fetal skulls of Stenella attenuata (pantropical spotted dolphin) specimens. The specimens represent early fetal life as suggested by the presence of rostral tactile hairs and the beginnings of skin pigmentation. These specimens exhibit the developmental order of ossification of the intramembranous and endochondral elements of the cranium as well as the functional and morphological development of specific cetacean anatomical adaptations. Detailed observations are presented on telescoping, nasal anatomy, and middle ear anatomy. The development of the middle ear ossicles, ectotympanic bone, and median nasal cartilage is of interest because in the adult these structures are morphologically different from those in land mammals. We follow specific cetacean morphological characteristics through fetal development to provide insight into the form and function of the cetacean body plan. Combining these data with fossil evidence, it is possible to overlie ontogenetic patterns and discern evolutionary patterns of the cetacean skull.

  6. Silicon delays Tobacco ringspot virus systemic symptoms in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zellner, Wendy; Frantz, Jonathan; Leisner, Scott

    2011-10-15

    Soluble silicon (Si) provides protection to plants against a variety of abiotic and biotic stress. However, the effects of Si on viral infections are largely unknown. To investigate the role of Si in viral infections, hydroponic studies were conducted in Nicotiana tabacum with two pathogens: Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Plants grown in elevated Si showed a delay in TRSV systemic symptom formation and a reduction in symptomatic leaf area, compared to the non-supplemented controls. TRSV-infected plants showed significantly higher levels of foliar Si compared to mock-inoculated plants. However, the Si effect appeared to be virus-specific, since the element did not alter TMV symptoms nor did infection by this virus alter foliar Si levels. Hence, increased foliar Si levels appear to correlate with Si-modulated protection against viral infection. This is all the more intriguing since N. tabacum is classified as a low Si accumulator. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of pharmaceuticals on the regeneration of the cnidarian, Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Brian; Gagné, François; Blaise, Christian

    2008-08-25

    The Hydra attenuata regeneration assay was used to identify the teratogenic potential of 10 pharmaceuticals identified in effluent from a large city wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Three types of solvents were used to solubilise the pharmaceuticals (DMSO, acetone and ethanol), at concentrations determined to have no significant effect on measured endpoints. On the one hand, regeneration was significantly inhibited at (nominal) concentrations of 1, 5 and 1 mg/L for gemfibrozil, ibuprofen and naproxen respectively and at the higher concentration of 50 mg/L for bezafibrate and trimethoprim. On the other hand, carbamazepine and the antibiotics sulfapyridine, oxytetracycline and novobiocin significantly increased regeneration at 25, 5, 50 and 50 mg/L respectively. Relatively high IC50 values of 0.9, 3.84, 4.9 and 22.5 mg/L were calculated for gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, naproxen and bezafibrate, respectively. However when subjected to tier two toxicity assessment under EU regulatory guidance using environmentally relevant concentrations a MEC/PNEC value>1 was calculated for gemfibrozil, ibuprofen and naproxen indicating teratogenic potential and the necessity for further tier three assessment. A toxicity index (TI) was also calculated using three different techniques, with TI values>3 (indicating teratogenic potential) found for gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, naproxen and bezafibrate and >1 (indicating a weak teratogenic potential) found for carbamazepine. These results are discussed in the context of their environmental relevance and toxic potential.

  8. Application of the Hydra attenuata assay for identifying developmental hazards among natural waters and wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Staples, R.E.; Stahl, R.G. Jr. )

    1991-12-01

    This study concerns application of the Hydra attenuata assay to detect the developmental toxicity potential of various aqueous samples. First, the assay was modified for testing aqueous samples because water quality has a major impact on aquatic toxicity testing and the results thus obtained. Ranges of sample pH, salinity (conductivity), and hardness were examined for their adverse effects upon the hydra. Adult hydra were unaffected morphologically by pH 5.5-9.5, and the artificial embryo ( embryo') developed normally in a pH range of 6.25 to 8.25. For water hardness, the minimal affective concentration was 1000 mg/liter (as CaCO3) in adults and 625 mg/liter in the embryos; the NOAELs for these were 750 mg/liter in the adult and 250 mg/liter CaCO3 in the embryo. Salinity in excess of 5 ppt was lethal to adults and embryos, indicating the assay may not be applicable to marine or highly saline samples. Finally, grab samples were tested from rivers in Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware, some of which are impacted by industrial and agricultural activities, as well as several samples of industrial wastewaters from one major facility. The assay functioned normally with these diverse samples and yielded results that can be used in assessing the potential developmental hazard of these materials.

  9. First record of Pantropical spotted dolphins Stenella attenuata in the Yellow Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fuxing; Wang, Xianyan; Zhang, Qiuxia; Miao, Xing; Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Qian

    2015-07-01

    On October 1, 2009, sixteen dolphins were obtained from fishermen by incidental catching in the Yellow Sea, China. As the dolphins' skin color was ambiguous, morphological parameters were measured, and mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence was studied to identify the species. Morphological characteristics were consistent with Pantropical spotted dolphins, Stenella attenuata. Furthermore, a partial mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence as long as 328-bp was studied by extracting genomic DNA from the skins, and six haplotypes were detected in the sixteen dolphins. By comparing homologous sequences available in GenBank (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov), all the six haplotypes had maximal genetic similarity with Pantropical spotted dolphin. Eight species of cetacean (whales and dolphins) are now recognised in the Yellow Sea. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first record of Pantropical spotted dolphins from this region. Despite this species being listed as a Grade II National Key Protected Animal since 1988, little is known of its biology in Chinese waters. We recommend remedial research be undertaken to ensure appropriate management.

  10. Tobacco mosaic virus infection disproportionately impacts phloem associated translatomes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Collum, Tamara D; Culver, James N

    2017-10-01

    In this study we use vascular specific promoters and a translating ribosome affinity purification strategy to identify phloem associated translatome responses to infection by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in systemic hosts Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Shahdara and Nicotiana benthamiana. Results demonstrate that in both hosts the number of translatome gene alterations that occurred in response to infection is at least four fold higher in phloem specific translatomes than in non-phloem translatomes. This finding indicates that phloem functions as a key responsive tissue to TMV infection. In addition, host comparisons of translatome alterations reveal both similarities and differences in phloem responses to infection, representing both conserved virus induced phloem alterations involved in promoting infection and virus spread as well as host specific alterations that reflect differences in symptom responses. Combined these results suggest phloem tissues play a disproportion role in the mediation and control of host responses to virus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Virus Infection Suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana Adaptive Phenotypic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Elena, Santiago F.

    2011-01-01

    Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus). Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana – potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked. PMID:21359142

  12. Virus infection suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-02-17

    Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus). Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana--potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked.

  13. Jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine hydrolase 1 (JIH1) contributes to a termination of jasmonate signaling in N. attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Woldemariam, Melkamu G; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T

    2014-01-01

    The jasmonate signaling pathway is essential for plant development, reproduction, and defense against herbivores and pathogens. When attacked by herbivores, plants elicit defense responses through the rapid accumulation of jasmonates. Although the transduction of the jasmonate burst into downstream responses has been largely resolved in the past decade, how the jasmonate burst is switched off remained unknown. Recently, two mechanisms that involve cytochrome p450-mediated hydroxylation/carboxylation and NaJIH1-mediated hydrolysis of JA-Ile were identified as major termination mechanisms of JA signaling. Due to a lack of hydrolysis, N. attenuata plants silenced in the expression of the JIH1 gene accumulated significantly more JA-Ile than did wild type plants and became more resistant to herbivore attack. Although less likely, additional functions of JIH1, such as contributing to the pool of free Ile and thereby increasing JA-Ile accumulation, remained untested. Here we show that increased isoleucine availability does not explain the observed phenotype in JIH1-deficient N. attenuata plants. PMID:24776843

  14. Potency of Nicotiana tabacum as anti - microfouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aunurohim, Nurilma, Dian Ahmada; Kuswytasari, Nengah Dwianita

    2017-06-01

    In general, the attachment and growth of organisms on the surface of the object or material immersed in the sea are called Biofouling. Biofouling microscopic called microfouling, where it acts as a precursor of the next engaging organisms that are generally larger in size (called macrofouling). In recent time, biofouling control over the use of chemicals in antifouling paints. Usage tributyltin polishing copolymer paints (TBT - SPC paint) containing TBT has adverse effects on non-target marine organisms. This study uses tobacco dust as an anti-microfouling, which is the waste generated during the process of tobacco leaves. Five of bacterial isolates have been founded at Surabaya coastal in a preliminary test with iron plates. Then those isolates tested to detect and visualized of biofilm. The activity of anti-bacteria had been done and the result is known that more high of tobacco extract given, a diameter of zone inhibit high too. The extract of tobacco dust can be applied most effectively to be anti-microfouling is a concentration of 40%, isolates 3 and 4 are a type of bacteria that is most inhibited growth. So, in this result, Nicotiana tabacum is potential as an anti-microfouling.

  15. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana *

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Fen; Zhou, Guo-jun; Chu, Guo-hai; Huang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao-mei; Jin, Li-feng; Lin, Fu-cheng; Yang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from all six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were observed both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R 2=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding. PMID:24302710

  16. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Fen; Zhou, Guo-jun; Chu, Guo-hai; Huang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao-mei; Jin, Li-feng; Lin, Fu-cheng; Yang, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from all six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were observed both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R(2)=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding.

  17. Absence of some truncated genes in the amphidiploid Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Jamet, E; Durr, A; Fleck, J

    1987-01-01

    As an initial step towards understanding how a multigene family evolves after an interspecific hybridization and subsequent chromosomal doubling, genomic Southern blots of three related species were compared: Nicotiana tabacum (the progeny), and Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis (the progenitors). Genomic restriction fragments generated by two endonucleases were hybridized with a cDNA of the small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from N. sylvestris. The restriction pattern of the DNA of the progenitors revealed considerable polymorphism of restriction-fragment lengths. All the fragments in N. tabacum, except one, have a corresponding fragment in one of the progenitors. Some fragments present in the parents were absent from the progeny: they may correspond to truncated genes consisting of only part of the 3' portion of the gene.

  18. Phylogenetic fragrance patterns in Nicotiana sections Alatae and Suaveolentes.

    PubMed

    Raguso, Robert A; Schlumpberger, Boris O; Kaczorowski, Rainee L; Holtsford, Timothy P

    2006-09-01

    We analyzed floral volatiles from eight tobacco species (Nicotiana; Solanaceae) including newly discovered Brazilian taxa (Nicotiana mutabilis and "Rastroensis") in section Alatae. Eighty-four compounds were found, including mono- and sesquiterpenoids, nitrogenous compounds, benzenoid and aliphatic alcohols, aldehydes and esters. Floral scent from recent accessions of Nicotiana alata, Nicotiana bonariensis and Nicotiana langsdorffii differed from previously published data, suggesting intraspecific variation in scent composition at the level of biosynthetic class. Newly discovered taxa in Alatae, like their relatives, emit large amounts of 1,8-cineole and smaller amounts of monoterpenes on a nocturnal rhythm, constituting a chemical synapomorphy for this lineage. Fragrance data from three species of Nicotiana sect. Suaveolentes, the sister group of Alatae, (two Australian species: N. cavicola, N. ingulba; one African species: N. africana), were compared to previously reported data from their close relative, N. suaveolens. Like N. suaveolens, N. cavicola and N. ingulba emit fragrances dominated by benzenoids and phenylpropanoids, whereas the flowers of N. africana lacked a distinct floral scent and instead emitted only small amounts of an aliphatic methyl ester from foliage. Interestingly, this ester also is emitted from foliage of N. longiflora and N. plumbaginifolia (both in section Alatae s.l.), which share a common ancestor with N. africana. This result, combined with the synapomorphic pattern of 1,8 cineole emission in Alatae s.s., suggests that phylogenetic signal explains a major component of fragrance composition among tobacco species in sections Alatae and Suaveolentes. At the intraspecific level, interpopulational scent variation is widespread in sect. Alatae, and may reflect edaphic specialization, introgression, local pollinator shifts, genetic drift or artificial selection in cultivation. Further studies with genetically and geographically well

  19. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. © The Author(s).

  20. The morphological and physiological properties of the genetic tumours from a Nicotiana interspecific hybrid.

    PubMed

    Wang, M H

    1998-06-01

    Many plant tumours have been loosely referred to as genetic tumours when no obvious external cause was identifiable. In this study, the morphology of genetic tumours was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the influence of exogenous phytohormones on genetic tumour growth was examined. Genetic tumours in Nicotiana hybrid were first observed in the hypocotyl area and later appeared from stems as a cluster complex. In vitro, genetic tumours were produced 5-6 days after explant treatment near each of the cut ends. The morphology of genetic tumours was investigated using SEM. Genetic tumours are mainly composed of epidermal cells surrounded by a well developed extracellular matrix (ECM), that is organized in a network linking surface cells. Globular structures containing several cells were formed from these clusters of epidermal cells. Vigorous tumourous growth from the leaf discs of the Nicotiana hybrid was obtained on medium supplemented with auxin and cytokinin at 0 to 10 muM, but 100 muM of auxin and cytokinin inhibited genetic tumour growth. Leaf discs treated with 10 muM cytokinin or auxin alone produced genetic tumours, but 10 muM cytokinin supplemented with 100 muM auxin stopped growth. Therefore genetic tumours are tissues that are, clearly, disturbed in endogenous hormone balance or have altered sensitivity to hormones and response to exogenous hormones.

  1. Silicon delays tobacco Ringspot virus systemic symptoms in Nicotiana tabacum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soluble silicon (Si) provides protection to plants against a variety of abiotic and biotic stress. However, the role of Si in viral infections has been elusive. To investigate the role of Si in viral infections, hydroponic studies were conducted in Nicotiana tabacum with two pathogens: Tobacco rings...

  2. A morphological and histological examination of the pan-tropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata) and the spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Clark, L S; Cowan, D F; Pfeiffer, D C

    2008-04-01

    The morphology and histology of the cetacean adrenal gland are poorly understood. Therefore, this study examined 32 pairs of adrenal glands from 18 pan-tropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) and 14 spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris). In both species, the cortex was pseudolobulated and contained a typical mammalian zonation. Medullary protrusions (0-3 per section) and a medullary band were identified in both species. For S. attenuata, no statistical differences were found in the cortex to medulla (CM) ratio or the percent cross-sectional area (PCA) of the adrenal glands compared with sex or sexual maturity. The mean CM ratio for S. attenuata was 2.34 and the PCA was 64.4% cortex, 29.4% medulla and 6.2%'other'. 'Other' indicates blood vessels, connective tissue and the gland capsule itself. For S. longirostris, there was no statistical difference in the CM ratio compared with sexual maturity. However, a statistical difference was found between the CM ratio and sex, suggesting sexual dimorphism (female CM ratio = 2.46 and males = 3.21). No statistical differences were found in the PCA of S. longirostris adrenal glands by sexual maturity. However, a statistical difference was found between the PCA by sex. Female S. longirostris adrenal glands consisted of 65.0% cortex, 27.3% medulla and 7.7% 'other', whereas male adrenal glands consisted of 71.7% cortex, 22.7% medulla and 5.6% 'other'.

  3. Characterization of Cercospora nicotianae Hypothetical Proteins in Cercosporin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Beseli, Aydin; Noar, Roslyn; Daub, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    The photoactivated toxin, cercosporin, produced by Cercospora species, plays an important role in pathogenesis of this fungus to host plants. Cercosporin has almost universal toxicity to cells due to its production of reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen. For that reason, Cercospora species, which are highly resistant to their own toxin, are good candidates to identify genes for resistance to cercosporin and to the reactive oxygen species it produces. In previous research, the zinc cluster transcription factor CRG1 (cercosporin resistance gene 1) was found to be crucial for Cercospora species’ resistance against cercosporin, and subtractive hybridization analysis identified 185 genes differentially expressed between Cercospora nicotianae wild type (wt) and a crg1 mutant. The focus of this work was to identify and characterize the hypothetical proteins that were identified in the Cercospora nicotianae subtractive library as potential resistance factors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the 20 genes encoding hypothetical proteins showed that two, 24cF and 71cR, were induced under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, suggesting a role in resistance. Transformation and expression of 24cF and 71cR in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus, Neurospora crassa, showed that 71cR provided increased resistance to cercosporin toxicity, whereas no significant increase was observed in 24cF transformants. Gene disruption was used to generate C. nicotianae 71cR mutants; these mutants did not differ from wt C. nicotianae in cercosporin resistance or production. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed induction of other resistance genes in the 71cR mutant that may compensate for the loss of 71cR. Analysis of 71cR conserved domains and secondary and tertiary structure identify the protein as having an NTF2-like superfamily DUF1348 domain with unknown function, to be intracellular and localized in the cytosol, and to have similarities to proteins in the steroid delta

  4. Characterization of Cercospora nicotianae Hypothetical Proteins in Cercosporin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Noar, Roslyn; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    The photoactivated toxin, cercosporin, produced by Cercospora species, plays an important role in pathogenesis of this fungus to host plants. Cercosporin has almost universal toxicity to cells due to its production of reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen. For that reason, Cercospora species, which are highly resistant to their own toxin, are good candidates to identify genes for resistance to cercosporin and to the reactive oxygen species it produces. In previous research, the zinc cluster transcription factor CRG1 (cercosporin resistance gene 1) was found to be crucial for Cercospora species' resistance against cercosporin, and subtractive hybridization analysis identified 185 genes differentially expressed between Cercospora nicotianae wild type (wt) and a crg1 mutant. The focus of this work was to identify and characterize the hypothetical proteins that were identified in the Cercospora nicotianae subtractive library as potential resistance factors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the 20 genes encoding hypothetical proteins showed that two, 24cF and 71cR, were induced under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, suggesting a role in resistance. Transformation and expression of 24cF and 71cR in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus, Neurospora crassa, showed that 71cR provided increased resistance to cercosporin toxicity, whereas no significant increase was observed in 24cF transformants. Gene disruption was used to generate C. nicotianae 71cR mutants; these mutants did not differ from wt C. nicotianae in cercosporin resistance or production. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed induction of other resistance genes in the 71cR mutant that may compensate for the loss of 71cR. Analysis of 71cR conserved domains and secondary and tertiary structure identify the protein as having an NTF2-like superfamily DUF1348 domain with unknown function, to be intracellular and localized in the cytosol, and to have similarities to proteins in the steroid delta-isomerase family.

  5. Manganese toxicity to chlorophyll synthesis in tobacco callus. [Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Clairmont, K.B.; Hagar, W.G.; Davis, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pith explants were grown on manganese containing medium. At moderate concentration (10 millimolar), manganese selectivity inhibited chlorophyll synthesis, resulting initially in growth of white callus. Several weeks later the white callus turned brown due to the accumulation of a pigment identified as protoporphyrin IX by its elution profile using high performance liquid chromatography, by its absorption spectrum, and by its fluorescence properties. At a concentration of 100 millimolar manganese the pigment accumulated without growth of the explant.

  6. Evolutionary potential and adaptation of Banksia attenuata (Proteaceae) to climate and fire regime in southwestern Australia, a global biodiversity hotspot

    PubMed Central

    He, Tianhua; D’Agui, Haylee; Lim, Sim Lin; Enright, Neal J.; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-01-01

    Substantial climate changes are evident across Australia, with declining rainfall and rising temperature in conjunction with frequent fires. Considerable species loss and range contractions have been predicted; however, our understanding of how genetic variation may promote adaptation in response to climate change remains uncertain. Here we characterized candidate genes associated with rainfall gradients, temperatures, and fire intervals through environmental association analysis. We found that overall population adaptive genetic variation was significantly affected by shortened fire intervals, whereas declining rainfall and rising temperature did not have a detectable influence. Candidate SNPs associated with rainfall and high temperature were diverse, whereas SNPs associated with specific fire intervals were mainly fixed in one allele. Gene annotation further revealed four genes with functions in stress tolerance, the regulation of stomatal opening and closure, energy use, and morphogenesis with adaptation to climate and fire intervals. B. attenuata may tolerate further changes in rainfall and temperature through evolutionary adaptations based on their adaptive genetic variation. However, the capacity to survive future climate change may be compromised by changes in the fire regime. PMID:27210077

  7. Cadmium contamination of tissues and organs of delphinids species (Stenella attenuata)--influence of biological and ecological factors

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, J.M.; Amiard, J.C.; Amiard-Triquet, C.; Boudou, A.; Ribeyre, F. )

    1990-12-01

    Based on a sample of 27 dolphins (Stenella attenuata) captured in the Eastern tropical zone of the Pacific Ocean, this study was carried out to analyze the cadmium accumulation levels and distribution in 12 organs or tissue samples. The average cadmium concentrations were between 0.2 mg Cd.kg-1 in the brain and muscle and 48 mg Cd.kg-1 in the kidneys. For most of organs and tissues the average values were between 1 and 5 mg Cd.kg-1. Kidneys, liver, muscle, and intestine contained almost 85% of the total cadmium burden of all tissues considered in this study. Most of the biological and ecological factors taken into account (age, sex, total weight, and length of the dolphins, weight of the organs, place and date of capture) interacted with the cadmium concentrations and burdens in the collected organs or tissues. Three factors appear to be of prime importance: age, body weight, and geographical location of the area of capture.

  8. Evolutionary potential and adaptation of Banksia attenuata (Proteaceae) to climate and fire regime in southwestern Australia, a global biodiversity hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tianhua; D'Agui, Haylee; Lim, Sim Lin; Enright, Neal J.; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-05-01

    Substantial climate changes are evident across Australia, with declining rainfall and rising temperature in conjunction with frequent fires. Considerable species loss and range contractions have been predicted; however, our understanding of how genetic variation may promote adaptation in response to climate change remains uncertain. Here we characterized candidate genes associated with rainfall gradients, temperatures, and fire intervals through environmental association analysis. We found that overall population adaptive genetic variation was significantly affected by shortened fire intervals, whereas declining rainfall and rising temperature did not have a detectable influence. Candidate SNPs associated with rainfall and high temperature were diverse, whereas SNPs associated with specific fire intervals were mainly fixed in one allele. Gene annotation further revealed four genes with functions in stress tolerance, the regulation of stomatal opening and closure, energy use, and morphogenesis with adaptation to climate and fire intervals. B. attenuata may tolerate further changes in rainfall and temperature through evolutionary adaptations based on their adaptive genetic variation. However, the capacity to survive future climate change may be compromised by changes in the fire regime.

  9. Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in hydra attenuata and in rat whole-embryo culture. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M.C.

    1991-05-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDEs) are a class of biaryl compounds that have little commercial application, but appear to be widespread in the environment. They have been found in wood preservative waste dumpsites and in fly ash from municipal waste incinerators. They have been detected in bird eggs and tissues, fish, and other edible marine organisms in the United States, Canada, and Europe. There are limited reports in the extant literature on the toxicity of PCDEs. This study was designed to evaluate the toxicity of selected PCDEs in cultures of Hydra attenuata and post-implantation rat whole embryos. The toxicity of several closely related polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was evaluated in both cultures and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was evaluated in whole embryo culture. Embryonic growth and development parameters (yolk sac diameter, crown-rump length, somite count, and DNA and protein content) and gross morphology were determined. Findings indicated that these chemicals were neither embryotoxic nor teratogenic. Thus, the PCDEs, which elicit other diverse toxic and biochemical responses in rodents, are relatively inactive in these bioassays for developmental toxicity.

  10. Evolutionary potential and adaptation of Banksia attenuata (Proteaceae) to climate and fire regime in southwestern Australia, a global biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    He, Tianhua; D'Agui, Haylee; Lim, Sim Lin; Enright, Neal J; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-05-23

    Substantial climate changes are evident across Australia, with declining rainfall and rising temperature in conjunction with frequent fires. Considerable species loss and range contractions have been predicted; however, our understanding of how genetic variation may promote adaptation in response to climate change remains uncertain. Here we characterized candidate genes associated with rainfall gradients, temperatures, and fire intervals through environmental association analysis. We found that overall population adaptive genetic variation was significantly affected by shortened fire intervals, whereas declining rainfall and rising temperature did not have a detectable influence. Candidate SNPs associated with rainfall and high temperature were diverse, whereas SNPs associated with specific fire intervals were mainly fixed in one allele. Gene annotation further revealed four genes with functions in stress tolerance, the regulation of stomatal opening and closure, energy use, and morphogenesis with adaptation to climate and fire intervals. B. attenuata may tolerate further changes in rainfall and temperature through evolutionary adaptations based on their adaptive genetic variation. However, the capacity to survive future climate change may be compromised by changes in the fire regime.

  11. Cercosporin-deficient mutants by plasmid tagging in the asexual fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, K-R; Ehrenshaft, M; Wetzel, D K; Daub, M E

    2003-11-01

    We have successfully adapted plasmid insertion and restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) to produce cercosporin toxin-deficient mutants in the asexual phytopathogenic fungus Cercospora nicotianae. The use of pre-linearized plasmid or restriction enzymes in the transformation procedure significantly decreased the transformation frequency, but promoted a complicated and undefined mode of plasmid integration that leads to mutations in the C. nicotianae genome. Vector DNA generally integrated in multiple copies, and no increase in single-copy insertion was observed when enzymes were added to the transformation mixture. Out of 1873 transformants tested, 39 putative cercosporin toxin biosynthesis ( ctb) mutants were recovered that showed altered levels of cercosporin production. Seven ctb mutants were recovered using pre-linearized plasmids without the addition of enzymes, and these were considered to be non-REMI mutants. The correlation between a specific insertion and a mutant phenotype was confirmed using rescued plasmids as gene disruption vectors in the wild-type strain. Six out of fifteen rescued plasmids tested yielded cercosporin-deficient transformants when re-introduced into the wild-type strain, suggesting a link between the insertion site and the cercosporin-deficient phenotype. Sequence analysis of a fragment flanking the insert site recovered from one insertion mutant showed it to be disrupted in sequences with high homology to the acyl transferase domain of polyketide synthases from other fungi. Disruption of this polyketide synthase gene ( CTB1) using a rescued plasmid resulted in mutants that were defective in cercosporin production. Thus, we provide the first molecular evidence that cercosporin is synthesized via a polyketide pathway as previously hypothesized.

  12. Genetic analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae populations from different hosts using microsatellite markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two hundred thirty-one isolates of P. nicotianae representing 14 populations from different host genera, including agricultural crops (Citrus, Nicotiana, and Lycopersicon), potted ornamental species in nurseries (Lavandula, Convolvulus, Myrtus, Correa and Ruta) and other plant genera of lesser econo...

  13. Ketoisophorone transformation by Marchantia polymorpha and Nicotiana tabacum cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F; Hirata, Toshifumi; Abdel-Lateff, Ahmed; el-Razek, Mohamed H Abd; Mohamed, Abou El-Hamd H; Hassan, Nahed M; Paré, Paul W; Mahmoud, Ahmed A

    2008-01-01

    Stereospecific olefin (C=C) and carbonyl (C=O) reduction of the readily available prochiral compound ketoisophorone (2,2,6-trimethyl-2-cyclohexene-1,4-dione) (1) by Marchantia polymorpha and Nicotiana tabacum cell suspension cultures produce the chiral products (6R)-levodione (2), (4R,5S)-4-hydroxy-3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexanone (3), and (4R,6R)-actinol (4) as well as the minor components (4R)-hydroxyisophorone (5) and (4S)-phorenol (6).

  14. [Turkish (Aztec) tobbaco (Nicotiana rustica L.) unnoticeable danger?].

    PubMed

    Modnicki, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Tobacco harmful influence on men's health is usually linked with smoking cigarettes. Alternative ways of intake tobacco are also dangerous. Nicotine and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines with carcinogenic activity are not only present in tobacco smoke but also of nicotine-rich product for chewing. There are some internet sources about Turkish (Aztec) tobacco (Nicotiana rustica L.) as easy available material for home-made tobacco mixtures. A some reports about dangerous effects connected with chewing tobacco and similar to smoking-related disorders are present in current literature.

  15. Influence of green leaf herbivory by Manduca sexta on floral volatile emission by Nicotiana suaveolens.

    PubMed

    Effmert, Uta; Dinse, Claudia; Piechulla, Birgit

    2008-04-01

    Plants have to cope with various abiotic and biotic impacts as a consequence of changing environments, which can impair their ability to sexually reproduce. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether green leaf herbivory, having one of the most hazardous biotic impacts, would have any direct effect on the production and emission of floral volatiles because volatiles are known to play a crucial role in pollination. Nicotiana suaveolens plants were challenged with Manduca sexta feeding on leaves, and alterations in the quality and quantity of the floral blend, shifts in emission patterns, and changes in expression patterns of the floral benzoic/salicylic acid carboxyl-methyltransferase were monitored in noninfested and infested plants. Leaves responded to larval feeding by herbivory-induced diurnal emission of semiochemicals, whereas the emission of floral volatiles remained unchanged in comparison to the noninfested control. Neither the volatile composition nor the quantity of components or the nocturnal emission patterns was altered. The mRNA and protein levels of the benzoic/salicylic acid carboxyl-methyltransferase, as well as its enzyme activity, also did not show any significant differences. These results indicate that metabolism in flowers at and postanthesis is an autonomous process and is independent of metabolic changes in green leaves. By this sustaining mechanism, N. suaveolens plants ensure sexual reproduction even under unfavorable conditions.

  16. Deep sequencing of the ancestral tobacco species Nicotiana tomentosiformis reveals multiple T-DNA inserts and a complex evolutionary history of natural transformation in the genus Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Dorlhac de Borne, François; Szegedi, Ernö; Otten, Léon

    2014-11-01

    Nicotiana species carry cellular T-DNA sequences (cT-DNAs), acquired by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We characterized the cT-DNA sequences of the ancestral Nicotiana tabacum species Nicotiana tomentosiformis by deep sequencing. N. tomentosiformis contains four cT-DNA inserts derived from different Agrobacterium strains. Each has an incomplete inverted-repeat structure. TA is similar to part of the Agrobacterium rhizogenes 1724 mikimopine-type T-DNA, but has unusual orf14 and mis genes. TB carries a 1724 mikimopine-type orf14-mis fragment and a mannopine-agropine synthesis region (mas2-mas1-ags). The mas2' gene codes for an active enzyme. TC is similar to the left part of the A. rhizogenes A4 T-DNA, but also carries octopine synthase-like (ocl) and c-like genes normally found in A. tumefaciens. TD shows a complex rearrangement of T-DNA fragments similar to the right end of the A4 TL-DNA, and including an orf14-like gene and a gene with unknown function, orf511. The TA, TB, TC and TD insertion sites were identified by alignment with N. tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris sequences. The divergence values for the TA, TB, TC and TD repeats provide an estimate for their relative introduction times. A large deletion has occurred in the central part of the N. tabacum cv. Basma/Xanthi TA region, and another deletion removed the complete TC region in N. tabacum. Nicotiana otophora lacks TA, TB and TD, but contains TC and another cT-DNA, TE. This analysis, together with that of Nicotiana glauca and other Nicotiana species, indicates multiple sequential insertions of cT-DNAs during the evolution of the genus Nicotiana. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Large-scale detection and application of expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhou, D; Wang, S; Yang, L

    2015-07-14

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widespread in the Nicotiana genome. Using an alignment and variation detection method, we developed 20,607,973 SNPs, based on the expressed sequence tag sequences of 10 Nicotiana species. The replacement rate was much higher than the transversion rate in the SNPs, and SNPs widely exist in the Nicotiana. In vitro verification indicated that all of the SNPs were high quality and accurate. Evolutionary relationships between 15 varieties were investigated by polymerase chain reaction with a special primer; the specific 302 locus of these sequence results clearly indicated the origin of Zhongyan 100. A database of Nicotiana SNPs (NSNP) was developed to store and search for SNPs in Nicotiana. NSNP is a tool for researchers to develop SNP markers of sequence data.

  18. Cybrids containing mixed and sorted-out chloroplasts following interspecific somatic fusions in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Fluhr, R; Aviv, D; Edelman, M; Galun, E

    1983-06-01

    Streptomycin resistance was transferred by "donor-recipient" protoplast fusion from Nicotiana tabacum (SR-1) protoplasts into Nicotiana tabacum (cytoplasmic male sterile - Line 92) protoplasts in one case and into Nicotiana sylvestris protoplasts in another. It is demonstrated that streptomycin resistance (SR-1) is a chloroplast marker which segregates independently from a mitochondrial marker.In the fusion experiment where Nicotiana tabacum (Line 92) was the recipient, microcalli were plated in the presence of streptomycin. In this case, chloroplast sorting out occurred at a stage preceeding plant regeneration, producing stable streptomycin resistant cybrids. In the fusion whre Nicotiana sylvestris was the recipient, no direct selection for streptomycin resistance was performed. In this case chloroplast sorting out was incomplete, thus producing cybrid plants with a mixed chloroplast population. In some plants, sorting out of streptomycin resistant and sensitive chloroplasts was still apparent in the second generation progeny.

  19. Characteristic alatoid 'cineole cassette' monoterpene synthase present in Nicotiana noctiflora.

    PubMed

    Fähnrich, Anke; Neumann, Madeleine; Piechulla, Birgit

    2014-05-01

    Nicotiana species of the section Alatae emit a characteristic floral scent comprising the' cineole cassette' monoterpenes 1,8-cineole, limonene, myrcene, β-pinene, α-pinene, sabinene and α-terpineol. All previously isolated 'cineole cassette'-monoterpene synthase genes are multi product enzymes that synthesize the seven compounds of the 'cineole cassette'. Interestingly, so far this 'alatoid' trait was only shared with the eponymous species Nicotiana suaveolens of the sister section Suaveolentes. To determine the origin of the 'cineole cassette' monoterpene phenotype other potential parent species of section Noctiflorae or Petunoides as well as of the distantly related section Trigonophyllae were analysed. A monoterpene synthase producing the set of 'cineole cassette' compounds was isolated from N. noctiflorae. N. obtusifolia emitted solely 1,8-cineole and no monoterpenes were found in floral scents of N. petunoides and N. palmeri. Interestingly, the phylogenetic analysis clustered the new gene of N. noctiflora closely to the terpineol synthase genes of e.g. N. alata rather than to cineole synthase genes of e.g. N. forgetiana.

  20. Interspecific chloroplast recombination in a Nicotiana somatic hybrid.

    PubMed

    Medgyesy, P; Fejes, E; Maliga, P

    1985-10-01

    Genetic recombination between chloroplasts of two flowering plant species, Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, after somatic cell fusion is described. The parental lines differed in three cytoplasmic genetic markers. The N. tabacum mutant SR1-A15 was streptomycin-resistant, defective in chloroplast greening, and lincomycin-sensitive. The N. plumbaginifolia mutant LR400 was streptomycin-sensitive, normal green, and lincomycin-resistant. Streptomycin-resistant clones in cell culture are identified by their ability to form a green callus on a selective medium. Streptomycin resistance in the SR1-A15 mutant could not be expressed due to defective chloroplasts. Protoplasts of the two species were fused, and calli grown from the fused population were screened for the expression of streptomycin resistance from the SR1-A15 line as the result of interspecific chloroplast recombination. A somatic hybrid, pt14, expressed a new combination of the cytoplasmic genetic markers. In the pt14 chloroplast genome three N. tabacum and four N. plumbaginifolia parent specific restriction sites have been identified, indicating that the pt14 chloroplast genome contains at least six recombination sites.

  1. Maternal inheritance of cytochrome f in interspecific Nicotiana hybrids.

    PubMed

    Gray, J C

    1980-11-01

    Cytochrome f has been purified to homogeneity, as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum, Nicotiana glutinosa and their reciprocal hybrids. The cytochrome was extracted from chloroplast membranes by sonication in 2% Triton X-100 and 4M urea and was subsequently purified by acetone precipitation and chromatography on Ultrogel AcA 22 in the presence of cholate and on Sephadex G-200 in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate. The purified cytochrome had a molecular weight of 32,700 determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate. A difference in the primary structure of cytochrome f from N. tabacum and N. glutinosa was detected by ion-exchange chromatography of the products of trypsin hydrolysis. Cytochrome f from N. tabacum contained an additional peptide not present in the cytochrome fom N. glutinosa. This additional peptide was present in the cytochrome from N. tabacum female x N. glutinosa male, but not in the cytochrome from N. glutinosa female x N. tabacum male, indicating a maternal mode of inheritance of the primary structure of cytochrome f. This suggests an extranuclear, probably chloroplast, location for the genetic information for cytochrome f.

  2. Ozone, sulfur dioxide, and ultraviolet B have similar effects on mRNA accumulation of antioxidant genes in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L.

    SciTech Connect

    Willekens, H.; Van Camp, W.; Van Montagu, M.; Inze, D.; Langebartels, C.; Sandermann, H. Jr. |

    1994-11-01

    We have studied the expression of antioxidant genes in response to near ambient conditions of O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and ultraviolet B (UV-B) in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L. The genes analyzed encode four different superoxide dismutases (SODs), three catalases (Cat1, Cat2, and Cat3), the cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (cyt APx), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). The experimental setup for each treatment was essentially the same and caused no visible damage, thus allowing direct comparison of the different stress responses. Our data showed that the effects of O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and UV-B on the antioxidant genes are very similar, although the response to SO{sub 2} is generally less pronounced and delayed. The effects of the different stresses are characterized by a decline in Cat1, a moderate increase in Cat3, and a strong increase in Cat2 and GPx. Remarkably, SODs and cyt APx were not affected. Analysis of SOD and APx expression in the ozone-sensitive Nicotiana tabacum L. cv PBD6 revealed that induction of the cytosolic copper/zinc SOD and cyt APx occurs only with the onset of visible damage. It is proposed that alterations in mRNA levels of catalases and GPx, but not of SODs and cyt APx, form part of the initial antioxidant response to O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and UV-B in Nicotiana. 57 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Seven of eight species in Nicotiana section Suaveolentes have common factors leading to hybrid lethality in crosses with Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Kuboyama, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Marubashi, Wataru

    2010-08-01

    Reproductive isolation is a mechanism that separates species, and is classified into two types: prezygotic and postzygotic. Inviability of hybrids, or hybrid lethality, is a type of postzygotic isolation and is observed in some plant species, including Nicotiana species. Previous work has shown that the Q chromosome, which belongs to the S subgenome of N. tabacum, encodes one or more genes leading to hybrid lethality in some crosses. Interspecific crosses of eight wild species were conducted in section Suaveolentes (which consists of species restricted to Australasia and Africa) with the cultivated species Nicotiana tabacum. Hybrid seedlings were cultivated at 28, 34 or 36 degrees C, and PCR and chromosome analysis were performed. Seven of eight wild species produced inviable hybrids after crossing. Hybrid lethality, which was observed in all crosses at 28 degrees C, was Type II lethality, with the characteristic symptoms of browning of hypocotyl and roots; lethality was suppressed at elevated temperatures (34 or 36 degrees C). Furthermore, one or more genes on the Q chromosome of N. tabacum were absolutely responsible for hybrid lethality, suggesting that many species of section Suaveolentes share the same factor that triggers hybrid lethality by interaction with the genes on the Q chromosome. Exceptionally, only one wild species, N. fragrans, produced 100 % viable hybrids after crossing with N. tabacum, suggesting that N. fragrans has no factor triggering hybrid lethality.

  4. Seven of eight species in Nicotiana section Suaveolentes have common factors leading to hybrid lethality in crosses with Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Kuboyama, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Marubashi, Wataru

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Reproductive isolation is a mechanism that separates species, and is classified into two types: prezygotic and postzygotic. Inviability of hybrids, or hybrid lethality, is a type of postzygotic isolation and is observed in some plant species, including Nicotiana species. Previous work has shown that the Q chromosome, which belongs to the S subgenome of N. tabacum, encodes one or more genes leading to hybrid lethality in some crosses. Methods Interspecific crosses of eight wild species were conducted in section Suaveolentes (which consists of species restricted to Australasia and Africa) with the cultivated species Nicotiana tabacum. Hybrid seedlings were cultivated at 28, 34 or 36 °C, and PCR and chromosome analysis were performed. Results and Conclusions Seven of eight wild species produced inviable hybrids after crossing. Hybrid lethality, which was observed in all crosses at 28 °C, was Type II lethality, with the characteristic symptoms of browning of hypocotyl and roots; lethality was suppressed at elevated temperatures (34 or 36 °C). Furthermore, one or more genes on the Q chromosome of N. tabacum were absolutely responsible for hybrid lethality, suggesting that many species of section Suaveolentes share the same factor that triggers hybrid lethality by interaction with the genes on the Q chromosome. Exceptionally, only one wild species, N. fragrans, produced 100 % viable hybrids after crossing with N. tabacum, suggesting that N. fragrans has no factor triggering hybrid lethality. PMID:20519236

  5. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Nicotiana otophora and its Comparison with Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul L.; Khan, Abdur R.; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad A.; Lee, Seok-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana otophora is a wild parental species of Nicotiana tabacum, an interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris. However, N. otophora is least understood as an alternative paternal donor. Here, we compared the fully assembled chloroplast (cp) genome of N. otophora and with those of closely related species. The analysis showed a cp genome size of 156,073 bp and exhibited a typical quadripartite structure, which contains a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, containing 163 representative genes, with 165 microsatellites distributed unevenly throughout the genome. Comparative analysis of a gene with known function across Nicotiana species revealed 76 protein-coding sequences, 20 tRNA sequences, and 3 rRNA sequence shared between the cp genomes. The analysis revealed that N. otophora is a sister species to N. tomentosiformis within the Nicotiana genus, and Atropha belladonna and Datura stramonium are their closest relatives. These findings provide a valuable analysis of the complete N. otophora cp genome, which can identify species, elucidate taxonomy, and reconstruct the phylogeny of genus Nicotiana. PMID:27379132

  6. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Nicotiana otophora and its Comparison with Related Species.

    PubMed

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul L; Khan, Abdur R; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad A; Lee, Seok-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana otophora is a wild parental species of Nicotiana tabacum, an interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris. However, N. otophora is least understood as an alternative paternal donor. Here, we compared the fully assembled chloroplast (cp) genome of N. otophora and with those of closely related species. The analysis showed a cp genome size of 156,073 bp and exhibited a typical quadripartite structure, which contains a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, containing 163 representative genes, with 165 microsatellites distributed unevenly throughout the genome. Comparative analysis of a gene with known function across Nicotiana species revealed 76 protein-coding sequences, 20 tRNA sequences, and 3 rRNA sequence shared between the cp genomes. The analysis revealed that N. otophora is a sister species to N. tomentosiformis within the Nicotiana genus, and Atropha belladonna and Datura stramonium are their closest relatives. These findings provide a valuable analysis of the complete N. otophora cp genome, which can identify species, elucidate taxonomy, and reconstruct the phylogeny of genus Nicotiana.

  7. Acute respiratory failure due to Nicotiana glauca ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, D; Kargakis, M; Topalis, T; Drouzas, A; Potolidis, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: A variety of organisms produce potent toxins that impact human health through compromising respiratory function. Case report: We describe a rare case of abrupt respiratory failure afterNicotiana glaucaingestion in a previously healthy sixty years old female patient. She presented complaining for gait instability and malaise after ingestion of cooked leaves of the wild plant and two hours after the onset she developed respiratory failurefor which she was intubated and mechanically ventilated for two days. The patient fully recovered and was discharged from the hospital. Conclusion: Anabasine, the plant’s main active ingredient, can cause severe systemic intoxication due to its nicotinic receptor agonist action with respiratory muscle paralysis being the main effect. PMID:24376330

  8. PHANTASTICA regulates development of the adaxial mesophyll in Nicotiana leaves.

    PubMed

    McHale, Neil A; Koning, Ross E

    2004-05-01

    Initiation and growth of leaf blades is oriented by an adaxial/abaxial axis aligned with the original axis of polarity in the leaf primordium. To investigate mechanisms regulating this process, we cloned the Nicotiana tabacum ortholog of PHANTASTICA (NTPHAN) and generated a series of antisense transgenics in N. sylvestris. We show that NSPHAN is expressed throughout emerging blade primordia in the wild type and becomes localized to the middle mesophyll in the expanding lamina. Antisense NSPHAN leaves show ectopic expression of NTH20, a class I KNOX gene. Juvenile transgenic leaves have normal adaxial/abaxial polarity and generate leaf blades in the normal position, but the adaxial mesophyll shows disorganized patterns of cell division, delayed maturation of palisade, and ectopic reinitiation of blade primordia along the midrib. Reversal of the phenotype with exogenous gibberellic acid suggests that NSPHAN, acting via KNOX repression, maintains determinacy in the expanding lamina and sustains the patterns of cell proliferation critical to palisade development.

  9. PHANTASTICA Regulates Development of the Adaxial Mesophyll in Nicotiana Leaves

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Neil A.; Koning, Ross E.

    2004-01-01

    Initiation and growth of leaf blades is oriented by an adaxial/abaxial axis aligned with the original axis of polarity in the leaf primordium. To investigate mechanisms regulating this process, we cloned the Nicotiana tabacum ortholog of PHANTASTICA (NTPHAN) and generated a series of antisense transgenics in N. sylvestris. We show that NSPHAN is expressed throughout emerging blade primordia in the wild type and becomes localized to the middle mesophyll in the expanding lamina. Antisense NSPHAN leaves show ectopic expression of NTH20, a class I KNOX gene. Juvenile transgenic leaves have normal adaxial/abaxial polarity and generate leaf blades in the normal position, but the adaxial mesophyll shows disorganized patterns of cell division, delayed maturation of palisade, and ectopic reinitiation of blade primordia along the midrib. Reversal of the phenotype with exogenous gibberellic acid suggests that NSPHAN, acting via KNOX repression, maintains determinacy in the expanding lamina and sustains the patterns of cell proliferation critical to palisade development. PMID:15084717

  10. GhWRKY68 reduces resistance to salt and drought in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haihong; Wang, Chen; Wang, Fang; Liu, Shuchang; Li, Guilin; Guo, Xingqi

    2015-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factors modulate numerous physiological processes, including plant growth, development and responses to various environmental stresses. Currently, our understanding of the functions of the majority of the WRKY family members and their possible roles in signalling crosstalk is limited. In particular, very few WRKYs have been identified and characterised from an economically important crop, cotton. In this study, we characterised a novel group IIc WRKY gene, GhWRKY68, which is induced by different abiotic stresses and multiple defence-related signalling molecules. The β-glucuronidase activity driven by the GhWRKY68 promoter was enhanced after exposure to drought, salt, abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2. The overexpression of GhWRKY68 in Nicotiana benthamiana reduced resistance to drought and salt and affected several physiological indices. GhWRKY68 may mediate salt and drought responses by modulating ABA content and enhancing the transcript levels of ABA-responsive genes. GhWRKY68-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced tolerance to oxidative stress after drought and salt stress treatments, which correlated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced enzyme activities, elevated malondialdehyde (MDA) content and altered ROS-related gene expression. These results indicate that GhWRKY68 is a transcription factor that responds to drought and salt stresses by regulating ABA signalling and modulating cellular ROS.

  11. Changes in photosynthetic metabolism induced by tobamovirus infection in Nicotiana benthamiana studied in vivo by thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Sajnani, Carlota; Zurita, Jorge L; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M; Barón, Matilde; Ducruet, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    * In thylakoids from Nicotiana benthamiana infected with the pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), a decreased amount of the PsbP and PsbQ proteins of photosystem II and different proteins of the Calvin cycle have been previously observed. We used thermoluminescence to study the consequences in vivo. * Measurements on unfrozen discs from symptomatic and asymptomatic leaves of plants infected by two tobamovirus PMMoV-S and PMMoV-I strains were compared with homologous samples in control plants. * Thermoluminescence emission did not reveal noticeable alteration of PSII electron transfer activity in infected symptomatic leaves. In these leaves, the relative intensity of the 'afterglow' emission indicated an increase of the NADPH + ATP assimilatory potential, contrasting with its decrease in asymptomatic leaves. High-temperature thermoluminescence, as a result of peroxides, increased in symptomatic and asymptomatic leaves. * In young infected leaves, PSII activity is preserved, producing a high assimilatory potential. Older asymptomatic leaves export more nutrients towards young infected leaves. This depresses their assimilatory potential and weakens their defence mechanisms against reactive oxygen species, resulting in higher peroxide content.

  12. NMR-based structural validation of therapeutic antibody produced in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hirokazu; Fukuzawa, Noriho; Tasaka, Yasushi; Matsuo, Kouki; Zhang, Ying; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Kondo, Sachiko; Nakazawa, Shiori; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Matsumura, Takeshi; Kato, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    We successfully developed a method for metabolic isotope labeling of recombinant proteins produced in transgenic tobacco. This enabled assessment of structural integrity of plant-derived therapeutic antibodies by NMR analysis. A variety of expression vehicles have been developed for the production of promising biologics, including plants, fungi, bacteria, insects, and mammals. Glycoprotein biologics often experience altered folding and post-translational modifications that are typified by variant glycosylation patterns. These differences can dramatically affect their efficacy, as exemplified by therapeutic antibodies. However, it is generally difficult to validate the structural integrity of biologics produced using different expression vehicles. To address this issue, we have developed and applied a stable-isotope-assisted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method for the conformational characterization of recombinant antibodies produced in plants. Nicotiana benthamiana used as a vehicle for the production of recombinant immunoglobulin G (IgG) was grown in a (15)N-enriched plant growth medium. The Fc fragment derived from the (15)N-labeled antibody thus prepared was subjected to heteronuclear two-dimensional (2D) NMR measurements. This approach enabled assessment of the structural integrity of the plant-derived therapeutic antibodies by comparing their NMR spectral properties with those of an authentic IgG-Fc derived from mammalian cells.

  13. Untargeted metabolomics analysis reveals dynamic changes in azelaic acid- and salicylic acid derivatives in LPS-treated Nicotiana tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Mhlongo, M I; Tugizimana, F; Piater, L A; Steenkamp, P A; Madala, N E; Dubery, I A

    2017-01-22

    To counteract biotic stress factors, plants employ multilayered defense mechanisms responsive to pathogen-derived elicitor molecules, and regulated by different phytohormones and signaling molecules. Here, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecule, was used to induce defense responses in Nicotiana tabacum cell suspensions. Intracellular metabolites were extracted with methanol and analyzed using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-qTOF-MS/MS) platform. The generated data were processed and examined with multivariate and univariate statistical tools. The results show time-dependent dynamic changes and accumulation of glycosylated signaling molecules, specifically those of azelaic acid, salicylic acid and methyl-salicylate as contributors to the altered metabolomic state in LPS-treated cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 from Nicotiana tabacum suppresses RNA silencing and enhances viral infection in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xiao-Bao; Dong, Li; Zhu, Hui; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Du, Quan-Sheng; Lv, Dian-Qiu; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Garcia, Juan Antonio; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2010-04-01

    Endogenous eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) produce double-stranded RNA intermediates in diverse processes of small RNA synthesis in RNA silencing pathways. RDR6 is required in plants for posttranscriptional gene silencing induced by sense transgenes (S-PTGS) and has an important role in amplification of antiviral silencing. Whereas RDR1 is also involved in antiviral defense in plants, this does not necessarily proceed through triggering silencing. In this study, we show that Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with RDR1 from Nicotiana tabacum (Nt-RDR1 plants) exhibits hypersusceptibility to Plum pox potyvirus and other viruses, resembling RDR6-silenced (RDR6i) N. benthamiana. Analysis of transient induction of RNA silencing in N. benthamiana Nt-RDR1 and RDR6i plants revealed that Nt-RDR1 possesses silencing suppression activity. We found that Nt-RDR1 does not interfere with RDR6-dependent siRNA accumulation but turns out to suppress RDR6-dependent S-PTGS. Our results, together with previously published data, suggest that RDR1 might have a dual role, contributing, on one hand, to salicylic acid-mediated antiviral defense, and suppressing, on the other hand, the RDR6-mediated antiviral RNA silencing. We propose a scenario in which the natural loss-of-function variant of RDR1 in N. benthamiana may be the outcome of selective pressure to maintain a high RDR6-dependent antiviral defense, which would be required to face the hypersensitivity of this plant to a large number of viruses.

  15. Cell death processes during expression of hybrid lethality in interspecific F1 hybrid between Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Mino, Masanobu; Maekawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2002-12-01

    Hybrid lethality, a type of reproductive isolation, is a genetically controlled event appearing at the seedling stage in interspecific hybrids. We characterized the lethality of F(1) hybrid seedlings from Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright-Yellow 4 using a number of traits including growth rate, microscopic features of tissues and cells, ion leakage, DNA degradation, reactive oxygen intermediates including superoxide radical (O(2)(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and expression of stress response marker genes. Lethal symptoms appeared at 4 d after germination in the basal hypocotyl and extended toward both the hypocotyl and root of the plants grown at 26 degrees C. Microscopic analysis revealed a prompt lysis of cell components during cell death. Membrane disruption and DNA degradation were found in the advanced stage of the lethality. The death of mesophyll cells in the cotyledon was initiated by the vascular bundle, suggesting that a putative factor inducing cell death diffused into surrounding cells from the vascular tissue. In contrast, these symptoms were not observed in the plants grown at 37 degrees C. Seedlings grown at 26 degrees C generated larger amounts of reactive oxygen intermediate in the hypocotyl than those grown at 37 degrees C. A number of stress response marker genes were expressed at 26 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. We proposed that a putative death factor moving systemically through the vascular system induced a prompt and successive lysis of the cytoplasm of cells and that massive cell death eventually led to the loss of the hybrid plant.

  16. Genes in S and T subgenomes are responsible for hybrid lethality in interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Marubashi, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    Many species of Nicotiana section Suaveolentes produce inviable F(1) hybrids after crossing with Nicotiana tabacum (genome constitution SSTT), a phenomenon that is often called hybrid lethality. Through crosses with monosomic lines of N. tabacum lacking a Q chromosome, we previously determined that hybrid lethality is caused by interaction between gene(s) on the Q chromosome belonging to the S subgenome of N. tabacum and gene(s) in Suaveolentes species. Here, we examined if hybrid seedlings from the cross N. occidentalis (section Suaveolentes)×N. tabacum are inviable despite a lack of the Q chromosome. Hybrid lethality in the cross of N. occidentalis×N. tabacum was characterized by shoots with fading color. This symptom differed from what has been previously observed in lethal crosses between many species in section Suaveolentes and N. tabacum. In crosses of monosomic N. tabacum plants lacking the Q chromosome with N. occidentalis, hybrid lethality was observed in hybrid seedlings either lacking or possessing the Q chromosome. N. occidentalis was then crossed with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT), to reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum contains gene(s) responsible for hybrid lethality. Hybrid seedlings from the crosses N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis and N. occidentalis×N. sylvestris were inviable. Although the specific symptoms of hybrid lethality in the cross N. occidentalis×N. tabacum were similar to those appearing in hybrids from the cross N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis, genes in both the S and T subgenomes of N. tabacum appear responsible for hybrid lethality in crosses with N. occidentalis.

  17. Genes in S and T Subgenomes Are Responsible for Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific Hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Marubashi, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    Background Many species of Nicotiana section Suaveolentes produce inviable F1 hybrids after crossing with Nicotiana tabacum (genome constitution SSTT), a phenomenon that is often called hybrid lethality. Through crosses with monosomic lines of N. tabacum lacking a Q chromosome, we previously determined that hybrid lethality is caused by interaction between gene(s) on the Q chromosome belonging to the S subgenome of N. tabacum and gene(s) in Suaveolentes species. Here, we examined if hybrid seedlings from the cross N. occidentalis (section Suaveolentes)×N. tabacum are inviable despite a lack of the Q chromosome. Methodology/Principal Findings Hybrid lethality in the cross of N. occidentalis×N. tabacum was characterized by shoots with fading color. This symptom differed from what has been previously observed in lethal crosses between many species in section Suaveolentes and N. tabacum. In crosses of monosomic N. tabacum plants lacking the Q chromosome with N. occidentalis, hybrid lethality was observed in hybrid seedlings either lacking or possessing the Q chromosome. N. occidentalis was then crossed with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT), to reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum contains gene(s) responsible for hybrid lethality. Hybrid seedlings from the crosses N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis and N. occidentalis×N. sylvestris were inviable. Conclusions/Significance Although the specific symptoms of hybrid lethality in the cross N. occidentalis×N. tabacum were similar to those appearing in hybrids from the cross N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis, genes in both the S and T subgenomes of N. tabacum appear responsible for hybrid lethality in crosses with N. occidentalis. PMID:22563450

  18. Cell Death Processes during Expression of Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific F1 Hybrid between Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Mino, Masanobu; Maekawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2002-01-01

    Hybrid lethality, a type of reproductive isolation, is a genetically controlled event appearing at the seedling stage in interspecific hybrids. We characterized the lethality of F1 hybrid seedlings from Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright-Yellow 4 using a number of traits including growth rate, microscopic features of tissues and cells, ion leakage, DNA degradation, reactive oxygen intermediates including superoxide radical (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and expression of stress response marker genes. Lethal symptoms appeared at 4 d after germination in the basal hypocotyl and extended toward both the hypocotyl and root of the plants grown at 26°C. Microscopic analysis revealed a prompt lysis of cell components during cell death. Membrane disruption and DNA degradation were found in the advanced stage of the lethality. The death of mesophyll cells in the cotyledon was initiated by the vascular bundle, suggesting that a putative factor inducing cell death diffused into surrounding cells from the vascular tissue. In contrast, these symptoms were not observed in the plants grown at 37°C. Seedlings grown at 26°C generated larger amounts of reactive oxygen intermediate in the hypocotyl than those grown at 37°C. A number of stress response marker genes were expressed at 26°C but not at 37°C. We proposed that a putative death factor moving systemically through the vascular system induced a prompt and successive lysis of the cytoplasm of cells and that massive cell death eventually led to the loss of the hybrid plant. PMID:12481061

  19. Enhancement of volatile aglycone recovery facilitated by acid hydrolysis of glucosides from Nicotiana flower species.

    PubMed

    Coleman, William M; Dube, Michael F; Gerardi, Anthony R; Ashraf-Khorassani, Mehdi; Taylor, Larry T

    2012-11-21

    Four different Nicotiana flowers (Nicotiana alata (alata), Nicotiana sylvestris (Sy), Nicotiana suaveolens (Su), and Nicotiana tabacum cv. Flue-Cured (FC)) from farms in Virginia and North Carolina were harvested and promptly quenched with liquid nitrogen and hand-ground prior to analysis. Each Nicotiana flower was pre-extracted with hexane to remove unbound volatiles. Fifteen standard compounds that were thought to be in the pre-extract were employed to aid in GC-MS identification and quantification. Glucosides were then chromatographically isolated and next hydrolyzed via 2 M sulfuric acid for 24 h at 75 °C. For each flower, the products of hydrolysis were extracted in tandem with hexane and dichloromethane (DCM) prior to analysis by GC-MS. The mixture of hexane and DCM extracts of the flowers after hydrolysis were then analyzed for each of 15 external standards via GC-MS to determine the concentration of any isolated flower-derived aglycone. Quantitative results for each of the possible 15 free volatile compounds extracted before and after hydrolysis were compared. Benzyl alcohol, phenethyl alcohol, and cis-3-hexenol were found in all Nicotiana both before and after acid hydrolysis. Enormous increases in the mass of benzyl alcohol and phenethyl alcohol were obtained with all flowers as a result of acid hydrolysis. With selected Nicotiana flowers, significant increases were observed for eugenol and cinnamaldehyde. The significant increases observed in cinnamaldehyde and eugenol upon mild acid hydrolysis strongly indicate that this approach could be a viable alternative process for the production scale isolation of these important natural flavor compounds.

  20. Assessing acute toxicities of pre- and post-treatment industrial wastewaters with Hydra attenuata: A comparative study of acute toxicity with the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Staples, R.E.; Stahl, R.G. Jr. . Haskell Lab. for Toxicology and Industrial Medicine)

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (a) determine wastewater treatment effectiveness using two freshwater organisms, (b) compare acute toxicity results from the two species exposed to the wastewaters, and (c) link acute and potential developmental toxicity of wastewaters in one organism. The acute toxicities of several pretreatment and post-treatment industrial waste-water samples wee evaluated with adult Hydra attenuata and fathead minnows. The acute LC50s agreed closely when results in Hydra attenuata were compared with those from fathead minnow tests. Acute LC50s ranged from 3 to >100% of samples with hydra, and from 1.0 to >100% of sample with fathead minnows. The results provided strong evidence of treatment effectiveness because toxicity decreased with progressive stages of treatment. Previously the Hydra Developmental Toxicity Assay was used as a prescreen mainly for in vitro assessment of developmental toxicity with pure compounds and to prioritized toxicants according to selective toxicity to the developing embryo. Recently the authors modified the assay for testing natural waters and wastewaters; hence, some of the wastewater samples also were tested for their developmental toxicity. In this case, the relative selective toxicity of these wastewater samples ranged from 0.7 to 2.1, indicating that no sample was uniquely toxic to the developing embryo, although acute toxicity was manifested. Overall, their results indicate the Hydra Assay functions appropriately in assessments of acute and developmental toxicity of industrial wastewaters and may be a simple and useful tool in a battery of tests for broader scale detection of environmental hazards.

  1. A tobamovirus expression vector for agroinfection of legumes and Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zun; Kearney, Christopher M

    2010-06-01

    The highest recombinant protein expression levels in plants have been achieved using tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vectors via agroinoculation of the tobacco, Nicotiana benthamiana. These vectors have been utilized for pharmaceutical protein production and also can serve as rapid gene expression screens for proteonomics. We have constructed a similar vector based on the legume-infecting tobamovirus, sunn hemp mosaic virus (SHMV), by deleting the coat protein gene (SHMV eliminate coat protein gene or SHEC). SHEC/GFP co-agroinoculated with a 35S/p19 binary yielded 600 microg GFP/gfw (25% TSP) in N. benthamiana. In the absence of p19, SHEC/GFP expression was nearly eliminated. SHEC also yielded strong GUS production in agroinoculated Medicago trunculata, Pinto bean, cowpea, pea and lentil even without the aid of systemic infection. A full-length version (SHAC, SHMV alternate coat protein) was created by adding to SHEC the coat protein subgenomic promoter and ORF from the tobamovirus, tobacco mild green mottle virus (TMGMV). SHAC induced a slowly developing, symptomless infection of N. benthamiana and may be of use as a virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector.

  2. Investigation of Nicotiana tabacum (+) N. suaveolens cybrids with carpelloid stamens.

    PubMed

    Fitter, John T; Thomas, Mark R; Niu, Chen; Rose, Ray J

    2005-02-01

    To investigate cytoplasmic effects on homeotic floral morphology, Nicotiana tabacum and N. suaveolens protoplasts were fused and cybrids obtained to contrast with the sexual alloplasmic line Nta(sua)S. Nta(sua)S contains the nucleus of N. tabacum and cytoplasm of N. suaveolens while cybrids derive from fused cells where the cytoplasms can interact. The three male-sterile somatic cybrid plants analyzed contained mitochondria with N. tabacum and N. suaveolens mtDNA sequences, but not all the N. tabacum or all the N. suaveolens mtDNA sequences were present. The flowers were N. tabacum-like but with a split corolla (not observed in Nta(sua)S) and the whorl of stamens replaced by a whorl of carpel-like structures. Based on scanning electron microscopy the carpelloid stamens had a characteristic N. tabacum stigma, a style of variable length and a pseudo-ovary with ovule-like structures. The Southern blot data were consistent with mtDNA recombination. These genomic changes were maternally inherited. Chloroplasts were either of the N. tabacum or N. suaveolens type. AFLP analysis showed transfer of variable amounts of N. suaveolens nuclear DNA. However, it is the presence of the N. suaveolens sequences and/or absence of N. tabacum sequences in the mitochondria that correlates with the homeotic floral morphology. These cybrids will facilitate the analysis of the role of mitochondrial DNA sequences in floral organ identity; which has received limited attention in genetic flowering models based primarily on Arabidopsis research.

  3. Pathway of phloem unloading in tobacco sink leaves. [Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, R.

    1987-04-01

    Phloem unloading in transition sink leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) was analyzed by quantitative autoradiography. Source leaves were labeled with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and experimental treatments were begun approximately 1 h later when label had entered the sink leaves. Autoradiographs were prepared from rapidly frozen, lyophilized sink tissue at the beginning and end of the treatments and the amount of label in veins and in surrounding cells was determined by microdensitometry. Photoassimilate unloaded from third order and larger, but not smaller, veins. Long-distance import and unloading did not respond the same way to all experimental treatments. Import was completely inhibited by cold, anaerobiosis or steam girdling the sink leaf petiole. Unloading was inhibited by cold but continued in an anaerobic atmosphere and after steam girdling. Uptake of exogenous (/sup 14/C)sucrose was inhibited by anaerobiosis. Since an apoplastic pathway of phloem unloading would involve solute uptake from the apoplast the results are most consistent with passive symplastic unloading of photoassimilates from phloem to surrounding cells.

  4. Transmission of paternal chloroplasts in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Horlow, C; Goujaud, J; Lépingle, A; Missonier, C; Bourgin, J P

    1990-09-01

    Medgyesy et al. (1986, Mol. Gen. Genet. 204, 195-198) have described in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and in an interspecific cross involving N. plumbaginifolia and N. tabacum a procedure for selecting cell lines derived from seedlings carrying paternal chloroplasts by taking advantage of a plastid-encoded mutation which confers resistance to streptomycin. We have extended their demonstration of occasional transmission of chloroplasts through pollen to the case of an intraspecific cross in N. tabacum. The line used as maternal parent, ITB19(sua), displayed a cytoplasmic male sterility due to the presence of a cytoplasm originating from N. suaveolens. The line used as paternal parent, SR1, was fertile and possessed mutant chloroplasts conferring resistance to streptomycin. From cell lines derived from 204 seedlings, three were regenerated into streptomycin-resistant buds. The plants derived from these three clones were male-sterile. Their progeny, after crossing with a wild type tobacco line, XHFD8, was resistant to streptomycin. Tests of resistance of the seedlings to tentoxin and restriction analyses of the chloroplast DNA indicated that two clones still had the maternal chloroplasts and were thus probably new streptomycin-resistant mutants, whereas the third one had acquired the chloroplasts of the paternal parent, but had retained the mitochondria of the maternal parent.

  5. Reactions of Nicotiana species to inoculation with monopartite and bipartite begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some Nicotiana species are widely used as experimental hosts for plant viruses. Nicotiana species differ in ploidy levels, chromosome numbers and have diverse geographical origins. Thus, these species are useful model systems to investigate virus-host interactions, co-evolution of pathogens and hosts and the effects of ploidy level on virus resistance/susceptibility. Results Here we have studied the responses of seven Nicotiana species to inoculation with Cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMV), a monopartite begomovirus, and Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV), a bipartite begomovirus, both from the Indian subcontinent. All Nicotiana species supported the replication of both begomoviruses in inoculated leaves. However, only three Nicotiana species, namely N. benthamiana, N. tabacum and N. sylvestris showed symptoms when inoculated with ToLCNDV, while N. benthamiana was the only species that developed leaf curl symptoms when inoculated with CLCuMV. CLCuMV accumulated to detectable levels in N. tabacum, but plants remained asymptomatic. A previously identified mutation of RNA dependent RNA polymerase 1 was shown to be present only in N. benthamiana. The finding is in line with earlier results showing that the susceptibility of this species to a diverse range of plant viruses correlates with a defective RNA silencing-mediated host defense. Conclusions The results presented show that individual Nicotiana species respond differently to inoculation with begomoviruses. The inability of begomoviruses to systemically infect several Nicotiana species is likely due to inhibition of virus movement, rather than replication, and thus provides a novel model to study virus-host interactions in resistant/susceptible hosts. PMID:22011413

  6. Expression of a constitutively activated plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 cells results in cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Niczyj, Marta; Champagne, Antoine; Alam, Iftekhar; Nader, Joseph; Boutry, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Increased acidification of the external medium by an activated H (+) -ATPase results in cell expansion, in the absence of upstream activating signaling. The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase couples ATP hydrolysis with proton transport outside the cell, and thus creates an electrochemical gradient, which energizes secondary transporters. According to the acid growth theory, this enzyme is also proposed to play a major role in cell expansion, by acidifying the external medium and so activating enzymes that are involved in cell wall-loosening. However, this theory is still debated. To challenge it, we made use of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase isoform from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia truncated from its C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain (ΔCPMA4), and thus constitutively activated. This protein was expressed in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells using a heat shock inducible promoter. The characterization of several independent transgenic lines showed that the expression of activated ΔCPMA4 resulted in a reduced external pH by 0.3-1.2 units, as well as in an increased H(+)-ATPase activity by 77-155 % (ATP hydrolysis), or 70-306 % (proton pumping) of isolated plasma membranes. In addition, ΔCPMA4-expressing cells were 17-57 % larger than the wild-type cells and displayed abnormal shapes. A proteomic comparison of plasma membranes isolated from ΔCPMA4-expressing and wild-type cells revealed the altered abundance of several proteins involved in cell wall synthesis, transport, and signal transduction. In conclusion, the data obtained in this work showed that H(+)-ATPase activation is sufficient to induce cell expansion and identified possible actors which intervene in this process.

  7. Expression of a Self-Incompatibility Glycoprotein (S2-Ribonuclease) from Nicotiana alata in Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed Central

    Murfett, J; Cornish, EC; Ebert, PR; Bonig, I; McClure, BA; Clarke, AE

    1992-01-01

    In Nicotiana alata, self-incompatibility is controlled by a single locus, designated the S-locus, with multiple alleles. Stylar products of these alleles are ribonucleases that are secreted mainly in the transmitting tract tissues. N. tabacum plants were transformed with constructs containing the S2-cDNA and genomic S2-sequences from N. alata that were linked to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Unlike other genes controlled by this promoter, the genes were expressed most highly in mature floral organs. This pattern of expression was observed at both the protein and RNA levels. The S2-glycoprotein was detected in the stylar transmitting tract tissues of the transgenic plants. The transgene product was secreted, had ribonuclease activity, and was glycosylated with the correct number of glycan chains. However, the maximum level of S2-glycoprotein in styles of the transgenic plants was approximately 100-fold lower than that found in N. alata styles carrying the S2-allele. Perhaps because of this lower protein level, the plants showed no changes in the incompatibility phenotype. PMID:12297668

  8. Long-distance transport of Gibberellic Acid Insensitive mRNA in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; Iwashiro, Reika; Li, Tianzhong; Harada, Takeo

    2013-10-21

    The Gibberellic Acid (GA) signal is governed by the GAI (Gibberellic Acid Insensitive) repressor, which is characterized by a highly conserved N-terminal DELLA domain. Deletion of the DELLA domain results in constitutive suppression of GA signaling. As the GAI transcript is transportable in phloem elements, a Δ-DELLA GAI (gai) transgenic stock plant can reduce the stature of a scion through transport of gai mRNA from the stock. However, little is known about the characteristics of a scion on a gai stock. Arabidopsis Δ-DELLA GAI (gai) was fused with a T7 epitope tag and expressed under the control of a companion cell-specific expression promoter, Commelina yellow mottle virus promoter (CoYMVp), to enhance transport in the phloem. The CoYMVp:Atgai-T7 (CgT) transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana exhibited a dwarf phenotype and lower sensitivity to GA enhancement of shoot stature. A wild-type (WT) scion on a CgT stock contained both Atgai-T7 mRNA and the translated product. Microarray analysis to clarify the effect of the CgT stock on the gene expression pattern in the scion clearly revealed that the WT scions on CgT stocks had fewer genes whose expression was altered in response to GA treatment. An apple rootstock variety, Malus prunifolia, integrating CoYMVp:Atgai moderately reduced the tree height of the apple cultivar scion. Our results demonstrate that Atgai mRNA can move from companion cells to sieve tubes and that the translated product remains at the sites to which it is transported, resulting in attenuation of GA responses by reducing the expression of many genes. The induction of semi-dwarfism in an apple cultivar on root stock harbouring Atgai suggests that long-distance transport of mRNA from grafts would be applicable to horticulture crops.

  9. Long-distance transport of Gibberellic Acid Insensitive mRNA in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Gibberellic Acid (GA) signal is governed by the GAI (Gibberellic Acid Insensitive) repressor, which is characterized by a highly conserved N-terminal DELLA domain. Deletion of the DELLA domain results in constitutive suppression of GA signaling. As the GAI transcript is transportable in phloem elements, a Δ-DELLA GAI (gai) transgenic stock plant can reduce the stature of a scion through transport of gai mRNA from the stock. However, little is known about the characteristics of a scion on a gai stock. Results Arabidopsis Δ-DELLA GAI (gai) was fused with a T7 epitope tag and expressed under the control of a companion cell-specific expression promoter, Commelina yellow mottle virus promoter (CoYMVp), to enhance transport in the phloem. The CoYMVp:Atgai-T7 (CgT) transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana exhibited a dwarf phenotype and lower sensitivity to GA enhancement of shoot stature. A wild-type (WT) scion on a CgT stock contained both Atgai-T7 mRNA and the translated product. Microarray analysis to clarify the effect of the CgT stock on the gene expression pattern in the scion clearly revealed that the WT scions on CgT stocks had fewer genes whose expression was altered in response to GA treatment. An apple rootstock variety, Malus prunifolia, integrating CoYMVp:Atgai moderately reduced the tree height of the apple cultivar scion. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Atgai mRNA can move from companion cells to sieve tubes and that the translated product remains at the sites to which it is transported, resulting in attenuation of GA responses by reducing the expression of many genes. The induction of semi-dwarfism in an apple cultivar on root stock harbouring Atgai suggests that long-distance transport of mRNA from grafts would be applicable to horticulture crops. PMID:24144190

  10. Efficacy of Chaetomium Species as Biological Control Agents against Phytophthora nicotianae Root Rot in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Wattanachai, Pongnak; Kasem, Soytong; Poeaim, Supattra

    2015-01-01

    Thailand is one of the largest citrus producers in Southeast Asia. Pathogenic infection by Phytophthora, however, has become one of major impediments to production. This study identified a pathogenic oomycete isolated from rotted roots of pomelo (Citrus maxima) in Thailand as Phytophthora nicotianae by the internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Then, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of Chaetomium globosum, Chaetomium lucknowense, Chaetomium cupreum and their crude extracts as biological control agents in controlling this P. nicotianae strain. Represent as antagonists in biculture test, the tested Chaetomium species inhibited mycelial growth by 50~56% and parasitized the hyphae, resulting in degradation of P. nicotianae mycelia after 30 days. The crude extracts of these Chaetomium species exhibited antifungal activities against mycelial growth of P. nicotianae, with effective doses of 2.6~101.4 µg/mL. Under greenhouse conditions, application of spores and methanol extracts of these Chaetomium species to pomelo seedlings inoculated with P. nicotianae reduced root rot by 66~71% and increased plant weight by 72~85% compared to that in the control. The method of application of antagonistic spores to control the disease was simple and economical, and it may thus be applicable for large-scale, highly effective biological control of this pathogen. PMID:26539045

  11. Efficacy of Chaetomium Species as Biological Control Agents against Phytophthora nicotianae Root Rot in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Hung, Phung Manh; Wattanachai, Pongnak; Kasem, Soytong; Poeaim, Supattra

    2015-09-01

    Thailand is one of the largest citrus producers in Southeast Asia. Pathogenic infection by Phytophthora, however, has become one of major impediments to production. This study identified a pathogenic oomycete isolated from rotted roots of pomelo (Citrus maxima) in Thailand as Phytophthora nicotianae by the internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Then, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of Chaetomium globosum, Chaetomium lucknowense, Chaetomium cupreum and their crude extracts as biological control agents in controlling this P. nicotianae strain. Represent as antagonists in biculture test, the tested Chaetomium species inhibited mycelial growth by 50~56% and parasitized the hyphae, resulting in degradation of P. nicotianae mycelia after 30 days. The crude extracts of these Chaetomium species exhibited antifungal activities against mycelial growth of P. nicotianae, with effective doses of 2.6~101.4 µg/mL. Under greenhouse conditions, application of spores and methanol extracts of these Chaetomium species to pomelo seedlings inoculated with P. nicotianae reduced root rot by 66~71% and increased plant weight by 72~85% compared to that in the control. The method of application of antagonistic spores to control the disease was simple and economical, and it may thus be applicable for large-scale, highly effective biological control of this pathogen.

  12. A distinct endogenous pararetrovirus family in Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a diploid progenitor of polyploid tobacco.

    PubMed

    Gregor, Wolfgang; Mette, M Florian; Staginnus, Christina; Matzke, Marjori A; Matzke, Antonius J M

    2004-03-01

    A distinct endogenous pararetrovirus (EPRV) family corresponding to a previously unknown virus has been identified in the genome of Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a diploid ancestor of allotetraploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The putative virus giving rise to N. tomentosiformis EPRVs (NtoEPRVs) is most similar to tobacco vein clearing virus, an episomal form of a normally silent EPRV family in Nicotiana glutinosa; it is also related to a putative virus giving rise to the NsEPRV family in Nicotiana sylvestris (the second diploid progenitor of tobacco) and in the N. sylvestris fraction of the tobacco genome. The copy number of NtoEPRVs is significantly higher in N. tomentosiformis than in tobacco. This suggests that after the polyploidization event, many copies were lost from the polyploid genome or were accumulated specifically in the diploid genome. By contrast, the copy number of NsEPRVs has remained constant in N. sylvestris and tobacco, indicating that changes have occurred preferentially in the NtoEPRV family during evolution of the three Nicotiana species. NtoEPRVs are often flanked by Gypsy retrotransposon-containing plant DNA. Although the mechanisms of NtoEPRV integration, accumulation, and/or elimination are unknown, these processes are possibly linked to retrotransposon activity.

  13. AFLP analysis of genetic polymorphism and evolutionary relationships among cultivated and wild Nicotiana species.

    PubMed

    Ren, N; Timko, M P

    2001-08-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was used to determine the degree of intra- and inter-specific genetic variation in the genus Nicotiana. Forty-six lines of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and seven wild Nicotiana species, including N. sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis, N. otophora, N. glutinosa, N. suaveolens, N. rustica, and N. longiflora, were analyzed, using at least eight different oligonucleotide primer combinations capable of detecting a minimum of 50 polymorphic bands per primer pair. The amount of genetic polymorphism present among cultivated tobacco lines (N. tabacum) was limited, as evidenced by the high degree of similarity in the AFLP profiles of cultivars collected worldwide. Six major clusters were found within cultivated tobacco that were primarily based upon geographic origin and manufacturing quality traits. A greater amount of genetic polymorphism exists among wild species of Nicotiana than among cultivated forms. Pairwise comparisons of the AFLP profiles of wild and cultivated Nicotiana species show that polymorphic bands present in N. tabacum can be found in at least one of three proposed wild progenitor species (i.e., N. sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis, and N. otophora). This observation provides additional support for these species contributing to the origin of N. tabacum.

  14. A Distinct Endogenous Pararetrovirus Family in Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a Diploid Progenitor of Polyploid Tobacco1[w

    PubMed Central

    Gregor, Wolfgang; Mette, M. Florian; Staginnus, Christina; Matzke, Marjori A.; Matzke, Antonius J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A distinct endogenous pararetrovirus (EPRV) family corresponding to a previously unknown virus has been identified in the genome of Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a diploid ancestor of allotetraploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The putative virus giving rise to N. tomentosiformis EPRVs (NtoEPRVs) is most similar to tobacco vein clearing virus, an episomal form of a normally silent EPRV family in Nicotiana glutinosa; it is also related to a putative virus giving rise to the NsEPRV family in Nicotiana sylvestris (the second diploid progenitor of tobacco) and in the N. sylvestris fraction of the tobacco genome. The copy number of NtoEPRVs is significantly higher in N. tomentosiformis than in tobacco. This suggests that after the polyploidization event, many copies were lost from the polyploid genome or were accumulated specifically in the diploid genome. By contrast, the copy number of NsEPRVs has remained constant in N. sylvestris and tobacco, indicating that changes have occurred preferentially in the NtoEPRV family during evolution of the three Nicotiana species. NtoEPRVs are often flanked by Gypsy retrotransposon-containing plant DNA. Although the mechanisms of NtoEPRV integration, accumulation, and/or elimination are unknown, these processes are possibly linked to retrotransposon activity. PMID:14988473

  15. Current status and prospects for the study of Nicotiana genomics, genetics, and nicotine biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2015-02-01

    Nicotiana, a member of the Solanaceae family, is one of the most important research model plants, and of high agricultural and economic value worldwide. To better understand the substantial and rapid research progress with Nicotiana in recent years, its genomics, genetics, and nicotine gene studies are summarized, with useful web links. Several important genetic maps, including a high-density map of N. tabacum consisting of ~2,000 markers published in 2012, provide tools for genetics research. Four whole genome sequences are from allotetraploid species, including N. benthamiana in 2012, and three N. tabacum cultivars (TN90, K326, and BX) in 2014. Three whole genome sequences are from diploids, including progenitors N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis in 2013 and N. otophora in 2014. These and additional studies provide numerous insights into genome evolution after polyploidization, including changes in gene composition and transcriptome expression in N. tabacum. The major genes involved in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway have been identified and the genetic basis of the differences in nicotine levels among Nicotiana species has been revealed. In addition, other progress on chloroplast, mitochondrial, and NCBI-registered projects on Nicotiana are discussed. The challenges and prospects for genomic, genetic and application research are addressed. Hence, this review provides important resources and guidance for current and future research and application in Nicotiana.

  16. Molecular diversity in the genus Nicotiana as revealed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA.

    PubMed

    Siva Raju, K; Sheshumadhav, M; Murthy, T G K

    2008-10-01

    The genus Nicotiana consists of 64 recognized species of which, only two species, tabacum and rustica are cultivated extensively. Wild Nicotiana species are storehouses of genes for several diseases and pests, besides genes for several important phytochemicals and quality traits, which are not present in cultivated varieties. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was used to determine the degree of genetic variation in the genus Nicotiana and to develop species specific markers. Twenty two species and two interspecific hybrids were analyzed by using 18 random decamer primers. Genetic polymorphism abounds among the wild species of genus Nicotiana (99.5 %) as evidenced by the high degree of polymorphism in RAPD profiles. The pairwise similarity measures in the species of subgenus Rustica was 0.252 whereas in the subgenus Tabacum was 0.189, suggesting that there was significant diversity among the species of these subgenera. In the species of subgenus Petunioides, the range of pairwise similarity measures was 0.128 to 0.941. The clustering pattern coincided with the traditional classification of Nicotiana species. All the primers generated specific bands in the various species. Thirty six species-specific markers identified in the present study will be useful in interspecific breeding programs.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Bacteriophage Endolysin Produced in Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    PubMed

    Kovalskaya, Natalia; Foster-Frey, Juli; Donovan, David M; Bauchan, Gary; Hammond, Rosemarie W

    2016-01-01

    The increasing spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has raised the interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments. In our study, the functionally active gram-negative bacterium bacteriophage CP933 endolysin was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by a combination of transient expression and vacuole targeting strategies, and its antimicrobial activity was investigated. Expression of the cp933 gene in E. coli led to growth inhibition and lysis of the host cells or production of trace amounts of CP933. Cytoplasmic expression of the cp933 gene in plants using Potato virus X-based transient expression vectors (pP2C2S and pGR107) resulted in death of the apical portion of experimental plants. To protect plants against the toxic effects of the CP933 protein, the cp933 coding region was fused at its Nterminus to an N-terminal signal peptide from the potato proteinase inhibitor I to direct CP933 to the delta-type vacuoles. Plants producing the CP933 fusion protein did not exhibit the severe toxic effects seen with the unfused protein and the level of expression was 0.16 mg/g of plant tissue. Antimicrobial assays revealed that, in contrast to gram-negative bacterium E. coli (BL21(DE3)), the gram-positive plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis was more susceptible to the plant-produced CP933, showing 18% growth inhibition. The results of our experiments demonstrate that the combination of transient expression and protein targeting to the delta vacuoles is a promising approach to produce functionally active proteins that exhibit toxicity when expressed in plant cells.

  18. Vacuolar targeting of recombinant antibodies in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Carolina Gabriela; Lareu, Jorge Fabricio; Marin Viegas, Vanesa Soledad; Mangano, Silvina; Loos, Andreas; Steinkellner, Herta; Petruccelli, Silvana

    2016-12-01

    Plant-based platforms are extensively used for the expression of recombinant proteins, including monoclonal antibodies. However, to harness the approach effectively and leverage it to its full potential, a better understanding of intracellular processes that affect protein properties is required. In this work, we examined vacuolar (vac) targeting and deposition of the monoclonal antibody (Ab) 14D9 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Two distinct vacuolar targeting signals (KISIA and NIFRGF) were C-terminal fused to the heavy chain of 14D9 (vac-Abs) and compared with secreted and ER-retained variants (sec-Ab, ER-Ab, respectively). Accumulation of ER- and vac-Abs was 10- to 15-fold higher than sec-Ab. N-glycan profiling revealed the predominant presence of plant typical complex fucosylated and xylosylated GnGnXF structures on sec-Ab while vac-Abs carried mainly oligomannosidic (Man 7-9) next to GnGnXF forms. Paucimannosidic glycans (commonly assigned as typical vacuolar) were not detected. Confocal microscopy analysis using RFP fusions showed that sec-Ab-RFP localized in the apoplast while vac-Abs-RFP were exclusively detected in the central vacuole. The data suggest that vac-Abs reached the vacuole by two different pathways: direct transport from the ER bypassing the Golgi (Ab molecules containing Man structures) and trafficking through the Golgi (for Ab molecules containing complex N-glycans). Importantly, vac-Abs were correctly assembled and functionally active. Collectively, we show that the central vacuole is an appropriate compartment for the efficient production of Abs with appropriate post-translational modifications, but also point to a reconsideration of current concepts in plant glycan processing. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Nicotiana benthamiana as a Production Platform for Artemisinin Precursors

    PubMed Central

    van Herpen, Teun W. J. M.; Cankar, Katarina; Nogueira, Marilise; Bosch, Dirk; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Beekwilder, Jules

    2010-01-01

    Background Production of pharmaceuticals in plants provides an alternative for chemical synthesis, fermentation or natural sources. Nicotiana benthamiana is deployed at commercial scale for production of therapeutic proteins. Here the potential of this plant is explored for rapid production of precursors of artemisinin, a sesquiterpenoid compound that is used for malaria treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Biosynthetic genes leading to artemisinic acid, a precursor of artemisinin, were combined and expressed in N. benthamiana by agro-infiltration. The first committed precursor of artemisinin, amorpha-4,11-diene, was produced upon infiltration of a construct containing amorpha-4,11-diene synthase, accompanied by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Amorpha-4,11-diene was detected both in extracts and in the headspace of the N. benthamiana leaves. When the amorphadiene oxidase CYP71AV1 was co-infiltrated with the amorphadiene-synthesizing construct, the amorpha-4,11-diene levels strongly decreased, suggesting it was oxidized. Surprisingly, no anticipated oxidation products, such as artemisinic acid, were detected upon GC-MS analysis. However, analysis of leaf extracts with a non-targeted metabolomics approach, using LC-QTOF-MS, revealed the presence of another compound, which was identified as artemisinic acid-12-β-diglucoside. This compound accumulated to 39.5 mg.kg−1 fwt. Apparently the product of the heterologous pathway that was introduced, artemisinic acid, is further metabolized efficiently by glycosyl transferases that are endogenous to N. benthamiana. Conclusion/Significance This work shows that agroinfiltration of N. bentamiana can be used as a model to study the production of sesquiterpenoid pharmaceutical compounds. The interaction between the ectopically introduced pathway and the endogenous metabolism of the plant is discussed. PMID:21151979

  20. Transient Expression of Tetrameric Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Alkanaimsh, Salem; Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Guerrero, Andrés; Tu, Aye M.; Hashimoto, Bryce; Hwang, Min Sook; Phu, My L.; Arzola, Lucas; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Falk, Bryce W.; Nandi, Somen; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; McDonald, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the expression, extraction and purification of plant-derived tetrameric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE), we describe the development and use of plant viral amplicon-based gene expression system; Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) RNA-based overexpression vector (TRBO) to express enzymatically active FLAG-tagged plant made recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rBChE) in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using transient agroinfiltration. Two gene expression cassettes were designed to express the recombinant protein in either the ER or to the apoplastic compartment. Leaf homogenization was used to isolate ER-retained recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE-ER) while apoplast-targeted rBChE was isolated by either leaf homogenization (prBChE) or vacuum-extraction of apoplastic wash fluid (prBChE-AWF). rBChE from apoplast wash fluid had a higher specific activity but lower enzyme yield than leaf homogenate. To optimize the isolation and purification of total recombinant protein from leaf homogenates, an acidic extraction buffer was used. The acidic extraction buffer yielded >95% enzymatically active tetrameric rBChE as verified by Coomassie stained and native gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, when compared to human butyrylcholinesterase, the prBChE was found to be similar in terms of tetramerization and enzyme kinetics. The N-linked glycan profile of purified prBChE-ER was found to be mostly high mannose structures while the N-linked glycans on prBChE-AWF were primarily complex. The glycan profile of the prBChE leaf homogenates showed a mixture of high mannose, complex and paucimannose type N-glycans. These findings demonstrate the ability of plants to produce rBChE that is enzymatically active and whose oligomeric state is comparable to mammalian butyrylcholinesterase. The process of plant made rBChE tetramerization and strategies for improving its pharmacokinetics properties are also discussed. PMID:27379103

  1. Molecular genetics of alkaloid biosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Ralph E; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-10-01

    Alkaloids represent an extensive group of nitrogen-containing secondary metabolites that are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. The pyridine alkaloids of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) have been the subject of particularly intensive investigation, driven largely due to the widespread use of tobacco products by society and the role that nicotine (16) (see Fig. 1) plays as the primary compound responsible for making the consumption of these products both pleasurable and addictive. In a typical commercial tobacco plant, nicotine (16) comprises about 90% of the total alkaloid pool, with the alkaloids nornicotine (17) (a demethylated derivative of nicotine), anatabine (15) and anabasine (5) making up most of the remainder. Advances in molecular biology have led to the characterization of the majority of the genes encoding the enzymes directly responsible the biosynthesis of nicotine (16) and nornicotine (17), while notable gaps remain within the anatabine (15) and anabasine (5) biosynthetic pathways. Several of the genes involved in the transcriptional regulation and transport of nicotine (16) have also been elucidated. Investigations of the molecular genetics of tobacco alkaloids have not only provided plant biologists with insights into the mechanisms underlying the synthesis and accumulation of this important class of plant alkaloids, they have also yielded tools and strategies for modifying the tobacco alkaloid composition in a manner that can result in changing the levels of nicotine (16) within the leaf, or reducing the levels of a potent carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamine (TSNA). This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of alkaloid biosynthesis in tobacco, and discusses the potential for applying information accrued from these studies toward efforts designed to help mitigate some of the negative health consequences associated with the use of tobacco products.

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junping; Wang, Genhong; Ma, Sanyuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingtan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is one of the most powerful tools for revealing gene function and improving crop plants. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as a powerful and efficient tool for genome editing in various organisms. Here, we report genome editing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two genes, NtPDS and NtPDR6, were used for targeted mutagenesis. First, we examined the transient genome editing activity of this system in tobacco protoplasts, insertion and deletion (indel) mutations were observed with frequencies of 16.2-20.3% after transfecting guide RNA (gRNA) and the nuclease Cas9 in tobacco protoplasts. The two genes were also mutated using multiplexing gRNA at a time. Additionally, targeted deletions and inversions of a 1.8-kb fragment between two target sites in the NtPDS locus were demonstrated, while indel mutations were also detected at both the sites. Second, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants with NtPDS and NtPDR6 mutations induced by Cas9/gRNA. The mutation percentage was 81.8% for NtPDS gRNA4 and 87.5% for NtPDR6 gRNA2. Obvious phenotypes were observed, etiolated leaves for the psd mutant and more branches for the pdr6 mutant, indicating that highly efficient biallelic mutations occurred in both transgenic lines. No significant off-target mutations were obtained. Our results show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a useful tool for targeted mutagenesis of the tobacco genome.

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) anionic peroxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-De-Leon, F.; Klotz, K.L.; Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in numerous physiological processes including lignification (Grisebach, 1981), wound-healing (Espelie et al., 1986), phenol oxidation (Lagrimini, 1991), pathogen defense (Ye et al., 1990), and the regulation of cell elongation through the formation of interchain covalent bonds between various cell wall polymers (Fry, 1986; Goldberg et al., 1986; Bradley et al., 1992). However, a complete description of peroxidase action in vivo is not available because of the vast number of potential substrates and the existence of multiple isoenzymes. The tobacco anionic peroxidase is one of the better-characterized isoenzymes. This enzyme has been shown to oxidize a number of significant plant secondary compounds in vitro including cinnamyl alcohols, phenolic acids, and indole-3-acetic acid (Maeder, 1980; Lagrimini, 1991). A cDNA encoding the enzyme has been obtained, and this enzyme was shown to be expressed at the highest levels in lignifying tissues (xylem and tracheary elements) and also in epidermal tissue (Lagrimini et al., 1987). It was shown at this time that there were four distinct copies of the anionic peroxidase gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). A tobacco genomic DNA library was constructed in the [lambda]-phase EMBL3, from which two unique peroxidase genes were sequenced. One of these clones, [lambda]POD1, was designated as a pseudogene when the exonic sequences were found to differ from the cDNA sequences by 1%, and several frame shifts in the coding sequences indicated a dysfunctional gene (the authors' unpublished results). The other clone, [lambda]POD3, described in this manuscript, was designated as the functional tobacco anionic peroxidase gene because of 100% homology with the cDNA. Significant structural elements include an AS-2 box indicated in shoot-specific expression (Lam and Chua, 1989), a TATA box, and two intervening sequences. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Pollination triggers female gametophyte development in immature Nicotiana tabacum flowers

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Michael S.; Bertolino, Lígia T.; Cossalter, Viviane; Quiapim, Andréa C.; DePaoli, Henrique C.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Teixeira, Simone P.; Goldman, Maria H. S.

    2015-01-01

    In Nicotiana tabacum, female gametophytes are not fully developed at anthesis, but flower buds pollinated 12 h before anthesis produce mature embryo sacs. We investigated several pollination-associated parameters in N. tabacum flower buds to determine the developmental timing of important events in preparation for successful fertilization. First, we performed hand pollinations in flowers from stages 4 to 11 to study at which developmental stage pollination would produce fruits. A Peroxtesmo test was performed to correlate peroxidase activity on the stigma surface, indicative of stigma receptivity, with fruit set. Pollen tube growth and female gametophyte development were microscopically analyzed in pistils of different developmental stages. Fruits were obtained only after pollinations of flower buds at late stage 7 and older; fruit weight and seed germination capacity increased as the developmental stage of the pollinated flower approached anthesis. Despite positive peroxidase activity and pollen tube growth, pistils at stages 5 and 6 were unable to produce fruits. At late stage 7, female gametophytes were undergoing first mitotic division. After 24 h, female gametophytes of unpollinated pistils were still in the end of the first division, whereas those of pollinated pistils showed egg cells. RT-qPCR assay showed that the expression of the NtEC1 gene, a marker of egg cell development, is considerably higher in pollinated late stage 7 ovaries compared with unpollinated ovaries. To test whether ethylene is the signal eliciting female gametophyte maturation, the expression of ACC synthase was examined in unpollinated and pollinated stage 6 and late stage 7 stigmas/styles. Pollination induced NtACS expression in stage 6 pistils, which are unable to produce fruits. Our results show that pollination is a stimulus capable of triggering female gametophyte development in immature tobacco flowers and suggests the existence of a yet undefined signal sensed by the pistil. PMID

  5. Production, partial purification and characterization of xylanase using Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust as substrate.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Komal P; Shilpkar, Prateek

    2016-03-01

    Isolated Bacillus sp. was used in the present study for production of xylanase from Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust. The strain was able to give a maximum of 1.77 Uml⁻¹ xylanase activity under optimized fermentation conditions which was further increased upto 2.77 Uml⁻¹ after extraction and partial purification of enzyme. After partial purification, the enzyme was characterized and it gave the highest xylanase activity at pH 7.0, when 0.2 ml enzyme was incubated with 2.0% substrate (Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust) for 60 min at 60°C. Saccharification study of Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust with partially purified enzyme revealed that 18.4% reducing sugar was released in 20 hrs incubation, and TLC and HPTLC analysis showed that xylose and glucose sugars were obtained after hydrolysis of substrate. FTIR analysis confirmed decomposition of substrate.

  6. Isolation, sequence, and characterization of the Cercospora nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the Cercospora nicotianae gene for the carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme phytoene dehydrogenase. Analysis of the derived amino acid sequence revealed it has greater than 50% identity with its counterpart in Neurospora crassa and approximately 30% identity with prokaryotic phytoene dehydrogenases and is related, but more distantly, to phytoene dehydrogenases from plants and cyanobacteria. Our analysis confirms that phytoene dehydrogenase proteins fall into two groups: those from plants and cyanobacteria and those from eukaryotic and noncyanobacter prokaryotic microbes. Southern analysis indicated that the C. nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene is present in a single copy. Extraction of beta-carotene, the sole carotenoid accumulated by C. nicotianae, showed that both light- and dark-grown cultures synthesize carotenoids, but higher levels accumulate in the light. Northern (RNA) analysis of poly(A)+ RNA, however, showed no differential accumulation of phytoene dehydrogenase mRNA between light- and dark-grown fungal cultures. Images PMID:8085820

  7. Influence of Green Leaf Herbivory by Manduca sexta on Floral Volatile Emission by Nicotiana suaveolens1[W

    PubMed Central

    Effmert, Uta; Dinse, Claudia; Piechulla, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    Plants have to cope with various abiotic and biotic impacts as a consequence of changing environments, which can impair their ability to sexually reproduce. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether green leaf herbivory, having one of the most hazardous biotic impacts, would have any direct effect on the production and emission of floral volatiles because volatiles are known to play a crucial role in pollination. Nicotiana suaveolens plants were challenged with Manduca sexta feeding on leaves, and alterations in the quality and quantity of the floral blend, shifts in emission patterns, and changes in expression patterns of the floral benzoic/salicylic acid carboxyl-methyltransferase were monitored in noninfested and infested plants. Leaves responded to larval feeding by herbivory-induced diurnal emission of semiochemicals, whereas the emission of floral volatiles remained unchanged in comparison to the noninfested control. Neither the volatile composition nor the quantity of components or the nocturnal emission patterns was altered. The mRNA and protein levels of the benzoic/salicylic acid carboxyl-methyltransferase, as well as its enzyme activity, also did not show any significant differences. These results indicate that metabolism in flowers at and postanthesis is an autonomous process and is independent of metabolic changes in green leaves. By this sustaining mechanism, N. suaveolens plants ensure sexual reproduction even under unfavorable conditions. PMID:18281418

  8. Photorespiratory Properties of Mesophyll Protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Pascal; Peltier, Gilles

    1989-01-01

    The photorespiratory activity of mesophyll protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia has been clearly demonstrated by the presence of a Warburg-effect, the occurrence of an important CO2-sensitive O2 uptake and the effect of some photorespiratory inhibitors on photosynthetic activity. At a nonsaturating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration (0.1 millimolar), we observed that the rate of CO2 fixation was 60% lower at 50% O2 compared to that measured at 2% O2. Using 18O2 and mass spectrometry, we measured O2 exchange as a function of light intensity and of DIC concentration. Oxygen uptake measured at the CO2 compensation point (47.4 micromoles O2 per hour per milligram chlorophyll) was three-fold higher than that measured at a saturating CO2 concentration. Cyanide or iodoacetamide, inhibitors of the Calvin cycle, were found to reduce the O2 uptake to the same extent as CO2 saturation. We conclude from these results that the major part of the CO2-sensitive O2 uptake is due to photorespiration. Further, we investigated the effect on net photosynthesis of some inhibitors of the glycolate pathway. At CO2 saturation (10 millimolar DIC), 5 millimolar aminoacetonitrile (AAN), and 1 millimolar aminooxyacetate (AOA) did not cause any significant decrease in net photosynthesis. However, when these two inhibitors were added under a period of active photorespiration (10 minutes at the CO2 compensation point at 20% O2), we observed a decrease in the rate of net photosynthesis at 10 millimolar DIC measured afterward (respectively, 18 and 29%). This inhibition did not appear at 2% O2, but was stronger at 50% O2 (40% for AAN and 47% for AOA). With 0.05 millimolar butyl 2-hydroxy-3-butynoate (BHB) or 0.5 millimolar l-methionine-dl-sulfoximine (l-MSO), rates of net photosynthesis at 10 millimolar DIC were decreased by 10 to 15%. Additional decreases were observed after a period at the CO2 compensation point at 20% O2 (30% for BHB and 20% for l-MSO). From the sites of action of

  9. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  10. Population structure and genetic diversity of Phytophthora nicotianae from tobacco in Georgia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Black shank caused by Phytophthora nicotianae occurs worldwide and is responsible for significant yield loss in tobacco production in Georgia. Management of the disease has primarily relied on utilization of tobacco cultivars with resistance to race 0 of the pathogen and application of the fungicide...

  11. Product variability of the 'cineole cassette' monoterpene synthases of related Nicotiana species.

    PubMed

    Fähnrich, Anke; Krause, Katrin; Piechulla, Birgit

    2011-11-01

    Nicotiana species of the section Alatae characteristically emit the floral scent compounds of the 'cineole cassette' comprising 1,8-cineole, limonene, myrcene, α-pinene, β-pinene, sabinene, and α-terpineol. We successfully isolated genes of Nicotiana alata and Nicotiana langsdorfii that encoded enzymes, which produced the characteristic monoterpenes of this 'cineole cassette' with α-terpineol being most abundant in the volatile spectra. The amino acid sequences of both terpineol synthases were 99% identical. The enzymes cluster in a monophyletic branch together with the closely related cineole synthase of Nicotiana suaveolens and monoterpene synthase 1 of Solanum lycopersicum. The cyclization reactions (α-terpineol to 1,8-cineole) of the terpineol synthases of N. alata and N. langsdorfii were less efficient compared to the 'cineole cassette' monoterpene synthases of Arabidopsis thaliana, N. suaveolens, Salvia fruticosa, Salvia officinalis, and Citrus unshiu. The terpineol synthases of N. alata and N. langsdorfii were localized in pistils and in the adaxial and abaxial epidermis of the petals. The enzyme activities reached their maxima at the second day after anthesis when flowers were fully opened and the enzyme activity in N. alata was highest at the transition from day to night (diurnal rhythm).

  12. Calcium Efflux as a Component of Hypersensitive Response of Nicotiana benthamiana to Pseudomonas syringae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using a model plant Nicotiana benthamiana we have demonstrated that initial calcium uptake in response to HR (hypersensitive response)-causing pathogen, P. syringae pv syringae 61 is followed by the net calcium efflux initiated at about 12 hrs after the bacterial challenge and sustained for at least...

  13. In Vitro Grown Pollen Tubes of Nicotiana alata Actively Synthesise a Fucosylated Xyloglucan

    PubMed Central

    Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Moller, Isabel E.; Cassin, Andrew; Jones, Daniel F.; Koh, Poh Ling; Ratnayake, Sunil; Beahan, Cherie T.; Wilson, Sarah M.; Bacic, Antony; Newbigin, Ed

    2013-01-01

    Nicotiana alata pollen tubes are a widely used model for studies of polarized tip growth and cell wall synthesis in plants. To better understand these processes, RNA-Seq and de novo assembly methods were used to produce a transcriptome of N. alata pollen grains. Notable in the reconstructed transcriptome were sequences encoding proteins that are involved in the synthesis and remodelling of xyloglucan, a cell wall polysaccharide previously not thought to be deposited in Nicotiana pollen tube walls. Expression of several xyloglucan-related genes in actively growing pollen tubes was confirmed and xyloglucan epitopes were detected in the wall with carbohydrate-specific antibodies: the major xyloglucan oligosaccharides found in N. alata pollen grains and tubes were fucosylated, an unusual structure for the Solanaceae, the family to which Nicotiana belongs. Finally, carbohydrate linkages consistent with xyloglucan were identified chemically in the walls of N. alata pollen grains and pollen tubes grown in culture. The presence of a fucosylated xyloglucan in Nicotiana pollen tube walls was thus confirmed. The consequences of this discovery to models of pollen tube growth dynamics and more generally to polarised tip-growing cells in plants are discussed. PMID:24116212

  14. Indole-3-acetic Acid Synthesis in Tumorous and Nontumorous Species of Nicotiana 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shih-Tung; Katz, Charles D.; Knight, C. Arthur

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in the enzyme extracts of Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana langsdorffii, their F1 hybrid, their amphidiploid hybrid, and the nontumorous mutant of the hybrid was investigated. Tryptamine, a possible precursor of IAA biosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum, was not found in the callus tissue of N. glauca, N. langsdorffii, and their F1 hybrid. In petiole slices, the synthesis of IAA progressively increased during 5 hours of incubation in [14C]tryptophan. The rate of synthesis was about equal in the hybrid and N. langsdorffii but lower in N. glauca on either a cell or fresh weight basis. It was also found that tryptophan was about 25 times more efficient than tryptamine in promoting synthesis of IAA in petiole slices. It was found that indoleacetaldehyde oxidase, indoleacetaldehyde reductase, and tryptophan aminotransferase activities were present in all of the species examined; however, tryptophan decarboxylase activity was not found. The tryptophan aminotransferase activity in N. glauca, N. langsdorffii, and the nontumorous mutant required α-ketoglutaric acid and pyridoxal 5-phosphate whereas the addition of pyridoxal 5-phosphate seemed not to increase the enzyme activity in tumor plants. The tryptophan aminotransferase in the amphidiploid hybrid was partially purified by acetone precipitation. The enzyme activity had a temperature optimum at 49 C and a pH optimum at 8.9. It is suggested that there is an indolepyruvic acid pathway in the synthesis of IAA in the Nicotiana species examined. PMID:16660376

  15. Anaerobic soil disinfestation reduces survival and infectivity of Phytophthora nicotianae chlamydospores in pepper

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytophthora nicotianae is the principal causal agent of root and crown rot disease of pepper plants in Extremadura (western Spain), a spring-summer crop in this region. Preplant soil treatment by anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) may effectively control plant pathogens in many crop production sys...

  16. Genetic Analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae Populations from Different Hosts Using Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Biasi, Antonio; Martin, Frank N; Cacciola, Santa O; di San Lio, Gaetano Magnano; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Schena, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    In all, 231 isolates of Phytophthora nicotianae representing 14 populations from different host genera, including agricultural crops (Citrus, Nicotiana, and Lycopersicon), potted ornamental species in nurseries (Lavandula, Convolvulus, Myrtus, Correa, and Ruta), and other plant genera were characterized using simple-sequence repeat markers. In total, 99 multilocus genotypes (MLG) were identified, revealing a strong association between genetic grouping and host of recovery, with most MLG being associated with a single host genus. Significant differences in the structure of populations were revealed but clonality prevailed in all populations. Isolates from Citrus were found to be genetically related regardless of their geographic origin and were characterized by high genetic uniformity and high inbreeding coefficients. Higher variability was observed for other populations and a significant geographical structuring was determined for isolates from Nicotiana. Detected differences were related to the propagation and cultivation systems of different crops. Isolates obtained from Citrus spp. are more likely to be distributed worldwide with infected plant material whereas Nicotiana and Lycopersicon spp. are propagated by seed, which would not contribute to the spread of the pathogen and result in a greater chance for geographic isolation of lineages. With regard to ornamental species in nurseries, the high genetic variation is likely the result of the admixture of diverse pathogen genotypes through the trade of infected plant material from various geographic origins, the presence of several hosts in the same nursery, and genetic recombination through sexual reproduction of this heterothallic species.

  17. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  18. Physiological and molecular changes during opening and senescence of Nicotiana mutabilis flowers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The flowers of Nicotiana mutabilis, a tobacco species recently discovered in southern Brazil, have petals that undergo a striking colour change from white through pink to red as they open and senesce over a typical 7-d lifespan. Colouration in petals was associated with an increase in chalcone synt...

  19. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR CHANGES DURING OPENING AND SENESCENCE OF NICOTIANA MUTABILIS FLOWERS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The flowers of Nicotiana mutabilis, a tobacco species recently discovered in southern Brazil, have petals that undergo a striking colour change from white through pink to red as they open and senesce over a typical 7-d lifespan. Colouration in petals was associated with an increase in chalcone synt...

  20. Identification and validation of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A large number of SSR loci were screened in the genomic assemblies of 14 different isolates of Phytophthora nicotianae and primers were developed for amplification of 17 markers distributed among different contigs. These loci were highly polymorphic and amplified from genetically distant isolates of...

  1. Effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation and CO2 stress on Phytophthora nicotianae zoospore survival

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan was used as a model pathogen to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation, and aeration with CO2 or breathable air on the survival of Phytophthora zoospores in water. Injecting CO2 into 2 liters of zoospore-infested water for 5 min at 110.4 ml ...

  2. Relationship between epistasis and aggressiveness in resistance of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) to Phytophthora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Bnejdi, Fethi; Saadoun, Morad; Allagui, Mohamed Bechir; Hanbury, Colin; Gazzah, Mohamed El

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the types of gene action governing the inheritance of resistance to Phytophthora nicotianae necrosis in populations derived from two crosses involving two susceptible (Beldi and Nabeul II) and one resistant (CM334) cultivars of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Populations, composed of Pr, Ps, F(1) , F (2) , BC (1) Pr, and BC (1) Ps generations, were inoculated with six P. nicotianae isolates. Generation means analysis indicated that an additive-dominance model was appropriate for P. nicotianae isolates Pn (Ko1) , Pn (Ko2) and Pn (Kr1) , which showed low aggressiveness in the two crosses. For the more aggressive isolates Pn (Bz1) , Pn (Bz2) and Pn (Kr2) , epistasis was an integral component of resistance in the two crosses. The presence of epistasis in the resistance of pepper to P. nicotianae was dependent on the level of aggressiveness of the isolates. Selection in pepper with less aggressive isolates was efficient, but not with more aggressive isolates; on the other hand, selection with more aggressive isolates was more stable. The minimum number of genes controlling resistance was estimated at up to 2.71. In the majority of cases, the additive variance was significant and greater than the environmental and dominance variance.

  3. In vitro grown pollen tubes of Nicotiana alata actively synthesise a fucosylated xyloglucan.

    PubMed

    Lampugnani, Edwin R; Moller, Isabel E; Cassin, Andrew; Jones, Daniel F; Koh, Poh Ling; Ratnayake, Sunil; Beahan, Cherie T; Wilson, Sarah M; Bacic, Antony; Newbigin, Ed

    2013-01-01

    Nicotiana alata pollen tubes are a widely used model for studies of polarized tip growth and cell wall synthesis in plants. To better understand these processes, RNA-Seq and de novo assembly methods were used to produce a transcriptome of N. alata pollen grains. Notable in the reconstructed transcriptome were sequences encoding proteins that are involved in the synthesis and remodelling of xyloglucan, a cell wall polysaccharide previously not thought to be deposited in Nicotiana pollen tube walls. Expression of several xyloglucan-related genes in actively growing pollen tubes was confirmed and xyloglucan epitopes were detected in the wall with carbohydrate-specific antibodies: the major xyloglucan oligosaccharides found in N. alata pollen grains and tubes were fucosylated, an unusual structure for the Solanaceae, the family to which Nicotiana belongs. Finally, carbohydrate linkages consistent with xyloglucan were identified chemically in the walls of N. alata pollen grains and pollen tubes grown in culture. The presence of a fucosylated xyloglucan in Nicotiana pollen tube walls was thus confirmed. The consequences of this discovery to models of pollen tube growth dynamics and more generally to polarised tip-growing cells in plants are discussed.

  4. Molecular Systematics, GISH and the Origin of Hybrid Taxa in Nicotiana (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    CHASE, MARK W.; KNAPP, SANDRA; COX, ANTONY V.; CLARKSON, JAMES J.; BUTSKO, YELENA; JOSEPH, JEFFREY; SAVOLAINEN, VINCENT; PAROKONNY, ALEX S.

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Nicotiana were investigated using parsimony analyses of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA). In addition, origins of some amphidiploid taxa in Nicotiana were investigated using the techniques of genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), and the results of both sets of analyses were used to evaluate previous hypotheses about the origins of these taxa. Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS nrDNA data were performed on the entire genus (66 of 77 naturally occurring species, plus three artificial hybrids), comprising both diploid and polyploid taxa, and on the diploid taxa only (35 species) to examine the effects of amphidiploids on estimates of relationships. All taxa, regardless of ploidy, produced clean, single copies of the ITS region, even though some taxa are hybrids. Results are compared with a published plastid (matK) phylogeny using fewer, but many of the same, taxa. The patterns of relationships in Nicotiana, as seen in both analyses, are largely congruent with each other and previous evolutionary ideas based on morphology and cytology, but some important differences are apparent. None of the currently recognized subgenera of Nicotiana is monophyletic and, although most of the currently recognized sections are coherent, others are clearly polyphyletic. Relying solely upon ITS nrDNA analysis to reveal phylogenetic patterns in a complex genus such as Nicotiana is insufficient, and it is clear that conventional analysis of single data sets, such as ITS, is likely to be misleading in at least some respects about evolutionary history. ITS sequences of natural and well‐documented amphidiploids are similar or identical to one of their two parents—usually, but not always, the maternal parent—and are not in any sense themselves ‘hybrid’. Knowing how ITS evolves in artificial amphidiploids gives insight into what ITS analysis might reveal about naturally occurring amphidiploids of

  5. Identification of host proteins modulated by the virulence factor AC2 of Tomato chlorotic mottle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Lilian Silveira Travassos; Resende, Renato Oliveira; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Ribeiro, Simone Graça; Mehta, Angela

    2013-06-01

    Tomato, one of the most important crops cultivated worldwide, has been severely affected by begomoviruses such as the Tomato chlorotic mottle virus (ToCMoV). Virulence factor AC2 is considered crucial for a successful virus-plant interaction and is known to act as a transcriptional activator and in some begomoviruses to function as an RNA silencing suppressor factor. However, the exact functions of the AC2 protein of the begomovirus ToCMoV are not yet established. The aim of the present study was to identify differentially expressed proteins of the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana in response to the expression of the AC2 gene, isolated from ToCMoV. N. benthamiana plants were inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing the viral vector Potato virus X (PVX) and with the PVX-AC2 construction. 2DE was performed and proteins were identified by MS. The results showed that the expression of ToCMoV AC2 alters the levels of several host proteins, which are important for normal plant development, causing an imbalance in cellular homeostasis. This study highlights the effect of AC2 in the modulation of plant defense processes by increasing the expression of several oxidative stress-related and pathogenesis-related proteins, as well as its role in modulating the proteome of the photosynthesis and energy production systems. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Silencing of host basal defense response-related gene expression increases susceptibility of Nicotiana benthamiana to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Vasudevan; Sessa, Guido; Smart, Christine D

    2011-03-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is an actinomycete, causing bacterial wilt and canker disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). We used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to identify genes playing a role in host basal defense response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis infection using Nicotiana benthamiana as a model plant. A preliminary VIGS screen comprising 160 genes from tomato known to be involved in defense-related signaling identified a set of 14 genes whose suppression led to altered host-pathogen interactions. Expression of each of these genes and three additional targets was then suppressed in larger-scale VIGS experiments and the effect of silencing on development of wilt disease symptoms and bacterial growth during an N. benthamiana-C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis compatible interaction was determined. Disease susceptibility and in planta bacterial population size were enhanced by silencing genes encoding N. benthamiana homologs of ubiquitin activating enzyme, snakin-2, extensin-like protein, divinyl ether synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 2, and Pto-like kinase. The identification of genes having a role in the host basal defense-response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis advances our understanding of the plant responses activated by C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and raises possibilities for devising novel and effective molecular strategies to control bacterial canker and wilt in tomato.

  7. Restoration of shooty morphology of a nontumorous mutant of Nicotiana glauca x N. langsdorffii by cytokinin and the isopentenyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Feng, X H; Dube, S K; Bottino, P J; Kung, S D

    1990-09-01

    The shooty morphology of a nontumorous amphidiploid mutant of Nicotiana glauca Grah. x N. langsdorffii Weinm. was restored by cytokinins, whether exogenously applied or endogenously produced by transformation of the mutant with a transfer DNA (T-DNA) cytokinin-biosynthesis gene (isopentenyltransferase; ipt). Auxins alone did not confer this effect. Similar transformation was not achieved for the parental species. In the case of transformation with the ipt gene, selection of the transformed tissues was based on its hormone-independent growth in the presence of the antibiotic kanamycin. Transformed tissues exhibited a shooty morphology, indistinguishable from that of wildtype genetic tumors N. glauca x N. langsdorffii. This altered phenotype was caused by the presence and constitutive expression of the ipt gene. The insertion and expression of this gene in transformed tissues was confirmed by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique as well as conventional molecular hybridization analysis. Expression of the ipt gene led to an elevated level of cytokinin in the transformed mutant tissues. This evidence supports the notion that genetic tumors are caused, at least in part, by elevated levels of cytokinin in interspecific hybrids.

  8. Expression dynamics and ultrastructural localization of epitope-tagged Abutilon mosaic virus nuclear shuttle and movement proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinow, Tatjana; Tanwir, Fariha; Kocher, Cornelia; Krenz, Bjoern; Wege, Christina; Jeske, Holger

    2009-09-01

    The geminivirus Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) encodes two proteins which are essential for viral spread within plants. The nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) transfers viral DNA between the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas the movement protein (MP) facilitates transport between cells through plasmodesmata and long-distance via phloem. An inducible overexpression system for epitope-tagged NSP and MP in plants yielded unprecedented amounts of both proteins. Western blots revealed extensive posttranslational modification and truncation for MP, but not for NSP. Ultrastructural examination of Nicotiana benthamiana tissues showed characteristic nucleopathic alterations, including fibrillar rings, when epitope-tagged NSP and MP were simultaneously expressed in leaves locally infected with an AbMV DNA A in which the coat protein gene was replaced by a green fluorescent protein encoding gene. Immunogold labelling localized NSP in the nucleoplasm and in the fibrillar rings. MP appeared at the cell periphery, probably the plasma membrane, and plasmodesmata.

  9. Chloroplast DNA Diversity among Trees, Populations and Species in the California Closed-Cone Pines (Pinus Radiata, Pinus Muricata and Pinus Attenuata)

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y. P.; Hipkins, V. D.; Strauss, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    The amount, distribution and mutational nature of chloroplast DNA polymorphisms were studied via analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in three closely related species of conifers, the California closed-cone pines-knobcone pine: Pinus attenuata Lemm.; bishop pine: Pinus muricata D. Don; and Monterey pine: Pinus radiata D. Don. Genomic DNA from 384 trees representing 19 populations were digested with 9-20 restriction enzymes and probed with cloned cpDNA fragments from Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] that comprise 82% of the chloroplast genome. Up to 313 restriction sites were surveyed, and 25 of these were observed to be polymorphic among or within species. Differences among species accounted for the majority of genetic (haplotypic) diversity observed [G(st) = 84(+/-13)%]; nucleotide diversity among species was estimated to be 0.3(+/-0.1)%. Knobcone pine and Monterey pine displayed almost no genetic variation within or among populations. Bishop pine also showed little variability within populations, but did display strong population differences [G(st) = 87(+/-8)%] that were a result of three distinct geographic groups. Mean nucleotide diversity within populations was 0.003(+/-0.002)%; intrapopulation polymorphisms were found in only five populations. This pattern of genetic variation contrasts strongly with findings from study of nuclear genes (allozymes) in the group, where most genetic diversity resides within populations rather than among populations or species. Regions of the genome subject to frequent length mutations were identified; estimates of subdivision based on length variant frequencies in one region differed strikingly from those based on site mutations or allozymes. Two trees were identified with a major chloroplast DNA inversion that closely resembled one documented between Pinus and Pseudotsuga. PMID:7905846

  10. [Distribution and environmental conditions related to the behavior in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata) (Cetacea: Delphinidae) in Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Cubero-Pardo, Priscilla

    2007-06-01

    Habitat characteristics influencing behavior in animal species vary locally. The influence that a particular environmental characteristic can have on a species depends not only on other variables, but on morphological, physiological and social conditions of that species. In this study, developed from June 1996 to July 1997, I studied whether specific behaviors are related to particular distribution areas and environmental factors in the bottlenose (Tursiops truncatus) and the spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). The study area was covered along oblicuous linear transects, and the behavior of single groups was observed from 15 min to 5 h. Environmental factors such as depth, temperature, salinity and distance from shore, among others, were considered. For the bottlenose dolphin, foraging/feeding activities showed exclusive coincidence with river mouths, coral reef and mangrove areas, while social and milling activities where seen close to feeding areas. Traveling occurred along different points parallel to the coast, with a low percentage of cases across the gulf (16.56 %), suggesting that the bottlenose rarely crosses from one side to the other. In the spotted dolphin, several behaviors were observed simultaneously in the schools and it was not possible to associate areas with particular behaviors. The lack of significant relationships among activities and particular environmental variables (ANOVA tests) is attributed to three aspects: (a) transitions among activities generally occurred into a low variable area, (b) dolphins often traveled along large areas without changing activities and (c) environmental conditions in Golfo Dulce are homogeneous. In the two species the highest average in the number of individuals per group corresponded to the category of active socializing, followed by traveling, passive socializing and feeding. In the case of the bottlenose dolphin, the smallest group size was associated with feeding activities (ANOVA, F= 2.624, p=0.037, n=156

  11. Screening micro-organisms for cadmium absorption from aqueous solution and cadmium absorption properties of Arthrobacter nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Takehiko; Umenai, Daishi; Hatano, Tomonobu; Hirajima, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    To obtain basic information on how microbial cells absorb cadmium from aqueous solution, we examined cadmium absorption in various micro-organisms. Of 51 micro-organism strains tested, we found that some Gram-positive bacteria, such as, Arthrobacter nicotianae and Bacillus subtilis, and some actinomycetes, such as, Streptomyces flavoviridis and S. levoris were highly capable of absorbing cadmium from an aqueous solution. A. nicotianae absorbed the largest amount of cadmium, over 800 μmol cadmium per gram of dry wt. cells. However, cadmium absorption by A. nicotianae was affected by the solution pH, cadmium concentration, and cell density. The absorption of cadmium was very rapid. Some factors that affected cadmium absorption by A. nicotianae cells were also discussed.

  12. Mitochondrial respiratory pathways modulate nitrate sensing and nitrogen-dependent regulation of plant architecture in Nicotiana sylvestris

    PubMed Central

    Pellny, Till K; Van Aken, Olivier; Dutilleul, Christelle; Wolff, Tonja; Groten, Karin; Bor, Melike; De Paepe, Rosine; Reyss, Agnès; Van Breusegem, Frank; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport pathways exert effects on carbon–nitrogen (C/N) relationships. To examine whether mitochondria–N interactions also influence plant growth and development, we explored the responses of roots and shoots to external N supply in wild-type (WT) Nicotiana sylvestris and the cytoplasmic male sterile II (CMSII) mutant, which has a N-rich phenotype. Root architecture in N. sylvestris seedlings showed classic responses to nitrate and sucrose availability. In contrast, CMSII showed an altered ‘nitrate-sensing’ phenotype with decreased sensitivity to C and N metabolites. The WT growth phenotype was restored in CMSII seedling roots by high nitrate plus sugars and in shoots by gibberellic acid (GA). Genome-wide cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis of leaves from mature plants revealed that only a small subset of transcripts was altered in CMSII. Tissue abscisic acid content was similar in CMSII and WT roots and shoots, and growth responses to zeatin were comparable. However, the abundance of key transcripts associated with GA synthesis was modified both by the availability of N and by the CMSII mutation. The CMSII mutant maintained a much higher shoot/root ratio at low N than WT, whereas no difference was observed at high N. Shoot/root ratios were strikingly correlated with root amines/nitrate ratios, values of <1 being characteristic of high N status. We propose a model in which the amine/nitrate ratio interacts with GA signalling and respiratory pathways to regulate the partitioning of biomass between shoots and roots. PMID:18318685

  13. Nicotiana Roots Recruit Rare Rhizosphere Taxa as Major Root-Inhabiting Microbes.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Law, Audrey D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Root-associated microbes have a profound impact on plant health, yet little is known about the distribution of root-associated microbes among different root morphologies or between rhizosphere and root environments. We explore these issues here with two commercial varieties of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing from rhizosphere soil, as well as from primary, secondary, and fine roots. While rhizosphere soils exhibited a fairly rich and even distribution, root samples were dominated by Proteobacteria. A comparison of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between rhizosphere and root samples indicated that Nicotiana roots select for rare taxa (predominantly Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria) from their corresponding rhizosphere environments. The majority of root-inhabiting OTUs (~80 %) exhibited habitat generalism across the different root morphological habitats, although habitat specialists were noted. These results suggest a specific process whereby roots select rare taxa from a larger community.

  14. The evolution of fraction i protein during the origin of a new species of Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Kung, S D; Sakano, K; Gray, J C; Wildman, S G

    1975-12-31

    The polypeptide composition of Fraction I protein from Nicotiana digluta, a synthetic species which arose by chromosome doubling following the interspecific hybridization of N. glutinosa and N. tabacum, has been examined by isoelectric focusing. The composition of the protein from N. digluta, which was identical to the protein from the infertile F1 hybrid N. glutinosa x N. tabacum, showed 3 polypeptides in the large subunit and 4 polypeptides in the small subunit. The large subunit polypeptides were identical to those from N. glutinosa, the maternal parent in the original hybridization, whereas the small subunit polypeptides were a composite of the small subunit polypeptides from both N. glutinosa and N. tabacum. This analysis demonstrates how the polypeptide composition of Fraction I protein evolves during the origin of new species of Nicotiana.

  15. BABA and Phytophthora nicotianae Induce Resistance to Phytophthora capsici in Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, Rio A.; Holguin, Omar; Dungan, Barry; Schaub, Tanner; Sanogo, Soumaila; Goldberg, Natalie; Randall, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance in plants is a systemic response to certain microorganisms or chemicals that enhances basal defense responses during subsequent plant infection by pathogens. Inoculation of chile pepper with zoospores of non-host Phytophthora nicotianae or the chemical elicitor beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) significantly inhibited foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici. Tissue extract analyses by GC/MS identified conserved change in certain metabolite concentrations following P. nicotianae or BABA treatment. Induced chile pepper plants had reduced concentrations of sucrose and TCA cycle intermediates and increased concentrations of specific hexose-phosphates, hexose-disaccharides and amino acids. Galactose, which increased significantly in induced chile pepper plants, was shown to inhibit growth of P. capsici in a plate assay. PMID:26020237

  16. Transgressive phenotypes and generalist pollination in the floral evolution of Nicotiana polyploids.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W; Chase, Mark W; Knapp, Sandra; Litt, Amy; Leitch, Andrew R; Le Comber, Steven C

    2016-08-08

    Polyploidy is an important driving force in angiosperm evolution, and much research has focused on genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomic responses to allopolyploidy. Nicotiana is an excellent system in which to study allopolyploidy because half of the species are allotetraploids of different ages, allowing us to examine the trajectory of floral evolution over time. Here, we study the effects of allopolyploidy on floral morphology in Nicotiana, using corolla tube measurements and geometric morphometrics to quantify petal shape. We show that polyploid morphological divergence from the intermediate phenotype expected (based on progenitor morphology) increases with time for floral limb shape and tube length, and that most polyploids are distinct or transgressive in at least one trait. In addition, we show that polyploids tend to evolve shorter and wider corolla tubes, suggesting that allopolyploidy could provide an escape from specialist pollination via reversion to more generalist pollination strategies.

  17. The Ups and Downs of Genome Size Evolution in Polyploid Species of Nicotiana (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, I. J.; Hanson, L.; Lim, K. Y.; Kovarik, A.; Chase, M. W.; Clarkson, J. J.; Leitch, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Background In studies looking at individual polyploid species, the most common patterns of genomic change are that either genome size in the polyploid is additive (i.e. the sum of parental genome donors) or there is evidence of genome downsizing. Reports showing an increase in genome size are rare. In a large-scale analysis of 3008 species, genome downsizing was shown to be a widespread biological response to polyploidy. Polyploidy in the genus Nicotiana (Solanaceae) is common with approx. 40 % of the approx. 75 species being allotetraploid. Recent advances in understanding phylogenetic relationships of Nicotiana species and dating polyploid formation enable a temporal dimension to be added to the analysis of genome size evolution in these polyploids. Methods Genome sizes were measured in 18 species of Nicotiana (nine diploids and nine polyploids) ranging in age from <200 000 years to approx. 4·5 Myr old, to determine the direction and extent of genome size change following polyploidy. These data were combined with data from genomic in situ hybridization and increasing amounts of information on sequence composition in Nicotiana to provide insights into the molecular basis of genome size changes. Key Results and Conclusions By comparing the expected genome size of the polyploid (based on summing the genome size of species identified as either a parent or most closely related to the diploid progenitors) with the observed genome size, four polyploids showed genome downsizing and five showed increases. There was no discernable pattern in the direction of genome size change with age of polyploids, although with increasing age the amount of genome size change increased. In older polyploids (approx. 4·5 million years old) the increase in genome size was associated with loss of detectable genomic in situ hybridization signal, whereas some hybridization signal was still detected in species exhibiting genome downsizing. The possible significance of these results is

  18. Performance of Luffa cylindrica as immobilization matrix in bioconversion reactions by Nicotiana tabacum BY-2.

    PubMed

    Bou-Saab, Hamid; Boulanger, Anna; Schellenbaum, Paul; Neunlist, Serge

    2013-10-01

    The dry fruit of Luffa cylindrica was investigated as an immobilization matrix for Nicotiana tabacum cells in bioconversion reactions of exogenous substrates. Immobilized cells show high biocatalytic activity under high substrate levels. Cell growth on the dry fruit can be maintained until reaching an immobilization capacity of 1.8 g cells/g(Luffa). Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Agroinoculation of Citrus tristeza virus causes systemic infection and symptoms in the presumed nonhost Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ambrós, Silvia; El-Mohtar, Choaa; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Peña, Leandro; Guerri, José; Dawson, William O; Moreno, Pedro

    2011-10-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) naturally infects only some citrus species and relatives and within these it only invades phloem tissues. Failure to agroinfect citrus plants and the lack of an experimental herbaceous host hindered development of a workable genetic system. A full-genome cDNA of CTV isolate T36 was cloned in binary plasmids and was used to agroinfiltrate Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, with or without coinfiltration with plasmids expressing different silencing-suppressor proteins. A time course analysis in agroinfiltrated leaves indicated that CTV accumulates and moves cell-to-cell for at least three weeks postinoculation (wpi), and then, it moves systemically and infects the upper leaves with symptom expression. Silencing suppressors expedited systemic infection and often increased infectivity. In systemically infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants, CTV invaded first the phloem, but after 7 wpi, it was also found in other tissues and reached a high viral titer in upper leaves, thus allowing efficient transmission to citrus by stem-slash inoculation. Infected citrus plants showed the symptoms, virion morphology, and phloem restriction characteristic of the wild T36 isolate. Therefore, agroinfiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana provided the first experimental herbaceous host for CTV and an easy and efficient genetic system for this closterovirus.

  20. A novel gene required for cercosporin toxin resistance in the fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, K R; Jenns, A E; Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1999-09-01

    Cercosporin, a photosensitizing perylenequinone toxin produced by the plant pathogenic Cercospora fungi, generates the highly toxic singlet oxygen (1O2) upon exposure to light. Cercosporin shows broad toxicity against a wide range of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals; however, Cercospora fungi are resistant to its effects. A novel gene, crg1 (cercosporin-resistance gene) was isolated from a wild-type strain of C. nicotianae by genetic complementation of a C. nicotianae mutant (CS10) which is cercosporin sensitive and down-regulated in cercosporin production. Sequence analysis indicated that crg1 encodes a putative protein of 550 amino acids with four putative transmembrane helical regions, however CRG1 shows no strong similarity to any other protein in sequence databases. Northern analysis identified two transcripts (4.5 and 2.6 kb) that are unaffected by the presence of light or cercosporin. Southern analysis demonstrated that crg1 is present in a single copy in the C. nicotianae genome and can be detected only in Cercospora species. Targeted disruption of crg1 resulted in mutants that, like CS10, are sensitive to cercosporin. However, unlike CS10, crg1 disruption mutants are not down-regulated in toxin production. Both CS10 and the crg1 disruption mutants are unaffected in their response to other 1O2-generating photosensitizers, suggesting that CRG1 functions specifically against cercosporin, rather than against 1O2.

  1. Development of SCAR markers linked to three disease resistances based on AFLP within Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Julio, E; Verrier, J-L; Dorlhac de Borne, F

    2006-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was conducted on a set of 92 Nicotiana tabacum L. accessions from diverse types (flue-cured, dark air-cured, burley, oriental, and cigar wrapper) and breeding origins to identify markers associated with disease resistances. Eleven primer combinations were required to identify 33 polymorphic fragments. This allowed the identification of 92% of these accessions, and yielded sufficient information for building a neighbor joining tree. Clusters of accessions with common traits or breeding origins were observed. An important part of this polymorphism could be related to interspecific introgressions from other Nicotiana species, performed during the breeding history of N. tabacum to confer resistance to pathogens. Seven fragments were associated with three different resistances: two for the blue-mold (Peronospora tabacina Adam) resistance derived from Nicotiana debneyi Domin, two for the Va gene (Potato Virus Y susceptibility), and three for the black root rot (Chalara elegans) resistance of N. debneyi origin. Some of these markers were converted into sequence characterized amplified region markers, and validated on recombinant inbred lines or doubled-haploid lines.

  2. Root-to-shoot translocation of alkaloids is dominantly suppressed in Nicotiana alata.

    PubMed

    Pakdeechanuan, Phattharaporn; Shoji, Tsubasa; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    In tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), nicotine and related pyridine alkaloids are produced in the root, and then transported to the aerial parts where these toxic chemicals function as part of chemical defense against insect herbivory. Although a few tobacco transporters have been recently reported to take up nicotine into the vacuole from the cytoplasm or into the cytoplasm from the apoplast, it is not known how the long-range translocation of tobacco alkaloids between organs is controlled. Nicotiana langsdorffii and N. alata are closely related species of diploid Nicotiana section Alatae, but the latter does not accumulate tobacco alkaloids in the leaf. We show here that N. alata does synthesize alkaloids in the root, but lacks the capacity to mobilize the root-borne alkaloids to the aerial parts. Interspecific grafting experiments between N. alata and N. langsdorffii indicate that roots of N. alata are unable to translocate alkaloids to their shoot system. Interestingly, genetic studies involving interspecific hybrids between N. alata and N. langsdorffii and their self-crossed or back-crossed progeny showed that the non-translocation phenotype is dominant over the translocation phenotype. These results indicate that a mechanism to retain tobacco alkaloids within the root organ has evolved in N. alata, which may represent an interesting strategy to control the distribution of secondary products within a whole plant.

  3. Intragenic recombination events and evidence for hybrid speciation in Nicotiana (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Andrew R; Clarkson, James J; Hunter, Robin B; Knapp, Sandra; Chase, Mark W

    2010-04-01

    Reticulate evolution may function both at the species level, through homoploid and polyploid hybridization, and below the species level, through inter and intragenic recombination. These processes represent challenges for the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships between species, because they cannot be represented adequately with bifurcating trees. We use data from low-copy nuclear genes to evaluate long-standing hypotheses of homoploid (interspecific) hybrid speciation in Nicotiana (Solanaceae) and reconstruct a complex series of reticulation events that have been important in the evolutionary history of this genus. Hybrid origins for three diploid species (Nicotiana glauca, N. linearis, and N. spegazzinii) are inferred on the basis of gene tree incongruence, evidence for interallelic recombination between likely parental alleles, and support for incompatible splits in Lento plots. Phylogenetic analysis of recombinant gene sequences illustrates that recombinants may be resolved with one of their progenitor lineages with a high posterior probability under Bayesian inference, and thus there is no indication of the conflict between phylogenetic signals that results from reticulation. Our results illustrate the importance of hybridization in shaping evolution in Nicotiana and also show that intragenic recombination may be relatively common. This finding demonstrates that it is important to investigate the possibility of recombination when aiming to detect hybrids from DNA-sequence data and reconstruct patterns of reticulate evolution between species.

  4. The effect of polyploidy and hybridization on the evolution of floral colour in Nicotiana (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W.; Arnold, Sarah E. J.; Chittka, Lars; Le Comber, Steven C.; Verity, Robert; Dodsworth, Steven; Knapp, Sandra; Kelly, Laura J.; Chase, Mark W.; Baldwin, Ian T.; Kovařík, Aleš; Mhiri, Corinne; Taylor, Lin; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Speciation in angiosperms can be accompanied by changes in floral colour that may influence pollinator preference and reproductive isolation. This study investigates whether changes in floral colour can accompany polyploid and homoploid hybridization, important processes in angiosperm evolution. Methods Spectral reflectance of corolla tissue was examined for 60 Nicotiana (Solanaceae) accessions (41 taxa) based on spectral shape (corresponding to pigmentation) as well as bee and hummingbird colour perception in order to assess patterns of floral colour evolution. Polyploid and homoploid hybrid spectra were compared with those of their progenitors to evaluate whether hybridization has resulted in floral colour shifts. Key Results Floral colour categories in Nicotiana seem to have arisen multiple times independently during the evolution of the genus. Most younger polyploids displayed an unexpected floral colour, considering those of their progenitors, in the colour perception of at least one pollinator type, whereas older polyploids tended to resemble one or both of their progenitors. Conclusions Floral colour evolution in Nicotiana is weakly constrained by phylogeny, and colour shifts do occur in association with both polyploid and homoploid hybrid divergence. Transgressive floral colour in N. tabacum has arisen by inheritance of anthocyanin pigmentation from its paternal progenitor while having a plastid phenotype like its maternal progenitor. Potentially, floral colour evolution has been driven by, or resulted in, pollinator shifts. However, those polyploids that are not sympatric (on a regional scale) with their progenitor lineages are typically not divergent in floral colour from them, perhaps because of a lack of competition for pollinators. PMID:25979919

  5. Transcriptional and biochemical responses of monoacylglycerol acyltransferase-mediated oil synthesis and associated senescence-like responses in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Divi, Uday K.; El Tahchy, Anna; Vanhercke, Thomas; Petrie, James R.; Robles-Martinez, Jose A.; Singh, Surinder P.

    2014-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulates in plant seeds as a major renewable source of carbon for food, fuel and industrial feedstock. Approaches to enhance TAG content by altering lipid pathways and genes in vegetative parts have gained significant attention for biofuel and other applications. However, consequences of these modifications are not always studied in detail. In an attempt to increase TAG levels in leaves we previously demonstrated that a novel substrate, monoacylglycerol (MAG), can be used for the biosynthesis of diacylglycerol (DAG) and TAG. Transient expression of the Mus musculus monoacylglycerol acyltransferases MGAT1 and 2 in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana increased TAG levels at 5 days post-infiltration (dpi). Here we show that increased TAG and DAG levels can be achieved as early as 2 dpi. In addition, the MGAT1 infiltrated areas showed senescence-like symptoms from 3 dpi onwards. To unravel underlying molecular mechanisms, Illumina deep sequencing was carried out (a) for de-novo assembling and annotation of N. benthamiana leaf transcripts and (b) to characterize MGAT1-responsive transcriptome. We found that MGAT1-responsive genes are involved in several processes including TAG biosynthesis, photosynthesis, cell-wall, cutin, suberin, wax and mucilage biosynthesis, lipid and hormone metabolism. Comparative analysis with transcript profiles from other senescence studies identified characteristic gene expression changes involved in senescence induction. We confirmed that increased TAG and observed senescence-symptoms are due to the MAG depletion caused by MGAT1 activity and suggest a mechanism for MGAT1 induced TAG increase and senescence-like symptoms. The data generated will serve as a valuable resource for oil and senescence related studies and for future N. benthamiana transcriptome studies. PMID:24904604

  6. Effects of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles on the Growth, Development, and microRNA Expression of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

    PubMed Central

    Burklew, Caitlin E.; Ashlock, Jordan; Winfrey, William B.; Zhang, Baohong

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles are a class of newly emerging environmental pollutions. To date, few experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect nanoparticles may have on plant growth and development. It is important to study the effects nanoparticles have on plants because they are stationary organisms that cannot move away from environmental stresses like animals can, therefore they must overcome these stresses by molecular routes such as altering gene expression. microRNAs (miRNA) are a newly discovered, endogenous class of post-transcriptional gene regulators that function to alter gene expression by either targeting mRNAs for degradation or inhibiting mRNAs translating into proteins. miRNAs have been shown to mediate abiotic stress responses such as drought and salinity in plants by altering gene expression, however no study has been performed on the effect of nanoparticles on the miRNA expression profile; therefore our aim in this study was to classify if certain miRNAs play a role in plant response to Al2O3 nanoparticle stress. In this study, we exposed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants (an important cash crop as well as a model organism) to 0%, 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% Al2O3 nanoparticles and found that as exposure to the nanoparticles increased, the average root length, the average biomass, and the leaf count of the seedlings significantly decreased. We also found that miR395, miR397, miR398, and miR399 showed an extreme increase in expression during exposure to 1% Al2O3 nanoparticles as compared to the other treatments and the control, therefore these miRNAs may play a key role in mediating plant stress responses to nanoparticle stress in the environment. The results of this study show that Al2O3 nanoparticles have a negative effect on the growth and development of tobacco seedlings and that miRNAs may play a role in the ability of plants to withstand stress to Al2O3 nanoparticles in the environment. PMID:22606225

  7. Effects of aluminum oxide nanoparticles on the growth, development, and microRNA expression of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Burklew, Caitlin E; Ashlock, Jordan; Winfrey, William B; Zhang, Baohong

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles are a class of newly emerging environmental pollutions. To date, few experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect nanoparticles may have on plant growth and development. It is important to study the effects nanoparticles have on plants because they are stationary organisms that cannot move away from environmental stresses like animals can, therefore they must overcome these stresses by molecular routes such as altering gene expression. microRNAs (miRNA) are a newly discovered, endogenous class of post-transcriptional gene regulators that function to alter gene expression by either targeting mRNAs for degradation or inhibiting mRNAs translating into proteins. miRNAs have been shown to mediate abiotic stress responses such as drought and salinity in plants by altering gene expression, however no study has been performed on the effect of nanoparticles on the miRNA expression profile; therefore our aim in this study was to classify if certain miRNAs play a role in plant response to Al(2)O(3) nanoparticle stress. In this study, we exposed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants (an important cash crop as well as a model organism) to 0%, 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles and found that as exposure to the nanoparticles increased, the average root length, the average biomass, and the leaf count of the seedlings significantly decreased. We also found that miR395, miR397, miR398, and miR399 showed an extreme increase in expression during exposure to 1% Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles as compared to the other treatments and the control, therefore these miRNAs may play a key role in mediating plant stress responses to nanoparticle stress in the environment. The results of this study show that Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles have a negative effect on the growth and development of tobacco seedlings and that miRNAs may play a role in the ability of plants to withstand stress to Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles in the environment.

  8. Resurrection of an ancestral gene: functional and evolutionary analyses of the Ngrol genes transferred from Agrobacterium to Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Seishiro

    2004-08-01

    The Ng rol genes, which have high similarity in sequence to the rol genes of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, are present in the genome of untransformed plants of Nicotiana glauca. It is thought that bacterial infection resulted in the transfer of the Ng rol genes to plants early in the evolution of the genus Nicotiana, since several species in this genus contain rol-like sequences but others do not. Plants transformed with the bacterial rol genes exhibit various developmental and morphological changes. The presence of rol-like sequences in plant genomes is therefore thought to have contributed to the evolution of Nicotiana species. This paper focuses on studies of the Ng rol genes in present-day plants and during the evolution of the genus Nicotiana. The functional sequences of several Ng rol genes may have been conserved after their ancient introduction from a bacterium to the plant. Resurrection of an ancestral function of one of the Ng rol genes, as examined by physiological and evolutionary analyses, is also described. The origin of the Ng rol genes is then considered, based on results of molecular phylogenetic analyses. The effects of the horizontal transfer of the Ng rol genes and mutations in the genes are discussed on the plants of the genus Nicotiana during evolution.

  9. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase 1 from Nicotiana tabacum Suppresses RNA Silencing and Enhances Viral Infection in Nicotiana benthamiana[W

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiao-Bao; Dong, Li; Zhu, Hui; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Du, Quan-Sheng; Lv, Dian-Qiu; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Garcia, Juan Antonio; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) produce double-stranded RNA intermediates in diverse processes of small RNA synthesis in RNA silencing pathways. RDR6 is required in plants for posttranscriptional gene silencing induced by sense transgenes (S-PTGS) and has an important role in amplification of antiviral silencing. Whereas RDR1 is also involved in antiviral defense in plants, this does not necessarily proceed through triggering silencing. In this study, we show that Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with RDR1 from Nicotiana tabacum (Nt-RDR1 plants) exhibits hypersusceptibility to Plum pox potyvirus and other viruses, resembling RDR6-silenced (RDR6i) N. benthamiana. Analysis of transient induction of RNA silencing in N. benthamiana Nt-RDR1 and RDR6i plants revealed that Nt-RDR1 possesses silencing suppression activity. We found that Nt-RDR1 does not interfere with RDR6-dependent siRNA accumulation but turns out to suppress RDR6-dependent S-PTGS. Our results, together with previously published data, suggest that RDR1 might have a dual role, contributing, on one hand, to salicylic acid–mediated antiviral defense, and suppressing, on the other hand, the RDR6-mediated antiviral RNA silencing. We propose a scenario in which the natural loss-of-function variant of RDR1 in N. benthamiana may be the outcome of selective pressure to maintain a high RDR6-dependent antiviral defense, which would be required to face the hypersensitivity of this plant to a large number of viruses. PMID:20400679

  10. Disorganization of F-actin cytoskeleton precedes vacuolar disruption in pollen tubes during the in vivo self-incompatibility response in Nicotiana alata

    PubMed Central

    Roldán, Juan A.; Rojas, Hernán J.; Goldraij, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The integrity of actin filaments (F-actin) is essential for pollen-tube growth. In S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI), incompatible pollen tubes are inhibited in the style. Consequently, research efforts have focused on the alterations of pollen F-actin cytoskeleton during the SI response. However, so far, these studies were carried out in in vitro-grown pollen tubes. This study aimed to assess the timing of in vivo changes of pollen F-actin cytoskeleton taking place after compatible and incompatible pollinations in Nicotiana alata. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the in vivo F-actin alterations occurring during pollen rejection in the S-RNase-based SI system. Methods The F-actin cytoskeleton and the vacuolar endomembrane system were fluorescently labelled in compatibly and incompatibly pollinated pistils at different times after pollination. The alterations induced by the SI reaction in pollen tubes were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Key Results Early after pollination, about 70 % of both compatible and incompatible pollen tubes showed an organized pattern of F-actin cables along the main axis of the cell. While in compatible pollinations this percentage was unchanged until pollen tubes reached the ovary, pollen tubes of incompatible pollinations underwent gradual and progressive F-actin disorganization. Colocalization of the F-actin cytoskeleton and the vacuolar endomembrane system, where S-RNases are compartmentalized, revealed that by day 6 after incompatible pollination, when the pollen-tube growth was already arrested, about 80 % of pollen tubes showed disrupted F-actin but a similar percentage had intact vacuolar compartments. Conclusions The results indicate that during the SI response in Nicotiana, disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton precedes vacuolar membrane breakdown. Thus, incompatible pollen tubes undergo a sequential disorganization process of major subcellular structures. Results also

  11. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin signaling in cercosporin toxin biosynthesis by Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2003-02-01

    Cercosporin is a non-host-selective, perylenequinone toxin produced by many phytopathogenic Cercospora species. The involvement of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) signaling in cercosporin biosynthesis was investigated by using pharmacological inhibitors. The results suggest that maintaining endogenous Ca(2+) homeostasis is required for cercosporin biosynthesis in Cercospora nicotianae. The addition of excess Ca(2+) to the medium slightly increased fungal growth but resulted in a reduction in cercosporin production. The addition of Ca(2+) chelators [EGTA and 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] also reduced cercosporin production. Ca(2+) channel blockers exhibited a strong inhibition of cercosporin production only at higher concentrations (>2 mM). Cercosporin production was reduced greatly by Ca(2+) ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin) and internal Ca(2+) blocker [3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino)octyl ester]. Phospholipase C inhibitors (lithium, U73122, and neomycin) led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of cercosporin biosynthesis. Furthermore, the addition of CaM inhibitors (compound 48/80, trifluoperazine, W-7, and chlorpromazine) also markedly reduced cercosporin production. In contrast to W-7, W-5, with less specificity for CaM, led to only minor inhibition of cercosporin production. The inhibitory effects of Ca(2+)/CaM inhibitors were partially or completely reversed by the addition of external Ca(2+). As assessed with Fluo-3/AM (a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator), the Ca(2+) content in the cytoplasm decreased significantly when fungal cultures were grown in a medium containing Ca(2+)/CaM antagonists, confirming the specificity of those Ca(2+)/CaM antagonists in C. nicotianae. Taken together, the results suggest that Ca(2+)/CaM signal transduction may play a pivotal role in cercosporin biosynthesis in C. nicotianae.

  12. Metabolic engineering to simultaneously activate anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathways in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fresquet-Corrales, Sandra; Roque, Edelín; Sarrión-Perdigones, Alejandro; Rochina, Maricruz; López-Gresa, María P.; Díaz-Mula, Huertas M.; Bellés, José M.; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Beltrán, José P.

    2017-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs), or condensed tannins, are powerful antioxidants that remove harmful free oxygen radicals from cells. To engineer the anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathways to de novo produce PAs in two Nicotiana species, we incorporated four transgenes to the plant chassis. We opted to perform a simultaneous transformation of the genes linked in a multigenic construct rather than classical breeding or retransformation approaches. We generated a GoldenBraid 2.0 multigenic construct containing two Antirrhinum majus transcription factors (AmRosea1 and AmDelila) to upregulate the anthocyanin pathway in combination with two Medicago truncatula genes (MtLAR and MtANR) to produce the enzymes that will derivate the biosynthetic pathway to PAs production. Transient and stable transformation of Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum with the multigenic construct were respectively performed. Transient expression experiments in N. benthamiana showed the activation of the anthocyanin pathway producing a purple color in the agroinfiltrated leaves and also the effective production of 208.5 nmol (-) catechin/g FW and 228.5 nmol (-) epicatechin/g FW measured by the p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) method. The integration capacity of the four transgenes, their respective expression levels and their heritability in the second generation were analyzed in stably transformed N. tabacum plants. DMACA and phoroglucinolysis/HPLC-MS analyses corroborated the activation of both pathways and the effective production of PAs in T0 and T1 transgenic tobacco plants up to a maximum of 3.48 mg/g DW. The possible biotechnological applications of the GB2.0 multigenic approach in forage legumes to produce “bloat-safe” plants and to improve the efficiency of conversion of plant protein into animal protein (ruminal protein bypass) are discussed. PMID:28902886

  13. Metabolic engineering to simultaneously activate anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathways in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed

    Fresquet-Corrales, Sandra; Roque, Edelín; Sarrión-Perdigones, Alejandro; Rochina, Maricruz; López-Gresa, María P; Díaz-Mula, Huertas M; Bellés, José M; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Beltrán, José P; Cañas, Luis A

    2017-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs), or condensed tannins, are powerful antioxidants that remove harmful free oxygen radicals from cells. To engineer the anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathways to de novo produce PAs in two Nicotiana species, we incorporated four transgenes to the plant chassis. We opted to perform a simultaneous transformation of the genes linked in a multigenic construct rather than classical breeding or retransformation approaches. We generated a GoldenBraid 2.0 multigenic construct containing two Antirrhinum majus transcription factors (AmRosea1 and AmDelila) to upregulate the anthocyanin pathway in combination with two Medicago truncatula genes (MtLAR and MtANR) to produce the enzymes that will derivate the biosynthetic pathway to PAs production. Transient and stable transformation of Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum with the multigenic construct were respectively performed. Transient expression experiments in N. benthamiana showed the activation of the anthocyanin pathway producing a purple color in the agroinfiltrated leaves and also the effective production of 208.5 nmol (-) catechin/g FW and 228.5 nmol (-) epicatechin/g FW measured by the p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) method. The integration capacity of the four transgenes, their respective expression levels and their heritability in the second generation were analyzed in stably transformed N. tabacum plants. DMACA and phoroglucinolysis/HPLC-MS analyses corroborated the activation of both pathways and the effective production of PAs in T0 and T1 transgenic tobacco plants up to a maximum of 3.48 mg/g DW. The possible biotechnological applications of the GB2.0 multigenic approach in forage legumes to produce "bloat-safe" plants and to improve the efficiency of conversion of plant protein into animal protein (ruminal protein bypass) are discussed.

  14. Coniferyl alcohol hinders the growth of tobacco BY-2 cells and Nicotiana benthamiana seedlings.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Enni E; Smeds, Annika I; Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Teeri, Teemu H; Willför, Stefan M; Kärkönen, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Externally added coniferyl alcohol at high concentrations reduces the growth of Nicotiana cells and seedlings. Coniferyl alcohol is metabolized by BY-2 cells to several compounds. Coniferyl alcohol (CA) is a common monolignol and a building block of lignin. The toxicity of monolignol alcohols has been stated in the literature, but there are only few studies suggesting that this is true. We investigated the physiological effects of CA on living plant cells in more detail. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright yellow-2 cells (BY-2) and Nicotiana benthamiana seedlings both showed concentration-dependent growth retardation in response to 0.5-5 mM CA treatment. In some cases, CA addition caused cell death in BY-2 cultures, but this response was dependent on the growth stage of the cells. Based on LC-MS/MS analysis, BY-2 cells did not accumulate the externally supplemented CA, but metabolized it to ferulic acid, ferulic acid glycoside, coniferin, and to some other phenolic compounds. In addition to growth inhibition, CA caused the formation of a lignin-like compound detected by phloroglucinol staining in N. benthamiana roots and occasionally in BY-2 cells. To prevent this, we added potassium iodide (KI, at 5 mM) to overcome the peroxidase-mediated CA polymerization to lignin. KI had, however, toxic effects on its own: in N. benthamiana seedlings, it caused reduction in growth; in BY-2 cells, reduction in growth and cell viability. Surprisingly, CA restored the growth of KI-treated BY-2 cells and N. benthamiana seedlings. Our results suggest that CA at high concentrations is toxic to plant cells.

  15. Assessing the bioconfinement potential of a Nicotiana hybrid platform for use in plant molecular farming applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The introduction of pharmaceutical traits in tobacco for commercial production could benefit from the utilization of a transgene bioconfinement system. It has been observed that interspecific F1Nicotiana hybrids (Nicotiana tabacum × Nicotiana glauca) are sterile and thus proposed that hybrids could be suitable bioconfined hosts for biomanufacturing. We genetically tagged hybrids with green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a visual marker to enable gene flow tracking and quantification for field and greenhouse studies. GFP was used as a useful proxy for pharmaceutical transgenes. Results Analysis of DNA content revealed significant genomic downsizing of the hybrid relative to that of N. tabacum. Hybrid pollen was capable of germination in vitro, albeit with a very low frequency and with significant differences between plants. In two field experiments, one each in Tennessee and Kentucky, we detected outcrossing at only one location (Tennessee) at 1.4%. Additionally, from 50 hybrid plants at each field site, formation of 84 and 16 seed was observed, respectively. Similar conclusions about hybrid fertility were drawn from greenhouse crosses. In terms of above-ground biomass, the hybrid yield was not significantly different than that of N. tabacum in the field. Conclusion N. tabacum × N. glauca hybrids show potential to contribute to a bioconfinement- and biomanufacturing host system. Hybrids exhibit extremely low fertility with no difference of green biomass yields relative to N. tabacum. In addition, hybrids are morphologically distinguishable from tobacco allowing for identity preservation. This hybrid system for biomanufacturing would optimally be used where N. glauca is not present and in physical isolation of N. tabacum production to provide total bioconfinement. PMID:23914736

  16. Assessing the bioconfinement potential of a Nicotiana hybrid platform for use in plant molecular farming applications.

    PubMed

    Rice, J Hollis; Mundell, Richard E; Millwood, Reginald J; Chambers, Orlando D; Stewart, C Neal; Davies, H Maelor

    2013-08-06

    The introduction of pharmaceutical traits in tobacco for commercial production could benefit from the utilization of a transgene bioconfinement system. It has been observed that interspecific F1Nicotiana hybrids (Nicotiana tabacum × Nicotiana glauca) are sterile and thus proposed that hybrids could be suitable bioconfined hosts for biomanufacturing. We genetically tagged hybrids with green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a visual marker to enable gene flow tracking and quantification for field and greenhouse studies. GFP was used as a useful proxy for pharmaceutical transgenes. Analysis of DNA content revealed significant genomic downsizing of the hybrid relative to that of N. tabacum. Hybrid pollen was capable of germination in vitro, albeit with a very low frequency and with significant differences between plants. In two field experiments, one each in Tennessee and Kentucky, we detected outcrossing at only one location (Tennessee) at 1.4%. Additionally, from 50 hybrid plants at each field site, formation of 84 and 16 seed was observed, respectively. Similar conclusions about hybrid fertility were drawn from greenhouse crosses. In terms of above-ground biomass, the hybrid yield was not significantly different than that of N. tabacum in the field. N. tabacum × N. glauca hybrids show potential to contribute to a bioconfinement- and biomanufacturing host system. Hybrids exhibit extremely low fertility with no difference of green biomass yields relative to N. tabacum. In addition, hybrids are morphologically distinguishable from tobacco allowing for identity preservation. This hybrid system for biomanufacturing would optimally be used where N. glauca is not present and in physical isolation of N. tabacum production to provide total bioconfinement.

  17. The effect of polyploidy and hybridization on the evolution of floral colour in Nicotiana (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W; Arnold, Sarah E J; Chittka, Lars; Le Comber, Steven C; Verity, Robert; Dodsworth, Steven; Knapp, Sandra; Kelly, Laura J; Chase, Mark W; Baldwin, Ian T; Kovařík, Aleš; Mhiri, Corinne; Taylor, Lin; Leitch, Andrew R

    2015-06-01

    Speciation in angiosperms can be accompanied by changes in floral colour that may influence pollinator preference and reproductive isolation. This study investigates whether changes in floral colour can accompany polyploid and homoploid hybridization, important processes in angiosperm evolution. Spectral reflectance of corolla tissue was examined for 60 Nicotiana (Solanaceae) accessions (41 taxa) based on spectral shape (corresponding to pigmentation) as well as bee and hummingbird colour perception in order to assess patterns of floral colour evolution. Polyploid and homoploid hybrid spectra were compared with those of their progenitors to evaluate whether hybridization has resulted in floral colour shifts. Floral colour categories in Nicotiana seem to have arisen multiple times independently during the evolution of the genus. Most younger polyploids displayed an unexpected floral colour, considering those of their progenitors, in the colour perception of at least one pollinator type, whereas older polyploids tended to resemble one or both of their progenitors. Floral colour evolution in Nicotiana is weakly constrained by phylogeny, and colour shifts do occur in association with both polyploid and homoploid hybrid divergence. Transgressive floral colour in N. tabacum has arisen by inheritance of anthocyanin pigmentation from its paternal progenitor while having a plastid phenotype like its maternal progenitor. Potentially, floral colour evolution has been driven by, or resulted in, pollinator shifts. However, those polyploids that are not sympatric (on a regional scale) with their progenitor lineages are typically not divergent in floral colour from them, perhaps because of a lack of competition for pollinators. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Influence of selected herbicides on ozone injury in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, J.J.; Moore, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted over a four year period to determine the influence of selected herbicides on ozone injury in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Isopropalin (2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropylcumidine), pebulate (S-propyl butylethylthiocarbamate), and diphenamid (N,N-dimethyl-2,2-diphenylacetamide) were applied at the recommended rates of 1.7, 4.5, and 4.5 kg/ha (ai), respectively. Treatment of tobacco plants with isopropalin or diphenamid reduced oxidant injury for the first two to four weeks after transplanting, but not later in the season. Pebulate has no consistent affect on the sensitivity of tobacco to ozone. 26 references, 3 tables.

  19. Short-term effects of hydrogen fluoride on Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Döğeroğlu, Tuncay; Ciçek, Arzu; Kara, Serap

    2003-09-01

    Data on the short-term effects of fumigation with hydrogen fluoride (HF) on the response behavior of the Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. St. Karabalar 6265 are being presented. Growth rate, fluoride accumulation in leaves and soils, and degradation in chlorophyll and nicotine contents of the plant species against the variations in two experimental factors, namely the exposure concentration and exposure time parameters, were investigated. Resulting data reveals that the variety selected for this study is not so tolerant to fluoride as generally reported in the literature, if only the individual effects of the pollutant is considered.

  20. Resistance management in a native plant: nicotine prevents herbivores from compensating for plant protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steppuhn, Anke; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-06-01

    Plants deploy chemical defenses in complex mixtures, which are thought to be adaptive, but experimental tests have used artificial diets rather than plants. Herbivore attack on Nicotiana attenuata rapidly increases the production and accumulation of trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPI) and the toxic alkaloid nicotine. By transgenically silencing their respective biosynthetic genes, we were able to abolish TPI activity and reduce inducible nicotine by 85%. Nicotine production was not affected by silencing pi or vice versa, and transformation did not alter levels of other metabolites examined. Spodoptera exigua, a native generalist herbivore that can compensate for heterologous TPI expression, performed better on TPI- or nicotine-deficient plants compared with the wild-type. Because of a compensatory feeding response to TPI when nicotine is absent, larvae performed better on nicotine-deficient plants than they did on plants silenced in both defenses. The antifeedant toxin, nicotine, prevents this compensatory response. We conclude that N. attenuata counters an insect adaptation with a defensive synergism.

  1. Gene-specific disruption in the filamentous fungus Cercospora nicotianae using a split-marker approach.

    PubMed

    You, Bang-Jau; Lee, Miin-Huey; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2009-07-01

    To determine if DNA configuration, gene locus, and flanking sequences will affect homologous recombination in the phytopathogenic fungus Cercospora nicotianae, we evaluated and compared disruption efficiency targeting four cercosporin toxin biosynthetic genes encoding a polyketide synthase (CTB1), a monooxygenase/O-methyltransferase (CTB3), a NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase (CTB5), and a FAD/FMN-dependent oxidoreductase (CTB7). Transformation of C. nicotianae using a circular plasmid resulted in low disruption frequency. The use of endonucleases or a selectable marker DNA fragment flanked by homologous sequence either at one end or at both ends in the transformation procedures, increased disruption efficiency in some but not all CTB genes. A split-marker approach, using two DNA fragments overlapping within the selectable marker, increased the frequency of targeted gene disruption and homologous integration as high as 50%, depending on the target gene and on the length of homologous DNA sequence flanking the selectable marker. The results indicate that the split-marker approach favorably decreased ectopic integration and thus, greatly facilitated targeted gene disruption in this important fungal pathogen.

  2. Low abundant spacer 5S rRNA transcripts are frequently polyadenylated in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Fulnecek, Jaroslav; Kovarik, Ales

    2007-11-01

    In plants, 5S rRNA genes (5S rDNA) encoding 120-nt structural RNA molecules of ribosomes are organized in tandem arrays comprising thousands of units. Failure to correctly terminate transcription would generate longer inaccurately processed transcripts interfering with ribosome biogenesis. Hence multiple termination signals occur immediately after the 5S rRNA coding sequence. To obtain information about the efficiency of termination of 5S rDNA transcription in plants we analyzed 5S rRNA pools in three Nicotiana species, N. sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis and N. tabacum. In addition to highly abundant 120-nt 5S rRNA transcripts, we also detected RNA species composed of a genic region and variable lengths of intergenic sequences. These genic-intergenic RNA molecules occur at a frequency severalfold lower than the mature 120-nt transcripts, and are posttranscriptionally modified by polyadenylation at their 3' end in contrast to 120-nt transcripts. An absence of 5S small RNAs (smRNA) argue against a dominant role for the smRNA biosynthesis pathway in the degradation of aberrant 5S rRNA in Nicotiana. This work is the first description of polyadenylated 5S rRNA species in higher eukaryotes originating from a read-through transcription into the intergenic spacer. We propose that polyadenylation may function in a "quality control" pathway ensuring that only correctly processed molecules enter the ribosome biogenesis.

  3. Overexpression of Citrus junos mitochondrial citrate synthase gene in Nicotiana benthamiana confers aluminum tolerance.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; Luo, Keming; Li, Zhengguo; Yang, Yingwu; Hu, Nan; Wu, Yu

    2009-07-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is one of the major factors that limit plant growth in acid soils. Al-induced release of organic acids into rhizosphere from the root apex has been identified as a major Al-tolerance mechanism in many plant species. In this study, Al tolerance of Yuzu (Citrus Junos Sieb. ex Tanaka) was tested on the basis of root elongation and the results demonstrated that Yuzu was Al tolerant compared with other plant species. Exposure to Al triggered the exudation of citrate from the Yuzu root. Thus, the mechanism of Al tolerance in Yuzu involved an Al-inducible increase in citrate release. Aluminum also elicited an increase of citrate content and increased the expression level of mitochondrial citrate synthase (CjCS) gene and enzyme activity in Yuzu. The CjCS gene was cloned from Yuzu and overexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated methods. Increased expression level of the CjCS gene and enhanced enzyme activity were observed in transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants. Root growth experiments showed that transgenic plants have enhanced levels of Al tolerance. The transgenic Nicotiana plants showed increased levels of citrate in roots compared to wild-type plants. The exudation of citrate from roots of the transgenic plants significantly increased when exposed to Al. The results with transgenic plants suggest that overexpression of mitochondrial CS can be a useful tool to achieve Al tolerance.

  4. Oxygen-dependent chemical tumorigenesis in a Nicotiana hybrid: inhibition by ascorbic acid and dinitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Andersen, R A; Linney, T L

    1977-12-01

    Aqueous solutions of molecular oxygen, per se, or in combination with either pyrogallol or 6-azauracil increased tumorigenesis in Nicotiana suaveolens X Nicotiana langsdorffii seedlings relative to control seedlings. The biological activities of the organic chemicals were O2-dependent, because the substitution of N2 or O2 or the degassing of 0.1-1 mM solutions of the compounds eliminated or greatly reduced their tumorigenic effects. Rates of tumorigenesis exceeded 95% for 0.5 mM solutions of either pyrogallol or 6-azauracil solutions in the presence of l mM O2. Although tumors developed in 20% of seedlings in the presence of 1 mM O2, alone, 4-5 times more tumors were induced by the organic chemical--O2-H2O systems. Dinitrophenol and ascorbic acid, compounds which affect cellular respiration or redox systems, strongly inhibited the chemically-mediated tumorigenesis. Dinitrophenol was equally effective at one-tenth of the molar concentrations of ascorbic acid that were required for the suppressions of oncogenesis. Dehydroascorbic acid was much less inhibitory than ascorbic acid.

  5. Lipoxygenase gene expression in the tobacco-Phytophthora parasitica nicotianae interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Véronési, C; Rickauer, M; Fournier, J; Pouénat, M L; Esquerré-Tugayé, M T

    1996-01-01

    A recently isolated cDNA clone of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) lipoxygenase (LOX) was used to study LOX gene expression in tobacco cell-suspension cultures and intact plants in response to infection with Phytophthora parasitica nicotianae (Ppn). Southern blot analysis of tobacco DNA indicated that only a small number of LOX genes hybridize to this probe. These genes were not constitutively expressed to a detectable level in control cells and healthy plants. In contrast, a rapid and transient accumulation of transcripts occurred in cells and plants after treatment with elicitor and inoculation with zoospores of Ppn, respectively. In cell cultures LOX gene expression could also be induced by linolenic acid, a LOX substrate, and by methyl jasmonate, one of the products derived from the action of LOX on linolenic acid. In the infection assays, LOX gene expression and enzyme activity were observed earlier when the plants carried a resistance gene against the race of Ppn used for inoculation. The differential expression of LOX during the race-cultivar-specific interaction between tobacco and Ppn, as well as its regulation by elicitors and jasmonate, suggest a role of LOX in plant resistance and establishment of the defense status against this pathogen. PMID:8938408

  6. Some physiological aspects of nitrate reductase-deficient Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    SciTech Connect

    Saux, C.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.; Lemoine, Y.; Caboche, M.

    1986-04-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv. Viviani) mutants were found to be defective in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR/sup -/ nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild type Nicotiana tabacum. The grafts of NR/sup -/ plants were found to contain less malate but more amino acids, sugars and starch than the wild type. Moreover they were chlorotic, with a slight increase of the proportion of LH Chl a/b protein complexes and they exhibited a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between the light-harvesting complexes and the active centers. After /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse and chase experiments. The total /sup 14/C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20% of that of the control. The NR/sup -/ leaves mainly accumulated /sup 14/C in the whole intermediates of the Calvin-cycle and in sucrose. In the most deficient NR leaves, chloroplasts were stuffed with large starch inclusions disorganizing the lamellar system.

  7. Consequence of absence of nitrate reductase activity on photosynthesis in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    SciTech Connect

    Saux, C.; Lemoine, Y.; Marion-Poll, A.; Valadier, M.H.; Deng, M.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv Viviani) mutants were found to be deficient in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR/sup -/ nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild-type Nicotiana tabacum plants. The grafts of mutant plants were chlorotic compared to the grafts of wild type. Mutant leaves did not accumulate nitrogen but contained less malate and more glutamine than wild leaves. They exhibited a slight increase of the proportion of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complexes and a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between these complexes and the active centers. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse, the total /sup 14/C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20/sup 5/ of that of the control. The /sup 14/C was essentially recovered in ribulose bisphosphate in these plants. It was consistent with a decline of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity observed in the mutant. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse followed by a 60 second chase with normal CO/sub 2/, /sup 14/C was mainly accumulated in starch which was labeled more in the mutant than in the wild type. These results confirm the observation that in the nitrate reductase deficient leaves, chloroplasts were loaded with large starch inclusions preceding disorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  8. Evolutionary time-scale of the begomoviruses: evidence from integrated sequences in the Nicotiana genome.

    PubMed

    Lefeuvre, Pierre; Harkins, Gordon W; Lett, Jean-Michel; Briddon, Rob W; Chase, Mark W; Moury, Benoit; Martin, Darren P

    2011-01-01

    Despite having single stranded DNA genomes that are replicated by host DNA polymerases, viruses in the family Geminiviridae are apparently evolving as rapidly as some RNA viruses. The observed substitution rates of geminiviruses in the genera Begomovirus and Mastrevirus are so high that the entire family could conceivably have originated less than a million years ago (MYA). However, the existence of geminivirus related DNA (GRD) integrated within the genomes of various Nicotiana species suggests that the geminiviruses probably originated >10 MYA. Some have even suggested that a distinct New-World (NW) lineage of begomoviruses may have arisen following the separation by continental drift of African and American proto-begomoviruses ∼110 MYA. We evaluate these various geminivirus origin hypotheses using Bayesian coalescent-based approaches to date firstly the Nicotiana GRD integration events, and then the divergence of the NW and Old-World (OW) begomoviruses. Besides rejecting the possibility of a<2 MYA OW-NW begomovirus split, we could also discount that it may have occurred concomitantly with the breakup of Gondwanaland 110 MYA. Although we could only confidently narrow the date of the split down to between 2 and 80 MYA, the most plausible (and best supported) date for the split is between 20 and 30 MYA--a time when global cooling ended the dispersal of temperate species between Asia and North America via the Beringian land bridge.

  9. Chronic ozone exacerbates the reduction in photosynthesis and acceleration of senescence caused by limited N availability in Nicotiana sylvestris

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elevated ozone (O3) and limiting soil nitrogen (N) availability both negatively affect crop performance. However, little is known about how the combination of elevated O3 and limiting N affect crop growth and metabolism. In this study, we grew tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) in ambient and elevated O...

  10. [TMV-infection localization and development of induced virus resistance in Nicotiana sanderae Hort., Datura stramonium L. and Datura metel].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, O H; Kyrychenko, A M

    2004-01-01

    The localization of virus infection and development of local and systemic induced resistance in plants Nicotiana sanderae Hort., Datura stramonium L. and D. metel L. infected by TMV have been studied. It was shown that acquired resistance to the second infection is induced in hypersensitive plants infected by TMV independent of localization mechanism. No definite correlation exists between these defense reactions.

  11. Analyses of the population structure in a global collection of Phytophthora nicotianae isolates inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic variation within the heterothallic cosmopolitan plant pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae was determined in 96 isolates from a wide range of hosts and geographic locations by characterizing four mitochondrial (10% of the genome) and three nuclear loci. Fifty-two SNPs ( average of 1 every 58 bp)...

  12. Non-functionalization of two CYP82E nicotine N-demethylase genes abolishes nornicotine formation in Nicotiana langsdorffii.

    PubMed

    Pakdeechanuan, Phattharaporn; Teoh, Seddon; Shoji, Tsubasa; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    Nornicotine is formed from nicotine by nicotine N-demethylase, a CYP82E family monooxygenase, and accumulates to high levels in some tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivars and many wild Nicotiana species. Nicotiana langsdorffii does not form nornicotine, whereas the closely related species N. alata accumulates this alkaloid abundantly. We show here that the two nicotine N-demethylase genes in N. langsdorffii have been inactivated by different molecular mechanisms. We identified four N. alata CYP82E genes that encode functional nicotine N-demethylases. In N. langsdorffii, however, one CYP82E gene encoding a functional enzyme was not expressed at all, whereas the other was weakly expressed but contained a one-nucleotide deletion in the first exon, yielding a truncated protein. Expression analysis of interspecific F(1) hybrids between N. alata and N. langsdorffii indicated that cis-acting polymorphisms abolish expression of the otherwise functional CYP82E gene in N. langsdorffii. Segregation analysis of tobacco alkaloids and individual CYP82E alleles in F(2) progeny revealed that duplicated CYP82E genes in both species are genetically linked, and provide genetic evidence that CYP82E genes are solely responsible for nornicotine formation in these wild Nicotiana species.

  13. Polymorphism and structure of style-specific arabinogalactan proteins as determinants of pollen tube growth in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Noyszewski, Andrzej K; Liu, Yi-Cheng; Tamura, Koichiro; Smith, Alan G

    2017-08-10

    Pollen tube growth and fertilization are key processes in angiosperm sexual reproduction. The transmitting tract (TT) of Nicotiana tabacum controls pollen tube growth in part by secreting pistil extensin-like protein III (PELPIII), transmitting-tract-specific (TTS) protein and 120 kDa glycoprotein (120 K) into the stylar extracellular matrix. The three arabinogalactan proteins (AGP) are referred to as stylar AGPs and are the focus of this research. The transmitting tract regulates pollen tube growth, promoting fertilization or rejecting pollen tubes. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of the stylar AGPs is proline rich and polymorphic among Nicotiana spp. The NTD was predicted to be mainly an intrinsically disordered region (IDR), making it a candidate for protein-protein interactions. The NTD is also the location for the majority of the predicted O-glycosylation sites that were variable among Nicotiana spp. The C-terminal domain (CTD) contains an Ole e 1-like domain, that was predicted to form beta-sheets that are similar in position and length among Nicotiana spp. and among stylar AGPs. The TTS protein had the greatest amino acid and predicted O-glycosylation conservation among Nicotiana spp. relative to the PELPIII and 120 K. The PELPIII, TTS and 120 K genes undergo negative selection, with dn/ds ratios of 0.59, 0.29 and 0.38 respectively. The dn/ds ratio for individual species ranged from 0.4 to 0.9 and from 0.1 to 0.8, for PELPIII and TTS genes, respectively. These data indicate that PELPIII and TTS genes are under different selective pressures. A newly discovered AGP gene, Nicotiana tabacum Proline Rich Protein (NtPRP), was found with a similar intron-exon configuration and protein structure resembling other stylar AGPs, particularly TTS. Further studies of the NtPRP gene are necessary to elucidate its biological role. Due to its high similarity to the TTS gene, NtPRP may be involved in pollen tube guidance and growth. In contrast to TTS, both PELPIII and 120

  14. Possible involvement of genes on the Q chromosome of Nicotiana tabacum in expression of hybrid lethality and programmed cell death during interspecific hybridization to Nicotiana debneyi.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Kuboyama, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Marubashi, Wataru

    2007-08-01

    Hybrid seedlings from the cross between Nicotiana tabacum, an allotetraploid composed of S and T subgenomes, and N. debneyi die at the cotyledonary stage. This lethality involves programmed cell death (PCD). We carried out reciprocal crosses between the two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis, and N. debneyi to reveal whether only the S subgenome in N. tabacum is related to hybrid lethality. Hybrid seedlings from reciprocal crosses between N. sylvestris and N. debneyi showed lethal characteristics identical to those from the cross between N. tabacum and N. debneyi. Conversely, hybrid seedlings from reciprocal crosses between N. tomentosiformis and N. debneyi were viable. Furthermore, hallmarks of PCD were observed in hybrid seedlings from the cross N. debneyi x N. sylvestris, but not in hybrid seedlings from the cross N. debneyi x N. tomentosiformis. We also carried out crosses between monosomic lines of N. tabacum lacking the Q chromosome and N. debneyi. Using Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers, hybrid seedlings were divided into two groups, hybrids possessing the Q chromosome and hybrids lacking the Q chromosome. Hybrids possessing the Q chromosome died with characteristics of PCD. However, hybrids lacking the Q chromosome were viable and PCD did not occur. From these results, we concluded that the Q chromosome belonging to the S subgenome of N. tabacum encodes gene(s) leading to hybrid lethality in the cross N. tabacum x N. debneyi.

  15. In vitro cytotoxicity of Nicotiana gossei leaves, used in the Australian Aboriginal smokeless tobacco known as pituri or mingkulpa.

    PubMed

    Moghbel, Nahid; Ryu, BoMi; Cabot, Peter J; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2016-07-08

    The Aboriginal population of Central Australia use endemic Nicotiana species to make a smokeless tobacco product known usually as pituri or mingkulpa. Nicotiana leaves are masticated with wood ash into a 'quid' that is chewed/sucked for absorption of nicotine. In addition to nicotine, smokeless tobacco products contain a spectrum of biologically active compounds that may contribute to effects on health. The objective of this study was to quantify nicotine, and related alkaloids and tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), in Nicotiana leaves used in pituri, and compare in vitro toxicity of pure nicotine with Nicotiana leaf extract at the same concentration of nicotine. An aqueous extract of dry leaves of Nicotiana gossei and a reference smokeless tobacco (CORESTA CRP2) were quantified for major pyridine alkaloids and TSNAs using HPLC-UV and LC-MS/MS. A range of extract concentrations and corresponding concentrations of nicotine standard were tested using an MTS assay to measure human lung epithelium cell (A549) survival. Cells treated for 24h with the maximum concentration of 1.5mg/ml of nicotine resulted in 77% viability. In contrast, extracts from N. gossei leaves and CRP2 containing a similar concentration of nicotine (1.3mg/ml) resulted in remarkably lower viability of 1.5 and 6%, respectively. Comparison of cytotoxicity of pure nicotine with that of the extracts revealed that nicotine was not the source of their cytotoxicity. Other biologically active compounds such as the known carcinogens NNK and NNN, derived from nicotine and nornicotine and found to be present in the smokeless tobacco extracts, may be responsible.

  16. [A hydroponic cultivation system for rapid high-yield transient protein expression in Nicotiana plants under laboratory conditions].

    PubMed

    Mo, Qianzhen; Mai, Rongjia; Yang, Zhixiao; Chen, Minfang; Yang, Tiezhao; Lai, Huafang; Yang, Peiliang; Chen, Qiang; Zhou, Xiaohong

    2012-06-01

    To develop a hydroponic Nicotiana cultivation system for rapid and high-yield transient expression of recombinant proteins under laboratory conditions. To establish the hydroponic cultivation system, several parameters were examined to define the optimal conditions for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants. We used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the geminiviral plant transient expression vector as the model protein/expression vector. We examined the impact of Nicotiana species, the density and time of Agrobacterium infiltration, and the post-infiltration growth period on the accumulation of GFP. The expression levels of GFP in Nicotiana leaves were then examined by Western blotting and ELISA. Our data indicated that a hydroponic Nicotiana cultivation system with a light intensity of 9000 LX/layer, a light cycle of 16 h day/8 h night, a temperature regime of 28 degrees celsius; day/21 degrees celsius; night, and a relative humidity of 80% could support the optimal plant growth and protein expression. After agroinfiltration with pBYGFPDsRed.R/LBA4404, high levels of GFP expression were observed in both N. benthamiana and N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) plants cultured with this hydroponic cultivation system. An optimal GFP expression was achieved in both Nicotiana species leaves 4 days after infiltration by Agrobacterium with an OD(600) of 0.8. At a given time point, the average biomass of N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) was significantly higher than that of N. benthamiana. The leaves from 6-week-old N. benthamiana plants and 5-week-old N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) plants could be the optimal material for agroinfiltration. We have established a hydroponic cultivation system that allows robust growth of N. benthamiana and N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) plants and the optimal GFP expression in the artificial climate box.

  17. The transcriptome of Verticillium dahliae-infected Nicotiana benthamiana determined by deep RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Faino, Luigi; de Jonge, Ronnie; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2012-09-01

    Verticillium wilt disease is caused by fungi of the Verticillium genus that occur on a wide range of host plants, including Solanaceous species such as tomato and tobacco. Currently, the well characterized Ve1 gene of tomato is the only Verticillium wilt resistance gene cloned. During experiments to identify the Verticillium molecule that activates Ve1 resistance in tomato, RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of Verticillium-infected Nicotiana benthamiana was performed. In total, over 99% of the obtained reads were derived from N. benthamiana. Here, we report the assembly and annotation of the N. benthamiana transcriptome. In total, 142,738 transcripts > 100 bp were obtained, amounting to a total transcriptome size of 38.7 Mbp, which is comparable to the Arabidopsis transcriptome. About 30,282 transcripts could be annotated based on homology to Arabidopsis genes. By assembly of the N. benthamiana transcriptome, we provide a catalogue of transcripts of a Solanaceous model plant under pathogen stress.

  18. Polypeptide synthesis induced in Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by infection with raspberry ringspot nepovirus.

    PubMed

    Acosta, O; Mayo, M A

    1993-01-01

    Infection of Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by raspberry ringspot nepovirus resulted in the accumulation of about 24 polypeptides that differed in M(r) and pI from polypeptides accumulating in mock-inoculated protoplasts. Similar polypeptides accumulated in protoplasts infected with the S and E strains of RRV but different infection-specific polypeptides were detected in protoplasts infected with tobacco ringspot nepovirus. The M(r) of RRV-specific polypeptides ranged from 210,000 to 18,000 and most are presumed to be derived from others by proteolytic cleavage. No evidence was found for marked changes in polypeptide abundance with time after inoculation or for any virus-specific polypeptide becoming disproportionately abundant in the medium during culture.

  19. Molecular Characterization of the Cercosporin Biosynthetic Pathway in the Fungal Plant Pathogen Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Newman, Adam G; Townsend, Craig A

    2016-03-30

    Perylenequinones are a class of photoactivated polyketide mycotoxins produced by fungal plant pathogens that notably produce reactive oxygen species with visible light. The best-studied perylenequinone is cercosporin-a product of the Cercospora species. While the cercosporin biosynthetic gene cluster has been described in the tobacco pathogen Cercospora nicotianae, little is known of the metabolite's biosynthesis. Furthermore, in vitro investigations of the polyketide synthase central to cercosporin biosynthesis identified the naphthopyrone nor-toralactone as its direct product-an observation in conflict with published biosynthetic proposals. Here, we present an alternative biosynthetic pathway to cercosporin based on metabolites characterized from a series of biosynthetic gene knockouts. We show that nor-toralactone is the key polyketide intermediate and the substrate for the unusual didomain protein CTB3. We demonstrate the unique oxidative cleavage activity of the CTB3 monooxygenase domain in vitro. These data advance our understanding of perylenequinone biosynthesis and expand the biochemical repertoire of flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

  20. Stable genetic transformation of intact Nicotiana cells by the particle bombardment process

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Theodore M.; Harper, Elisabeth C.; Svab, Zora; Sanford, John C.; Fromm, Michael E.; Maliga, Pal

    1988-01-01

    We show that the genetic transformation of Nicotiana tabacum can be achieved by bombarding intact cells and tissues with DNA-coated particles. Leaves or suspension culture cells were treated with tungsten microprojectiles carrying plasmid DNA containing a neomycin phosphotransferase gene. Callus harboring the foreign gene was recovered from the bombarded tissue by selection on medium containing kanamycin. Kanamycin-resistant plants have subsequently been regenerated from the callus derived from leaves. Transient expression of an introduced β-glucuronidase gene was used to assess the efficiency of DNA delivery by microprojectiles. The frequency of cells that were stably transformed with the neomycin phosphotransferase gene was a few percent of the cells that transiently expressed the β-glucuronidase gene. These results show that gene transfer by high-velocity microprojectiles is a rapid and direct means for transforming intact plant cells and tissues that eliminates the need for production of protoplasts or infection by Agrobacterium. Images PMID:16593993

  1. A TOM1 homologue is required for multiplication of Tobacco mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana *

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing; Jiang, Jin-hua; Zhou, Xue-ping

    2007-01-01

    The AtTOM1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana had been shown to be essential for the efficient multiplication of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in A. thaliana. In this study, we cloned an AtTOM1-like gene from Nicotiana benthamiana named as NbTOM1. Sequence alignment showed that NbTOM1 is closely related to AtTOM1 homologues of N. tabacum and Lycopersicon esculentum with 97.2% and 92.6% nucleotide sequence identities, respectively. Silencing of NbTOM1 by a modified viral satellite DNA-based vector resulted in complete inhibition of the multiplication of TMV in N. benthamiana. The result suggests that inhibition of NbTOM1 via RNA silencing is a potentially useful method for generating TMV-resistant plants. PMID:17444600

  2. Early events induced by the toxin deoxynivalenol lead to programmed cell death in Nicotiana tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Yekkour, Amine; Tran, Daniel; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Briand, Joël; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Errakhi, Rafik; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Bouteau, François

    2015-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin affecting animals and plants. This toxin synthesized by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum is currently believed to play a decisive role in the fungal phytopathogenesis as a virulence factor. Using cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum BY2, we showed that DON-induced programmed cell death (PCD) could require transcription and translation processes, in contrast to what was observed in animal cells. DON could induce different cross-linked pathways involving (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and a transcriptional down-regulation of the alternative oxidase (Aox1) gene and (ii) regulation of ion channel activities participating in cell shrinkage, to achieve PCD.

  3. Changes induced by the Pepper mild mottle tobamovirus on the chloroplast proteome of Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Pineda, M; Sajnani, C; Barón, M

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed the chloroplast proteome of Nicotiana benthamiana using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry followed by a database search. In order to improve the resolution of the two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, we have made separate maps for the low and the high pH range. At least 200 spots were detected. We identified 72 polypeptides, some being isoforms of different multiprotein families. In addition, changes in this chloroplast proteome induced by the infection with the Spanish strain of the Pepper mild mottle virus were investigated. Viral infection induced the down-regulation of several chloroplastidic proteins involved in both the photosynthetic electron-transport chain and the Benson-Calvin cycle.

  4. Inhibition of in Vitro Pollen Tube Growth by Isolated S-Glycoproteins of Nicotiana alata.

    PubMed Central

    Jahnen, W.; Lush, W. M.; Clarke, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    Pollen from three S-genotypes of Nicotiana alata was grown in vitro in the presence of S-glycoproteins isolated from styles of the same three genotypes. Pollen germination was not affected by the presence of the S-glycoproteins, but pollen tube growth of all genotypes was inhibited. S2 pollen was preferentially inhibited by the S2-glycoprotein and S3 pollen by the S3-glycoprotein. The S6-glycoprotein preferentially inhibited growth of both S2 and S6 pollen over S3 pollen. Heat treatment dramatically increased the inhibitory activity of the S-glycoproteins as inhibitors both of pollen germination and tube growth; after heat treatment, S-allele specificity of pollen tube inhibition was not detected. PMID:12359898

  5. Wax esters of different compositions produced via engineering of leaf chloroplast metabolism in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Selcuk; Sun, Chuanxin; Leonova, Svetlana; Dutta, Paresh; Dörmann, Peter; Domergue, Frédéric; Stymne, Sten; Hofvander, Per

    2014-09-01

    In a future bio-based economy, renewable sources for lipid compounds at attractive cost are needed for applications where today petrochemical derivatives are dominating. Wax esters and fatty alcohols provide diverse industrial uses, such as in lubricant and surfactant production. In this study, chloroplast metabolism was engineered to divert intermediates from de novo fatty acid biosynthesis to wax ester synthesis. To accomplish this, chloroplast targeted fatty acyl reductases (FAR) and wax ester synthases (WS) were transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Wax esters of different qualities and quantities were produced providing insights to the properties and interaction of the individual enzymes used. In particular, a phytyl ester synthase was found to be a premium candidate for medium chain wax ester synthesis. Catalytic activities of FAR and WS were also expressed as a fusion protein and determined functionally equivalent to the expression of individual enzymes for wax ester synthesis in chloroplasts. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein-Protein Interaction Assays with Effector-GFP Fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Petre, Benjamin; Win, Joe; Menke, Frank L H; Kamoun, Sophien

    2017-01-01

    Plant parasites secrete proteins known as effectors into host tissues to manipulate host cell structures and functions. One of the major goals in effector biology is to determine the host cell compartments and the protein complexes in which effectors accumulate. Here, we describe a five-step pipeline that we routinely use in our lab to achieve this goal, which consists of (1) Golden Gate assembly of pathogen effector-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions into binary vectors, (2) Agrobacterium-mediated heterologous protein expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells, (3) laser-scanning confocal microscopy assay, (4) anti-GFP coimmunoprecipitation-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (coIP/MS) assay, and (5) anti-GFP western blotting. This pipeline is suitable for rapid, cost-effective, and medium-throughput screening of pathogen effectors in planta.

  7. Transcriptomics assisted proteomic analysis of Nicotiana occidentalis infected by Candidatus Phytoplasma mali strain AT.

    PubMed

    Luge, Toni; Kube, Michael; Freiwald, Anja; Meierhofer, David; Seemüller, Erich; Sauer, Sascha

    2014-08-01

    Phytoplasmas are pathogenic bacteria within the class of Mollicutes, which are associated with more than 1000 plant diseases. In this study, we applied quantitative mass spectrometry to analyse affected pathways of the model plant tobacco (Nicotiana occidentalis) upon Candidatus Phytoplasma mali strain AT infection. Using tissue obtained from leaf midribs, 1466 plant-assigned proteins were identified. For 1019 of these proteins, we could reproducibly quantify the expression changes of infected versus noninfected plants, of which 157 proteins were up- and 173 proteins were downregulated. Differential expression took place in a number of pathways, among others strong downregulation of porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism and upregulation of alpha-linolenic acid metabolism, which was consistent with observed increased levels of jasmonic acid, a key signal molecule of plant defence. Our data shed light on the molecular networks that are involved in defence of plants against phytoplasma infection and provide a resource for further studies.

  8. An amphibian antimicrobial peptide variant expressed in Nicotiana tabacum confers resistance to phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Donatella; Mangoni, M Luisa; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Simmaco, Maurizio; Barra, Donatella

    2003-02-15

    Esculentin-1 is a 46-residue antimicrobial peptide present in skin secretions of Rana esculenta. It is effective against a wide variety of micro-organisms, including plant pathogens with negligible effects on eukaryotic cells. As a possible approach to enhance plant resistance, a DNA coding for esculentin-1, with the substitution Met-28Leu, was fused at the C-terminal end of the leader sequence of endopolygalacturonase-inhibiting protein, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter region, and introduced into Nicotiana tabacum. The antimicrobial peptide was isolated from the intercellular fluids of healthy leaves of transgenic plants, suggesting that it was properly processed, secreted outside cells and accumulated in the intercellular spaces. The morphology of transgenic plants was unaffected. Challenging these plants with bacterial or fungal phytopathogens demonstrated enhanced resistance up to the second generation. Moreover, transgenic plants displayed insecticidal properties.

  9. Biphenyls from Nicotiana tabacum and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Shang, Shan-Zhai; Xu, Wen-Xiu; Lei, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Jian-Guo; Miao, Ming-Ming; Sun, Han-Dong; Pu, Jian-Xin; Chen, Yong-Kuan; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2014-12-01

    Five new biphenyls, tababiphenyls A-E (1-5), together with five known ones (5-10), were isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum, of which compound 1 possessed a seldom reported 6-carbons unit in biphenyls. Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. All compounds were tested for their anti-tobacco mosaic virus (anti-TMV) activities. The results showed that compounds 3 and 5 exhibited high anti-TMV activities with inhibition rate of 48.4% and 32.1%, respectively, which were higher than that of positive control (ningnanmycin). The other compounds also showed potential anti-TMV activities with inhibition rates in the range of 18.6-28.7%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Complete genome sequence of tobacco virus 1, a closterovirus from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Qi, Shuishui; Gao, Zhengliang; Akinyemi, Ibukun A; Xu, Dafeng; Zhou, Benguo

    2016-04-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel virus, provisionally named tobacco virus 1 (TV1), was determined, and this virus was identified in leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exhibiting leaf mosaic and yellowing symptoms in Anhui Province, China. The genome sequence of TV1 consists of 15,395 nucleotides with 61.6 % nucleotide sequence identity to mint virus 1 (MV1). Its genome organization is similar to that of MV1, containing nine open reading frames (ORFs) that potentially encode proteins with putative functions in virion assembly, cell-to-cell movement and suppression of RNA silencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the heat shock protein 70 homolog (HSP70h) placed TV1 alongside members of the genus Closterovirus in the family Closteroviridae. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of the complete genome sequence of a closterovirus identified in tobacco.

  11. Production of Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana Using GENEWARE® Tobacco Mosaic Virus Vector.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lauren; Hamorsky, Krystal; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method to produce a recombinant cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana plants (CTBp) using the GENEWARE(®) tobacco mosaic virus vector system. Infectious transcripts of the vector RNA are generated in vitro and inoculated on N. benthamiana seedlings. After 11 days, CTBp is extracted in a simple tris buffer at room temperature. No protease inhibitor is required. The leaf homogenate is treated with mild heat and a pH shift to selectively precipitate host-derived proteins. CTBp is purified to >95 % homogeneity by two-step chromatography using immobilized metal affinity and ceramic hydroxyapatite resins. This procedure yields on average 400 mg of low-endotoxin CTBp from 1 kg of fresh leaf material.

  12. Identification of fructo- and malto-oligosaccharides in cured tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Nagai, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2012-07-04

    Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOSs) and malto-oligosaccharides (MOSs) in cured tobacco leaves ( Nicotiana tabacum ) were detected and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). These oligosaccharides were present in several tobacco materials including flue-cured tobacco, sun/air-cured tobacco, and cut filler of commercially available tobacco products, but were not detected in air-cured tobacco. The changes in these oligosaccharides during storage were also investigated. The results revealed that MOSs simply decreased under a warm atmosphere and FOSs increased. In addition, the formation of FOSs in cured tobacco leaves occurred in the presence of sucrose. With regard to FOSs, it has been reported that green tobacco leaves do not contain FOSs such as kestose, nystose, and fructosyl-nystose. The results of a model test suggested that the changes in FOS amount were caused by enzymatic reactions.

  13. Identifying Growth Conditions for Nicotiana benthimiana Resulting in Predictable Gene Expression of Promoter-Gus Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, V.; Barton, K.; Longhurst, A.

    2012-12-01

    Revoluta (Rev) is a transcription factor that establishes leaf polarity inArabidopsis thaliana. Through previous work in Dr. Barton's Lab, it is known that Revoluta binds to the ZPR3 promoter, thus activating the ZPR3 gene product inArabidopsis thaliana. Using this knowledge, two separate DNA constructs were made, one carrying revgene and in the other, the ZPR3 promoter fussed with the GUS gene. When inoculated in Nicotiana benthimiana (tobacco), the pMDC32 plasmid produces the Rev protein. Rev binds to the ZPR3 promoter thereby activating the transcription of the GUS gene, which can only be expressed in the presence of Rev. When GUS protein comes in contact with X-Gluc it produce the blue stain seen (See Figure 1). In the past, variability has been seen of GUS expression on tobacco therefore we hypothesized that changing the growing conditions and leaf age might improve how well it's expressed.

  14. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of tobacco virus 2, a polerovirus from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benguo; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Lina; Lin, Huafeng

    2017-07-01

    The complete genome sequence of a new virus, provisionally named tobacco virus 2 (TV2), was determined and identified from leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exhibiting leaf mosaic, yellowing, and deformity, in Anhui Province, China. The genome sequence of TV2 comprises 5,979 nucleotides, with 87% nucleotide sequence identity to potato leafroll virus (PLRV). Its genome organization is similar to that of PLRV, containing six open reading frames (ORFs) that potentially encode proteins with putative functions in cell-to-cell movement and suppression of RNA silencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence placed TV2 alongside members of the genus Polerovirus in the family Luteoviridae. To the best our knowledge, this study is the first report of a complete genome sequence of a new polerovirus identified in tobacco.

  15. Cytological investigations of the interspecific hybrids of Nicotiana tabacum L. x N. glauca Grah.

    PubMed

    Trojak-Goluch, Anna; Berbeć, Apoloniusz

    2003-01-01

    Interspecific amphihaploid and amphidiploid hybrids between Nicotiana glauca Grah. (2n = 24) and N. tabacum L. (2n = 48) cultivars BY 103 and K 326 were analysed. F1 amphihaploids (2n = 36) were viable and completely self- and cross-sterile, and mostly univalents were present during meiosis (with pairing range from 0 to 5). In some meiocytes, meiotic irregularities were observed, such as sporadic chromatin bridges and formation of restitution nuclei. The resultant F1 hybrids were easily converted to amphidiploids (2n = 72) via colchicine treatment of seedlings. The number of univalents and the frequency of PMCs containing unpaired chromosomes indicated that amphidiploids N. tabacum cv. BY 103 or K 326 x N. glauca represented quite a high pairing category. However, they were male sterile because pollen mother cells were arrested at the tetrad stage. The termination of development of PMCs, and consequently male sterility, are very rare in this kind of tobacco hybrids.

  16. Spermine either delays or promotes cell death in Nicotiana tabacum L. corolla depending on the floral developmental stage and affects the distribution of transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Cai, Giampiero; Della Mea, Massimiliano; Faleri, Claudia; Fattorini, Laura; Aloisi, Iris; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Del Duca, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    The role of spermine (SM) was studied to verify if SM supplied to Nicotiana tabacum flower can modulate programmed cell death (PCD) of the corolla. SM has strong effects on the development and senescence of excised flowers despite its low physiological levels. The timing and duration of SM treatment is a key factor; SM counteracts PCD (verified by morphological observations, pigment contents and DNA laddering) only in the narrow developmental window of corolla expansion. Before and after, SM promotes PCD. SM exerts its pro-survival role by delaying fresh weight loss, by inhibiting reduction of pigments and finally by preventing DNA degradation. Moreover, SM deeply alters the distribution of the PA-conjugating enzyme transglutaminase (TGase). TGase is present in the epidermis during development, but it sprays also in the cell walls of inner parenchyma at senescence. After SM treatment, parenchyma cells accumulate TGase, increase in size and their cell walls do not undergo stiffening contrarily to control cells. The subcellular localization of TGase has been validated by biolistic-transformation of onion epidermal cells. Results indicated that SM is a critical factor in the senescence of N. tabacum corolla by controlling biochemical and morphological parameters; the lasts are probably interconnected with the action of TGase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing of Plastidial Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Impairs Essential Leaf Anabolic Pathways and Reduces Drought Stress Tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    George, Gavin M.; van der Merwe, Margaretha J.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bauer, Rolene; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Kossmann, Jens; Lloyd, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The role of pyrophosphate in primary metabolism is poorly understood. Here, we report on the transient down-regulation of plastid-targeted soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase in Nicotiana benthamiana source leaves. Physiological and metabolic perturbations were particularly evident in chloroplastic central metabolism, which is reliant on fast and efficient pyrophosphate dissipation. Plants lacking plastidial soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (psPPase) were characterized by increased pyrophosphate levels, decreased starch content, and alterations in chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis, while constituents like amino acids (except for histidine, serine, and tryptophan) and soluble sugars and organic acids (except for malate and citrate) remained invariable from the control. Furthermore, translation of Rubisco was significantly affected, as observed for the amounts of the respective subunits as well as total soluble protein content. These changes were concurrent with the fact that plants with reduced psPPase were unable to assimilate carbon to the same extent as the controls. Furthermore, plants with lowered psPPase exposed to mild drought stress showed a moderate wilting phenotype and reduced vitality, which could be correlated to reduced abscisic acid levels limiting stomatal closure. Taken together, the results suggest that plastidial pyrophosphate dissipation through psPPase is indispensable for vital plant processes. PMID:20605913

  18. Jasmonate-Sensitivity-Assisted Screening and Characterization of Nicotine Synthetic Mutants from Activation-Tagged Population of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guoying; Wang, Wenjing; Niu, Haixia; Ding, Yongqiang; Zhang, Dingyu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Guanshan; Wang, Sangen; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is a secondary metabolite that is important to the defense system and commercial quality of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Jasmonate and its derivatives (JAs) are phytohormone regulators of nicotine formation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. Owing to the amphitetraploid origin of N. tabacum, research on screening and identification of nicotine-synthetic mutants is relatively scarce. Here, we describe a method based on JA-sensitivity for screening nicotine mutants from an activation-tagged population of tobacco. In this approach, the mutants were first screened for abnormal JA responses in seed germination and root elongation, and then the levels of nicotine synthesis and expression of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants with altered JA-response were measured to determine the nicotine-synthetic mutants. We successfully obtained five mutants that maintained stable nicotine contents and JA responses for three generations. This method is simple, effective and low-cost, and the finding of transcriptional changes of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants shows potentials for identifying novel regulators involved in JA-regulated nicotine biosynthesis. PMID:28243248

  19. Effects of drought stress and subsequent rewatering on photosynthetic and respiratory pathways in Nicotiana sylvestris wild type and the mitochondrial complex I-deficient CMSII mutant.

    PubMed

    Galle, Alexander; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Thameur, Afwa; de Paepe, Rosine; Flexas, Jaume; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel

    2010-03-01

    The interaction of photosynthesis and respiration has been studied in vivo under conditions of limited water supply and after consecutive rewatering. The role of the alternative (v(alt)) and cytochrome (v(cyt)) pathways on drought stress-induced suppression of photosynthesis and during photosynthetic recovery was examined in the Nicotiana sylvestris wild type (WT) and the complex I-deficient CMSII mutant. Although photosynthetic traits, including net photosynthesis (A(N)), stomatal (g(s)) and mesophyll conductances (g(m)), as well as respiration (v(cyt) and v(alt)) differed between well-watered CMSII and WT, similar reductions of A(N), g(s), and g(m) were observed during severe drought stress. However, total respiration (V(t)) remained slightly higher in CMSII due to the still increased v(cyt) (to match ATP demand). v(alt) and maximum carboxylation rates remained almost unaltered in both genotypes, while in CMSII, changes in photosynthetic light harvesting (i.e. Chl a/b ratio) were detected. In both genotypes, photosynthesis and respiration were restored after 2 d of rewatering, predominantly limited by a delayed stomatal response. Despite complex I dysfunction and hence altered redox balance, the CMSII mutant seems to be able to adjust its photosynthetic machinery during and after drought stress to reduce photo-oxidation and to maintain the cell redox state and the ATP level.

  20. A Redox-Mediated Modulation of Stem Bolting in Transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris Differentially Expressing the External Mitochondrial NADPH Dehydrogenase1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun-Jun; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Wallström, Sabá V.; Lager, Ida; Michalecka, Agnieszka M.; Norberg, Fredrik E.B.; Widell, Susanne; Fredlund, Kenneth M.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Rasmusson, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cytosolic NADPH can be directly oxidized by a calcium-dependent NADPH dehydrogenase, NDB1, present in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, little is known regarding the impact of modified cytosolic NADPH reduction levels on growth and metabolism. Nicotiana sylvestris plants overexpressing potato (Solanum tuberosum) NDB1 displayed early bolting, whereas sense suppression of the same gene led to delayed bolting, with consequential changes in flowering time. The phenotype was dependent on light irradiance but not linked to any change in biomass accumulation. Whereas the leaf NADPH/NADP+ ratio was unaffected, the stem NADPH/NADP+ ratio was altered following the genetic modification and strongly correlated with the bolting phenotype. Metabolic profiling of the stem showed that the NADP(H) change affected relatively few, albeit central, metabolites, including 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate, ascorbate, sugars, and hexose-phosphates. Consistent with the phenotype, the modified NDB1 level also affected the expression of putative floral meristem identity genes of the SQUAMOSA and LEAFY types. Further evidence for involvement of the NADPH redox in stem development was seen in the distinct decrease in the stem apex NADPH/NADP+ ratio during bolting. Additionally, the potato NDB1 protein was specifically detected in mitochondria, and a survey of its abundance in major organs revealed that the highest levels are found in green stems. These results thus strongly suggest that NDB1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain can, by modifying cell redox levels, specifically affect developmental processes. PMID:19429607

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing of plastidial soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase impairs essential leaf anabolic pathways and reduces drought stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    George, Gavin M; van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bauer, Rolene; Fernie, Alisdair R; Kossmann, Jens; Lloyd, James R

    2010-09-01

    The role of pyrophosphate in primary metabolism is poorly understood. Here, we report on the transient down-regulation of plastid-targeted soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase in Nicotiana benthamiana source leaves. Physiological and metabolic perturbations were particularly evident in chloroplastic central metabolism, which is reliant on fast and efficient pyrophosphate dissipation. Plants lacking plastidial soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (psPPase) were characterized by increased pyrophosphate levels, decreased starch content, and alterations in chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis, while constituents like amino acids (except for histidine, serine, and tryptophan) and soluble sugars and organic acids (except for malate and citrate) remained invariable from the control. Furthermore, translation of Rubisco was significantly affected, as observed for the amounts of the respective subunits as well as total soluble protein content. These changes were concurrent with the fact that plants with reduced psPPase were unable to assimilate carbon to the same extent as the controls. Furthermore, plants with lowered psPPase exposed to mild drought stress showed a moderate wilting phenotype and reduced vitality, which could be correlated to reduced abscisic acid levels limiting stomatal closure. Taken together, the results suggest that plastidial pyrophosphate dissipation through psPPase is indispensable for vital plant processes.

  2. Transgenic expression of Tobacco mosaic virus capsid and movement proteins modulate plant basal defense and biotic stress responses in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Conti, G; Rodriguez, M C; Manacorda, C A; Asurmendi, S

    2012-10-01

    Plant viruses cause metabolic and physiological changes associated with symptomatic disease phenotypes. Symptoms involve direct and indirect effects, which result in disruption of host physiology. We used transgenic tobacco expressing a variant of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein (CP(T42W)) or movement protein (MP), and a hybrid line (MP×CP(T42W)) that coexpresses both proteins, to study the plant response to individual viral proteins. Findings employing microarray analysis of MP×CP(T42W) plants and silenced mp×cp(T42W)* controls revealed that altered transcripts were mostly downregulated, suggesting a persistent shut-off due to MP×CP(T42W) expression. Next, we showed that MP triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, reduction of total ascorbate, and expression of ROS scavenging genes. These effects were enhanced when both proteins were coexpressed. MP and MP×CP(T42W) plants showed increased levels of salicylic acid (SA) and SA-responsive gene expression. Furthermore, these effects were partially reproduced in Nicotiana benthamiana when GMP1 transcript was silenced. CP(T42W) seems to be playing a negative role in the defense response by reducing the expression of PR-1 and RDR-1. MP and MP×CP(T42W) transgenic expression promoted a recovery-like phenotype in TMV RNA infections and enhanced susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The individual effects of viral proteins may reflect the ability of a virus to balance its own virulence.

  3. The F-box protein COI1 functions upstream of MYB305 to regulate primary carbohydrate metabolism in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Liu, Guanshan; Niu, Haixia; Timko, Michael P; Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-05-01

    Jasmonate (JA) plays an important role in regulating plant male fertility and secondary metabolism, but its role in regulating primary metabolism remains unclear. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) is a critical component of the JA receptor, and mediates JA-signalling by targeting JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins for proteasomal degradation in response to JA perception. Here, we found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NtCOI1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90) recapitulated many previously observed phenotypes in coi1 mutants, including male sterility, JA insensitivity, and loss of floral anthocyanin production. It also affected starch metabolism in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary, leading to pollen abortion and loss of floral nectar. Transcript levels of genes encoding starch metabolism enzymes were significantly altered in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary of NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. Changes in leaf primary metabolism were also observed in the NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. The expression of NtMYB305, an orthologue of MYB305 previously identified as a flavonoid metabolic regulator in Antirrhinum majus flowers and as a floral-nectar regulator mediating starch synthesis in ornamental tobacco, was extremely downregulated in NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. These findings suggest that NtCOI1 functions upstream of NtMYB305 and plays a fundamental role in coordinating plant primary carbohydrate metabolism and correlative physiological processes.

  4. The F-box protein COI1 functions upstream of MYB305 to regulate primary carbohydrate metabolism in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) plays an important role in regulating plant male fertility and secondary metabolism, but its role in regulating primary metabolism remains unclear. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) is a critical component of the JA receptor, and mediates JA-signalling by targeting JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins for proteasomal degradation in response to JA perception. Here, we found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NtCOI1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90) recapitulated many previously observed phenotypes in coi1 mutants, including male sterility, JA insensitivity, and loss of floral anthocyanin production. It also affected starch metabolism in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary, leading to pollen abortion and loss of floral nectar. Transcript levels of genes encoding starch metabolism enzymes were significantly altered in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary of NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. Changes in leaf primary metabolism were also observed in the NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. The expression of NtMYB305, an orthologue of MYB305 previously identified as a flavonoid metabolic regulator in Antirrhinum majus flowers and as a floral-nectar regulator mediating starch synthesis in ornamental tobacco, was extremely downregulated in NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. These findings suggest that NtCOI1 functions upstream of NtMYB305 and plays a fundamental role in coordinating plant primary carbohydrate metabolism and correlative physiological processes. PMID:24604735

  5. The transmitting tissue of Nicotiana tabacum is not essential to pollen tube growth, and its ablation can reverse prezygotic interspecific barriers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan G; Eberle, Carrie A; Moss, Nicole G; Anderson, Neil O; Clasen, Benjamin M; Hegeman, Adrian D

    2013-12-01

    The Nicotiana tabacum transmitting tissue is a highly specialized file of metabolically active cells that is the pathway for pollen tubes from the stigma to the ovules where fertilization occurs. It is thought to be essential to pollen tube growth because of the nutrients and guidance it provides to the pollen tubes. It also regulates gametophytic self-incompatibility in the style. To test the function of the transmitting tissue in pollen tube growth and to determine its role in regulating prezygotic interspecific incompatibility, genetic ablation was used to eliminate the mature transmitting tissue, producing a hollow style. Despite the absence of the mature transmitting tissue and greatly reduced transmitting-tissue-specific gene expression, self-pollen tubes had growth to the end of the style. Pollen tubes grew at a slower rate in the transmitting-tissue-ablated line during the first 24 h post-pollination. However, pollen tubes grew to a similar length 40 h post-pollination with and without a transmitting tissue. Ablation of the N. tabacum transmitting tissue significantly altered interspecific pollen tube growth. These results implicate the N. tabacum transmitting tissue in facilitating or inhibiting interspecific pollen tube growth in a species-dependent manner and in controlling prezygotic reproductive barriers.

  6. Jasmonate-Sensitivity-Assisted Screening and Characterization of Nicotine Synthetic Mutants from Activation-Tagged Population of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Yin, Guoying; Wang, Wenjing; Niu, Haixia; Ding, Yongqiang; Zhang, Dingyu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Guanshan; Wang, Sangen; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is a secondary metabolite that is important to the defense system and commercial quality of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Jasmonate and its derivatives (JAs) are phytohormone regulators of nicotine formation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. Owing to the amphitetraploid origin of N. tabacum, research on screening and identification of nicotine-synthetic mutants is relatively scarce. Here, we describe a method based on JA-sensitivity for screening nicotine mutants from an activation-tagged population of tobacco. In this approach, the mutants were first screened for abnormal JA responses in seed germination and root elongation, and then the levels of nicotine synthesis and expression of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants with altered JA-response were measured to determine the nicotine-synthetic mutants. We successfully obtained five mutants that maintained stable nicotine contents and JA responses for three generations. This method is simple, effective and low-cost, and the finding of transcriptional changes of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants shows potentials for identifying novel regulators involved in JA-regulated nicotine biosynthesis.

  7. Necrotic Lesion Resistance Induced by Peronospora tabacina on Leaves of Nicotiana obtusifolia.

    PubMed

    Heist, E P; Zaitlin, D; Funnell, D L; Nesmith, W C; Schardl, C L

    2004-11-01

    ABSTRACT Infection of Nicotiana obtusifolia plant introduction (PI) #555573 by the downy mildew pathogen Peronospora tabacina resulted in a compatible interaction, in which P. tabacina penetrated and freely colonized host leaf tissue. This interaction became incompatible 5 to 6 days later, with the appearance of necrotic lesions (NLs) and inhibition of pathogen growth and subsequent sporulation. NL development depended upon the presence of P. tabacina in host tissue, was not due to the effects of other microbes, and occurred co-incident in time with the pathogen's ability to produce asexual sporangia on a susceptible N. obtusifolia genotype. Inhibition of the necrotic response by CoCl(2) (a calcium channel blocker) and pathogen-induced transcription of a defense-related gene (PR-1a) suggested that necrosis was due to hypersensitive cell death in the host. In contrast, N. obtusifolia PI#555543 did not exhibit hypersensitivity upon infection by P. tabacina, but rather developed characteristic symptoms of tobacco blue mold disease: chlorotic lesions accompanied by abundant pathogen sporulation. Disease reactions scored on PI#555573 x PI#555543 F(2) progeny inoculated with P. tabacina sporangia indicated that the resistance phenotype was due to the action of a single gene from N. obtusifolia PI#555573, which we have named Rpt1. To date, Rpt1 is the only gene known to confer a hypersensitive response (HR) to P. tabacina infection in any species of Nicotiana. A survey of wild N. obtusifolia revealed that the HR to P. tabacina was expressed in the progeny of 7 of 21 (33%) plants collected in southern Arizona, but not in the progeny of plants originating from Death Valley National Park in California and the Big Bend National Park in west Texas.

  8. Membrane transporters in self resistance of Cercospora nicotianae to the photoactivated toxin cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Herrero, Sonia; Thomas, Elizabeth; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize membrane transporter genes in Cercospora fungi required for autoresistance to the photoactivated, active-oxygen-generating toxin cercosporin they produce for infection of host plants. Previous studies implicated a role for diverse membrane transporters in cercosporin resistance. In this study, transporters identified in a subtractive cDNA library between a Cercospora nicotianae wild type and a cercosporin-sensitive mutant were characterized, including two ABC transporters (CnATR2, CnATR3), an MFS transporter (CnMFS2), a uracil transporter, and a zinc transport protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that only CnATR3 clustered with transporters previously characterized to be involved in cercosporin resistance. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, however, showed that only CnATR2 was upregulated, thus this gene was selected for further characterization. Transformation and expression of CnATR2 in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus Neurospora crassa significantly increased cercosporin resistance. Targeted gene disruption of CnATR2 in the wild type C. nicotianae, however, did not decrease resistance. Expression analysis of other transporters in the cnatr2 mutant under conditions of cercosporin toxicity showed significant upregulation of the cercosporin facilitator protein gene (CFP), encoding an MFS transporter previously characterized as playing an important role in cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora species. We conclude that cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora is mediated by multiple genes, and that the fungus compensates for mutations by up-regulation of other resistance genes. CnATR2 may be a useful gene, alone or in addition to other known resistance genes, for engineering Cercospora resistance in crop plants.

  9. Expression, Purification, and Biophysical Characterization of a Secreted Anthrax Decoy Fusion Protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Duhra-Gill, Sifti; Kailemia, Muchena J.; Phu, My L.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; Nandi, Somen; McDonald, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptor-mediated drug development for blocking anthrax toxin action has received much attention in recent decades. In this study, we produced a secreted anthrax decoy fusion protein comprised of a portion of the human capillary morphogenesis gene-2 (CMG2) protein fused via a linker to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) domain of human immunoglobulin G1 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a transient expression system. Using the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and co-expression with the p19 gene silencing suppressor, we were able to achieve a high level of recombinant CMG2-Fc-Apo (rCMG2-Fc-Apo) protein accumulation. Production kinetics were observed up to eight days post-infiltration, and maximum production of 826 mg/kg fresh leaf weight was observed on day six. Protein A affinity chromatography purification of the rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid showed the homodimeric form under non-reducing gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the molecular integrity of the secreted protein. The N-glycosylation pattern of purified rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein was analysed; the major portion of N-glycans consists of complex type structures in both protein samples. The most abundant (>50%) N-glycan structure was GlcNAc2(Xyl)Man3(Fuc)GlcNAc2 in rCMG2-Fc-Apo recovered from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid. High mannose N-glycan structures were not detected in the apoplast wash fluid preparation, which confirmed the protein secretion. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that high-level production of rCMG2-Fc-Apo can be achieved by transient production in Nicotiana benthamiana plants with apoplast targeting. PMID:28054967

  10. Plant oxidosqualene metabolism: cycloartenol synthase-dependent sterol biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ(5)-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis.

  11. High-level diterpene production by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Characterization of plant terpene synthases is typically done by production of recombinant enzymes in Escherichia coli. This is often difficult due to solubility and codon usage issues. Furthermore, plant terpene synthases which are targeted to the plastids, such as diterpene synthases, have to be shortened in a more or less empirical approach to improve expression. We report here an optimized Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assay in Nicotiana benthamiana for plant diterpene synthase expression and product analysis. Results Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of plant diterpene synthases in N. benthamiana led to the accumulation of diterpenes within 3 days of infiltration and with a maximum at 5 days. Over 50% of the products were exported onto the leaf surface, thus considerably facilitating the analysis by reducing the complexity of the extracts. The robustness of the method was tested by expressing three different plant enzymes, cembratrien-ol synthase from Nicotiana sylvestris, casbene synthase from Ricinus communis and levopimaradiene synthase from Gingko biloba. Furthermore, co-expression of a 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase from tomato and a geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase from tobacco led to a 3.5-fold increase in the amount of cembratrien-ol produced, with maximum yields reaching 2500 ng/cm2. Conclusion With this optimized method for diterpene synthase expression and product analysis, a single infiltrated leaf of N. benthamiana would be sufficient to produce quantities required for the structure elucidation of unknown diterpenes. The method will also be of general use for gene function discovery, pathway reconstitution and metabolic engineering of diterpenoid biosynthesis in plants. PMID:24330621

  12. Expression, Purification, and Biophysical Characterization of a Secreted Anthrax Decoy Fusion Protein in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Duhra-Gill, Sifti; Kailemia, Muchena J; Phu, My L; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Rodriguez, Raymond L; Nandi, Somen; McDonald, Karen A

    2017-01-04

    Anthrax toxin receptor-mediated drug development for blocking anthrax toxin action has received much attention in recent decades. In this study, we produced a secreted anthrax decoy fusion protein comprised of a portion of the human capillary morphogenesis gene-2 (CMG2) protein fused via a linker to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) domain of human immunoglobulin G1 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a transient expression system. Using the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and co-expression with the p19 gene silencing suppressor, we were able to achieve a high level of recombinant CMG2-Fc-Apo (rCMG2-Fc-Apo) protein accumulation. Production kinetics were observed up to eight days post-infiltration, and maximum production of 826 mg/kg fresh leaf weight was observed on day six. Protein A affinity chromatography purification of the rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid showed the homodimeric form under non-reducing gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the molecular integrity of the secreted protein. The N-glycosylation pattern of purified rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein was analysed; the major portion of N-glycans consists of complex type structures in both protein samples. The most abundant (>50%) N-glycan structure was GlcNAc₂(Xyl)Man₃(Fuc)GlcNAc₂ in rCMG2-Fc-Apo recovered from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid. High mannose N-glycan structures were not detected in the apoplast wash fluid preparation, which confirmed the protein secretion. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that high-level production of rCMG2-Fc-Apo can be achieved by transient production in Nicotiana benthamiana plants with apoplast targeting.

  13. Regulation of catalase activity in leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris by high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Havir, E.A.; McHale, N.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The effect of high CO{sub 2} (1% CO{sub 2}/21% O{sub 2}) on the activity of specific forms of catalase (CAT-1, -2, and -3) in seedling leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum) was examined. In high CO{sub 2} total catalase activity decreased by 50% in the first 2 days, followed by a more gradual decline in the next 4 days. The loss of total activity resulted primarily from a decrease in CAT-1 catalase. In contrast, the activity of CAT-3 catalase, a form with enhanced peroxidatic activity, increased 3-fold in high CO{sub 2} relative to air controls after 4 days. Short-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} indicated that the 50% loss of total activity occurs in the firs 12 hours. Catalase levels increased to normal within 12 hours after seedlings were returned to air. When seedlings were transferred to air after prolonged exposure to high CO{sub 2} (13 days), the levels of CAT-1 catalase were partially restored while CAT-3 remained at its elevated level. Levels of superoxide dismutase activity and those of several peroxisomal enzymes were not affected by high CO{sub 2}. Total catalase levels did not decline when seedlings were exposed to atmospheres of 0.04% CO{sub 2}/5% O{sub 2} or 0.04% CO{sub 2}/1% O{sub 2}, indicating that regulation of catalase in high CO{sub 2} is not related directly to suppression of photorespiration. Antibodies prepared against CAT-1 catalase from N. tabacum reacted strongly against CAT-1 catalase from both N. sylvestris and N. tabacum but not against CAT-3 catalase from either species.

  14. Metabolomic analysis of wild and transgenic Nicotiana langsdorffii plants exposed to abiotic stresses: unraveling metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Scalabrin, Elisa; Radaelli, Marta; Rizzato, Giovanni; Bogani, Patrizia; Buiatti, Marcello; Gambaro, Andrea; Capodaglio, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Nicotiana langsdorffii plants, wild and transgenic for the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rol C gene and the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, were exposed to different abiotic stresses (high temperature, water deficit, and high chromium concentrations). An untargeted metabolomic analysis was carried out in order to investigate the metabolic effects of the inserted genes in response to the applied stresses and to obtain a comprehensive profiling of metabolites induced during abiotic stresses. High-performance liquid chromatography separation (HPLC) coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enabled the identification of more than 200 metabolites, and statistical analysis highlighted the most relevant compounds for each plant treatment. The plants exposed to heat stress showed a unique set of induced secondary metabolites, some of which were known while others were not previously reported for this kind of stress; significant changes were observed especially in lipid composition. The role of trichome, as a protection against heat stress, is here suggested by the induction of both acylsugars and glykoalkaloids. Water deficit and Cr(VI) stresses resulted mainly in enhanced antioxidant (HCAs, polyamine) levels and in the damage of lipids, probably as a consequence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, the ability of rol C expression to prevent oxidative burst was confirmed. The results highlighted a clear influence of GR modification on plant stress response, especially to water deficiency-a phenomenon whose applications should be further investigated. This study provides new insights into the field of system biology and demonstrates the importance of metabolomics in the study of plant functioning. Graphical Abstract Untargeted metabolomic analysis was applied to wild type, GR and RolC modified Nicotiana Langsdorffii plants exposed to heat, water and Cr(VI) stresses. The key metabolites, highly affected by stress application, were identified

  15. Plant Oxidosqualene Metabolism: Cycloartenol Synthase–Dependent Sterol Biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J.; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ5-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis. PMID:25343375

  16. The only African wild tobacco, Nicotiana africana: alkaloid content and the effect of herbivory.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Danica; Nicolson, Susan W; Yusuf, Abdullahi A; Stevenson, Philip C; Heyman, Heino M; Krüger, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Herbivory in some Nicotiana species is known to induce alkaloid production. This study examined herbivore-induced defenses in the nornicotine-rich African tobacco N. africana, the only Nicotiana species indigenous to Africa. We tested the predictions that: 1) N. africana will have high constitutive levels of leaf, flower and nectar alkaloids; 2) leaf herbivory by the African bollworm Helicoverpa armigera will induce increased alkaloid levels in leaves, flowers and nectar; and 3) increased alkaloid concentrations in herbivore-damaged plants will negatively affect larval growth. We grew N. africana in large pots in a greenhouse and exposed flowering plants to densities of one, three and six fourth-instar larvae of H. armigera, for four days. Leaves, flowers and nectar were analyzed for nicotine, nornicotine and anabasine. The principal leaf alkaloid was nornicotine (mean: 28 µg/g dry mass) followed by anabasine (4.9 µg/g) and nicotine (0.6 µg/g). Nornicotine was found in low quantities in the flowers, but no nicotine or anabasine were recorded. The nectar contained none of the alkaloids measured. Larval growth was reduced when leaves of flowering plants were exposed to six larvae. As predicted by the optimal defense theory, herbivory had a localized effect and caused an increase in nornicotine concentrations in both undamaged top leaves of herbivore damaged plants and herbivore damaged leaves exposed to one and three larvae. The nicotine concentration increased in damaged compared to undamaged middle leaves. The nornicotine concentration was lower in damaged leaves of plants exposed to six compared to three larvae, suggesting that N. africana rather invests in new growth as opposed to protecting older leaves under severe attack. The results indicate that the nornicotine-rich N. africana will be unattractive to herbivores and more so when damaged, but that potential pollinators will be unaffected because the nectar remains alkaloid-free even after herbivory.

  17. Tissue-specific expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase gene variants in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Jurečková, Jana Fišerová; Sýkorová, Eva; Hafidh, Said; Honys, David; Fajkus, Jiří; Fojtová, Miloslava

    2017-03-01

    In tobacco, three sequence variants of the TERT gene have been described. We revealed unbalanced levels of TERT variant transcripts in vegetative tobacco tissues and enhanced TERT transcription and telomerase activity in reproductive tissues. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex responsible for the maintenance of telomeres, structures delimiting ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes. In the Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) allotetraploid plant, three sequence variants (paralogs) of the gene coding for the telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit (TERT) have been described, two of them derived from the maternal N. sylvestris genome (TERT_Cs, TERT_D) and one originated from the N. tomentosiformis paternal genome (TERT_Ct). In this work, we analyzed the transcription of TERT variants in correlation with telomerase activity in tobacco tissues. High and approximately comparable levels of TERT_Ct and TERT_Cs transcripts were detected in seedlings, roots, flower buds and leaves, while the transcript of the TERT_D variant was markedly underrepresented. Similarly, in N. sylvestris tissues, TERT_Cs transcript significantly predominated. A specific pattern of TERT transcripts was found in samples of tobacco pollen with the TERT_Cs variant clearly dominating particularly at the early stage of pollen development. Detailed analysis of TERT_C variants representation in functionally distinct fractions of pollen transcriptome revealed their prevalence in large ribonucleoprotein particles encompassing translationally silent mRNA; only a minority of TERT_Ct and TERT_Cs transcripts were localized in actively translated polysomes. Histones of the TERT_C chromatin were decorated predominantly with the euchromatin-specific epigenetic modification in both telomerase-positive and telomerase-negative tobacco tissues. We conclude that the existence and transcription pattern of tobacco TERT paralogs represents an interesting phenomenon and our results indicate its functional significance

  18. The Only African Wild Tobacco, Nicotiana africana: Alkaloid Content and the Effect of Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Marlin, Danica; Nicolson, Susan W.; Yusuf, Abdullahi A.; Stevenson, Philip C.; Heyman, Heino M.; Krüger, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Herbivory in some Nicotiana species is known to induce alkaloid production. This study examined herbivore-induced defenses in the nornicotine-rich African tobacco N. africana, the only Nicotiana species indigenous to Africa. We tested the predictions that: 1) N. africana will have high constitutive levels of leaf, flower and nectar alkaloids; 2) leaf herbivory by the African bollworm Helicoverpa armigera will induce increased alkaloid levels in leaves, flowers and nectar; and 3) increased alkaloid concentrations in herbivore-damaged plants will negatively affect larval growth. We grew N. africana in large pots in a greenhouse and exposed flowering plants to densities of one, three and six fourth-instar larvae of H. armigera, for four days. Leaves, flowers and nectar were analyzed for nicotine, nornicotine and anabasine. The principal leaf alkaloid was nornicotine (mean: 28 µg/g dry mass) followed by anabasine (4.9 µg/g) and nicotine (0.6 µg/g). Nornicotine was found in low quantities in the flowers, but no nicotine or anabasine were recorded. The nectar contained none of the alkaloids measured. Larval growth was reduced when leaves of flowering plants were exposed to six larvae. As predicted by the optimal defense theory, herbivory had a localized effect and caused an increase in nornicotine concentrations in both undamaged top leaves of herbivore damaged plants and herbivore damaged leaves exposed to one and three larvae. The nicotine concentration increased in damaged compared to undamaged middle leaves. The nornicotine concentration was lower in damaged leaves of plants exposed to six compared to three larvae, suggesting that N. africana rather invests in new growth as opposed to protecting older leaves under severe attack. The results indicate that the nornicotine-rich N. africana will be unattractive to herbivores and more so when damaged, but that potential pollinators will be unaffected because the nectar remains alkaloid-free even after herbivory. PMID

  19. Pollinator preferences for Nicotiana alata, N. forgetiana, and their F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Anthony; Fernandes, G Wilson; Holtsford, Timothy P

    2004-12-01

    The role of pollinators in plant speciation and maintenance of species boundaries is dubious because most plant species are visited by several types of pollinators, and most pollinator species visit several species of plants. We investigated pollinator preferences and their efficacy as ethological isolation mechanisms between two interfertile species, Nicotiana alata and N. forgetiana and their F1 hybrids. Hawkmoths pollinate N. alata, while primarily hummingbirds and occasionally small hawkmoths visit N. forgetiana. F1 hybrids are easily produced in the greenhouse and although the species grow in similar habitats, hybrids have not been found in nature. In Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, near where both species are found, experimental plots were studied containing both species, and both species plus F1 hybrids. In the mixed-species plots, hawkmoths showed a strong preference for N. alata. Hummingbirds were less common and only visited N. forgetiana. Hybrid seed was produced but plants made significantly fewer hybrid offspring than predicted by the frequency of interspecific pollinator movements. Nicotiana forgetiana was the seed parent of 97% of the F1 offspring, suggesting an asymmetry in pollen delivery or postpollination processes. In plots containing F1 hybrids plus both parental species, hawkmoths preferred N. alata and undervisited the other two phenotypes, except that in the third plot they visited hybrids in proportion to the hybrid frequency. Hummingbirds strongly preferred N. forgetiana in all plots but also visited F1 hybrids in proportion to their frequency in the third plot. Overall, F1 hybrids were well pollinated and were frequently visited immediately before or after one of the parental species. Thus hybrids could facilitate gene flow between the parental species. We conclude that pollinator discrimination among species is strong but is an imperfect isolation mechanism, especially if hybrids are present.

  20. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Results Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions) and the overall defence response. A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI). The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2) reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. Conclusion The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular of phenolics, alkaloids

  1. Simultaneous detection and quantification of Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum, and distribution analyses in strawberry greenhouses by duplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhu; Inada, Minoru; Watanabe, Hideki; Suga, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum cause Phytophthora rot of strawberry. A duplex real-time PCR technique for simultaneous detection and quantification of the two pathogens was developed. Species-specific primers for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum were designed based on the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of rDNA and the ras-related protein gene Ypt1, respectively. TaqMan probes were labeled with FAM for P. nicotianae and HEX for P. cactorum. Specificities were demonstrated using 52 isolates, including various soil-borne pathogens. Sensitivities for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum DNAs were 10 fg and 1 pg, respectively. The technique was applied to naturally infested soil and root samples; the two pathogens were detected and the target DNA concentrations were quantified. Significant correlations of DNA quantities in roots and the surrounding soils were found. The minimum soil DNA concentration predicting the development of disease symptoms was estimated as 20 pg (g soil)(-1). In three strawberry greenhouses examined, the target DNA concentrations ranged from 1 to 1,655 pg (g soil)(-1) for P. nicotianae and from 13 to 233 pg (g soil)(-1) for P. cactorum. The method proved fast and reliable, and provides a useful tool to monitor P. nicotianae and P. cactorum in plants or soils.

  2. Functional characterization of SOR1, a gene required for resistance to photosensitizing toxins in the fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Ehrenshaft, M; Chung, K R; Jenns, A E; Daub, M E

    1999-01-01

    The Cercospora nicotianae SOR1 gene is required for resistance to singlet oxygen-generating photosensitizers. SOR1 was characterized in the wild-type and in five photosensitizer-sensitive mutant strains which are complemented to photosensitizer resistance by transformation with SOR1. Sequence analysis determined that three of the mutants contain SOR1 copies with mutations encoding substitutions in the protein-coding sequence; however, two other mutants had wild-type SOR1 protein and promoter sequences. All five mutants accumulate SOR1 mRNA at levels comparable to that of the wild-type strain. In the wild-type strain, SOR1 accumulation is enhanced two-fold by light, but is unaffected by the presence of cercosporin, the photosensitizer synthesized by C. nicotianae. Southern analysis indicates that SOR1 is present in other fungi that synthesize structurally related perylenequinone photosensitizers.

  3. Enzymatic, expression and structural divergences among carboxyl O-methyltransferases after gene duplication and speciation in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Hippauf, Frank; Michalsky, Elke; Huang, Ruiqi; Preissner, Robert; Barkman, Todd J; Piechulla, Birgit

    2010-02-01

    Methyl salicylate and methyl benzoate have important roles in a variety of processes including pollinator attraction and plant defence. These compounds are synthesized by salicylic acid, benzoic acid and benzoic acid/salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferases (SAMT, BAMT and BSMT) which are members of the SABATH gene family. Both SAMT and BSMT were isolated from Nicotiana suaveolens, Nicotiana alata, and Nicotiana sylvestris allowing us to discern levels of enzyme divergence resulting from gene duplication in addition to species divergence. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Nicotiana SAMTs and BSMTs evolved in separate clades and the latter can be differentiated into the BSMT1 and the newly established BSMT2 branch. Although SAMT and BSMT orthologs showed minimal change coincident with species divergences, substantial evolutionary change of enzyme activity and expression patterns occurred following gene duplication. After duplication, the BSMT enzymes evolved higher preference for benzoic acid (BA) than salicylic acid (SA) whereas SAMTs maintained ancestral enzymatic preference for SA over BA. Expression patterns are largely complementary in that BSMT transcripts primarily accumulate in flowers, leaves and stems whereas SAMT is expressed mostly in roots. A novel enzyme, nicotinic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (NAMT), which displays a high degree of activity with nicotinic acid was discovered to have evolved in N. gossei from an ancestral BSMT. Furthermore a SAM-dependent synthesis of methyl anthranilate via BSMT2 is reported and contrasts with alternative biosynthetic routes previously proposed. While BSMT in flowers is clearly involved in methyl benzoate synthesis to attract pollinators, its function in other organs and tissues remains obscure.

  4. The stylar 120 kDa glycoprotein is required for S-specific pollen rejection in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Hancock, C Nathan; Kent, Lia; McClure, Bruce A

    2005-09-01

    S-RNase participates in at least three mechanisms of pollen rejection. It functions in S-specific pollen rejection (self-incompatibility) and in at least two distinct interspecific mechanisms of pollen rejection in Nicotiana. S-specific pollen rejection and rejection of pollen from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia also require additional stylar proteins. Transmitting-tract-specific (TTS) protein, 120 kDa glycoprotein (120K) and pistil extensin-like protein III (PELP III) are stylar glycoproteins that bind S-RNase in vitro and are also known to interact with pollen. Here we tested whether these glycoproteins have a direct role in pollen rejection. 120K shows the most polymorphism in size between Nicotiana species. Larger 120K-like proteins are often correlated with S-specific pollen rejection. Sequencing results suggest that the polymorphism primarily reflects differences in glycosylation, although indels also occur in the predicted polypeptides. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we suppressed expression of 120K to determine if it is required for S-specific pollen rejection. Transgenic SC N. plumbaginifolia x SI Nicotiana alata (S105S105 or SC10SC10) hybrids with no detectable 120K were unable to perform S-specific pollen rejection. Thus, 120K has a direct role in S-specific pollen rejection. However, suppression of 120K had no effect on rejection of N. plumbaginifolia pollen. In contrast, suppression of HT-B, a factor previously implicated in S-specific pollen rejection, disrupts rejection of N. plumbaginifolia pollen. Thus, S-specific pollen rejection and rejection of N. plumbaginifolia pollen are mechanistically distinct, because they require different non-S-RNase factors.

  5. PELPIII: the class III pistil-specific extensin-like Nicotiana tabacum proteins are essential for interspecific incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Carrie A; Anderson, Neil O; Clasen, Benjamin M; Hegeman, Adrian D; Smith, Alan G

    2013-06-01

    Pre-zygotic interspecific incompatibility (II) involves an active inhibition mechanism between the pollen of one species and the pistil of another. As a barrier to fertilization, II effectively prevents hybridization and maintains species identity. Transgenic ablation of the mature transmitting tract (TT) in Nicotiana tabacum resulted in the loss of inhibition of pollen tube growth in Nicotiana obtusifolia (synonym Nicotiana trigonophylla) and Nicotiana repanda. The role of the TT in the II interaction between N. tabacum and N. obtusifolia was characterized by evaluating N. obtusifolia pollen tube growth in normal and TT-ablated N. tabacum styles at various post-pollination times and developmental stages. The II activity of the TT slowed and then arrested N. obtusifolia pollen tube growth, and was developmentally synchronized. We hypothesize that proteins produced by the mature TT and secreted into the extracellular matrix inhibit interspecific pollen tubes. When extracts from the mature TT of N. tabacum were injected into the TT-ablated style prior to pollination, the growth of incompatible pollen tubes of N. obtusifolia and N. repanda was inhibited. The class III pistil-specific extensin-like protein (PELPIII) was consistently associated with specific inhibition of pollen tubes, and its requirement for II was confirmed through use of plants with antisense suppression of PELPIII. Inhibition of N. obtusifolia and N. repanda pollen tube growth required accumulation of PELPIII in the TT of N. tabacum, supporting PELPIII function in pre-zygotic II. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An interspecific Nicotiana hybrid as a useful and cost-effective platform for production of animal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ling, Huai-Yian; Edwards, Aaron M; Gantier, Michael P; Deboer, Kathleen D; Neale, Alan D; Hamill, John D; Walmsley, Amanda M

    2012-01-01

    The use of transgenic plants to produce novel products has great biotechnological potential as the relatively inexpensive inputs of light, water, and nutrients are utilised in return for potentially valuable bioactive metabolites, diagnostic proteins and vaccines. Extensive research is ongoing in this area internationally with the aim of producing plant-made vaccines of importance for both animals and humans. Vaccine purification is generally regarded as being integral to the preparation of safe and effective vaccines for use in humans. However, the use of crude plant extracts for animal immunisation may enable plant-made vaccines to become a cost-effective and efficacious approach to safely immunise large numbers of farm animals against diseases such as avian influenza. Since the technology associated with genetic transformation and large-scale propagation is very well established in Nicotiana, the genus has attributes well-suited for the production of plant-made vaccines. However the presence of potentially toxic alkaloids in Nicotiana extracts impedes their use as crude vaccine preparations. In the current study we describe a Nicotiana tabacum and N. glauca hybrid that expresses the HA glycoprotein of influenza A in its leaves but does not synthesize alkaloids. We demonstrate that injection with crude leaf extracts from these interspecific hybrid plants is a safe and effective approach for immunising mice. Moreover, this antigen-producing alkaloid-free, transgenic interspecific hybrid is vigorous, with a high capacity for vegetative shoot regeneration after harvesting. These plants are easily propagated by vegetative cuttings and have the added benefit of not producing viable pollen, thus reducing potential problems associated with bio-containment. Hence, these Nicotiana hybrids provide an advantageous production platform for partially purified, plant-made vaccines which may be particularly well suited for use in veterinary immunization programs.

  7. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of fifteen NtabSPL genes in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Qinyan95.

    PubMed

    Han, Yao-Yao; Ma, Yan-Qin; Li, Dian-Zhen; Yao, Jing-Wen; Xu, Zi-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen SPL (SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE) genes were identified and characterized in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Qinyan95. The exon-intron structures of these genes were determined according to the coding sequences confirmed by RT-PCR and the genomic DNA sequences downloaded from the databases in Sol Genomics Network, and thirteen of them were found to carry the response element of miR156. To elucidate the origin of the validated NtabSPL genes, multiple alignments of the nucleotide sequences encompassing the open reading frames were conducted by using the orthologs in N. tabacum, Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tomentosiformis, and Nicotiana otophora. The results showed that six NtabSPL genes were derived from a progenitor of N. sylvestris, and nine NtabSPL genes were derived from a progenitor of N. tomentosiformis, further corroborating that N. tabacum came from the interspecific hybridization between the ancestors of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. In contrast to previous statements about highly repetitive sequences, the genome of N. tabacum mainly retained the paternal-derived SPL genes in diploidization process. Phylogenetic analyses based on the highly conserved SBP (SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN) domains and the full-length amino acid sequences reveal that the SPL proteins of tobacco, tomato, and Arabidopsis can be categorized into eight groups. It is worth noting that N. tabacum contains seven NtabSPL6 genes originated from two parental genomes and NtabSPL6-2 possesses a GC-AG intron. In addition, transgenic tobacco plants harboring Arabidopsis Pri-miR156A were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, and the constitutive expression of miR156 could obviously inhibit the activity of the NtabSPL genes containing its target site, suggesting the function of miR156 is conservative in tobacco and Arabidopsis.

  8. An Interspecific Nicotiana Hybrid as a Useful and Cost-Effective Platform for Production of Animal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Huai-Yian; Edwards, Aaron M.; Gantier, Michael P.; DeBoer, Kathleen D.; Neale, Alan D.; Hamill, John D.; Walmsley, Amanda M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of transgenic plants to produce novel products has great biotechnological potential as the relatively inexpensive inputs of light, water, and nutrients are utilised in return for potentially valuable bioactive metabolites, diagnostic proteins and vaccines. Extensive research is ongoing in this area internationally with the aim of producing plant-made vaccines of importance for both animals and humans. Vaccine purification is generally regarded as being integral to the preparation of safe and effective vaccines for use in humans. However, the use of crude plant extracts for animal immunisation may enable plant-made vaccines to become a cost-effective and efficacious approach to safely immunise large numbers of farm animals against diseases such as avian influenza. Since the technology associated with genetic transformation and large-scale propagation is very well established in Nicotiana, the genus has attributes well-suited for the production of plant-made vaccines. However the presence of potentially toxic alkaloids in Nicotiana extracts impedes their use as crude vaccine preparations. In the current study we describe a Nicotiana tabacum and N. glauca hybrid that expresses the HA glycoprotein of influenza A in its leaves but does not synthesize alkaloids. We demonstrate that injection with crude leaf extracts from these interspecific hybrid plants is a safe and effective approach for immunising mice. Moreover, this antigen-producing alkaloid-free, transgenic interspecific hybrid is vigorous, with a high capacity for vegetative shoot regeneration after harvesting. These plants are easily propagated by vegetative cuttings and have the added benefit of not producing viable pollen, thus reducing potential problems associated with bio-containment. Hence, these Nicotiana hybrids provide an advantageous production platform for partially purified, plant-made vaccines which may be particularly well suited for use in veterinary immunization programs. PMID:22539991

  9. Synthesis of 'cineole cassette' monoterpenes in Nicotiana section Alatae: gene isolation, expression, functional characterization and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Fähnrich, Anke; Brosemann, Anne; Teske, Laura; Neumann, Madeleine; Piechulla, Birgit

    2012-08-01

    The scent bouquets of flowers of Nicotiana species, particularly those of section Alatae, are rich in monoterpenes, including 1,8-cineole, limonene, β-myrcene, α- and β-pinene, sabinene, and α-terpineol. New terpene synthase genes were isolated from flowers of Nicotiana bonariensis, N. forgetiana, N. longiflora, and N. mutabilis. The recombinant enzymes synthesize simultaneously the characteristic 'cineole cassette' monoterpenes with 1,8-cineole as the dominant volatile product. Interestingly, amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic tree construction clustered the newly isolated cineole synthases (CIN) of section Alatae together with the catalytically similar CIN of N. suaveolens of section Suaveolentes, thus suggesting a common ancestor. These CIN genes of N. bonariensis, N. forgetiana, N. longiflora, and N. mutabilis are distinct from the terpineol synthases (TERs) of the taxonomically related N. alata and N. langsdorfii (both Alatae), thus indicating gene diversification of monoterpene synthases in section Alatae. Furthermore, the presence of CINs in species of the American section Alatae supports the hypothesis that one parent of the Australian section Suaveolentes was a member of the present section Alatae. Amino acid sequences of the Nicotiana CINs and TERs were compared to identify relevant amino acids of the cyclization reaction from α-terpineol to 1,8-cineole.

  10. The CTB1 gene encoding a fungal polyketide synthase is required for cercosporin biosynthesis and fungal virulence of Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Choquer, Mathias; Dekkers, Katherine L; Chen, Hui-Qin; Cao, Lihua; Ueng, Peter P; Daub, Margaret E; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2005-05-01

    Cercosporin is a light-activated, non-host-selective toxin produced by many Cercospora fungal species. In this study, a polyketide synthase gene (CTB1) was functionally identified and molecularly characterized to play a key role in cercosporin biosynthesis by Cercospora nicotianae. We also provide conclusive evidence to confirm the crucial role of cercosporin in fungal pathogenesis. CTB1 encoded a polypeptide with a deduced length of 2,196 amino acids containing a keto synthase (KS), an acyltransferase (AT), a thioesterase/claisen cyclase (TE/CYC), and two acyl carrier protein (ACP) domains, and had high levels of similarity to many fungal type I polyketide synthases. Expression of a 6.8-kb CTB1 transcript was highly regulated by light and medium composition, consistent with the conditions required for cercosporin biosynthesis in cultures. Targeted disruption of CTB1 resulted in the loss of both CTB1 transcript and cercosporin biosynthesis in C. nicotianae. The ctb1-null mutants incited fewer necrotic lesions on inoculated tobacco leaves compared with the wild type. Complementation of ctb1-null mutants with a full-length CTB1 clone restored wild-type levels of cercosporin production as well as the ability to induce lesions on tobacco. Thus, we have demonstrated conclusively that cercosporin is synthesized via a polyketide pathway, and cercosporin is an important virulence factor in C. nicotianae. The results also suggest that strategies that avoid the toxicity of cercosporin will be useful in reduction of disease incidence caused by Cercospora spp.

  11. The A622 gene in Nicotiana glauca (tree tobacco): evidence for a functional role in pyridine alkaloid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Deboer, Kathleen D; Lye, Jessica C; Aitken, Campbell D; Su, Angela K-K; Hamill, John D

    2009-02-01

    Nicotiana glauca (Argentinean tree tobacco) is atypical within the genus Nicotiana, accumulating predominantly anabasine rather than nicotine and/or nornicotine as the main component of its leaf pyridine alkaloid fraction. The current study examines the role of the A622 gene from N. glauca (NgA622) in alkaloid production and utilises an RNAi approach to down-regulate gene expression and diminish levels of A622 protein in transgenic tissues. Results indicate that RNAi-mediated reduction in A622 transcript levels markedly reduces the capacity of N. glauca to produce anabasine resulting in plants with scarcely any pyridine alkaloids in leaf tissues, even after damage to apical tissues. In addition, analysis of hairy roots containing the NgA622-RNAi construct shows a substantial reduction in both anabasine and nicotine levels within these tissues, even if stimulated with methyl jasmonate, indicating a role for the A622 enzyme in the synthesis of both alkaloids in roots of N. glauca. Feeding of Nicotinic Acid (NA) to hairy roots of N. glauca containing the NgA622-RNAi construct did not restore capacity for synthesis of anabasine or nicotine. Moreover, treatment of these hairy root lines with NA did not lead to an increase in anatabine levels, unlike controls. Together, these results strongly suggest that A622 is an integral component of the final enzyme complex responsible for biosynthesis of all three pyridine alkaloids in Nicotiana.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of the Fate of Exogenous DNA in Nicotiana Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Murashige, Toshio

    1977-01-01

    After a 5-hour incubation of protoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum L. `Xanthi' with 3H-DNA (7.26 μg/ml) from N. tabacum L. `Xanthi nc' 3.5% of the initial radioactivity was found in acid-insoluble substances of the protoplasts. The addition of DEAE-dextran and poly-l-lysine to the incubation medium nearly doubled radioactivity adsorption. The absorption was inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol, KCN, and low temperature (0 C); this inhibition could not be reversed by exogenous ATP. About 500 tobacco plants established from protoplasts of a normally tobacco-mosaic virus-susceptible cultivar that had been allowed to absorb DNA prepared from a resistant cultivar did not show transfer of the virus-resistant gene. A detailed analysis was performed of the disposition of exogenous DNA in plant protoplasts, by employing Escherichia coli3H-DNA and Nicotiana glutinosa protoplasts. In 5 to 20 hours, about 10% of the 3H-DNA entered the protoplasts. Competition experiments between the 3H-DNA and unlabeled DNA or thymidine showed that the entry occurred as undegraded 3H-DNA. Examination of intraprotoplast fractions revealed that 60 to 80% of the absorbed radioactivity resided in the “soluble” fraction of the cytoplasm and 20% in the nuclear fraction. The mitochondrion fraction also contained measurable radioactivity. Sizing on sucrose density gradients showed that the bulk of the absorbed E. coli DNA had been depolymerized. Of the incorporated radioactivity, 15% was accountable as DNA, exogenous as well as resynthesized, and 15% as RNA, protein, and other cell constituents. DNA/DNA hybridization test indicated that 17.6% of the re-extractable 3H-DNA retained homology with the E. coli DNA; this was equivalent to 2.6% of the absorbed radioactivity. Resynthesized receptor protoplast DNA was represented by a fraction at least 1.7% of the total absorbed radioactivity. The amount of bacterial DNA remaining in protoplasts suggests that each protoplast retained 2.3 × 10−15g donor DNA, or

  13. Effects of Iron Excess on Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Plants (Implications to Oxidative Stress).

    PubMed Central

    Kampfenkel, K.; Van Montagu, M.; Inze, D.

    1995-01-01

    Fe excess is believed to generate oxidative stress. To contribute to the understanding of Fe metabolism, Fe excess was induced in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia grown in hydroponic culture upon root cutting. Toxicity symptoms leading to brown spots covering the leaf surface became visible after 6 h. Photosynthesis was greatly affected within 12 h; the photosynthetic rate was decreased by 40%. Inhibition of photosynthesis was accompanied by photoinhibition, increased reduction of photosystem II, and higher thylakoid energization. Fe excess seemed to stimulate photorespiration because catalase activity doubled. To cope with cellular damage, respiration rate increased and cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity more than doubled. Simultaneously, the content of free hexoses was reduced. Indicative of generation of oxidative stress was doubling of ascorbate peroxidase activity within 12 h. Contents of the antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione were reduced by 30%, resulting in equivalent increases of dehydroascorbate and oxidized glutathione. Taken together, moderate changes in leaf Fe content have a dramatic effect on plant metabolism. This indicates that cellular Fe concentrations must be finely regulated to avoid cellular damage most probably because of oxidative stress induced by Fe. PMID:12228397

  14. An efficient Potato virus X -based microRNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinping; Liu, Qingtao; Hu, Pu; Jia, Qi; Liu, Na; Yin, Kangquan; Cheng, Ye; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping; Liu, Yule

    2016-02-03

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in many biological processes. Although many miRNAs have been identified in various plant species, the functions of these miRNAs remain largely unknown due to the shortage of effective genetic tools to block their functional activity. Recently, miRNA target mimic (TM) technologies have been applied to perturb the activity of specific endogenous miRNA or miRNA families. We previously reported that Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based TM expression can successfully mediate virus-based miRNA silencing/suppression (VbMS) in plants. In this study, we show the Potato virus X (PVX)-based TM expression causes strong miRNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana. The PVX-based expression of short tandem target mimic (STTMs) against miR165/166 and 159 caused the corresponding phenotype in all infected plants. Thus, a PVX-based VbMS is a powerful method to study miRNA function and may be useful for high-throughput investigation of miRNA function in N. benthamiana.

  15. The induction of manganese superoxide dismutase in response to stress in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, C; Alliotte, T; De Loose, M; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1989-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are metalloproteins that catalyse the dismutation of superoxide radicals to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme has been found in all aerobic organisms examined, where it plays a major role in the defence against toxic reduced oxygen species which are generated in many biological oxidations. Here we report the complete primary structure of a plant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), deduced from a cDNA clone of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. The plant protein is highly homologous to MnSODs from other organisms and also contains an N-terminal leader sequence resembling a transit peptide for mitochondrial targeting. The location of the mature protein within the mitochondria has been demonstrated by subcellular fractionation experiments. We have analysed the expression profile of this MnSOD and found that it is dramatically induced during stress conditions, most notably in tissue culture as a result of sugar metabolism and also as part of the pathogenesis response of the plant, being induced by ethylene, salicylic acid, and Pseudomonas syringae infection. This induction is always accompanied by an increase in cytochrome oxidase activity, which suggests a specific protective role for MnSOD during conditions of increased mitochondrial respiration. Images PMID:2540959

  16. Metabolic Engineering in Nicotiana benthamiana Reveals Key Enzyme Functions in Arabidopsis Indole Glucosinolate Modification[W

    PubMed Central

    Pfalz, Marina; Mikkelsen, Michael Dalgaard; Bednarek, Paweł; Olsen, Carl Erik; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Kroymann, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Indole glucosinolates, derived from the amino acid Trp, are plant secondary metabolites that mediate numerous biological interactions between cruciferous plants and their natural enemies, such as herbivorous insects, pathogens, and other pests. While the genes and enzymes involved in the Arabidopsis thaliana core biosynthetic pathway, leading to indol-3-yl-methyl glucosinolate (I3M), have been identified and characterized, the genes and gene products responsible for modification reactions of the indole ring are largely unknown. Here, we combine the analysis of Arabidopsis mutant lines with a bioengineering approach to clarify which genes are involved in the remaining biosynthetic steps in indole glucosinolate modification. We engineered the indole glucosinolate biosynthesis pathway into Nicotiana benthamiana, showing that it is possible to produce indole glucosinolates in a noncruciferous plant. Building upon this setup, we demonstrate that all members of a small gene subfamily of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, CYP81Fs, are capable of carrying out hydroxylation reactions of the glucosinolate indole ring, leading from I3M to 4-hydroxy-indol-3-yl-methyl and/or 1-hydroxy-indol-3-yl-methyl glucosinolate intermediates, and that these hydroxy intermediates are converted to 4-methoxy-indol-3-yl-methyl and 1-methoxy-indol-3-yl-methyl glucosinolates by either of two family 2 O-methyltransferases, termed indole glucosinolate methyltransferase 1 (IGMT1) and IGMT2. PMID:21317374

  17. A novel pollen tube growth assay utilizing a transmitting tract-ablated Nicotiana tabacum style.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Carrie A; Clasen, Benjamin M; Anderson, Neil O; Smith, Alan G

    2012-03-01

    Sexual plant reproduction requires multiple pollen-pistil interactions from the stigma (pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination) to the ovary (fertilization). Understanding the factors that regulate pollen tube growth is critical to understanding the processes essential to sexual reproduction. Many pollen tube growth assays (PTGAs) have shorter and slower pollen tube growth when compared to pollen tube growth through the style. The identification and study of factors that regulate pollen tube growth have been impeded by a lack of an efficient and reproducible PTGA. The objective of this research is to develop a robust assay for Nicotiana tabacum pollen tube growth in an environment that supports sustained and normal growth yet is amenable to testing the effects of specific factors. In this paper, we introduce a novel PTGA, which uses pistils from N. tabacum that lack a mature transmitting tract (TT) due to tissue-specific ablation. The TT-ablated style supports normal pollen tube growth and the hollow structure of the style allows modification of the growth environment by direct injection of test material. This PTGA is robust and allows for rapid and accurate measurement of pollen tube length and pollen tube morphology, supporting pollen tube growth from 20 to 35°C and at pH ranging from 4.8 to 7.6. Use of the ablated style for a PTGA is a novel method for the culture of pollen tubes with sustained growth in vivo while permitting the application of treatments to the growing pollen tubes.

  18. A Phytophthora sojae cytoplasmic effector mediates disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meixiang; Ahmed Rajput, Nasir; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Peng; Zeng, Wentao; Liu, Tingli; Juma Mafurah, Joseph; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Each oomycete pathogen encodes a large number of effectors. Some effectors can be used in crop disease resistance breeding, such as to accelerate R gene cloning and utilisation. Since cytoplasmic effectors may cause acute physiological changes in host cells at very low concentrations, we assume that some of these effectors can serve as functional genes for transgenic plants. Here, we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that express a Phytophthora sojae CRN (crinkling and necrosis) effector, PsCRN115. We showed that its expression did not significantly affect the growth and development of N. benthamiana, but significantly improved disease resistance and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Furthermore, we found that expression of heat-shock-protein and cytochrome-P450 encoding genes were unregulated in PsCRN115-transgenic N. benthamiana based on digital gene expression profiling analyses, suggesting the increased plant defence may be achieved by upregulation of these stress-related genes in transgenic plants. Thus, PsCRN115 may be used to improve plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26039925

  19. (+)-Valencene production in Nicotiana benthamiana is increased by down-regulation of competing pathways.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Katarina; Jongedijk, Esmer; Klompmaker, Martin; Majdic, Timotej; Mumm, Roland; Bouwmeester, Harro; Bosch, Dirk; Beekwilder, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Plant sesquiterpenes, such as (+)-valencene, artemisinin, and farnesene are valuable chemicals for use as aromatics, pharmaceuticals, and biofuels. Plant-based production systems for terpenoids critically depend on the availability of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Currently, these systems show insufficient yields, due to the competition for FPP of newly introduced pathways with endogenous ones. In this study, for the first time an RNAi strategy aiming at silencing of endogenous pathways for increased (+)-valencene production was employed. Firstly, a transient production system for (+)-valencene in Nicotiana benthamiana was set up using agroinfiltration. Secondly, silencing of the endogenous 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (EAS) and squalene synthase (SQS) that compete for the FPP pool was deployed. This resulted in a N. benthamiana plant that produces (+)-valencene as a prevalent volatile with a 2.8-fold increased yield. Finally, the size of the FPP pool was increased by overexpression of enzymes that are rate-limiting in FPP biosynthesis. Combined with silencing of EAS and SQS, no further increase of (+)-valencene production was observed, but emission of farnesol. Formation of farnesol, which is a breakdown product of FPP, indicates that overproducing sesquiterpenes is no longer limited by FPP availability in the cytosol. This study shows that metabolic engineering of plants can effectively be used for increased production of desired products in plants. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Molecular analysis of the cercosporin biosynthetic gene cluster in Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiqin; Lee, Miin-Huey; Daub, Margret E; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2007-05-01

    We describe a core gene cluster, comprised of eight genes (designated CTB1-8), and associated with cercosporin toxin production in Cercospora nicotianae. Sequence analysis identified 10 putative open reading frames (ORFs) flanking the previously characterized CTB1 and CTB3 genes that encode, respectively, the polyketide synthase and a dual methyltransferase/monooxygenase required for cercosporin production. Expression of eight of the genes was co-ordinately induced under cercosporin-producing conditions and was regulated by the Zn(II)Cys(6) transcriptional activator, CTB8. Expression of the genes, affected by nitrogen and carbon sources and pH, was also controlled by another transcription activator, CRG1, previously shown to regulate cercosporin production and resistance. Disruption of the CTB2 gene encoding a methyltransferase or the CTB8 gene yielded mutants that were completely defective in cercosporin production and inhibitory expression of the other CTB cluster genes. Similar 'feedback' transcriptional inhibition was observed when the CTB1, or CTB3 but not CTB4 gene was inactivated. Expression of four ORFs located on the two distal ends of the cluster did not correlate with cercosporin biosynthesis and did not show regulation by CTB8, suggesting that the biosynthetic cluster was limited to CTB1-8. A biosynthetic pathway and a regulatory network leading to cercosporin formation are proposed.

  1. Metabolomic analysis of isonitrosoacetophenone-induced perturbations in phenolic metabolism of Nicotiana tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Madala, Ntakadzeni E; Steenkamp, Paul A; Piater, Lizelle A; Dubery, Ian A

    2013-10-01

    Plants have developed biochemical and molecular responses to adapt to different stress environments. One of the characteristics of the multi-component defence response is the production of defence-related metabolites. Plant defences can be triggered by various stimuli, including synthetic or naturally occurring molecules, especially those derived from pathogens. In the current study, Nicotiana tabacum cell suspensions were treated with isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP), a subcomponent of a plant-derived stress metabolite with anti-fungal and anti-oxidant properties, in order to investigate the effect thereof on cellular metabolism. Subsequent metabolomic-based analyses were employed to evaluate changes in the metabolome. UPLC-MS in conjunction with multivariate data analyses was found to be an appropriate approach to study the effect of chemical inducers like INAP on plant metabolism in this model system. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that INAP is capable of inducing time-dependent metabolic perturbations in the cultured cells. Orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed metabolites of which the levels are affected by INAP, and eight of these were tentatively annotated from the mass spectral data and online databases. These metabolites are known in the context of plant stress- and defence responses and include benzoic- or cinnamic acid derivatives that are either glycosylated or quinilated as well as flavonoid derivatives. The results indicate that INAP affects the shikimate-, phenylpropanoid- and flavonoid pathways, the products of which may subsequently lead to an anti-oxidant environment in vivo.

  2. Lysinibacillus tabacifolii sp. nov., a novel endophytic bacterium isolated from Nicotiana tabacum leaves.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yan-Qing; He, Song-Tao; Li, Qing-Qing; Wang, Ming-Feng; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Zhe, Wei; Cao, Yong-Hong; Mo, Ming-He; Zhai, Yu-Long; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-06-01

    A Gram-positive, catalase- and oxidase-positive, strictly aerobic, endospore-forming rod bacterium, designated K3514(T), was isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. The strain was able to grow at temperatures of 8-40°C, pH 5.0-10.0 and NaCl concentrations of 0-7%. The predominant quinones (>30%) of this strain were MK-7(H2) and MK-7. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain K3514(T) was affiliated to the genus Lysinibacillus, with its closest relatives being Lysinibacillus mangiferihumi (98.3% sequence similarity), Lysinibacillus sphaericus (97.9% sequence similarity), Lysinibacillus fusiformis (97.4% sequence similarity), and Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus (97.3% sequence similarity). However, low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness values suggested that the isolate was distinct from the other closest Lysinibacillus species. Additionally, based on analysis of morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics, the isolate could be differentiated from the closest known relatives. Therefore, based on polyphasic taxonomic data, the novel isolate likely represents a novel species, for which the name Lysinibacillus tabacifolii sp. nov. and the type strain K3514(T) (=KCTC 33042(T) =CCTCC AB 2012050(T)) are proposed.

  3. Identification of photoperiod-regulated gene in soybean and functional analysis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ai-Hua, Sha; Yin-Hua, Chen; Zhi-Hui, Shan; Xiao-Juan, Zhang; Xue-Jun, Wu; De-Zheng, Qiu; Xin-An, Zhou

    2014-04-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is a short-day crop and the photoperiod is a crucial factor regulating its flowering time. To investigate the molecular mechanism controlling the flowering time by photoperiod in soybean, cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) was used to identify photoperiod-regulated genes in leaves of soybean growing under short-day length, neutral photoperiod and long-day length. A total of 36 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were identified to be regulated by photoperiod. Among them, 26 TDFs were homologues of genes with known function. These genes are involved in secondary metabolism, cellular metabolism, cell wall components metabolism, ion transport and hormone signalling. Silencing of the homologue genes in Nicotiana benthamiana for 14 TDFs was conducted by virus-induced gene silencing. The flowering time was delayed by silencing of the genes encoding rhodanese and 40S ribosomal protein S4 (RPS4). The results indicated that rhodanese and RPS4 probably play important roles in regulating flowering time.

  4. Metabolic engineering of Nicotiana benthamiana for the increased production of taxadiene.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Mohidul; Kim, Hyun-Soon; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Kim, Sung Hong; Moon, BoKyung; Song, Jai-Young; Shim, Sang Hee; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    We report the production of taxadiene by transformation of N. benthamiana with a taxadiene synthase gene. The production was significantly increased by an elicitor treatment or metabolic pathway shunting. Paclitaxel (Taxol(®)) was first isolated from the bark of the pacific yew tree as an anticancer agent and has been used extensively to treat various types of cancer. Taxadiene, the first committed product of paclitaxel synthesis is cyclized from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP), and further complex hydroxylation and acylation processes of the unique taxane core skeleton produce paclitaxel. To accomplish de novo production of taxadiene, we transformed Nicotiana benthamiana with a taxadiene synthase (TS) gene. The introduced TS gene under the transcriptional control of the CaMV 35S promoter was constitutively expressed in N. benthamiana, and the de novo production of taxadiene was confirmed by mass spectroscopy profiling. Transformed N. benthamiana homozygous lines produced 11-27 μg taxadiene/g of dry weight. The highest taxadiene production line TSS-8 was further treated with an elicitor, methyl jasmonate, and metabolic pathway shunting by suppression of the phytoene synthase gene expression which resulted in accumulation of increased taxadiene accumulation by 1.4- or 1.9-fold, respectively. In summary, we report that the production of taxadiene in N. benthamiana was possible by the ectopic expression of the TS gene, and higher accumulation of taxadiene could be achieved by elicitor treatment or metabolic pathway shunting of the terpenoid pathway.

  5. Nicotiana benthamiana: Its History and Future as a Model for Plant-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Michael M; Zaitlin, David; Naidu, Rayapati A; Lommel, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana is the most widely used experimental host in plant virology, due mainly to the large number of diverse plant viruses that can successfully infect it. Addi- tionally, N. benthamiana is susceptible to a wide variety of other plant-pathogenic agents (such as bacteria, oomycetes, fungi, and so on), making this species a cornerstone of host-pathogen research, particularly in the context of innate immunity and defense signaling. Moreover, because it can be genetically transformed and regenerated with good efficiency and is amenable to facile methods for virus- induced gene silencing or transient protein expression, N. benthamiana is rapidly gaining popularity in plant biology, particularly in studies requiring protein localization, inter- action, or plant-based systems for protein expression and purification. Paradoxically, despite being an indispensable research model, little is known about the origins, genetic variation, or ecology of the N. benthamiana accessions cur- rently used by the research community. In addition to ad- dressing these latter topics, the purpose of this review is to provide information regarding sources for tools and reagents that can be used to support research in N. benthamiana. Finally, we propose that N. benthamiana is well situated to become a premier plant cell biology model, particularly for the virology community, who as a group were the first to recognize the potential of this unique Australian native.

  6. Optimization of Engineered Production of the Glucoraphanin Precursor Dihomomethionine in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Crocoll, Christoph; Mirza, Nadia; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are natural products characteristic of the Brassicales order, which include vegetables such as cabbages and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Glucoraphanin is the major glucosinolate in broccoli and associated with the health-promoting effects of broccoli consumption. Toward our goal of creating a rich source of glucoraphanin for dietary supplements, we have previously reported the feasibility of engineering glucoraphanin in Nicotiana benthamiana through transient expression of glucoraphanin biosynthetic genes from A. thaliana (Mikkelsen et al., 2010). As side-products, we obtained fivefold to eightfold higher levels of chain-elongated leucine-derived glucosinolates, not found in the native plant. Here, we investigated two different strategies to improve engineering of the methionine chain elongation part of the glucoraphanin pathway in N. benthamiana: (1) coexpression of the large subunit (LSU1) of the heterodimeric isopropylmalate isomerase and (2) coexpression of BAT5 transporter for efficient transfer of intermediates across the chloroplast membrane. We succeeded in raising dihomomethionine (DHM) levels to a maximum of 432 nmol g−1 fresh weight that is equivalent to a ninefold increase compared to the highest production of this intermediate, as previously reported (Mikkelsen et al., 2010). The increased DHM production without increasing leucine-derived side-product levels provides new metabolic engineering strategies for improved glucoraphanin production in a heterologous host. PMID:26909347

  7. Cloning and Expression of TNF Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Hamid Reza; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Vahidi, Hossein; Barar, Jaleh; Kazemi, Bahram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Molecular farming has been considered as a secure and economical approach for production of biopharmaceuticals. Human TNF Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) as a promising biopharmaceutical candidate has been produced in different expression hosts. However, little attention has been paid to molecular farming of the TRAIL in spite of numerous advantages of plant expression systems. Therefore, in this study the cytoplasmic production of the TRAIL was tackled in Nicotiana tabacum using Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA 4404. Initially, the desired coding sequence was obtained using PCR technique on the constructed human cDNA library. Afterward, the necessary requirements for expression of the TRAIL in plant cell system were provided through sub-cloning into 35S-CaMV (Cauliflower Mosaic Virus) helper and final 0179-pGreen expression vectors. Then, the final TRAIL-pGreen expression vector was cloned into A. tumefaciens LBA 4404. Subsequently, the N. tabacum cells were transformed through co-culture method and expression of the TRAIL was confirmed by western blot analysis. Finally, the recombinant TRAIL was extracted through chromatographic technique and biological activity was evaluated through MTT assay (Methylthiazol Tetrazolium Assay). The result of western blot analysis indicated that only monomer and oxidized dimer forms of the TRAIL can be extracted from the N. tabacum cells. Moreover, the lack of trimeric assembly of the extracted TRAIL diminished its biological activity in sensitive A549 cell line. In conclusion, although N. tabacum cells can successfully produce the TRAIL, proper assembly and functionality of the TRAIL were unfavorable. PMID:25561925

  8. A Phytophthora sojae cytoplasmic effector mediates disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meixiang; Ahmed Rajput, Nasir; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Peng; Zeng, Wentao; Liu, Tingli; Juma Mafurah, Joseph; Dou, Daolong

    2015-06-03

    Each oomycete pathogen encodes a large number of effectors. Some effectors can be used in crop disease resistance breeding, such as to accelerate R gene cloning and utilisation. Since cytoplasmic effectors may cause acute physiological changes in host cells at very low concentrations, we assume that some of these effectors can serve as functional genes for transgenic plants. Here, we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that express a Phytophthora sojae CRN (crinkling and necrosis) effector, PsCRN115. We showed that its expression did not significantly affect the growth and development of N. benthamiana, but significantly improved disease resistance and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Furthermore, we found that expression of heat-shock-protein and cytochrome-P450 encoding genes were unregulated in PsCRN115-transgenic N. benthamiana based on digital gene expression profiling analyses, suggesting the increased plant defence may be achieved by upregulation of these stress-related genes in transgenic plants. Thus, PsCRN115 may be used to improve plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  9. Integration and expression of a rabbit liver cytochrome P-450 gene in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, K; Noji, M; Ohmori, S; Imai, Y; Murakoshi, I

    1991-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 is involved in the oxidative metabolism of a broad range of substrates. We have made a chimeric construct, pSN002, containing the cDNA for rabbit liver cytochrome P-450 (IIC14) under the control of the TR2' promoter for mannopine synthase in the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid. Nicotiana tabacum was transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring a cointegrated plasmid pSN002::pGV2260. The presence of mRNA and of the translated protein from the chimeric cytochrome P-450 gene in transgenic plants was confirmed by RNA blot hybridization and by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. The transformants in which the foreign cytochrome P-450 protein is expressed show marked phenotypic changes, notably a tendency rapidly to senesce. We detected 2-propenylpyrrolidine, a degradative metabolite of nicotine alkaloids, in transgenic tobacco showing this pronounced phenotypic change. Such metabolism is likely to be due to the effect of senescence and not directly to the presence of the cytochrome P-450. Images PMID:1714583

  10. The effect of intermittent dosing of Nicotiana glauca on teratogenesis in goats.

    PubMed

    Welch, K D; Panter, K E; Lee, S T; Gardner, D R

    2015-01-01

    Sustained inhibition of fetal movement in livestock species, induced by several poisonous plants, can result in numerous skeletal-contracture malformations. Lupines are responsible for a condition in cattle referred to as "crooked calf syndrome" that occurs when pregnant cattle graze teratogenic lupines. Similar malformations are also seen in animals poisoned by Conium maculatum (coniine) and Nicotiana glauca (anabasine). A proposed management strategy to limit these types of birth defects includes utilizing an intermittent grazing schedule to allow short durations of grazing lupine-infested areas interrupted by movement to a lupine-free pasture. The objective of this study was to use a goat model to determine if an intermittent schedule of five continuous days on treatment followed by two days off treatment would be sufficient to decrease, or prevent, the incidence of anabasine-induced malformations. The data from this study suggest that, for N. glauca in goats, the intermittent grazing program of five days exposure with two days of non-exposure is insufficient to prevent significant skeletal malformations from occurring. However, this study did demonstrate an inverse relationship between the amount of serum anabasine in the dam and the extent of fetal movement.

  11. Isoprene emission protects photosynthesis but reduces plant productivity during drought in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette C; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Possell, Malcolm; Vickers, Claudia E; Purnell, Anna; Mullineaux, Philip M; Davies, William J; Dodd, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Isoprene protects the photosynthetic apparatus of isoprene-emitting plants from oxidative stress. The role of isoprene in the response of plants to drought is less clear. Water was withheld from transgenic isoprene-emitting and non-emitting tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, to examine: the response of isoprene emission to plant water deficit; a possible relationship between concentrations of the drought-induced phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and isoprene; and whether isoprene affected foliar reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation levels. Isoprene emission did not affect whole-plant water use, foliar ABA concentration or leaf water potential under water deficit. Compared with well-watered controls, droughted non-emitting plants significantly increased ROS content (31-46%) and lipid peroxidation (30-47%), concomitant with decreased operating and maximum efficiencies of photosystem II photochemistry and lower leaf and whole-plant water use efficiency (WUE). Droughted isoprene-emitting plants showed no increase in ROS content or lipid peroxidation relative to well-watered controls, despite isoprene emission decreasing before leaf wilting. Although isoprene emission protected the photosynthetic apparatus and enhanced leaf and whole-plant WUE, non-emitting plants had 8-24% more biomass under drought, implying that isoprene emission incurred a yield penalty. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Larval Helicoverpa zea Transcriptional, Growth and Behavioral Responses to Nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Gog, Linus; Vogel, Heiko; Hum-Musser, Sue M.; Tuter, Jason; Musser, Richard O.

    2014-01-01

    The polyphagous feeding habits of the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), underscore its status as a major agricultural pest with a wide geographic distribution and host plant repertoire. To study the transcriptomic response to toxins in diet, we conducted a microarray analysis of H. zea caterpillars feeding on artificial diet, diet laced with nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum (L.) plants. We supplemented our analysis with growth and aversion bioassays. The transcriptome reflects an abundant expression of proteases, chitin, cytochrome P450 and immune-related genes, many of which are shared between the two experimental treatments. However, the tobacco treatment tended to elicit stronger transcriptional responses than nicotine-laced diet. The salivary factor glucose oxidase, known to suppress nicotine induction in the plant, was upregulated by H. zea in response to tobacco but not to nicotine-laced diet. Reduced caterpillar growth rates accompanied the broad regulation of genes associated with growth, such as juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase. The differential expression of chemosensory proteins, such as odorant binding-protein-2 precursor, as well as the neurotransmitter nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor subunit 9, highlights candidate genes regulating aversive behavior towards nicotine. We suggest that an observed coincidental rise in cannibalistic behavior and regulation of proteases and protease inhibitors in H. zea larvae signify a compensatory response to induced plant defenses. PMID:26462833

  13. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling. PMID:26838475

  14. Copper-mediated oxidative burst in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2 cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Raeymaekers, T; Potters, G; Asard, H; Guisez, Y; Horemans, N

    2003-05-01

    In cell suspension cultures of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2) a rapid and concentration-dependent accumulation of H(2)O(2) is induced by excess concentrations of copper (up to 100 microM). This specific and early response towards copper stress was shown to be extracellular. Addition of 300 U of catalase per ml decreased the level of H(2)O(2). Superoxide dismutase (5 U/ml) induced an increase in H(2)O(2) production by 22.2%. This indicates that at least part of the H(2)O(2) is produced by dismutation of superoxide. Pretreatment of the cell cultures with the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors diphenylene iodonium (2 and 10 microM) and quinacrine (1 and 5 mM) prevented the generation of H(2)O(2) under copper stress for 90%. The influence of the pH on the H(2)O(2) production revealed the possible involvement of cell-wall-dependent peroxidases in the generation of reactive oxygen species after copper stress.

  15. In vivo effects of NbSiR silencing on chloroplast development in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yong-Won; Lee, Jae-Yong; Jeon, Young; Cheong, Gang-Won; Kim, Moonil; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2010-04-01

    Sulfite reductase (SiR) performs dual functions, acting as a sulfur assimilation enzyme and as a chloroplast (cp-) nucleoid binding protein. In this study, we examined the in vivo effects of SiR deficiency on chloroplast development in Nicotiana benthamiana. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSiR resulted in leaf yellowing and growth retardation phenotypes, which were not rescued by cysteine supplementation. NbSiR:GFP fusion protein was targeted to chloroplasts and colocalized with cp-nucleoids. Recombinant full-length NbSiR protein and the C-terminal half of NbSiR possessed cp-DNA compaction activities in vitro, and expression of full-length NbSiR in E. coli caused condensation of genomic DNA. NbSiR silencing differentially affected expression of plastid-encoded genes, inhibiting expression of several genes more severely than others. In the later stages, depletion of NbSiR resulted in chloroplast ablation. In NbSiR-silenced plants, enlarged cp-nucleoids containing an increased amount of cp-DNA were observed in the middle of the abnormal chloroplasts, and the cp-DNAs were predominantly of subgenomic sizes based on pulse field gel electrophoresis. The abnormal chloroplasts developed prolamellar body-like cubic lipid structures in the light without accumulating NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase proteins. Our results suggest that NbSiR plays a role in cp-nucleoid metabolism, plastid gene expression, and thylakoid membrane development.

  16. Metabolic engineering of medium-chain fatty acid biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana plant leaf lipids

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kyle B.; Taylor, Matthew C.; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Vanhercke, Thomas; Wood, Craig C.; Blanchard, Christopher L.; Singh, Surinder P.; Petrie, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Various research groups are investigating the production of oil in non-seed biomass such as leaves. Recently, high levels of oil accumulation have been achieved in plant biomass using a combination of biotechnological approaches which also resulted in significant changes to the fatty acid composition of the leaf oil. In this study, we were interested to determine whether medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) could be accumulated in leaf oil. MCFA are an ideal feedstock for biodiesel and a range of oleochemical products including lubricants, coatings, and detergents. In this study, we explore the synthesis, accumulation, and glycerolipid head-group distribution of MCFA in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana after transient transgenic expression of C12:0-, C14:0-, and C16:0-ACP thioesterase genes. We demonstrate that the production of these MCFA in leaf is increased by the co-expression of the WRINKLED1 (WRI1) transcription factor, with the lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) from Cocos nucifera being required for the assembly of tri-MCFA TAG species. We also demonstrate that the newly-produced MCFA are incorporated into the triacylglycerol of leaves in which WRI1 + diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (DGAT1) genes are co-expressed for increased oil accumulation. PMID:25852716

  17. Detection of Nicotiana DNA in Tobacco Products Using a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Korchinski, Katie L; Land, Adrian D; Craft, David L; Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    Establishing that a product contains tobacco is a requirement for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation and/or prosecution of tobacco products. Therefore, a multiplex real-time PCR method was designed to determine if Nicotiana (tobacco) DNA is present in tobacco products. The PCR method simultaneously amplifies a 73 bp fragment of the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase CYP82E4 gene and 66 bp fragment in the nia-1 gene for nitrate reductase, which are detected using dual-labeled TaqMan probes. The assay is capable of detecting approximately 7.8 pg purified tobacco DNA, with a similar sensitivity for either gene target while incorporating an internal positive control (IPC). DNA was extracted from prepared tobacco products-including chewing tobacco, pipe tobacco, and snuff-or from the cut fill (no wrapper) of cigarettes and cigars. Of the 13 products analyzed, 12 were positive for both tobacco-specific markers and the IPC. DNA was also extracted from the fill of five varieties of herbal cigarettes, which were negative for both tobacco-specific gene targets and positive for the IPC. Our method expands on current assays by introducing a multiplex reaction, targeting two sequences in two different genes of interest, incorporating an IPC into the reaction, and lowering the LOD and LOQ while increasing the efficiency of the PCR.

  18. Silencing of the FRO1 gene and its effects on iron partition in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gama, Florinda; Saavedra, Teresa; Dandlen, Susana; de Varennes, Amarilis; Correia, Pedro J; Pestana, Maribela; Nolasco, Gustavo

    2017-03-06

    To evaluate the dynamic role of the ferric-chelate reductase enzyme (FCR) and to identify possible pathways of regulation of its activity in different plant organs an investigation was conducted by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) using tobacco rattle virus (TRV) to silence the ferric reductase oxidase gene (FRO1) that encodes the FCR enzyme. Half of Nicotiana benthamiana plants received the VIGS vector and the rest remained as control. Four treatments were imposed: two levels of Fe in the nutrient solution (0 or 2.5 μM of Fe), each one with silenced or non-silenced (VIGS-0; VIGS-2.5) plants. Plants grown without iron (0; VIGS-0) developed typical symptoms of iron deficiency in the youngest leaves. To prove that FRO1 silencing had occurred, resupply of Fe (R) was done by adding 2.5 μM of Fe to the nutrient solution in a subset of chlorotic plants (0-R; VIGS-R). Twelve days after resupply, 0-R plants had recovered from Fe deficiency while plants containing the VIGS vector (VIGS-R) remained chlorotic and both FRO1 gene expression and FCR activity were considerably reduced, consequently preventing Fe uptake. With the VIGS technique we were able to silence the FRO1 gene in N. benthamiana and point out its importance in chlorophyll synthesis and Fe partition.

  19. Crystalline ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of high integrity and catalytic activity from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Servaites, J C

    1985-04-01

    Crystalline tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) was prepared using a procedure which protected the enzyme from hydrolysis by endogenous proteases. Leaves were extracted in a buffered medium containing casein, leupeptin, and high concentrations of MgSO4 and NaHCO3. After filtration through ion-exchange resin to remove contaminants, the enzyme was concentrated by precipitation with polyethylene glycol and crystal formation was induced by low-salt dialysis. The crystalline enzyme had a measured specific activity of 1.7 mumol CO2 mg protein-1 min-1, and about 93% of the enzyme could be activated with Mg2+ and CO2. Crystalline enzyme prepared in the absence of casein exhibited an activity which was only one-third of this rate and only about 70% of the enzyme could be activated with Mg2+ and CO2. Casein-extracted enzyme was resolved into distinct bands corresponding to the large (55,000) and small (14,000) subunits by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The large subunit of enzyme prepared according to the latter procedure was found to be composed of five different polypeptides of slightly decreasing molecular weight. Only about one-third of the large subunits were of the 55,000 molecular weight type. No differences between the two preparations were observed in the Km (CO2) and apparent Km (ribulose bisphosphate).

  20. Potato virus X movement in Nicotiana benthamiana: new details revealed by chimeric coat protein variants.

    PubMed

    Betti, Camilla; Lico, Chiara; Maffi, Dario; D'Angeli, Simone; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Faoro, Franco; Baschieri, Selene

    2012-02-01

    Potato virus X coat protein is necessary for both cell-to-cell and phloem transfer, but it has not been clarified definitively whether it is needed in both movement phases solely as a component of the assembled particles or also of differently structured ribonucleoprotein complexes. To clarify this issue, we studied the infection progression of a mutant carrying an N-terminal deletion of the coat protein, which was used to construct chimeric virus particles displaying peptides selectively affecting phloem transfer or cell-to-cell movement. Nicotiana benthamiana plants inoculated with expression vectors encoding the wild-type, mutant and chimeric viral genomes were examined by microscopy techniques. These experiments showed that coat protein-peptide fusions promoting cell-to-cell transfer only were not competent for virion assembly, whereas long-distance movement was possible only for coat proteins compatible with virus particle formation. Moreover, the ability of the assembled PVX to enter and persist into developing xylem elements was revealed here for the first time.

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide Yields during the Incompatible Interaction of Tobacco Suspension Cells Inoculated with Phytophthora nicotianae1

    PubMed Central

    Able, Amanda J.; Guest, David I.; Sutherland, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Rates of H2O2 production by tobacco suspension cells inoculated with zoospores from compatible or incompatible races of the pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae were followed by direct measurement of oxygen evolution from culture supernatants following catalase addition. Rates of HO2./O2− production were compared by following the formation of the formazan of sodium, 3′-[1-[phenylamino-carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro) benzene-sulfonic acid hydrate. In the incompatible interaction only, both reactive oxygen species (ROS) were produced by the cultured host cells in a minor burst between 0 and 2 h and then in a major burst between 8 and 12 h after inoculation. Absolute levels of H2O2 could not be accurately measured due to its metabolism by host cells, but results are consistent with the majority of H2O2 being formed via dismutation of HO2./O2−. The effects of inhibitors of endogenous Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (diethyldithiocarbamate) and catalase (3-amino-1,2,4-triazole and salicylic acid) were also examined. Yields of ROS in the presence of the inhibitors diphenylene iodonium, allopurinol, and salicylhydroxamic acid suggest that ROS were generated in incompatible host responses by more than one mechanism. PMID:11027737

  2. Localization of methyl benzoate synthesis and emission in Stephanotis floribunda and Nicotiana suaveolens flowers.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, D; Buss, D; Effmert, U; Piechulla, B

    2006-09-01

    The emission of fragrances can qualitatively and quantitatively differ in different parts of flowers. A detailed analysis was initiated to localize the floral tissues and cells which contribute to scent synthesis in STEPHANOTIS FLORIBUNDA (Asclepiadaceae) and NICOTIANA SUAVEOLENS (Solanaceae). The emission of scent compounds in these species is primarily found in the lobes of the corollas and little/no emission can be attributed to other floral organs or tissues. The rim and centre of the petal lobes of S. FLORIBUNDA contribute equally to scent production since the amount of SAMT (salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase) and specific SAMT activity compensate each other in the rim region and centre region. IN SITU immunolocalizations with antibodies against the methyl benzoate and methyl salicylate-synthesizing enzyme indicate that the adaxial epidermis with few subepidermal cell layers of S. FLORIBUNDA is the site of SAMT accumulation. In N. SUAVEOLENS flowers, the petal rim emits twice as much methyl benzoate due to higher total protein concentrations in the rim versus the petal centre; and, both the adaxial and abaxial epidermis house the BSMT (salicylic acid/benzoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase).

  3. Localization of Barley yellow dwarf virus Movement Protein Modulating Programmed Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jiwon; Kim, Kangmin; Lee, Kui-Jae; Lee, Wang Hu; Ju, Ho-Jong

    2017-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) belongs to Luteovirus and is limited only at phloem related tissues. An open reading frame (ORF) 4 of BYDV codes for the movement protein (MP) of BYDV gating plasmodesmata (PD) to facilitate virus movement. Like other Luteoviruses, ORF 4 of BYDV is embedded in the ORF3 but expressed from the different reading frame in leaky scanning manner. Although MP is a very important protein for systemic infection of BYDV, there was a little information. In this study, MP was characterized in terms of subcellular localization and programmed cell death (PCD). Gene of MP or its mutant (ΔMP) was expressed by Agroinfiltration method. MP was clearly localized at the nucleus and the PD, but ΔMP which was deleted distal N-terminus of MP showed no localization to PD exhibited the different target with original MP. In addition to PD localization, MP appeared associated with small granules in cytoplasm whereas ΔMP did not. MP associated with PD and small granules induced PCD, but ΔMP showed no association with PD and small granules did not exhibit PCD. Based on this study, the distal N-terminal region within MP is seemingly responsible for the localization of PD and the induction small granules and PCD induction. These results suggest that subcellular localization of BYDV MP may modulate the PCD in Nicotiana benthamiana. PMID:28167888

  4. Imaging viral infection: studies on Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected with the pepper mild mottle tobamovirus.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bueno, María Luisa; Ciscato, Massimo; VandeVen, Martin; García-Luque, Isabel; Valcke, Roland; Barón, Matilde

    2006-11-01

    We have studied by kinetic Chl-fluorescence imaging (Chl-FI) Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected with the Italian strain of the pepper mild mottle tobamovirus (PMMoV-I). We have mapped leaf photosynthesis at different points of the fluorescence induction curve as well as at different post-infection times. Images of different fluorescence parameters were obtained to investigate which one could discriminate control from infected leaves in the absence of symptoms. The non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of excess energy in photosystem II (PSII) seems to be the most adequate chlorophyll fluorescence parameter to assess the effect of tobamoviral infection on the chloroplast. Non-symptomatic mature leaves from inoculated plants displayed a very characteristic time-varying NPQ pattern. In addition, a correlation between NPQ amplification and virus localization by tissue-print was found, suggesting that an increase in the local NPQ values is associated with the areas invaded by the pathogen. Changes in chloroplast ultrastructure in non-symptomatic leaf areas showing different NPQ levels were also investigated. A gradient of ultrastructural modifications was observed among the different areas.

  5. Functional analysis of a viroid RNA motif mediating cell-to-cell movement in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dongmei; Wang, Meng; Li, Shifang

    2017-01-01

    Cell-to-cell trafficking through different cellular layers is a key process for various RNAs including those of plant viruses and viroids, but the regulatory mechanisms involved are still not fully elucidated and good model systems are important. Here, we analyse the function of a simple RNA motif (termed 'loop19') in potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) which is required for trafficking in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Northern blotting, reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization analyses demonstrated that unlike wild-type PSTVd, which was present in the nuclei in all cell types, the trafficking-defective loop19 mutants were visible only in the nuclei of upper epidermal and palisade mesophyll cells, which shows that PSTVd loop19 plays a role in mediating RNA trafficking from palisade to spongy mesophyll cells in N.benthamiana leaves. Our findings and approaches have broad implications for studying the RNA motifs mediating trafficking of RNAs across specific cellular boundaries in other biological systems.

  6. Evaluation of hepatoprotective effect of Pistacia lentiscus, Phillyrea latifolia and Nicotiana glauca.

    PubMed

    Janakat, Sana; Al-Merie, Hela

    2002-11-01

    The hepatoprotective effect of the boiled and non-boiled aqueous extracts of Pistacia lentiscus, Phillyrea latifolia, and Nicotiana glauca, that are alleged to be effective in the treatment of jaundice in Jordanian folk medicine, was evaluated in vivo using carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) intoxicated rats as an experimental model. Plant extracts were administrated orally at a dose of 4 ml/kg body weight, containing various amounts of solid matter. Only total serum bilirubin level was reduced by treatment with non-boiled aqueous extract of N. glauca leaves, while the boiled and non-boiled aqueous extracts of the N. glauca flowers were non effective. Bilirubin level and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were both reduced upon treatment with boiled aqueous extract of P. latifolia without reducing the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Aqueous extract of P. lentiscus (both boiled and non-boiled) showed marked antihepatotoxic activity against CCl(4) by reducing the activity of the three enzymes and the level of bilirubin. The effect of the non-boiled aqueous extract was more pronounced than that of the boiled extract.

  7. Oligomerization status influences subcellular deposition and glycosylation of recombinant butyrylcholinesterase in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jeannine D; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Castilho, Alexandra; Gruber, Clemens; Werner, Stefan; Mach, Lukas; Klimyuk, Victor; Mor, Tsafrir S; Steinkellner, Herta

    2014-01-01

    Plants have a proven track record for the expression of biopharmaceutically interesting proteins. Importantly, plants and mammals share a highly conserved secretory pathway that allows similar folding, assembly and posttranslational modifications of proteins. Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is a highly sialylated, tetrameric serum protein, investigated as a bioscavenger for organophosphorous nerve agents. Expression of recombinant BChE (rBChE) in Nicotiana benthamiana results in accumulation of both monomers as well as assembled oligomers. In particular, we show here that co-expression of BChE with a novel gene-stacking vector, carrying six mammalian genes necessary for in planta protein sialylation, resulted in the generation of rBChE decorated with sialylated N-glycans. The N-glycosylation profile of monomeric rBChE secreted to the apoplast largely resembles the plasma-derived orthologue. In contrast, rBChE purified from total soluble protein extracts was decorated with a significant portion of ER-typical oligomannosidic structures. Biochemical analyses and live-cell imaging experiments indicated that impaired N-glycan processing is due to aberrant deposition of rBChE oligomers in the endoplasmic reticulum or endoplasmic-reticulum-derived compartments. In summary, we show the assembly of rBChE multimers, however, also points to the need for in-depth studies to explain the unexpected subcellular targeting of oligomeric BChE in plants. PMID:24618259

  8. Transient Expression of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Effector Induces Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Pitino, Marco; Armstrong, Cheryl M.; Cano, Liliana M.; Duan, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus “Las” is a phloem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Although, the complete sequence of the Las genome provides the basis for studying functional genomics of Las and molecular mechanisms of Las-plant interactions, the functional characterization of Las effectors remains a slow process since remains to be cultured. Like other plant pathogens, Las may deliver effector proteins into host cells and modulate a variety of host cellular functions for their infection progression. In this study, we identified 16 putative Las effectors via bioinformatics, and transiently expressed them in Nicotiana benthamiana. Diverse subcellular localization with different shapes and aggregation patterns of the effector candidates were revealed by UV- microscopy after transient expression in leaf tissue. Intriguingly, one of the 16 candidates, Las5315mp (mature protein), was localized in the chloroplast and induced cell death at 3 days post inoculation (dpi) in N. benthamiana. Moreover, Las5315mp induced strong callose deposition in plant cells. This study provides new insights into the localizations and potential roles of these Las effectors in planta. PMID:27458468

  9. Techno-economic analysis of horseradish peroxidase production using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, David Richard; Huddy, Suzanne M; Rybicki, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advantages of plant-based transient expression systems relative to microbial or mammalian cell systems, the commercial production of recombinant proteins using plants has not yet been achieved to any significant extent. One of the challenges has been the lack of published data on the costs of manufacture for products other than biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we report on the techno-economic analysis of the production of a standard commercial enzyme, namely, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana. Based on the proven plant yield of 240 mg HRP/kg biomass, a biomass productivity of 15-kg biomass/m(2)/year and a process yield of 54 % (mg HRP product/mg HRP in biomass), it is apparent that HRP can be manufactured economically via transient expression in plants in a large-scale facility (>5 kg HRP/year). At this level, the process is competitive versus the existing technology (extraction of the enzyme from horseradish), and the product is of comparable or improved activity, containing only the preferred isoenzyme C. Production scale, protein yield and biomass productivity are found to be the most important determinants of overall viability.

  10. Salivary proteins of spider mites suppress defenses in Nicotiana benthamiana and promote mite reproduction.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Carlos A; Jonckheere, Wim; Alba, Juan M; Glas, Joris J; Dermauw, Wannes; Haring, Michel A; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Schuurink, Robert C; Kant, Merijn R

    2016-04-01

    Spider mites (Tetranychidae sp.) are widely occurring arthropod pests on cultivated plants. Feeding by the two-spotted spider mite T. urticae, a generalist herbivore, induces a defense response in plants that mainly depends on the phytohormones jasmonic acid and salicylic acid (SA). On tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), however, certain genotypes of T. urticae and the specialist species T. evansi were found to suppress these defenses. This phenomenon occurs downstream of phytohormone accumulation via an unknown mechanism. We investigated if spider mites possess effector-like proteins in their saliva that can account for this defense suppression. First we performed an in silico prediction of the T. urticae and the T. evansi secretomes, and subsequently generated a short list of candidate effectors based on additional selection criteria such as life stage-specific expression and salivary gland expression via whole mount in situ hybridization. We picked the top five most promising protein families and then expressed representatives in Nicotiana benthamiana using Agrobacterium tumefaciens transient expression assays to assess their effect on plant defenses. Four proteins from two families suppressed defenses downstream of the phytohormone SA. Furthermore, T. urticae performance on N. benthamiana improved in response to transient expression of three of these proteins and this improvement was similar to that of mites feeding on the tomato SA accumulation mutant nahG. Our results suggest that both generalist and specialist plant-eating mite species are sensitive to SA defenses but secrete proteins via their saliva to reduce the negative effects of these defenses.

  11. Zoospore density-dependent behaviors of Phytophthora nicotianae are autoregulated by extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue

    2010-07-01

    Phytophthora species are destructive fungus-like plant pathogens that use asexual single-celled flagellate zoospores for dispersal and plant infection. Many of the zoospore behaviors are density-dependent although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we use P. nicotianae as a model and demonstrate autoregulation of some zoospore behaviors using signal molecules that zoospores release into the environment. Specifically, zoospore aggregation, plant targeting, and infection required or were enhanced by threshold concentrations of these signal molecules. Below the threshold concentration, zoospores did not aggregate and move toward a cauline leaf of Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) and failed to individually attack annual vinca (Catharanthus roseus cv. Little Bright Eye). These processes were reversed when supplemented with zoospore-free fluid (ZFF) prepared from a zoospore suspension above threshold densities but not with calcium chloride at a concentration equivalent to extracellular Ca(2+) in ZFF. These results suggest that Ca(2+) is not a primary signal molecule regulating these communal behaviors. Zoospores coordinated their communal behaviors by releasing, detecting, and responding to signal molecules. This chemical communication mechanism raises the possibility that Phytophthora plant infection may not depend solely on zoospore number in the real world. Single zoospore infection may take place if it is signaled by a common molecule available in the environment which contributes to the destructiveness of these plant pathogens.

  12. The alternative respiratory pathway is involved in brassinosteroid-induced environmental stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs), plant steroid hormones, play essential roles in modulating cell elongation, vascular differentiation, senescence, and stress responses. However, the mechanisms by which BRs regulate plant mitochondria and resistance to abiotic stress remain largely unclear. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) is involved in the plant response to a variety of environmental stresses. In this report, the role of AOX in BR-induced tolerance against cold, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and high-light stresses was investigated. Exogenous applied brassinolide (BL, the most active BR) induced, while brassinazole (BRZ, a BR biosynthesis inhibitor) reduced alternative respiration and AOX1 expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Chemical scavenging of H2O2 and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of NbRBOHB compromised the BR-induced alternative respiratory pathway, and this result was further confirmed by NbAOX1 promoter analysis. Furthermore, inhibition of AOX activity by chemical treatment or a VIGS-based approach decreased plant resistance to environmental stresses and compromised BR-induced stress tolerance. Taken together, our results indicate that BR-induced AOX capability might contribute to the avoidance of superfluous reactive oxygen species accumulation and the protection of photosystems under stress conditions in N. benthamiana. PMID:26175355

  13. Citrus leaf blotch virus invades meristematic regions in Nicotiana benthamiana and citrus.

    PubMed

    Agüero, Jesús; Vives, María Carmen; Velázquez, Karelia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Juárez, Jose; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2013-08-01

    To invade systemically host plants, viruses need to replicate in the infected cells, spread to neighbouring cells through plasmodesmata and move to distal parts of the plant via sieve tubes to start new infection foci. To monitor the infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV), leaves were agroinoculated with an infectious cDNA clone of the CLBV genomic RNA expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the transcriptional control of a duplicate promoter of the coat protein subgenomic RNA. Fluorescent spots first appeared in agroinfiltrated leaves 11-12 days after infiltration, indicating CLBV replication. Then, after entering the phloem vascular system, CLBV was unloaded in the upper parts of the plant and invaded all tissues, including flower organs and meristems. GFP fluorescence was not visible in citrus plants infected with CLBV-GFP. Therefore, to detect CLBV in meristematic regions, Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) plants were graft inoculated with CLBV, with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a virus readily eliminated by shoot-tip grafting in vitro, or with both simultaneously. Although CLBV was detected by hybridization and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 0.2-mm shoot tips in all CLBV-inoculated plants, CTV was not detected. These results explain the difficulty in eliminating CLBV by shoot-tip grafting in vitro. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. In vitro antioxidant properties of flavonoids and polysaccharides extract from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qiao-Mei; Wang, Li-Juan; Li, Wei-Ming; Wang, Jing-Lu; Ding, Yu-Ting

    2012-09-21

    In the present study, antioxidant properties of flavonoids and polysaccharides from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaves were evaluated in several in vitro systems, e.g., scavenging activities on hydroxyl, superoxide anion, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radicals, and reducing power. Flavonoids showed much better activity than polysaccharides in scavenging activities on free radicals. When compared to the positive control, ascorbic acid, both showed weaker antioxidant potential. However, flavonoids possessed comparable superoxide anion, DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging abilities to ascorbic acid at high concentration (600 μg/mL). Meanwhile, it was found that flavonoids had prominent effects on the reducing power, which was equivalent to ascorbic acid, and was significantly higher than polysaccharides. These results clearly indicate that flavonoids are effective in scavenging free radicals and have the potential to be powerful antioxidants. Thus, tobacco leaves could be considered as a potential source of natural antioxidants for food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics or nutraceutical industries.

  15. Infection and Colonization of Nicotiana benthamiana by Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3.

    PubMed

    Prator, Cecilia A; Kashiwagi, Chloe M; Vončina, Darko; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2017-10-01

    Grapevine leafroll disease is an increasing problem in all grape-growing regions of the world. The most widespread agent of the disease, Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3), has never been shown to infect species outside of the genus Vitis. Virus transmission to several plant species used as model systems was tested using the vine mealybug, Planococcus ficus. We show that GLRaV-3 is able to infect Nicotiana benthamiana. Working with GLRaV-3 infected N. benthamiana revealed distinct advantages in comparison with its natural host Vitis vinifera, yielding both higher viral protein and virion concentrations in western blot and transmission electron microscopy observations, respectively. Immunogold labelling of thin sections through N. benthamiana petioles revealed filamentous particles in the phloem cells of GLRaV-3 positive plants. Comparison of assembled whole genomes from GLRaV-3 infected V. vinifera vs. N. benthamiana revealed substitutions in the 5' UTR. These results open new avenues and opportunities for GLRaV-3 research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2014-07-01

    Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is widely used in various plant species to downregulate the expression of a target plant gene. TRV is a bipartite, positive-strand RNA virus with the TRV1 and TRV2 genomes. To induce post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), the TRV2 genome is genetically modified to carry a fragment of the target gene and delivered into the plant (along with the TRV1 genome) by agroinoculation. TRV1- and TRV2-carrying Agrobacterium strains are then co-inoculated into 3-week-old plant leaves by one of three methods: a needleless syringe, the agrodrench method or by pricking with a toothpick. Target gene silencing occurs in the newly developed noninoculated leaves within 2-3 weeks of TRV inoculation. The TRV-VIGS protocol described here takes only 4 weeks to implement, and it is faster and easier to perform than other gene silencing techniques that are currently available. Although we use Nicotiana benthamiana as an example, the protocol is adaptable to other plant species.

  17. Growth of nicotiana in response to atmospheric CO sub 2 enrichment and various light regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, S.; Thomas, J.F. )

    1989-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum NCTG-22, N. tabacum Petite Havana and N. plumbaginifolia were grown in chambers (24 C, 12-h light) under daytime atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels of 340 ppm (ambient) or 1000 ppm (enriched). All 3 types of tobacco grew faster and had open flowers sooner under CO2 enrichment, but patterns of dry weight distribution varied with type of tobacco. In N. plumbaginifolia significant proportions of dry weight were allocated to stems and branches, while in tabacum types, less was allocated to stems and more to leaves and roots. Increases in dry weight due to CO2 enrichment were accompanied by increases in leaf area and thickness. Plants given a far-red low intensity night break exhibited few differences from controls except having thinner leaves under ambient CO2; but under enriched CO2, had greater total dry weight and thicker leaves containing a higher proportion of spongy mesophyll than controls. A 50% reduction in light intensity led to a comparable reduction in dry weight and leaf area across treatments.

  18. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase of high specific activity from anther-derived haploid plants of Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran, S.; Burdick, P.J.; Smith, R.H.

    1986-04-01

    Crystalline ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase was purified from several haploid plants of Nicotiana tabacum obtained by anther-culture. Specific activity of the enzyme ranged from 1.09 to 2.15 ..mu..moles /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixed mg protein/sup -1/ min/sup -1/ in growth chamber grown plants and 0.5 to 1.15 ..mu..moles /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixed mg protein/sup -1/ min/sup -1/ in greenhouse grown plants. No degradation of the large subunit was observed on SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of these purified preparations. A low specific activity of 0.25 units was obtained for a preparation of the enzyme from a plant grown under fluctuating growth conditions. This protein gave an additional band for the large subunit on electrophoresis, presumably a degradation product. Individual differences in specific activity under identical growth conditions in these haploids suggest a possible role for the small subunit in regulation of enzyme activity.

  19. Plant coexistence can enhance phytoextraction of cadmium by tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Li, Yuefang; Tang, Jianjun; Hu, Liangliang; Chen, Xin

    2011-01-01

    A mesocosm experiment was conducted to investigate whether plant coexistence affects cadmium (Cd) uptake by plant in contaminated soil. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. K326) and Japanese clover (Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl.) were used. Cadmium was applied as 3CdSO4 x 8H2O in solution at three levels (0, 1, and 3 mg/kg soil) to simulate an unpolluted soil and soils that were slightly and moderately polluted with Cd. Tobacco (crop), Japanese clover (non-crop), and their combination were grown under each Cd treatment. Compared to monoculture and under all Cd treatments, co-planting with Japanese clover did not affect tobacco biomass but significantly increased Cd concentration in all tobacco tissues and enhanced Cd accumulation in tobacco shoots and roots. Compared to monoculture, co-planting reduced soil pH and increased Cd bioavailability. For tobacco, co-planting with Japanese clover increased the Cd bioconcentration factor (BCF) in Cd contaminated soil. Japanese clover also accumulated substantial quantities of Cd in shoots and roots. Thus, total Cd uptake by the plants was much greater with co-planting than with monoculture. The results suggested that phytoextraction can be effectively increased through tobacco co-planting with Japanese clover in mildly Cd-contaminated soil.

  20. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-02-03

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling.

  1. Intracellular compartmentation of ions in salt adapted tobacco cells. [Nicotiana tabacum L

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, M.L.; Hess, F.D.; Bressan, R.A.; Hasegawa, P.M. )

    1988-02-01

    Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} are the principal solutes utilized for osmotic adjustment in cells of Nicotiana tabacum L. var Wisconsin 38 (tobacco) adapted to NaCl, accumulating to levels of 472 and 386 millimolar, respectively, in cells adapted to 428 millimolar NaCl. X-ray microanalysis of unetched frozen-hydrated cells adapted to salt indicated that Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} were compartmentalized in the vacuole, at concentrations of 780 and 624 millimolar, respectively, while cytoplasmic concentrations of the ions were maintained at 96 millimolar. The morphometric differences which existed between unadapted and salt adapted cells, (cytoplasmic volume of 22 and 45% of the cell, respectively), facilitated containment of the excited volume of the x-ray signal in the cytoplasm of the adapted cells. Confirmation of ion compartmentation in salt adapted cells was obtained based on kinetic analyses of {sup 22}Na{sup +} and {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} efflux from cells in steady state. These data provide evidence that ion compartmentation is a component of salt adaptation of glycophyte cells.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide mediates nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under high temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Ruijing; Jia, Yujie; Ef, Abd Allah; Jia, Aiqun; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a signal to induce many physiological processes in plants, but its role in controlling the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites is not well established. In this study, we found that high temperature (HT) treatment induced nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and promoted the rapid accumulation of H2S. Furthermore, HT triggered the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA), a plant hormone that promotes nicotine biosynthesis. Suppression of the H2S signal using chemical inhibitors or via RNAi suppression of l-cysteine desulphydrase (L-CD) in transgenic plants, compromised JA production and nicotine biosynthesis under HT treatments, and these inhibitory effects could be reversed by applying exogenous H2S. Based on these data, we propose that H2S is an important trigger of nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco under HT conditions, and that H2S acts upstream of JA signaling by modulating the transcription of genes associated with JA biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. High levels of expression of fibroblast growth factor 21 in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana).

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongqi; Pang, Shifeng; Xue, Ping; Yang, Jing; Liu, Xiuming; Wang, Yanfang; Li, Tingting; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiaokun

    2011-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) is a hepatic hormone that plays a critical role in metabolism, stimulating fatty acid oxidation in the liver and glucose uptake in adipose tissue. In this study, we produced tobacco plants expressing human recombinant FGF21 (hFGF21) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using a potato virus X (PVX)-based vector (pgR107). The vector contained the sequence encoding the human FGF21 gene fused with green florescence protein and a histidine tag. The recombinant plasmid was introduced into leaf cells of Nicotiana benthamiana (a wild Australian tobacco) via Agrobacterium-mediated agroinfiltration. As determined by fluorescence and Western blot of leaf extracts, the hFGF21 gene was correctly translated in tobacco plants. Seven days after agroinfection, the recombinant hFGF21 had accumulated to levels as high as 450 μg g(-1) fresh weight in leaves of agroinfected plants. The recombinant hFGF21 was purified from plant tissues by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, and the purified hFGF21 stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3/L1 cells. This indicated that the recombinant hFGF21 expressed via the PVX viral vector in N. benthamiana was biologically active.

  4. Introgression of a Tombusvirus Resistance Locus from Nicotiana edwardsonii var. Columbia to N. clevelandii.

    PubMed

    Schoelz, James E; Wiggins, B Elizabeth; Wintermantel, William M; Ross, Kathleen

    2006-05-01

    ABSTRACT A new variety of Nicotiana, N. edwardsonii var. Columbia, was evaluated for its capacity to serve as a new source for virus resistance genes. Columbia was developed from a hybridization between N. glutinosa and N. clevelandii, the same parents used for the formation of the original N. edwardsonii. However, in contrast to the original N. edwardsonii, crosses between Columbia and either of its parents are fertile. Thus, the inheritance of virus resistance genes present in N. glutinosa could be characterized by using Columbia as a bridge plant in crosses with the susceptible parent, N. clevelandii. To determine how virus resistance genes would segregate in interspecific crosses between Columbia and N. clevelandii, we followed the fate of the N gene, a single dominant gene that specifies resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Our genetic evidence indicated that the entire chromosome containing the N gene was introgressed into N. clevelandii to create an addition line, designated N. clevelandii line 19. Although line 19 was homozygous for resistance to TMV, it remained susceptible to Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) strain W260, indicating that resistance to these viruses must reside on other N. glutinosa chromosomes. We also developed a second addition line, N. clevelandii line 36, which was homozygous for resistance to TBSV. Line 36 was susceptible to TMV and CaMV strain W260, but was resistant to other tombusviruses, including Cucumber necrosis virus, Cymbidium ringspot virus, Lettuce necrotic stunt virus, and Carnation Italian ringspot virus.

  5. Cytogenetic study of an interspecific cross of Nicotiana debneyi X N. umbratica.

    PubMed

    Gangadevi, T; Rao, P N; Satyanarayana, K V

    1982-06-01

    Interspecific F1 hybrids of Nicotiana debneyi Domin (2n=48) and N. umbratica Burbidge (2n=46), both belonging to the section Suaveolentes, showed a high degree of meiotic chromosome pairing. Two of the five F2 plants obtained exhibited chromosome mosaicism. The first colchiploid generation (C1) had the expected chromosome number of 2n=94 while C2 showed 2n=88, a loss of three pairs of chromosomes. This same chromosome number continued in further colchiploid generations, followed up to C5, except for a few plants in C3 which showed chromosome mosaicism. The F1 phenotype was stable through C1 to C5 and fertility was normal in colchiploids through all generations in spite of the loss of three pairs of chromosomes and chromosome mosaicism. This stability and fertility apparently reflect the tolerance of the genomes to the genetic adjustment of chromosome complements which is believed to be associated with the originally polyploid nature of the parental species and the chromosome doubling brought about in the amphidiploids.

  6. Polyphenol content, polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase activity in certain Nicotiana species, varieties and interspecific hybrids.

    PubMed

    Sheen, S J

    1970-01-01

    Eight Nicotiana species including the putative progenitors of N. tabacum, Kostoff's amphidiploid (N. sylvestris × N. tomentosiformis), and 19 cultivars have been compared for total polyphenols, polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase activity in the leaf and/or root by a small plant technique. Greater variations for these chemical constituents occurred in the species than in the cultivars. N. tomentosiformis was highest in polyphenol content. Root extracts contained more polyphenoloxidase than the leaf, but its peroxidase content may not exceed the concentration in the leaf. The Kostoff's amphidiploid tended to resemble more the low oxidase and polyphenol parent. An additional study based on mature green leaves of Burley 21, the progenitor species, and their F 1 hybrids confirmed the quantitative differences of these chemical constituents in the species. The magnitude of the heterosis appeared to be greater in the hybrids of N. tomentosiformis or N. otophora crossed to N. sylvestris than those between the Tomentosae members or involving Burley 21 as the parent. An exception was the hybrid Burley 21 × N. tomentosiformis which showed heterosis for oxidase activities.

  7. Localization of Barley yellow dwarf virus Movement Protein Modulating Programmed Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jiwon; Kim, Kangmin; Lee, Kui-Jae; Lee, Wang Hu; Ju, Ho-Jong

    2017-02-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) belongs to Luteovirus and is limited only at phloem related tissues. An open reading frame (ORF) 4 of BYDV codes for the movement protein (MP) of BYDV gating plasmodesmata (PD) to facilitate virus movement. Like other Luteoviruses, ORF 4 of BYDV is embedded in the ORF3 but expressed from the different reading frame in leaky scanning manner. Although MP is a very important protein for systemic infection of BYDV, there was a little information. In this study, MP was characterized in terms of subcellular localization and programmed cell death (PCD). Gene of MP or its mutant (ΔMP) was expressed by Agroinfiltration method. MP was clearly localized at the nucleus and the PD, but ΔMP which was deleted distal N-terminus of MP showed no localization to PD exhibited the different target with original MP. In addition to PD localization, MP appeared associated with small granules in cytoplasm whereas ΔMP did not. MP associated with PD and small granules induced PCD, but ΔMP showed no association with PD and small granules did not exhibit PCD. Based on this study, the distal N-terminal region within MP is seemingly responsible for the localization of PD and the induction small granules and PCD induction. These results suggest that subcellular localization of BYDV MP may modulate the PCD in Nicotiana benthamiana.

  8. Molecular Characterization of the Cercosporin Biosynthetic Pathway in the Fungal Plant Pathogen Cercospora nicotianae

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Adam G.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Perylenequinones are a class of photoactivated polyketide mycotoxins produced by fungal plant pathogens that notably produce reactive oxygen species with visible light. The best-studied perylenequinone is cercosporin—a product of the Cercospora species. While the cercosporin biosynthetic gene cluster has been described in the tobacco pathogen Cercospora nicotianae, little is known of the metabolite’s biosynthesis. Furthermore, in vitro investigations of the polyketide synthase central to cercosporin biosynthesis identified the naphthopyrone nor-toralactone as its direct product—an observation in conflict with published biosynthetic proposals. Here, we present an alternative biosynthetic pathway to cercosporin based on metabolites characterized from a series of biosynthetic gene knockouts. We show that nor-toralactone is the key polyketide intermediate and the substrate for the unusual didomain protein CTB3. We demonstrate the unique oxidative cleavage activity of the CTB3 monooxygenase domain in vitro. These data advance our understanding of perylenequinone biosynthesis and expand the biochemical repertoire of flavin-dependent monooxygenases. PMID:26938470

  9. β-Carboxysomal proteins assemble into highly organized structures in Nicotiana chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Myat T; Occhialini, Alessandro; Andralojc, P John; Devonshire, Jean; Hines, Kevin M; Parry, Martin A J; Hanson, Maureen R

    2014-07-01

    The photosynthetic efficiency of C3 plants suffers from the reaction of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) with O2 instead of CO2 , leading to the costly process of photorespiration. Increasing the concentration of CO2 around Rubisco is a strategy used by photosynthetic prokaryotes such as cyanobacteria for more efficient incorporation of inorganic carbon. Engineering the cyanobacterial CO2 -concentrating mechanism, the carboxysome, into chloroplasts is an approach to enhance photosynthesis or to compartmentalize other biochemical reactions to confer new capabilities on transgenic plants. We have chosen to explore the possibility of producing β-carboxysomes from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, a model freshwater cyanobacterium. Using the agroinfiltration technique, we have transiently expressed multiple β-carboxysomal proteins (CcmK2, CcmM, CcmL, CcmO and CcmN) in Nicotiana benthamiana with fusions that target these proteins into chloroplasts, and that provide fluorescent labels for visualizing the resultant structures. By confocal and electron microscopic analysis, we have observed that the shell proteins of the β-carboxysome are able to assemble in plant chloroplasts into highly organized assemblies resembling empty microcompartments. We demonstrate that a foreign protein can be targeted with a 17-amino-acid CcmN peptide to the shell proteins inside chloroplasts. Our experiments establish the feasibility of introducing carboxysomes into chloroplasts for the potential compartmentalization of Rubisco or other proteins. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Spectral reflectance, chlorophyll fluorescence and virological investigations of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Hristova, Dimitrina; Iliev, Ilko; Yanev, Tony

    Application of multispectral remote sensing techniques to plant condition monitoring has been adopted for various purposes. Remote sensing is a reliable tool for detecting signs of vege-tation stress and diseases. Spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence are functions of tissue optical properties and biological status of the plants, and illumination conditions. The mean reflectance spectrum depends on the relative composition of all the pigments in the leaf including chlorophylls, carotenoids etc. Chlorophyll fluorescence results from the primary re-actions of photosynthesis and during the last decade it finds widening application as a means for revelation of stress and diseases. The changes in chlorophyll function take place before the alteration in chlorophyll content to occur so that changes in the fluorescence signal arise before any visible signs are apparent. The aim of our investigations was to study the development and spreading out of a viral infection on the leaves of two cultivars tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We applied two remote sensing tech-niques (spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements) for evaluation of the changes in the optical properties of the plants in accordance to their physiological status. The serological analyses via the Double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) were made with appropriate kits (Leowe, Germany) for quantitative assessment of the concentration of viruses in the plants. The tobacco plants were grown in green house under controlled conditions. The first cultivar Nevrocop 1146 is known as resistive to the TMV, i.e. it shows hypersensitive response. The second cultivar named Krumovgrad is normally sen-sitive to the TMV. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, up to one leaf from 20 plants for each cultivar were inoculated with TMV. The leaves opposite to the infected ones formed the group of control (untreated) leaves. The

  11. In vitro inhibition of incompatible pollen tubes in Nicotiana alata involves the uncoupling of the F-actin cytoskeleton and the endomembrane trafficking system.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Juan A; Rojas, Hernán J; Goldraij, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    In the S-RNase-based self-incompatibility system, subcellular events occurring in the apical region of incompatible pollen tubes during the pollen rejection process are poorly understood. F-actin dynamics and endomembrane trafficking are crucial for polar growth, which is temporally and spatially controlled in the tip region of pollen tubes. Thus, we developed a simple in vitro assay to study the changes in the F-actin cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system at the apical region of incompatible pollen tubes in Nicotiana alata. Growth but not germination of pollen tubes of S c₁₀-, S₇₀-, and S₇₅-haplotypes was selectively inhibited by style extracts carrying the same haplotypes. Pollen F-actin cytoskeleton and endomembrane system, visualized by fluorescent markers, were normal during the initial 60 min of pollen culture in the presence of compatible and incompatible style extracts. Additional culture resulted in complete growth arrest and critical alterations in the integrity of the F-actin cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system of incompatible pollen tubes. The F-actin ring and the V-shaped zone disappeared from the apical region, while distorted F-actin cables and progressive formation of membrane aggregates evolved in the subapical region and the shank. The vacuolar network of incompatible pollen tubes invaded the tip region, but vacuolar membrane integrity remained mostly unaffected. The polar growth machinery of incompatible pollen tubes was uncoupled, as evidenced by the severe disruption of colocalization between the F-actin cytoskeleton and the endomembrane compartments. A model of pollen rejection integrating the main subcellular events occurring in incompatible pollen is discussed.

  12. Reduced gravitropic sensitivity in roots of a starch-deficient mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in seedlings of Nicotiana sylvestris Speg. et Comes wild-type (WT) and mutant NS 458 which has a defective plastid phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1.). Starch was greatly reduced in NS 458 compared to the WT, but small amounts of starch were detected in rootcap columella cells in NS 458 by light and electron microscopy. The roots of WT are more sensitive to gravity than mutant NS 458 roots since: (1) in mutant roots, curvature was reduced and delayed in the time course of curvature; (2) curvature of mutant roots was 24-56% that of WT roots over the range of induction periods tested; (3) in intermittent-stimulation experiments, curvature of mutant roots was 37% or less than that of WT roots in all treatments tested. The perception time, determined by intermittent-stimulation experiments, was < or = 5 s for WT roots and 30-60 s for mutant roots. The growth rates for WT and NS 458 roots were essentially equal. These results and our previous results with WT and starchless mutant Arabidopsis roots (Kiss et al. 1989, Planta 177, 198-206) support the conclusions that a full complement of starch is necessary for full gravitropic sensitivity and that amyloplasts function in gravity perception. Since a presumed relatively small increase in plastid buoyant mass (N. sylvestris mutant versus Arabidopsis mutant) significantly improves the orientation of the N. sylvestris mutant roots, we suggest that plastids are the likeliest candidates to be triggering gravity perception in roots of both mutants.

  13. Manipulation of monoubiquitin improves chilling tolerance in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanan; Zhang, Meng; Guo, Qifang; Wang, Guokun; Gong, Jiangfeng; Xu, Ying; Wang, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a multifunctional protein that mainly functions to tag proteins for selective degradation by the 26S proteasome. We cloned an Ub gene TaUb2 from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) previously. To study the function of TaUB2 in chilling stress, sense and antisense Ub transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.), as well as wild type (WT) and vector control β-glucuronidase (T-GUS) plants, were used. Under stress, leaf wilting in sense plants was significantly less than in controls, but more severe in antisense plants. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) in sense plants were greater than controls, but lower in antisense plants during chilling stress and recovery. Less wilting in sense plants resulted from improved water status, which may be related to the accumulation of proline and solute sugar. Furthermore, as indicated by electrolyte leakage, membrane damage under stress was less in sense plants and more severe in antisense plants than controls. Consistent with electrolyte leakage, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was less in sense plants, but more in antisense plants compared to controls. Meanwhile, the less accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the greater antioxidant enzyme activity in sense plants implied the improved antioxidant competence by the overexpression of monoubiquitin gene Ta-Ub2 from wheat. We suggest that overexpressing Ub is a useful strategy to promote chilling tolerance. The improvement of ROS scavenging may be an important mechanism underlying the role of Ub in promoting plants tolerant to chilling stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduced gravitropic sensitivity in roots of a starch-deficient mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in seedlings of Nicotiana sylvestris Speg. et Comes wild-type (WT) and mutant NS 458 which has a defective plastid phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1.). Starch was greatly reduced in NS 458 compared to the WT, but small amounts of starch were detected in rootcap columella cells in NS 458 by light and electron microscopy. The roots of WT are more sensitive to gravity than mutant NS 458 roots since: (1) in mutant roots, curvature was reduced and delayed in the time course of curvature; (2) curvature of mutant roots was 24-56% that of WT roots over the range of induction periods tested; (3) in intermittent-stimulation experiments, curvature of mutant roots was 37% or less than that of WT roots in all treatments tested. The perception time, determined by intermittent-stimulation experiments, was < or = 5 s for WT roots and 30-60 s for mutant roots. The growth rates for WT and NS 458 roots were essentially equal. These results and our previous results with WT and starchless mutant Arabidopsis roots (Kiss et al. 1989, Planta 177, 198-206) support the conclusions that a full complement of starch is necessary for full gravitropic sensitivity and that amyloplasts function in gravity perception. Since a presumed relatively small increase in plastid buoyant mass (N. sylvestris mutant versus Arabidopsis mutant) significantly improves the orientation of the N. sylvestris mutant roots, we suggest that plastids are the likeliest candidates to be triggering gravity perception in roots of both mutants.

  15. Phytase activity in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) root exudates is exhibited by a purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Leung, Andy; Kuang, Rainbow; Wang, Yu; Leung, Priscilla; Lim, Boon-Leong

    2008-01-01

    Phytases are enzymes that catalyze liberation of inorganic phosphates from phytate, the major organic phosphorus in soil. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) responds to phosphorus starvation with an increase in extracellular phytase activity. By a three-step purification scheme, a phosphatase with phytase activity was purified 486-fold from tobacco root exudates to a specific activity of 6,028 nkat mg(-1) and an overall yield of 3%. SDS-PAGE revealed a single polypeptide of 64 kDa, thus indicating apparent homogeneity of the final enzyme preparation. Gel filtration chromatography suggested that the enzyme was a ca. 56 kDa monomeric protein. De novo sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry resulted in a tryptic peptide sequence that shares high homology with several plant purple acid phosphatases. The identity of the enzyme was further confirmed by molybdate-inhibition assay and cDNA cloning. The purified enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima at 5.0-5.5 and 45 degrees C, respectively, and were found to have high affinities for both p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP; K(m)=13.9 microM) and phytate (K(m)=14.7 microM), but a higher kcat for pNPP (2,056 s(-1)) than phytate (908 s(-1)). Although a broad specificity of the enzyme was observed for a range of physiological substrates in soil, maximum activity was achieved using mononucleotides as substrates. We conclude that the phytase activity in tobacco root exudates is exhibited by a purple acid phosphatase and its catalytic properties are pertinent to its role in mobilizing organic P in soil.

  16. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase maintains respiration and preserves photosynthetic capacity during moderate drought in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Wang, Jia; Martyn, Greg D; Rahimy, Farkhunda; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2014-11-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain includes an alternative oxidase (AOX) that is hypothesized to aid photosynthetic metabolism, perhaps by acting as an additional electron sink for photogenerated reductant or by dampening the generation of reactive oxygen species. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosystem I (PSI) absorbance, and biochemical and protein analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum 'Petit Havana SR1' wild-type plants with that of transgenic AOX knockdown (RNA interference) and overexpression lines, under both well-watered and moderate drought-stressed conditions. During drought, AOX knockdown lines displayed a lower rate of respiration in the light than the wild type, as confirmed by two independent methods. Furthermore, CO2 and light response curves indicated a nonstomatal limitation of photosynthesis in the knockdowns during drought, relative to the wild type. Also relative to the wild type, the knockdowns under drought maintained PSI and PSII in a more reduced redox state, showed greater regulated nonphotochemical energy quenching by PSII, and displayed a higher relative rate of cyclic electron transport around PSI. The origin of these differences may lie in the chloroplast ATP synthase amount, which declined dramatically in the knockdowns in response to drought. None of these effects were seen in plants overexpressing AOX. The results show that AOX is necessary to maintain mitochondrial respiration during moderate drought. In its absence, respiration rate slows and the lack of this electron sink feeds back on the photosynthetic apparatus, resulting in a loss of chloroplast ATP synthase that then limits photosynthetic capacity. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Glutathione Transferase from Trichoderma virens Enhances Cadmium Tolerance without Enhancing Its Accumulation in Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Prachy; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Ramachandran, V.; Eapen, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background Cadmium (Cd) is a major heavy metal pollutant which is highly toxic to plants and animals. Vast agricultural areas worldwide are contaminated with Cd. Plants take up Cd and through the food chain it reaches humans and causes toxicity. It is ideal to develop plants tolerant to Cd, without enhanced accumulation in the edible parts for human consumption. Glutathione transferases (GST) are a family of multifunctional enzymes known to have important roles in combating oxidative stresses induced by various heavy metals including Cd. Some GSTs are also known to function as glutathione peroxidases. Overexpression/heterologous expression of GSTs is expected to result in plants tolerant to heavy metals such as Cd. Results Here, we report cloning of a glutathione transferase gene from Trichoderma virens, a biocontrol fungus and introducing it into Nicotiana tabacum plants by Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Transgenic nature of the plants was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization and expression by reverse transcription PCR. Transgene (TvGST) showed single gene Mendelian inheritance. When transgenic plants expressing TvGST gene were exposed to different concentrations of Cd, they were found to be more tolerant compared to wild type plants, with transgenic plants showing lower levels of lipid peroxidation. Levels of different antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione transferase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, guiacol peroxidase and catalase showed enhanced levels in transgenic plants expressing TvGST compared to control plants, when exposed to Cd. Cadmium accumulation in the plant biomass in transgenic plants were similar or lower than wild-type plants. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that transgenic tobacco plants expressing a Trichoderma virens GST are more tolerant to Cd, without enhancing its accumulation in the plant biomass. It should be possible to extend the present results to crop plants for developing Cd tolerance and

  18. Multiplexed, targeted gene editing in Nicotiana benthamiana for glyco-engineering and monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Stoddard, Thomas J; Demorest, Zachary L; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Luo, Song; Clasen, Benjamin M; Cedrone, Frederic; Ray, Erin E; Coffman, Andrew P; Daulhac, Aurelie; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Biopharmaceutical glycoproteins produced in plants carry N-glycans with plant-specific residues core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose, which can significantly impact the activity, stability and immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we have employed sequence-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knock out two α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT) and the two β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) genes within Nicotiana benthamiana to generate plants with improved capacity to produce glycoproteins devoid of plant-specific residues. Among plants regenerated from N. benthamiana protoplasts transformed with TALENs targeting either the FucT or XylT genes, 50% (80 of 160) and 73% (94 of 129) had mutations in at least one FucT or XylT allele, respectively. Among plants regenerated from protoplasts transformed with both TALEN pairs, 17% (18 of 105) had mutations in all four gene targets, and 3% (3 of 105) plants had mutations in all eight alleles comprising both gene families; these mutations were transmitted to the next generation. Endogenous proteins expressed in the complete knockout line had N-glycans that lacked β(1,2)-xylose and had a significant reduction in core α(1,3)-fucose levels (40% of wild type). A similar phenotype was observed in the N-glycans of a recombinant rituximab antibody transiently expressed in the homozygous mutant plants. More importantly, the most desirable glycoform, one lacking both core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose residues, increased in the antibody from 2% when produced in the wild-type line to 55% in the mutant line. These results demonstrate the power of TALENs for multiplexed gene editing. Furthermore, the mutant N. benthamiana lines provide a valuable platform for producing highly potent biopharmaceutical products.

  19. A century of tobamovirus evolution in an Australian population of Nicotiana glauca.

    PubMed Central

    Fraile, A; Escriu, F; Aranda, M A; Malpica, J M; Gibbs, A J; García-Arenal, F

    1997-01-01

    The evolution over the past century of two tobamoviruses infecting populations of the immigrant plant Nicotiana glauca in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, has been studied. This plant species probably entered Australia in the 1870s. Isolates of the viruses were obtained from N. glauca specimens deposited in the NSW Herbarium between 1899 and 1972, and others were obtained from living plants in 1985 and 1993. It was found that the NSW N. glauca population was infected with tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (TMV) and tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV) before 1950 but only with TMGMV after that date. Half the pre-1950 infections were mixtures of the two viruses, and one was a recombinant. Remarkably, sequence analyses showed no increase in the genetic diversity among the TMGMV isolates over the period. However, for TMV, the genetic diversity of synonymous (but not of nonsynonymous) differences between isolates varied and was correlated with their time of isolation. TMV accumulated to smaller concentrations than TMGMV in N. glauca plants, and in mixed experimental infections, the accumulation of TMV, but not of TMGMV, was around 1/10 that in single infections. However, no evidence was found of isolate-specific interaction between the viruses. We conclude that although TMV may have colonized N. glauca in NSW earlier or faster than TMGMV, the latter virus caused a decrease of the TMV population below a threshold at which deleterious mutations were eliminated. This phenomenon, called Muller's ratchet, or a "mutational meltdown," probably caused the disappearance of TMV from the niche. PMID:9343184

  20. Gene Inactivation by CRISPR-Cas9 in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Suspension Cells.

    PubMed

    Mercx, Sébastien; Tollet, Jérémie; Magy, Bertrand; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Plant suspension cells are interesting hosts for the heterologous production of pharmacological proteins such as antibodies. They have the advantage to facilitate the containment and the application of good manufacturing practices. Furthermore, antibodies can be secreted to the extracellular medium, which makes the purification steps much simpler. However, improvements are still to be made regarding the quality and the production yield. For instance, the inactivation of proteases and the humanization of glycosylation are both important targets which require either gene silencing or gene inactivation. To this purpose, CRISPR-Cas9 is a very promising technique which has been used recently in a series of plant species, but not yet in plant suspension cells. Here, we sought to use the CRISPR-Cas9 system for gene inactivation in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells. We transformed a transgenic line expressing a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) with a binary vector containing genes coding for Cas9 and three guide RNAs targeting mCherry restriction sites, as well as a bialaphos-resistant (bar) gene for selection. To demonstrate gene inactivation in the transgenic lines, the mCherry gene was PCR-amplified and analyzed by electrophoresis. Seven out of 20 transformants displayed a shortened fragment, indicating that a deletion occurred between two target sites. We also analyzed the transformants by restriction fragment length polymorphism and observed that the three targeted restriction sites were hit. DNA sequencing of the PCR fragments confirmed either deletion between two target sites or single nucleotide deletion. We therefore conclude that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used in N. tabacum BY2 cells.

  1. Expression of Aspergillus nidulans phy gene in Nicotiana benthamiana produces active phytase with broad specificities.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae-Kyun; Oh, Sung; Kim, Seongdae; Park, Jae Sung; Vinod, Nagarajan; Jang, Kyung Min; Kim, Sei Chang; Choi, Chang Won; Ko, Suk-Min; Jeong, Dong Kee; Udayakumar, Rajangam

    2014-09-03

    A full-length phytase gene (phy) of Aspergillus nidulans was amplified from the cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and it was introduced into a bacterial expression vector, pET-28a. The recombinant protein (rPhy-E, 56 kDa) was overexpressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli culture, purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions and injected into rats as an immunogen. To express A. nidulans phytase in a plant, the full-length of phy was cloned into a plant expression binary vector, pPZP212. The resultant construct was tested for its transient expression by Agrobacterium-infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Compared with a control, the agro-infiltrated leaf tissues showed the presence of phy mRNA and its high expression level in N. benthamiana. The recombinant phytase (rPhy-P, 62 kDa) was strongly reacted with the polyclonal antibody against the nonglycosylated rPhy-E. The rPhy-P showed glycosylation, two pH optima (pH 4.5 and pH 5.5), an optimum temperature at 45~55 °C, thermostability and broad substrate specificities. After deglycosylation by peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F), the rPhy-P significantly lost the phytase activity and retained 1/9 of the original activity after 10 min of incubation at 45 °C. Therefore, the deglycosylation caused a significant reduction in enzyme thermostability. In animal experiments, oral administration of the rPhy-P at 1500 U/kg body weight/day for seven days caused a significant reduction of phosphorus excretion by 16% in rat feces. Besides, the rPhy-P did not result in any toxicological changes and clinical signs.

  2. Heterologous expression and characterization of choline oxidase from the soil bacterium Arthrobacter nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Ribitsch, D; Karl, W; Wehrschütz-Sigl, E; Tutz, S; Remler, P; Weber, H J; Gruber, K; Stehr, R; Bessler, C; Hoven, N; Sauter, K; Maurer, K H; Schwab, H

    2009-01-01

    In the course of a microbial screening of soil samples for new oxidases, different enrichment strategies were carried out. With choline as the only carbon source, a microorganism was isolated and identified as Arthrobacter nicotianae. From this strain, a gene coding for a choline oxidase was isolated from chromosomal DNA. This gene named codA was cloned in Escherichia coli BL21-Gold and the protein (An_CodA) heterologously overexpressed as a soluble intracellular protein of 59.1 kDa. Basic biochemical characterization of purified protein revealed a pH optimum of 7.4 and activity over a broad temperature range (15-70 degrees C). Specific activities were determined toward choline chloride (4.70 +/- 0.12 U/mg) and the synthetic analogs bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-dimethylammonium chloride (0.05 +/- 0.45 x 10(-2) U/mg) and tris-(2-hydroxyethyl)-methylammonium methylsulfate (0.01 +/- 0.12 x 10(-2) U/mg). With increasing number of oxidizable groups, a significant decrease in activity was noted. Determination of kinetic parameters in atmorspheric oxygen resulted in K (M) = 1.51 +/- 0.09 mM and V (max) = 42.73 +/- 0.42 mU/min for choline chloride and K (M) = 4.77 +/- 0.76 mM and V (max) = 48.40 +/- 2.88 mU/min for the reaction intermediate betaine aldehyde respectively. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of the products formed during the enzyme reaction with choline chloride showed that in vitro the intermediate betaine aldehyde exists also free in solution.

  3. High-Level Transient Expression of ER-Targeted Human Interleukin 6 in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Henrik; Mikschofsky, Heike; Koslowski, Roswitha; Meyer, Udo; Broer, Inge; Huckauf, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco plants can be used to express recombinant proteins that cannot be produced in a soluble and active form using traditional platforms such as Escherichia coli. We therefore expressed the human glycoprotein interleukin 6 (IL6) in two commercial tobacco cultivars (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Virginia and cv. Geudertheimer) as well as the model host N. benthamiana to compare different transformation strategies (stable vs. transient expression) and subcellular targeting (apoplast, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and vacuole). In T0 transgenic plants, the highest expression levels were achieved by ER targeting but the overall yields of IL6 were still low in the leaves (0.005% TSP in the ER, 0.0008% in the vacuole and 0.0005% in the apoplast). The apoplast variant accumulated to similar levels in leaves and seeds, whereas the ER-targeted variant was 1.2-fold more abundant in seeds and the vacuolar variant was 6-fold more abundant in seeds. The yields improved in subsequent generations, with the best-performing T2 plants producing the ER-targeted IL6 at 0.14% TSP in both leaves and seeds. Transient expression of ER-targeted IL6 in leaves using the MagnICON system resulted in yields of up to 7% TSP in N. benthamiana, but only 1% in N. tabacum cv. Virginia and 0.5% in cv. Geudertheimer. Although the commercial tobacco cultivars produced up to threefold more biomass than N. benthamiana, this was not enough to compensate for the lower overall yields. The recombinant IL6 produced by transient and stable expression in plants was biologically active and presented as two alternative bands matching the corresponding native protein. PMID:23152824

  4. Characterization of a heavy-ion induced white flower mutant of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Yusuke; Fujiwara, Makoto T; Takehisa, Hinako; Ohbu, Sumie; Saito, Hiroyuki; Ichida, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Yoriko; Abe, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We characterized a white flower mutant of allotetraploid N. tabacum as a DFR-deficient mutant; one copy of DFR has a cultivar-specific frameshift, while the other was deleted by heavy-ion irradiation. In most plants, white-flowered mutants have some kind of deficiency or defect in their anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. Nicotiana tabacum normally has pink petals, in which cyanidin is the main colored anthocyanidin. When a relevant gene in the cyanidin biosynthetic pathway is mutated, the petals show a white color. Previously, we generated white-flowered mutants of N. tabacum by heavy-ion irradiation, which is accepted as an effective mutagen. In this study, we determined which gene was responsible for the white-flowered phenotype of one of these mutants, cv. Xanthi white flower 1 (xwf1). Southern blot analysis using a DNA fragment of the dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) gene as a probe showed that the xwf1 mutant lacked signals that were present in wild-type genomic DNAs. Sequence analysis demonstrated that one copy of the DFR gene (NtDFR2) was absent from the genome of the xwf1 mutant. The other copy of the DFR gene (NtDFR1) contained a single-base deletion resulting in a frameshift mutation, which is a spontaneous mutation in cv. Xanthi. Introduction of NtDFR2 cDNA into the petal limbs of xwf1 by particle bombardment resulted in production of the pink-colored cells, whereas introduction of NtDFR1 cDNA did not. These results indicate that xwf1 is a DFR-deficient mutant. One copy of NtDFR1 harbors a spontaneous frameshift mutation, while the other copy of NtDFR2 was deleted by heavy-ion beam irradiation.

  5. Ethylene and the Regulation of Senescence Processes in Transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Thomas F.; Gonzalez-Carranza, Zinnia H.; Maunders, Martin J.; Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Exposure of plants to ethylene can influence a spectrum of developmental processes including organ senescence and abscission. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the gaseous regulator in Nicotiana sylvestris plants exhibiting a silenced or constitutive ethylene response. Methods Transgenic N. sylvestris plants were generated that either ectopically expressed the Arabidopsis mutant ethylene receptor ETR1-1 or the tomato EIN3-like (LeEIL1) gene. Highly expressing homozygous lines were selected and the time-course of development, from germination to organ senescence, was studied. Key Results Fifty percent of the homozygous Pro35S:ETR1-1 lines examined showed a high susceptibility to collapse prior to flowering, with plant death occurring within a few days of leaf wilting. The time-course of leaf senescence in the remaining Pro35S:ETR1-1 lines was visibly arrested compared to wild type (negative segregant) plants and this observation was reaffirmed by chlorophyll and protein analysis. Petal necrosis was also delayed in Pro35S:ETR1-1 lines and corolla abscission did not take place. When senescence of Pro35S:ETR1-1 plants did take place this was accompanied by leaf bleaching, but tissues remained fully turgid and showed no signs of collapse. A single Pro35S:LeEIL1 line was found to exhibit consistently accelerated leaf and flower senescence and precocious flower bud shedding. Conclusions These observations support a role for ethylene in regulating a spectrum of developmental events associated with organ senescence and tissue necrosis. Furthermore, the transgenic lines generated during this study may provide a valuable resource for exploring how senescence processes are regulated in plants. PMID:17901061

  6. Biocatalytic Asymmetric Alkene Reduction: Crystal Structure and Characterization of a Double Bond Reductase from Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The application of biocatalysis for the asymmetric reduction of activated C=C is a powerful tool for the manufacture of high-value chemical commodities. The biocatalytic potential of “-ene” reductases from the Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE) family of oxidoreductases is well-known; however, the specificity of these enzymes toward mainly small molecule substrates has highlighted the need to discover “-ene” reductases from different enzymatic classes to broaden industrial applicability. Here, we describe the characterization of a flavin-free double bond reductase from Nicotiana tabacum (NtDBR), which belongs to the leukotriene B4 dehydrogenase (LTD) subfamily of the zinc-independent, medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily of enzymes. Using steady-state kinetics and biotransformation reactions, we have demonstrated the regio- and stereospecificity of NtDBR against a variety of α,β-unsaturated activated alkenes. In addition to catalyzing the reduction of typical LTD substrates and several classical OYE-like substrates, NtDBR also exhibited complementary activity by reducing non-OYE substrates (i.e., reducing the exocyclic C=C double bond of (R)-pulegone) and in some cases showing an opposite stereopreference in comparison with the OYE family member pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) reductase. This serves to augment classical OYE “-ene” reductase activity and, coupled with its aerobic stability, emphasizes the potential industrial value of NtDBR. Furthermore, we also report the X-ray crystal structures of the holo-, binary NADP(H)-bound, and ternary [NADP+ and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde (9a)-bound] NtDBR complexes. These will underpin structure-driven site-saturated mutagenesis studies aimed at enhancing the reactivity, stereochemistry, and specificity of this enzyme. PMID:27547488

  7. Production of an active anti-CD20-hIL-2 immunocytokine in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Carla; Novelli, Flavia; Salzano, Anna M; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Pioli, Claudio; Donini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 murine or chimeric antibodies (Abs) have been used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and other diseases characterized by overactive or dysfunctional B cells. Anti-CD20 Abs demonstrated to be effective in inducing regression of B-cell lymphomas, although in many cases patients relapse following treatment. A promising approach to improve the outcome of mAb therapy is the use of anti-CD20 antibodies to deliver cytokines to the tumour microenvironment. In particular, IL-2-based immunocytokines have shown enhanced antitumour activity in several preclinical studies. Here, we report on the engineering of an anti-CD20-human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) immunocytokine (2B8-Fc-hIL2) based on the C2B8 mAb (Rituximab) and the resulting ectopic expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The scFv-Fc-engineered immunocytokine is fully assembled in plants with minor degradation products as assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Purification yields using protein-A affinity chromatography were in the range of 15-20 mg/kg of fresh leaf weight (FW). Glycopeptide analysis confirmed the presence of a highly homogeneous plant-type glycosylation. 2B8-Fc-hIL2 and the cognate 2B8-Fc antibody, devoid of hIL-2, were assayed by flow cytometry on Daudi cells revealing a CD20 binding activity comparable to that of Rituximab and were effective in eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of human PBMC versus Daudi cells, demonstrating their functional integrity. In 2B8-Fc-hIL2, IL-2 accessibility and biological activity were verified by flow cytometry and cell proliferation assay. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a recombinant immunocytokine based on the therapeutic Rituximab antibody scaffold, whose expression in plants may be a valuable tool for NHLs treatment.

  8. Glyphosate inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthease from suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.L.; Gaines, C.G.; Jensen, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    Treatment of isogenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris Speg, et Comes with glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) led to elevated levels of intracellular shikimate (364-fold increase by 1.0 millimolar glyphosate). In the presence of glyphosate, it is likely that most molecules of shikimate originate from the action of 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase-Mn since this isozyme, in contrast to the DAHP synthase-Co isozyme, is insensitive to inhibition by glyphosate. 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (EC 2.5.1.19) from N. silvestris was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of glyphosate and possessed a single inhibitor binding site. Rigorous kinetic studies of EPSP synthase required resolution from the multiple phosphatase activities present in crude extracts, a result achieved by ion-exchange column chromatography. Although EPSP synthase exhibited a broad pH profile (50% of maximal activity between pH 6.2 and 8.5), sensitivity to glyphosate increased dramatically with increasing pH within this range. In accordance with these data and the pK/sub a/ values of glyphosate, it is likely that the ionic form of glyphosate inhibiting EPSP synthase is COO/sup -/CH/sub 2/NH/sub 2//sup +/CH/sub 2/PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and that a completely ionized phosphono group is essential for inhibition. At pH 7.0, inhibition was competitive with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (K/sub i/ = 1.25 micromolar) and uncompetitive with respect to shikimate-3-P (K/sub i/ = 18.3 micromolar). All data were consistent with a mechanism of inhibition in which glyphosate competes with PEP for binding to an (enzyme:shikimate-3-P) complex and ultimately forms the dead-end complex of (enzyme:shikimate-3-P:glyphosate). 36 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  9. Optimisation of contained Nicotiana tabacum cultivation for the production of recombinant protein pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Richard; Atkinson, Christopher J; Paul, Matthew; Hassan, Sally; Drake, Pascal M W; Sexton, Amy L; Santa-Cruz, Simon; James, David; Hamp, Keith; Gutteridge, Colin; Ma, Julian K-C

    2010-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum is emerging as a crop of choice for production of recombinant protein pharmaceuticals. Although there is significant commercial expertise in tobacco farming, different cultivation practices are likely to be needed when the objective is to optimise protein expression, yield and extraction, rather than the traditional focus on biomass and alkaloid production. Moreover, pharmaceutical transgenic tobacco plants are likely to be grown initially within a controlled environment, the parameters for which have yet to be established. Here, the growth characteristics and functional recombinant protein yields for two separate transgenic tobacco plant lines were investigated. The impacts of temperature, day-length, compost nitrogen content, radiation and plant density were examined. Temperature was the only environmental variable to affect IgG concentration in the plants, with higher yields observed in plants grown at lower temperature. In contrast, temperature, supplementary radiation and plant density all affected the total soluble protein yield in the same plants. Transgenic plants expressing a second recombinant protein (cyanovirin-N) responded differently to IgG transgenic plants to elevated temperature, with an increase in cyanovirin-N concentration, although the effect of the environmental variables on total soluble protein yields was the same as the IgG plants. Planting density and radiation levels were important factors affecting variability of the two recombinant protein yields in transgenic plants. Phenotypic differences were observed between the two transgenic plant lines and non-transformed N. tabacum, but the effect of different growing conditions was consistent between the three lines. Temperature, day length, radiation intensity and planting density all had a significant impact on biomass production. Taken together, the data suggest that recombinant protein yield is not affected substantially by environmental factors other than growth

  10. Increased Salt and Drought Tolerance by D-Ononitol Production in Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed Central

    Sheveleva, E.; Chmara, W.; Bohnert, H. J.; Jensen, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA encoding myo-inositol O-methyltransferase (IMT1) has been transferred into Nicotiana tabacum cultivar SR1. During drought and salt stress, transformants (I5A) accumulated the methylated inositol D-ononitol in amounts exceeding 35 [mu]mol g-1 fresh weight In I5A, photosynthetic CO2 fixation was inhibited less during salt stress and drought, and the plants recovered faster than wild type. One day after rewatering drought-stressed plants, I5A photosynthesis had recovered 75% versus 57% recovery with cultivar SR1 plants. After 2.5 weeks of 250 mM NaCl in hydroponic solution, I5A fixed 4.9 [plus or minus] 1.4 [mu]mol CO2 m-2 s-1, whereas SR1 fixed 2.5 [plus or minus] 0.6 [mu]mol CO2 m-2 s-1. myo-Inositol, the substrate for IMT1, increases in tobacco under stress. Preconditioning of I5A plants in 50 mM NaCl increased D-ononitol amounts and resulted in increased protection when the plants were stressed subsequently with 150 mM NaCl. Pro, Suc, Fru, and Glc showed substantial diurnal fluctuations in amounts, but D-ononitol did not. Plant transformation resulting in stress-inducible, stable solute accumulation appears to provide better protection under drought and salt-stress conditions than strategies using osmotic adjustment by metabolites that are constitutively present. PMID:12223867

  11. [Induction of polyploid in hairy roots of Nicotiana tabacum and its plant regeneration].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lili; Shi, Heping; Yu, Wu; Tsang, Po Keung Eric; Chow, Cheuk Fai Stephen

    2014-04-01

    By genetic transformation with Agrobacterum rhizogenes and artificial chromosome doubling techniques, we studied the induction of hairy roots and their polyploidization, and subsequent plant regeneration and nicotine determination to enhance the content of nicotine in Nicotiana tabacum. The results show that hairy roots could be induced from the basal surface of leaf explants of N. tabacum 8 days after inoculation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC15834. The percentage of the rooting leaf explants was 100% 15 days after inoculation. The hairy roots could grow rapidly and autonomously on solid or liquid phytohormones-free MS medium. The transformation was confirmed by PCR amplification of rol gene of Ri plasmid and paper electrophoresis of opines from N. tabacum hairy roots. The highest rate of polyploidy induction, more than 64.71%, was obtained after treatment of hairy roots with 0.1% colchicine for 36 h. The optimum medium for plant regeneration from polyploid hairy roots was MS+2.0 mg/L 6-BA +0.2 mg/L NAA. Compared with the control diploid plants, the hairy roots-regenerated plants had weak apical dominance, more axillary buds and more narrow leaves; whereas the polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants had thicker stems, shorter internodes and the colour, width and thickness of leaves were significantly higher than that of the control. Observation of the number of chromosomes in their root tip cells reveals that the obtained polyploid regenerated plants were tetraploidy, with 96 (4n = 96) chromosomes. Pot-grown experiments showed compared to the control, the flowering was delayed by 21 days in diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants and polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants. GC-MS detection shows that the content of nicotine in polyploid plants was about 6.90 and 4.57 times the control and the diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants, respectively.

  12. Heterologous expression of a rice miR395 gene in Nicotiana tabacum impairs sulfate homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ning; Yuan, Shuangrong; Li, Zhigang; Li, Dayong; Hu, Qian; Luo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur participates in many important mechanisms and pathways of plant development. The most common source of sulfur in soil –SO42−– is absorbed into root tissue and distributed into aerial part through vasculature system, where it is reduced into sulfite and finally sulfide within the subcellular organs such as chloroplasts and mitochondria and used for cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. MicroRNAs are involved in many regulation pathways by repressing the expression of their target genes. MiR395 family in Arabidopsis thaliana has been reported to be an important regulator involved in sulfate transport and assimilation, and a high-affinity sulphate transporter and three ATP sulfurylases (ATPS) were the target genes of AthmiR395 (Arabidopsis thaliana miR395). We have cloned a miR395 gene from rice (Oryza sativa) and studied its function in plant nutritional response. Our results indicated that in rice, transcript level of OsamiR395 (Oryza sativa miR395) increased under sulfate deficiency conditions, and the two predicted target genes of miR395 were down-regulated under the same conditions. Overexpression of OsamiR395h in tobacco impaired its sulfate homeostasis, and sulfate distribution was also slightly impacted among leaves of different ages. One sulfate transporter (SULTR) gene NtaSULTR2 was identified to be the target of miR395 in Nicotiana tobacum, which belongs to low affinity sulfate transporter group. Both miR395 and NtaSULTR2 respond to sulfate starvation in tobacco. PMID:27350219

  13. Combining Transcriptome Assemblies from Multiple De Novo Assemblers in the Allo-Tetraploid Plant Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Nakasugi, Kenlee; Crowhurst, Ross; Bally, Julia; Waterhouse, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Nicotiana benthamiana is an allo-tetraploid plant, which can be challenging for de novo transcriptome assemblies due to homeologous and duplicated gene copies. Transcripts generated from such genes can be distinct yet highly similar in sequence, with markedly differing expression levels. This can lead to unassembled, partially assembled or mis-assembled contigs. Due to the different properties of de novo assemblers, no one assembler with any one given parameter space can re-assemble all possible transcripts from a transcriptome. Results In an effort to maximise the diversity and completeness of de novo assembled transcripts, we utilised four de novo transcriptome assemblers, TransAbyss, Trinity, SOAPdenovo-Trans, and Oases, using a range of k-mer sizes and different input RNA-seq read counts. We complemented the parameter space biologically by using RNA from 10 plant tissues. We then combined the output of all assemblies into a large super-set of sequences. Using a method from the EvidentialGene pipeline, the combined assembly was reduced from 9.9 million de novo assembled transcripts to about 235,000 of which about 50,000 were classified as primary. Metrics such as average bit-scores, feature response curves and the ability to distinguish paralogous or homeologous transcripts, indicated that the EvidentialGene processed assembly was of high quality. Of 35 RNA silencing gene transcripts, 34 were identified as assembled to full length, whereas in a previous assembly using only one assembler, 9 of these were partially assembled. Conclusions To achieve a high quality transcriptome, it is advantageous to implement and combine the output from as many different de novo assemblers as possible. We have in essence taking the ‘best’ output from each assembler while minimising sequence redundancy. We have also shown that simultaneous assessment of a variety of metrics, not just focused on contig length, is necessary to gauge the quality of assemblies. PMID

  14. Association of carbonic anhydrase with a Calvin cycle enzyme complex in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Jebanathirajah, J A; Coleman, J R

    1998-02-01

    Chloroplast-localized carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1), an enzyme which catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2, appears to be associated with other enzymes of the Calvin cycle in a large multienzyme complex. Gel-filtration fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) of soluble proteins obtained by osmotic lysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Carlson) chloroplasts results in the co-elution of a protein complex of greater than 600 kDa which includes CA, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), phosphoribulokinase (PRK), and ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. Anion-exchange FPLC of chloroplast extracts indicates that there is an association of CA with other proteins that modifies its elution profile in a NaCl gradient, and that Rubisco co-elutes with the fractions containing CA. Following a protocol described by Süss et al. (1993, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518), limited protease treatment of chloroplast extracts was used to show that the association of PRK with other chloroplast proteins appears to protect a number of lysine and arginine residues which may be involved in specific protein-protein interactions. A similar treatment of CA indicates some protection of these residues when CA is associated with other chloroplast polypeptides but the level of protection is not as profound as that exhibited by PRK. In concert with previously published immunolocalization studies, these data indicate that CA may be associated with Rubisco at the stromal periphery of a Calvin cycle enzyme complex in which PRK is more centrally located and associated with thylakoid membranes.

  15. Suppression of plant defense responses by extracellular metabolites from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonghee; Yang, Dong Sik; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Sumner, Lloyd W; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2013-04-18

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pstab) is the causal agent of wildfire disease in tobacco plants. Several pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae produce a phytotoxic extracellular metabolite called coronatine (COR). COR has been shown to suppress plant defense responses. Interestingly, Pstab does not produce COR but still actively suppresses early plant defense responses. It is not clear if Pstab produces any extracellular metabolites that actively suppress early defense during bacterial pathogenesis. We found that the Pstab extracellular metabolite extracts (Pstab extracts) remarkably suppressed stomatal closure and nonhost hypersensitive response (HR) cell death induced by a nonhost pathogen, P. syringae pv. tomato T1 (Pst T1), in Nicotiana benthamiana. We also found that the accumulation of nonhost pathogens, Pst T1 and P. syringae pv. glycinea (Psgly), was increased in N. benthamiana plants upon treatment with Pstab extracts . The HR cell death induced by Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (INF1), gene-for-gene interaction (Pto/AvrPto and Cf-9/AvrCf-9) and ethanol was not delayed or suppressed by Pstab extracts. We performed metabolite profiling to investigate the extracellular metabolites from Pstab using UPLC-qTOF-MS and identified 49 extracellular metabolites from the Pstab supernatant culture. The results from gene expression profiling of PR-1, PR-2, PR-5, PDF1.2, ABA1, COI1, and HSR203J suggest that Pstab extracellular metabolites may interfere with SA-mediated defense pathways. In this study, we found that Pstab extracts suppress plant defense responses such as stomatal closure and nonhost HR cell death induced by the nonhost bacterial pathogen Pst T1 in N. benthamiana.

  16. Elucidating the physiological and biochemical responses of different tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) genotypes to lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Maodzeka, Antony; Hussain, Nazim; Wei, Liquan; Zvobgo, Gerald; Mapodzeke, James Mutemachani; Adil, Muhammad Faheem; Jabeen, Salma; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Lixi; Shamsi, Imran Haider

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of lead (Pb) uptake and toxicity were investigated in a hydroponic culture using 7 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) genotypes (Bina 1 [B1], Kutsaga Mammoth 10 [KM10], Nanjing 3 [N3], Kutsaga 35 [K35], Kutsaga E1 [KE1], Cocker 176 [C176], and Kutsaga RK6 [KRK6]) that differed in Pb tolerance. Lead was applied as a solution of Pb nitrate at concentrations of 0 μM, 10 μM, 250 μM, and 500 μM. After 4 wk of Pb treatment, tissue biomass and photosynthetic parameters were measured and elemental analysis was performed. The results showed decreases in growth and photosynthetic parameters with increases in Pb concentration compared with the control. The least reduction in the recorded physiological parameters was noted in K35, whereas the greatest reduction was observed in N3, which is an obvious indication of genotypic differences. Activities of peroxidase, catalase, and malondialdehyde increased significantly with increases in Pb concentration, with genotypes K35 and N3 showing the least and the greatest reduction, respectively. The results demonstrate the phototoxic nature of Pb on plants, and it can be concluded that in Pb-prone areas genotypes K35 and B1 can be used for cultivation because they can grow efficiently in the presence of high Pb concentrations while restricting Pb uptake in the aboveground parts, as seen by the higher Pb tolerance index. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:175-181. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  17. [Transgenic plant regeneration of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) haboring mammalian cyp2e1 gene].

    PubMed

    Li, Peihan; Xiang, Taihe; Xie, Jun; Feng, Ting; Lu, Wenyi

    2012-10-01

    CYP2E1 enzyme encoded by cyp2e1 gene plays an important role in metabolism of heterogeneous organics in mammalian liver cells. The transgenic plant with cyp2e1 can metabolize various low molecular weight organic pollutants. However, it is unclear the mechanism of expression control of cyp2e1 in transgenic plant. In this study, plasmid pSLD50-6 with cyp2e1 and pKH200 with gus as control were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 separately. Then, the cyp2e1 or gus genes were transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and the transgenic plants were regenerated via Agrobacterium tumefaciens method. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze the cyp2e1 gene expression. The expression of cyp2e1 in transgenic tobacco with cyp2e1 decreased obviously treated by ethyl alcohol and reduced slightly by benzene and toluene, while it enhanced by acetone, formaldehyde and oxygen deficit in different levels. In addition, the gene expression of NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in the transgenic tobacco with cyp2e1 were increased significantly treated by benzene, which showed that NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in transgenic tobacco have relation with CYP2E1 detoxication process. It suggested that the NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in transgenic plant formed the requirement in mammalian and participated in the electron transport chain of CYP2E1 enzyme catalytic process.

  18. Reconstitution of the Costunolide Biosynthetic Pathway in Yeast and Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Cankar, Katarina; Goedbloed, Miriam; Charnikhova, Tatsiana; Verstappen, Francel W. A.; de Vos, Ric C. H.; Beekwilder, Jules; van der Krol, Sander; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2011-01-01

    The sesquiterpene costunolide has a broad range of biological activities and is the parent compound for many other biologically active sesquiterpenes such as parthenolide. Two enzymes of the pathway leading to costunolide have been previously characterized: germacrene A synthase (GAS) and germacrene A oxidase (GAO), which together catalyse the biosynthesis of germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid. However, the gene responsible for the last step toward costunolide has not been characterized until now. Here we show that chicory costunolide synthase (CiCOS), CYP71BL3, can catalyse the oxidation of germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid to yield costunolide. Co-expression of feverfew GAS (TpGAS), chicory GAO (CiGAO), and chicory COS (CiCOS) in yeast resulted in the biosynthesis of costunolide. The catalytic activity of TpGAS, CiGAO and CiCOS was also verified in planta by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Mitochondrial targeting of TpGAS resulted in a significant increase in the production of germacrene A compared with the native cytosolic targeting. When the N. benthamiana leaves were co-infiltrated with TpGAS and CiGAO, germacrene A almost completely disappeared as a result of the presence of CiGAO. Transient expression of TpGAS, CiGAO and CiCOS in N. benthamiana leaves resulted in costunolide production of up to 60 ng.g−1 FW. In addition, two new compounds were formed that were identified as costunolide-glutathione and costunolide-cysteine conjugates. PMID:21858047

  19. Geographic variation of floral traits in Nicotiana glauca : Relationships with biotic and abiotic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nattero, Julieta; Sérsic, Alicia N.; Cocucci, Andrea A.

    2011-09-01

    Geographic pattern of phenotypic variation can appear in a clinal or a mosaic fashion and can evidence adaptive or non-adaptive variation. To shed light on the mechanisms underlying this variation, we studied the relationships between geographic variation of floral traits and both biotic and abiotic factors of the hummingbird-pollinated plant, Nicotiana glauca, across its natural range. We obtained floral measures of 38 populations from an area about 1600 km long and 1050 km wide and an altitude range from 7 to over 3400 m. We used a MANOVA to detect between-population differentiations in flower traits and a DFA to determine the traits that best discriminate between populations. To test for associations between floral traits and climatic variables we used correlation analysis. We explored any possible distance-based pattern of variation (either geographic or altitudinal) in floral traits or bill length of pollinators using Mantel tests. Finally, we used a multiple regression to analyze simultaneously the effects and relative importance of abiotic predictor variables and bill length on corolla length. We found a high variation in flower traits among populations. Morphometric traits were the ones that best discriminated across populations. There was a clinal pattern of floral phenotypic variation explained by climatic factors. Differences in floral phenotypic distances were structured by altitudinal distances but not by geographic distances. Bill length of the hummingbird pollinators was structured both by altitudinal and geographic distances. Differences in bill length of hummingbird pollinators explained differences in corolla length across populations. Our findings support the assumption of flower evolution at a broad geographic scale. Floral traits seem to be structured not only by altitude but also by climatic factors.

  20. Native Bacterial Endophytes Promote Host Growth in a Species-Specific Manner; Phytohormone Manipulations Do Not Result in Common Growth Responses

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hoang Hoa; Schmidt, Dominik D.; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2008-01-01

    Background All plants in nature harbor a diverse community of endophytic bacteria which can positively affect host plant growth. Changes in plant growth frequently reflect alterations in phytohormone homoeostasis by plant-growth-promoting (PGP) rhizobacteria which can decrease ethylene (ET) levels enzymatically by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase or produce indole acetic acid (IAA). Whether these common PGP mechanisms work similarly for different plant species has not been rigorously tested. Methodology/ Principal Findings We isolated bacterial endophytes from field-grown Solanum nigrum; characterized PGP traits (ACC deaminase activity, IAA production, phosphate solubilization and seedling colonization); and determined their effects on their host, S. nigrum, as well as on another Solanaceous native plant, Nicotiana attenuata. In S. nigrum, a majority of isolates that promoted root growth were associated with ACC deaminase activity and IAA production. However, in N. attenuata, IAA but not ACC deaminase activity was associated with root growth. Inoculating N. attenuata and S. nigrum with known PGP bacteria from a culture collection (DSMZ) reinforced the conclusion that the PGP effects are not highly conserved. Conclusions/ Significance We conclude that natural endophytic bacteria with PGP traits do not have general and predictable effects on the growth and fitness of all host plants, although the underlying mechanisms are conserved. PMID:18628963

  1. Population Structure of Phytophthora nicotianae Reveals Host-Specific Lineages on Brinjal, Ridge Gourd, and Tomato in South India.

    PubMed

    Chowdappa, P; Kumar, B J Nirmal; Kumar, S P Mohan; Madhura, S; Bhargavi, B Reddi; Lakshmi, M Jyothi

    2016-12-01

    Severe outbreaks of Phytophthora fruit rot on brinjal, ridge gourd, and tomato have been observed since 2011 in Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Telangana, and Tamil Nadu states of India. Therefore, 76 Phytophthora nicotianae isolates, recovered from brinjal (17), ridge gourd (40), and tomato (19) from different localities in these states during the June to December cropping season of 2012 and 2013, were characterized based on phenotypic and genotypic analyses and aggressiveness on brinjal, tomato, and ridge gourd. All brinjal and ridge gourd isolates were A2, while tomato isolates were both A1 (13) and A2 (6). All isolates were metalaxyl sensitive. In addition, isolates were genotyped for three mitochondrial (ribosomal protein L5-small subunit ribosomal RNA [rpl5-rns], small subunit ribosomal RNA-cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 [rns-cox2], and cox2+spacer) and three nuclear loci (hypothetical protein [hyp], scp-like extracellular protein [scp], and beta-tubulin [β-tub]). All regions were polymorphic but nuclear regions were more variable than mitochondrial regions. The network analysis of genotypes using the combined dataset of three nuclear regions revealed a host-specific association. However, the network generated using mitochondrial regions limited such host-specific groupings only to brinjal isolates. P. nicotianae isolates were highly aggressive and produced significantly (P ≤ 0.01) larger lesions on their respective host of origin than on other hosts. The results indicate significant genetic variation in the population of P. nicotianae, leading to identification of host-specific lineages responsible for severe outbreaks on brinjal, ridge gourd, and tomato.

  2. S-Glycoprotein-Like Protein Regulates Defense Responses in Nicotiana Plants against Ralstonia solanacearum1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Maimbo, Milimo; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    RsRGA4 (for Ralstonia solanacearum-responsive gene A4) encodes a polypeptide similar to S-locus glycoprotein (SGP) from Brassica rapa and SGP-like proteins from Ipomoea trifida and Medicago truncatula. Therefore, we designated RsRGA4 as NtSGLP (for Nicotiana tabacum SGP-like protein) and NbSGLP (its Nicotiana benthamiana ortholog). NbSGLP is expressed in root, leaf, petal, gynoecium, and stamen. Expression of NbSGLP was strongly induced by inoculation with an avirulent strain of R. solanacearum (Rs8107) and slightly enhanced by inoculation with virulent R. solanacearum (RsOE1-1). Expression of NbSGLP was induced by inoculation with an hrpY-deficient mutant of RsOE1-1 and Rs8107. Expression was also induced by aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid and salicylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSGLP enhanced the growth of Rs8107. Growth of RsOE1-1 and appearance of wilt symptoms were also accelerated in silenced plants. Expression of PR-1a and EREBP was reduced, and markers for basal defense, such as callose deposition and reduced vascular flow, were compromised in NbSGLP-silenced plants. Moreover, growth of Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci, and P. syringae pv mellea was also enhanced in the silenced plants. On the other hand, silencing of NbSGLP did not interfere with the appearance of the hypersensitive response. NbSGLP was secreted in a signal peptide-dependent manner. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression of NbSGLP induced PR-1a and EREBP expression, callose deposition, and reduced vascular flow. NbSGLP-induced callose deposition and reduced vascular flow were not observed in salicylic acid-deficient N. benthamiana NahG plants. Taken together, SGLP might have a role in the induction of basal defense in Nicotiana plants. PMID:20118275

  3. Genetic processes in intergeneric cell hybrids Atropa + Nicotiana : 1. Genetic constitution of cells of different clonal origin grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gleba, Y Y; Momot, V P; Okolot, A N; Cherep, N N; Skarzhynskaya, M V; Kotov, V

    1983-06-01

    The genetic constitution of the cell hybrids Atropa belladonna + Nicotiana chinensis, obtained by cloning of individual heteroplasmic protoplast fusion products (Gleba et al. 1982) and cultured in vitro for 12 months, has been studied. The study comprised 11 hybrid cell clones of independent origin and included analysis of a) chromosome number, size, morphology, and relative position in metaphase plates, b) multiple molecular forms of the enzymes esterase and amylase, and c) relative nuclear DNA content. The data obtained permit us to conclude that, after one year of unorganized growth in vitro, the cells of most (8) clones had retained chromosomes of both parents, while species-specific elimination of nearly all Atropa chromosomes had occurred in three clones. About half of the non-segregating clones possess 120-150 chromosomes including 50-70 of Atropa and 50-90 of Nicotiana. Other clones are polyploid and possess 200-250 chromosomes with a predominance of either Atropa or Nicotiana chromosome types. Only a few chromosomal changes (reconstituted chromosomes, ring chromosomes) have been detected. In some metaphase plates, chromosomes of the two parents tend to group separately, indicating non-random arrangement of chromosomes of the two parents within the hybrid nucleus. Cytophotometric studies of the relative nuclear DNA content showed that distribution histograms for cell clones were similar to those of non-hybrid cultured cells. Cell populations were relatively homogenous and do not indicate any genetic instability as a result of hybridization between remote plant species. Biochemical analysis of isoenzyme patterns confirmed that in most cell clones, species-specific multiple molecular forms of esterase and amylase from both parents were present, i.e. genetic material of both parental species was expressed in the cell hybrids.

  4. Molecular Linkage Mapping and Marker-Trait Associations with NlRPT, a Downy Mildew Resistance Gene in Nicotiana langsdorffii

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shouan; Gao, Muqiang; Zaitlin, David

    2012-01-01

    Nicotiana langsdorffii is one of two species of Nicotiana known to express an incompatible interaction with the oomycete Peronospora tabacina, the causal agent of tobacco blue mold disease. We previously showed that incompatibility is due to the hypersensitive response (HR), and plants expressing the HR are resistant to P. tabacina at all stages of growth. Resistance is due to a single dominant gene in N. langsdorffii accession S-4-4 that we have named NlRPT. In further characterizing this unique host-pathogen interaction, NlRPT has been placed on a preliminary genetic map of the N. langsdorffii genome. Allelic scores for five classes of DNA markers were determined for 90 progeny of a “modified backcross” involving two N. langsdorffii inbred lines and the related species N. forgetiana. All markers had an expected segregation ratio of 1:1, and were scored in a common format. The map was constructed with JoinMap 3.0, and loci showing excessive transmission distortion were removed. The linkage map consists of 266 molecular marker loci defined by 217 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 26 simple-sequence repeats (SSRs), 10 conserved orthologous sequence markers, nine inter-simple sequence repeat markers, and four target region amplification polymorphism markers arranged in 12 linkage groups with a combined length of 1062 cM. NlRPT is located on linkage group three, flanked by four AFLP markers and one SSR. Regions of skewed segregation were detected on LGs 1, 5, and 9. Markers developed for N. langsdorffii are potentially useful genetic tools for other species in Nicotiana section Alatae, as well as in N. benthamiana. We also investigated whether AFLPs could be used to infer genetic relationships within N. langsdorffii and related species from section Alatae. A phenetic analysis of the AFLP data showed that there are two main lineages within N. langsdorffii, and that both contain populations expressing dominant resistance to P. tabacina. PMID

  5. Two new benzolactones from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qinpeng; Xu, Xingmeng; Zhang, Fengmei; Xiang, Nengjun; He, Pei; Si, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Ruizhi; Wang, Kunmiao; Liu, Zhihua; Liu, Chunbo; Miao, Mingming

    2016-07-01

    Two new benzolactones, 5-methyl-6-prenyl-isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (1), 5-hydroxymethyl-6-prenyl-isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (2), together with four known phenolic compounds (3-6), were isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1-6 were evaluated for their anti-tobacco mosaic virus (anti-TMV) activities. The results showed that compounds 1-6 exhibited high anti-TMV activities with inhibition rates in the range of 16.9-26.2%, respectively.

  6. A study of morphology, cytology and sterility in interspecific hybrids and amphidiploids of Nicotiana knightiana X N. umbratica.

    PubMed

    Gangadevi, T; Rao, P N; Rao, B H; Satyanarayana, K V

    1985-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids and amphidiploids of Nicotiana knightiana Goodspeed (n= 12)x N. umbratica Burbidge (n = 23) resembled either parent in some characters and were intermediate in other characters. The F1 hybrids (2n = 35) showed mostly univalents during meiosis, while the amphidiploids (2n = 70) formed bivalents almost regularly. The former were completely sterile and the latter fully male fertile but predominantly female sterile. This female sterility was due to disintegration of the embryo sacs leading to collapsed ovules. The few fertile ovules, however, showed normal development of embryo sac and embryo. The occurrence of fertile and sterile ovules was believed to be due to segregation of the genes governing sterility.

  7. Flower-bud formation in explants of photoperiodic and day-neutral Nicotiana biotypes and its bearing on the regulation of flower formation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeevan, M.S.; Lang, A. )

    1993-05-15

    The capacity to form flower buds in thin-layer explants was studied in Nicotiana of several species, cultivars, and lines of differing in their response to photoperiod. This capacity was found in all biotypes examined and could extend into sepals and corolla. It varied depending on genotype, source tissue and its developmental state, and composition of the culture medium, particularly the levels of glucose, auxin, and cytokinin. It was greatest in the two day-neutral plants examined, Samsun tobacco and Nicotiana rustica, where it extended from the inflorescence region down the vegetative stem, in a basipetally decreasing gradient; it was least in the two qualitative photoperiodic plants studied, the long-day plant Nicotiana silvestris and the short-day plant Maryland Mammoth tobacco, the quantitative long-day plant Nicotiana alata and the quantitative short-day plant Nicotiana otophora line 38-G-81, where it was limited to the pedicels (and, in some cases, the sepals). Regardless of the photoperiodic response of the source plants, the response was the same in explants cultured under long and short days. The capacity to form flow buds in explants is present in all Nicotiana biotypes studied supports the idea that it is regulated by the same mechanism(s), regardless of the plant's photoperiodic character. However, flower formation in the explants is not identical with de novo flower formation in a hitherto vegetative plant: it is rather the expression of a floral state already established in the plant, although it can vary widely in extent and spatial distribution. Culture conditions that permit flower-bud formation in an explant are conditions that maintain the floral state and encourage its expression; conditions under which no flower buds are formed reduce this state and/or prevent its expression. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A survey of resistance to Tomato bushy stunt virus in the genus Nicotiana reveals that the hypersensitive response is triggered by one of three different viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Angel, Carlos A; Schoelz, James E

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we screened 22 Nicotiana spp. for resistance to the tombusviruses Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), Cucumber necrosis virus, and Cymbidium ringspot virus. Eighteen species were resistant, and resistance was manifested in at least two different categories. In all, 13 species responded with a hypersensitive response (HR)-type resistance, whereas another five were resistant but either had no visible response or responded with chlorotic lesions rather than necrotic lesions. Three different TBSV proteins were found to trigger HR in Nicotiana spp. in an agroinfiltration assay. The most common avirulence (avr) determinant was the TBSV coat protein P41, a protein that had not been previously recognized as an avr determinant. A mutational analysis confirmed that the coat protein rather than the viral RNA sequence was responsible for triggering HR, and it triggered HR in six species in the Alatae section. The TBSV P22 movement protein triggered HR in two species in section Undulatae (Nicotiana glutinosa and N. edwardsonii) and one species in section Alatae (N. forgetiana). The TBSV P19 RNA silencing suppressor protein triggered HR in sections Sylvestres (N. sylvestris), Nicotiana (N. tabacum), and Alatae (N. bonariensis). In general, Nicotiana spp. were capable of recognizing only one tombusvirus avirulence determinant, with the exceptions of N. bonariensis and N. forgetiana, which were each able to recognize P41, as well as P19 and P22, respectively. Agroinfiltration failed to detect the TBSV avr determinants responsible for triggering HR in N. arentsii, N. undulata, and N. rustica. This study illustrates the breadth and variety of resistance responses to tombusviruses that exists in the Nicotiana genus.

  9. Altered sucrose metabolism impacts plant biomass production and flower development.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather D; Beamish, Leigh; Reid, Anya; Park, Ji-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2010-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) was transformed with three genes involved in sucrose metabolism, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase, EC 2.7.7.9), sucrose synthase (SuSy, EC 2.4.1.13) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS, EC 2.4.1.14). Plants harbouring the single transgenes were subsequently crossed to produce double and triple transgenic lines, including: 2 x 35S::UGPase x SPS, 4CL::UGPase x SPS, 2 x 35S::SuSy x SPS, 4CL::SuSy x SPS, 2 x 35S::UGPase x SuSy x SPS, and 4CL::UGPase x SuSy x SPS. The ultimate aim of the study was to examine whether it is possible to alter cellulose production through the manipulation of sucrose metabolism genes. While altering sucrose metabolism using UGPase, SuSy and SPS does not have an end effect on cellulose production, their simultaneous overexpression resulted in enhanced primary growth as seen in an increase in height growth, in some cases over 50%. Furthermore, the pyramiding strategy of simultaneously altering the expression of multiple genes in combination resulted in increased time to reproductive bud formation as well as altered flower morphology and foliar stipule formation in 4CL lines. Upregulation of these sucrose metabolism genes appears to directly impact primary growth and therefore biomass production in tobacco.

  10. Exceptional inheritance of plastids via pollen in Nicotiana sylvestris with no detectable paternal mitochondrial DNA in the progeny.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Gregory; Svab, Zora; Maliga, Pal

    2012-10-01

    Plastids and mitochondria, the DNA-containing cytoplasmic organelles, are maternally inherited in the majority of angiosperm species. Even in plants with strict maternal inheritance, exceptional paternal transmission of plastids has been observed. Our objective was to detect rare leakage of plastids via pollen in Nicotiana sylvestris and to determine if pollen transmission of plastids results in co-transmission of paternal mitochondria. As father plants, we used N. sylvestris plants with transgenic, selectable plastids and wild-type mitochondria. As mother plants, we used N. sylvestris plants with Nicotiana undulata cytoplasm, including the CMS-92 mitochondria that cause cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) by homeotic transformation of the stamens. We report here exceptional paternal plastid DNA in approximately 0.002% of N. sylvestris seedlings. However, we did not detect paternal mitochondrial DNA in any of the six plastid-transmission lines, suggesting independent transmission of the cytoplasmic organelles via pollen. When we used fertile N. sylvestris as mothers, we obtained eight fertile plastid transmission lines, which did not transmit their plastids via pollen at higher frequencies than their fathers. We discuss the implications for transgene containment and plant evolutionary histories inferred from cytoplasmic phylogenies.

  11. Mechanisms of nitric-oxide-induced increase of free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cells.

    PubMed

    Lamotte, Olivier; Courtois, Cécile; Dobrowolska, Grazyna; Besson, Angélique; Pugin, Alain; Wendehenne, David

    2006-04-15

    In this study, we investigated a role for nitric oxide (NO) in mediating the elevation of the free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](cyt)) in plants using Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cells expressing the Ca(2+) reporter apoaequorin. Hyperosmotic stress induced a fast increase of [Ca(2+)](cyt) which was strongly reduced by pretreating cell suspensions with the NO scavenger carboxy PTIO, indicating that NO mediates [Ca(2+)](cyt) changes in plant cells challenged by abiotic stress. Accordingly, treatment of transgenic N. plumbaginifolia cells with the NO donor diethylamine NONOate was followed by a transient increase of [Ca(2+)](cyt) sensitive to plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel inhibitors and antagonist of cyclic ADP ribose. We provided evidence that NO might activate plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels by inducing a rapid and transient plasma membrane depolarization. Furthermore, NO-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](cyt) was suppressed by the kinase inhibitor staurosporine, suggesting that NO enhances [Ca(2+)](cyt) by promoting phosphorylation-dependent events. This result was further supported by the demonstration that the NO donor induced the activation of a 42-kDa protein kinase which belongs to SnRK2 families and corresponds to Nicotiana tabacum osmotic-stress-activated protein kinase (NtOSAK). Interestingly, NtOSAK was activated in response to hyperosmotic stress through a NO-dependent process, supporting the hypothesis that NO also promotes protein kinase activation during physiological processes.

  12. A reversed-phase HPLC-UV method developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of six alkaloids from Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed

    Moghbel, Nahid; Ryu, BoMi; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2015-08-01

    A reversed-phase HPLC-UV method was developed, optimized, and validated for the separation and quantitation of six target alkaloids from leaves of Nicotiana species (nicotine, nornicotine, anatabine, anabasine, myosmine, and cotinine). A bidentate reversed-phase C18 column was used as stationary phase and an alkaline ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile as mobile phase. The alkaloids were well separated in a short run time of 13min with mobile phase pH 10.5 and a small gradient of 9-13% acetonitrile, and detected using UV at 260nm. Peak parameters were acceptable for all six closely related alkaloids. The proposed method has enough linearity with correlation coefficient >0.999 within the investigated range for all tested alkaloids. Satisfactory precision was achieved for both intra- and inter-day assay, with RSD less than 2% for all alkaloid standards. Reproducibility was also within the acceptable range of RSD <2%. Limit of detection was 1.6μg/mL for nicotine and below 1μg/mL for all other alkaloids. The limit of quantification was 2.8 and 4.8μg/mL for nornicotine and nicotine respectively, and below 2μg/mL for all other alkaloids. The method was successfully applied for simultaneous analysis of alkaloids in leaves of Nicotiana b