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Sample records for nicotiana tabacum altered

  1. Profiling of Altered Metabolomic States in Nicotiana tabacum Cells Induced by Priming Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has developed into a valuable tool for advancing our understanding of plant metabolism. Plant innate immune defenses can be activated and enhanced so that, subsequent to being pre-sensitized, plants are able to launch a stronger and faster defense response upon exposure to pathogenic microorganisms, a phenomenon known as priming. Here, three contrasting chemical activators, namely acibenzolar-S-methyl, azelaic acid and riboflavin, were used to induce a primed state in Nicotiana tabacum cells. Identified biomarkers were then compared to responses induced by three phytohormones—abscisic acid, methyljasmonate, and salicylic acid. Altered metabolomes were studied using a metabolite fingerprinting approach based on liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Multivariate data models indicated that these inducers cause time-dependent metabolic perturbations in the cultured cells and revealed biomarkers of which the levels are affected by these agents. A total of 34 metabolites were annotated from the mass spectral data and online databases. Venn diagrams were used to identify common biomarkers as well as those unique to a specific agent. Results implicate 20 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to (i) quinic acid (chlorogenic acids), (ii) tyramine, (iii) polyamines, or (iv) glucose as discriminatory biomarkers of priming in tobacco cells. Functional roles for most of these metabolites in plant defense responses could thus be proposed. Metabolites induced by the activators belong to the early phenylpropanoid pathway, which indicates that different stimuli can activate similar pathways but with different metabolite fingerprints. Possible linkages to phytohormone-dependent pathways at a metabolomic level were indicated in the case of cells treated with salicylic acid and methyljasmonate. The results contribute to a better understanding of the priming phenomenon and advance our knowledge of cinnamic acid derivatives as versatile defense metabolites. PMID

  2. Antisense-mediated reduction in ADC activity causes minor alterations in the alkaloid profile of cultured hairy roots and regenerated transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chintapakorn, Yupyn; Hamill, John D

    2007-10-01

    In species of the genus Nicotiana, as in most plants, the important polyamine precursor putrescine can be derived from the amino acids ornithine and/or arginine via the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and/or arginine decarboxylase (ADC), respectively. Nicotiana species also utilize putrescine to provide the pyrollidine ring of the defensive alkaloid nicotine and its derivatives. Previous biochemical studies, involving callus tissues cultured in vitro, suggested that the ADC-mediated route to putrescine is used preferentially to provide the putrescine that is utilized for nicotine synthesis in N. tabacum. To ascertain if this is the case in N. tabacum plants, where nicotine synthesis takes place exclusively in roots, we used an antisense approach to diminish ADC activity in transformed roots which were cultured in vitro. Several independent lines were recovered possessing markedly reduced levels of ADC transcript and ADC activity compared to controls. Transcript levels of other genes in this general area of metabolism, including ODC, were not altered as a result of the antisense-mediated downregulation of ADC. Concentrations of nicotine were comparable in antisense-ADC and control hairy root lines throughout most of their respective culture cycles, except at the latter stages of growth when the nicotine content of antisense-ADC hairy root lines was observed to be approximately 20% lower than in controls. Levels of anatabine, the second most abundant alkaloid typically found in N. tabacum, which is not derived from putrescine, were slightly elevated in two antisense-ADC hairy root lines at the latter stages of their culture cycles compared to controls. Comparison of alkaloid levels in leaves of transgenic plants that were regenerated from separate antisense-ADC and control transformed root lines indicated that the former possessed slightly elevated levels of anatabine but did not contain average levels of leaf nicotine that were different from that of

  3. Ectopic expression of class 1 KNOX genes induce and adventitious shoot regeneration and alter growth and development of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and plum (Prunus domestica L) were produced by transforming with apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKN1 and MdKN2) or corn KN1 gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were regenerated in vitro from transformed leaf discs cultured in a tissue medium lacking cytoki...

  4. Drought stress alters water relations and expression of PIP-type aquaporin genes in Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Mahdieh, Majid; Mostajeran, Akbar; Horie, Tomoaki; Katsuhara, Maki

    2008-05-01

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), a type of aquaporins, mediate water transport in many plant species. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the functions of PIP-type water channels and water relations of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun) under drought stress. Drought stress treatments have led to reductions in the stomatal conductance, transpiration, water potential and turgor pressure in leaves, and also the sap flow rate and osmotic hydraulic conductance in roots. In contrast, leaf osmotic pressure was increased in response to drought stress. Interestingly, the accumulation of NtPIP1;1 and NtPIP2;1 transcripts was significantly decreased, but only that of the NtAQP1 transcript was increased under drought stress. Functional analysis using Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed that NtPIP2;1 shows marked water transport activity, but the activities of NtAQP1 and NtPIP1;1 are weak or almost negligible, respectively, when expressed alone. However, co-expression of NtPIP1;1 with NtPIP2;1 significantly enhanced water transport activity compared with that of NtPIP1;1- or NtPIP2;1-expressing oocytes, suggesting that these two aquaporins may function as a water channel, forming a heterotetramer. Heteromerization of NtPIP1;1 and NtPIP2;1 was also suggested by co-expression analyses of NtPIP1;1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and NtPIP2;1 in Xenopus oocytes. Re-watering treatments recovered water relation parameters and the accumulation of the three NtPIP transcripts to levels similar to control conditions. These results suggest that NtPIP1;1 and NtPIP2;1 play an important role in water transport in roots, and that expression of NtPIP1;1 and NtPIP2;1 is down-regulated in order to reduce osmotic hydraulic conductance in the roots of tobacco plants under drought stress.

  5. Potency of Nicotiana tabacum as anti - microfouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aunurohim, Nurilma, Dian Ahmada; Kuswytasari, Nengah Dwianita

    2017-06-01

    In general, the attachment and growth of organisms on the surface of the object or material immersed in the sea are called Biofouling. Biofouling microscopic called microfouling, where it acts as a precursor of the next engaging organisms that are generally larger in size (called macrofouling). In recent time, biofouling control over the use of chemicals in antifouling paints. Usage tributyltin polishing copolymer paints (TBT - SPC paint) containing TBT has adverse effects on non-target marine organisms. This study uses tobacco dust as an anti-microfouling, which is the waste generated during the process of tobacco leaves. Five of bacterial isolates have been founded at Surabaya coastal in a preliminary test with iron plates. Then those isolates tested to detect and visualized of biofilm. The activity of anti-bacteria had been done and the result is known that more high of tobacco extract given, a diameter of zone inhibit high too. The extract of tobacco dust can be applied most effectively to be anti-microfouling is a concentration of 40%, isolates 3 and 4 are a type of bacteria that is most inhibited growth. So, in this result, Nicotiana tabacum is potential as an anti-microfouling.

  6. Underexpression of apoplastic polyamine oxidase improves thermotolerance in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Karamanoli, Katerina; Beris, Despoina; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Constantinidou, Helen-Isis A; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A

    2017-08-31

    Polyamines (PAs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the product of PA oxidation by polyamine oxidase (PAO), are potential players affecting plant growth, development and responses to abiotic/biotic stresses. Genetically modified Nicotiana tabacum plants with altered PA/H2O2 homeostasis due to over/underexpression of the ZmPAO gene (S-ZmPAO/AS-ZmPAO, respectively) were assessed under heat stress (HS). Underexpression of ZmPAO correlates with increased thermotolerance of the photosynthetic machinery and improved biomass accumulation, accompanied by enhanced levels of the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, whereas ZmPAO overexpressors exhibit significant impairment of thermotolerance. These data provide important clues on PA catabolism/H2O2/thermotolerance, which merit further exploitation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Silicon delays Tobacco ringspot virus systemic symptoms in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zellner, Wendy; Frantz, Jonathan; Leisner, Scott

    2011-10-15

    Soluble silicon (Si) provides protection to plants against a variety of abiotic and biotic stress. However, the effects of Si on viral infections are largely unknown. To investigate the role of Si in viral infections, hydroponic studies were conducted in Nicotiana tabacum with two pathogens: Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Plants grown in elevated Si showed a delay in TRSV systemic symptom formation and a reduction in symptomatic leaf area, compared to the non-supplemented controls. TRSV-infected plants showed significantly higher levels of foliar Si compared to mock-inoculated plants. However, the Si effect appeared to be virus-specific, since the element did not alter TMV symptoms nor did infection by this virus alter foliar Si levels. Hence, increased foliar Si levels appear to correlate with Si-modulated protection against viral infection. This is all the more intriguing since N. tabacum is classified as a low Si accumulator. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Silicon delays tobacco Ringspot virus systemic symptoms in Nicotiana tabacum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soluble silicon (Si) provides protection to plants against a variety of abiotic and biotic stress. However, the role of Si in viral infections has been elusive. To investigate the role of Si in viral infections, hydroponic studies were conducted in Nicotiana tabacum with two pathogens: Tobacco rings...

  9. Investigation of Nicotiana tabacum (+) N. suaveolens cybrids with carpelloid stamens.

    PubMed

    Fitter, John T; Thomas, Mark R; Niu, Chen; Rose, Ray J

    2005-02-01

    To investigate cytoplasmic effects on homeotic floral morphology, Nicotiana tabacum and N. suaveolens protoplasts were fused and cybrids obtained to contrast with the sexual alloplasmic line Nta(sua)S. Nta(sua)S contains the nucleus of N. tabacum and cytoplasm of N. suaveolens while cybrids derive from fused cells where the cytoplasms can interact. The three male-sterile somatic cybrid plants analyzed contained mitochondria with N. tabacum and N. suaveolens mtDNA sequences, but not all the N. tabacum or all the N. suaveolens mtDNA sequences were present. The flowers were N. tabacum-like but with a split corolla (not observed in Nta(sua)S) and the whorl of stamens replaced by a whorl of carpel-like structures. Based on scanning electron microscopy the carpelloid stamens had a characteristic N. tabacum stigma, a style of variable length and a pseudo-ovary with ovule-like structures. The Southern blot data were consistent with mtDNA recombination. These genomic changes were maternally inherited. Chloroplasts were either of the N. tabacum or N. suaveolens type. AFLP analysis showed transfer of variable amounts of N. suaveolens nuclear DNA. However, it is the presence of the N. suaveolens sequences and/or absence of N. tabacum sequences in the mitochondria that correlates with the homeotic floral morphology. These cybrids will facilitate the analysis of the role of mitochondrial DNA sequences in floral organ identity; which has received limited attention in genetic flowering models based primarily on Arabidopsis research.

  10. Absence of some truncated genes in the amphidiploid Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Jamet, E; Durr, A; Fleck, J

    1987-01-01

    As an initial step towards understanding how a multigene family evolves after an interspecific hybridization and subsequent chromosomal doubling, genomic Southern blots of three related species were compared: Nicotiana tabacum (the progeny), and Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis (the progenitors). Genomic restriction fragments generated by two endonucleases were hybridized with a cDNA of the small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from N. sylvestris. The restriction pattern of the DNA of the progenitors revealed considerable polymorphism of restriction-fragment lengths. All the fragments in N. tabacum, except one, have a corresponding fragment in one of the progenitors. Some fragments present in the parents were absent from the progeny: they may correspond to truncated genes consisting of only part of the 3' portion of the gene.

  11. Manipulation of the napin primary structure alters its packaging and deposition in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Scarafoni, A; Carzaniga, R; Harris, N; Croy, R R

    2001-08-01

    Napin is a 2S storage protein found in the seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and related species. Using protein structural prediction programs we have identified a region in the napin protein sequence which forms a 'hydrophilic loop' composed of amino acid residues located at the protein surface. Targeting this region, we have constructed two napin chimeric genes containing the coding sequence for the peptide hormone leucine-enkephalin as a topological marker. One version has a single enkephalin sequence of 11 amino acids including linkers and the second contains a tandem repeat of this peptide comprising 22 amino acids, inserted into the napin large subunit. The inserted peptide sequences alter the balance of hydrophilic to hydrophobic amino acids and introduce flexibility into this region of the polypeptide chain. The chimeric genes have been expressed in tobacco plants under the control of the seed-specific napA gene promoter. Analyses indicate that the engineered napin proteins are expressed, transported, post-translationally modified and deposited inside the protein bodies of the transgenic seeds demonstrating that the altered napin proteins behave in a similar fashion to the authentic napin protein. Detailed immunolocalisation studies indicate that the insertion of the peptide sequences has a significant effect on the distribution of the napin proteins within the tobacco seed protein bodies.

  12. Manganese toxicity to chlorophyll synthesis in tobacco callus. [Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Clairmont, K.B.; Hagar, W.G.; Davis, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pith explants were grown on manganese containing medium. At moderate concentration (10 millimolar), manganese selectivity inhibited chlorophyll synthesis, resulting initially in growth of white callus. Several weeks later the white callus turned brown due to the accumulation of a pigment identified as protoporphyrin IX by its elution profile using high performance liquid chromatography, by its absorption spectrum, and by its fluorescence properties. At a concentration of 100 millimolar manganese the pigment accumulated without growth of the explant.

  13. Ketoisophorone transformation by Marchantia polymorpha and Nicotiana tabacum cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F; Hirata, Toshifumi; Abdel-Lateff, Ahmed; el-Razek, Mohamed H Abd; Mohamed, Abou El-Hamd H; Hassan, Nahed M; Paré, Paul W; Mahmoud, Ahmed A

    2008-01-01

    Stereospecific olefin (C=C) and carbonyl (C=O) reduction of the readily available prochiral compound ketoisophorone (2,2,6-trimethyl-2-cyclohexene-1,4-dione) (1) by Marchantia polymorpha and Nicotiana tabacum cell suspension cultures produce the chiral products (6R)-levodione (2), (4R,5S)-4-hydroxy-3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexanone (3), and (4R,6R)-actinol (4) as well as the minor components (4R)-hydroxyisophorone (5) and (4S)-phorenol (6).

  14. Ectopic expression of class 1 KNOX genes induce adventitious shoot regeneration and alter growth and development of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L).

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, C; Liu, Zongrang; Scorza, Ralph

    2011-04-01

    Transgenic plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L) were produced by transforming with the apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKN1 and MdKN2) or corn KNOX1 gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were regenerated in vitro from transformed leaf discs cultured in a medium lacking cytokinin. Ectopic expression of KNOX genes retarded shoot growth by suppressing elongation of internodes in transgenic tobacco plants. Expression of each of the three KNOX1 genes induced malformation and extensive lobbing in tobacco leaves. In situ regeneration of adventitious shoots was observed from leaves and roots of transgenic tobacco plants expressing each of the three KNOX genes. In vitro culture of leaf explants and internode sections excised from in vitro grown MdKN1 expressing tobacco shoots regenerated adventitious shoots on MS (Murashige and Skoog 1962) basal medium in the absence of exogenous cytokinin. Transgenic plum plants that expressed the MdKN2 or corn KNOX1 gene grew normally but MdKN1 caused a significant reduction in plant height, leaf shape and size and produced malformed curly leaves. A high frequency of adventitious shoot regeneration (96%) was observed in cultures of leaf explants excised from corn KNOX1-expressing transgenic plum shoots. In contrast to KNOX1-expressing tobacco, leaf and internode explants of corn KNOX1-expressing plum required synthetic cytokinin (thidiazuron) in the culture medium to induce adventitious shoot regeneration. The induction of high-frequency regeneration of adventitious shoots in vitro from leaves and stem internodal sections of plum through the ectopic expression of a KNOX1 gene is the first such report for a woody perennial fruit trees.

  15. Ectopic expression of Malus domestica class 1 knox genes altered growth and development of Nicotiana tabacum and Prunus domestica, and induced adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants without exogenous cytokinin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and plum (Prunus domestica L) plants were regenerated by transforming with apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKNP1 and MdKNP2) or a corn KN1 (ZmKN1) gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were produced in vitro from transformed leaf discs in the absence of cytokinin in th...

  16. Transmission of paternal chloroplasts in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Horlow, C; Goujaud, J; Lépingle, A; Missonier, C; Bourgin, J P

    1990-09-01

    Medgyesy et al. (1986, Mol. Gen. Genet. 204, 195-198) have described in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and in an interspecific cross involving N. plumbaginifolia and N. tabacum a procedure for selecting cell lines derived from seedlings carrying paternal chloroplasts by taking advantage of a plastid-encoded mutation which confers resistance to streptomycin. We have extended their demonstration of occasional transmission of chloroplasts through pollen to the case of an intraspecific cross in N. tabacum. The line used as maternal parent, ITB19(sua), displayed a cytoplasmic male sterility due to the presence of a cytoplasm originating from N. suaveolens. The line used as paternal parent, SR1, was fertile and possessed mutant chloroplasts conferring resistance to streptomycin. From cell lines derived from 204 seedlings, three were regenerated into streptomycin-resistant buds. The plants derived from these three clones were male-sterile. Their progeny, after crossing with a wild type tobacco line, XHFD8, was resistant to streptomycin. Tests of resistance of the seedlings to tentoxin and restriction analyses of the chloroplast DNA indicated that two clones still had the maternal chloroplasts and were thus probably new streptomycin-resistant mutants, whereas the third one had acquired the chloroplasts of the paternal parent, but had retained the mitochondria of the maternal parent.

  17. Pollination triggers female gametophyte development in immature Nicotiana tabacum flowers

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Michael S.; Bertolino, Lígia T.; Cossalter, Viviane; Quiapim, Andréa C.; DePaoli, Henrique C.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Teixeira, Simone P.; Goldman, Maria H. S.

    2015-01-01

    In Nicotiana tabacum, female gametophytes are not fully developed at anthesis, but flower buds pollinated 12 h before anthesis produce mature embryo sacs. We investigated several pollination-associated parameters in N. tabacum flower buds to determine the developmental timing of important events in preparation for successful fertilization. First, we performed hand pollinations in flowers from stages 4 to 11 to study at which developmental stage pollination would produce fruits. A Peroxtesmo test was performed to correlate peroxidase activity on the stigma surface, indicative of stigma receptivity, with fruit set. Pollen tube growth and female gametophyte development were microscopically analyzed in pistils of different developmental stages. Fruits were obtained only after pollinations of flower buds at late stage 7 and older; fruit weight and seed germination capacity increased as the developmental stage of the pollinated flower approached anthesis. Despite positive peroxidase activity and pollen tube growth, pistils at stages 5 and 6 were unable to produce fruits. At late stage 7, female gametophytes were undergoing first mitotic division. After 24 h, female gametophytes of unpollinated pistils were still in the end of the first division, whereas those of pollinated pistils showed egg cells. RT-qPCR assay showed that the expression of the NtEC1 gene, a marker of egg cell development, is considerably higher in pollinated late stage 7 ovaries compared with unpollinated ovaries. To test whether ethylene is the signal eliciting female gametophyte maturation, the expression of ACC synthase was examined in unpollinated and pollinated stage 6 and late stage 7 stigmas/styles. Pollination induced NtACS expression in stage 6 pistils, which are unable to produce fruits. Our results show that pollination is a stimulus capable of triggering female gametophyte development in immature tobacco flowers and suggests the existence of a yet undefined signal sensed by the pistil. PMID

  18. Genes in S and T subgenomes are responsible for hybrid lethality in interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Marubashi, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    Many species of Nicotiana section Suaveolentes produce inviable F(1) hybrids after crossing with Nicotiana tabacum (genome constitution SSTT), a phenomenon that is often called hybrid lethality. Through crosses with monosomic lines of N. tabacum lacking a Q chromosome, we previously determined that hybrid lethality is caused by interaction between gene(s) on the Q chromosome belonging to the S subgenome of N. tabacum and gene(s) in Suaveolentes species. Here, we examined if hybrid seedlings from the cross N. occidentalis (section Suaveolentes)×N. tabacum are inviable despite a lack of the Q chromosome. Hybrid lethality in the cross of N. occidentalis×N. tabacum was characterized by shoots with fading color. This symptom differed from what has been previously observed in lethal crosses between many species in section Suaveolentes and N. tabacum. In crosses of monosomic N. tabacum plants lacking the Q chromosome with N. occidentalis, hybrid lethality was observed in hybrid seedlings either lacking or possessing the Q chromosome. N. occidentalis was then crossed with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT), to reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum contains gene(s) responsible for hybrid lethality. Hybrid seedlings from the crosses N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis and N. occidentalis×N. sylvestris were inviable. Although the specific symptoms of hybrid lethality in the cross N. occidentalis×N. tabacum were similar to those appearing in hybrids from the cross N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis, genes in both the S and T subgenomes of N. tabacum appear responsible for hybrid lethality in crosses with N. occidentalis.

  19. Genes in S and T Subgenomes Are Responsible for Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific Hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Marubashi, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    Background Many species of Nicotiana section Suaveolentes produce inviable F1 hybrids after crossing with Nicotiana tabacum (genome constitution SSTT), a phenomenon that is often called hybrid lethality. Through crosses with monosomic lines of N. tabacum lacking a Q chromosome, we previously determined that hybrid lethality is caused by interaction between gene(s) on the Q chromosome belonging to the S subgenome of N. tabacum and gene(s) in Suaveolentes species. Here, we examined if hybrid seedlings from the cross N. occidentalis (section Suaveolentes)×N. tabacum are inviable despite a lack of the Q chromosome. Methodology/Principal Findings Hybrid lethality in the cross of N. occidentalis×N. tabacum was characterized by shoots with fading color. This symptom differed from what has been previously observed in lethal crosses between many species in section Suaveolentes and N. tabacum. In crosses of monosomic N. tabacum plants lacking the Q chromosome with N. occidentalis, hybrid lethality was observed in hybrid seedlings either lacking or possessing the Q chromosome. N. occidentalis was then crossed with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT), to reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum contains gene(s) responsible for hybrid lethality. Hybrid seedlings from the crosses N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis and N. occidentalis×N. sylvestris were inviable. Conclusions/Significance Although the specific symptoms of hybrid lethality in the cross N. occidentalis×N. tabacum were similar to those appearing in hybrids from the cross N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis, genes in both the S and T subgenomes of N. tabacum appear responsible for hybrid lethality in crosses with N. occidentalis. PMID:22563450

  20. Pathway of phloem unloading in tobacco sink leaves. [Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, R.

    1987-04-01

    Phloem unloading in transition sink leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) was analyzed by quantitative autoradiography. Source leaves were labeled with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and experimental treatments were begun approximately 1 h later when label had entered the sink leaves. Autoradiographs were prepared from rapidly frozen, lyophilized sink tissue at the beginning and end of the treatments and the amount of label in veins and in surrounding cells was determined by microdensitometry. Photoassimilate unloaded from third order and larger, but not smaller, veins. Long-distance import and unloading did not respond the same way to all experimental treatments. Import was completely inhibited by cold, anaerobiosis or steam girdling the sink leaf petiole. Unloading was inhibited by cold but continued in an anaerobic atmosphere and after steam girdling. Uptake of exogenous (/sup 14/C)sucrose was inhibited by anaerobiosis. Since an apoplastic pathway of phloem unloading would involve solute uptake from the apoplast the results are most consistent with passive symplastic unloading of photoassimilates from phloem to surrounding cells.

  1. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. © The Author(s).

  2. Molecular genetics of alkaloid biosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Ralph E; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-10-01

    Alkaloids represent an extensive group of nitrogen-containing secondary metabolites that are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. The pyridine alkaloids of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) have been the subject of particularly intensive investigation, driven largely due to the widespread use of tobacco products by society and the role that nicotine (16) (see Fig. 1) plays as the primary compound responsible for making the consumption of these products both pleasurable and addictive. In a typical commercial tobacco plant, nicotine (16) comprises about 90% of the total alkaloid pool, with the alkaloids nornicotine (17) (a demethylated derivative of nicotine), anatabine (15) and anabasine (5) making up most of the remainder. Advances in molecular biology have led to the characterization of the majority of the genes encoding the enzymes directly responsible the biosynthesis of nicotine (16) and nornicotine (17), while notable gaps remain within the anatabine (15) and anabasine (5) biosynthetic pathways. Several of the genes involved in the transcriptional regulation and transport of nicotine (16) have also been elucidated. Investigations of the molecular genetics of tobacco alkaloids have not only provided plant biologists with insights into the mechanisms underlying the synthesis and accumulation of this important class of plant alkaloids, they have also yielded tools and strategies for modifying the tobacco alkaloid composition in a manner that can result in changing the levels of nicotine (16) within the leaf, or reducing the levels of a potent carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamine (TSNA). This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of alkaloid biosynthesis in tobacco, and discusses the potential for applying information accrued from these studies toward efforts designed to help mitigate some of the negative health consequences associated with the use of tobacco products.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junping; Wang, Genhong; Ma, Sanyuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingtan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is one of the most powerful tools for revealing gene function and improving crop plants. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as a powerful and efficient tool for genome editing in various organisms. Here, we report genome editing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two genes, NtPDS and NtPDR6, were used for targeted mutagenesis. First, we examined the transient genome editing activity of this system in tobacco protoplasts, insertion and deletion (indel) mutations were observed with frequencies of 16.2-20.3% after transfecting guide RNA (gRNA) and the nuclease Cas9 in tobacco protoplasts. The two genes were also mutated using multiplexing gRNA at a time. Additionally, targeted deletions and inversions of a 1.8-kb fragment between two target sites in the NtPDS locus were demonstrated, while indel mutations were also detected at both the sites. Second, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants with NtPDS and NtPDR6 mutations induced by Cas9/gRNA. The mutation percentage was 81.8% for NtPDS gRNA4 and 87.5% for NtPDR6 gRNA2. Obvious phenotypes were observed, etiolated leaves for the psd mutant and more branches for the pdr6 mutant, indicating that highly efficient biallelic mutations occurred in both transgenic lines. No significant off-target mutations were obtained. Our results show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a useful tool for targeted mutagenesis of the tobacco genome.

  4. Nucleotide sequence of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) anionic peroxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-De-Leon, F.; Klotz, K.L.; Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in numerous physiological processes including lignification (Grisebach, 1981), wound-healing (Espelie et al., 1986), phenol oxidation (Lagrimini, 1991), pathogen defense (Ye et al., 1990), and the regulation of cell elongation through the formation of interchain covalent bonds between various cell wall polymers (Fry, 1986; Goldberg et al., 1986; Bradley et al., 1992). However, a complete description of peroxidase action in vivo is not available because of the vast number of potential substrates and the existence of multiple isoenzymes. The tobacco anionic peroxidase is one of the better-characterized isoenzymes. This enzyme has been shown to oxidize a number of significant plant secondary compounds in vitro including cinnamyl alcohols, phenolic acids, and indole-3-acetic acid (Maeder, 1980; Lagrimini, 1991). A cDNA encoding the enzyme has been obtained, and this enzyme was shown to be expressed at the highest levels in lignifying tissues (xylem and tracheary elements) and also in epidermal tissue (Lagrimini et al., 1987). It was shown at this time that there were four distinct copies of the anionic peroxidase gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). A tobacco genomic DNA library was constructed in the [lambda]-phase EMBL3, from which two unique peroxidase genes were sequenced. One of these clones, [lambda]POD1, was designated as a pseudogene when the exonic sequences were found to differ from the cDNA sequences by 1%, and several frame shifts in the coding sequences indicated a dysfunctional gene (the authors' unpublished results). The other clone, [lambda]POD3, described in this manuscript, was designated as the functional tobacco anionic peroxidase gene because of 100% homology with the cDNA. Significant structural elements include an AS-2 box indicated in shoot-specific expression (Lam and Chua, 1989), a TATA box, and two intervening sequences. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Production, partial purification and characterization of xylanase using Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust as substrate.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Komal P; Shilpkar, Prateek

    2016-03-01

    Isolated Bacillus sp. was used in the present study for production of xylanase from Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust. The strain was able to give a maximum of 1.77 Uml⁻¹ xylanase activity under optimized fermentation conditions which was further increased upto 2.77 Uml⁻¹ after extraction and partial purification of enzyme. After partial purification, the enzyme was characterized and it gave the highest xylanase activity at pH 7.0, when 0.2 ml enzyme was incubated with 2.0% substrate (Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust) for 60 min at 60°C. Saccharification study of Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust with partially purified enzyme revealed that 18.4% reducing sugar was released in 20 hrs incubation, and TLC and HPTLC analysis showed that xylose and glucose sugars were obtained after hydrolysis of substrate. FTIR analysis confirmed decomposition of substrate.

  6. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  7. Seven of eight species in Nicotiana section Suaveolentes have common factors leading to hybrid lethality in crosses with Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Kuboyama, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Marubashi, Wataru

    2010-08-01

    Reproductive isolation is a mechanism that separates species, and is classified into two types: prezygotic and postzygotic. Inviability of hybrids, or hybrid lethality, is a type of postzygotic isolation and is observed in some plant species, including Nicotiana species. Previous work has shown that the Q chromosome, which belongs to the S subgenome of N. tabacum, encodes one or more genes leading to hybrid lethality in some crosses. Interspecific crosses of eight wild species were conducted in section Suaveolentes (which consists of species restricted to Australasia and Africa) with the cultivated species Nicotiana tabacum. Hybrid seedlings were cultivated at 28, 34 or 36 degrees C, and PCR and chromosome analysis were performed. Seven of eight wild species produced inviable hybrids after crossing. Hybrid lethality, which was observed in all crosses at 28 degrees C, was Type II lethality, with the characteristic symptoms of browning of hypocotyl and roots; lethality was suppressed at elevated temperatures (34 or 36 degrees C). Furthermore, one or more genes on the Q chromosome of N. tabacum were absolutely responsible for hybrid lethality, suggesting that many species of section Suaveolentes share the same factor that triggers hybrid lethality by interaction with the genes on the Q chromosome. Exceptionally, only one wild species, N. fragrans, produced 100 % viable hybrids after crossing with N. tabacum, suggesting that N. fragrans has no factor triggering hybrid lethality.

  8. Seven of eight species in Nicotiana section Suaveolentes have common factors leading to hybrid lethality in crosses with Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Kuboyama, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Marubashi, Wataru

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Reproductive isolation is a mechanism that separates species, and is classified into two types: prezygotic and postzygotic. Inviability of hybrids, or hybrid lethality, is a type of postzygotic isolation and is observed in some plant species, including Nicotiana species. Previous work has shown that the Q chromosome, which belongs to the S subgenome of N. tabacum, encodes one or more genes leading to hybrid lethality in some crosses. Methods Interspecific crosses of eight wild species were conducted in section Suaveolentes (which consists of species restricted to Australasia and Africa) with the cultivated species Nicotiana tabacum. Hybrid seedlings were cultivated at 28, 34 or 36 °C, and PCR and chromosome analysis were performed. Results and Conclusions Seven of eight wild species produced inviable hybrids after crossing. Hybrid lethality, which was observed in all crosses at 28 °C, was Type II lethality, with the characteristic symptoms of browning of hypocotyl and roots; lethality was suppressed at elevated temperatures (34 or 36 °C). Furthermore, one or more genes on the Q chromosome of N. tabacum were absolutely responsible for hybrid lethality, suggesting that many species of section Suaveolentes share the same factor that triggers hybrid lethality by interaction with the genes on the Q chromosome. Exceptionally, only one wild species, N. fragrans, produced 100 % viable hybrids after crossing with N. tabacum, suggesting that N. fragrans has no factor triggering hybrid lethality. PMID:20519236

  9. Performance of Luffa cylindrica as immobilization matrix in bioconversion reactions by Nicotiana tabacum BY-2.

    PubMed

    Bou-Saab, Hamid; Boulanger, Anna; Schellenbaum, Paul; Neunlist, Serge

    2013-10-01

    The dry fruit of Luffa cylindrica was investigated as an immobilization matrix for Nicotiana tabacum cells in bioconversion reactions of exogenous substrates. Immobilized cells show high biocatalytic activity under high substrate levels. Cell growth on the dry fruit can be maintained until reaching an immobilization capacity of 1.8 g cells/g(Luffa). Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of SCAR markers linked to three disease resistances based on AFLP within Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Julio, E; Verrier, J-L; Dorlhac de Borne, F

    2006-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was conducted on a set of 92 Nicotiana tabacum L. accessions from diverse types (flue-cured, dark air-cured, burley, oriental, and cigar wrapper) and breeding origins to identify markers associated with disease resistances. Eleven primer combinations were required to identify 33 polymorphic fragments. This allowed the identification of 92% of these accessions, and yielded sufficient information for building a neighbor joining tree. Clusters of accessions with common traits or breeding origins were observed. An important part of this polymorphism could be related to interspecific introgressions from other Nicotiana species, performed during the breeding history of N. tabacum to confer resistance to pathogens. Seven fragments were associated with three different resistances: two for the blue-mold (Peronospora tabacina Adam) resistance derived from Nicotiana debneyi Domin, two for the Va gene (Potato Virus Y susceptibility), and three for the black root rot (Chalara elegans) resistance of N. debneyi origin. Some of these markers were converted into sequence characterized amplified region markers, and validated on recombinant inbred lines or doubled-haploid lines.

  11. Cloning and Expression of TNF Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Hamid Reza; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Vahidi, Hossein; Barar, Jaleh; Kazemi, Bahram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Molecular farming has been considered as a secure and economical approach for production of biopharmaceuticals. Human TNF Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) as a promising biopharmaceutical candidate has been produced in different expression hosts. However, little attention has been paid to molecular farming of the TRAIL in spite of numerous advantages of plant expression systems. Therefore, in this study the cytoplasmic production of the TRAIL was tackled in Nicotiana tabacum using Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA 4404. Initially, the desired coding sequence was obtained using PCR technique on the constructed human cDNA library. Afterward, the necessary requirements for expression of the TRAIL in plant cell system were provided through sub-cloning into 35S-CaMV (Cauliflower Mosaic Virus) helper and final 0179-pGreen expression vectors. Then, the final TRAIL-pGreen expression vector was cloned into A. tumefaciens LBA 4404. Subsequently, the N. tabacum cells were transformed through co-culture method and expression of the TRAIL was confirmed by western blot analysis. Finally, the recombinant TRAIL was extracted through chromatographic technique and biological activity was evaluated through MTT assay (Methylthiazol Tetrazolium Assay). The result of western blot analysis indicated that only monomer and oxidized dimer forms of the TRAIL can be extracted from the N. tabacum cells. Moreover, the lack of trimeric assembly of the extracted TRAIL diminished its biological activity in sensitive A549 cell line. In conclusion, although N. tabacum cells can successfully produce the TRAIL, proper assembly and functionality of the TRAIL were unfavorable. PMID:25561925

  12. Cytological investigations of the interspecific hybrids of Nicotiana tabacum L. x N. glauca Grah.

    PubMed

    Trojak-Goluch, Anna; Berbeć, Apoloniusz

    2003-01-01

    Interspecific amphihaploid and amphidiploid hybrids between Nicotiana glauca Grah. (2n = 24) and N. tabacum L. (2n = 48) cultivars BY 103 and K 326 were analysed. F1 amphihaploids (2n = 36) were viable and completely self- and cross-sterile, and mostly univalents were present during meiosis (with pairing range from 0 to 5). In some meiocytes, meiotic irregularities were observed, such as sporadic chromatin bridges and formation of restitution nuclei. The resultant F1 hybrids were easily converted to amphidiploids (2n = 72) via colchicine treatment of seedlings. The number of univalents and the frequency of PMCs containing unpaired chromosomes indicated that amphidiploids N. tabacum cv. BY 103 or K 326 x N. glauca represented quite a high pairing category. However, they were male sterile because pollen mother cells were arrested at the tetrad stage. The termination of development of PMCs, and consequently male sterility, are very rare in this kind of tobacco hybrids.

  13. Influence of selected herbicides on ozone injury in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, J.J.; Moore, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted over a four year period to determine the influence of selected herbicides on ozone injury in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Isopropalin (2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropylcumidine), pebulate (S-propyl butylethylthiocarbamate), and diphenamid (N,N-dimethyl-2,2-diphenylacetamide) were applied at the recommended rates of 1.7, 4.5, and 4.5 kg/ha (ai), respectively. Treatment of tobacco plants with isopropalin or diphenamid reduced oxidant injury for the first two to four weeks after transplanting, but not later in the season. Pebulate has no consistent affect on the sensitivity of tobacco to ozone. 26 references, 3 tables.

  14. Short-term effects of hydrogen fluoride on Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Döğeroğlu, Tuncay; Ciçek, Arzu; Kara, Serap

    2003-09-01

    Data on the short-term effects of fumigation with hydrogen fluoride (HF) on the response behavior of the Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. St. Karabalar 6265 are being presented. Growth rate, fluoride accumulation in leaves and soils, and degradation in chlorophyll and nicotine contents of the plant species against the variations in two experimental factors, namely the exposure concentration and exposure time parameters, were investigated. Resulting data reveals that the variety selected for this study is not so tolerant to fluoride as generally reported in the literature, if only the individual effects of the pollutant is considered.

  15. Untargeted metabolomics analysis reveals dynamic changes in azelaic acid- and salicylic acid derivatives in LPS-treated Nicotiana tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Mhlongo, M I; Tugizimana, F; Piater, L A; Steenkamp, P A; Madala, N E; Dubery, I A

    2017-01-22

    To counteract biotic stress factors, plants employ multilayered defense mechanisms responsive to pathogen-derived elicitor molecules, and regulated by different phytohormones and signaling molecules. Here, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecule, was used to induce defense responses in Nicotiana tabacum cell suspensions. Intracellular metabolites were extracted with methanol and analyzed using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-qTOF-MS/MS) platform. The generated data were processed and examined with multivariate and univariate statistical tools. The results show time-dependent dynamic changes and accumulation of glycosylated signaling molecules, specifically those of azelaic acid, salicylic acid and methyl-salicylate as contributors to the altered metabolomic state in LPS-treated cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Possible involvement of genes on the Q chromosome of Nicotiana tabacum in expression of hybrid lethality and programmed cell death during interspecific hybridization to Nicotiana debneyi.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Kuboyama, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Marubashi, Wataru

    2007-08-01

    Hybrid seedlings from the cross between Nicotiana tabacum, an allotetraploid composed of S and T subgenomes, and N. debneyi die at the cotyledonary stage. This lethality involves programmed cell death (PCD). We carried out reciprocal crosses between the two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis, and N. debneyi to reveal whether only the S subgenome in N. tabacum is related to hybrid lethality. Hybrid seedlings from reciprocal crosses between N. sylvestris and N. debneyi showed lethal characteristics identical to those from the cross between N. tabacum and N. debneyi. Conversely, hybrid seedlings from reciprocal crosses between N. tomentosiformis and N. debneyi were viable. Furthermore, hallmarks of PCD were observed in hybrid seedlings from the cross N. debneyi x N. sylvestris, but not in hybrid seedlings from the cross N. debneyi x N. tomentosiformis. We also carried out crosses between monosomic lines of N. tabacum lacking the Q chromosome and N. debneyi. Using Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers, hybrid seedlings were divided into two groups, hybrids possessing the Q chromosome and hybrids lacking the Q chromosome. Hybrids possessing the Q chromosome died with characteristics of PCD. However, hybrids lacking the Q chromosome were viable and PCD did not occur. From these results, we concluded that the Q chromosome belonging to the S subgenome of N. tabacum encodes gene(s) leading to hybrid lethality in the cross N. tabacum x N. debneyi.

  17. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 from Nicotiana tabacum suppresses RNA silencing and enhances viral infection in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xiao-Bao; Dong, Li; Zhu, Hui; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Du, Quan-Sheng; Lv, Dian-Qiu; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Garcia, Juan Antonio; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2010-04-01

    Endogenous eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) produce double-stranded RNA intermediates in diverse processes of small RNA synthesis in RNA silencing pathways. RDR6 is required in plants for posttranscriptional gene silencing induced by sense transgenes (S-PTGS) and has an important role in amplification of antiviral silencing. Whereas RDR1 is also involved in antiviral defense in plants, this does not necessarily proceed through triggering silencing. In this study, we show that Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with RDR1 from Nicotiana tabacum (Nt-RDR1 plants) exhibits hypersusceptibility to Plum pox potyvirus and other viruses, resembling RDR6-silenced (RDR6i) N. benthamiana. Analysis of transient induction of RNA silencing in N. benthamiana Nt-RDR1 and RDR6i plants revealed that Nt-RDR1 possesses silencing suppression activity. We found that Nt-RDR1 does not interfere with RDR6-dependent siRNA accumulation but turns out to suppress RDR6-dependent S-PTGS. Our results, together with previously published data, suggest that RDR1 might have a dual role, contributing, on one hand, to salicylic acid-mediated antiviral defense, and suppressing, on the other hand, the RDR6-mediated antiviral RNA silencing. We propose a scenario in which the natural loss-of-function variant of RDR1 in N. benthamiana may be the outcome of selective pressure to maintain a high RDR6-dependent antiviral defense, which would be required to face the hypersensitivity of this plant to a large number of viruses.

  18. Cell death processes during expression of hybrid lethality in interspecific F1 hybrid between Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Mino, Masanobu; Maekawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2002-12-01

    Hybrid lethality, a type of reproductive isolation, is a genetically controlled event appearing at the seedling stage in interspecific hybrids. We characterized the lethality of F(1) hybrid seedlings from Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright-Yellow 4 using a number of traits including growth rate, microscopic features of tissues and cells, ion leakage, DNA degradation, reactive oxygen intermediates including superoxide radical (O(2)(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and expression of stress response marker genes. Lethal symptoms appeared at 4 d after germination in the basal hypocotyl and extended toward both the hypocotyl and root of the plants grown at 26 degrees C. Microscopic analysis revealed a prompt lysis of cell components during cell death. Membrane disruption and DNA degradation were found in the advanced stage of the lethality. The death of mesophyll cells in the cotyledon was initiated by the vascular bundle, suggesting that a putative factor inducing cell death diffused into surrounding cells from the vascular tissue. In contrast, these symptoms were not observed in the plants grown at 37 degrees C. Seedlings grown at 26 degrees C generated larger amounts of reactive oxygen intermediate in the hypocotyl than those grown at 37 degrees C. A number of stress response marker genes were expressed at 26 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. We proposed that a putative death factor moving systemically through the vascular system induced a prompt and successive lysis of the cytoplasm of cells and that massive cell death eventually led to the loss of the hybrid plant.

  19. Cell Death Processes during Expression of Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific F1 Hybrid between Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Mino, Masanobu; Maekawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2002-01-01

    Hybrid lethality, a type of reproductive isolation, is a genetically controlled event appearing at the seedling stage in interspecific hybrids. We characterized the lethality of F1 hybrid seedlings from Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright-Yellow 4 using a number of traits including growth rate, microscopic features of tissues and cells, ion leakage, DNA degradation, reactive oxygen intermediates including superoxide radical (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and expression of stress response marker genes. Lethal symptoms appeared at 4 d after germination in the basal hypocotyl and extended toward both the hypocotyl and root of the plants grown at 26°C. Microscopic analysis revealed a prompt lysis of cell components during cell death. Membrane disruption and DNA degradation were found in the advanced stage of the lethality. The death of mesophyll cells in the cotyledon was initiated by the vascular bundle, suggesting that a putative factor inducing cell death diffused into surrounding cells from the vascular tissue. In contrast, these symptoms were not observed in the plants grown at 37°C. Seedlings grown at 26°C generated larger amounts of reactive oxygen intermediate in the hypocotyl than those grown at 37°C. A number of stress response marker genes were expressed at 26°C but not at 37°C. We proposed that a putative death factor moving systemically through the vascular system induced a prompt and successive lysis of the cytoplasm of cells and that massive cell death eventually led to the loss of the hybrid plant. PMID:12481061

  20. Early events induced by the toxin deoxynivalenol lead to programmed cell death in Nicotiana tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Yekkour, Amine; Tran, Daniel; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Briand, Joël; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Errakhi, Rafik; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Bouteau, François

    2015-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin affecting animals and plants. This toxin synthesized by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum is currently believed to play a decisive role in the fungal phytopathogenesis as a virulence factor. Using cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum BY2, we showed that DON-induced programmed cell death (PCD) could require transcription and translation processes, in contrast to what was observed in animal cells. DON could induce different cross-linked pathways involving (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and a transcriptional down-regulation of the alternative oxidase (Aox1) gene and (ii) regulation of ion channel activities participating in cell shrinkage, to achieve PCD.

  1. An amphibian antimicrobial peptide variant expressed in Nicotiana tabacum confers resistance to phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Donatella; Mangoni, M Luisa; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Simmaco, Maurizio; Barra, Donatella

    2003-02-15

    Esculentin-1 is a 46-residue antimicrobial peptide present in skin secretions of Rana esculenta. It is effective against a wide variety of micro-organisms, including plant pathogens with negligible effects on eukaryotic cells. As a possible approach to enhance plant resistance, a DNA coding for esculentin-1, with the substitution Met-28Leu, was fused at the C-terminal end of the leader sequence of endopolygalacturonase-inhibiting protein, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter region, and introduced into Nicotiana tabacum. The antimicrobial peptide was isolated from the intercellular fluids of healthy leaves of transgenic plants, suggesting that it was properly processed, secreted outside cells and accumulated in the intercellular spaces. The morphology of transgenic plants was unaffected. Challenging these plants with bacterial or fungal phytopathogens demonstrated enhanced resistance up to the second generation. Moreover, transgenic plants displayed insecticidal properties.

  2. Biphenyls from Nicotiana tabacum and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Shang, Shan-Zhai; Xu, Wen-Xiu; Lei, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Jian-Guo; Miao, Ming-Ming; Sun, Han-Dong; Pu, Jian-Xin; Chen, Yong-Kuan; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2014-12-01

    Five new biphenyls, tababiphenyls A-E (1-5), together with five known ones (5-10), were isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum, of which compound 1 possessed a seldom reported 6-carbons unit in biphenyls. Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. All compounds were tested for their anti-tobacco mosaic virus (anti-TMV) activities. The results showed that compounds 3 and 5 exhibited high anti-TMV activities with inhibition rate of 48.4% and 32.1%, respectively, which were higher than that of positive control (ningnanmycin). The other compounds also showed potential anti-TMV activities with inhibition rates in the range of 18.6-28.7%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Complete genome sequence of tobacco virus 1, a closterovirus from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Qi, Shuishui; Gao, Zhengliang; Akinyemi, Ibukun A; Xu, Dafeng; Zhou, Benguo

    2016-04-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel virus, provisionally named tobacco virus 1 (TV1), was determined, and this virus was identified in leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exhibiting leaf mosaic and yellowing symptoms in Anhui Province, China. The genome sequence of TV1 consists of 15,395 nucleotides with 61.6 % nucleotide sequence identity to mint virus 1 (MV1). Its genome organization is similar to that of MV1, containing nine open reading frames (ORFs) that potentially encode proteins with putative functions in virion assembly, cell-to-cell movement and suppression of RNA silencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the heat shock protein 70 homolog (HSP70h) placed TV1 alongside members of the genus Closterovirus in the family Closteroviridae. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of the complete genome sequence of a closterovirus identified in tobacco.

  4. Identification of fructo- and malto-oligosaccharides in cured tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Nagai, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2012-07-04

    Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOSs) and malto-oligosaccharides (MOSs) in cured tobacco leaves ( Nicotiana tabacum ) were detected and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). These oligosaccharides were present in several tobacco materials including flue-cured tobacco, sun/air-cured tobacco, and cut filler of commercially available tobacco products, but were not detected in air-cured tobacco. The changes in these oligosaccharides during storage were also investigated. The results revealed that MOSs simply decreased under a warm atmosphere and FOSs increased. In addition, the formation of FOSs in cured tobacco leaves occurred in the presence of sucrose. With regard to FOSs, it has been reported that green tobacco leaves do not contain FOSs such as kestose, nystose, and fructosyl-nystose. The results of a model test suggested that the changes in FOS amount were caused by enzymatic reactions.

  5. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of tobacco virus 2, a polerovirus from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benguo; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Lina; Lin, Huafeng

    2017-07-01

    The complete genome sequence of a new virus, provisionally named tobacco virus 2 (TV2), was determined and identified from leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exhibiting leaf mosaic, yellowing, and deformity, in Anhui Province, China. The genome sequence of TV2 comprises 5,979 nucleotides, with 87% nucleotide sequence identity to potato leafroll virus (PLRV). Its genome organization is similar to that of PLRV, containing six open reading frames (ORFs) that potentially encode proteins with putative functions in cell-to-cell movement and suppression of RNA silencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence placed TV2 alongside members of the genus Polerovirus in the family Luteoviridae. To the best our knowledge, this study is the first report of a complete genome sequence of a new polerovirus identified in tobacco.

  6. A novel pollen tube growth assay utilizing a transmitting tract-ablated Nicotiana tabacum style.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Carrie A; Clasen, Benjamin M; Anderson, Neil O; Smith, Alan G

    2012-03-01

    Sexual plant reproduction requires multiple pollen-pistil interactions from the stigma (pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination) to the ovary (fertilization). Understanding the factors that regulate pollen tube growth is critical to understanding the processes essential to sexual reproduction. Many pollen tube growth assays (PTGAs) have shorter and slower pollen tube growth when compared to pollen tube growth through the style. The identification and study of factors that regulate pollen tube growth have been impeded by a lack of an efficient and reproducible PTGA. The objective of this research is to develop a robust assay for Nicotiana tabacum pollen tube growth in an environment that supports sustained and normal growth yet is amenable to testing the effects of specific factors. In this paper, we introduce a novel PTGA, which uses pistils from N. tabacum that lack a mature transmitting tract (TT) due to tissue-specific ablation. The TT-ablated style supports normal pollen tube growth and the hollow structure of the style allows modification of the growth environment by direct injection of test material. This PTGA is robust and allows for rapid and accurate measurement of pollen tube length and pollen tube morphology, supporting pollen tube growth from 20 to 35°C and at pH ranging from 4.8 to 7.6. Use of the ablated style for a PTGA is a novel method for the culture of pollen tubes with sustained growth in vivo while permitting the application of treatments to the growing pollen tubes.

  7. Characterization of a heavy-ion induced white flower mutant of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Yusuke; Fujiwara, Makoto T; Takehisa, Hinako; Ohbu, Sumie; Saito, Hiroyuki; Ichida, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Yoriko; Abe, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We characterized a white flower mutant of allotetraploid N. tabacum as a DFR-deficient mutant; one copy of DFR has a cultivar-specific frameshift, while the other was deleted by heavy-ion irradiation. In most plants, white-flowered mutants have some kind of deficiency or defect in their anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. Nicotiana tabacum normally has pink petals, in which cyanidin is the main colored anthocyanidin. When a relevant gene in the cyanidin biosynthetic pathway is mutated, the petals show a white color. Previously, we generated white-flowered mutants of N. tabacum by heavy-ion irradiation, which is accepted as an effective mutagen. In this study, we determined which gene was responsible for the white-flowered phenotype of one of these mutants, cv. Xanthi white flower 1 (xwf1). Southern blot analysis using a DNA fragment of the dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) gene as a probe showed that the xwf1 mutant lacked signals that were present in wild-type genomic DNAs. Sequence analysis demonstrated that one copy of the DFR gene (NtDFR2) was absent from the genome of the xwf1 mutant. The other copy of the DFR gene (NtDFR1) contained a single-base deletion resulting in a frameshift mutation, which is a spontaneous mutation in cv. Xanthi. Introduction of NtDFR2 cDNA into the petal limbs of xwf1 by particle bombardment resulted in production of the pink-colored cells, whereas introduction of NtDFR1 cDNA did not. These results indicate that xwf1 is a DFR-deficient mutant. One copy of NtDFR1 harbors a spontaneous frameshift mutation, while the other copy of NtDFR2 was deleted by heavy-ion beam irradiation.

  8. [Induction of polyploid in hairy roots of Nicotiana tabacum and its plant regeneration].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lili; Shi, Heping; Yu, Wu; Tsang, Po Keung Eric; Chow, Cheuk Fai Stephen

    2014-04-01

    By genetic transformation with Agrobacterum rhizogenes and artificial chromosome doubling techniques, we studied the induction of hairy roots and their polyploidization, and subsequent plant regeneration and nicotine determination to enhance the content of nicotine in Nicotiana tabacum. The results show that hairy roots could be induced from the basal surface of leaf explants of N. tabacum 8 days after inoculation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC15834. The percentage of the rooting leaf explants was 100% 15 days after inoculation. The hairy roots could grow rapidly and autonomously on solid or liquid phytohormones-free MS medium. The transformation was confirmed by PCR amplification of rol gene of Ri plasmid and paper electrophoresis of opines from N. tabacum hairy roots. The highest rate of polyploidy induction, more than 64.71%, was obtained after treatment of hairy roots with 0.1% colchicine for 36 h. The optimum medium for plant regeneration from polyploid hairy roots was MS+2.0 mg/L 6-BA +0.2 mg/L NAA. Compared with the control diploid plants, the hairy roots-regenerated plants had weak apical dominance, more axillary buds and more narrow leaves; whereas the polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants had thicker stems, shorter internodes and the colour, width and thickness of leaves were significantly higher than that of the control. Observation of the number of chromosomes in their root tip cells reveals that the obtained polyploid regenerated plants were tetraploidy, with 96 (4n = 96) chromosomes. Pot-grown experiments showed compared to the control, the flowering was delayed by 21 days in diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants and polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants. GC-MS detection shows that the content of nicotine in polyploid plants was about 6.90 and 4.57 times the control and the diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants, respectively.

  9. Expression of a Self-Incompatibility Glycoprotein (S2-Ribonuclease) from Nicotiana alata in Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed Central

    Murfett, J; Cornish, EC; Ebert, PR; Bonig, I; McClure, BA; Clarke, AE

    1992-01-01

    In Nicotiana alata, self-incompatibility is controlled by a single locus, designated the S-locus, with multiple alleles. Stylar products of these alleles are ribonucleases that are secreted mainly in the transmitting tract tissues. N. tabacum plants were transformed with constructs containing the S2-cDNA and genomic S2-sequences from N. alata that were linked to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Unlike other genes controlled by this promoter, the genes were expressed most highly in mature floral organs. This pattern of expression was observed at both the protein and RNA levels. The S2-glycoprotein was detected in the stylar transmitting tract tissues of the transgenic plants. The transgene product was secreted, had ribonuclease activity, and was glycosylated with the correct number of glycan chains. However, the maximum level of S2-glycoprotein in styles of the transgenic plants was approximately 100-fold lower than that found in N. alata styles carrying the S2-allele. Perhaps because of this lower protein level, the plants showed no changes in the incompatibility phenotype. PMID:12297668

  10. PELPIII: the class III pistil-specific extensin-like Nicotiana tabacum proteins are essential for interspecific incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Carrie A; Anderson, Neil O; Clasen, Benjamin M; Hegeman, Adrian D; Smith, Alan G

    2013-06-01

    Pre-zygotic interspecific incompatibility (II) involves an active inhibition mechanism between the pollen of one species and the pistil of another. As a barrier to fertilization, II effectively prevents hybridization and maintains species identity. Transgenic ablation of the mature transmitting tract (TT) in Nicotiana tabacum resulted in the loss of inhibition of pollen tube growth in Nicotiana obtusifolia (synonym Nicotiana trigonophylla) and Nicotiana repanda. The role of the TT in the II interaction between N. tabacum and N. obtusifolia was characterized by evaluating N. obtusifolia pollen tube growth in normal and TT-ablated N. tabacum styles at various post-pollination times and developmental stages. The II activity of the TT slowed and then arrested N. obtusifolia pollen tube growth, and was developmentally synchronized. We hypothesize that proteins produced by the mature TT and secreted into the extracellular matrix inhibit interspecific pollen tubes. When extracts from the mature TT of N. tabacum were injected into the TT-ablated style prior to pollination, the growth of incompatible pollen tubes of N. obtusifolia and N. repanda was inhibited. The class III pistil-specific extensin-like protein (PELPIII) was consistently associated with specific inhibition of pollen tubes, and its requirement for II was confirmed through use of plants with antisense suppression of PELPIII. Inhibition of N. obtusifolia and N. repanda pollen tube growth required accumulation of PELPIII in the TT of N. tabacum, supporting PELPIII function in pre-zygotic II. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of fifteen NtabSPL genes in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Qinyan95.

    PubMed

    Han, Yao-Yao; Ma, Yan-Qin; Li, Dian-Zhen; Yao, Jing-Wen; Xu, Zi-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen SPL (SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE) genes were identified and characterized in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Qinyan95. The exon-intron structures of these genes were determined according to the coding sequences confirmed by RT-PCR and the genomic DNA sequences downloaded from the databases in Sol Genomics Network, and thirteen of them were found to carry the response element of miR156. To elucidate the origin of the validated NtabSPL genes, multiple alignments of the nucleotide sequences encompassing the open reading frames were conducted by using the orthologs in N. tabacum, Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tomentosiformis, and Nicotiana otophora. The results showed that six NtabSPL genes were derived from a progenitor of N. sylvestris, and nine NtabSPL genes were derived from a progenitor of N. tomentosiformis, further corroborating that N. tabacum came from the interspecific hybridization between the ancestors of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. In contrast to previous statements about highly repetitive sequences, the genome of N. tabacum mainly retained the paternal-derived SPL genes in diploidization process. Phylogenetic analyses based on the highly conserved SBP (SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN) domains and the full-length amino acid sequences reveal that the SPL proteins of tobacco, tomato, and Arabidopsis can be categorized into eight groups. It is worth noting that N. tabacum contains seven NtabSPL6 genes originated from two parental genomes and NtabSPL6-2 possesses a GC-AG intron. In addition, transgenic tobacco plants harboring Arabidopsis Pri-miR156A were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, and the constitutive expression of miR156 could obviously inhibit the activity of the NtabSPL genes containing its target site, suggesting the function of miR156 is conservative in tobacco and Arabidopsis.

  12. Expression of synthetic human tropoelastin (hTE) protein in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghani, Mona; El-Heba, Ghada A Abu; Abdelhadi, Abdelhadi A; Abdallah, Naglaa A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plant molecular farming (PMF) is an important growing prospective approach in plant biotechnology; it includes production of recombinant pharmaceutical and industrial proteins in large quantities from engineered plants. Elastin is a major protein component of tissues that require elasticity, it helps keep skin smooth as it stretches to allow normal.  Elastin is used as a raw material for the cosmetic industry. In this work, we aimed to use plant as a bioreactor for the expression and production of the full human tropoelastin protein. Agrobacterium- mediated transient expression system into Nicotiana tabacum using syringe agroinfiltration was used to provide fast and convenient way to produce recombinant proteins with greater expression overall the plant leaf. This study aimed to establish an efficient and rapid system for transiently expression and production of human recombinant tropoelastin protein in transgenic N. tabacum plants. Modified elastin (ELN) gene was biosynthesized and cloned into pCambia1390 vector to be used into N. tabacum agroinfilteration. Optimization of codon usage for the human tropoelastin gene, without changing the primary structure of the protein was carried out to ensure high expression in tobacco plants. The obtained data proved that the 5th day post-infiltration is the optimum interval to obtain the maximum production of our recombinant protein. Southern blot analysis was able to detect 2175 bp fragment length representing the ELN orf (open reding frame). On the other hand, ELN -expression within plant's tissue was visualized by RT-PCR during the period 3–10 days post agroinfiltration. At the protein level, western and ELISA confirmed the expression of recombinant tropoelastin protein. Western blot analysis detected the tropoelastin protein as parent band at ∼70 kDa from freshly extracted protein, while two degraded bands of ∼55 and ∼45 kDa, representing a pattern of tropoelastin were appeared with frozen samples

  13. Identification of Nicotiana tabacum Linkage Group Corresponding to the Q Chromosome Gene(s) Involved in Hybrid Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Matsuo, Chihiro; Iizuka, Takahiro; Oda, Masayuki; Marubashi, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    Background A linkage map consisting of 24 linkage groups has been constructed using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in Nicotiana tabacum. However, chromosomal assignments of all linkage groups have not yet been made. The Q chromosome in N. tabacum encodes a gene or genes triggering hybrid lethality, a phenomenon that causes death of hybrids derived from some crosses. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified a linkage group corresponding to the Q chromosome using an interspecific cross between an N. tabacum monosomic line lacking the Q chromosome and N. africana. N. ingulba yielded inviable hybrids after crossing with N. tabacum. SSR markers on the identified linkage group were used to analyze hybrid lethality in this cross. The results implied that one or more genes on the Q chromosome are responsible for hybrid lethality in this cross. Furthermore, the gene(s) responsible for hybrid lethality in the cross N. tabacum × N. africana appear to be on the region of the Q chromosome to which SSR markers PT30342 and PT30365 map. Conclusions/Significance Linkage group 11 corresponded to the Q chromosome. We propose a new method to correlate linkage groups with chromosomes in N. tabacum. PMID:22629459

  14. Identification of Nicotiana tabacum linkage group corresponding to the Q chromosome gene(s) involved in hybrid lethality.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Takahiro; Matsuo, Chihiro; Iizuka, Takahiro; Oda, Masayuki; Marubashi, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    A linkage map consisting of 24 linkage groups has been constructed using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in Nicotiana tabacum. However, chromosomal assignments of all linkage groups have not yet been made. The Q chromosome in N. tabacum encodes a gene or genes triggering hybrid lethality, a phenomenon that causes death of hybrids derived from some crosses. We identified a linkage group corresponding to the Q chromosome using an interspecific cross between an N. tabacum monosomic line lacking the Q chromosome and N. africana. N. ingulba yielded inviable hybrids after crossing with N. tabacum. SSR markers on the identified linkage group were used to analyze hybrid lethality in this cross. The results implied that one or more genes on the Q chromosome are responsible for hybrid lethality in this cross. Furthermore, the gene(s) responsible for hybrid lethality in the cross N. tabacum × N. africana appear to be on the region of the Q chromosome to which SSR markers PT30342 and PT30365 map. Linkage group 11 corresponded to the Q chromosome. We propose a new method to correlate linkage groups with chromosomes in N. tabacum.

  15. Immobilization of Nicotiana tabacum plant cell suspensions within calcium alginate gel beads for the production of enhanced amounts of scopolin.

    PubMed

    Gilleta; Roisin; Fliniaux; Jacquin-Dubreuil; Barbotin; Nava-Saucedo

    2000-02-01

    Scopolin-producing cells of Nicotiana tabacum were immobilized within Ca-alginate gel beads. Free cell suspensions accumulated scopolin within cytoplasmic compartments and cell disruption was necessary to recover scopolin. On the contrary, immobilized plant cells excreted considerable amounts of scopolin. Scopolin diffused throughout the gel matrix and reached the culture media. A large fraction of produced scopolin could then be recovered from the culture medium without disrupting cells. Immobilized N. tabacum cells produced more scopolin than free cell suspensions did (3.8 mg/g fresh weight biomass [into the culture media] versus 0.2 mg/g fresh weight biomass [intracellular]). Variation of the immobilization conditions revealed a marked influence on the behavior of N. tabacum plant cells: production of scopolin and enhanced excretion, cell growth, and morphological aspect of plant cell colonies. This excretion phenomenon could be used advantageously at an industrial production level.

  16. Gene Inactivation by CRISPR-Cas9 in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Suspension Cells.

    PubMed

    Mercx, Sébastien; Tollet, Jérémie; Magy, Bertrand; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Plant suspension cells are interesting hosts for the heterologous production of pharmacological proteins such as antibodies. They have the advantage to facilitate the containment and the application of good manufacturing practices. Furthermore, antibodies can be secreted to the extracellular medium, which makes the purification steps much simpler. However, improvements are still to be made regarding the quality and the production yield. For instance, the inactivation of proteases and the humanization of glycosylation are both important targets which require either gene silencing or gene inactivation. To this purpose, CRISPR-Cas9 is a very promising technique which has been used recently in a series of plant species, but not yet in plant suspension cells. Here, we sought to use the CRISPR-Cas9 system for gene inactivation in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells. We transformed a transgenic line expressing a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) with a binary vector containing genes coding for Cas9 and three guide RNAs targeting mCherry restriction sites, as well as a bialaphos-resistant (bar) gene for selection. To demonstrate gene inactivation in the transgenic lines, the mCherry gene was PCR-amplified and analyzed by electrophoresis. Seven out of 20 transformants displayed a shortened fragment, indicating that a deletion occurred between two target sites. We also analyzed the transformants by restriction fragment length polymorphism and observed that the three targeted restriction sites were hit. DNA sequencing of the PCR fragments confirmed either deletion between two target sites or single nucleotide deletion. We therefore conclude that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used in N. tabacum BY2 cells.

  17. Optimisation of contained Nicotiana tabacum cultivation for the production of recombinant protein pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Richard; Atkinson, Christopher J; Paul, Matthew; Hassan, Sally; Drake, Pascal M W; Sexton, Amy L; Santa-Cruz, Simon; James, David; Hamp, Keith; Gutteridge, Colin; Ma, Julian K-C

    2010-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum is emerging as a crop of choice for production of recombinant protein pharmaceuticals. Although there is significant commercial expertise in tobacco farming, different cultivation practices are likely to be needed when the objective is to optimise protein expression, yield and extraction, rather than the traditional focus on biomass and alkaloid production. Moreover, pharmaceutical transgenic tobacco plants are likely to be grown initially within a controlled environment, the parameters for which have yet to be established. Here, the growth characteristics and functional recombinant protein yields for two separate transgenic tobacco plant lines were investigated. The impacts of temperature, day-length, compost nitrogen content, radiation and plant density were examined. Temperature was the only environmental variable to affect IgG concentration in the plants, with higher yields observed in plants grown at lower temperature. In contrast, temperature, supplementary radiation and plant density all affected the total soluble protein yield in the same plants. Transgenic plants expressing a second recombinant protein (cyanovirin-N) responded differently to IgG transgenic plants to elevated temperature, with an increase in cyanovirin-N concentration, although the effect of the environmental variables on total soluble protein yields was the same as the IgG plants. Planting density and radiation levels were important factors affecting variability of the two recombinant protein yields in transgenic plants. Phenotypic differences were observed between the two transgenic plant lines and non-transformed N. tabacum, but the effect of different growing conditions was consistent between the three lines. Temperature, day length, radiation intensity and planting density all had a significant impact on biomass production. Taken together, the data suggest that recombinant protein yield is not affected substantially by environmental factors other than growth

  18. Expression of a constitutively activated plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 cells results in cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Niczyj, Marta; Champagne, Antoine; Alam, Iftekhar; Nader, Joseph; Boutry, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Increased acidification of the external medium by an activated H (+) -ATPase results in cell expansion, in the absence of upstream activating signaling. The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase couples ATP hydrolysis with proton transport outside the cell, and thus creates an electrochemical gradient, which energizes secondary transporters. According to the acid growth theory, this enzyme is also proposed to play a major role in cell expansion, by acidifying the external medium and so activating enzymes that are involved in cell wall-loosening. However, this theory is still debated. To challenge it, we made use of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase isoform from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia truncated from its C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain (ΔCPMA4), and thus constitutively activated. This protein was expressed in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells using a heat shock inducible promoter. The characterization of several independent transgenic lines showed that the expression of activated ΔCPMA4 resulted in a reduced external pH by 0.3-1.2 units, as well as in an increased H(+)-ATPase activity by 77-155 % (ATP hydrolysis), or 70-306 % (proton pumping) of isolated plasma membranes. In addition, ΔCPMA4-expressing cells were 17-57 % larger than the wild-type cells and displayed abnormal shapes. A proteomic comparison of plasma membranes isolated from ΔCPMA4-expressing and wild-type cells revealed the altered abundance of several proteins involved in cell wall synthesis, transport, and signal transduction. In conclusion, the data obtained in this work showed that H(+)-ATPase activation is sufficient to induce cell expansion and identified possible actors which intervene in this process.

  19. Phytoaccumulation of lead by sunflower (Helianthus annuus), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides).

    PubMed

    Boonyapookana, Benjaporn; Parkpian, Preeda; Techapinyawat, Sombun; DeLaune, R D; Jugsujinda, Aroon

    2005-01-01

    The ability of three plant species: Helianthus annuus, Nicotiana tabacum, and Vetiveria zizanioides for phytoaccumulation of Pb was studied. Plants were grown in hydroponic solution containing Pb(NO3)2 at concentration of 0.25 and 2.5 mM Pb in the presence or absence of chelating agents (EDTA or DTPA). Lead (Pb) transport and localization within the tissues of the plant species was determined using scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers (SEM-EDS). The addition of chelators increased Pb uptake as compared to plants grown in solution containing Pb alone. Lead taken up by the plant species were concentrated in both leaf and stem at the region of vascular bundles with greater amounts in the leaf portion. Lead granules were also found in the H. annuus root tissue from the epidermis layer to the central axis. After four weeks of growth a 23-fold increase in shoot Pb content for H. annuus and N. tabacum and 17-fold increase in shoot Pb for V. zizanioides resulted from plants grown in the 2.5 mM Pb-EDTA treatment. The higher Pb treatment (2.5 mM Pb containing EDTA) resulted in higher concentrations of Pb in plant tissue at the fourth week of exposure as compared to Pb treatment containing DTPA. Overall, Pb accumulation potential of H. annuus was greater than that of N. tabacum and V. zizanioides as indicated by the bioconcentration factor (171, 70, and 88, respectively). The highest measured Pb concentrations were found in H. annuus roots, stems, and leaves (2668, 843, and 3611 microg/g DW, respectively) grown in the 2.5 mM Pb-EDTA treatment. The addition of chelators caused some reduction in plant growth and biomass. Results showed that the three plant species tested have potential for use in phytoaccumulation of Pb since the Pb was concentrated in leaf and stem as compared to control plants. H. annuus however best meet the prerequisites for a hyperaccumulator plant and would have the potential for use in the restoration of

  20. Tissue-specific expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase gene variants in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Jurečková, Jana Fišerová; Sýkorová, Eva; Hafidh, Said; Honys, David; Fajkus, Jiří; Fojtová, Miloslava

    2017-03-01

    In tobacco, three sequence variants of the TERT gene have been described. We revealed unbalanced levels of TERT variant transcripts in vegetative tobacco tissues and enhanced TERT transcription and telomerase activity in reproductive tissues. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex responsible for the maintenance of telomeres, structures delimiting ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes. In the Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) allotetraploid plant, three sequence variants (paralogs) of the gene coding for the telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit (TERT) have been described, two of them derived from the maternal N. sylvestris genome (TERT_Cs, TERT_D) and one originated from the N. tomentosiformis paternal genome (TERT_Ct). In this work, we analyzed the transcription of TERT variants in correlation with telomerase activity in tobacco tissues. High and approximately comparable levels of TERT_Ct and TERT_Cs transcripts were detected in seedlings, roots, flower buds and leaves, while the transcript of the TERT_D variant was markedly underrepresented. Similarly, in N. sylvestris tissues, TERT_Cs transcript significantly predominated. A specific pattern of TERT transcripts was found in samples of tobacco pollen with the TERT_Cs variant clearly dominating particularly at the early stage of pollen development. Detailed analysis of TERT_C variants representation in functionally distinct fractions of pollen transcriptome revealed their prevalence in large ribonucleoprotein particles encompassing translationally silent mRNA; only a minority of TERT_Ct and TERT_Cs transcripts were localized in actively translated polysomes. Histones of the TERT_C chromatin were decorated predominantly with the euchromatin-specific epigenetic modification in both telomerase-positive and telomerase-negative tobacco tissues. We conclude that the existence and transcription pattern of tobacco TERT paralogs represents an interesting phenomenon and our results indicate its functional significance

  1. Development and application of an efficient virus-induced gene silencing system in Nicotiana tabacum using geminivirus alphasatellite*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chang-jun; Zhang, Tong; Li, Fang-fang; Zhang, Xin-yue; Zhou, Xue-ping

    2011-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed technique for characterizing the function of plant genes by gene transcript suppression and is increasingly used to generate transient loss-of-function assays. Here we report that the 2mDNA1, a geminivirus satellite vector, can induce efficient gene silencing in Nicotiana tabacum with Tobacco curly shoot virus. We have successfully silenced the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene in GUS transgenic N. tabacum plants and the sulphur desaturase (Su) gene in five different N. tabacum cultivars. These pronounced and severe silencing phenotypes are persistent and ubiquitous. Once initiated in seedlings, the silencing phenotype lasted for the entire life span of the plants and silencing could be induced in a variety of tissues and organs including leaf, shoot, stem, root, and flower, and achieved at any growth stage. This system works well between 18–32 °C. We also silenced the NtEDS1 gene and demonstrated that NtEDS1 is essential for N gene mediated resistance against Tobacco mosaic virus in N. tabacum. The above results indicate that this system has great potential as a versatile VIGS system for routine functional analysis of genes in N. tabacum. PMID:21265040

  2. Genomic factors controlling the lethality exhibited in the hybrid between Nicotiana suaveolens Lehm. and N. tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Inoue, E; Marubashi, W; Niwa, M

    1996-08-01

    Interspecific hybrid plants between Nicotiana suaveolens and N. tabacum exhibit lethal symptoms at the seedling stage and cannot grow to maturity. In this investigation, an attempt was made to clarify the genomic factors responsible for this lethality. N. suaveolens was crossed to N. sylvestris (genomic constitution: SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT), these latter two species being the progenitors of N. tabacum (SSTT). From the cross N. suaveolens x N. tomentosiformis, many seedlings were obtained through ovule culture, and these subsequently grew to maturity without exhibiting any lethality. In the reciprocal crossing between N. sauvelons and N. sylvestris, only a few hybrid seedlings were obtained through ovlue culture and all died after unfolding their cotyledons when cultured at 28 °C. This lethality could be avoided by culturing the ovules at 36 °C. These features of hybrid lethality resembled those observed in the interspecific hybrid between N. suaveolens and N. tabacum. These findings suggest that the S genome in N. tabacum is responsible for the lethality exhibited in the hybrid between N. suaveolens and N. tabacum.

  3. Metabolomic analysis of isonitrosoacetophenone-induced perturbations in phenolic metabolism of Nicotiana tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Madala, Ntakadzeni E; Steenkamp, Paul A; Piater, Lizelle A; Dubery, Ian A

    2013-10-01

    Plants have developed biochemical and molecular responses to adapt to different stress environments. One of the characteristics of the multi-component defence response is the production of defence-related metabolites. Plant defences can be triggered by various stimuli, including synthetic or naturally occurring molecules, especially those derived from pathogens. In the current study, Nicotiana tabacum cell suspensions were treated with isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP), a subcomponent of a plant-derived stress metabolite with anti-fungal and anti-oxidant properties, in order to investigate the effect thereof on cellular metabolism. Subsequent metabolomic-based analyses were employed to evaluate changes in the metabolome. UPLC-MS in conjunction with multivariate data analyses was found to be an appropriate approach to study the effect of chemical inducers like INAP on plant metabolism in this model system. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that INAP is capable of inducing time-dependent metabolic perturbations in the cultured cells. Orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed metabolites of which the levels are affected by INAP, and eight of these were tentatively annotated from the mass spectral data and online databases. These metabolites are known in the context of plant stress- and defence responses and include benzoic- or cinnamic acid derivatives that are either glycosylated or quinilated as well as flavonoid derivatives. The results indicate that INAP affects the shikimate-, phenylpropanoid- and flavonoid pathways, the products of which may subsequently lead to an anti-oxidant environment in vivo.

  4. Lysinibacillus tabacifolii sp. nov., a novel endophytic bacterium isolated from Nicotiana tabacum leaves.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yan-Qing; He, Song-Tao; Li, Qing-Qing; Wang, Ming-Feng; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Zhe, Wei; Cao, Yong-Hong; Mo, Ming-He; Zhai, Yu-Long; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-06-01

    A Gram-positive, catalase- and oxidase-positive, strictly aerobic, endospore-forming rod bacterium, designated K3514(T), was isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. The strain was able to grow at temperatures of 8-40°C, pH 5.0-10.0 and NaCl concentrations of 0-7%. The predominant quinones (>30%) of this strain were MK-7(H2) and MK-7. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain K3514(T) was affiliated to the genus Lysinibacillus, with its closest relatives being Lysinibacillus mangiferihumi (98.3% sequence similarity), Lysinibacillus sphaericus (97.9% sequence similarity), Lysinibacillus fusiformis (97.4% sequence similarity), and Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus (97.3% sequence similarity). However, low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness values suggested that the isolate was distinct from the other closest Lysinibacillus species. Additionally, based on analysis of morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics, the isolate could be differentiated from the closest known relatives. Therefore, based on polyphasic taxonomic data, the novel isolate likely represents a novel species, for which the name Lysinibacillus tabacifolii sp. nov. and the type strain K3514(T) (=KCTC 33042(T) =CCTCC AB 2012050(T)) are proposed.

  5. Integration and expression of a rabbit liver cytochrome P-450 gene in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, K; Noji, M; Ohmori, S; Imai, Y; Murakoshi, I

    1991-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 is involved in the oxidative metabolism of a broad range of substrates. We have made a chimeric construct, pSN002, containing the cDNA for rabbit liver cytochrome P-450 (IIC14) under the control of the TR2' promoter for mannopine synthase in the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid. Nicotiana tabacum was transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring a cointegrated plasmid pSN002::pGV2260. The presence of mRNA and of the translated protein from the chimeric cytochrome P-450 gene in transgenic plants was confirmed by RNA blot hybridization and by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. The transformants in which the foreign cytochrome P-450 protein is expressed show marked phenotypic changes, notably a tendency rapidly to senesce. We detected 2-propenylpyrrolidine, a degradative metabolite of nicotine alkaloids, in transgenic tobacco showing this pronounced phenotypic change. Such metabolism is likely to be due to the effect of senescence and not directly to the presence of the cytochrome P-450. Images PMID:1714583

  6. Isoprene emission protects photosynthesis but reduces plant productivity during drought in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette C; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Possell, Malcolm; Vickers, Claudia E; Purnell, Anna; Mullineaux, Philip M; Davies, William J; Dodd, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Isoprene protects the photosynthetic apparatus of isoprene-emitting plants from oxidative stress. The role of isoprene in the response of plants to drought is less clear. Water was withheld from transgenic isoprene-emitting and non-emitting tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, to examine: the response of isoprene emission to plant water deficit; a possible relationship between concentrations of the drought-induced phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and isoprene; and whether isoprene affected foliar reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation levels. Isoprene emission did not affect whole-plant water use, foliar ABA concentration or leaf water potential under water deficit. Compared with well-watered controls, droughted non-emitting plants significantly increased ROS content (31-46%) and lipid peroxidation (30-47%), concomitant with decreased operating and maximum efficiencies of photosystem II photochemistry and lower leaf and whole-plant water use efficiency (WUE). Droughted isoprene-emitting plants showed no increase in ROS content or lipid peroxidation relative to well-watered controls, despite isoprene emission decreasing before leaf wilting. Although isoprene emission protected the photosynthetic apparatus and enhanced leaf and whole-plant WUE, non-emitting plants had 8-24% more biomass under drought, implying that isoprene emission incurred a yield penalty. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Larval Helicoverpa zea Transcriptional, Growth and Behavioral Responses to Nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Gog, Linus; Vogel, Heiko; Hum-Musser, Sue M.; Tuter, Jason; Musser, Richard O.

    2014-01-01

    The polyphagous feeding habits of the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), underscore its status as a major agricultural pest with a wide geographic distribution and host plant repertoire. To study the transcriptomic response to toxins in diet, we conducted a microarray analysis of H. zea caterpillars feeding on artificial diet, diet laced with nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum (L.) plants. We supplemented our analysis with growth and aversion bioassays. The transcriptome reflects an abundant expression of proteases, chitin, cytochrome P450 and immune-related genes, many of which are shared between the two experimental treatments. However, the tobacco treatment tended to elicit stronger transcriptional responses than nicotine-laced diet. The salivary factor glucose oxidase, known to suppress nicotine induction in the plant, was upregulated by H. zea in response to tobacco but not to nicotine-laced diet. Reduced caterpillar growth rates accompanied the broad regulation of genes associated with growth, such as juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase. The differential expression of chemosensory proteins, such as odorant binding-protein-2 precursor, as well as the neurotransmitter nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor subunit 9, highlights candidate genes regulating aversive behavior towards nicotine. We suggest that an observed coincidental rise in cannibalistic behavior and regulation of proteases and protease inhibitors in H. zea larvae signify a compensatory response to induced plant defenses. PMID:26462833

  8. Copper-mediated oxidative burst in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2 cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Raeymaekers, T; Potters, G; Asard, H; Guisez, Y; Horemans, N

    2003-05-01

    In cell suspension cultures of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2) a rapid and concentration-dependent accumulation of H(2)O(2) is induced by excess concentrations of copper (up to 100 microM). This specific and early response towards copper stress was shown to be extracellular. Addition of 300 U of catalase per ml decreased the level of H(2)O(2). Superoxide dismutase (5 U/ml) induced an increase in H(2)O(2) production by 22.2%. This indicates that at least part of the H(2)O(2) is produced by dismutation of superoxide. Pretreatment of the cell cultures with the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors diphenylene iodonium (2 and 10 microM) and quinacrine (1 and 5 mM) prevented the generation of H(2)O(2) under copper stress for 90%. The influence of the pH on the H(2)O(2) production revealed the possible involvement of cell-wall-dependent peroxidases in the generation of reactive oxygen species after copper stress.

  9. Crystalline ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of high integrity and catalytic activity from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Servaites, J C

    1985-04-01

    Crystalline tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) was prepared using a procedure which protected the enzyme from hydrolysis by endogenous proteases. Leaves were extracted in a buffered medium containing casein, leupeptin, and high concentrations of MgSO4 and NaHCO3. After filtration through ion-exchange resin to remove contaminants, the enzyme was concentrated by precipitation with polyethylene glycol and crystal formation was induced by low-salt dialysis. The crystalline enzyme had a measured specific activity of 1.7 mumol CO2 mg protein-1 min-1, and about 93% of the enzyme could be activated with Mg2+ and CO2. Crystalline enzyme prepared in the absence of casein exhibited an activity which was only one-third of this rate and only about 70% of the enzyme could be activated with Mg2+ and CO2. Casein-extracted enzyme was resolved into distinct bands corresponding to the large (55,000) and small (14,000) subunits by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The large subunit of enzyme prepared according to the latter procedure was found to be composed of five different polypeptides of slightly decreasing molecular weight. Only about one-third of the large subunits were of the 55,000 molecular weight type. No differences between the two preparations were observed in the Km (CO2) and apparent Km (ribulose bisphosphate).

  10. In vitro antioxidant properties of flavonoids and polysaccharides extract from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qiao-Mei; Wang, Li-Juan; Li, Wei-Ming; Wang, Jing-Lu; Ding, Yu-Ting

    2012-09-21

    In the present study, antioxidant properties of flavonoids and polysaccharides from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaves were evaluated in several in vitro systems, e.g., scavenging activities on hydroxyl, superoxide anion, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radicals, and reducing power. Flavonoids showed much better activity than polysaccharides in scavenging activities on free radicals. When compared to the positive control, ascorbic acid, both showed weaker antioxidant potential. However, flavonoids possessed comparable superoxide anion, DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging abilities to ascorbic acid at high concentration (600 μg/mL). Meanwhile, it was found that flavonoids had prominent effects on the reducing power, which was equivalent to ascorbic acid, and was significantly higher than polysaccharides. These results clearly indicate that flavonoids are effective in scavenging free radicals and have the potential to be powerful antioxidants. Thus, tobacco leaves could be considered as a potential source of natural antioxidants for food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics or nutraceutical industries.

  11. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase of high specific activity from anther-derived haploid plants of Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran, S.; Burdick, P.J.; Smith, R.H.

    1986-04-01

    Crystalline ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase was purified from several haploid plants of Nicotiana tabacum obtained by anther-culture. Specific activity of the enzyme ranged from 1.09 to 2.15 ..mu..moles /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixed mg protein/sup -1/ min/sup -1/ in growth chamber grown plants and 0.5 to 1.15 ..mu..moles /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixed mg protein/sup -1/ min/sup -1/ in greenhouse grown plants. No degradation of the large subunit was observed on SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of these purified preparations. A low specific activity of 0.25 units was obtained for a preparation of the enzyme from a plant grown under fluctuating growth conditions. This protein gave an additional band for the large subunit on electrophoresis, presumably a degradation product. Individual differences in specific activity under identical growth conditions in these haploids suggest a possible role for the small subunit in regulation of enzyme activity.

  12. Plant coexistence can enhance phytoextraction of cadmium by tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Li, Yuefang; Tang, Jianjun; Hu, Liangliang; Chen, Xin

    2011-01-01

    A mesocosm experiment was conducted to investigate whether plant coexistence affects cadmium (Cd) uptake by plant in contaminated soil. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. K326) and Japanese clover (Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl.) were used. Cadmium was applied as 3CdSO4 x 8H2O in solution at three levels (0, 1, and 3 mg/kg soil) to simulate an unpolluted soil and soils that were slightly and moderately polluted with Cd. Tobacco (crop), Japanese clover (non-crop), and their combination were grown under each Cd treatment. Compared to monoculture and under all Cd treatments, co-planting with Japanese clover did not affect tobacco biomass but significantly increased Cd concentration in all tobacco tissues and enhanced Cd accumulation in tobacco shoots and roots. Compared to monoculture, co-planting reduced soil pH and increased Cd bioavailability. For tobacco, co-planting with Japanese clover increased the Cd bioconcentration factor (BCF) in Cd contaminated soil. Japanese clover also accumulated substantial quantities of Cd in shoots and roots. Thus, total Cd uptake by the plants was much greater with co-planting than with monoculture. The results suggested that phytoextraction can be effectively increased through tobacco co-planting with Japanese clover in mildly Cd-contaminated soil.

  13. Intracellular compartmentation of ions in salt adapted tobacco cells. [Nicotiana tabacum L

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, M.L.; Hess, F.D.; Bressan, R.A.; Hasegawa, P.M. )

    1988-02-01

    Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} are the principal solutes utilized for osmotic adjustment in cells of Nicotiana tabacum L. var Wisconsin 38 (tobacco) adapted to NaCl, accumulating to levels of 472 and 386 millimolar, respectively, in cells adapted to 428 millimolar NaCl. X-ray microanalysis of unetched frozen-hydrated cells adapted to salt indicated that Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} were compartmentalized in the vacuole, at concentrations of 780 and 624 millimolar, respectively, while cytoplasmic concentrations of the ions were maintained at 96 millimolar. The morphometric differences which existed between unadapted and salt adapted cells, (cytoplasmic volume of 22 and 45% of the cell, respectively), facilitated containment of the excited volume of the x-ray signal in the cytoplasm of the adapted cells. Confirmation of ion compartmentation in salt adapted cells was obtained based on kinetic analyses of {sup 22}Na{sup +} and {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} efflux from cells in steady state. These data provide evidence that ion compartmentation is a component of salt adaptation of glycophyte cells.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide mediates nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under high temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Ruijing; Jia, Yujie; Ef, Abd Allah; Jia, Aiqun; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a signal to induce many physiological processes in plants, but its role in controlling the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites is not well established. In this study, we found that high temperature (HT) treatment induced nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and promoted the rapid accumulation of H2S. Furthermore, HT triggered the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA), a plant hormone that promotes nicotine biosynthesis. Suppression of the H2S signal using chemical inhibitors or via RNAi suppression of l-cysteine desulphydrase (L-CD) in transgenic plants, compromised JA production and nicotine biosynthesis under HT treatments, and these inhibitory effects could be reversed by applying exogenous H2S. Based on these data, we propose that H2S is an important trigger of nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco under HT conditions, and that H2S acts upstream of JA signaling by modulating the transcription of genes associated with JA biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The transmitting tissue of Nicotiana tabacum is not essential to pollen tube growth, and its ablation can reverse prezygotic interspecific barriers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan G; Eberle, Carrie A; Moss, Nicole G; Anderson, Neil O; Clasen, Benjamin M; Hegeman, Adrian D

    2013-12-01

    The Nicotiana tabacum transmitting tissue is a highly specialized file of metabolically active cells that is the pathway for pollen tubes from the stigma to the ovules where fertilization occurs. It is thought to be essential to pollen tube growth because of the nutrients and guidance it provides to the pollen tubes. It also regulates gametophytic self-incompatibility in the style. To test the function of the transmitting tissue in pollen tube growth and to determine its role in regulating prezygotic interspecific incompatibility, genetic ablation was used to eliminate the mature transmitting tissue, producing a hollow style. Despite the absence of the mature transmitting tissue and greatly reduced transmitting-tissue-specific gene expression, self-pollen tubes had growth to the end of the style. Pollen tubes grew at a slower rate in the transmitting-tissue-ablated line during the first 24 h post-pollination. However, pollen tubes grew to a similar length 40 h post-pollination with and without a transmitting tissue. Ablation of the N. tabacum transmitting tissue significantly altered interspecific pollen tube growth. These results implicate the N. tabacum transmitting tissue in facilitating or inhibiting interspecific pollen tube growth in a species-dependent manner and in controlling prezygotic reproductive barriers.

  16. Manipulation of monoubiquitin improves chilling tolerance in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanan; Zhang, Meng; Guo, Qifang; Wang, Guokun; Gong, Jiangfeng; Xu, Ying; Wang, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a multifunctional protein that mainly functions to tag proteins for selective degradation by the 26S proteasome. We cloned an Ub gene TaUb2 from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) previously. To study the function of TaUB2 in chilling stress, sense and antisense Ub transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.), as well as wild type (WT) and vector control β-glucuronidase (T-GUS) plants, were used. Under stress, leaf wilting in sense plants was significantly less than in controls, but more severe in antisense plants. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) in sense plants were greater than controls, but lower in antisense plants during chilling stress and recovery. Less wilting in sense plants resulted from improved water status, which may be related to the accumulation of proline and solute sugar. Furthermore, as indicated by electrolyte leakage, membrane damage under stress was less in sense plants and more severe in antisense plants than controls. Consistent with electrolyte leakage, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was less in sense plants, but more in antisense plants compared to controls. Meanwhile, the less accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the greater antioxidant enzyme activity in sense plants implied the improved antioxidant competence by the overexpression of monoubiquitin gene Ta-Ub2 from wheat. We suggest that overexpressing Ub is a useful strategy to promote chilling tolerance. The improvement of ROS scavenging may be an important mechanism underlying the role of Ub in promoting plants tolerant to chilling stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Phytase activity in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) root exudates is exhibited by a purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Leung, Andy; Kuang, Rainbow; Wang, Yu; Leung, Priscilla; Lim, Boon-Leong

    2008-01-01

    Phytases are enzymes that catalyze liberation of inorganic phosphates from phytate, the major organic phosphorus in soil. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) responds to phosphorus starvation with an increase in extracellular phytase activity. By a three-step purification scheme, a phosphatase with phytase activity was purified 486-fold from tobacco root exudates to a specific activity of 6,028 nkat mg(-1) and an overall yield of 3%. SDS-PAGE revealed a single polypeptide of 64 kDa, thus indicating apparent homogeneity of the final enzyme preparation. Gel filtration chromatography suggested that the enzyme was a ca. 56 kDa monomeric protein. De novo sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry resulted in a tryptic peptide sequence that shares high homology with several plant purple acid phosphatases. The identity of the enzyme was further confirmed by molybdate-inhibition assay and cDNA cloning. The purified enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima at 5.0-5.5 and 45 degrees C, respectively, and were found to have high affinities for both p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP; K(m)=13.9 microM) and phytate (K(m)=14.7 microM), but a higher kcat for pNPP (2,056 s(-1)) than phytate (908 s(-1)). Although a broad specificity of the enzyme was observed for a range of physiological substrates in soil, maximum activity was achieved using mononucleotides as substrates. We conclude that the phytase activity in tobacco root exudates is exhibited by a purple acid phosphatase and its catalytic properties are pertinent to its role in mobilizing organic P in soil.

  18. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase maintains respiration and preserves photosynthetic capacity during moderate drought in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Wang, Jia; Martyn, Greg D; Rahimy, Farkhunda; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2014-11-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain includes an alternative oxidase (AOX) that is hypothesized to aid photosynthetic metabolism, perhaps by acting as an additional electron sink for photogenerated reductant or by dampening the generation of reactive oxygen species. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosystem I (PSI) absorbance, and biochemical and protein analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum 'Petit Havana SR1' wild-type plants with that of transgenic AOX knockdown (RNA interference) and overexpression lines, under both well-watered and moderate drought-stressed conditions. During drought, AOX knockdown lines displayed a lower rate of respiration in the light than the wild type, as confirmed by two independent methods. Furthermore, CO2 and light response curves indicated a nonstomatal limitation of photosynthesis in the knockdowns during drought, relative to the wild type. Also relative to the wild type, the knockdowns under drought maintained PSI and PSII in a more reduced redox state, showed greater regulated nonphotochemical energy quenching by PSII, and displayed a higher relative rate of cyclic electron transport around PSI. The origin of these differences may lie in the chloroplast ATP synthase amount, which declined dramatically in the knockdowns in response to drought. None of these effects were seen in plants overexpressing AOX. The results show that AOX is necessary to maintain mitochondrial respiration during moderate drought. In its absence, respiration rate slows and the lack of this electron sink feeds back on the photosynthetic apparatus, resulting in a loss of chloroplast ATP synthase that then limits photosynthetic capacity. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Glutathione Transferase from Trichoderma virens Enhances Cadmium Tolerance without Enhancing Its Accumulation in Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Prachy; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Ramachandran, V.; Eapen, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background Cadmium (Cd) is a major heavy metal pollutant which is highly toxic to plants and animals. Vast agricultural areas worldwide are contaminated with Cd. Plants take up Cd and through the food chain it reaches humans and causes toxicity. It is ideal to develop plants tolerant to Cd, without enhanced accumulation in the edible parts for human consumption. Glutathione transferases (GST) are a family of multifunctional enzymes known to have important roles in combating oxidative stresses induced by various heavy metals including Cd. Some GSTs are also known to function as glutathione peroxidases. Overexpression/heterologous expression of GSTs is expected to result in plants tolerant to heavy metals such as Cd. Results Here, we report cloning of a glutathione transferase gene from Trichoderma virens, a biocontrol fungus and introducing it into Nicotiana tabacum plants by Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Transgenic nature of the plants was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization and expression by reverse transcription PCR. Transgene (TvGST) showed single gene Mendelian inheritance. When transgenic plants expressing TvGST gene were exposed to different concentrations of Cd, they were found to be more tolerant compared to wild type plants, with transgenic plants showing lower levels of lipid peroxidation. Levels of different antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione transferase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, guiacol peroxidase and catalase showed enhanced levels in transgenic plants expressing TvGST compared to control plants, when exposed to Cd. Cadmium accumulation in the plant biomass in transgenic plants were similar or lower than wild-type plants. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that transgenic tobacco plants expressing a Trichoderma virens GST are more tolerant to Cd, without enhancing its accumulation in the plant biomass. It should be possible to extend the present results to crop plants for developing Cd tolerance and

  20. Biocatalytic Asymmetric Alkene Reduction: Crystal Structure and Characterization of a Double Bond Reductase from Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The application of biocatalysis for the asymmetric reduction of activated C=C is a powerful tool for the manufacture of high-value chemical commodities. The biocatalytic potential of “-ene” reductases from the Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE) family of oxidoreductases is well-known; however, the specificity of these enzymes toward mainly small molecule substrates has highlighted the need to discover “-ene” reductases from different enzymatic classes to broaden industrial applicability. Here, we describe the characterization of a flavin-free double bond reductase from Nicotiana tabacum (NtDBR), which belongs to the leukotriene B4 dehydrogenase (LTD) subfamily of the zinc-independent, medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily of enzymes. Using steady-state kinetics and biotransformation reactions, we have demonstrated the regio- and stereospecificity of NtDBR against a variety of α,β-unsaturated activated alkenes. In addition to catalyzing the reduction of typical LTD substrates and several classical OYE-like substrates, NtDBR also exhibited complementary activity by reducing non-OYE substrates (i.e., reducing the exocyclic C=C double bond of (R)-pulegone) and in some cases showing an opposite stereopreference in comparison with the OYE family member pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) reductase. This serves to augment classical OYE “-ene” reductase activity and, coupled with its aerobic stability, emphasizes the potential industrial value of NtDBR. Furthermore, we also report the X-ray crystal structures of the holo-, binary NADP(H)-bound, and ternary [NADP+ and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde (9a)-bound] NtDBR complexes. These will underpin structure-driven site-saturated mutagenesis studies aimed at enhancing the reactivity, stereochemistry, and specificity of this enzyme. PMID:27547488

  1. Increased Salt and Drought Tolerance by D-Ononitol Production in Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed Central

    Sheveleva, E.; Chmara, W.; Bohnert, H. J.; Jensen, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA encoding myo-inositol O-methyltransferase (IMT1) has been transferred into Nicotiana tabacum cultivar SR1. During drought and salt stress, transformants (I5A) accumulated the methylated inositol D-ononitol in amounts exceeding 35 [mu]mol g-1 fresh weight In I5A, photosynthetic CO2 fixation was inhibited less during salt stress and drought, and the plants recovered faster than wild type. One day after rewatering drought-stressed plants, I5A photosynthesis had recovered 75% versus 57% recovery with cultivar SR1 plants. After 2.5 weeks of 250 mM NaCl in hydroponic solution, I5A fixed 4.9 [plus or minus] 1.4 [mu]mol CO2 m-2 s-1, whereas SR1 fixed 2.5 [plus or minus] 0.6 [mu]mol CO2 m-2 s-1. myo-Inositol, the substrate for IMT1, increases in tobacco under stress. Preconditioning of I5A plants in 50 mM NaCl increased D-ononitol amounts and resulted in increased protection when the plants were stressed subsequently with 150 mM NaCl. Pro, Suc, Fru, and Glc showed substantial diurnal fluctuations in amounts, but D-ononitol did not. Plant transformation resulting in stress-inducible, stable solute accumulation appears to provide better protection under drought and salt-stress conditions than strategies using osmotic adjustment by metabolites that are constitutively present. PMID:12223867

  2. Association of carbonic anhydrase with a Calvin cycle enzyme complex in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Jebanathirajah, J A; Coleman, J R

    1998-02-01

    Chloroplast-localized carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1), an enzyme which catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2, appears to be associated with other enzymes of the Calvin cycle in a large multienzyme complex. Gel-filtration fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) of soluble proteins obtained by osmotic lysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Carlson) chloroplasts results in the co-elution of a protein complex of greater than 600 kDa which includes CA, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), phosphoribulokinase (PRK), and ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. Anion-exchange FPLC of chloroplast extracts indicates that there is an association of CA with other proteins that modifies its elution profile in a NaCl gradient, and that Rubisco co-elutes with the fractions containing CA. Following a protocol described by Süss et al. (1993, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518), limited protease treatment of chloroplast extracts was used to show that the association of PRK with other chloroplast proteins appears to protect a number of lysine and arginine residues which may be involved in specific protein-protein interactions. A similar treatment of CA indicates some protection of these residues when CA is associated with other chloroplast polypeptides but the level of protection is not as profound as that exhibited by PRK. In concert with previously published immunolocalization studies, these data indicate that CA may be associated with Rubisco at the stromal periphery of a Calvin cycle enzyme complex in which PRK is more centrally located and associated with thylakoid membranes.

  3. Elucidating the physiological and biochemical responses of different tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) genotypes to lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Maodzeka, Antony; Hussain, Nazim; Wei, Liquan; Zvobgo, Gerald; Mapodzeke, James Mutemachani; Adil, Muhammad Faheem; Jabeen, Salma; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Lixi; Shamsi, Imran Haider

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of lead (Pb) uptake and toxicity were investigated in a hydroponic culture using 7 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) genotypes (Bina 1 [B1], Kutsaga Mammoth 10 [KM10], Nanjing 3 [N3], Kutsaga 35 [K35], Kutsaga E1 [KE1], Cocker 176 [C176], and Kutsaga RK6 [KRK6]) that differed in Pb tolerance. Lead was applied as a solution of Pb nitrate at concentrations of 0 μM, 10 μM, 250 μM, and 500 μM. After 4 wk of Pb treatment, tissue biomass and photosynthetic parameters were measured and elemental analysis was performed. The results showed decreases in growth and photosynthetic parameters with increases in Pb concentration compared with the control. The least reduction in the recorded physiological parameters was noted in K35, whereas the greatest reduction was observed in N3, which is an obvious indication of genotypic differences. Activities of peroxidase, catalase, and malondialdehyde increased significantly with increases in Pb concentration, with genotypes K35 and N3 showing the least and the greatest reduction, respectively. The results demonstrate the phototoxic nature of Pb on plants, and it can be concluded that in Pb-prone areas genotypes K35 and B1 can be used for cultivation because they can grow efficiently in the presence of high Pb concentrations while restricting Pb uptake in the aboveground parts, as seen by the higher Pb tolerance index. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:175-181. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  4. [Transgenic plant regeneration of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) haboring mammalian cyp2e1 gene].

    PubMed

    Li, Peihan; Xiang, Taihe; Xie, Jun; Feng, Ting; Lu, Wenyi

    2012-10-01

    CYP2E1 enzyme encoded by cyp2e1 gene plays an important role in metabolism of heterogeneous organics in mammalian liver cells. The transgenic plant with cyp2e1 can metabolize various low molecular weight organic pollutants. However, it is unclear the mechanism of expression control of cyp2e1 in transgenic plant. In this study, plasmid pSLD50-6 with cyp2e1 and pKH200 with gus as control were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 separately. Then, the cyp2e1 or gus genes were transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and the transgenic plants were regenerated via Agrobacterium tumefaciens method. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze the cyp2e1 gene expression. The expression of cyp2e1 in transgenic tobacco with cyp2e1 decreased obviously treated by ethyl alcohol and reduced slightly by benzene and toluene, while it enhanced by acetone, formaldehyde and oxygen deficit in different levels. In addition, the gene expression of NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in the transgenic tobacco with cyp2e1 were increased significantly treated by benzene, which showed that NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in transgenic tobacco have relation with CYP2E1 detoxication process. It suggested that the NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in transgenic plant formed the requirement in mammalian and participated in the electron transport chain of CYP2E1 enzyme catalytic process.

  5. The Sclerophyllous Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Herbaceous Nicotiana tabacum Have Different Mechanisms to Maintain High Rates of Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Tong, You-Gui; Yu, Guo-Yun; Yang, Wei-Xian

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that high levels of mesophyll conductance (gm) largely contribute to the high rates of photosynthesis in herbaceous C3 plants. However, some sclerophyllous C3 plants that display low levels of gm have high rates of photosynthesis, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for high photosynthetic rates in sclerophyllous C3 plants are unclear. In the present study, we examined photosynthetic characteristics in two high-photosynthesis plants (the sclerophyllous Eucalyptus camaldulensis and the herbaceous Nicotiana tabacum) using measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence. Under saturating light intensities, both species had similar rates of CO2 assimilation at 400 μmol mol−1 CO2 (A400). However, E. camaldulensis exhibited significantly lower gm and chloroplast CO2 concentration (Cc) than N. tabacum. A quantitative analysis revealed that, in E. camaldulensis, the gm limitation was the most constraining factor for photosynthesis. By comparison, in N. tabacum, the biochemical limitation was the strongest, followed by gm and gs limitations. In conjunction with a lower Cc, E. camaldulensis up-regulated the capacities of photorespiratory pathway and alternative electron flow. Furthermore, the rate of alternative electron flow was positively correlated with the rates of photorespiration and ATP supply from other flexible mechanisms, suggesting the important roles of photorespiratory pathway, and alternative electron flow in sustaining high rate of photosynthesis in E. camaldulensis. These results highlight the different mechanisms used to maintain high rates of photosynthesis in the sclerophyllous E. camaldulensis and the herbaceous N. tabacum. PMID:27933083

  6. Two new benzolactones from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qinpeng; Xu, Xingmeng; Zhang, Fengmei; Xiang, Nengjun; He, Pei; Si, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Ruizhi; Wang, Kunmiao; Liu, Zhihua; Liu, Chunbo; Miao, Mingming

    2016-07-01

    Two new benzolactones, 5-methyl-6-prenyl-isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (1), 5-hydroxymethyl-6-prenyl-isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (2), together with four known phenolic compounds (3-6), were isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1-6 were evaluated for their anti-tobacco mosaic virus (anti-TMV) activities. The results showed that compounds 1-6 exhibited high anti-TMV activities with inhibition rates in the range of 16.9-26.2%, respectively.

  7. Biological and chemical induction of resistance to the Globodera tabacum solanacearum in oriental and flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Parkunan, Venkatesan; Johnson, Charles S; Eisenback, Jon D

    2009-09-01

    The effects of acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and four combinations of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on the reproduction of a tobacco cyst nematode, Globodera tabacum solanacearum, and growth of Nicotiana tabacum (cv. K326 and Xanthi) were tested under greenhouse and field conditions. The PGPR included combinations of Bacillus subtilis A13 with B. pumilis INR7, B. pumilis SE34, B. licheniformis IN937b, or B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a, respectively. Among the four rhizobacterial combinations, IN937a + A13 exhibited the most consistent reduction in G. t. solanacearum cysts under greenhouse and field conditions. No undesirable effects of IN937a + A13 were observed on tobacco growth under greenhouse and field conditions. Use of INR7 + A13 reduced G. t. solanacearum reproduction on flue-cured tobacco cv. K326 but not on oriental tobacco cv. Xanthi. Application of ASM reduced final numbers of G. t. solanacearum cysts, but also resulted in phytotoxicity mainly under the greenhouse conditions. When oriental tobacco seedlings were pre-grown in a IN937a + A13-treated soil-less medium, a single application of ASM at 200 mg/L one week after transplanting significantly reduced G. t. solanacearum reproduction in the field.

  8. Biological and Chemical Induction of Resistance to the Globodera tabacum solanacearum in Oriental and Flue-Cured Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Charles S.; Eisenback, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and four combinations of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on the reproduction of a tobacco cyst nematode, Globodera tabacum solanacearum, and growth of Nicotiana tabacum (cv. K326 and Xanthi) were tested under greenhouse and field conditions. The PGPR included combinations of Bacillus subtilis A13 with B. pumilis INR7, B. pumilis SE34, B. licheniformis IN937b, or B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a, respectively. Among the four rhizobacterial combinations, IN937a + A13 exhibited the most consistent reduction in G. t. solanacearum cysts under greenhouse and field conditions. No undesirable effects of IN937a + A13 were observed on tobacco growth under greenhouse and field conditions. Use of INR7 + A13 reduced G. t. solanacearum reproduction on flue-cured tobacco cv. K326 but not on oriental tobacco cv. Xanthi. Application of ASM reduced final numbers of G. t. solanacearum cysts, but also resulted in phytotoxicity mainly under the greenhouse conditions. When oriental tobacco seedlings were pre-grown in a IN937a + A13-treated soil-less medium, a single application of ASM at 200 mg/L one week after transplanting significantly reduced G. t. solanacearum reproduction in the field. PMID:22736815

  9. Genome-wide identification of the expansin gene family in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Ding, Anming; Marowa, Prince; Kong, Yingzhen

    2016-10-01

    Expansins are pH-dependent cell wall loosening proteins which form a large family in plants. They have been shown to be involved in various developmental processes and been implicated in enabling plants' ability to absorb nutrients from the soil as well as conferring biotic and abiotic stress resistances. It is therefore clear that they can be potential targets in genetic engineering for crop improvement. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is a major crop species as well as a model organism. Considering that only a few tobacco expansins have been studied, a genome-wide analysis of the tobacco expansin gene family is necessary. In this study, we identified 52 expansins in tobacco, which were classified into four subfamilies: 36 NtEXPAs, 6 NtEXPBs, 3 NtEXLAs and 7 NtEXLBs. Compared to other species, the NtEXLB subfamily size was relatively larger. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 52 tobacco expansins were divided into 13 subgroups. Gene structure analysis revealed that genes within subfamilies/subgroups exhibited similar characteristics such as gene structure and protein motif arrangement. Whole-genome duplication and tandem duplication events may have played important roles in the expanding of tobacco expansins. Cis-Acting element analysis revealed that each expansin gene was regulated or several expansin genes were co-regulated by both internal and environmental factors. 35 of these genes were identified as being expressed according to a microarray analysis. In contrast to most NtEXPAs which had higher expression levels in young organs, NtEXLAs and NtEXLBs were preferentially expressed in mature or senescent tissues, suggesting that they might play different roles in different organs or at different developmental stages. As the first step towards genome-wide analysis of the tobacco expansin gene family, our work provides solid background information related to structure, evolution and expression as well as regulatory cis-acting elements of the tobacco expansins. This

  10. Cloning of the Lycopene β-cyclase Gene in Nicotiana tabacum and Its Overexpression Confers Salt and Drought Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanmei; Guo, Jinggong; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Lifeng; Liu, Pingping; Chen, Xia; Li, Feng; Wei, Pan; Li, Zefeng; Li, Wenzheng; Wei, Chunyang; Zheng, Qingxia; Chen, Qiansi; Zhang, Jianfeng; Lin, Fucheng; Qu, Lingbo; Snyder, John Hugh; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are important pigments in plants that play crucial roles in plant growth and in plant responses to environmental stress. Lycopene β cyclase (β-LCY) functions at the branch point of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, catalyzing the cyclization of lycopene. Here, a β-LCY gene from Nicotiana tabacum, designated as Ntβ-LCY1, was cloned and functionally characterized. Robust expression of Ntβ-LCY1 was found in leaves, and Ntβ-LCY1 expression was obviously induced by salt, drought, and exogenous abscisic acid treatments. Strong accumulation of carotenoids and expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes resulted from Ntβ-LCY1 overexpression. Additionally, compared to wild-type plants, transgenic plants with overexpression showed enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stress with higher abscisic acid levels and lower levels of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species. Conversely, transgenic RNA interference plants had a clear albino phenotype in leaves, and some plants did not survive beyond the early developmental stages. The suppression of Ntβ-LCY1 expression led to lower expression levels of genes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway and to reduced accumulation of carotenoids, chlorophyll, and abscisic acid. These results indicate that Ntβ-LCY1 is not only a likely cyclization enzyme involved in carotenoid accumulation but also confers salt and drought stress tolerance in Nicotiana tabacum. PMID:26703579

  11. A reference genome for Nicotiana tabacum enables map-based cloning of homeologous loci implicated in nitrogen utilization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K D; Fernandez-Pozo, N; Drake-Stowe, K; Humphry, M; Evans, A D; Bombarely, A; Allen, F; Hurst, R; White, B; Kernodle, S P; Bromley, J R; Sanchez-Tamburrino, J P; Lewis, R S; Mueller, L A

    2017-06-19

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is an important plant model system that has played a key role in the early development of molecular plant biology. The tobacco genome is large and its characterisation challenging because it is an allotetraploid, likely arising from hybridisation between diploid N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis ancestors. A draft assembly was recently published for N. tabacum, but because of the aforementioned genome complexities it was of limited utility due to a high level of fragmentation. Here we report an improved tobacco genome assembly, which, aided by the application of optical mapping, achieves an N50 size of 2.17 Mb and enables anchoring of 64% of the genome to pseudomolecules; a significant increase from the previous value of 19%. We use this assembly to identify two homeologous genes that explain the differentiation of the burley tobacco market class, with potential for greater understanding of Nitrogen Utilization Efficiency and Nitrogen Use Efficiency in plants; an important trait for future sustainability of agricultural production. Development of an improved genome assembly for N. tabacum enables what we believe to be the first successful map-based gene discovery for the species, and demonstrates the value of an improved assembly for future research in this model and commercially-important species.

  12. Analysis of Nicotiana tabacum PIN genes identifies NtPIN4 as a key regulator of axillary bud growth.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaodong; Qin, Guangyong; Si, Ping; Luo, Zhaopeng; Gao, Junping; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Jianfeng; Wei, Pan; Xia, Qingyou; Lin, Fucheng; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-27

    The plant-specific PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux proteins have been well characterized in many plant species, where they are crucial in the regulation of auxin transport in various aspects of plant development. However, little is known about the exact roles of the PIN genes during plant development in Nicotiana species. This study investigated the PIN genes in tobacco (N. tabacum) and in two ancestral species (N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis). Genome-wide analysis of the N. tabacum genome identified 20 genes of the PIN family. An in-depth phylogenetic analysis of the PIN genes of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis was conducted. NtPIN4 expression was strongly induced by the application of exogenous IAA, but was downregulated by the application of ABA, a strigolactone analogue, and cytokinin, as well as by decapitation treatments, suggesting that the NtPIN4 expression level is likely positively regulated by auxin. Expression analysis indicated that NtPIN4 was highly expressed in tobacco stems and shoots, which was further validated through analysis of the activity of the NtPIN4 promoter. We used CRISPR-Cas9 technology to generate mutants for NtPIN4 and observed that both T0 and T1 plants had a significantly increased axillary bud growth phenotype, as compared with the wild-type plants. Therefore, NtPIN4 offers an opportunity for studying auxin-dependent branching processes.

  13. Effects of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles on the Growth, Development, and microRNA Expression of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

    PubMed Central

    Burklew, Caitlin E.; Ashlock, Jordan; Winfrey, William B.; Zhang, Baohong

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles are a class of newly emerging environmental pollutions. To date, few experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect nanoparticles may have on plant growth and development. It is important to study the effects nanoparticles have on plants because they are stationary organisms that cannot move away from environmental stresses like animals can, therefore they must overcome these stresses by molecular routes such as altering gene expression. microRNAs (miRNA) are a newly discovered, endogenous class of post-transcriptional gene regulators that function to alter gene expression by either targeting mRNAs for degradation or inhibiting mRNAs translating into proteins. miRNAs have been shown to mediate abiotic stress responses such as drought and salinity in plants by altering gene expression, however no study has been performed on the effect of nanoparticles on the miRNA expression profile; therefore our aim in this study was to classify if certain miRNAs play a role in plant response to Al2O3 nanoparticle stress. In this study, we exposed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants (an important cash crop as well as a model organism) to 0%, 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% Al2O3 nanoparticles and found that as exposure to the nanoparticles increased, the average root length, the average biomass, and the leaf count of the seedlings significantly decreased. We also found that miR395, miR397, miR398, and miR399 showed an extreme increase in expression during exposure to 1% Al2O3 nanoparticles as compared to the other treatments and the control, therefore these miRNAs may play a key role in mediating plant stress responses to nanoparticle stress in the environment. The results of this study show that Al2O3 nanoparticles have a negative effect on the growth and development of tobacco seedlings and that miRNAs may play a role in the ability of plants to withstand stress to Al2O3 nanoparticles in the environment. PMID:22606225

  14. Effects of aluminum oxide nanoparticles on the growth, development, and microRNA expression of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Burklew, Caitlin E; Ashlock, Jordan; Winfrey, William B; Zhang, Baohong

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles are a class of newly emerging environmental pollutions. To date, few experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect nanoparticles may have on plant growth and development. It is important to study the effects nanoparticles have on plants because they are stationary organisms that cannot move away from environmental stresses like animals can, therefore they must overcome these stresses by molecular routes such as altering gene expression. microRNAs (miRNA) are a newly discovered, endogenous class of post-transcriptional gene regulators that function to alter gene expression by either targeting mRNAs for degradation or inhibiting mRNAs translating into proteins. miRNAs have been shown to mediate abiotic stress responses such as drought and salinity in plants by altering gene expression, however no study has been performed on the effect of nanoparticles on the miRNA expression profile; therefore our aim in this study was to classify if certain miRNAs play a role in plant response to Al(2)O(3) nanoparticle stress. In this study, we exposed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants (an important cash crop as well as a model organism) to 0%, 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles and found that as exposure to the nanoparticles increased, the average root length, the average biomass, and the leaf count of the seedlings significantly decreased. We also found that miR395, miR397, miR398, and miR399 showed an extreme increase in expression during exposure to 1% Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles as compared to the other treatments and the control, therefore these miRNAs may play a key role in mediating plant stress responses to nanoparticle stress in the environment. The results of this study show that Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles have a negative effect on the growth and development of tobacco seedlings and that miRNAs may play a role in the ability of plants to withstand stress to Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles in the environment.

  15. Spermine either delays or promotes cell death in Nicotiana tabacum L. corolla depending on the floral developmental stage and affects the distribution of transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Cai, Giampiero; Della Mea, Massimiliano; Faleri, Claudia; Fattorini, Laura; Aloisi, Iris; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Del Duca, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    The role of spermine (SM) was studied to verify if SM supplied to Nicotiana tabacum flower can modulate programmed cell death (PCD) of the corolla. SM has strong effects on the development and senescence of excised flowers despite its low physiological levels. The timing and duration of SM treatment is a key factor; SM counteracts PCD (verified by morphological observations, pigment contents and DNA laddering) only in the narrow developmental window of corolla expansion. Before and after, SM promotes PCD. SM exerts its pro-survival role by delaying fresh weight loss, by inhibiting reduction of pigments and finally by preventing DNA degradation. Moreover, SM deeply alters the distribution of the PA-conjugating enzyme transglutaminase (TGase). TGase is present in the epidermis during development, but it sprays also in the cell walls of inner parenchyma at senescence. After SM treatment, parenchyma cells accumulate TGase, increase in size and their cell walls do not undergo stiffening contrarily to control cells. The subcellular localization of TGase has been validated by biolistic-transformation of onion epidermal cells. Results indicated that SM is a critical factor in the senescence of N. tabacum corolla by controlling biochemical and morphological parameters; the lasts are probably interconnected with the action of TGase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Jasmonate-Sensitivity-Assisted Screening and Characterization of Nicotine Synthetic Mutants from Activation-Tagged Population of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guoying; Wang, Wenjing; Niu, Haixia; Ding, Yongqiang; Zhang, Dingyu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Guanshan; Wang, Sangen; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is a secondary metabolite that is important to the defense system and commercial quality of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Jasmonate and its derivatives (JAs) are phytohormone regulators of nicotine formation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. Owing to the amphitetraploid origin of N. tabacum, research on screening and identification of nicotine-synthetic mutants is relatively scarce. Here, we describe a method based on JA-sensitivity for screening nicotine mutants from an activation-tagged population of tobacco. In this approach, the mutants were first screened for abnormal JA responses in seed germination and root elongation, and then the levels of nicotine synthesis and expression of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants with altered JA-response were measured to determine the nicotine-synthetic mutants. We successfully obtained five mutants that maintained stable nicotine contents and JA responses for three generations. This method is simple, effective and low-cost, and the finding of transcriptional changes of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants shows potentials for identifying novel regulators involved in JA-regulated nicotine biosynthesis. PMID:28243248

  17. Jasmonate-Sensitivity-Assisted Screening and Characterization of Nicotine Synthetic Mutants from Activation-Tagged Population of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Yin, Guoying; Wang, Wenjing; Niu, Haixia; Ding, Yongqiang; Zhang, Dingyu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Guanshan; Wang, Sangen; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is a secondary metabolite that is important to the defense system and commercial quality of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Jasmonate and its derivatives (JAs) are phytohormone regulators of nicotine formation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. Owing to the amphitetraploid origin of N. tabacum, research on screening and identification of nicotine-synthetic mutants is relatively scarce. Here, we describe a method based on JA-sensitivity for screening nicotine mutants from an activation-tagged population of tobacco. In this approach, the mutants were first screened for abnormal JA responses in seed germination and root elongation, and then the levels of nicotine synthesis and expression of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants with altered JA-response were measured to determine the nicotine-synthetic mutants. We successfully obtained five mutants that maintained stable nicotine contents and JA responses for three generations. This method is simple, effective and low-cost, and the finding of transcriptional changes of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants shows potentials for identifying novel regulators involved in JA-regulated nicotine biosynthesis.

  18. Independent, Rapid and Targeted Loss of Highly Repetitive DNA in Natural and Synthetic Allopolyploids of Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Renny-Byfield, Simon; Kovařík, Ales; Chester, Michael; Nichols, Richard A.; Macas, Jiri; Novák, Petr; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Allopolyploidy (interspecific hybridisation and polyploidy) has played a significant role in the evolutionary history of angiosperms and can result in genomic, epigenetic and transcriptomic perturbations. We examine the immediate effects of allopolyploidy on repetitive DNA by comparing the genomes of synthetic and natural Nicotiana tabacum with diploid progenitors N. tomentosiformis (paternal progenitor) and N. sylvestris (maternal progenitor). Using next generation sequencing, a recently developed graph-based repeat identification pipeline, Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) we characterise two highly repetitive DNA sequences (NicCL3 and NicCL7/30). Analysis of two independent high-throughput DNA sequencing datasets indicates NicCL3 forms 1.6–1.9% of the genome in N. tomentosiformis, sequences that occur in multiple, discontinuous tandem arrays scattered over several chromosomes. Abundance estimates, based on sequencing depth, indicate NicCL3 is almost absent in N. sylvestris and has been dramatically reduced in copy number in the allopolyploid N. tabacum. Surprisingly elimination of NicCL3 is repeated in some synthetic lines of N. tabacum in their forth generation. The retroelement NicCL7/30, which occurs interspersed with NicCL3, is also under-represented but to a much lesser degree, revealing targeted elimination of the latter. Analysis of paired-end sequencing data indicates the tandem component of NicCL3 has been preferentially removed in natural N. tabacum, increasing the proportion of the dispersed component. This occurs across multiple blocks of discontinuous repeats and based on the distribution of nucleotide similarity among NicCL3 units, was concurrent with rounds of sequence homogenisation. PMID:22606317

  19. Independent, rapid and targeted loss of highly repetitive DNA in natural and synthetic allopolyploids of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Renny-Byfield, Simon; Kovařík, Ales; Chester, Michael; Nichols, Richard A; Macas, Jiri; Novák, Petr; Leitch, Andrew R

    2012-01-01

    Allopolyploidy (interspecific hybridisation and polyploidy) has played a significant role in the evolutionary history of angiosperms and can result in genomic, epigenetic and transcriptomic perturbations. We examine the immediate effects of allopolyploidy on repetitive DNA by comparing the genomes of synthetic and natural Nicotiana tabacum with diploid progenitors N. tomentosiformis (paternal progenitor) and N. sylvestris (maternal progenitor). Using next generation sequencing, a recently developed graph-based repeat identification pipeline, Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) we characterise two highly repetitive DNA sequences (NicCL3 and NicCL7/30). Analysis of two independent high-throughput DNA sequencing datasets indicates NicCL3 forms 1.6-1.9% of the genome in N. tomentosiformis, sequences that occur in multiple, discontinuous tandem arrays scattered over several chromosomes. Abundance estimates, based on sequencing depth, indicate NicCL3 is almost absent in N. sylvestris and has been dramatically reduced in copy number in the allopolyploid N. tabacum. Surprisingly elimination of NicCL3 is repeated in some synthetic lines of N. tabacum in their forth generation. The retroelement NicCL7/30, which occurs interspersed with NicCL3, is also under-represented but to a much lesser degree, revealing targeted elimination of the latter. Analysis of paired-end sequencing data indicates the tandem component of NicCL3 has been preferentially removed in natural N. tabacum, increasing the proportion of the dispersed component. This occurs across multiple blocks of discontinuous repeats and based on the distribution of nucleotide similarity among NicCL3 units, was concurrent with rounds of sequence homogenisation.

  20. Progeny analysis of the interspecific somatic hybrids: Nicotiana tabacum (CMS) + Nicotiana sylvestris with respect to nuclear and chloroplast markers.

    PubMed

    Aviv, D; Fluhr, R; Edelman, M; Galun, E

    1980-07-01

    The progeny of a fusion experiment involving N. sylvestris protoplasts and X-irradiated protoplasts of the cytoplasmic male sterile 'Line 92' (N. tabacum nucleus and alien, male-sterility inducing, cytoplasm) were analyzed. Three groups of somatic hybrid plants resulted: Type A, Type B-1 and Type B-2. These as well as their androgenic progenies and the progenies resulting from their pollination with N. tabacum or N. sylvestris were followed with respect to several nuclear and cytoplasmic traits. Those controlled by the nuclear genome were plant and flower morphologies; those controlled by genetic information in the cytoplasm were tentoxin sensitivity (affecting the coupling factor of chloroplast ATPase), the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and the restriction endonuclease pattern of plastid DNA. A further cytoplasmic trait investigated (exact site of genetic control not known) was male sterility. The examinations of the somatic-hybrid groups and their respective progenies indicated that: Type A plants have N. sylvestris nuclei and 'Line 92' plastids; Type B-1 plants also have 'Line 92' plastids but their genome is composed of N. sylvestris and N. tabacum nuclei; Type B-2 plants with impaired male fertility had N. sylvestris plastids and N. sylvestris nuclei.

  1. [Transgenic Expression of Serratia marcescens Native and Mutant Nucleases Modulates Tobacco Mosaic Virus Resistance in Nicotiana tabacum L].

    PubMed

    Trifonova, E A; Saveleva, A V; Romanova, A V; Filipenko, E A; Sapotsky, M V; Malinovsky, V I; Kochetov, A V; Shumny, V K

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular Serratia marcescens nuclease is an extremely active enzyme which non-specifically degrades RNA and DNA. Its antiviral activity was previously shown both in animals and in plants when applied exogenously. Transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L cv. SR1) expressing S. marcescens chimeric, mutant, and intracellular mutant nuclease gene variants were regenerated and challenged with tobacco mosaic virus. The transgenic plants exhibited a higher level of resistance to the virus infection than the control non-transgenic plants. The resistance was evidenced by the delay of the appearance of mosaic symptoms and the retarded accumulation of viral antigen. Thus, these results reveal that modulations of both extracellular nuclease activity and intracellular RNA/DNA binding can protect plants against viral diseases.

  2. Hybrid lethality of cultured cells of an interspecific F1 hybrid of Nicotiana gossei Domin and N. tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Mino, Masanobu; Misaka, Yuko; Ueda, Junko; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2005-06-01

    Cultured cells were established from the hypocotyl of F(1) hybrid seedlings of Nicotiana gossei Domin and N. tabacum L. The cultured cells started to die at 26 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C, which is similar to what occurred in cells of the original hybrid plants. An increase in the number of cells without cytoplasmic strands and acidification of the cytoplasm followed by decomposition of the mitochondria and chloroplasts indicated that vacuolar collapse plays a central role in the execution of cell death. Oxygen but not light was required for cell death. Cellular levels of the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide temporarily increased during the early phase at 26 degrees C, while no such oxidative burst was observed at 37 degrees C. The reactive oxygen intermediates are potentially involved in the death of the hybrid cells.

  3. Ionome changes in Xylella fastidiosa-infected Nicotiana tabacum correlate with virulence and discriminate between subspecies of bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J E; Sefick, S A; Parker, J K; Arnold, T; Cobine, P A; De La Fuente, L

    2014-10-01

    Characterization of ionomes has been used to uncover the basis of nutrient utilization and environmental adaptation of plants. Here, ionomic profiles were used to understand the phenotypic response of a plant to infection by genetically diverse isolates of Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterial plant pathogen. In this study, X. fastidiosa isolates were used to infect a common model host (Nicotiana tabacum 'SR1'), and leaf and sap concentrations of eleven elements together with plant colonization and symptoms were assessed. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that changes in the ionome were significantly correlated with symptom severity and bacterial populations in host petioles. Moreover, plant ionome modification by infection could be used to differentiate the X. fastidiosa subspecies with which the plant was infected. This report establishes host ionome modification as a phenotypic response to infection.

  4. Characterization of two genes for the biosynthesis of the labdane diterpene Z-abienol in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Sallaud, Christophe; Giacalone, Cécile; Töpfer, Romy; Goepfert, Simon; Bakaher, Nicolas; Rösti, Sandrine; Tissier, Alain

    2012-10-01

    Leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) are covered with glandular trichomes that produce sucrose esters and diterpenoids in varying quantities, depending on cultivar type. The bicyclic diterpene Z-abienol is the major labdanoid present in some oriental tobacco cultivars, where it constitutes a precursor of important flavours and aromas. We describe here the identification and characterization of two genes governing the biosynthesis of Z-abienol in N. tabacum. As for other angiosperm labdanoid diterpenes, the biosynthesis of Z-abienol proceeds in two steps. NtCPS2 encodes a class-II terpene synthase that synthesizes 8-hydroxy-copalyl diphosphate, and NtABS encodes a kaurene synthase-like (KSL) protein that uses 8-hydroxy-copalyl diphosphate to produce Z-abienol. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that NtABS belongs to a distinct clade of KSL proteins that comprises the recently identified tomato (Solanum habrochaites) santalene and bergamotene synthase. RT-PCR results show that both genes are preferentially expressed in trichomes. Moreover, microscopy of NtCPS2 promoter-GUS fusion transgenics demonstrated a high specificity of expression to trichome glandular cells. Ectopic expression of both genes, but not of either one alone, driven by a trichome-specific promoter in transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris conferred Z-abienol formation to this species, which does not normally produce it. Furthermore, sequence analysis of over 100 tobacco cultivars revealed polymorphisms in NtCPS2 that lead to a prematurely truncated protein in cultivars lacking Z-abienol, thus establishing NtCPS2 as a major gene controlling Z-abienol biosynthesis in tobacco. These results offer new perspectives for tobacco breeding and the metabolic engineering of labdanoid diterpenes, as well as for structure-function relationship studies of terpene synthases. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Heterologous expression of the BABY BOOM AP2/ERF transcription factor enhances the regeneration capacity of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Chinnathambi; Liu, Zongrang; Heidmann, Iris; Supena, Ence Darmo Jaya; Fukuoka, Hiro; Joosen, Ronny; Lambalk, Joep; Angenent, Gerco; Scorza, Ralph; Custers, Jan B M; Boutilier, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Gain-of-function studies have shown that ectopic expression of the BABY BOOM (BBM) AP2/ERF domain transcription factor is sufficient to induce spontaneous somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh) and Brassica napus (B. napus L.) seedlings. Here we examined the effect of ectopic BBM expression on the development and regenerative capacity of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) through heterologous expression of Arabidopsis and B. napus BBM genes. 35S::BBM tobacco lines exhibited a number of the phenotypes previously observed in 35S::BBM Arabidopsis and B. napus transgenics, including callus formation, leaf rumpling, and sterility, but they did not undergo spontaneous somatic embryogenesis. 35S::BBM plants with severe ectopic expression phenotypes could not be assessed for enhanced regeneration at the seedling stage due to complete male and female sterility of the primary transformants, therefore fertile BBM ectopic expression lines with strong misexpression phenotypes were generated by expressing a steroid-inducible, post-translationally controlled BBM fusion protein (BBM:GR) under the control of a 35S promoter. These lines exhibited spontaneous shoot and root formation, while somatic embryogenesis could be induced from in-vitro germinated seedling hypocotyls cultured on media supplemented with cytokinin. Together these results suggest that ectopic BBM expression in transgenic tobacco also activates cell proliferation pathways, but differences exist between Arabidopsis/B. napus and N. tabacum with respect to their competence to respond to the BBM signalling molecule.

  6. Organ- and Growing Stage-Specific Expression of Solanesol Biosynthesis Genes in Nicotiana tabacum Reveals Their Association with Solanesol Content.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ning; Zhang, Hongbo; Zhang, Zhongfeng; Shi, John; Timko, Michael P; Du, Yongmei; Liu, Xinmin; Liu, Yanhua

    2016-11-15

    Solanesol is a noncyclic terpene alcohol that is composed of nine isoprene units and mainly accumulates in solanaceous plants, especially tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). In the present study, RNA-seq analyses of tobacco leaves, stems, and roots were used to identify putative solanesol biosynthesis genes. Six 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), two 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), two 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (IspD), four 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methyl-d-erythritol kinase (IspE), two 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclo-diphosphate synthase (IspF), four 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (IspG), two 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase (IspH), six isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IPI), and two solanesyl diphosphate synthase (SPS) candidate genes were identified in the solanesol biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, the two N. tabacum SPS proteins (NtSPS1 and NtSPS2), which possessed two conserved aspartate-rich DDxxD domains, were highly homologous with SPS enzymes from other solanaceous plant species. In addition, the solanesol contents of three organs and of leaves from four growing stages of tobacco plants corresponded with the distribution of chlorophyll. Our findings provide a comprehensive evaluation of the correlation between the expression of different biosynthesis genes and the accumulation of solanesol, thus providing valuable insight into the regulation of solanesol biosynthesis in tobacco.

  7. Hybrid lethality in interspecific F1 hybrid Nicotiana gossei x N. tabacum involves a MAP-kinases signalling cascade.

    PubMed

    Mino, M; Kubota, M; Nogi, T; Zhang, S; Inoue, M

    2007-05-01

    A cultured cell line, GTH4 (Nicotiana gossei Domin x N. tabacum L.), which exhibits hybrid lethality, died at 26 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C. Pharmacological experiments using inhibitors of protein phosphatases and protein kinases indicated the involvement of a protein kinase signalling pathway in the cell death process. Immunoblot analysis revealed that salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) was phosphorylated soon after the shift in temperature from 37 degrees C to 26 degrees C. Cultured cells of the hybrid of N. gossei x transgenic N. tabacum harboring a steroid (dexamethasone; DEX)-inducible NtMEK2 (DD) or NtMEK2 (KR), constitutively active and inactive forms of NtMEK2, respectively, were established. Induction of NtMEK2 (DD) by DEX in the hybrid cells induced the activation of SIPK, the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H (2)O (2)), and cell death at 37 degrees C. The activation of SIPK, generation of H (2)O (2), and cell death at 26 degrees C were compromised by DEX treatment in hybrid cells harbouring NtMEK2 (KR). This study provides evidence for the involvement of MAPK signalling in the regulation of cell death in hybrids.

  8. OBSERVATIONS ON THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF SOME WILD SPECIES OF THE GENUS NICOTINA AND OF SOME VARIETIES OF NICOTIANA TABACUM L. AND N. RUSTICA L. TO BLUE MOULD (PERONOSPORA TABACINA ADAM) -- PULAWY 1962

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Observations on the susceptibility of some wild species of the genus nicotina and of some varieties of nicotiana tabacum l. and n. rustica l. to blue mould (peronospora tabacina adam) -- pulawy 1962--Translation.

  9. Species origin of genomic factors in Nicotiana nudicaulis Watson controlling hybrid lethality in interspecific hybrids between N. nudicaulis Watson and N. tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongshuo; Marubashi, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid lethality is expressed at 28°C in the cross Nicotiana nudicaulis × N. tabacum. The S subgenome of N. tabacum has been identified as controlling this hybrid lethality. To clarify the responsible genomic factor(s) of N. nudicaulis, we crossed N. trigonophylla (paternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) with N. tabacum, because hybrids between N. sylvestris (maternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) and N. tabacum are viable when grown in a greenhouse. In the cross N. trigonophylla×N. tabacum, approximately 50% of hybrids were vitrified, 20% were viable, and 20% were nonviable at 28°C. To reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum was responsible for these phenotypes, we crossed N. trigonophylla with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT). In the cross N. sylvestris × N. trigonophylla, we confirmed that over half of hybrids of N. sylvestris × N. trigonophylla were vitrified, and none of the hybrids of N. trigonophylla × N. tomentosiformis were. The results imply that the S subgenome, encoding a gene or genes inducing hybrid lethality in the cross between N. nudicaulis and N. tabacum, has one or more genomic factors that induce vitrification. Furthermore, in vitrified hybrids of N. trigonophylla × N. tabacum and N. sylvestris × N. trigonophylla, we found that nuclear fragmentation, which progresses during expression of hybrid lethality, was accompanied by vitrification. This observation suggests that vitrification has a relationship to hybrid lethality. Based on these results, we speculate that when N. nudicaulis was formed approximately 5 million years ago, several causative genomic factors determining phenotypes of hybrid seedlings were inherited from N. trigonophylla. Subsequently, genome downsizing and various recombination-based processes took place. Some of the causative genomic factors were lost and some became genomic factor(s) controlling hybrid lethality in extant N. nudicaulis.

  10. Species Origin of Genomic Factors in Nicotiana nudicaulis Watson Controlling Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific Hybrids between N. nudicaulis Watson and N. tabacum L

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongshuo; Marubashi, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid lethality is expressed at 28°C in the cross Nicotiana nudicaulis×N. tabacum. The S subgenome of N. tabacum has been identified as controlling this hybrid lethality. To clarify the responsible genomic factor(s) of N. nudicaulis, we crossed N. trigonophylla (paternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) with N. tabacum, because hybrids between N. sylvestris (maternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) and N. tabacum are viable when grown in a greenhouse. In the cross N. trigonophylla×N. tabacum, approximately 50% of hybrids were vitrified, 20% were viable, and 20% were nonviable at 28°C. To reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum was responsible for these phenotypes, we crossed N. trigonophylla with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT). In the cross N. sylvestris×N. trigonophylla, we confirmed that over half of hybrids of N. sylvestris×N. trigonophylla were vitrified, and none of the hybrids of N. trigonophylla×N. tomentosiformis were. The results imply that the S subgenome, encoding a gene or genes inducing hybrid lethality in the cross between N. nudicaulis and N. tabacum, has one or more genomic factors that induce vitrification. Furthermore, in vitrified hybrids of N. trigonophylla×N. tabacum and N. sylvestris×N. trigonophylla, we found that nuclear fragmentation, which progresses during expression of hybrid lethality, was accompanied by vitrification. This observation suggests that vitrification has a relationship to hybrid lethality. Based on these results, we speculate that when N. nudicaulis was formed approximately 5 million years ago, several causative genomic factors determining phenotypes of hybrid seedlings were inherited from N. trigonophylla. Subsequently, genome downsizing and various recombination-based processes took place. Some of the causative genomic factors were lost and some became genomic factor(s) controlling hybrid lethality in extant N. nudicaulis. PMID:24806486

  11. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase 1 from Nicotiana tabacum Suppresses RNA Silencing and Enhances Viral Infection in Nicotiana benthamiana[W

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiao-Bao; Dong, Li; Zhu, Hui; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Du, Quan-Sheng; Lv, Dian-Qiu; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Garcia, Juan Antonio; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) produce double-stranded RNA intermediates in diverse processes of small RNA synthesis in RNA silencing pathways. RDR6 is required in plants for posttranscriptional gene silencing induced by sense transgenes (S-PTGS) and has an important role in amplification of antiviral silencing. Whereas RDR1 is also involved in antiviral defense in plants, this does not necessarily proceed through triggering silencing. In this study, we show that Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with RDR1 from Nicotiana tabacum (Nt-RDR1 plants) exhibits hypersusceptibility to Plum pox potyvirus and other viruses, resembling RDR6-silenced (RDR6i) N. benthamiana. Analysis of transient induction of RNA silencing in N. benthamiana Nt-RDR1 and RDR6i plants revealed that Nt-RDR1 possesses silencing suppression activity. We found that Nt-RDR1 does not interfere with RDR6-dependent siRNA accumulation but turns out to suppress RDR6-dependent S-PTGS. Our results, together with previously published data, suggest that RDR1 might have a dual role, contributing, on one hand, to salicylic acid–mediated antiviral defense, and suppressing, on the other hand, the RDR6-mediated antiviral RNA silencing. We propose a scenario in which the natural loss-of-function variant of RDR1 in N. benthamiana may be the outcome of selective pressure to maintain a high RDR6-dependent antiviral defense, which would be required to face the hypersensitivity of this plant to a large number of viruses. PMID:20400679

  12. In vitro and in planta interaction evidence between Nicotiana tabacum thaumatin-like protein 1 (TLP1) and cucumber mosaic virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Ham, Byung-Kook; Kim, Hwa Ran; Lee, In-Ju; Kim, Young Jin; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Park, Young In; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2005-12-01

    Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we identified a plant cellular factor that interacts with the proteins of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Initially 14 candidate genes were isolated from Nicotiana tabacum, using a full-length CMV 1a gene as bait. Among the candidate genes, two were encoding thaumatin-like proteins (TLP), and were designated as Nicotiana tabacum thaumatin-like protein 1 (NtTLP1). Consistent with this observation, recombinant GST-NtTLP1 protein, which was expressed and purified in E. coli, bound tightly to CMV 1a in vitro. In planta interaction was also verified via co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, NtTLP1 specifically interacted with the CMV movement-related proteins, movement protein and coat protein, in yeast. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the expression of NtTLP1 increased as the result of CMV inoculation.

  13. Chromosomal rearrangements in interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana gossei Domin and N. tabacum L., obtained by crossing with pollen exposed to helium ion beams or gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, S.; Inoue, M.; Ohmido, N.; Fukui, K.; Tanaka, A.

    2003-05-01

    It is very difficult to obtain interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum L. (2 n=48) and N. gossei Domin (2 n=36), because of strong cross incompatibility. We had already obtained interspecific hybrids between these two species, crossing N. gossei flower with N. tabacum pollen exposed to He ions or gamma-rays. Here, we analyze chromosome constitution of these hybrids by genomic in situ hybridization. In root tip cells of the two hybrids obtained with He ion exposure, most mitotic cells contained 18 chromosomes of N. gossei and 24 chromosomes of N. tabacum. However, in some cells, translocations and insertions between parental genomes were observed. On the other hand, in a hybrid obtained by gamma-ray irradiation, intergenomic rearrangements were not observed, although mitotic cells showed 19 hybridization signals with N. gossei DNA in 41 chromosomes. Such chromosomal changes in structure or constitution may be related to overcoming cross incompatibility between these two species.

  14. Enhancement of cadmium tolerance and accumulation by introducing Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt var. frutescens genes in Nicotiana tabacum L. plants.

    PubMed

    Wei, Keqiang; Pang, Shengxi; Yang, Junxian; Wei, Zhizhong

    2015-04-01

    The tobacco has the genetic potential to remove toxic metals from the soil. To develop hyperaccumulating tobacco plants, distant hybridization between tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), a high-biomass crop, and Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt var. frutescens, a newfound Cd-hyperaccumulator species, was carried out using a novel method viz. pollination following grafting. Their hybrid nature was preliminarily confirmed by phenotype, isozyme pattern, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and metabolites analysis. About 120 putative F2 hybrids derived from the cross-combination [(N. sylvestris Speg. & Comes rootstock + N. tabacum L. var. 78-04 scion) × P. frutescens (L.) Britt var. frutescens] were then subjected to up to 300 μM CdCl2 in hydroponic conditions for 10 days. Results showed five seedlings were more resistant to Cd than female parent and accumulated 314.6 ± 99.9 mg kg(-1) Cd in their aerial biomass, which was 5.7 times greater than that in "78-04" tobacco (47.2 ± 3.56 mg kg(-1)) (P ≤ 0.05). Two of these seedlings exceeded male parent P. frutescens in the Cd concentration of shoots and reached 424 and 396 mg kg(-1), which was 13% and 6% greater for that of perilla (374.2 ± 10.38 mg kg(-1)), respectively. Compared with parents, two other F2 hybrids tended to accumulate more Cd in the root with bioconcentration factor (BCF) 7.05 and 5.17, respectively. Only one hybrid showed lower Cd concentration but transferred Cd more effectively from the root to the shoot than parents and other F2 hybrids, with the maximum translocation factor (TF) value 1.37. These indicated that the introduction of P. frutescens genes could obviously enhance the cadmium tolerance and accumulation of superior individuals.

  15. Cadmium and zinc activate adaptive mechanisms in Nicotiana tabacum similar to those observed in metal tolerant plants.

    PubMed

    Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Gómez-Méndez, María F; Amezcua-Romero, Julio C; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Rosas-Santiago, Paul; Pantoja, Omar

    2017-04-28

    Tobacco germinated and grew in the presence of high concentrations of cadmium and zinc without toxic symptoms. Evidence suggests that these ions are sequestered into the vacuole by heavy metal/H (+) exchanger mechanisms. Heavy metal hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance are traits shared by a small set of plants which show specialized physiological and molecular adaptations allowing them to accumulate and sequester toxic metal ions. Nicotiana tabacum was used to test its potential as a metal-accumulator in a glass house experiment. Seed germination was not affected in the presence of increasing concentrations of zinc and cadmium. Juvenile and adult plants could concentrate CdCl2 and ZnSO4 to levels exceeding those in the hydroponic growth medium and maintained or increased their leaf dry weight when treated with 0.5- or 1-mM CdCl2 or 1-mM ZnSO4 for 5 days. Accumulation of heavy metals did not affect the chlorophyll and carotenoid levels, while variable effects were observed in cell sap osmolarity. Heavy metal-dependent H(+) transport across the vacuole membrane was monitored using quinacrine fluorescence quenching. Cadmium- or zinc-dependent fluorescence recovery revealed that increasing concentrations of heavy metals stimulated the activities of the tonoplast Cd(2+) or Zn(2+)/H(+) exchangers. Immunodetection of the V-ATPase subunits showed that the increased proton transport by zinc was not due to changes in protein amount. MTP1 and MTP4 immunodetection and semiquantitative RT-PCR of NtMTP1, NtNRAMP1, and NtZIP1 helped to identify the genes that are likely involved in sequestration of cadmium and zinc in the leaf and root tissue. Finally, we demonstrated that cadmium and zinc treatments induced an accumulation of zinc in leaf tissues. This study shows that N. tabacum possesses a hyperaccumulation response, and thus could be used for phytoremediation purposes.

  16. Low-temperature derivatization followed by vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for the analysis of polyamines in Nicotiana Tabacum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Cai, Bin; Xiang, Zhangmin; Zhao, Huina; Rao, Xingyi; Pan, Wenjie; Lei, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Polyamines are ubiquitous polycationic molecules that play a key role in many biological processes such as nucleic acid metabolism, protein synthesis, cell growth, and nicotine synthesis precursors. This work describes a rapid, sensitive, convenient, green, and cost-effective method for the determination of polyamines in Nicotiana tabacum by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. The analytes were derivatized with 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl chloride at low temperature (about 4°C) and then extracted with vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction. The experimental designs based on quarter-fractional factorial design and Doehlert design were used to screen and optimize the important factors in microextraction process. Under the optimal conditions, the method was linear over 0.05-8.00 μg/mL with an r(2) ≥ 0.992 and exhibited good repeatability and reproducibility less than 6.0 and 6.9%, respectively. The limit of detection ranged between 0.013 and 0.029 μg/g. The newly developed method was successfully employed to analyze different leaf samples of Nicotiana tabacum, among which the polyamines contents were found to be very different. Moreover, tyramine, 1,3-diaminopropane, homospermidine, and canavalmine were tentatively identified with the electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. To our knowledge, this is the first report of identification of canavalmine in Nicotiana Tabacum.

  17. Hybrid lethality in interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum and N. suaveolens: evidence that the Q chromosome causes hybrid lethality based on Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, T; Marubashi, W

    2006-04-01

    Hybrid seedlings from the cross Nicotiana tabacum x N. suaveolens express lethality at 28 degrees C. We carried out a cross between monosomic lines of N. tabacum lacking the Q chromosome and N. suaveolens by test-tube pollination and ovule culture at 28 degrees C. To suppress hybrid lethality, hybrid seedlings obtained were transferred to 36 degrees C immediately after germination and cultured. We determined whether Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers were detected among hybrid seedlings. When hybrid seedlings cultured at 36 degrees C were transferred to 28 degrees C, hybrid seedlings in which Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers were detected expressed hybrid lethality, while hybrid seedlings in which Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers were not detected did not express hybrid lethality. From these results, we concluded that the presence of the Q chromosome of N. tabacum is related to hybrid lethality observed in crosses between N. tabacum and N. suaveolens. This is the first report that clearly demonstrates the relationship between a certain chromosome and hybrid lethality in the genus Nicotiana using chromosome-specific DNA markers. Additionally, we confirmed that the Q chromosome belongs to the S subgenome because Q-chromosome-specific DNA markers were detected only in N. sylvestris.

  18. Spectral reflectance, chlorophyll fluorescence and virological investigations of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Hristova, Dimitrina; Iliev, Ilko; Yanev, Tony

    Application of multispectral remote sensing techniques to plant condition monitoring has been adopted for various purposes. Remote sensing is a reliable tool for detecting signs of vege-tation stress and diseases. Spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence are functions of tissue optical properties and biological status of the plants, and illumination conditions. The mean reflectance spectrum depends on the relative composition of all the pigments in the leaf including chlorophylls, carotenoids etc. Chlorophyll fluorescence results from the primary re-actions of photosynthesis and during the last decade it finds widening application as a means for revelation of stress and diseases. The changes in chlorophyll function take place before the alteration in chlorophyll content to occur so that changes in the fluorescence signal arise before any visible signs are apparent. The aim of our investigations was to study the development and spreading out of a viral infection on the leaves of two cultivars tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We applied two remote sensing tech-niques (spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements) for evaluation of the changes in the optical properties of the plants in accordance to their physiological status. The serological analyses via the Double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) were made with appropriate kits (Leowe, Germany) for quantitative assessment of the concentration of viruses in the plants. The tobacco plants were grown in green house under controlled conditions. The first cultivar Nevrocop 1146 is known as resistive to the TMV, i.e. it shows hypersensitive response. The second cultivar named Krumovgrad is normally sen-sitive to the TMV. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, up to one leaf from 20 plants for each cultivar were inoculated with TMV. The leaves opposite to the infected ones formed the group of control (untreated) leaves. The

  19. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Heidi L; Blomstedt, Cecilia K; Neale, Alan D; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D; Hamill, John D

    2016-05-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana.

  20. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Heidi L.; Blomstedt, Cecilia K.; Neale, Alan D.; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D.; Hamill, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana. PMID

  1. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the WRKY gene family in common tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Xiaohua, Xiang; Xinru, Wu; Jiangtao, Chao; Minglei, Yang; Fan, Yang; Guo, Chen; Guanshan, Liu; Yuanying, Wang

    2016-09-01

    The coding products of WRKY gene family plays important roles in plant growth and development as well as in various stress responses. They have been identified in various plants, but only few in common tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). In this study, 164 putative WRKY proteins in the common tobacco genome were identified by using the conserved WRKY sequence (PF03106) from the Pfam database. Phylogenetic trees, functional domain analysis, chromosomal localization, subcellular localization and tissue expression patterns were analyzed with the bioinformatics softwares, including DNAMAN 5.0, Weblogo 3, MEGA 5.1, MG2C and MEME. First of all, phylogenetic trees divided all the candidate genes into three subfamilies: Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ, respectively, and subfamily Ⅱ could be further divided into five subgroups: group Ⅱ-a, -b, -c, -d and -e. Secondly, the WRKY regions contained a highly conserved heptapeptide stretch WRKYGQK followed by a zinc-finger motif. Most of the NtWRKY genes contained 2-5 exons and a highly conserved gene structure. Thirdly, 154 out of 164 NtWRKY genes were distributed with different densities on 24 chromosomes, and each subfamily with different patterns and frequency. The largest number of NtWRKY genes was found on chromosome VI, and only one on chromosome X. Fourthly, the majority of NtWRKY members located in the nucleus, with 74 percent of subfamily Ⅲ in the extracellular matrix. Lastly, the members in the same subfamily had different spatial and temporal expression profiles, with 11 NtWRKY genes in roots, stems and leaves expressed at various levels. The expression of genes NtWRKY26, NtWRKY30 and NtWRKY32 can be induced by Phytophthora nicotianae. Our research thus provides valuable information for NtWRKY gene cloning and functional characterization in common tobacco.

  2. The F-box protein COI1 functions upstream of MYB305 to regulate primary carbohydrate metabolism in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Liu, Guanshan; Niu, Haixia; Timko, Michael P; Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-05-01

    Jasmonate (JA) plays an important role in regulating plant male fertility and secondary metabolism, but its role in regulating primary metabolism remains unclear. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) is a critical component of the JA receptor, and mediates JA-signalling by targeting JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins for proteasomal degradation in response to JA perception. Here, we found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NtCOI1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90) recapitulated many previously observed phenotypes in coi1 mutants, including male sterility, JA insensitivity, and loss of floral anthocyanin production. It also affected starch metabolism in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary, leading to pollen abortion and loss of floral nectar. Transcript levels of genes encoding starch metabolism enzymes were significantly altered in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary of NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. Changes in leaf primary metabolism were also observed in the NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. The expression of NtMYB305, an orthologue of MYB305 previously identified as a flavonoid metabolic regulator in Antirrhinum majus flowers and as a floral-nectar regulator mediating starch synthesis in ornamental tobacco, was extremely downregulated in NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. These findings suggest that NtCOI1 functions upstream of NtMYB305 and plays a fundamental role in coordinating plant primary carbohydrate metabolism and correlative physiological processes.

  3. The F-box protein COI1 functions upstream of MYB305 to regulate primary carbohydrate metabolism in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) plays an important role in regulating plant male fertility and secondary metabolism, but its role in regulating primary metabolism remains unclear. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) is a critical component of the JA receptor, and mediates JA-signalling by targeting JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins for proteasomal degradation in response to JA perception. Here, we found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NtCOI1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90) recapitulated many previously observed phenotypes in coi1 mutants, including male sterility, JA insensitivity, and loss of floral anthocyanin production. It also affected starch metabolism in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary, leading to pollen abortion and loss of floral nectar. Transcript levels of genes encoding starch metabolism enzymes were significantly altered in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary of NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. Changes in leaf primary metabolism were also observed in the NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. The expression of NtMYB305, an orthologue of MYB305 previously identified as a flavonoid metabolic regulator in Antirrhinum majus flowers and as a floral-nectar regulator mediating starch synthesis in ornamental tobacco, was extremely downregulated in NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. These findings suggest that NtCOI1 functions upstream of NtMYB305 and plays a fundamental role in coordinating plant primary carbohydrate metabolism and correlative physiological processes. PMID:24604735

  4. Gene-Splitting Technology: A Novel Approach for the Containment of Transgene Flow in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ning; Jia, Shi-Rong; Tang, Qiao-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact of transgene escape on the environment and food safety is a major concern to the scientists and public. This work aimed to assess the effect of intein-mediated gene splitting on containment of transgene flow. Two fusion genes, EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc, were constructed and integrated into N. tabacum, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. EPSPSn-In encodes the first 295 aa of the herbicide resistance gene 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) fused with the first 123 aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (In), whereas Ic-EPSPSc encodes the 36 C-terminal aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (Ic) fused to the rest of EPSPS C terminus peptide sequences. Both EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc constructs were introduced into the same N. tabacum genome by genetic crossing. Hybrids displayed resistance to the herbicide N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine (glyphosate). Western blot analysis of protein extracts from hybrid plants identified full-length EPSPS. Furthermore, all hybrid seeds germinated and grew normally on glyphosate selective medium. The 6-8 leaf hybrid plants showed tolerance of 2000 ppm glyphosate in field spraying. These results indicated that functional EPSPS protein was reassembled in vivo by intein-mediated trans-splicing in 100% of plants. In order to evaluate the effect of the gene splitting technique for containment of transgene flow, backcrossing experiments were carried out between hybrids, in which the foreign genes EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc were inserted into different chromosomes, and non-transgenic plants NC89. Among the 2812 backcrossing progeny, about 25% (664 plantlets) displayed glyphosate resistance. These data indicated that transgene flow could be reduced by 75%. Overall, our findings provide a new and highly effective approach for biological containment of transgene flow. PMID:24915192

  5. Effect of increased UV-B radiation on carotenoid accumulation and total antioxidant capacity in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Shen, J; Jiang, C Q; Yan, Y F; Liu, B R; Zu, C L

    2017-03-08

    Carotenoids are important components of plant antioxidant systems, which protect photosystems from photooxidative destruction during ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure. The influence of carotenoids on total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of plants has rarely been studied. In this study, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., 'K326') seedlings exposed to UV-B radiation were used in order to evaluate the effects of ambient levels of UV-B radiation on carotenoid accumulation. The aim was to investigate whether carotenoids could enhance TAC as a means of UV protection. Our results showed that leaf carotenoid content in the low UV-B exposure (+9.75 μW/cm(2)) plants was approximately 8% higher than that observed in control plants at 2-8 days of exposure. At high UV-B exposure (+20.76 μW/cm(2)), the carotenoid content increased rapidly after 1 day's exposure (10.41% higher than the control), followed by a return to the content as in control plants. Furthermore, carotenoid content positively correlated with TAC (P = 0.024). These results suggest that carotenoids have antioxidant properties and play an important role in the antioxidant system. UV-B exposure increased the carotenoid synthesis capability of plants. The plants could deplete the carotenoids to scavenge excess ROS at high UV-B radiation levels, which protects the tobacco plant from oxidative damage caused by UV-B stress.

  6. Expression of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene (xPPARalpha) from Xenopus laevis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Nila, Alejandro G; Sandalio, Luisa M; López, Mercedes G; Gómez, Manuel; del Rio, Luis A; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2006-08-01

    In this work, we have genetically transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor cDNA (xPPARalpha) from Xenopus laevis, which is a transcriptional factor involved in the peroxisomal proliferation and induction of fatty acid beta-oxidation in animal cells. Several transgenic lines were generated and one representative line (T) from the R2 generation was selected for further studies. Analysis of free fatty acids revealed that unsaturated fatty acids such as C16:2 and C16:3 were deficient in line T, whereas saturated fatty acids like C16:0, C18:0, and C20:0 were more abundant than in non-transformed plants. Acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX) activity was assayed as a marker enzyme of beta-oxidation in crude leaf extracts and it was found that in line T there was a threefold increase in enzyme activity. We also found that the peroxisome population was increased and that catalase (CAT) activity was induced by clofibrate, a known activator of xPPARalpha protein, in leaves from line T. Taken together, these findings suggest that xPPARalpha is functional in plants and that its expression in tobacco leads to changes in general lipid metabolism and peroxisomal proliferation as reported in animal cells. Furthermore, it indicates that there is an endogenous ligand in tobacco cells able to activate xPPARalpha.

  7. Isoprene emission aids recovery of photosynthetic performance in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum following high intensity acute UV-B exposure.

    PubMed

    Centritto, Mauro; Haworth, Matthew; Marino, Giovanni; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Tsonev, Tsonko; Velikova, Violeta; Nogues, Isabel; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Isoprene emission by terrestrial plants is believed to play a role in mitigating the effects of abiotic stress on photosynthesis. Ultraviolet-B light (UV-B) induces damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of plants, but the role of isoprene in UV-B tolerance is poorly understood. To investigate this putative protective role, we exposed non-emitting (NE) control and transgenic isoprene emitting (IE) Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants to high intensity UV-B exposure. Methanol emissions increased with UV-B intensity, indicating oxidative damage. However, isoprene emission was unaffected during exposure to UV-B radiation, but declined in the 48 h following UV-B treatment at the highest UV-B intensities of 9 and 15 Wm(-2). Photosynthesis and the performance of photosystem II (PSII) declined to similar extents in IE and NE plants following UV-B exposure, suggesting that isoprene emission did not ameliorate the immediate impact of UV-B on photosynthesis. However, after the stress, photosynthesis and PSII recovered in IE plants, which maintained isoprene formation, but not in NE plants. Recovery of IE plants was also associated with elevated antioxidant levels and cycling; suggesting that both isoprene formation and antioxidant systems contributed to reinstating the integrity and functionality of cellular membranes and photosynthesis following exposure to excessive levels of UV-B radiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison and evaluation of two diagnostic methods for detection of npt II and GUS genes in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Almasi, Mohammad Amin; Aghapour-Ojaghkandi, Mehdi; Bagheri, Khadijeh; Ghazvini, Mohammadreza; Hosseyni-Dehabadi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    To diminish the time required for some diagnostic assays including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and also a visual detection protocol on the basis of npt II and GUS genes in transgenic tobacco plants were used. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Nicotiana tabacum leaf discs was performed with plant transformation vector of pBI 121. From kanamycin-resistant plants selected by their antibiotic resistance, four plants were selected for DNA isolation. Presence of the transgene was confirmed in the transformants by PCR and LAMP. In this regard, all LAMP and PCR primers were designed on the basis of the gene sequences of npt II and GUS. The LAMP assay was applied for direct detection of gene marker from plant samples without DNA extraction steps (direct LAMP assay). Also, a novel colorimetric LAMP assay for rapid and easy detection of npt II and GUS genes was developed here, its potential compared with PCR assay. The LAMP method, on the whole, had the following advantages over the PCR method: easy detection, high sensitivity, high efficiency, simple manipulation, safety, low cost, and user friendly.

  9. Cloning the bacterial bphC gene into Nicotiana tabacum to improve the efficiency of phytoremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Novakova, Martina; Mackova, Martina; Antosova, Zuzana; Viktorova, Jitka; Szekeres, Miklos; Demnerova, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct transgenic plants with increased capabilities to degrade organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls. The environmentally important gene of bacterial dioxygenase, the bphC gene, was chosen to clone into a plant of Nicotiana tabacum. The chosen bphC gene encodes 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase, which cleaves the aromatic ring of dihydroxybiphenyl, and we cloned it in fusion with the gene for β-glucuronidase (GUS), luciferase (LUC) or with a histidine tail. Several genetic constructs were designed and prepared and the possible expression of desired proteins in tobacco plants was studied by transient expression. We used genetic constructs successfully expressing dioxygenase's genes we used for preparation of transgenic tobacco plants by agrobacterial infection. The presence of transgenic DNA , mRNA and protein was determined in parental and the first filial generation of transgenic plants with the bphC gene. Properties of prepared transgenic plants will be further studied. PMID:21468210

  10. GC-MS and MALDI-TOF MS profiling of sucrose esters from Nicotiana tabacum and N. rustica.

    PubMed

    Haliński, Łukasz P; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been applied for the first time to the analysis of the sucrose esters from the surface of Nicotiana L. leaves. The profiles obtained for the model plant N. tabacum were similar to those from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) analysis. The most reproducible results were obtained using a dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) matrix. The main advantage of this method is that crude plant extracts can be analysed without sample clean-up. GC-MS analysis of Aztec tobacco (N. rustica) extracts revealed the presence of three types of sucrose esters. All identified compounds had three C4-C8 acyl chains substituting the glucose moiety, while the fructose part of the molecule was substituted with 0, 1, or 2 acetyl groups. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the sucrose ester fraction revealed the presence of compounds not eluting from a GC column. Combining the data from both GC-MS and MALDI-TOF MS experiments, we obtained a full sucrose ester profile, which is based on the molecular weight of the compounds and on the number of acyl chains in the molecule.

  11. The antioxidative defense system is involved in the premature senescence in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum NC89).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Lu; Liu, Heng; Zhao, Rongrong; Liu, Bin; Fu, Quanjuan; Zhang, Yuanhu

    2016-07-02

    α-Farnesene is a volatile sesquiterpene synthesized by the plant mevalonate (MVA) pathway through the action of α-farnesene synthase. The α-farnesene synthase 1 (MdAFS1) gene was isolated from apple peel (var. white winter pearmain), and transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum NC89). The transgenic plants had faster stem elongation during vegetative growth and earlier flowering than wild type (WT). Our studies focused on the transgenic tobacco phenotype. The levels of chlorophyll and soluble protein decreased and a lower seed biomass and reduced net photosynthetic rate (Pn) in transgenic plants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide radicals (O 2 (·-) ) had higher levels in transgenics compared to controls. Transgenic plants also had enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress. The transcriptome of 8-week-old plants was studied to detect molecular changes. Differentially expressed unigene analysis showed that ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, cell growth, and death unigenes were upregulated. Unigenes related to photosynthesis, antioxidant activity, and nitrogen metabolism were downregulated. Combined with the expression analysis of senescence marker genes, these results indicate that senescence started in the leaves of the transgenic plants at the vegetative growth stage. The antioxidative defense system was compromised and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) played an important role in the premature aging of transgenic plants.

  12. Synthesis of glycolate from pyruvate via isocitrate lyase by tobacco leaves in light. [Nicotiana tabacum var Havana Seed

    SciTech Connect

    Zelitch, I. )

    1988-02-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Havana Seed) leaf discs were supplied tracer quantities of (2-{sup 14}C)- and (3-{sup 14}C) pyruvate for 60 minutes in steady state photosynthesis with 21% or 1% O{sub 2}, and the glycolate oxidase inhibitor {alpha}-hydroxy-2-pyridinemethanesulfonic acid was then added for 5 or 10 minutes to cause glycolate to accumulate. The (3-{sup 14}C) pyruvate was converted directly to glycolate as shown by a 50% greater than equal-labeled {sup 14}C in C-2 of glycolate, and the fraction of {sup 14}C in C-2 increased in 1% O{sub 2} to 80% greater than equal-labeled. This suggests the pathway using pyruvate is less O{sub 2}-dependent than the oxygenase reaction producing glycolate from the Calvin cycle. The formation of glycolate from pyruvate in the leaf discs was time-dependent and with (2-{sup 14}C)- and (3-{sup 14}C) pyruvate supplied leaf discs the C-2 of glyoxylate derived from C-2 of isocitrate was labeled asymmetrically in a manner similar to the asymmetrical labeling of C-2 of glycolate under a number of conditions. Thus glycolate was probably formed by the reduction of glyoxylate. Isocitric lyase activity of tobacco leaves was associated with leaf mitochondria, through most of the activity was in the supernatant fraction after differential centrifugation of leaf homogenates.

  13. Pretreatment with alternation of light/dark periods improves the tolerance of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) to clomazone herbicide.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Majd; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; El Maataoui, Mohamed; Urban, Laurent; Sallanon, Huguette

    2014-05-05

    This work analyses the effects of alternation of light/dark periods pretreatment (AL) in tobacco plantlets (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv.Virginie vk51) growing in solution with low concentration of the clomazone herbicide. The experimentation has been carried out by exposing the plantlets to successive and regulated periods of light (16min light/8min dark cycles, PAR 50μmolm(-2)s(-1)) for three days. The photosynthesis efficiency was determined by mean of the chlorophyll fluorescence and JIP-test. The AL pretreatment improved the clomazone tolerance; this has been observed by the increase in the leaf area of the plant, the maximal photochemical quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), the actual PSII efficiency (ФPSII), the performance index (PIabs), the electron flux beyond Quinone A (1-VJ), and also by the diminution of the energy dissipating into heat (DI0/RC). Furthermore, AL pretreatment led to low accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) which proves that the scavenging enzymatic system have been activated before clomazone treatment. In the plantlets pretreated with AL, with regard to the ascorbate content, some of antioxidant enzyme whose function is associated with it have continued to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by clomazone, such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and glutathione reductase (GR). So, the observed photooxidative damages induced by clomazone herbicide were noticeably reduced. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Anapleurotic CO/sub 2/ fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C/sub 3/ plants. [Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Melzer, E.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1987-05-01

    The role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in photosynthesis in the C/sub 3/ plant Nicotiana tabacum has been probed by measurement of the /sup 13/C content of various materials. Whole leaf and purified ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase are within the range expected for C/sub 3/ plants. Aspartic acid purified following acid hydrolysis of this ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase is enriched in /sup 13/C compared to whole protein. Carbons 1-3 of this aspratic acid are in the normal C/sub 3/ range, but carbon-4 (obtained by treatment of the aspartic acid with aspartate ..beta..-decarboxylase) has an isotopic composition in the range expected for products of C/sub 4/ photosynthesis (-5%), and it appears that more than half of the aspartic acid is synthesized by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase using atmospheric CO/sub 2//HCO/sub 3//sup -/. Thus, a primary role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C/sub 3/ plants appears to be the anapleurotic synthesis of four-carbon acids.

  15. Cadmium and zinc induced similar changes in protein and glycoprotein patterns in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum l.) seedlings and plants.

    PubMed

    Peharec Štefanić, Petra; Sikić, Sandra; Cvjetko, Petra; Balen, Biljana

    2012-09-01

    The effects of 10 μmol L-1 and 15 μmol L-1 cadmium (Cd), a nonessential toxic element and 25 μmol L-1 and 50 μmol L-1 zinc (Zn), an essential micronutrient, on proteins and glycoproteins of Nicotiana tabacum L. seedlings and plants were investigated after exposure to each metal alone or to their combinations. Changes in only few polypeptides related to heavy metal treatments were observed in tobacco seedlings and leaves of adult plants, while the greatest change in total soluble protein pattern was observed in plant roots. Differences between control and treated tobacco tissues were more pronounced in the glycoprotein pattern, which was analysed by application of different lectins. The majority of the detected glycoproteins in leaves and roots of adult plants can be considered as a result of enhanced glycosylation due to heavy metal stress. The difference in glycoproteins between Cd and Zn application on tobacco seedlings and adult plants could not be determined since enhanced glycosylation was noticed after treatment with either metal alone or in combination. Therefore, it can be concluded that both metals induced N- and Oglycosylation as a result of changed environmental conditions.

  16. Roles of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins in the pollen tube and style cell growth of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuelian; Ma, Haoli; Qi, Huandong; Zhao, Jie

    2014-07-15

    Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) are plant cell wall proteins related to plant growth and development, and extensins (EXTs) are a subfamily of HRGPs. In this study, the function of HRGPs, especially EXTs, was investigated in the pollen tube and style cell growth of Nicotiana tabacum L. By using the techniques of protein blot and immunohistochemistry, the JIM20-recognized epitopes of EXTs were abundantly expressed in vivo for pollen tubes and transmitting tissue. A hydroxyproline synthesis inhibitor, 3,4-dehydro-l-proline (3,4-DHP), was used to investigate the functions of HRGPs. The addition of 3,4-DHP decreased the speed of pollen tube growth and shortened the length of style. Moreover, the hydroxyproline assay and JIM20 immunolocalization confirmed that 3,4-DHP treatment reduced the level of hydroxyproline and EXTs in the treated styles, respectively. These results indicate that HRGPs, most likely EXTs, may play important roles in the pollen tube and style cell growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in response to root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita infection.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xuexia; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Mingzhen; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Bingyang; Xi, Qiliang; Zhao, Ke; Wu, Yunjie; Yang, Tiezhao

    2017-01-22

    The root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita reproduces on the roots of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), damaging crops, reducing crop yield, and causing economic losses annually. The development of resistant genotypes is an alternative strategy to effectively control these losses. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for host pathogenesis and defense responses in tobacco specifically against RKNs remain poorly understood. Here, root transcriptome analysis of resistant (Yuyan12) and susceptible (Changbohuang) tobacco varieties infected with RKNs was performed. Moreover, 2623 and 545 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in RKN-infected roots were observed in Yuyan12 and Changbohuang, respectively, compared to those in non-infected roots, including 289 DEGs commonly expressed in the two genotypes. Among these DEGs, genes encoding cell wall modifying proteins, auxin-related proteins, the ROS scavenging system, and transcription factors involved in various biological and physiochemical processes were significantly expressed in both the resistant and susceptible genotypes. This work is thus the first report on the relationships in the RKN-tobacco interaction using transcriptome analysis, and the results provide important information on the mechanism of RKN resistance in tobacco. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Early inhibition of photosynthesis during development of Mn toxicity in tobacco. [Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY14

    SciTech Connect

    Nable, R.O.; Houtz, R.L.; Cheniae, G.M. )

    1988-04-01

    Early physiological effects of developing Mn toxicity in young leaves of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY 14) were examined in glass-house/water cultured plants grown at high (summer) and low (winter) photon flux. Following transfer of plants to solutions containing 1 millimolar Mn{sup 2+}, sequential samplings were made at various times for the following 9 days, during which Mn accumulation by leaves increased rapidly from {approx} 70 on day 0 to {approx} 1700 and {approx} 5000 microgram per gram dry matter after 1 and 9 days, respectively. In plants grown at high photon flux, net photosynthesis declined by {approx} 20 and {approx} 60% after 1 and 9 days, respectively, and the onset of this decline preceded appearance (after 3 to 4 days) of visible foliar symptoms of Mn toxicity. Intercellular CO{sub 2} concentrations and rates of transpiration were not significantly affected. Though the activity of latent or activated polyphenol oxidase increased in parallel with Mn accumulation, neither leaf respiration nor the activity of catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) and peroxidase (EC 1.10.1.7) were greatly affected. These effects from Mn toxicity could not be explained by any changes in protein or chlorophyll abundance. Additionally, they were not a consequence of Mn induced Fe deficiency. Therefore, inhibition of net photosynthesis and enhancement of polyphenol oxidase activity are early indicators of excess Mn accumulation in tobacco leaves.

  19. Comparative study on macro- and micro-elements concentration in Nicotiana tabacum and Faba siliquis plants by ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazs, Zoltan; Voica, Cezara; Dehelean, Adriana; Magdas, Dana Alina; Ristoiu, Dumitru

    2015-12-01

    Plants are important components of ecosystems as they transfer elements from abiotic into biotic environments. The concentration of macro and micro-elements in tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum) and bean (Faba siliquis) was analyzed using ICP-MS technique. The results obtained indicated that the mean concentration of Mg, P, K and Ca in tobacco leaves was 0.965, 0.812, 4.412 and 2.694 g.kg-1, respectively, while in bean samples were 0.899, 2.024, 6.725 and 1.387 g.kg-1, respectively. Mn concentration ranged from 156.835 mg.kg-1 to 234.593 mg.kg-1 in tobacco leaves and from 116.174 mg.kg-1 to 440.423 mg.kg-1 in bean samples. The results for Cu and Zn were between 7.262 mg.kg-1 and 105.738 mg.kg-1, 68.549 mg.kg-1 and 113.720 mg.kg-1 (tobacco leaves); and 6.830 mg.kg-1 and 46.034 mg.kg-1, 50.166 mg.kg-1 and 77.242 mg.kg-1 (bean samples), respectively. In analyzed samples, Pb, Cd and As concentrations ranged between <0.001-0.717 mg.kg-1, 0.046 mg.kg-1 -6.218 mg.kg-1, <0.001-0.381 mg.kg-1. The paper discusses the transfer of metal ions (Mn, As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn, respectively) from soil to these plants in terms of transfer factors (TF).

  20. Activation of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Nicotiana tabacum Improves the Performance of the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci via Reduced Jasmonate Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Alon, Michal; Malka, Osnat; Eakteiman, Galit; Elbaz, Moshe; Moyal Ben Zvi, Michal; Vainstein, Alexander; Morin, Shai

    2013-01-01

    Background Phloem-feeding insects can manipulate plant-induced resistance and are able to suppress effective jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET) defenses by the induction of inefficient salicylic acid (SA) based responses. As a result, activation of the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway in transgenic plants is anticipated to cause complex interactions between phloem-feeding insects and their host plants due to predicted contradiction between two defense forces: the toxicity of various phenylpropanoids and the accumulation of SA via a branch of the activated pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we investigated the effect of activating the phenylpropanoids pathway in Nicotiana tabacum, by over-expression of the PAP1 transcription factor, on the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, a phloem-feeding insect model. Our performance assays indicated that the over-expression made the transgenic plants a more suitable host for B. tabaci than wild-type (WT) plants, although these plants accumulated significantly higher levels of flavonoids. Transcription analyses of indicator genes in the SA (PR1a) and JA/ET (ERF1, COI1 and AOC) pathways followed by quantification of the SA and JA hormone levels, indicated that B. tabaci infestation periods longer than 8 hours, caused higher levels of activity of SA signaling in transgenic plants and higher levels of JA/ET signaling in WT plants. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results emphasize the important role JA/ET-induced defenses play in protecting plants from successful infestation by B. tabaci and likely other phloem-feeding insects. It also indicates the necessity of phloem feeders to suppress these defenses for efficient utilization of plant hosts. Our data also indicate that the defensive chemistry produced by the phenylpropanoids pathway has only a minor effect on the insect fitness. PMID:24204646

  1. Nicotiana tabacum overexpressing γ-ECS exhibits biotic stress tolerance likely through NPR1-dependent salicylic acid-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Srijani; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Sinha, Ragini; Banerjee, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2011-05-01

    The elaborate networks and the crosstalk of established signaling molecules like salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET), abscisic acid (ABA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) play key role in plant defense response. To obtain further insight into the mechanism through which GSH is involved in this crosstalk to mitigate biotic stress, transgenic Nicotiana tabacum overexpressing Lycopersicon esculentum gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (LeECS) gene (NtGB lines) were generated with enhanced level of GSH in comparison with wild-type plants exhibiting resistance to pathogenesis as well. The expression levels of non-expressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1)-dependent genes like pathogenesis-related gene 1 (NtPR1), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (NtMAPKK), glutamine synthetase (NtGLS) were significantly enhanced along with NtNPR1. However, the expression levels of NPR1-independent genes like NtPR2, NtPR5 and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family protein (NtSDRLP) were either insignificant or were downregulated. Additionally, increase in expression of thioredoxin (NtTRXh), S-nitrosoglutathione reductase 1 (NtGSNOR1) and suppression of isochorismate synthase 1 (NtICS1) was noted. Comprehensive analysis of GSH-fed tobacco BY2 cell line in a time-dependent manner reciprocated the in planta results. Better tolerance of NtGB lines against biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci was noted as compared to necrotrophic Alternaria alternata. Through two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and image analysis, 48 differentially expressed spots were identified and through identification as well as functional categorization, ten proteins were found to be SA-related. Collectively, our results suggest GSH to be a member in cross-communication with other signaling molecules in mitigating biotic stress likely through NPR1-dependent SA-mediated pathway.

  2. Interaction of sulfur and nitrogen nutrition in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants: significance of nitrogen source and root nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kruse, J; Kopriva, S; Hänsch, R; Krauss, G-J; Mendel, R-R; Rennenberg, H

    2007-09-01

    The significance of root nitrate reductase for sulfur assimilation was studied in tobacco (NICOTIANA TABACUM) plants. For this purpose, uptake, assimilation, and long-distance transport of sulfur were compared between wild-type tobacco and transformants lacking root nitrate reductase, cultivated either with nitrate or with ammonium nitrate. A recently developed empirical model of plant internal nitrogen cycling was adapted to sulfur and applied to characterise whole plant sulfur relations in wild-type tobacco and the transformant. Both transformation and nitrogen nutrition strongly affected sulfur pools and sulfur fluxes. Transformation decreased the rate of sulfate uptake in nitrate-grown plants and root sulfate and total sulfur contents in root biomass, irrespective of N nutrition. Nevertheless, glutathione levels were enhanced in the roots of transformed plants. This may be a consequence of enhanced APR activity in the leaves that also resulted in enhanced organic sulfur content in the leaves of the tranformants. The lack of nitrate reductase in the roots in the transformants caused regulatory changes in sulfur metabolism that resembled those observed under nitrogen deficiency. Nitrate nutrition reduced total sulfur content and all the major fractions analysed in the leaves, but not in the roots, compared to ammonium nitrate supply. The enhanced organic sulfur and glutathione levels in ammonium nitrate-fed plants corresponded well to elevated APR activity. But foliar sulfate contents also increased due to decreased re-allocation of sulfate into the phloem of ammonium nitrate-fed plants. Further studies will elucidate whether this decrease is achieved by downregulation of a specific sulfate transporter in vascular tissues.

  3. Mitochondrial Alternative Oxidase Maintains Respiration and Preserves Photosynthetic Capacity during Moderate Drought in Nicotiana tabacum1[W

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Keshav; Wang, Jia; Martyn, Greg D.; Rahimy, Farkhunda; Vanlerberghe, Greg C.

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain includes an alternative oxidase (AOX) that is hypothesized to aid photosynthetic metabolism, perhaps by acting as an additional electron sink for photogenerated reductant or by dampening the generation of reactive oxygen species. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosystem I (PSI) absorbance, and biochemical and protein analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum ‘Petit Havana SR1’ wild-type plants with that of transgenic AOX knockdown (RNA interference) and overexpression lines, under both well-watered and moderate drought-stressed conditions. During drought, AOX knockdown lines displayed a lower rate of respiration in the light than the wild type, as confirmed by two independent methods. Furthermore, CO2 and light response curves indicated a nonstomatal limitation of photosynthesis in the knockdowns during drought, relative to the wild type. Also relative to the wild type, the knockdowns under drought maintained PSI and PSII in a more reduced redox state, showed greater regulated nonphotochemical energy quenching by PSII, and displayed a higher relative rate of cyclic electron transport around PSI. The origin of these differences may lie in the chloroplast ATP synthase amount, which declined dramatically in the knockdowns in response to drought. None of these effects were seen in plants overexpressing AOX. The results show that AOX is necessary to maintain mitochondrial respiration during moderate drought. In its absence, respiration rate slows and the lack of this electron sink feeds back on the photosynthetic apparatus, resulting in a loss of chloroplast ATP synthase that then limits photosynthetic capacity. PMID:25204647

  4. Three nicotine demethylase genes mediate nornicotine biosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum L.: functional characterization of the CYP82E10 gene.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ramsey S; Bowen, Steven W; Keogh, Matthew R; Dewey, Ralph E

    2010-12-01

    In most tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants, nornicotine is a relatively minor alkaloid, comprising about 2-5% of the total pyridine alkaloid pool in the mature leaf. Changes in gene expression at an unstable locus, however, can give rise to plants that produce high levels of nornicotine, specifically during leaf senescence and curing. Minimizing the nornicotine content in tobacco is highly desirable, because this compound serves as the direct precursor in the synthesis of N'-nitrosonornicotine, a potent carcinogen in laboratory animals. Nornicotine is likely produced almost entirely via the N-demethylation of nicotine, in a process called nicotine conversion that is catalyzed by the enzyme nicotine N-demethylase (NND). Previous studies have identified CYP82E4 as the specific NND gene responsible for the unstable conversion phenomenon, and CYP82E5v2 as a putative minor NND gene. Here, by discovery and characterization of CYP82E10, a tobacco NND gene, is reported. PCR amplification studies showed that CYP82E10 originated from the N. sylvestris ancestral parent of modern tobacco. Using a chemical mutagenesis strategy, knockout mutations were induced and identified in all three tobacco NND genes. By generating a series of mutant NND genotypes, the relative contribution of each NND gene toward the nornicotine content of the plant was assessed. Plants possessing knockout mutations in all three genes displayed nornicotine phenotypes that were much lower (∼0.5% of total alkaloid content) than that found in conventional tobacco cultivars. The introduction of these mutations into commercial breeding lines promises to be a viable strategy for reducing the levels of one of the best characterized animal carcinogens found in tobacco products. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bensulfuron-Methyl Treatment of Soil Affects the Infestation of Whitefly, Aphid, and Tobacco Mosaic Virus on Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Renyi; Islam, Saif Ul; Wu, Zujian; Ye, Xiujuan

    2016-01-01

    Bensulfuron-methyl (BSM) is widely used in paddy soil for weed control. BSM residue in the soil has been known to inhibit the growth of sensitive crop plants. However, it is unknown whether BSM residue can affect the agrosystem in general. In this study, we have found significant effects of BSM on the infestation of Bemisia tabaci, Myzus persicae, and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Nicotiana tabacum. The soil was treated with BSM before the pest inoculation. The herbicide-treated tobaccos showed resistance to B. tabaci, but this resistance could not be detected until 15-day post-infestation when smaller number of adults B. tabaci appeared. In M. persicae assay, the longevity of all development stages of insects, and the fecundity of insects were not significantly affected when feeding on BSM-treated plants. In TMV assay, the BSM treatment also reduced virus-induced lesions in early infection time. However, the titer of TMV in BSM treated plants increased greatly over time and was over 40-fold higher than the mock-infected control plants after 20 days. Further studies showed that BSM treatment increased both jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) levels in tobacco, as well as the expression of target genes in the JA and SA signaling pathways, such as NtWIPK, NtPR1a, and NtPAL. NtPR1a and NtPAL were initially suppressed after virus-inoculation, while NtRDR1 and NtRDR6, which play a key role in fighting virus infection, only showed up- or were down-regulated 20 days post virus-inoculation. Taken together, our results suggested that BSM residue in the soil may affect the metabolism of important phytohormones such as JA and SA in sensitive plants and consequently affect the plant immune response against infections such as whitefly, aphids, and viruses. PMID:28083007

  6. Immunodiagnostic Properties of Wucheraria bancrofti SXP-1, a Potential Filarial Diagnostic Candidate Expressed in Tobacco Plant, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Mathangi; Chakravarthi, M; Charles, S Jason; Harunipriya, P; Jaiganesh, S; Subramonian, N; Kaliraj, P

    2015-08-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants were developed expressing WbSXP-1, a diagnostic antigen isolated from the cDNA library of L3 stage larvae of Wucheraria bancrofti. This antigen produced by recombinant Escherichia coli has been demonstrated by to be successful as potential diagnostic candidate against lymphatic filariasis. A rapid format simple and qualitative flow through immune-filtration diagnostic kit has been developed for the identification of IgG antibodies to the recombinant WbSXP-1 and is being marketed by M/S Span Diagnostics Ltd in India and Africa. Here, we present the results of experiments on the transformation and expression of the same filarial antigen, WbSXP-1, in tobacco plant, Nicotiana tabacum, to produce plant-based diagnostic antigen. It was possible to successfully transform the tobacco plant with WbSXP-1, the integration of the parasite-specific gene in plants was confirmed by PCR amplification and the expression of the filarial protein by Western blotting. The immunoreactivity of the plant-produced WbSXP-1 was assessed based on its reaction with the monoclonal antibodies developed against the E. coli-produced protein. Immunological screening using clinical sera from patients indicates that the plant-produced protein is comparable to E. coli-produced diagnostic antigen. The result demonstrated that plants can be used as suitable expression systems for the production of diagnostic proteins against lymphatic filariasis, a neglected tropical infectious disease which has a negative impact on socioeconomic development. This is the first report of the integration, expression and efficacy of a diagnostic candidate of lymphatic filariasis in plants.Key MessageTransgenic tobacco plants with WbSXP-1, a filarial diagnostic candidate, were developed. The plant-produced protein showed immunoreactivity on par with the E. coli product.

  7. Induction of UDP-glucose:salicylic acid glucosyltransferase activity in tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Enyedi, A.J.; Raskin, I. )

    1993-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a putative signal that activates plant resistance to pathogens. SA levels increase systemically following the hypersensitive response produced by tobacco masaic virus (TMV) inoculation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Xanthi-nc) leaves. The SA increase in the inoculated leaf coincided with the appearance of a [beta]-glucosidase-hydrolyzable SA conjugate identified as [beta]-O-D-glucosylsalicylic acid (GSA). SA and GSA accumulation in the TMV-inoculated leaf paralleled the increase in the activity of a UDP-glucose:salicylic acid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35) ([beta]-GTase) capable of converting SA to GSA. Healthy tissues had constitutive [beta]-GTase activity of 0.076 milliunits g[sup [minus]1] fresh weight. This activity started to increase 48 h after TMV inoculation, reaching its maximum (6.7-fold induction over the basal levels) 72 h after TMV inoculation. No significant GSA or elevated [beta]-GTase activity could be detected in the healthy leaf immediately above the TMV-inoculated leaf. The effect of TMV inoculation on the [beta]-GTase and GSA accumulation could be duplicated by infiltrating tobacco leaf discs with SA at the levels naturally produced in TMV-inoculated leaves (2.7--27.0 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1] fresh weight). Pretreatment of leaf discs with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide inhibited the induction of [beta]GTase by SA and prevented the formation of GSA. Of 12 analogs of SA tested, only 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid induced [beta]-GTase activity. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Heterologous expression of a rice miR395 gene in Nicotiana tabacum impairs sulfate homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ning; Yuan, Shuangrong; Li, Zhigang; Li, Dayong; Hu, Qian; Luo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur participates in many important mechanisms and pathways of plant development. The most common source of sulfur in soil –SO42−– is absorbed into root tissue and distributed into aerial part through vasculature system, where it is reduced into sulfite and finally sulfide within the subcellular organs such as chloroplasts and mitochondria and used for cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. MicroRNAs are involved in many regulation pathways by repressing the expression of their target genes. MiR395 family in Arabidopsis thaliana has been reported to be an important regulator involved in sulfate transport and assimilation, and a high-affinity sulphate transporter and three ATP sulfurylases (ATPS) were the target genes of AthmiR395 (Arabidopsis thaliana miR395). We have cloned a miR395 gene from rice (Oryza sativa) and studied its function in plant nutritional response. Our results indicated that in rice, transcript level of OsamiR395 (Oryza sativa miR395) increased under sulfate deficiency conditions, and the two predicted target genes of miR395 were down-regulated under the same conditions. Overexpression of OsamiR395h in tobacco impaired its sulfate homeostasis, and sulfate distribution was also slightly impacted among leaves of different ages. One sulfate transporter (SULTR) gene NtaSULTR2 was identified to be the target of miR395 in Nicotiana tobacum, which belongs to low affinity sulfate transporter group. Both miR395 and NtaSULTR2 respond to sulfate starvation in tobacco. PMID:27350219

  9. Variation of genomic DNA methylation in the nitrate reductase gene of sibling tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Fu, S L; Tang, Z X; Liu, L; Lu, L M; Huang, Y B

    2012-05-07

    To better understand genomic DNA methylation in sibling plant cultivars, methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis was used to investigate two sibling tobacco cultivars, Yunyan85 and Yunyan87, and their two parents, K326 and Yunyan No. 2. Differences in the degree of genomic DNA methylation were found among the four tobacco cultivars. Compared with parents, the two sibling cultivars had fewer methylated sites. Twenty-nine methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism fragments that exhibited methylation alteration in the four tobacco cultivars were recovered and sequenced. BLAST (nucleotide BLAST) searches showed that two of the 29 sequences have 99% similarity with nucleotides 1442-1694 of the nia-1 gene and the other 27 sequences contain GC, CAAT or TATA box. The nitrate reductase genes from Yunyan87, K326 and Yunyan No. 2 were found to be identical; however, the third intron of the nitrate reductase gene from Yunyan85 was different compared to the third introns of Yunyan87, K326 and Yunyan No. 2. We conclude that methylation alteration of promoter regions could be responsible for the different phenotypes in tobacco and that introns of the nitrate reductase gene can vary as a result of intra-species crossing in tobacco.

  10. Promoter analysis of the sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene IbAGP1 in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuelian; Li, Qian; Liu, Dongqing; Zang, Lili; Zhang, Kaiyue; Deng, Kejun; Yang, Shixin; Xie, Zhengyang; Tang, Xu; Qi, Yiping; Zhang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    The IbAGP1 gene of sweet potato ( Ipomoea batatas ) encodes the sucrose-inducible small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Through expression analysis of 5'-truncations and synthetic forms of the IbAGP1 promoter in transgenic tobacco, we show that SURE-Like elements and W-box elements of the promoter contribute to the sucrose inducibility of this gene. Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) contains two genes (IbAGP1 and IbAGP2) encoding the catalytically active small subunits of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme with an important role in regulating starch synthesis in higher plants. Previous studies have shown that IbAGP1 is expressed in the storage roots, leaves, and stem tissues of sweet potato, and its transcript is strongly induced by applying sucrose exogenously to detached leaves. To investigate the tissue-specific expression of the IbAGP1 promoter, a series of 5'-truncated promoters extending from bases -1913, -1598, -1298, -1053, -716, and -286 to base +75 were used to drive the expression of the β-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS) in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum). Histochemical and fluorometric GUS assays showed that (1) GUS expression driven by the longest fragment (1989 bp) of the IbAGP1 promoter was detected in vegetative tissues (roots, stems, leaves), (2) fragments extending to -1053 or beyond retained strong GUS expression in roots, stems, and leaves, whereas further 5'-deletions resulted in considerable reduction in GUS activity, and (3) the series of 5'-truncated promoters responded differently to exogenously applied sucrose. The 1989-bp IbAGP1 promoter contains five sequences (two AATAAAA, one AATAAAAAA, and two AATAAATAAA) that are similar to sucrose-responsive elements (SURE). These SURE-Like sequences are found at nucleotide positions -1273, -1239, -681, -610, and -189. Moreover, putative W-box elements are found at positions -1985, -1434, -750, and -578. Synthetic promoters containing tandem repeats of the 4X SURE-Like or 4X W

  11. Properties of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cadmium-binding peptide(s). Unique non-metallothionein cadmium ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Reese, R N; Wagner, G J

    1987-01-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of Cd-binding peptides isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and suspension-cultured tobacco cells were determined and compared with properties of rat liver Cd,Zn-thionein. Some emphasis was placed on metal-binding and specificity properties. Cd-peptides of apparent Mr 6000 and 2000 were induced in tobacco leaves by growth of plants with 90 microM-Cd. Only the apparent-Mr-2000 Cd-peptide was induced in the leaves of tobacco plants grown in the presence of 3 microM-Cd. In cultured tobacco cells exposed to a wide range of Cd levels (3-180 microM), a peptide of apparent Mr 2000 was observed. Under denaturing conditions [6 M-guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) with or without 100 mM-2-mercaptoethanol], all of the above forms were shown to have an Mr of approx. 1300, compared with an Mr of 6000 for Cd,Zn-thionein. The apparent disaggregation of the Mr-6000 form by GdmCl to what appears to be the unit Cd-binding peptide was reversible. Tobacco-derived Cd-peptide contained approx. 40, 35 and 15 residues of glutamate/glutamine, cysteine and glycine respectively, with serine, lysine, and aromatic residues being absent. Tobacco Cd-peptide had an isoelectric point (pI) of 3.15, which is lower than the pI greater than or equal to 4 reported for metallothionein. A 50% dissociation of Cd occurred at pH 5 and 3.5 for the tobacco Cd-peptide and Cd,Zn-thionein respectively, and GdmCl was shown to cause Cd dissociation from tobacco peptide, but not from metallothionein. No evidence was obtained for Zn induction in vivo of, or Zn binding in vitro to, tobacco Cd-peptide. Copper induced a low-Mr metal-binding component in cultured tobacco cells which did not appear to be identical with the peptide induced by Cd. Properties of tobacco Cd-peptide and Cd,Zn-thionein, including metal affinity and selectivity, are greatly different, except for the common presence of 30 residues of cysteine/100 residues. PMID:3593213

  12. Root-specific expression of opine genes and opine accumulation in some cultivars of the naturally occurring genetically modified organism Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; de Borne, François Dorlhac; Julio, Emilie; Obszynski, Julie; Pale, Patrick; Otten, Léon

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that Nicotiana tabacum contains three Agrobacterium-derived T-DNA sequences inherited from its paternal ancestor Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Among these, the TB locus carries an intact mannopine synthase 2' gene (TB-mas2'). This gene is similar to the Agrobacterium rhizogenes A4-mas2' gene that encodes the synthesis of the Amadori compound deoxyfructosyl-glutamine (DFG or santhopine). In this study we show that TB-mas2' is expressed at very low levels in N. tomentosiformis and in most N. tabacum cultivars; however, some cultivars show high TB-mas2' expression levels. The TB-mas2' promoter sequences of low- and high-expressing cultivars are identical. The low/high level of expression segregates as a single Mendelian factor in a cross between a low- and a high-expression cultivar. pTB-mas2'-GUS and pA4-mas2'-GUS reporter genes were stably introduced in N. benthamiana. Both were mainly expressed in the root expansion zone and leaf vasculature. Roots of tobacco cultivars with high TB-mas2' expression contain detectable levels of DFG. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of UV irradiation, toluidine blue, and environment on maternal haploid frequencies from the cross between Nicotiana tabacum and N. africana

    SciTech Connect

    Chimoyo, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Treating Nicotiana africana Merxm. pollen with three levels UV radiation prior to pollinating four cultivars of flue-cured tobacco (Coker 176, NC95, McN944 and PD4), Nicotiana tabacum produced 1,953 viable seedlings from an estimated total of 170,248 seeds, of which 1,667 were haploid and 286 were hybrids. Drenching N. tabacum flowers with toluidine blue 18 hours after pollination with normal N. africana pollen, yielded 511 viable seedlings from 70,613 seeds, of which 346 were haploid and 165 hybrids. Untreated pollen gave 548 viable seedlings from 56,291 seeds, comprising 341 haploids and 208 hybrids. Contrary to results from a previous histological study, in vivo pollen tube growth rate appears to be similar irrespective of pollen source or treatment, and fertilization seems to occur at about the same time as in the selfed control. From an estimated total of 803,854 seeds sown, 3,014 viable seedlings were obtained. Coker 176 gave significantly higher yields of haploids than the other three cultivars. Field grown plants produced more haploids than greenhouse grown plants. Further evidence was obtained to support selective chromosomal elimination as the mechanism governing the development of maternal haploids from this interspecific cross.

  14. Dynamic metabonomic responses of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingtao; Zhang, Yong; Du, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shiyun; Tang, Huiru

    2011-04-01

    Metabolic responses are important for plant adaptation to osmotic stresses. To understand the dosage and duration dependence of salinity effects on plant metabolisms, we analyzed the metabonome of tobacco plants and its dynamic responses to salt treatments using NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that the tobacco metabonome was dominated by 40 metabolites including organic acids/bases, amino acids, carbohydrates and choline, pyrimidine, and purine metabolites. A dynamic trajectory was clearly observable for the tobacco metabonomic responses to the dosage of salinity. Short-term low-dose salt stress (50 mM NaCl, 1 day) caused metabolic shifts toward gluconeogenesis with depletion of pyrimidine and purine metabolites. Prolonged salinity with high-dose salt (500 mM NaCl) induced progressive accumulation of osmolytes, such as proline and myo-inositol, and changes in GABA shunt. Such treatments also promoted the shikimate-mediated secondary metabolisms with enhanced biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Therefore, salinity caused systems alterations in widespread metabolic networks involving transamination, TCA cycle, gluconeogenesis/glycolysis, glutamate-mediated proline biosynthesis, shikimate-mediated secondary metabolisms, and the metabolisms of choline, pyrimidine, and purine. These findings provided new insights for the tobacco metabolic adaptation to salinity and demonstrated the NMR-based metabonomics as a powerful approach for understanding the osmotic effects on plant biochemistry.

  15. Isonitrosoacetophenone Drives Transcriptional Reprogramming in Nicotiana tabacum Cells in Support of Innate Immunity and Defense

    PubMed Central

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T.; Maake, Mmapula P.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to various stress stimuli by activating broad-spectrum defense responses both locally as well as systemically. As such, identification of expressed genes represents an important step towards understanding inducible defense responses and assists in designing appropriate intervention strategies for disease management. Genes differentially expressed in tobacco cell suspensions following elicitation with isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP) were identified using mRNA differential display and pyro-sequencing. Sequencing data produced 14579 reads, which resulted in 198 contigs and 1758 singletons. Following BLAST analyses, several inducible plant defense genes of interest were identified and classified into functional categories including signal transduction, transcription activation, transcription and protein synthesis, protein degradation and ubiquitination, stress-responsive, defense-related, metabolism and energy, regulation, transportation, cytoskeleton and cell wall-related. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the expression of 17 selected target genes within these categories. Results indicate that INAP has a sensitising or priming effect through activation of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid- and ethylene pathways that result in an altered transcriptome, with the expression of genes involved in perception of pathogens and associated cellular re-programming in support of defense. Furthermore, infection assays with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci confirmed the establishment of a functional anti-microbial environment in planta. PMID:25658943

  16. Overexpression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) induces a hypoxic response in Nicotiana tabacum leaves

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Pedro; Okura, Vagner; Pena, Izabella A.; Maia, Renato; Maia, Ivan G.; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) decreases reactive oxygen species production under stress conditions by uncoupling the electrochemical gradient from ATP synthesis. This study combined transcriptome profiling with experimentally induced hypoxia to mechanistically dissect the impact of Arabidopsis thaliana UCP1 (AtUCP1) overexpression in tobacco. Transcriptomic analysis of AtUCP1-overexpressing (P07) and wild-type (WT) plants was carried out using RNA sequencing. Metabolite and carbohydrate profiling of hypoxia-treated plants was performed using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The transcriptome of P07 plants revealed a broad induction of stress-responsive genes that were not strictly related to the mitochondrial antioxidant machinery, suggesting that overexpression of AtUCP1 imposes a strong stress response within the cell. In addition, transcripts that mapped into carbon fixation and energy expenditure pathways were broadly altered. It was found that metabolite markers of hypoxic adaptation, such as alanine and tricarboxylic acid intermediates, accumulated in P07 plants under control conditions at similar rates to WT plants under hypoxia. These findings indicate that constitutive overexpression of AtUCP1 induces a hypoxic response. The metabolites that accumulated in P07 plants are believed to be important in signalling for an improvement in carbon assimilation and induction of a hypoxic response. Under these conditions, mitochondrial ATP production is less necessary and fermentative glycolysis becomes critical to meet cell energy demands. In this scenario, the more flexible energy metabolism along with an intrinsically activated hypoxic response make these plants better adapted to face several biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26494730

  17. Expression of recombinant antibody (single chain antibody fragment) in transgenic plant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi.

    PubMed

    Dobhal, S; Chaudhary, V K; Singh, A; Pandey, D; Kumar, A; Agrawal, S

    2013-12-01

    Plants offer an alternative inexpensive and convenient technology for large scale production of recombinant proteins especially recombinant antibodies (plantibodies). In this paper, we describe the expression of a model single chain antibody fragment (B6scFv) in transgenic tobacco. Four different gene constructs of B6scFv with different target signals for expression in different compartments of a tobacco plant cell with and without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal were used. Agrobacterium mediated plant transformation of B6scFv gene was performed with tobacco leaf explants and the gene in regenerated plants was detected using histochemical GUS assay and PCR. The expression of B6scFv gene was detected by western blotting and the recombinant protein was purified from putative transgenic tobacco plants using metal affinity chromatography. The expression level of recombinant protein was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highest accumulation of protein was found up to 3.28 % of the total soluble protein (TSP) in plants expressing B6scFv 1003 targeted to the ER, and subsequently expression of 2.9 % of TSP in plants expressing B6scFv 1004 (with target to apoplast with ER retention signal). In contrast, lower expression of 0.78 and 0.58 % of TSP was found in plants expressing antibody fragment in cytosol and apoplast, without ER retention signal. The described method/system could be used in the future for diverse applications including expression of other recombinant molecules in plants for immunomodulation, obtaining pathogen resistance against plant pathogens, altering metabolic pathways and also for the expression of different antibodies of therapeutic and diagnostic uses.

  18. Posttranslational processing of a new class of hydroxyproline-containing proteins. Prolyl hydroxylation and C-terminal cleavage of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) vacuolar chitinase.

    PubMed

    Sticher, L; Hofsteenge, J; Neuhaus, J M; Boller, T; Meins, F

    1993-04-01

    The fungicidal class I chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) are believed to be important in defending plants against microbial pathogens. The vacuolar isoforms of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), chitinases A and B, are the first examples of a new type of hydroxyproline-containing protein with intracellular location, enzymic activity, and a small number of hydroxyprolyl residues restricted to a single, short peptide sequence. We have investigated the posttranslational processing and intracellular transport of transgene-encoded chitinase A in callus cultures of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Havana 425 and leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris Spegazzini and Comes. Pulse-chase experiments and cell fractionation show that chitinase A is processed in two distinct steps. In the first step, the nascent protein undergoes an increase in apparent M(r) of approximately 1500 detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Experiments with the inhibitor of prolyl hydroxylation, alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl, and pulse-chase labeling of cells expressing recombinant forms of chitinase A indicate that the anomalous increase in M(r) is due to hydroxylation of prolyl residues. This step occurs in the endomembrane system before sorting for secretion and vacuolar transport and does not appear to be required for correct targeting of chitinase A to the vacuole. The second step is a proteolytic cleavage. Sequencing of tryptic peptides of the mature proteins indicates that during processing essentially all molecules of chitinase A and B lose a C-terminal heptapeptide, which has been shown to be a vacuolar targeting signal. This appears to occur primarily in the endomembrane system late in intracellular transport. A model for the posttranslational modification of chitinase A is proposed.

  19. Improvement in the stability and functionality of Nicotiana tabacum produced recombinant TRAIL through employment of endoplasmic reticulum expression and ascorbate buffer mediated extraction strategies

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Hamid Reza; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Vahidi, Hossein; Barar, Jaleh; Kazemi, Bahram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In order to employ Nicotiana tabacum cells as a profitable natural bioreactor for production of bio-functional "Soluble human TRAIL" (ShTRAIL), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeted expression and innovative extraction procedures were exploited. Methods: At first, the ShTRAIL encoding gene was sub-cloned into designed H2 helper vector to equip it with potent TMV omega leader sequences, ER sorting signal peptide, poly-histidine tag and ER retention signal peptide (KDEL). Then, the ER targeted ShTRAIL cassette was sequentially sub-cloned into "CaMV-35S" helper and "pGreen-0179" final expression vectors. Afterward, Agrobacterium mediated transformation method was adopted to express the ShTRAIL in the ER of N. tabacum . Next, the ShTRAIL protein was extracted through both phosphate and innovative ascorbate extraction buffers. Subsequently, oligomerization state of the ShTRAIL was evaluated through cross-linking assay and western blot analysis. Then, semi-quantitative western blot analysis was performed to estimate the ShTRAIL production. Finally, biological activity of the ShTRAIL was evaluated through MTT assay. Results: The phosphate buffer extracted ShTRAIL was produced in dimmer form, whereas the ShTRAIL extracted with ascorbate buffer generated trimer form. The ER targeted ShTRAIL strategy increased the ShTRAIL’s production level up to about 20 μg/g of fresh weight of N. tabacum . MTT assay indicated that ascorbate buffer extracted ShTRAIL could prohibit proliferation of A549 cell line. Conclusion: Endoplasmic reticulum expression and reductive ascorbate buffer extraction procedure can be employed to enhance the stability and overall production level of bio-functional recombinant ShTRAIL from transgenic N. tabacum cells. PMID:25337465

  20. S-Carvone Suppresses Cellulase-Induced Capsidiol Production in Nicotiana tabacum by Interfering with Protein Isoprenylation1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Huchelmann, Alexandre; Gastaldo, Clément; Veinante, Mickaël; Zeng, Ying; Heintz, Dimitri; Tritsch, Denis; Schaller, Hubert; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J.; Hemmerlin, Andréa

    2014-01-01

    S-Carvone has been described as a negative regulator of mevalonic acid (MVA) production by interfering with 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity, a key player in isoprenoid biosynthesis. The impact of this monoterpene on the production of capsidiol in Nicotiana tabacum, an assumed MVA-derived sesquiterpenoid phytoalexin produced in response to elicitation by cellulase, was investigated. As expected, capsidiol production, as well as early stages of elicitation such as hydrogen peroxide production or stimulation of 5-epi-aristolochene synthase activity, were repressed. Despite the lack of capsidiol synthesis, apparent HMGR activity was boosted. Feeding experiments using (1-13C)Glc followed by analysis of labeling patterns by 13C-NMR, confirmed an MVA-dependent biosynthesis; however, treatments with fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of the MVA-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) isoprenoid pathway, unexpectedly down-regulated the biosynthesis of this sesquiterpene as well. We postulated that S-carvone does not directly inhibit the production of MVA by inactivating HMGR, but possibly targets an MEP-derived isoprenoid involved in the early steps of the elicitation process. A new model is proposed in which the monoterpene blocks an MEP pathway–dependent protein geranylgeranylation necessary for the signaling cascade. The production of capsidiol was inhibited when plants were treated with some inhibitors of protein prenylation or by further monoterpenes. Moreover, S-carvone hindered isoprenylation of a prenylable GFP indicator protein expressed in N. tabacum cell lines, which can be chemically complemented with geranylgeraniol. The model was further validated using N. tabacum cell extracts or recombinant N. tabacum protein prenyltransferases expressed in Escherichia coli. Our study endorsed a reevaluation of the effect of S-carvone on plant isoprenoid metabolism. PMID:24367019

  1. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the lycopene ε-cyclase gene via virus-induced gene silencing and its expression pattern in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanmei; Wang, Ran; Luo, Zhaopeng; Jin, Lifeng; Liu, Pingping; Chen, Qiansi; Li, Zefeng; Li, Feng; Wei, Chunyang; Wu, Mingzhu; Wei, Pan; Xie, He; Qu, Lingbo; Lin, Fucheng; Yang, Jun

    2014-08-22

    Lycopene ε-cyclase (ε-LCY) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of α-branch carotenoids through the cyclization of lycopene. Two cDNA molecules encoding ε-LCY (designated Ntε-LCY1 and Ntε-LCY2) were cloned from Nicotiana tabacum. Ntε-LCY1 and Ntε-LCY2 are encoded by two distinct genes with different evolutionary origins, one originating from the tobacco progenitor, Nicotiana sylvestris, and the other originating from Nicotiana tomentosiformis. The two coding regions are 97% identical at the nucleotide level and 95% identical at the amino acid level. Transcripts of Ntε-LCY were detectable in both vegetative and reproductive organs, with a relatively higher level of expression in leaves than in other tissues. Subcellular localization experiments using an Ntε-LCY1-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that mature Ntε-LCY1 protein is localized within the chloroplast in Bright Yellow 2 suspension cells. Under low-temperature and low-irradiation stress, Ntε-LCY transcript levels substantially increased relative to control plants. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated silencing of ε-LCY in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in an increase of β-branch carotenoids and a reduction in the levels of α-branch carotenoids. Meanwhile, transcripts of related genes in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway observably increased, with the exception of β-OHase in the TRV-ε-lcy line. Suppression of ε-LCY expression was also found to alleviate photoinhibition of Potosystem II in virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) plants under low-temperature and low-irradiation stress. Our results provide insight into the regulatory role of ε-LCY in plant carotenoid biosynthesis and suggest a role for ε-LCY in positively modulating low temperature stress responses.

  2. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of the Lycopene ε-Cyclase Gene via Virus-Induced Gene Silencing and Its Expression Pattern in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanmei; Wang, Ran; Luo, Zhaopeng; Jin, Lifeng; Liu, Pingping; Chen, Qiansi; Li, Zefeng; Li, Feng; Wei, Chunyang; Wu, Mingzhu; Wei, Pan; Xie, He; Qu, Lingbo; Lin, Fucheng; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Lycopene ε-cyclase (ε-LCY) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of α-branch carotenoids through the cyclization of lycopene. Two cDNA molecules encoding ε-LCY (designated Ntε-LCY1 and Ntε-LCY2) were cloned from Nicotiana tabacum. Ntε-LCY1 and Ntε-LCY2 are encoded by two distinct genes with different evolutionary origins, one originating from the tobacco progenitor, Nicotiana sylvestris, and the other originating from Nicotiana tomentosiformis. The two coding regions are 97% identical at the nucleotide level and 95% identical at the amino acid level. Transcripts of Ntε-LCY were detectable in both vegetative and reproductive organs, with a relatively higher level of expression in leaves than in other tissues. Subcellular localization experiments using an Ntε-LCY1-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that mature Ntε-LCY1 protein is localized within the chloroplast in Bright Yellow 2 suspension cells. Under low-temperature and low-irradiation stress, Ntε-LCY transcript levels substantially increased relative to control plants. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated silencing of ε-LCY in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in an increase of β-branch carotenoids and a reduction in the levels of α-branch carotenoids. Meanwhile, transcripts of related genes in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway observably increased, with the exception of β-OHase in the TRV-ε-lcy line. Suppression of ε-LCY expression was also found to alleviate photoinhibition of Potosystem II in virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) plants under low-temperature and low-irradiation stress. Our results provide insight into the regulatory role of ε-LCY in plant carotenoid biosynthesis and suggest a role for ε-LCY in positively modulating low temperature stress responses. PMID:25153631

  3. Synchronous high-resolution phenotyping of leaf and root growth in Nicotiana tabacum over 24-h periods with GROWMAP-plant.

    PubMed

    Ruts, Tom; Matsubara, Shizue; Walter, Achim

    2013-01-23

    Root growth is highly responsive to temporal changes in the environment. On the contrary, diel (24 h) leaf expansion in dicot plants is governed by endogenous control and therefore its temporal pattern does not strictly follow diel changes in the environment. Nevertheless, root and shoot are connected with each other through resource partitioning and changing environments for one organ could affect growth of the other organ, and hence overall plant growth. We developed a new technique, GROWMAP-plant, to monitor growth processes synchronously in leaf and root of the same plant with a high resolution over the diel period. This allowed us to quantify treatment effects on the growth rates of the treated and non-treated organ and the possible interaction between them. We subjected the root system of Nicotiana tabacum seedlings to three different conditions: constant darkness at 22°C (control), constant darkness at 10°C (root cooling), and 12 h/12 h light-dark cycles at 22°C (root illumination). In all treatments the shoot was kept under the same 12 h/12 h light-dark cycles at 22°C. Root growth rates were found to be constant when the root-zone environment was kept constant, although the root cooling treatment significantly reduced root growth. Root velocity was decreased after light-on and light-off events of the root illumination treatment, resulting in diel root growth rhythmicity. Despite these changes in root growth, leaf growth was not affected substantially by the root-zone treatments, persistently showing up to three times higher nocturnal growth than diurnal growth. GROWMAP-plant allows detailed synchronous growth phenotyping of leaf and root in the same plant. Root growth was very responsive to the root cooling and root illumination, while these treatments altered neither relative growth rate nor diel growth pattern in the seedling leaf. Our results that were obtained simultaneously in growing leaves and roots of the same plants corroborate the high

  4. Uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L.): dependence on stomatal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, A.; Kley, D.; Wildt, J.; Segschneider, H. J.; Förstel, H.

    The uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers ( Helianthus annuus L. var. giganteus) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Bel W3), using concentrations representative for moderately polluted air, has been determined by gas exchange experiments. Conductivities for these trace gases were measured at different light fluxes ranging from 820 μEm -2s -1 to darkness. The conductivities to water vapor and the trace gases are highly correlated. It is concluded that the uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers and tobacco plants is linearly dependent on stomatal opening. While the uptake of NO is limited by the mesophyll resistance, the uptake of NO 2 is only by diffusion through the stomata. Loss processes by deposition to the leaf surfaces are more pronounced for O 3 than for NO and NO 2.

  5. Purification and biochemical characterization of NpABCG5/NpPDR5, a plant pleiotropic drug resistance transporter expressed in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Frédéric; Pierman, Baptiste; Bertin, Aurélie; Lévy, Daniel; Boutry, Marc

    2017-05-04

    Pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters belong to the ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and are involved in the transport of various molecules across plasma membranes. During evolution, PDR genes appeared independently in fungi and in plants from a duplication of a half-size ABC gene. The enzymatic properties of purified PDR transporters from yeast have been characterized. This is not the case for any plant PDR transporter, or, incidentally, for any purified plant ABC transporter. Yet, plant PDR transporters play important roles in plant physiology such as hormone signaling or resistance to pathogens or herbivores. Here, we describe the expression, purification, enzymatic characterization and 2D analysis by electron microscopy of NpABCG5/NpPDR5 from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, which has been shown to be involved in the plant defense against herbivores. We constitutively expressed NpABCG5/NpPDR5, provided with a His-tag in a homologous system: suspension cells from Nicotiana tabacum (Bright Yellow 2 line). NpABCG5/NpPDR5 was targeted to the plasma membrane and was solubilized by dodecyl maltoside and purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The ATP-hydrolyzing specific activity (27 nmol min(-1) mg(-1)) was stimulated seven-fold in the presence of 0.1% asolectin. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that NpABCG5/NpPDR5 is monomeric and with dimensions shorter than those of known ABC transporters. Enzymatic data (optimal pH and sensitivity to inhibitors) confirmed that plant and fungal PDR transporters have different properties. These data also show that N. tabacum suspension cells are a convenient host for the purification and biochemical characterization of ABC transporters. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. RNA-seq approach to analysis of gene expression profiles in dark green islands and light green tissues of Cucumber mosaic virus-infected Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijuan; Fei, Chunyan; Zhu, Lin; Xu, Zhenpeng; Zou, Wenshan; Yang, Ting; Lin, Honghui; Xi, Dehui

    2017-01-01

    Dark green islands (DGIs) surrounded by light green tissues (LGTs) are common leaf symptoms of plants that are systemically infected by various viruses that induce leaf mosaic in infected plants. The inoculation of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in Nicotiana tabacum produced a commonly occurring sequence of classic patterns of DGIs and LGTs. Previous studies confirmed that there are significant differences between DGIs and LGTs in terms of physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology, but the mechanisms by which DGIs form remain unclear. To investigate the global gene expression changes that occur in these special tissues, individual differential gene expression tag libraries were constructed from three total RNA samples isolated from DGIs, LGTs and control plants (CK) and were sequenced using an Illumina HiSeqTM 2000. An analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis were performed. These analyses revealed the differences between DGIs, LGTs and CK. GO enrichment and KEGG pathway analyses suggested that several pathways related to photosynthesis and chlorophyll metabolism were enriched in DGIs compared to LGTs and CK. Several pathways related to apoptosis were significantly up-regulated in LGTs compared to DGIs. Additionally, we identified sets of DEGs that may be related to the formation or development of DGIs and LGTs. Our systematic analyses provide comprehensive transcriptomic information regarding DGIs and LGTs in CMV-infected N. tabacum. These data will help characterize the detailed mechanisms of DGI and LGT formation.

  7. Two aspartate residues at the putative p10 subunit of a type II metacaspase from Nicotiana tabacum L. may contribute to the substrate-binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Maspons, Alexis; Sepúlveda-García, Edgar; Sánchez-Baldoquín, Laura; Marrero-Gutiérrez, Junier; Pons, Tirso; Rocha-Sosa, Mario; González, Lien

    2014-01-01

    Metacaspases are cysteine proteases present in plants, fungi, prokaryotes, and early branching eukaryotes, although a detailed description of their cellular function remains unclear. Currently, three-dimensional (3D) structures are only available for two metacaspases: Trypanosoma brucei (MCA2) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Yca1). Furthermore, metacaspases diverged from animal caspases of known structure, which limits straightforward homology-based interpretation of functional data. We report for the first time the identification and initial characterization of a metacaspase of Nicotiana tabacum L., NtMC1. By combining domain search, multiple sequence alignment (MSA), and protein fold-recognition studies, we provide compelling evidences that NtMC1 is a plant metacaspase type II, and predict its 3D structure using the crystal structure of two type I metacaspases (MCA2 and Yca1) and Gsu0716 protein from Geobacter sulfurreducens as template. Analysis of the predicted 3D structure allows us to propose Asp353, at the putative p10 subunit, as a new member of the aspartic acid triad that coordinates the P1 arginine/lysine residue of the substrate. Nevertheless, site-directed mutagenesis and expression analysis in bacteria and Nicotiana benthamiana indicate the functionality of both Asp348 and Asp353. Through the co-expression of mutant and wild-type proteins by transient expression in N. benthamiana leaves we found that polypeptide processing seems to be intramolecular. Our results provide the first evidence in plant metacaspases concerning the functionality of the putative p10 subunit.

  8. Knockdown of NtMed8, a Med8-like gene, causes abnormal development of vegetative and floral organs in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengqing; Wei, He; Tong, Zhijun; Zhang, Xiaobo; Yang, Zemao; Lan, Tao; Duan, Yuanlin; Wu, Weiren

    2011-11-01

    Med8, a subunit of mediator complex, has proved to possess crucial functions in many organisms from yeast to human. In plant, the med8 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana displayed delayed anthesis and increased number of leaves during the vegetative period. However, the roles of Med8 in other flowering plants are still unknown. To investigate the function of Med8 ortholog in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.; named as NtMed8), we created transgenic tobacco plants with repressed NtMed8 expression mediated by RNA interference (RNAi). Compared with the wild type, the NtMed8-RNAi plants exhibited: more leaves with smaller but thicker blades; larger cells and vascular bundles with lower stomata density in leaves; swelled chloroplasts with thicker and lumen-enlarged thylakoids; weaker root system with fewer lateral roots; larger flowers and floral organs; flowering earlier under long day, but later under short day conditions; and male sterile with larger but less germinable pollens. In addition, quantitative RT-PCR indicated that NtMed8 is expressed in both vegetative and floral tissues. Subcellular localization analysis by transient expression of fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that NtMed8 was located in both plasma membrane and nucleus. These results suggest that NtMed8 plays important roles in both vegetative and reproductive development, and the function of Med8 appears to be, at least partially, conserved in flowering plants.

  9. The plastid chromosome of Atropa belladonna and its comparison with that of Nicotiana tabacum: the role of RNA editing in generating divergence in the process of plant speciation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Regel, Ralph; Du, Tung Gia; Hupfer, Holger; Herrmann, Reinhold G; Maier, Rainer M

    2002-09-01

    The nuclear and plastid genomes of the plant cell form a coevolving unit which in interspecific combinations can lead to genetic incompatibility of compartments even between closely related taxa. This phenomenon has been observed for instance in Atropa-Nicotiana cybrids. We have sequenced the plastid chromosome of Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade), a circular DNA molecule of 156,688 bp, and compared it with the corresponding published sequence of its relative Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) to understand how divergence at the level of this genome can contribute to nuclear-plastid incompatibilities and to speciation. It appears that (1) regulatory elements, i.e., promoters as well as translational and replicational signal elements, are well conserved between the two species; (2) genes--including introns--are even more highly conserved, with differences residing predominantly in regions of low functional importance; and (3) RNA editotypes differ between the two species, which makes this process an intriguing candidate for causing rapid reproductive isolation of populations.

  10. Growth modulation effects of CBM2a under the control of AtEXP4 and CaMV35S promoters in Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana tabacum and Eucalyptus camaldulensis.

    PubMed

    Keadtidumrongkul, Pornthep; Suttangkakul, Anongpat; Pinmanee, Phitsanu; Pattana, Kanokwan; Kittiwongwattana, Chokchai; Apisitwanich, Somsak; Vuttipongchaikij, Supachai

    2017-08-01

    The expression of cell-wall-targeted Carbohydrate Binding Modules (CBMs) can alter cell wall properties and modulate growth and development in plants such as tobacco and potato. CBM2a identified in xylanase 10A from Cellulomonas fimi is of particular interest for its ability to bind crystalline cellulose. However, its potential for promoting plant growth has not been explored. In this work, we tested the ability of CBM2a to promote growth when expressed using both CaMV35S and a vascular tissue-specific promoter derived from Arabidopsis expansin4 (AtEXP4) in three plant species: Arabidopsis, Nicotiana tabacum and Eucalyptus camaldulensis. In Arabidopsis, the expression of AtEXP4pro:CBM2a showed trends for growth promoting effects including the increase of root and hypocotyl lengths and the enlargements of the vascular xylem area, fiber cells and vessel cells. However, in N. tabacum, the expression of CBM2a under the control of either CaMV35S or AtEXP4 promoter resulted in subtle changes in the plant growth, and the thickness of secondary xylem and vessel and fiber cell sizes were generally reduced in the transgenic lines with AtEXP4pro:CBM2a. In Eucalyptus, while transgenics expressing CaMV35S:CBM2a showed very subtle changes compared to wild type, those transgenics with AtEXP4pro:CBM2a showed increases in plant height, enlargement of xylem areas and xylem fiber and vessel cells. These data provide comparative effects of expressing CBM2a protein in different plant species, and this finding can be applied for plant biomass improvement.

  11. The use of IAA to overcome interspecific hybrid inviability in reciprocal crosses between Nicotiana tabacum L. and N. repanda Willd.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W M; Yoshida, K; Shintaku, Y; Takeda, G

    1991-10-01

    Flowering hybrid plants were obtained from reciprocal crosses between N. tabacum L. (2n=48) and N. repanda Willd. (2n = 48), in which cross incompatibility and hybrid inviability were manifested. Stylar pollination and ovule culture were used to overcome the cross incompatibility of stylar barriers and ovular death. It was shown that application of 2 mg/l indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) during the growth period, from the fiveto six-leaf stage to the flowering stage, is a useful and easy method to overcome hybrid inviability.

  12. Immunocompetent truncated E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) expressed in Nicotiana tabacum plants: a candidate antigen for new generation of veterinary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Guillermo; Marconi, Patricia; Periolo, Osvaldo; La Torre, José; Alvarez, María Alejandra

    2012-06-22

    The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is the etiological agent responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical diseases in cattle. The glycoprotein E2 is the major envelope protein of this virus and the strongest inductor of the immune response. There are several available commercial vaccines against bovine viral diarrhea (BVD), which show irregular performances. Here, we report the use of tobacco plants as an alternative productive platform for the expression of the truncated version of E2 glycoprotein (tE2) from the BVDV. The tE2 sequence, lacking the transmembrane domain, was cloned into the pK7WG2 Agrobacterium binary vector. The construct also carried the 2S2 Arabidopsis thaliana signal for directing the protein into the plant secretory pathway, the Kozak sequence, an hexa-histidine tag to facilitate protein purification and the KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal. The resulting plasmid (pK-2S2-tE2-His-KDEL) was introduced into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 by electroporation. The transformed A. tumefaciens was then used to express tE2 in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum plants. Western blot and ELISA using specific monoclonal antibodies confirmed the presence of the recombinant tE2 protein in plant extracts. An estimated amount of 20 μg of tE2 per gram of fresh leaves was regularly obtained with this plant system. Injection of guinea pigs with plant extracts containing 20 μg of rtE2 induced the production of BVDV specific antibodies at equal or higher levels than those induced by whole virus vaccines. This is the first report of the production of an immunocompetent tE2 in N. tabacum plants, having the advantage to be free of any eventual animal contaminant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Relationship between leaf antioxidants and ozone injury in Nicotiana tabacum 'Bel-W3' under environmental conditions in São Paulo, SE - Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Marisia P.; Ferreira, Mauricio L.; Sant'Anna, Silvia M. R.; Domingos, Marisa; Souza, Silvia R.

    Previous studies have reported that the extent of leaf injury in Nicotiana tabacum "Bel-W3" exposed to environmental conditions in the city of São Paulo is influenced by weather conditions. This influence may occur by means of antioxidant responses. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate whether daily antioxidant responses to environmental variations interfere on the progression of leaf injury on plants of this cultivar during their exposure in a state park of São Paulo and to determine a linear combination of variables, among antioxidants and environmental factors, which mostly explain this visible response. Plants were exposed at the mentioned site for 14 days in four different experiments. During each experiment, three plants were daily sampled to determine the accumulated percentage of leaf area affected by necrosis and antioxidant responses (concentrations of total ascorbic acid (AA) and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidases (POD)). Ozone concentrations and weather conditions were also daily measured. Pearson correlations and multivariate analyses assessed the relationship between biological and environmental variables. Leaf injury appeared between the 3rd and 6th days of exposure and increased over the exposure periods. The daily concentrations of AA tended to decrease with time of exposure in all experiments, but the activity of SOD and POD oscillated during plant exposure. Positive correlations were observed between AA or SOD and O 3 concentrations, as well as negative correlations between AA and air temperature. The increasing percentage of leaf necrosis across the whole period was explained by decreasing levels of AA 2 days before injury estimation and by higher O 3 concentrations 5 days before ( R2 = 0.36; p < 0.001). The use of N. tabacum Bel-W3 as a bioindicator can be restricted by leaf antioxidant responses to both atmospheric contamination and weather conditions.

  14. Transfer of the cytochrome P450-dependent dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into Nicotiana tabacum chloroplasts for light-driven synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Karcher, Daniel; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Martens, Helle Juel; Ruf, Stephanie; Kroop, Xenia; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawie, Mohammed Saddik; Pribil, Mathias; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bock, Ralph; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Plant chloroplasts are light-driven cell factories that have great potential to act as a chassis for metabolic engineering applications. Using plant chloroplasts, we demonstrate how photosynthetic reducing power can drive a metabolic pathway to synthesise a bio-active natural product. For this purpose, we stably engineered the dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into the chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Dhurrin is a cyanogenic glucoside and its synthesis from the amino acid tyrosine is catalysed by two membrane-bound cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP79A1 and CYP71E1) and a soluble glucosyltransferase (UGT85B1), and is dependent on electron transfer from a P450 oxidoreductase. The entire pathway was introduced into the chloroplast by integrating CYP79A1, CYP71E1, and UGT85B1 into a neutral site of the N. tabacum chloroplast genome. The two P450s and the UGT85B1 were functional when expressed in the chloroplasts and converted endogenous tyrosine into dhurrin using electrons derived directly from the photosynthetic electron transport chain, without the need for the presence of an NADPH-dependent P450 oxidoreductase. The dhurrin produced in the engineered plants amounted to 0.1–0.2% of leaf dry weight compared to 6% in sorghum. The results obtained pave the way for plant P450s involved in the synthesis of economically important compounds to be engineered into the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, and demonstrate that their full catalytic cycle can be driven directly by photosynthesis-derived electrons. PMID:26969746

  15. Transfer of the cytochrome P450-dependent dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into Nicotiana tabacum chloroplasts for light-driven synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Karcher, Daniel; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Martens, Helle Juel; Ruf, Stephanie; Kroop, Xenia; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawie, Mohammed Saddik; Pribil, Mathias; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bock, Ralph; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-04-01

    Plant chloroplasts are light-driven cell factories that have great potential to act as a chassis for metabolic engineering applications. Using plant chloroplasts, we demonstrate how photosynthetic reducing power can drive a metabolic pathway to synthesise a bio-active natural product. For this purpose, we stably engineered the dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into the chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Dhurrin is a cyanogenic glucoside and its synthesis from the amino acid tyrosine is catalysed by two membrane-bound cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP79A1 and CYP71E1) and a soluble glucosyltransferase (UGT85B1), and is dependent on electron transfer from a P450 oxidoreductase. The entire pathway was introduced into the chloroplast by integrating CYP79A1, CYP71E1, and UGT85B1 into a neutral site of the N. tabacum chloroplast genome. The two P450s and the UGT85B1 were functional when expressed in the chloroplasts and converted endogenous tyrosine into dhurrin using electrons derived directly from the photosynthetic electron transport chain, without the need for the presence of an NADPH-dependent P450 oxidoreductase. The dhurrin produced in the engineered plants amounted to 0.1-0.2% of leaf dry weight compared to 6% in sorghum. The results obtained pave the way for plant P450s involved in the synthesis of economically important compounds to be engineered into the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, and demonstrate that their full catalytic cycle can be driven directly by photosynthesis-derived electrons. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Involvement of the Leaf-Specific Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) Transporter Nt-JAT2 in Vacuolar Sequestration of Nicotine in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Shitan, Nobukazu; Minami, Shota; Morita, Masahiko; Hayashida, Minaho; Ito, Shingo; Takanashi, Kojiro; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Goossens, Alain; Moriyasu, Masataka; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-01-01

    Alkaloids play a key role in higher plant defense against pathogens and herbivores. Following its biosynthesis in root tissues, nicotine, the major alkaloid of Nicotiana species, is translocated via xylem transport toward the accumulation sites, leaf vacuoles. Our transcriptome analysis of methyl jasmonate-treated tobacco BY-2 cells identified several multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter genes. In this study, we characterized a MATE gene, Nicotiana tabacum jasmonate-inducible alkaloid transporter 2 (Nt-JAT2), which encodes a protein that has 32% amino acid identity with Nt-JAT1. Nt-JAT2 mRNA is expressed at a very low steady state level in whole plants, but is rapidly upregulated by methyl jasmonate treatment in a leaf-specific manner. To characterize the function of Nt-JAT2, yeast cells were used as the host organism in a cellular transport assay. Nt-JAT2 was localized at the plasma membrane in yeast cells. When incubated in nicotine-containing medium, the nicotine content in Nt-JAT2-expressing cells was significantly lower than in control yeast. Nt-JAT2-expressing cells also showed lower content of other alkaloids like anabasine and anatabine, but not of flavonoids, suggesting that Nt-JAT2 transports various alkaloids including nicotine. Fluorescence assays in BY-2 cells showed that Nt-JAT2-GFP was localized to the tonoplast. These findings indicate that Nt-JAT2 is involved in nicotine sequestration in leaf vacuoles following the translocation of nicotine from root tissues. PMID:25268729

  17. Transient Expression of Lumbrokinase (PI239) in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Using a Geminivirus-Based Single Replicon System Dissolves Fibrin and Blood Clots

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Alexia; Wang, Nan; Breedlove, Drew

    2017-01-01

    Lumbrokinases, a group of fibrinolytic enzymes extracted from earthworm, have been widely used to prevent and treat various cardiovascular diseases. They specifically target fibrin to effectively degrade thrombi without major side effects. Plant expression systems are becoming potential alternative expression platforms for producing pharmaceutical proteins. In this work, a lumbrokinase (PI239) was produced from a plant system. Both wild-type (WT) and plant codon-optimized (OP) PI239 gene sequences were synthesized and cloned into a geminivirus-based single-vector DNA replicon system. Both vectors were independently expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves transiently by agroinfiltration. Overexpressed PI239 resulted in sudden tissue necrosis 3 days after infiltration. Remaining proteins were purified through His-tag affinity chromatography and analyzed with SDS-PAGE and Western blot methods. Purified PI239 successfully degraded artificial fibrin with relative activity of 13,400 U/mg when compared with commercial lumbrokinase product. In vitro tests demonstrated that plant-derived PI239 dissolved human blood clots and that the plant expression system is capable of producing functional PI239. PMID:28932252

  18. Salinity-induced accumulation of endogenous H2S and NO is associated with modulation of the antioxidant and redox defense systems in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Havana.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cristiane Jovelina; Batista Fontes, Elizabeth Pacheco; Modolo, Luzia Valentina

    2017-03-01

    Salinity is one of the abiotic factors that most affect crop growth and production. This study focused on the effect of high salinity on the endogenous levels of the signaling molecules hydrogen sulfite (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) in Nicotiana tabacum leaves and the extent of these for the biochemically-driven plant tolerance to such abiotic stress. The NaCl treatment for 10days led to an expressive augment of H2S and NO levels. This increase was correlated with the raise of l-Cys and l-Arg and the induction of l-cysteine desulfhydrase, cyanoalanine synthase, cysteine synthase, nitrate reductase and arginase, enzymes known to be involved in the biosynthesis of H2S or NO. The enzymatic antioxidant system (superoxide dismutase and catalase activity) was boosted and the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione was intensively oxidized in leaves upon stress allowing plants to cope with oxidative stress. Lower stomatal conductance was observed in stressed plants in comparison with control ones. Moreover, the high activity of antioxidant enzymes and high rate of glutathione oxidation following salt stress were considerably decreased upon NO or H2S scavenging. Thus, increment in NO and H2S levels and their interplay, along with metabolic and physiological changes, contributed to tobacco survival to extreme salinity conditions.

  19. Phenylpropanoid Defences in Nicotiana tabacum Cells: Overlapping Metabolomes Indicate Common Aspects to Priming Responses Induced by Lipopolysaccharides, Chitosan and Flagellin-22.

    PubMed

    Mhlongo, Msizi I; Piater, Lizelle A; Madala, Ntakadzeni E; Steenkamp, Paul A; Dubery, Ian A

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved both constitutive and inducible defence strategies to cope with different biotic stimuli and stresses. Exposure of a plant to a challenging stress can lead to a primed state that allows it to launch a more rapid and stronger defence. Here we applied a metabolomic approach to study and compare the responses induced in Nicotiana tabacum cells by microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules, namely lipopolysaccharides (LPS), chitosan (CHT) and flagellin-22 (FLG22). Early response metabolites, extracted with methanol, were analysed by UHPLC-MS/MS. Using multivariate statistical tools the metabolic profiles induced by these elicitors were analysed. In the metabolic fingerprint of these agents a total of 19 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to quinic acids (chlorogenic acids), shikimic acid, tyramine, polyamines or glucose were found as discriminant biomarkers. In addition, treatment with the phytohormones salicylic acid (SA), methyljasmonic acid (MJ) and abscisic acid (ABA) resulted in differentially-induced phenylpropanoid pathway metabolites. The results indicate that the phenylpropanoid pathway is activated by these elicitors while hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives are commonly associated with the metabolic response to the MAMPs, and that the activated responses are modulated by both SA and MJ, with ABA not playing a role.

  20. Difference of physiological characters in dark green islands and yellow leaf tissue of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected Nicotiana tabacum leaves.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Xi, De-Hui; Yuan, Shu; Xu, Fei; Xu, Mo-Yun; Qi, Hai-Long; Wang, Shao-Dong; Huang, Qing-Rong; Wen, Lin; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Dark green islands (DGIs) are a common symptom of plants systemically infected with the mosaic virus. DGIs are clusters of green leaf cells that are free of virus but surrounded by yellow leaf tissue that is full of virus particles. In Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected Nicotiana tabacum leaves, the respiration and photosynthesis capabilities of DGIs and yellow leaf tissues were measured. The results showed that the cyanide-resistant respiration was enhanced in yellow leaf tissue and the photosynthesis was declined, while in DGIs they were less affected. The activities of the oxygen-scavenging enzymes catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in infected leaves were significantly higher than those in the healthy leaves, and the enzyme activities in DGIs were always lower than in the yellow leaf tissues. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) staining showed that the hydrogen peroxide content in yellow leaf tissues was apparently higher than that in DGIs, while the superoxide content was on the contrary. Formation of DGIs may be a strategy of the host plants resistance to the CMV infection.

  1. Tobacco plants transformed with the bean. alpha. ai gene express an inhibitor of insect. alpha. -amylase in their seeds. [Nicotiana tabacum; Tenebrio molitor

    SciTech Connect

    Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds contain a putative plant defense protein that inhibits insect and mammalian but not plant {alpha}-amylases. We recently presented strong circumstantial evidence that this {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is encoded by an already-identified lectin gene whose product is referred to as lectin-like-protein (LLP). We have now made a chimeric gene consisting of the coding sequence of the lectin gene that encodes LLP and the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences of the lectin gene that encodes phytohemagglutinin-L. When this chimeric gene was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we observed in the seeds a series of polypeptides (M{sub r} 10,000-18,000) that cross-react with antibodies to the bean {alpha}-amylase inhibitor. Most of these polypeptides bind to a pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase affinity column. An extract of the seeds of the transformed tobacco plants inhibits pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase activity as well as the {alpha}-amylase present in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor. We suggest that introduction of this lectin gene (to be called {alpha}ai) into other leguminous plants may be a strategy to protect the seeds from the seed-eating larvae of Coleoptera.

  2. Comparison of Thermobifida fusca Cellulases Expressed in Escherichia coli and Nicotiana tabacum Indicates Advantages of the Plant System for the Expression of Bacterial Cellulases

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Johannes; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The economic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels requires in addition to pretreatment techniques access to large quantities of inexpensive cellulases to be competitive with established first generation processes. A solution to this problem could be achieved by plant based expression of these enzymes. We expressed the complete set of six cellulases and an additional β-glucosidase expressed from Thermobifida fusca in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum). This was done to determine whether functional enzyme expression was feasible in these organisms. In extracts of recombinant E. coli cells, five of the proteins were detected by western blot analysis, but exocellulases E3 and E6 were undetectable. In the plant-based expression system we were able to detect all six cellulases but not the β-glucosidase even though activity was detectable. When E. coli was used as the expression system, endocellulase E2 was active, while endocellulases E1 and E5 showed only residual activity. The remaining cellulases appeared completely inactive against the model substrates azo-carboxymethyl-cellulose (Azo-CMC) and 4-methylumbelliferyl-cellobioside (4-MUC). Only the β-glucosidase showed high activity against 4-MUC. In contrast, all the plant-derived enzymes were active against the respective model substrates. Our data indicate that some enzymes of bacterial origin are more active and more efficiently expressed in plants than in a bacterial host. PMID:26648951

  3. Exclusion of a Proton ATPase from the Apical Membrane Is Associated with Cell Polarity and Tip Growth in Nicotiana tabacum Pollen Tubes[W

    PubMed Central

    Certal, Ana C.; Almeida, Ricardo B.; Carvalho, Lara M.; Wong, Eric; Moreno, Nuno; Michard, Erwan; Carneiro, Jorge; Rodriguéz-Léon, Joaquín; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y.; Feijó, José A.

    2008-01-01

    Polarized growth in pollen tubes results from exocytosis at the tip and is associated with conspicuous polarization of Ca2+, H+, K+, and Cl− -fluxes. Here, we show that cell polarity in Nicotiana tabacum pollen is associated with the exclusion of a novel pollen-specific H+-ATPase, Nt AHA, from the growing apex. Nt AHA colocalizes with extracellular H+ effluxes, which revert to influxes where Nt AHA is absent. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis showed that Nt AHA moves toward the apex of growing pollen tubes, suggesting that the major mechanism of insertion is not through apical exocytosis. Nt AHA mRNA is also excluded from the tip, suggesting a mechanism of polarization acting at the level of translation. Localized applications of the cation ionophore gramicidin A had no effect where Nt AHA was present but acidified the cytosol and induced reorientation of the pollen tube where Nt AHA was absent. Transgenic pollen overexpressing Nt AHA-GFP developed abnormal callose plugs accompanied by abnormal H+ flux profiles. Furthermore, there is no net flux of H+ in defined patches of membrane where callose plugs are to be formed. Taken together, our results suggest that proton dynamics may underlie basic mechanisms of polarity and spatial regulation in growing pollen tubes. PMID:18364468

  4. Effect of Potato Virus Y on the NADP-Malic Enzyme from Nicotiana tabacum L.: mRNA, Expressed Protein and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doubnerová, Veronika; Müller, Karel; Čeřovská, Noemi; Synková, Helena; Spoustová, Petra; Ryšlavá, Helena

    2009-01-01

    The effect of biotic stress induced by viral infection (Potato virus Y, strain NTN and O) on NADP-malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Petit Havana, SR1) was tested at the transcriptional, translational and activity level. The increase of enzyme activity in infected leaves was correlated with the increased amount of expressed protein and with mRNA of cytosolic NADP-ME isoform. Transcription of the chloroplastic enzyme was not influenced by viral infection. The increase of the enzyme activity was also detected in stems and roots of infected plants. The effect of viral infection induced by Potato virus Y, NTN strain, causing more severe symptoms, was compared with the effect induced by milder strain PVYO. The observed increase in NADP-malic enzyme activity in all parts of the studied plants was higher in the case of PVYNTN strain than in the case of strain PVYO. The relevance of NADP-malic enzyme in plants under stress conditions was discussed. PMID:20111689

  5. [Characteristics of steroid metabolism in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants bearing the CYP11A1 cDNA of cytochrome P450(SCC) from the bovine adrenal cortex].

    PubMed

    Spivak, S G; Berdichevets, I N; Litvinovskaia, R P; Drach, S V; Kartel', N A; Shpakovskiĭ, G V

    2010-01-01

    In the mitochondria of animal steroidogenic tissues, cytochrome P450(SCC), encoded by the CYP11A1 gene, catalyzes the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone - the general precursor of all steroid hormones. In this work, we study the steroid metabolism in transgenic tobacco plants carrying the CYP11A1 cDNA cytochrome P450(SCC)from the bovine adrenal cortex. The transgenic plants under investigation markedly surpass the control wild-type plants by size and are characterized by a shortened period of vegetative growth (by rapid flowering); their leaves contain pregnenolone - the product of a reaction catalyzed by cytochrome P450(SCC). The level of progesterone in transgenic tobacco leaves is higher than in the control plants of the wild type. The seeds of the transgenic plants contain less (24R)-brassinosteroids than the wild-type tobacco plants. The results obtained indicate that the synthesis of an active P450(SCC) cytochrome in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants has a profound effect on steroid metabolism and is responsible for the specific phenotypic features of transgenic plants bearing CYP11A1 cDNA.

  6. Comparison of Thermobifida fusca Cellulases Expressed in Escherichia coli and Nicotiana tabacum Indicates Advantages of the Plant System for the Expression of Bacterial Cellulases.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Johannes; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The economic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels requires in addition to pretreatment techniques access to large quantities of inexpensive cellulases to be competitive with established first generation processes. A solution to this problem could be achieved by plant based expression of these enzymes. We expressed the complete set of six cellulases and an additional β-glucosidase expressed from Thermobifida fusca in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum). This was done to determine whether functional enzyme expression was feasible in these organisms. In extracts of recombinant E. coli cells, five of the proteins were detected by western blot analysis, but exocellulases E3 and E6 were undetectable. In the plant-based expression system we were able to detect all six cellulases but not the β-glucosidase even though activity was detectable. When E. coli was used as the expression system, endocellulase E2 was active, while endocellulases E1 and E5 showed only residual activity. The remaining cellulases appeared completely inactive against the model substrates azo-carboxymethyl-cellulose (Azo-CMC) and 4-methylumbelliferyl-cellobioside (4-MUC). Only the β-glucosidase showed high activity against 4-MUC. In contrast, all the plant-derived enzymes were active against the respective model substrates. Our data indicate that some enzymes of bacterial origin are more active and more efficiently expressed in plants than in a bacterial host.

  7. Identification and characterization of genes involved in hybrid lethality in hybrid tobacco cells (Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum) using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yu; Yamada, Tetsuya; Kuboyama, Tsutomu; Marubashi, Wataru

    2007-09-01

    Hybrid lethality is an important problem for cross-breeding; however, its molecular mechanism is not clear. The purpose of the present study was to identify the genes expressed during hybrid lethality in the hybrid cells (Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum). In order to identify these genes, we employed suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) between RNA isolated from cells expressing lethality (lethal hybrid line; LH line) and cells overcoming lethality fortuitously (a surviving hybrid line; SH line). Four populations of cDNA were created from the time points corresponding to before and during induction, and at and after the point of no return (PNR) during the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that occurs during hybrid lethality. By SSH and following dot-blot macroarray analysis, 99 genes out of 138 isolated clones were identified as hybrid lethality-related (HLR) genes. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis data indicated that ten clones were expressed specifically in LH line cells. The HLR genes in these clones show homology to genes involved in disease resistance, ethylene-induced reactions, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, jasmonic acid-related reactions, calcium signaling and self-incompatibility. These data suggested that at least some parts of the mechanism of hybrid lethality are shared with those of the putative functions of the HLR gene-related pathways.

  8. Overproduced ethylene causes programmed cell death leading to temperature-sensitive lethality in hybrid seedlings from the cross Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Marubashi, Wataru

    2003-09-01

    Reproductive isolation mechanisms (RIMs) often become obstacles in crossbreeding. Hybrid lethality is a subtype of RIM but its physiological mechanism remains poorly elucidated. Interspecific hybrids of Nicotiana suaveolens Lehm. x N. tabacum L. cv. Hicks-2 expressed temperature-sensitive lethality. This lethality was induced by programmed cell death (PCD) that was accompanied by the characteristic changes of animal apoptosis in hybrid seedlings at 28 degrees C but not at 36 degrees C. When hybrid seedlings were cultured at 28 degrees C, DNA fragmentation started in the cotyledon, and nuclear fragmentation subsequently progressed with lethal symptoms spreading throughout the seedlings. At 28 degrees C, ethylene production in hybrid seedlings was detectable at a high level compared with the level in parental seedlings. In contrast, the ethylene production rate in hybrid seedlings cultured at 36 degrees C was equal to that in parental seedlings. Treatment with ethylene biosynthetic inhibitors, amino-oxyacetic acid and amino-ethoxyvinyl glycine, suppressed lethal symptoms and apoptotic changes, and also prolonged survival of hybrid seedlings. Thus, the increase in the ethylene production rate correlated closely with expression of lethal symptoms and apoptotic changes in hybrid seedlings. From these observations, we conclude that overproduced ethylene acts as an essential factor mediating PCD and subsequent lethality in hybrid seedlings. Furthermore, the present study has provided the first evidence that ethylene is involved in the phenomenon of hybrid lethality.

  9. Facile induction of apoptosis into plant cells associated with temperature-sensitive lethality shown on interspecific hybrid from the cross Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Marubashi, W; Niwa, M

    2001-02-01

    Two lines of suspension culture cells were obtained from a hybrid seedling of Nicotiana suaveolens Lehm. x N. tabacum L. cv. Hicks-2 expressing temperature-sensitive lethality. One of them (LH line) was inducible cell death in accordance with the lethality at 28 degrees C but not under high-temperature conditions (36 degrees C). Another one (SH line) lost the lethality and survived at 28 degrees C. The cells of LH line showed apoptotic changes when they were cultured at 28 degrees C. Fragmentation of nuclei was correlated with the lethality in the cells, as confirmed by fluorimetry of the nuclear DNA using laser scanning cytometry. Agarose gel analysis of DNA extracted from the cells expressing the lethality revealed a specific ladder pattern suggesting nucleosomal fragmentation that is one of the biochemical characteristics of apoptosis. From these facts, we confirmed that the process of cell death leading to hybrid lethality in the cells is certainly apoptosis. Hybrid cells were used in the experiments to estimate the point of no return in temperature-sensitive lethality and to examine the influence of cation in DNA fragmentation during apoptosis. The utility of hybrid cells as an experimental system for studies of hybrid lethality and apoptosis in plants was confirmed.

  10. Time course analysis of apoptotic cell death during expression of hybrid lethality in hybrid tobacco cells (Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum).

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yu; Yamada, Tetsuya; Marubashi, Wataru

    2003-04-01

    Hybrid cells from the cross Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum expressed hybrid lethality at 28 degrees C in a thin layer cell culture system. Features characteristic of apoptosis, such as DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation, were detected during expression of hybrid lethality. Actinomycin D (ActD) or cycloheximide (CHX) added to the medium suppressed apoptotic cell death during hybrid lethality. This indicates that hybrid lethality requires de novo transcription and translation, and is thus under genetic control. To estimate the time course of apoptotic cell death during the expression of hybrid lethality, we determined when factors controlling hybrid lethality were expressed by observing the point of no return. When cells were exposed to 28 degrees C for 2 h or less in inhibitor-free medium before addition of ActD or CHX, the percentage of dead cells did not increase. However, when cells were exposed to 28 degrees C for 4 h before the addition of inhibitor, the percentage of dead cells increased. When cells were exposed to 28 degrees C for 3 h before the addition of inhibitor, the percentage of dead cells varied from experiment to experiment. These data indicate that the factors controlling hybrid lethality are expressed 3 h after induction of hybrid lethality. In addition, we found a time difference between the expression of cell death and nuclear fragmentation. This suggests that the factor controlling cell death is different from the one controlling nuclear fragmentation.

  11. Apoptotic cell death induces temperature-sensitive lethality in hybrid seedlings and calli derived from the cross of Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Marubashi, W; Niwa, M

    2000-10-01

    Hybrid lethality expressed in the interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana suaveolens Lehm. x N. tabacum L. cv. Hicks-2 is one of the mechanisms for reproductive isolation and it is temperature-sensitive. Apoptotic changes were detected in the cells of hybrid seedlings and calli expressing lethality at 28 degrees C but not under high-temperature conditions (36 degrees C), when the lethality is suppressed. Condensation of chromatin, fragmentation of nuclei and cytoplasmic reduction are the cytological changes associated with apoptosis leading to hybrid lethality. Fragmentation of nuclei was correlated with the lethal symptoms in both hybrid seedlings and calli, as confirmed by fluorimetry of the nuclear DNA using laser scanning cytometry. Agarose gel analysis of DNA extracted from hybrid seedlings and calli showing lethal symptoms revealed a specific ladder pattern suggesting nucleosomal fragmentation which is one of the biochemical changes of apoptosis. In-situ detection using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end labeling (TUNEL) showed that this process occurred in distinct stages on each organ of hybrid seedlings and centripetally in hybrid calli. From these results, we confirmed that cell death inducing hybrid lethality was indeed apoptosis.

  12. The fission yeast mitotic activator cdc25 and sucrose induce early flowering synergistically in the day-neutral Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun.

    PubMed

    Teichmanová, Martina; Masková, Petra; Vojvodová, Petra; Krekule, Jan; Francis, Dennis; Lipavská, Helena

    2007-01-01

    Here, the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) day-neutral (DN) cv. Samsun transformed with the Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitotic activator gene Spcdc25 was used to study the onset of flowering. Wild type (WT) and cdc25 plants were grown from seeds in vitro until they were 20 cm high. Apical and basal nodes were then subcultured repeatedly and the regenerated plants were used to document time to flowering and the number of leaves formed before flowering. Three sucrose treatments (3, 5 or 7% (weight/volume)) were used and measurements of leaf endogenous soluble carbohydrates were performed. In the 3% treatment, cdc25 plants flowered but WT plants did not. The higher sucrose treatments enabled WT flowering; two-thirds of the plants flowered at 5%, while all plants flowered at 7% sucrose. However, in all treatments, cdc25 plants exhibited significantly earlier flowering and fewer leaves compared with wild type. Remarkably, a typical acropetal flowering gradient in WT plants did not occur in cdc25 plants. In cdc25 leaves, there were significantly higher amounts of endogenous sugars with a higher proportion of sucrose compared with WT. Our data demonstrate that Spcdc25 expression and sucrose act synergistically to induce precocious flowering.

  13. Evaluation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) hairy roots for the production of geraniol, the first committed step in terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway.

    PubMed

    Ritala, Anneli; Dong, Lemeng; Imseng, Nicole; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Vasilev, Nikolay; van der Krol, Sander; Rischer, Heiko; Maaheimo, Hannu; Virkki, Arho; Brändli, Johanna; Schillberg, Stefan; Eibl, Regine; Bouwmeester, Harro; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2014-04-20

    The terpenoid indole alkaloids are one of the major classes of plant-derived natural products and are well known for their many applications in the pharmaceutical, fragrance and cosmetics industries. Hairy root cultures are useful for the production of plant secondary metabolites because of their genetic and biochemical stability and their rapid growth in hormone-free media. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) hairy roots, which do not produce geraniol naturally, were engineered to express a plastid-targeted geraniol synthase gene originally isolated from Valeriana officinalis L. (VoGES). A SPME-GC-MS screening tool was developed for the rapid evaluation of production clones. The GC-MS analysis revealed that the free geraniol content in 20 hairy root clones expressing VoGES was an average of 13.7 μg/g dry weight (DW) and a maximum of 31.3 μg/g DW. More detailed metabolic analysis revealed that geraniol derivatives were present in six major glycoside forms, namely the hexose and/or pentose conjugates of geraniol and hydroxygeraniol, resulting in total geraniol levels of up to 204.3 μg/g DW following deglycosylation. A benchtop-scale process was developed in a 20-L wave-mixed bioreactor eventually yielding hundreds of grams of biomass and milligram quantities of geraniol per cultivation bag.

  14. The Development of DNA Based Methods for the Reliable and Efficient Identification of Nicotiana tabacum in Tobacco and Its Derived Products.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sukumar; Fan, Wei; Li, Rong; Li, Sifan; Ping, Wenli; Li, Shujun; Naumova, Alexandra; Peelen, Tamara; Kok, Esther; Yuan, Zheng; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Reliable methods are needed to detect the presence of tobacco components in tobacco products to effectively control smuggling and classify tariff and excise in tobacco industry to control illegal tobacco trade. In this study, two sensitive and specific DNA based methods, one quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay and the other loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, were developed for the reliable and efficient detection of the presence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in various tobacco samples and commodities. Both assays targeted the same sequence of the uridine 5'-monophosphate synthase (UMPS), and their specificities and sensitivities were determined with various plant materials. Both qPCR and LAMP methods were reliable and accurate in the rapid detection of tobacco components in various practical samples, including customs samples, reconstituted tobacco samples, and locally purchased cigarettes, showing high potential for their application in tobacco identification, particularly in the special cases where the morphology or chemical compositions of tobacco have been disrupted. Therefore, combining both methods would facilitate not only the detection of tobacco smuggling control, but also the detection of tariff classification and of excise.

  15. The Development of DNA Based Methods for the Reliable and Efficient Identification of Nicotiana tabacum in Tobacco and Its Derived Products

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Li, Rong; Li, Sifan; Ping, Wenli; Li, Shujun; Naumova, Alexandra; Peelen, Tamara; Yuan, Zheng; Zhang, Dabing

    2016-01-01

    Reliable methods are needed to detect the presence of tobacco components in tobacco products to effectively control smuggling and classify tariff and excise in tobacco industry to control illegal tobacco trade. In this study, two sensitive and specific DNA based methods, one quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay and the other loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, were developed for the reliable and efficient detection of the presence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in various tobacco samples and commodities. Both assays targeted the same sequence of the uridine 5′-monophosphate synthase (UMPS), and their specificities and sensitivities were determined with various plant materials. Both qPCR and LAMP methods were reliable and accurate in the rapid detection of tobacco components in various practical samples, including customs samples, reconstituted tobacco samples, and locally purchased cigarettes, showing high potential for their application in tobacco identification, particularly in the special cases where the morphology or chemical compositions of tobacco have been disrupted. Therefore, combining both methods would facilitate not only the detection of tobacco smuggling control, but also the detection of tariff classification and of excise. PMID:27635142

  16. Evidence for effects on the in vivo activity of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase during development of Mn toxicity in tobacco. [Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY14

    SciTech Connect

    Houtz, R.L.; Nable, R.O.; Cheniae, G.M. )

    1988-04-01

    The progressive decrease in net photosynthesis accompanying development of Mn toxicity in young leaves of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY 14) is a result of effects on in vivo activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco, EC 4.1.1.39). This conclusion is supported by: (a) decrease in rates of CO{sub 2} depletion during measurements of CO{sub 2} compensation, (b) increase in leaf RuBP concentrations, (c) progressive decreases in rate-constants of RuBP loss (light to dark transition analyses) with progressive increases of leaf Mn concentrations, and (d) restoration of diminished rates of net photosynthesis to control rates by elevated CO{sub 2} (5%). Moreover, elevated CO{sub 2} (1100 microliters per liter) during culture of Mn-treated plants decreased elevated RuBP concentrations to control levels and alleviated foliar symptoms of Mn toxicity. These effects of Mn toxicity on in vivo activity of rubisco were not expressed by in vitro kinetic analyses of rubisco prepared under conditions to sequester Mn or to adsorb polyphenols or their oxidation products. Similarly, the in vitro activity of fructose bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) was unaffected by Mn toxicity.

  17. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in response to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Xie, He; Yang, Da-Hai; Yao, Heng; Bai, Ge; Zhang, Yi-Han; Xiao, Bing-Guang

    2016-01-15

    Drought is one of the most severe forms of abiotic stresses that threaten the survival of plants, including crops. In turn, plants dramatically change their physiology to increase drought tolerance, including reconfiguration of proteomes. Here, we studied drought-induced proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), a solanaceous plant, using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based protein labeling technology. Of identified 5570 proteins totally, drought treatment increased and decreased abundance of 260 and 206 proteins, respectively, compared with control condition. Most of these differentially regulated proteins are involved in photosynthesis, metabolism, and stress and defense. Although abscisic acid (ABA) levels greatly increased in drought-treated tobacco leaves, abundance of detected ABA biosynthetic enzymes showed no obvious changes. In contrast, heat shock proteins (HSPs), thioredoxins, ascorbate-, glutathione-, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-related proteins were up- or down-regulated in drought-treated tobacco leaves, suggesting that chaperones and redox signaling are important for tobacco tolerance to drought, and it is likely that redox-induced posttranslational modifications play an important role in modulating protein activity. This study not only provides a comprehensive dataset on overall protein changes in drought-treated tobacco leaves, but also shed light on the mechanism by which solanaceous plants adapt to drought stress. Copyright © 2015 Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Agricultural Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Relationship between ozone, meteorological conditions, gas exchange and leaf injury in Nicotiana tabacum Bel-W3 in a sub-tropical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Daiane T.; Meirelles, Sérgio T.; Moraes, Regina M.

    2012-12-01

    The city of São Paulo is located in a subtropical region whose climate exhibits few defined seasons as well as frequent oscillations in temperature and rainfall throughout the year. In addition to interfering with physiological processes, these peculiar climatic dynamics influence the formation of O3 and its influx into leaves, causing species used as bioindicators in temperate climates to be ineffective here. This study evaluated gas exchange variations in CO2 and H2O and leaf injuries induced by O3 in Nicotiana tabacum Bel-W3 in relation to oscillations in environmental conditions. Plants were exposed to an O3-polluted environment for fifteen periods of fourteen days each throughout 2008. Gas exchange and O3 were higher during the summer and winter but were highly variable in all seasons. Severe injuries occurred during the winter and spring, with significant variation in this parameter being observed throughout the year. An analysis of biotic and abiotic variables revealed complex relationships among them, with great importance of meteorological factors in plant responses. We conclude that under unstable climatic conditions, the relationship between O3 flux and injury is weak, and the qualitative character of biomonitoring is further confirmed.

  19. Identification of low potassium stress-responsive proteins in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seedling roots using an iTRAQ-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Ren, X L; Li, L Q; Xu, L; Guo, Y S; Lu, L M

    2016-08-29

    Potassium is one of the three main mineral nutrients, and is vital for leaf growth and the quality of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. In recent years, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) method has been one of the most popular techniques for quantitative proteomic analysis. In this study, we used iTRAQ to compare protein abundances in the roots of control and low potassium-treated tobacco seedlings, and found that 108 proteins were differentially expressed between the two treatments. Of these, 34 were upregulated and 74 were downregulated, and 39 (36%) were in the chloroplasts. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment results suggested that metabolic pathways were the dominant pathways (10 upregulated and 14 downregulated proteins). Ten proteins involved in the pyruvate metabolism pathway increased their expression levels, and 17 upregulated proteins were enriched in the ribosomes category. To evaluate correlations between protein and gene transcript abundances, the expression patterns of 12 randomly chosen genes were examined. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the 12 genes were induced after low potassium treatment for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Our results demonstrate that low potassium levels affect protein profiles in tobacco roots.

  20. Long-chain bases and their phosphorylated derivatives differentially regulate cryptogein-induced production of reactive oxygen species in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Coursol, Sylvie; Fromentin, Jérôme; Noirot, Elodie; Brière, Christian; Robert, Franck; Morel, Johanne; Liang, Yun-Kuan; Lherminier, Jeannine; Simon-Plas, Françoise

    2015-02-01

    The proteinaceous elicitor cryptogein triggers defence reactions in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) through a signalling cascade, including the early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the plasma membrane (PM)-located tobacco respiratory burst oxidase homologue D (NtRbohD). Sphingolipid long-chain bases (LCBs) are emerging as potent positive regulators of plant defence-related mechanisms. This led us to question whether both LCBs and their phosphorylated derivatives (LCB-Ps) are involved in the early signalling process triggered by cryptogein in tobacco BY-2 cells. Here, we showed that cryptogein-induced ROS production was inhibited by LCB kinase (LCBK) inhibitors. Additionally, Arabidopsis thaliana sphingosine kinase 1 and exogenously supplied LCB-Ps increased cryptogein-induced ROS production, whereas exogenously supplied LCBs had a strong opposite effect, which was not driven by a reduction in cellular viability. Immunogold-electron microscopy assay also revealed that LCB-Ps are present in the PM, which fits well with the presence of a high LCBK activity associated with this fraction. Our data demonstrate that LCBs and LCB-Ps differentially regulate cryptogein-induced ROS production in tobacco BY-2 cells, and support a model in which a cooperative synergism between LCBK/LCB-Ps and NtRbohD/ROS in the cryptogein signalling pathway is likely at the PM in tobacco BY-2 cells. © 2014 INRA New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. RNA-sequencing Reveals Global Transcriptomic Changes in Nicotiana tabacum Responding to Topping and Treatment of Axillary-shoot Control Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Wu, Yongmei; Ghosh, Jayadri S.; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Fisher, Colin; Wang, Ying; Lawson, Darlene; Yuan, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Removal of terminal buds (topping) and control of the formation of axillary shoots (suckers) are common agronomic practices that significantly impact the yield and quality of various crop plants. Application of chemicals (suckercides) to plants following topping is an effective method for sucker control. However, our current knowledge of the influence of topping, and subsequent suckercide applications, to gene expression is limited. We analyzed the differential gene expression using RNA-sequencing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that are topped, or treated after topping by two different suckercides, the contact-localized-systemic, Flupro® (FP), and contact, Off-Shoot-T®. Among the differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 179 were identified as common to all three conditions. DEGs, largely related to wounding, phytohormone metabolism and secondary metabolite biosynthesis, exhibited significant upregulation following topping, and downregulation after suckercide treatments. DEGs related to photosynthetic processes were repressed following topping and suckercide treatments. Moreover, topping and FP-treatment affect the expression of auxin and cytokinin signaling pathway genes that are possibly involved in axillary shoot formation. Our results provide insights into the global change of plant gene expression in response to topping and suckercide treatments. The regulatory elements of topping-inducible genes are potentially useful for the development of a chemical-free sucker control system. PMID:26670135

  2. Phenylpropanoid Defences in Nicotiana tabacum Cells: Overlapping Metabolomes Indicate Common Aspects to Priming Responses Induced by Lipopolysaccharides, Chitosan and Flagellin-22

    PubMed Central

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved both constitutive and inducible defence strategies to cope with different biotic stimuli and stresses. Exposure of a plant to a challenging stress can lead to a primed state that allows it to launch a more rapid and stronger defence. Here we applied a metabolomic approach to study and compare the responses induced in Nicotiana tabacum cells by microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules, namely lipopolysaccharides (LPS), chitosan (CHT) and flagellin-22 (FLG22). Early response metabolites, extracted with methanol, were analysed by UHPLC-MS/MS. Using multivariate statistical tools the metabolic profiles induced by these elicitors were analysed. In the metabolic fingerprint of these agents a total of 19 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to quinic acids (chlorogenic acids), shikimic acid, tyramine, polyamines or glucose were found as discriminant biomarkers. In addition, treatment with the phytohormones salicylic acid (SA), methyljasmonic acid (MJ) and abscisic acid (ABA) resulted in differentially-induced phenylpropanoid pathway metabolites. The results indicate that the phenylpropanoid pathway is activated by these elicitors while hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives are commonly associated with the metabolic response to the MAMPs, and that the activated responses are modulated by both SA and MJ, with ABA not playing a role. PMID:26978774

  3. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Results Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions) and the overall defence response. A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI). The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2) reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. Conclusion The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular of phenolics, alkaloids

  4. RNAi based simultaneous silencing of all forms of light-dependent NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase genes result in the accumulation of protochlorophyllide in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Talaat, Neveen B

    2013-10-01

    Conversion of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) into chlorophyllide (Chlide), a key step in chlorophyll biosynthesis, is mediated by a light-dependent NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR). POR exists in multiple isoforms that share high degree of homology. RNAi-mediated gene silencing approach was used to suppress the expression of POR genes in order to study its role in the Chls biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The transgenic plants were devoid of chlorophyll pigments and resembled albino plants. Northern blot analysis confirmed the degradation of POR transcripts into 21-23 bp fragments. Pigment analysis showed the accumulation of various intermediate compounds of Chl biosynthesis pathway including Pchlide. However, no trace of chlorophyll was observed. As compared to wild type, POR-silenced plants accumulated larger (60%) amounts of Pchlide from its endogenous substrate. When leaf discs of WT and POR-silenced plants were treated with exogenous ALA both WT and POR-silenced plants accumulated large amounts of tetrapyrrolic intermediates demonstrating that Pchlide biosynthesis potential was not suppressed in POR-silenced plants. Upon illumination, WT plants photo-transformed large amounts of Pchlide to Chlide. However, POR-silenced plants almost completely failed to do so. Results demonstrate that the antisense approaches to drop expression of individual POR isoforms have provided valuable insights into the role of distinct PORs during greening. Moreover, data illustrate that the POR is the only enzyme that can convert the Pchlide to Chlide and there is no alternate enzyme that can substitute the POR in higher plants. Thus, this investigation describes ideal mechanism for the silencing of POR isozymes in tobacco.

  5. The Role of Sink Strength and Nitrogen Availability in the Down-Regulation of Photosynthetic Capacity in Field-Grown Nicotiana tabacum L. at Elevated CO2 Concentration.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Vera, Ursula M; De Souza, Amanda P; Long, Stephen P; Ort, Donald R

    2017-01-01

    Down-regulation of photosynthesis is among the most common responses observed in C3 plants grown under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Down-regulation is often attributed to an insufficient capacity of sink organs to use or store the increased carbohydrate production that results from the stimulation of photosynthesis by elevated [CO2]. Down-regulation can be accentuated by inadequate nitrogen (N) supply, which may limit sink development. While there is strong evidence for down-regulation of photosynthesis at elevated [CO2] in enclosure studies most often involving potted plants, there is little evidence for this when [CO2] is elevated fully under open-air field treatment conditions. To assess the importance of sink strength on the down-regulation of photosynthesis and on the potential of N to mitigate this down-regulation under agriculturally relevant field conditions, two tobacco cultivars (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana; cv. Mammoth) of strongly contrasting ability to produce the major sink of this crop, leaves, were grown under ambient and elevated [CO2] and with two different N additions in a free air [CO2] (FACE) facility. Photosynthetic down-regulation at elevated [CO2] reached only 9% in cv. Mammoth late in the season likely reflecting sustained sink strength of the rapidly growing plant whereas down-regulation in cv. Petit Havana reached 25%. Increased N supply partially mitigated down-regulation of photosynthesis in cv. Petit Havana and this mitigation was dependent on plant developmental stage. Overall, these field results were consistent with the hypothesis that sustained sink strength, that is the ability to utilize photosynthate, and adequate N supply will allow C3 crops in the field to maintain enhanced photosynthesis and therefore productivity as [CO2] continues to rise.

  6. PET imaging of thin objects: measuring the effects of positron range and partial-volume averaging in the leag of Nicotiana Tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Alexoff, D.L.; Alexoff, D.L.; Dewey, S.L.; Vaska, P.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ferrieri, R.; Schueller, M.; Schlyer, D.; Fowler, J.S.

    2011-03-01

    PET imaging in plants is receiving increased interest as a new strategy to measure plant responses to environmental stimuli and as a tool for phenotyping genetically engineered plants. PET imaging in plants, however, poses new challenges. In particular, the leaves of most plants are so thin that a large fraction of positrons emitted from PET isotopes ({sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N) escape while even state-of-the-art PET cameras have significant partial-volume errors for such thin objects. Although these limitations are acknowledged by researchers, little data have been published on them. Here we measured the magnitude and distribution of escaping positrons from the leaf of Nicotiana tabacum for the radionuclides {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N using a commercial small-animal PET scanner. Imaging results were compared to radionuclide concentrations measured from dissection and counting and to a Monte Carlo simulation using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Simulated and experimentally determined escape fractions were consistent. The fractions of positrons (mean {+-} S.D.) escaping the leaf parenchyma were measured to be 59 {+-} 1.1%, 64 {+-} 4.4% and 67 {+-} 1.9% for {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N, respectively. Escape fractions were lower in thicker leaf areas like the midrib. Partial-volume averaging underestimated activity concentrations in the leaf blade by a factor of 10 to 15. The foregoing effects combine to yield PET images whose contrast does not reflect the actual activity concentrations. These errors can be largely corrected by integrating activity along the PET axis perpendicular to the leaf surface, including detection of escaped positrons, and calculating concentration using a measured leaf thickness.

  7. Chloroplast-targeted bacterial RecA proteins confer tolerance to chloroplast DNA damage by methyl viologen or UV-C radiation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyesung; Jin, Yong-Mei; Choi, Mi Hwa; Lee, Hyeyun; Kim, Minkyun

    2013-02-01

    The nature and importance of the DNA repair system in the chloroplasts of higher plants under oxidative stress or UV radiation-induced genotoxicity was investigated via gain-of-functional approaches exploiting bacterial RecAs. For this purpose, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants and cell suspensions overexpressing Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa RecA fused to a chloroplast-targeting transit peptide were first produced. The transgenic tobacco plants maintained higher amounts of chloroplast DNA compared with wild-type (WT) upon treatments with methyl viologen (MV), a herbicide that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chloroplasts. Consistent with these results, the transgenic tobacco leaves showed less bleaching than WT following MV exposure. Similarly, the MV-treated transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the chloroplast RecA homologue RECA1 showed weak bleaching, while the recA1 mutant showed opposite results upon MV treatment. In addition, when exposed to UV-C radiation, the dark-grown E. coli RecA-overexpressing transgenic tobacco cell suspensions, but not their WT counterparts, resumed growth and greening after the recovery period under light conditions. Measurements of UV radiation-induced chloroplast DNA damage using DraI assays (Harlow et al. 1994) with the chloroplast rbcL DNA probe and quantitative PCR analyses showed that the transgenic cell suspensions better repaired their UV-C radiation-induced chloroplast DNA lesions compared with WT. Taken all together, it was concluded that RecA-overexpressing transgenic plants are endowed with an increased chloroplast DNA maintenance capacity and enhanced repair activities, and consequently have a higher survival tolerance to genotoxic stresses. These observations are made possible by the functional compatibility of the bacterial RecAs in chloroplasts. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  8. Pneumatic hydrodynamics influence transplastomic protein yields and biological responses during in vitro shoot regeneration of Nicotiana tabacum callus: Implications for bioprocess routes to plant-made biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Sherwin S; Michoux, Franck; Hellgardt, Klaus; Nixon, Peter J

    2017-01-15

    Transplastomic plants are capable of high-yield production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins. Plant tissue culture combines advantages of agricultural cultivation with the bioprocess consistency associated with suspension culture. Overexpression of recombinant proteins through regeneration of transplastomic Nicotiana tabacum shoots from callus tissue in RITA(®) temporary immersion bioreactors has been previously demonstrated. In this study we investigated the hydrodynamics of periodic pneumatic suspension of liquid medium during temporary immersion culture (4 min aeration every 8 h), and the impact on biological responses and transplastomic expression of fragment C of tetanus toxin (TetC). Biomass was grown under a range of aeration rates for 3, 20 and 40-day durations. Growth, mitochondrial activity (a viability indicator) and TetC protein yields were correlated against the hydrodynamic parameters, shear rate and energy dissipation rate (per kg of medium). A critical aeration rate of 440 ml min(-1) was identified, corresponding to a shear rate of 96.7 s(-1), pneumatic power input of 8.8 mW kg(-1) and initial 20-day pneumatic energy dissipation of 127 J kg(-1), at which significant reductions in biomass accumulation and mitochondrial activity were observed. There was an exponential decline in TetC yields with increasing aeration rates at 40 days, across the entire range of conditions tested. These observations have important implications for the optimisation and scale-up of transplastomic plant tissue culture bioprocesses for biopharmaceutical production.

  9. Regulation of Nicotiana tabacum osmotic stress-activated protein kinase and its cellular partner GAPDH by nitric oxide in response to salinity.

    PubMed

    Wawer, Izabela; Bucholc, Maria; Astier, Jéremy; Anielska-Mazur, Anna; Dahan, Jennifer; Kulik, Anna; Wysłouch-Cieszynska, Aleksandra; Zareba-Kozioł, Monika; Krzywinska, Ewa; Dadlez, Michal; Dobrowolska, Grazyna; Wendehenne, David

    2010-07-01

    Several studies focusing on elucidating the mechanism of NO (nitric oxide) signalling in plant cells have highlighted that its biological effects are partly mediated by protein kinases. The identity of these kinases and details of how NO modulates their activities, however, remain poorly investigated. In the present study, we have attempted to clarify the mechanisms underlying NO action in the regulation of NtOSAK (Nicotiana tabacum osmotic stress-activated protein kinase), a member of the SNF1 (sucrose non-fermenting 1)-related protein kinase 2 family. We found that in tobacco BY-2 (bright-yellow 2) cells exposed to salt stress, NtOSAK is rapidly activated, partly through a NO-dependent process. This activation, as well as the one observed following treatment of BY-2 cells with the NO donor DEA/NO (diethylamine-NONOate), involved the phosphorylation of two residues located in the kinase activation loop, one being identified as Ser158. Our results indicate that NtOSAK does not undergo the direct chemical modifications of its cysteine residues by S-nitrosylation. Using a co-immunoprecipitation-based strategy, we identified several proteins present in immunocomplex with NtOSAK in salt-treated cells including the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). Our results indicate that NtOSAK directly interacts with GAPDH in planta. Furthermore, in response to salt, GAPDH showed a transient increase in its S-nitrosylation level which was correlated with the time course of NtOSAK activation. However, GADPH S-nitrosylation did not influence its interaction with NtOSAK and did not have an impact on the activity of the protein kinase. Taken together, the results support the hypothesis that NtOSAK and GAPDH form a cellular complex and that both proteins are regulated directly or indirectly by NO.

  10. The Role of Sink Strength and Nitrogen Availability in the Down-Regulation of Photosynthetic Capacity in Field-Grown Nicotiana tabacum L. at Elevated CO2 Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Vera, Ursula M.; De Souza, Amanda P.; Long, Stephen P.; Ort, Donald R.

    2017-01-01

    Down-regulation of photosynthesis is among the most common responses observed in C3 plants grown under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Down-regulation is often attributed to an insufficient capacity of sink organs to use or store the increased carbohydrate production that results from the stimulation of photosynthesis by elevated [CO2]. Down-regulation can be accentuated by inadequate nitrogen (N) supply, which may limit sink development. While there is strong evidence for down-regulation of photosynthesis at elevated [CO2] in enclosure studies most often involving potted plants, there is little evidence for this when [CO2] is elevated fully under open-air field treatment conditions. To assess the importance of sink strength on the down-regulation of photosynthesis and on the potential of N to mitigate this down-regulation under agriculturally relevant field conditions, two tobacco cultivars (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana; cv. Mammoth) of strongly contrasting ability to produce the major sink of this crop, leaves, were grown under ambient and elevated [CO2] and with two different N additions in a free air [CO2] (FACE) facility. Photosynthetic down-regulation at elevated [CO2] reached only 9% in cv. Mammoth late in the season likely reflecting sustained sink strength of the rapidly growing plant whereas down-regulation in cv. Petit Havana reached 25%. Increased N supply partially mitigated down-regulation of photosynthesis in cv. Petit Havana and this mitigation was dependent on plant developmental stage. Overall, these field results were consistent with the hypothesis that sustained sink strength, that is the ability to utilize photosynthate, and adequate N supply will allow C3 crops in the field to maintain enhanced photosynthesis and therefore productivity as [CO2] continues to rise. PMID:28649261

  11. Auxin polar transport is essential for the development of zygote and embryo in Nicotiana tabacum L. and correlated with ABP1 and PM H+-ATPase activities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dan; Ren, Yujun; Deng, Yingtian; Zhao, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Auxin is an important plant growth regulator, and plays a key role in apical–basal axis formation and embryo differentiation, but the mechanism remains unclear. The level of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) during zygote and embryo development of Nicotiana tabacum L. is investigated here using the techniques of GC-SIM-MS analysis, immunolocalization, and the GUS activity assay of DR5::GUS transgenic plants. The distribution of ABP1 and PM H+-ATPase was also detected by immunolocalization, and this is the first time that integral information has been obtained about their distribution in the zygote and in embryo development. The results showed an increase in IAA content in ovules and the polar distribution of IAA, ABP1, and PM H+-ATPase in the zygote and embryo, specifically in the top and basal parts of the embryo proper (EP) during proembryo development. For information about the regulation mechanism of auxin, an auxin transport inhibitor TIBA (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid) and exogenous IAA were, respectively, added to the medium for the culture of ovules at the zygote and early proembryo stages. Treatment with a suitable IAA concentration promoted zygote division and embryo differentiation, while TIBA treatment obviously suppressed these processes and caused the formation of abnormal embryos. The distribution patterns of IAA, ABP1, and PM H+-ATPase were also disturbed in the abnormal embryos. These results indicate that the polar distribution and transport of IAA begins at the zygote stage, and affects zygote division and embryo differentiation in tobacco. Moreover, ABP1 and PM H+-ATPase may play roles in zygote and embryo development and may also be involved in IAA signalling transduction. PMID:20348352

  12. In vivo reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum L. transformed with plastin-GFP. Correlation with light-activated chloroplast responses

    PubMed Central

    Anielska-Mazur, Anna; Bernaś, Tytus; Gabryś, Halina

    2009-01-01

    Background The actin cytoskeleton is involved in the responses of plants to environmental signals. Actin bundles play the role of tracks in chloroplast movements activated by light. Chloroplasts redistribute in response to blue light in the mesophyll cells of Nicotiana tabacum. The aim of this work was to study the relationship between chloroplast responses and the organization of actin cytoskeleton in living tobacco cells. Chloroplast movements were measured photometrically as changes in light transmission through the leaves. The actin cytoskeleton, labeled with plastin-GFP, was visualised by confocal microscopy. Results The actin cytoskeleton was affected by strong blue and red light. No blue light specific actin reorganization was detected. EGTA and trifluoperazine strongly inhibited chloroplast responses and disrupted the integrity of the cytoskeleton. This disruption was reversible by Ca2+ or Mg2+. Additionally, the effect of trifluoperazine was reversible by light. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide kinases, potently inhibited chloroplast responses but did not influence the actin cytoskeleton at the same concentration. Also this inhibition was reversed by Ca2+ and Mg2+. Magnesium ions were equally or more effective than Ca2+ in restoring chloroplast motility after treatment with EGTA, trifluoperazine or wortmannin. Conclusion The architecture of the actin cytoskeleton in the mesophyll of tobacco is significantly modulated by strong light. This modulation does not affect the direction of chloroplast redistribution in the cell. Calcium ions have multiple functions in the mechanism of the movements. Our results suggest also that Mg2+ is a regulatory molecule cooperating with Ca2+ in the signaling pathway of blue light-induced tobacco chloroplast movements. PMID:19480655

  13. Different blue-light requirement for the accumulation of transcripts from nuclear genes for thylakoid proteins in Nicotiana tabacum and Lycopersicon esculentum.

    PubMed

    Palomares, R; Herrmann, R G; Oelmüller, R

    1991-11-01

    We have isolated recombinant lambda gt11 phages which carry cDNA clones for the major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins of photosystem I (LHCPI) and II (LHCPII), subunit II of photosystem I, a chlorophyll a/b-binding protein of photosystem II (CP24), the Rieske iron-sulphur protein of the cytochrome b6/f complex, and the 33, 23 and 16 kDa proteins of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II from Nicotiana tabacum. The nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones encoding the precursors for LHCPI and the FeS protein are presented. If tobacco or tomato seedlings, or seedlings of a phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato which lacks more than 95% of the phytochrome of the isogenic wild type, are kept in blue light, the transcript level of each of these genes is higher than in seedlings grown in red light suggesting the involvement of a blue-UVA-light photoreceptor. In the case of LHCPI, a 1 min blue-light pulse applied to red-light-grown seedlings is sufficient to increase the transcript levels to those present in blue-light-grown seedlings, whereas almost no increase is observed for transcripts encoding the FeS and 33 kDa proteins. If dark-grown tomato seedlings receive a single far-red-light pulse, significant stimulation is detected for LHCPI transcripts, whereas transcripts encoding the FeS and 33 kDa proteins are not stimulated. It is concluded that the lower light requirement for the increase in the LHCPI transcript level is not specific for one of the light-dependent signal transduction chains.

  14. Tolerance to clomazone herbicide is linked to the state of LHC, PQ-pool and ROS detoxification in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Darwish, Majd; Vidal, Véronique; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; Alnaser, Osama; Junglee, Sanders; El Maataoui, Mohamed; Sallanon, Huguette

    2015-03-01

    In this study, plantlets of two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) varieties that are clomazone-tolerant (cv. Xanthi) and clomazone-sensitive (cv. Virginie vk51) were subjected to low concentration of clomazone herbicide. The oxygen-evolving rate of isolated chloroplasts, chlorophyll a fluorescence transients, JIP-test responses, hydrogen peroxide contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, cytohistological results and photosynthetic pigment contents were recorded. The results indicated that the carotenoid content was 2-fold higher in Virginie, which had greater clomazone sensitivity than Xanthi. Virginie exhibited noticeable decreases in the LHC content (Chl a/b ratio), the maximum photochemical quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), the performance index on the absorption basis (PIabs), and the electron flux beyond the first PSII QA evaluated as (1-VJ) with VJ=(FJ-F0)/(Fm-F0) as well as increases in the rate of photon absorption (ABS/RC) and the energy dissipation as heat (DI0/RC). These results suggest that PSII photoinhibition occurred as a consequence of more reduced PQ-pool and accumulated QA(-). The oxygen evolution measurements indicate that PSI electron transport activity was not affected by clomazone. The more significant accumulation of H2O2 in Virginie compared to Xanthi was due to the absence of ROS-scavenging enzymes, and presumably induced programmed cell death (PCD). The symptoms of PCD were observed by cytohistological analysis, which also indicated that the leaf tissues of clomazone-treated Virginie exhibited significant starch accumulation compared to Xanthi. Taken together, these results indicate that the variable tolerance to clomazone observed between Virginie and Xanthi is independent of the carotenoid content and could be related to the state of the LHC, the redox state of the PQ-pool, and the activity of detoxification enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced glutathione metabolism is correlated with sulfur-induced resistance in Tobacco mosaic virus-infected genetically susceptible Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Höller, Kerstin; Király, Lóránt; Künstler, András; Müller, Maria; Gullner, Gábor; Fattinger, Maria; Zechmann, Bernd

    2010-11-01

    Sulfur-induced resistance, also known as sulfur-enhanced defense (SIR/SED) was investigated in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun nn during compatible interaction with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in correlation with glutathione metabolism. To evaluate the influence of sulfur nutritional status on virus infection, tobacco plants were treated with nutrient solutions containing either sufficient sulfate (+S) or no sulfate (-S). Sufficient sulfate supply resulted in a suppressed and delayed symptom development and diminished virus accumulation over a period of 14 days after inoculation as compared with -S conditions. Expression of the defense marker gene PR-1a was markedly upregulated in sulfate-treated plants during the first day after TMV inoculation. The occurrence of SIR/SED correlated with a higher level of activity of sulfate assimilation, cysteine, and glutathione metabolism in plants treated with sulfate. Additionally, two key genes involved in cysteine and glutathione biosynthesis (encoding adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, respectively) were upregulated within the first day after TMV inoculation under +S conditions. Sulfate withdrawal from the soil was accelerated at the beginning of the infection, whereas it declined in the long term, leading to an accumulation of sulfur in the soil of plants grown with sulfate. This observation could be correlated with a decrease in sulfur contents in TMV-infected leaves in the long term. In summary, this is the first study that demonstrates a link between the activation of cysteine and glutathione metabolism and the induction of SIR/SED during a compatible plant-virus interaction in tobacco plants, indicating a general mechanism behind SIR/SED.

  16. A MADS-box gene NtSVP regulates pedicel elongation by directly suppressing a KNAT1-like KNOX gene NtBPL in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zenglin; Liu, Danmei; Song, Gaoyuan; Kong, Xingchen; Geng, Shuaifeng; Yang, Jiayue; Wang, Bingnan; Wu, Liang; Li, Aili; Mao, Long

    2015-10-01

    Optimal inflorescence architecture is important for plant reproductive success by affecting the ultimate number of flowers that set fruits and for plant competitiveness when interacting with biotic or abiotic conditions. The pedicel is one of the key contributors to inflorescence architecture diversity. To date, knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of pedicel development is derived from Arabidopsis. Not much is known regarding other plants. Here, an SVP family MADS-box gene, NtSVP, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that is required for pedicel elongation was identified. It is shown that knockdown of NtSVP by RNA interference (RNAi) caused elongated pedicels, while overexpression resulted in compact inflorescences with much shortened pedicels. Moreover, an Arabidopsis BREVIPEDECELLUS/KNAT1 homologue NtBP-Like (NtBPL) was significantly up-regulated in NtSVP-RNAi plants. Disruption of NtBPL decreased pedicel lengths and shortened cortex cells. Consistent with the presence of a CArG-box at the NtBPL promoter, the direct binding of NtSVP to the NtBPL promoter was demonstrated by yeast one-hybrid assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and dual-luciferase assay, in which NtSVP may act as a repressor of NtBPL. Microarray analysis showed that down-regulation of NtBPL resulted in differential expression of genes associated with a number of hormone biogenesis and signalling genes such as those for auxin and gibberellin. These findings together suggest the function of a MADS-box transcription factor in plant pedicel development, probably via negative regulation of a BP-like class I KNOX gene. The present work thus postulates the conservation and divergence of the molecular regulatory pathways underlying the development of plant inflorescence architecture. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. A MADS-box gene NtSVP regulates pedicel elongation by directly suppressing a KNAT1-like KNOX gene NtBPL in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Di; Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zenglin; Liu, Danmei; Song, Gaoyuan; Kong, Xingchen; Geng, Shuaifeng; Yang, Jiayue; Wang, Bingnan; Wu, Liang; Li, Aili; Mao, Long

    2015-01-01

    Optimal inflorescence architecture is important for plant reproductive success by affecting the ultimate number of flowers that set fruits and for plant competitiveness when interacting with biotic or abiotic conditions. The pedicel is one of the key contributors to inflorescence architecture diversity. To date, knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of pedicel development is derived from Arabidopsis. Not much is known regarding other plants. Here, an SVP family MADS-box gene, NtSVP, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that is required for pedicel elongation was identified. It is shown that knockdown of NtSVP by RNA interference (RNAi) caused elongated pedicels, while overexpression resulted in compact inflorescences with much shortened pedicels. Moreover, an Arabidopsis BREVIPEDECELLUS/KNAT1 homologue NtBP-Like (NtBPL) was significantly up-regulated in NtSVP-RNAi plants. Disruption of NtBPL decreased pedicel lengths and shortened cortex cells. Consistent with the presence of a CArG-box at the NtBPL promoter, the direct binding of NtSVP to the NtBPL promoter was demonstrated by yeast one-hybrid assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and dual-luciferase assay, in which NtSVP may act as a repressor of NtBPL. Microarray analysis showed that down-regulation of NtBPL resulted in differential expression of genes associated with a number of hormone biogenesis and signalling genes such as those for auxin and gibberellin. These findings together suggest the function of a MADS-box transcription factor in plant pedicel development, probably via negative regulation of a BP-like class I KNOX gene. The present work thus postulates the conservation and divergence of the molecular regulatory pathways underlying the development of plant inflorescence architecture. PMID:26175352

  18. Nicotiana tabacum EIL2 directly regulates expression of at least one tobacco gene induced by sulphur starvation.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2010-03-01

    Sulphur deficiency severely affects plant growth and their agricultural productivity leading to diverse changes in development and metabolisms. Molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression under low sulphur conditions remain largely unknown. AtSLIM1, a member of the EIN3-like (EIL) family was reported to be a central transcriptional regulator of the plant sulphur response, however, no direct interaction of this protein with any sulphur-responsive promoters was demonstrated. The focus of this study was on the analysis of a promoter region of UP9C, a tobacco gene strongly induced by sulphur limitation. Cloning and subsequent examination of this promoter resulted in the identification of a 20-nt sequence (UPE-box), also present in the promoters of several Arabidopsis genes, including three out of four homologues of UP9C. The UPE-box, consisting of two parallel tebs sequences (TEIL binding site), proved to be necessary to bind the transcription factors belonging to the EIL family and of a 5-nt conserved sequence at the 3'-end. The yeast one-hybrid analysis resulted in the identification of one transcription factor (NtEIL2) capable of binding to the UPE-box. The interactions of NtEIL2, and its homologue from Arabidopsis, AtSLIM1, with DNA were affected by mutations within the UPE-box. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana have further shown that both factors, NtEIL2 and AtSLIM1, activate the UP9C promoter. Interestingly, activation by NtEIL2, but not by AtSLIM1, was dependent on the sulphur-deficiency of the plants.

  19. Acidic α-galactosidase is the most abundant nectarin in floral nectar of common tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Hong-Guang; Flowers, V. Lynn; Yang, Min; Chen, Ling-Yang; Sun, Hang

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims To date, most floral nectarins (nectar proteins) are reported to function in nectar defence, particularly for insect-pollinated outcrossing species. We compared nectarin composition and abundance in selfing common tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum) with outcrossing ornamental tobacco plants to elucidate the functional difference of nectarins in different reproductive systems. Methods Common tobacco (CT) nectarins were separated by SDS-PAGE and the N terminus of the most abundant nectarin was sequenced via Edman degradation. The full-length nectarin gene was amplified and cloned from genomic DNA and mRNA with hiTail-PCR and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends), and expression patterns were then investigated in different tissues using semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Additionally, high-performance liquid chromatography and enzymatic analyses of nectar sugar composition, and other biochemical traits and functions of the novel nectarin were studied. Key Results The most abundant nectarin in CT nectar is an acidic α-galactosidase, here designated NTα-Gal. This compound has a molecular mass of 40 013 Da and a theoretical pI of 5·33. NTα-Gal has a conserved α-Gal characteristic signature, encodes a mature protein of 364 amino acids and is expressed in different organs. Compared with 27 other melliferous plant species from different families, CT floral nectar demonstrated the highest α-Gal activity, which is inhibited by d-galactose. Raffinose family oligosaccharides were not detected in CT nectar, indicating that NTα-Gal does not function in post-secretory hydrolysis. Moreover, tobacco plant fruits did not develop intact skin with galactose inhibition of NTα-Gal activity in nectar, suggesting that NTα-Gal induces cell-wall surface restructuring during the initial stages of fruit development. Conclusions α-Gal was the most abundant nectarin in selfing CT plants, but was not detected in the nectar of strictly outcrossing sister tobacco

  20. Acidic α-galactosidase is the most abundant nectarin in floral nectar of common tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Zha, Hong-Guang; Flowers, V Lynn; Yang, Min; Chen, Ling-Yang; Sun, Hang

    2012-03-01

    To date, most floral nectarins (nectar proteins) are reported to function in nectar defence, particularly for insect-pollinated outcrossing species. We compared nectarin composition and abundance in selfing common tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum) with outcrossing ornamental tobacco plants to elucidate the functional difference of nectarins in different reproductive systems. Common tobacco (CT) nectarins were separated by SDS-PAGE and the N terminus of the most abundant nectarin was sequenced via Edman degradation. The full-length nectarin gene was amplified and cloned from genomic DNA and mRNA with hiTail-PCR and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends), and expression patterns were then investigated in different tissues using semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Additionally, high-performance liquid chromatography and enzymatic analyses of nectar sugar composition, and other biochemical traits and functions of the novel nectarin were studied. The most abundant nectarin in CT nectar is an acidic α-galactosidase, here designated NTα-Gal. This compound has a molecular mass of 40 013 Da and a theoretical pI of 5·33. NTα-Gal has a conserved α-Gal characteristic signature, encodes a mature protein of 364 amino acids and is expressed in different organs. Compared with 27 other melliferous plant species from different families, CT floral nectar demonstrated the highest α-Gal activity, which is inhibited by d-galactose. Raffinose family oligosaccharides were not detected in CT nectar, indicating that NTα-Gal does not function in post-secretory hydrolysis. Moreover, tobacco plant fruits did not develop intact skin with galactose inhibition of NTα-Gal activity in nectar, suggesting that NTα-Gal induces cell-wall surface restructuring during the initial stages of fruit development. α-Gal was the most abundant nectarin in selfing CT plants, but was not detected in the nectar of strictly outcrossing sister tobacco species. No function was demonstrated in

  1. Expression of a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase gene in mesophyll and vascular cells and functions of the enzyme in ammonium assimilation in Nicotiana tabacum (L.).

    PubMed

    Feraud, Magali; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline; Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Pageau, Karine; Lelandais, Maud; Ziegler, Christine; Leboeuf, Edouard; Jouglet, Tiphaine; Viret, Lauriane; Spampinato, Axelle; Paganelli, Vanina; Hammouda, Mounir Ben; Suzuki, Akira

    2005-11-01

    GLU1 encodes the major ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotype Columbia). With the aim of providing clues on the role of Fd-GOGAT, we analyzed the expression of Fd-GOGAT in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). The 5' flanking element of GLU1 directed the expression of the uidA reporter gene in the palisade and spongy parenchyma of mesophyll, in the phloem cells of vascular tissue and in the roots of tobacco. White light, red light or sucrose induced GUS expression in the dark-grown seedlings in a pattern similar to the GLU1 mRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis. The levels of GLU2 mRNA encoding the second Fd-GOGAT and NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT, EC 1.4.1.14) were not affected by light. Both in the light and in darkness, (15)NH4(+) was incorporated into [5-(15)N]glutamine and [2-(15)N]glutamate by glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) and Fd-GOGAT in leaf disks of transgenic tobacco expressing antisense Fd-GOGAT mRNA and in wild-type tobacco. In the light, low level of Fd-glutamate synthase limited the [2-(15)N]glutamate synthesis in transgenic leaf disks. The efficient dark labeling of [2-(15)N]glutamate in the antisense transgenic tobacco leaves indicates that the remaining Fd-GOGAT (15-20% of the wild-type activity) was not the main limiting factor in the dark ammonium assimilation. The antisense tobacco under high CO2 contained glutamine, glutamate, asparagine and aspartate as the bulk of the nitrogen carriers in leaves (62.5%), roots (69.9%) and phloem exudates (53.2%). The levels of glutamate, asparagine and aspartate in the transgenic phloem exudates were similar to the wild-type levels while the glutamine level increased. The proportion of these amino acids remained unchanged in the roots of the transgenic plants. Expression of GLU1 in mesophyll cells implies that Fd-GOGAT assimilates photorespiratory and primary ammonium. GLU1 expression in vascular cells indicates that Fd-GOGAT provides

  2. The expression of the 14D9 catalytic antibody in suspended cells of Nicotiana tabacum cultures increased by the addition of protein stabilizers and by transference from Erlenmeyer flasks to a 2-L bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Patricia L; Alvarez, María Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The effect of two protein stabilizers (polyvinylpyrrolidone [PVP] and gelatine) on growth and 14D9 yield of Nicotiana tabacum cell suspension cultures (Ab-KDEL and sec-Ab) was analyzed. The addition of PVP at a concentration of 1.0 g L(-1) produced the highest total 14D9 yield (biomass + culture medium) in the Ab-KDEL line (4.82% total soluble protein [TSP]). With the addition of gelatine, the highest total 14D9 yield (2.48% TSP) was attained in the Ab-KDEL line at 5.0 g L(-1) gelatine. When the Ab-KDEL suspended cells were cultured in a 2-L bioreactor, the highest 14D9 yield was 8.1% TSP at a 5% w/v inoculum size, which was the best 14D9 yield so far obtained in the platforms tested (E. coli, N. tabacum leaves and seeds, N. tabacum hairy roots, and cell suspension cultures). © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  3. Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase overexpression modifies antioxidant defense against heat, drought and their combination in Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Lubovská, Zuzana; Dobrá, Jana; Storchová, Helena; Wilhelmová, Naďa; Vanková, Radomíra

    2014-11-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) as well as the antioxidant enzyme system (AES) play important roles in plant stress responses. The expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes (AE) were determined in drought, heat and combination of both stresses, comparing the response of tobacco plants overexpressing the main cytokinin degrading enzyme, cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase, under the control of root-specific WRKY6 promoter (W6:CKX1 plants) or constitutive promoter (35S:CKX1 plants) and the corresponding wild-type (WT). Expression levels as well as activities of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase, catalase 3, and cytosolic superoxide dismutase were low under optimal conditions and increased after heat and combined stress in all genotypes. Unlike catalase 3, two other peroxisomal enzymes, catalase 1 and catalase 2, were transcribed extensively under control conditions. Heat stress, in contrast to drought or combined stress, increased catalase 1 and reduced catalase 2 expression in WT and W6:CKX1 plants. In 35S:CKX1, catalase 1 expression was enhanced by heat or drought, but not under combined stress conditions. Mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression was generally higher in 35S:CKX1 plants than in WT. Genes encoding for chloroplastic AEs, stromatal ascorbate peroxidase, thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase and chloroplastic superoxide dismutase, were strongly transcribed under control conditions. All stresses down-regulated their expression in WT and W6:CKX1, whereas more stress-tolerant 35S:CKX1 plants maintained high expression during drought and heat. The achieved data show that the effect of down-regulation of CK levels on AES may be mediated by altered habit, resulting in improved stress tolerance, which is associated with diminished stress impact on photosynthesis, and changes in source/sink relations.

  4. Interspecific hybridization between Nicotiana repanda Willd. and N. tabacum L. through the pollen irradiation technique and the egg cell irradiation technique.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Y; Yamamoto, K; Nakajima, T

    1988-08-01

    Two techniques were useful in overcoming hybrid inviability between N. repanda and N. tabacum. These techniques combine gamma-ray irradiation to pollen or to egg cells (in ovules) with in vitro culture of fertilized ovules. When in vitro culture of fertilized ovules from in situ hybridization of N. repanda x N. tabacum was combined without gamma-ray irradiation to pollen or to egg cells (in ovules), all of the resulting seedlings developed chlorosis and died. Furthermore, in the case of in situ hybridization of N. repanda x N. tabacum with gamma-ray irradiated N. tabacum pollen, no viable seeds were obtained. By using both techniques, combining gamma-ray irradiation to N. tabacum pollen or to egg cells in (N. repanda ovules) with in vitro culture of fertilized ovules, we were successful in obtaining flowering hybrid plants. Thus, it appears that it may be possible to overcome hybrid inviability to a certain extent using both the pollen irradiation technique and the egg cell irradiation technique, i.e., gamma-ray irradiation to pollen or to egg cells (in ovules) before pollination and in vitro culture of fertilized ovules.

  5. Transgenic expression of Tobacco mosaic virus capsid and movement proteins modulate plant basal defense and biotic stress responses in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Conti, G; Rodriguez, M C; Manacorda, C A; Asurmendi, S

    2012-10-01

    Plant viruses cause metabolic and physiological changes associated with symptomatic disease phenotypes. Symptoms involve direct and indirect effects, which result in disruption of host physiology. We used transgenic tobacco expressing a variant of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein (CP(T42W)) or movement protein (MP), and a hybrid line (MP×CP(T42W)) that coexpresses both proteins, to study the plant response to individual viral proteins. Findings employing microarray analysis of MP×CP(T42W) plants and silenced mp×cp(T42W)* controls revealed that altered transcripts were mostly downregulated, suggesting a persistent shut-off due to MP×CP(T42W) expression. Next, we showed that MP triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, reduction of total ascorbate, and expression of ROS scavenging genes. These effects were enhanced when both proteins were coexpressed. MP and MP×CP(T42W) plants showed increased levels of salicylic acid (SA) and SA-responsive gene expression. Furthermore, these effects were partially reproduced in Nicotiana benthamiana when GMP1 transcript was silenced. CP(T42W) seems to be playing a negative role in the defense response by reducing the expression of PR-1 and RDR-1. MP and MP×CP(T42W) transgenic expression promoted a recovery-like phenotype in TMV RNA infections and enhanced susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The individual effects of viral proteins may reflect the ability of a virus to balance its own virulence.

  6. Photocontrol of the expression of genes encoding chlorophyll a/b binding proteins and small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase in etiolated seedlings of Lycopersicon esculentum (L. ) and Nicotiana tabacum (L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Wehmeyer, B. Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg ); Cashmore, A.R. ); Schaefer, E. )

    1990-07-01

    Phytochrome and the blue ultraviolet-A photoreceptor control light-induced expression of genes encoding the chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II and photosystem I and the genes for the small subunit of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase in etiolated seedlings of Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) and Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). A high irradiance response also controls the induction of these genes. Genes encoding photosystem II- and I-associated chlorophyll a/b binding proteins both exhibit a transient rapid increase in expression in response to light pulse or to continuous irradiation. In contrast, genes encoding the small subunit exhibit a continuous increase in expression in response to light. These distinct expression characteristics are shown to reflect differences at the level of transcription.

  7. Functional characterization of a sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase of the cold-resistant grass Bromus pictus by heterelogous expression in Pichia pastoris and Nicotiana tabacum and its involvement in freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Casabuono, Adriana C; Couto, Alicia S; Hopp, H Esteban; Puebla, Andrea F; Heinz, Ruth A

    2011-03-15

    We have previously reported the molecular characterization of a putative sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) of Bromus pictus, a graminean species from Patagonia, tolerant to cold and drought. Here, this enzyme was functionally characterized by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris and Nicotiana tabacum. Recombinant P. pastoris Bp6-SFT showed comparable characteristics to barley 6-SFT and an evident fructosyltransferase activity synthesizing bifurcose from sucrose and 1-kestotriose. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing Bp6-SFT, showed fructosyltransferase activity and fructan accumulation in leaves. Bp6-SFT plants exposed to freezing conditions showed a significantly lower electrolyte leakage in leaves compared to control plants, indicating less membrane damage. Concomitantly these transgenic plants resumed growth more rapidly than control ones. These results indicate that Bp6-SFT transgenic tobacco plants that accumulate fructan showed enhanced freezing tolerance compared to control plants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Inactivation of the β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase and the α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase genes in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Cells by a Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 Strategy Results in Glycoproteins without Plant-Specific Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Mercx, Sébastien; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Chaumont, François; De Pauw, Edwin; Boutry, Marc; Navarre, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Plants or plant cells can be used to produce pharmacological glycoproteins such as antibodies or vaccines. However these proteins carry N-glycans with plant-typical residues [β(1,2)-xylose and core α(1,3)-fucose], which can greatly impact the immunogenicity, allergenicity, or activity of the protein. Two enzymes are responsible for the addition of plant-specific glycans: β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) and α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT). Our aim consisted of knocking-out two XylT genes and four FucT genes (12 alleles altogether) in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Three XylT and six FucT sgRNAs were designed to target conserved regions. After transformation of N. tabacum BY-2 cells with genes coding for sgRNAs, Cas9, and a selectable marker (bar), transgenic lines were obtained and their extracellular as well as intracellular protein complements were analyzed by Western blotting using antibodies recognizing β(1,2)-xylose and α(1,3)-fucose. Three lines showed a strong reduction of β(1,2)-xylose and α(1,3)-fucose, while two lines were completely devoid of them, indicating complete gene inactivation. The absence of these carbohydrates was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular proteins. PCR amplification and sequencing of the targeted region indicated small INDEL and/or deletions between the target sites. The KO lines did not show any particular morphology and grew as the wild-type. One KO line was transformed with genes encoding a human IgG2 antibody. The IgG2 expression level was as high as in a control transformant which had not been glycoengineered. The IgG glycosylation profile determined by mass spectrometry confirmed that no β(1,2)-xylose or α(1,3)-fucose were present on the glycosylation moiety and that the dominant glycoform was the GnGn structure. These data represent an important step toward humanizing the glycosylation of pharmacological proteins expressed in N. tabacum BY-2 cells. PMID:28396675

  9. Inactivation of the β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase and the α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase genes in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Cells by a Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 Strategy Results in Glycoproteins without Plant-Specific Glycans.

    PubMed

    Mercx, Sébastien; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Chaumont, François; De Pauw, Edwin; Boutry, Marc; Navarre, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Plants or plant cells can be used to produce pharmacological glycoproteins such as antibodies or vaccines. However these proteins carry N-glycans with plant-typical residues [β(1,2)-xylose and core α(1,3)-fucose], which can greatly impact the immunogenicity, allergenicity, or activity of the protein. Two enzymes are responsible for the addition of plant-specific glycans: β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) and α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT). Our aim consisted of knocking-out two XylT genes and four FucT genes (12 alleles altogether) in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Three XylT and six FucT sgRNAs were designed to target conserved regions. After transformation of N. tabacum BY-2 cells with genes coding for sgRNAs, Cas9, and a selectable marker (bar), transgenic lines were obtained and their extracellular as well as intracellular protein complements were analyzed by Western blotting using antibodies recognizing β(1,2)-xylose and α(1,3)-fucose. Three lines showed a strong reduction of β(1,2)-xylose and α(1,3)-fucose, while two lines were completely devoid of them, indicating complete gene inactivation. The absence of these carbohydrates was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular proteins. PCR amplification and sequencing of the targeted region indicated small INDEL and/or deletions between the target sites. The KO lines did not show any particular morphology and grew as the wild-type. One KO line was transformed with genes encoding a human IgG2 antibody. The IgG2 expression level was as high as in a control transformant which had not been glycoengineered. The IgG glycosylation profile determined by mass spectrometry confirmed that no β(1,2)-xylose or α(1,3)-fucose were present on the glycosylation moiety and that the dominant glycoform was the GnGn structure. These data represent an important step toward humanizing the glycosylation of pharmacological proteins expressed in N. tabacum BY-2 cells.

  10. Antisense-mediated down-regulation of putrescine N-methyltransferase activity in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum L. can lead to elevated levels of anatabine at the expense of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Chintapakorn, Yupynn; Hamill, John D

    2003-09-01

    Nicotiana tabacum L. produces a number of pyridine alkaloids, with nicotine representing the major component and anatabine comprising most of the remainder of the alkaloid fraction. An antisense approach was used here to down-regulate activity of the important enzyme putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT) in transformed roots of this species to determine effects upon alkaloid metabolism. Transformed root lines were produced that contained markedly reduced PMT activity, with a concomitant reduction in nicotine content compared to controls. No negative effects upon growth were observed. Several antisense-PMT transformed root lines, and also leaf tissues of regenerated transformed plants, showed a substantial increase in anatabine content relative to controls. Northern hybridization experiments indicated that the antisense-PMT manipulation had little or no effect upon the transcript levels of other genes encoding enzymes involved in alkaloid metabolism, including quinolinate acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPT). The latter enzyme plays a key role in regulating the synthesis of nicotinic acid which supplies the pyridine ring necessary for both nicotine and anatabine synthesis. We suggest that elevated anatabine levels in antisense-PMT lines are a direct consequence of a relative oversupply of nicotinic acid which, in the absence of adequate levels of 1-methyl-delta(1)-pyrrolinium cation (the ultimate product of PMT activity), is used to synthesise anatabine directly. As is discussed, no naturally occurring species or varieties of Nicotiana are known that typically produce high levels of anatabine in root or leaf tissues, meaning that the antisense PMT transgenics produced in this study have no natural counterpart. These experiments thus represent an example of metabolic engineering of plant pyridine metabolism, via antisense down-regulation of gene expression in a contributing pathway leading to secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  11. Over-expression of a scopoletin glucosyltransferase in Nicotiana tabacum leads to precocious lesion formation during the hypersensitive response to tobacco mosaic virus but does not affect virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Gachon, Claire; Baltz, Rachel; Saindrenan, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Nicotiana tabacum Togt encodes a scopoletin glucosyltransferase (UDPglucose:scopoletin O -beta-D-glucosyltrans- ferase, EC 2.4.1.128) known to act in vitro on many different substrates including the 6-methoxy-7-hydroxy- coumarin scopoletin. This phenolic compound accumulates in vast amounts, essentially in its glucosylated form scopolin, in tobacco during the hypersensitive response (HR) to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). To identify the physiological role of this pathogen-inducible UDP-Glc glucosyltransferase (UGT), we generated TOGT over-expressing transgenic plants. Although no endogenous scopoletin or scopolin could be detected before infection, the accumulation of both the aglycone and the glucoside was found to be 2-fold higher in transgenic plants after inoculation with TMV than in wild-type plants. Scopoletin UGT activity in plants over-expressing Togt was significantly higher during the HR than in control plants. This up-regulated activity was associated with a strong increase of the bright blue fluorescence surrounding the HR-necrotic lesions under UV light, which is known to correlate with scopoletin and scopolin abundance. Necrosis appeared sooner in transgenic plants and lesions developed faster, suggesting an accelerated HR. Unexpectedly, the viral content in each lesion was not significantly different in transgenic and in wild-type plants. These results are discussed in relation to the role of TOGT as the major UDP-Glc: scopoletin glucosyltransferase and to the importance of scopoletin accumulation during the HR.

  12. Activity of the AtMRP3 promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum plants is increased by cadmium, nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead but not by zinc and iron.

    PubMed

    Zientara, Katarzyna; Wawrzyńska, Anna; Lukomska, Jolanta; López-Moya, José Rafael; Liszewska, Frantz; Assunção, Ana G L; Aarts, Mark G M; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2009-02-05

    Characterization of the function, regulation and metal-specificity of metal transporters is one of the basic steps needed for the understanding of transport and accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids by plants. In this work GUS was used as a reporter for monitoring the activity of the promoter of the AtMRP3 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, a gene encoding an ABC-transporter, expression of which is induced by heavy metals. The AtMRP3 promoter-GUS fusion expression cassette was introduced into the genome of two model plants, A. thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. The promoter induces GUS activity in the roots as well as in the shoots upon metal exposure. Similar responses of the AtMRP3 promoter to the presence of the selected metals was observed in both plant species. Cadmium, nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead strongly activated the transcription of the reporter gene, while zinc and iron had no impact. The AtMRP3 promoter thus seems to be a useful new tool in designing plants that can be used for biomonitoring of environmental contaminations.

  13. Analyses of chlorogenic acids and related cinnamic acid derivatives from Nicotiana tabacum tissues with the aid of UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS based on the in-source collision-induced dissociation method.

    PubMed

    Ncube, Efficient N; Mhlongo, Msizi I; Piater, Lizelle A; Steenkamp, Paul A; Dubery, Ian A; Madala, Ntakadzeni E

    2014-01-01

    Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) are a class of phytochemicals that are formed as esters between different derivatives of cinnamic acid and quinic acid molecules. In plants, accumulation of these compounds has been linked to several physiological responses against various stress factors; however, biochemical synthesis differs from one plant to another. Although structurally simple, the analysis of CGA molecules with modern analytical platforms poses an analytical challenge. The objective of the study was to perform a comparison of the CGA profiles and related derivatives from differentiated tobacco leaf tissues and undifferentiated cell suspension cultures. Using an UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS fingerprinting method based on the in-source collision induced dissociation (ISCID) approach, a total of 19 different metabolites with a cinnamic acid core moiety were identified. These metabolites were either present in both leaf tissue and cell suspension samples or in only one of the two plant systems. Profile differences point to underlying biochemical similarities or differences thereof. Using this method, the regio- and geometric-isomer profiles of chlorogenic acids of the two tissue types of Nicotiana tabacum were achieved. The method was also shown to be applicable for the detection of other related molecules containing a cinnamic acid core.

  14. Nuclear-encoded chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 of Nicotiana tabacum: characterization of mature protein and isolation and sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding its cytoplasmic precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, G A; Thomas, F J; McCreery, T P; Bourque, D P

    1992-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Petite Havana) leaves was used to prepare a cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. Recombinant phage containing cDNAs coding for chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 were identified and sequenced. Mature tobacco L12 protein has 44% amino acid identity with ribosomal protein L7/L12 of Escherichia coli. The longest L12 cDNA (733 nucleotides) codes for a 13,823 molecular weight polypeptide with a transit peptide of 53 amino acids and a mature protein of 133 amino acids. The transit peptide and mature protein share 43% and 79% amino acid identity, respectively, with corresponding regions of spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. The predicted amino terminus of the mature protein was confirmed by partial sequence analysis of HPLC-purified tobacco chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. A single L12 mRNA of about 0.8 kb was detected by hybridization of L12 cDNA to poly(A)+ and total leaf RNA. Hybridization patterns of restriction fragments of tobacco genomic DNA probed with the L12 cDNA suggested the existence of more than one gene for ribosomal protein L12. Characterization of a second cDNA with an identical L12 coding sequence but a different 3'-noncoding sequence provided evidence that at least two L12 genes are expressed in tobacco. Images PMID:1542565

  15. Nontargeted metabolite profiling in compatible pathogen-inoculated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38) using UPLC-Q-TOF/MS.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoungwon; Kim, Yuran; Wi, Soo Jin; Seo, Jong Bok; Kwon, Joseph; Chung, Joo Hee; Park, Ky Young; Nam, Myung Hee

    2012-11-07

    A biphasic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production has previously been observed in tobacco at 1 and 48 h after inoculation with the hemibiotrophic compatible pathogen, Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae (Ppn). To characterize the response of tobacco to biphasically produced ROS concerning the propagation of Ppn, ultraperformance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight/ mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS) based metabolic profiling combined with multivariate statistical analysis was performed. Among the nonredundant 355 mass ions in ESI+ mode and 345 mass ions in ESI- mode that were selected as significantly changed by Ppn inoculation (|p(corr)| > 0.6 on S-plot of orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), fold-change > 2, and p < 0.05 in the independent two-sample t test), 76 mass ions were identified on the basis of their accurate mass ions and MS/MS spectra. Phenolic amino acids, phenylpropanoids, hydroxycinnamic acid amides, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, lysophospholipids, glycoglycerolipids, and trioxidized phospholipids were identified as having changed after Ppn inoculation. On the basis of their quantitative changes, the metabolic responses occurring at each phase of ROS production after Ppn inoculation were investigated in this study.

  16. A 3D digital atlas of the Nicotiana tabacum root tip and its use to investigate changes in the root apical meristem induced by the Agrobacterium 6b oncogene.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Taras; Haser, Thomas; Falk, Thorsten; Ronneberger, Olaf; Palme, Klaus; Otten, Léon

    2017-10-01

    Using the intrinsic Root Coordinate System (iRoCS) Toolbox, a digital atlas at cellular resolution has been constructed for Nicotiana tabacum roots. Mitotic cells and cells labeled for DNA replication with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) were mapped. The results demonstrate that iRoCS analysis can be applied to roots that are thicker than those of Arabidopsis thaliana without histological sectioning. A three-dimensional (3-D) analysis of the root tip showed that tobacco roots undergo several irregular periclinal and tangential divisions. Irrespective of cell type, rapid cell elongation starts at the same distance from the quiescent center, however, boundaries between cell proliferation and transition domains are cell-type specific. The data support the existence of a transition domain in tobacco roots. Cell endoreduplication starts in the transition domain and continues into the elongation zone. The tobacco root map was subsequently used to analyse root organization changes caused by the inducible expression of the Agrobacterium 6b oncogene. In tobacco roots that express the 6b gene, the root apical meristem was shorter and radial cell growth was reduced, but the mitotic and DNA replication indexes were not affected. The epidermis of 6b-expressing roots produced less files and underwent abnormal periclinal divisions. The periclinal division leading to mature endodermis and cortex3 cell files was delayed. These findings define additional targets for future studies on the mode of action of the Agrobacterium 6b oncogene. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effects of ambient CO{sub 2} concentration on growth and nitrogen use in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants transformed with an antisense gene to the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Masle, J.; Hudson, G.S.; Badger, M.R.

    1993-12-01

    Growth of the R{sub 1} progeny of a tobacco plant (Nicotiana tabacum) transformed with an antisense gene to the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was analyzed under 330 and 930 {mu}bar of CO{sub 2r} at an irradiance of 1000 {mu}mol quanta m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. Rubisco activity was reduced to 30 to 50% and 13 to 18% of that in the wild type when one and two copies of the antisense gene, respectively, were present in the genome, whereas null plants and wild-type plants had similar phenotypes. At 330 {mu}bar of CO{sub 2} all antisense plants were smaller than the wild type. There was no indication that Rubisco is present in excess in the wild type with respect to growth under high light. Raising ambient CO{sub 2} pressure to 930 {mu}bar caused plants with one copy of the DNA transferred from plasmid to plant genome to achieve the same size as the wild type at 330 {mu}bar, but plants with two copies remained smaller. The authors suggest other intrinsic rate-limiting processes independent of carbohydrate supply were involved. Under plentiful nitrogen supply, reduction in the amount of nitrogen invested in Rubisco was more than compensated for by an increase in leaf nitrate. Nitrogen content of organic matter, excluding Rubisco, was unaffected by the antisense gene. In contrast, it was systematically lower at elevated p{sub a} than at normal p{sub a}. Combined with the positive effects of p{sub a} on growth, this resulted in the single-dose antisense plants growing as fast at 930 {mu}bar of CO{sub 2} as the wild-type plants at 330 {mu}bar of CO{sub 2} but at a lower organic nitrogen cost.

  18. Cell death in seedlings of the interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana gossei and N. tabacum; possible role of knob-like bodies formed on tonoplast in vacuolar-collapse-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Mino, Masanobu; Murata, Nachi; Date, Shuichi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2007-04-01

    Vacuolar collapse plays a direct role in the cell death of the interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana gossei Domin xN. tabacum L. which exhibits hybrid lethality at the seedling stage. We have previously reported that cell death in these seedlings began at the base of hypocotyls and spread throughout the plant (Mino et al. 2002). A light microscopic analysis revealed that the process involved disruption of the intra-cellular membranes, plasmolysis, and retraction of the wall of the cell in hypocotyls. A transmission electron microscopic analysis showed that there were several abnormal structures, i.e. knob-like bodies on the tonoplast and small vesicles in the cytoplasm, and the disintegration of the tonoplast, in the cells of seedlings grown at 26 degrees C. However, no such cytological defects were observed in the seedlings grown at 37 degrees C, at which temperature the expression of lethality was suppressed. The activity levels of vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE), which might be involved in the vacuolar collapse of plant cells, temporarily increased in the seedlings grown at 26 degrees C before apparent cell death proceeded, but it remained unchanged in the seedlings grown at 37 degrees C. Applications of acetyl-L: -tyrosyl-L: -valyl-L: -alanyl-L: -aspart-1-aldehyde, an inhibitor for VPE, and cycloheximide to the seedlings suppressed VPE's activities, the formation of knob-like bodies on the tonoplast, and cell death. VPE might be involved in the structural anomalies on the tonoplast which lead to cell death triggered by vacuolar collapse in hybrid seedlings.

  19. Silencing Nicotiana attenuata LHY and ZTL alters circadian rhythms in flowers.

    PubMed

    Yon, Felipe; Joo, Youngsung; Cortés Llorca, Lucas; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2016-02-01

    The rhythmic opening/closing and volatile emissions of flowers are known to attract pollinators at specific times. That these rhythms are maintained under constant light or dark conditions suggests a circadian clock involvement. Although a forward and reverse genetic approach has led to the identification of core circadian clock components in Arabidopsis thaliana, the involvement of these clock components in floral rhythms has remained untested, probably because of the weak diurnal rhythms in A. thaliana flowers. Here, we addressed the role of these core clock components in the flowers of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, whose flowers open at night, emit benzyl acetone (BA) scents and move vertically through a 140° arc. We first measured N. attenuata floral rhythms under constant light conditions. The results suggest that the circadian clock controls flower opening, BA emission and pedicel movement, but not flower closing. We generated transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in the homologous genes of Arabidopsis LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and ZEITLUPE (ZTL), which are known to be core clock components. Silencing NaLHY and NaZTL strongly altered floral rhythms in different ways, indicating that conserved clock components in N. attenuata coordinate these floral rhythms. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Changes in cytokinins are sufficient to alter developmental patterns of defense metabolites in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Brütting, Christoph; Schäfer, Martin; Vanková, Radomíra; Gase, Klaus; Baldwin, Ian T; Meldau, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Plant defense metabolites are well known to be regulated developmentally. The optimal defense (OD) theory posits that a tssue's fitness values and probability of attack should determine defense metabolite allocations. Young leaves are expected to provide a larger fitness value to the plant, and therefore their defense allocations should be higher when compared with older leaves. The mechanisms that coordinate development with defense remain unknown and frequently confound tests of the OD theory predictions. Here we demonstrate that cytokinins (CKs) modulate ontogeny-dependent defenses in Nicotiana attenuata. We found that leaf CK levels highly correlate with inducible defense expressions with high levels in young and low levels in older leaves. We genetically manipulated the developmental patterns of two different CK classes by using senescence- and chemically inducible expression of CK biosynthesis genes. Genetically modifying the levels of different CKs in leaves was sufficient to alter ontogenic patterns of defense metabolites. We conclude that the developmental regulation of growth hormones that include CKs plays central roles in connecting development with defense and therefore in establishing optimal patterns of defense allocation in plants. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Silencing Nicotiana attenuata LHY and ZTL alters circadian rhythms in flowers

    PubMed Central

    Yon, Felipe; Joo, Youngsung; Cortés Llorca, Lucas; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T.; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The rhythmic opening/closing and volatile emissions of flowers is known to attract pollinators at specific times. That these rhythms are maintained under constant light or dark conditions suggests a circadian clock involvement. Although a forward and reverse genetic approach led to the identification of core circadian clock components in Arabidopsis thaliana, involvement of these clock components for floral rhythms remained untested likely due to weak diurnal rhythms in A. thaliana flowers.Here we addressed the role of these core clock components in the flowers of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, whose flowers open at night, emit benzyl acetone (BA) scents, and move vertically through a 140° arc.We first measured N. attenuata floral rhythms under constant light conditions. The results suggest that the circadian clock controls flower opening, BA emission, and pedicel movement, but not flower closing.We generated transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in the homologous genes of Arabidopsis LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and ZEITLUPE (ZTL), which are known as a core clock component. Silencing NaLHY and NaZTL strongly altered floral rhythms in different ways, indicating that conserved clock components in N. attenuata coordinate these floral rhythms. PMID:26439540

  2. Periplasmic multilamellar membranous structures in Nicotiana tabacum L. pollen grains treated with Ni²⁺ or Cu²⁺.

    PubMed

    Polevova, Svetlana; Breygina, Maria; Matveyeva, Natalie; Yermakov, Igor

    2014-11-01

    Essential trace elements Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) can block pollen germination without causing cell death. Mechanisms of this effect remain unclear. Using TEM, we studied the effects of Ni(2+) or Cu(2+) treatment on the ultrastructure of the aperture regions in tobacco pollen preparing to germinate in vitro, since in these zones, the main fluxes of water, ions, and metabolites cross the plasmalemma. Neither Ni(2+) nor Cu(2+) altered the cytoplasm ultrastructure, but both affected the reorganization of apertural periplasm during pollen activation. Numerous multilamellar membranous structures continuous with the plasma membrane could be seen in hydrated but not yet activated pollen. When the normal activation was completed, the structures disappeared and the plasmalemma became smooth. In the presence of 1 mM Ni(2+) or 100 μM Cu(2+), these structures preserved its original appearance. It is assumed to be the storage form for the membrane material, which is to provide an initial phase of the pollen tube growth. Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) affect the utilization of these membranes, thereby, blocking the pollen germination.

  3. Silencing S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Decarboxylase (SAMDC) in Nicotiana tabacum Points at a Polyamine-Dependent Trade-Off between Growth and Tolerance Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Moschou, Panagiotis N.; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E.; Pankou, Chryssa; Gėmes, Katalin; Valassakis, Chryssanthi; Andronis, Efthimios A.; Beris, Despoina; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Roussis, Andreas; Karamanoli, Aikaterini; Matsi, Theodora; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos; Constantinidou, Helen-Isis; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are nitrogenous molecules that are indispensable for cell viability and with an agreed-on role in the modulation of stress responses. Tobacco plants with downregulated SAMDC (AS-SAMDC) exhibit reduced PAs synthesis but normal levels of PA catabolism. We used AS-SAMDC to increase our understanding on the role of PAs in stress responses. Surprisingly, at control conditions AS-SAMDC plants showed increased biomass and altered developmental characteristics, such as increased height and leaf number. On the contrary, during salt stress AS-SAMDC plants showed reduced vigor when compared to the WT. During salt stress, the AS-SAMDC plants although showing compensatory readjustments of the antioxidant machinery and of photosynthetic apparatus, they failed to sustain their vigor. AS-SAMDC sensitivity was accompanied by inability to effectively control H2O2 levels and concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations. In accordance with these findings, we suggest that PAs may regulate the trade-off between growth and tolerance responses. PMID:27064210

  4. Alternative splicing of basic chitinase gene PR3b in the low-nicotine mutants of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Burley 21

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Haoran; Wang, Feng; Wang, Wenjing; Yin, Guoying; Zhang, Dingyu; Ding, Yongqiang; Timko, Michael P.; Zhang, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Two unlinked semi-dominant loci, A (NIC1) and B (NIC2), control nicotine and related alkaloid biosynthesis in Burley tobaccos. Mutations in either or both loci (nic1 and nic2) lead to low nicotine phenotypes with altered environmental stress responses. Here we show that the transcripts derived from the pathogenesis-related (PR) protein gene PR3b are alternatively spliced to a greater extent in the nic1 and nic2 mutants of Burley 21 tobacco and the nic1nic2 double mutant. The alternative splicing results in a deletion of 65 nucleotides and introduces a premature stop codon into the coding region of PR3b that leads to a significant reduction of PR3b specific chitinase activity. Assays of PR3b splicing in F2 individuals derived from crosses between nic1 and nic2 mutants and wild-type plants showed that the splicing phenotype is controlled by the NIC1 and NIC2 loci, even though NIC1 and NIC2 are unlinked loci. Moreover, the transcriptional analyses showed that the splicing patterns of PR3b in the low-nicotine mutants were differentially regulated by jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET). These data suggest that the NIC1 and NIC2 loci display differential roles in regulating the alternative splicing of PR3b in Burley 21. The findings in this study have provided valuable information for extending our understanding of the broader effects of the low-nicotine mutants of Burley 21 and the mechanism by which JA and ET signalling pathways post-transcriptionally regulate the activity of PR3b protein. PMID:27664270

  5. Cybrids containing mixed and sorted-out chloroplasts following interspecific somatic fusions in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Fluhr, R; Aviv, D; Edelman, M; Galun, E

    1983-06-01

    Streptomycin resistance was transferred by "donor-recipient" protoplast fusion from Nicotiana tabacum (SR-1) protoplasts into Nicotiana tabacum (cytoplasmic male sterile - Line 92) protoplasts in one case and into Nicotiana sylvestris protoplasts in another. It is demonstrated that streptomycin resistance (SR-1) is a chloroplast marker which segregates independently from a mitochondrial marker.In the fusion experiment where Nicotiana tabacum (Line 92) was the recipient, microcalli were plated in the presence of streptomycin. In this case, chloroplast sorting out occurred at a stage preceeding plant regeneration, producing stable streptomycin resistant cybrids. In the fusion whre Nicotiana sylvestris was the recipient, no direct selection for streptomycin resistance was performed. In this case chloroplast sorting out was incomplete, thus producing cybrid plants with a mixed chloroplast population. In some plants, sorting out of streptomycin resistant and sensitive chloroplasts was still apparent in the second generation progeny.

  6. Phytoplasma SAP11 alters 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana by suppressing NbOMT1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Choon Meng; Li, Chia-Hua; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Su, Li-Wen; Lu, Yen-Ting; Chang, Shu Heng; Lin, Yi Yu; Liou, Jyun-Cyuan; Hsieh, Li-Ching; Yu, Jih-Zu; Sheue, Chiou-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Lee, Chin-Fa; Yang, Jun-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are bacterial phytopathogens that release virulence effectors into sieve cells and act systemically to affect the physiological and morphological state of host plants to promote successful pathogenesis. We show here that transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana lines expressing the secreted effector SAP11 from Candidatus Phytoplasma mali exhibit an altered aroma phenotype. This phenomenon is correlated with defects in the development of glandular trichomes and the biosynthesis of 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IBMP). IBMP is a volatile organic compound (VOC) synthesized by an O-methyltransferase, via a methylation step, from a non-volatile precursor, 3-isobutyl-2-hydroxypyrazine (IBHP). Based on comparative and functional genomics analyses, NbOMT1, which encodes an O-methyltransferase, was found to be highly suppressed in SAP11-transgenic plants. We further silenced NbOMT1 through virus-induced gene silencing and demonstrated that this enzyme influenced the accumulation of IBMP in N. benthamiana. In vitro biochemical analyses also showed that NbOMT1 can catalyse IBHP O-methylation in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Our study suggests that the phytoplasma effector SAP11 has the ability to modulate host VOC emissions. In addition, we also demonstrated that SAP11 destabilized TCP transcription factors and suppressed jasmonic acid responses in N. benthamiana. These findings provide valuable insights into understanding how phytoplasma effectors influence plant volatiles. PMID:27279277

  7. Expression of Brassica oleracea FtsZ1-1 and MinD alters chloroplast division in Nicotiana tabacum generating macro- and mini-chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Chikkala, Veera R N; Nugent, Gregory D; Stalker, David M; Mouradov, Aidyn; Stevenson, Trevor W

    2012-05-01

    FtsZ1-1 and MinD plastid division-related genes were identified and cloned from Brassica oleracea var. botrytis. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing BoFtsZ1-1 or BoMinD exhibited cells with either fewer but abnormally large chloroplasts or more but smaller chloroplasts relative to wild-type tobacco plants. An abnormal chloroplast phenotype in guard cells was found in BoMinD transgenic tobacco plants but not in BoFtsZ1-1 transgenic tobacco plants. Transgenic tobacco plants bearing the macro-chloroplast phenotype had 10 to 20-fold increased levels of total FtsZ1-1 or MinD, whilst the transgenic tobacco plants bearing the mini-chloroplast phenotype had lower increased FtsZ1-1 or absence of detectable MinD. We also described for the first time, plastid transformation of macro-chloroplast bearing tobacco shoots with a gene cassette allowing for expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Homoplasmic plastid transformants from normal chloroplast and macro-chloroplast tobacco plants expressing GFP were obtained. Both types of transformants accumulated GFP at ~6% of total soluble protein, thus indicating that cells containing macro-chloroplasts can regenerate shoots in tissue culture and can stably integrate and express a foreign gene to similar levels as plant cells containing a normal chloroplast size and number.

  8. Reference genomes and transcriptomes of Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis are members of the Solanaceae family that includes tomato, potato, eggplant and pepper. These two Nicotiana species originate from South America and exhibit different alkaloid and diterpenoid production. N. sylvestris is cultivated largely as an ornamental plant and it has been used as a diploid model system for studies of terpenoid production, plastid engineering, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis are considered to be modern descendants of the maternal and paternal donors that formed Nicotiana tabacum about 200,000 years ago through interspecific hybridization. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of these two Nicotiana species. Results Draft genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis were assembled to 82.9% and 71.6% of their expected size respectively, with N50 sizes of about 80 kb. The repeat content was 72-75%, with a higher proportion of retrotransposons and copia-like long terminal repeats in N. tomentosiformis. The transcriptome assemblies showed that 44,000-53,000 transcripts were expressed in the roots, leaves or flowers. The key genes involved in terpenoid metabolism, alkaloid metabolism and heavy metal transport showed differential expression in the leaves, roots and flowers of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. Conclusions The reference genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis represent a significant contribution to the SOL100 initiative because, as members of the Nicotiana genus of Solanaceae, they strengthen the value of the already existing resources by providing additional comparative information, thereby helping to improve our understanding of plant metabolism and evolution. PMID:23773524

  9. Reference genomes and transcriptomes of Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis.

    PubMed

    Sierro, Nicolas; Battey, James N D; Ouadi, Sonia; Bovet, Lucien; Goepfert, Simon; Bakaher, Nicolas; Peitsch, Manuel C; Ivanov, Nikolai V

    2013-06-17

    Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis are members of the Solanaceae family that includes tomato, potato, eggplant and pepper. These two Nicotiana species originate from South America and exhibit different alkaloid and diterpenoid production. N. sylvestris is cultivated largely as an ornamental plant and it has been used as a diploid model system for studies of terpenoid production, plastid engineering, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis are considered to be modern descendants of the maternal and paternal donors that formed Nicotiana tabacum about 200,000 years ago through interspecific hybridization. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of these two Nicotiana species. Draft genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis were assembled to 82.9% and 71.6% of their expected size respectively, with N50 sizes of about 80 kb. The repeat content was 72-75%, with a higher proportion of retrotransposons and copia-like long terminal repeats in N. tomentosiformis. The transcriptome assemblies showed that 44,000-53,000 transcripts were expressed in the roots, leaves or flowers. The key genes involved in terpenoid metabolism, alkaloid metabolism and heavy metal transport showed differential expression in the leaves, roots and flowers of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. The reference genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis represent a significant contribution to the SOL100 initiative because, as members of the Nicotiana genus of Solanaceae, they strengthen the value of the already existing resources by providing additional comparative information, thereby helping to improve our understanding of plant metabolism and evolution.

  10. Silencing an N-Acyltransferase-Like Involved in Lignin Biosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata Dramatically Alters Herbivory-Induced Phenolamide Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Onkokesung, Nawaporn; Galis, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    In a transcriptomic screen of Manduca sexta-induced N-acyltransferases in leaves of Nicotiana attenuata, we identified an N-acyltransferase gene sharing a high similarity with the tobacco lignin-biosynthetic hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) gene whose expression is controlled by MYB8, a transcription factor that regulates the production of phenylpropanoid polyamine conjugates (phenolamides, PAs). To evaluate the involvement of this HCT-like gene in lignin production as well as the resulting crosstalk with PA metabolism during insect herbivory, we transiently silenced (by VIGs) the expression of this gene and performed non-targeted (UHPLC-ESI/TOF-MS) metabolomics analyses. In agreement with a conserved function of N. attenuata HCT-like in lignin biogenesis, HCT-silenced plants developed weak, soft stems with greatly reduced lignin contents. Metabolic profiling demonstrated large shifts (up to 12% deregulation in total extracted ions in insect-attacked leaves) due to a large diversion of activated coumaric acid units into the production of developmentally and herbivory-induced coumaroyl-containing PAs (N′,N′′-dicoumaroylspermidine, N′,N′′-coumaroylputrescine, etc) and to minor increases in the most abundant free phenolics (chlorogenic and cryptochlorogenic acids), all without altering the production of well characterized herbivory-responsive caffeoyl- and feruloyl-based putrescine and spermidine PAs. These data are consistent with a strong metabolic tension, exacerbated during herbivory, over the allocation of coumaroyl-CoA units among lignin and unusual coumaroyl-containing PAs, and rule out a role for HCT-LIKE in tuning the herbivory-induced accumulation of other PAs. Additionally, these results are consistent with a role for lignification as an induced anti-herbivore defense. PMID:23704878

  11. Involvement of the putative Ca²⁺-permeable mechanosensitive channels, NtMCA1 and NtMCA2, in Ca²⁺ uptake, Ca²⁺-dependent cell proliferation and mechanical stress-induced gene expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Yamanaka, Takuya; Nakano, Masataka; Takiguchi, Akiko; Ogasawara, Yoko; Hayashi, Teruyuki; Iida, Kazuko; Hanamata, Shigeru; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Iida, Hidetoshi; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-01

    To gain insight into the cellular functions of the mid1-complementing activity (MCA) family proteins, encoding putative Ca²⁺-permeable mechanosensitive channels, we isolated two MCA homologs of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells, named NtMCA1 and NtMCA2. NtMCA1 and NtMCA2 partially complemented the lethality and Ca²⁺ uptake defects of yeast mutants lacking mechanosensitive Ca²⁺ channel components. Furthermore, in yeast cells overexpressing NtMCA1 and NtMCA2, the hypo-osmotic shock-induced Ca²⁺ influx was enhanced. Overexpression of NtMCA1 or NtMCA2 in BY-2 cells enhanced Ca²⁺ uptake, and significantly alleviated growth inhibition under Ca²⁺ limitation. NtMCA1-overexpressing BY-2 cells showed higher sensitivity to hypo-osmotic shock than control cells, and induced the expression of the touch-inducible gene, NtERF4. We found that both NtMCA1-GFP and NtMCA2-GFP were localized at the plasma membrane and its interface with the cell wall, Hechtian strands, and at the cell plate and perinuclear vesicles of dividing cells. NtMCA2 transcript levels fluctuated during the cell cycle and were highest at the G1 phase. These results suggest that NtMCA1 and NtMCA2 play roles in Ca²⁺-dependent cell proliferation and mechanical stress-induced gene expression in BY-2 cells, by regulating the Ca²⁺ influx through the plasma membrane.

  12. Transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants over-expressing a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene from Xenopus laevis (xPPARα) show increased susceptibility to infection by virulent Pseudomonas syringae pathogens.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Soto, José Humberto; Iruegas-Bocardo, Fernanda; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma Angélica; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Gómez-Lim, Miguel Angel; Délano-Frier, John Paul

    2011-03-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants capable of over-expressing Xenopus PPARα (xPPARα), a transcription factor known to be required for peroxisome proliferation in animals, were recently generated. These plants (herewith referred to as PPAR-OE) were found to have increased peroxisome abundance, higher peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase activity and modified fatty acid metabolism. Further characterization of PPAR-OE plants revealed a higher susceptibility to virulent and a partial loss of resistance to avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pathogens, whereas the basal resistance response remained unaffected. Biochemical- and defense-related gene expression analyses showed that increased susceptibility to bacterial invasion coincided with the generalized reduction in H(2)O(2) and salicylic acid (SA) levels observed within the first 24 h of bacterial contact. Decreased H(2)O(2) levels were correlated with modified activity levels of catalase and other antioxidant enzymes. A correspondence between a rapid (within 1-24 hpi; ACCO and AOC) and sustained increase (up to 6 days pi; ACCO) in the expression levels of ethylene (ACCO) and jasmonic acid (AOC) biosynthetic genes and a higher susceptibility to virulent bacterial invasion was also observed in PPAR-OE plants. Conversely, no apparent differences in the short- and/or long-term expression levels of markers for the hypersensitive-response, oxidative burst and systemic-acquired resistance were observed between wild type and PPAR-OE plants. The results suggest that peroxisome proliferation could lead to increased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens in tobacco by altering the redox balance of the plant and the expression pattern of key defense signaling pathway genes.

  13. Maternal inheritance of cytochrome f in interspecific Nicotiana hybrids.

    PubMed

    Gray, J C

    1980-11-01

    Cytochrome f has been purified to homogeneity, as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum, Nicotiana glutinosa and their reciprocal hybrids. The cytochrome was extracted from chloroplast membranes by sonication in 2% Triton X-100 and 4M urea and was subsequently purified by acetone precipitation and chromatography on Ultrogel AcA 22 in the presence of cholate and on Sephadex G-200 in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate. The purified cytochrome had a molecular weight of 32,700 determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate. A difference in the primary structure of cytochrome f from N. tabacum and N. glutinosa was detected by ion-exchange chromatography of the products of trypsin hydrolysis. Cytochrome f from N. tabacum contained an additional peptide not present in the cytochrome fom N. glutinosa. This additional peptide was present in the cytochrome from N. tabacum female x N. glutinosa male, but not in the cytochrome from N. glutinosa female x N. tabacum male, indicating a maternal mode of inheritance of the primary structure of cytochrome f. This suggests an extranuclear, probably chloroplast, location for the genetic information for cytochrome f.

  14. Deep sequencing of the ancestral tobacco species Nicotiana tomentosiformis reveals multiple T-DNA inserts and a complex evolutionary history of natural transformation in the genus Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Dorlhac de Borne, François; Szegedi, Ernö; Otten, Léon

    2014-11-01

    Nicotiana species carry cellular T-DNA sequences (cT-DNAs), acquired by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We characterized the cT-DNA sequences of the ancestral Nicotiana tabacum species Nicotiana tomentosiformis by deep sequencing. N. tomentosiformis contains four cT-DNA inserts derived from different Agrobacterium strains. Each has an incomplete inverted-repeat structure. TA is similar to part of the Agrobacterium rhizogenes 1724 mikimopine-type T-DNA, but has unusual orf14 and mis genes. TB carries a 1724 mikimopine-type orf14-mis fragment and a mannopine-agropine synthesis region (mas2-mas1-ags). The mas2' gene codes for an active enzyme. TC is similar to the left part of the A. rhizogenes A4 T-DNA, but also carries octopine synthase-like (ocl) and c-like genes normally found in A. tumefaciens. TD shows a complex rearrangement of T-DNA fragments similar to the right end of the A4 TL-DNA, and including an orf14-like gene and a gene with unknown function, orf511. The TA, TB, TC and TD insertion sites were identified by alignment with N. tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris sequences. The divergence values for the TA, TB, TC and TD repeats provide an estimate for their relative introduction times. A large deletion has occurred in the central part of the N. tabacum cv. Basma/Xanthi TA region, and another deletion removed the complete TC region in N. tabacum. Nicotiana otophora lacks TA, TB and TD, but contains TC and another cT-DNA, TE. This analysis, together with that of Nicotiana glauca and other Nicotiana species, indicates multiple sequential insertions of cT-DNAs during the evolution of the genus Nicotiana. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Low nitrogen-induced expression of cyclophilin in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijuan; Xu, Li; Cui, Hong; Zhong, Boxiong; Liu, Guoshun; Shi, Hongzhi

    2013-01-01

    Leaf morphology and the leaf protein expression profiles of flue-cured tobacco grown in central Henan province of China under low nitrogen (low-N) and normal nitrogen (normal-N) nutrition were examined. The leaf length and width were measured at 50, 60, and 70 days after transplanting. Leaves grown under low-N conditions were shorter and more narrow than those grown under normal-N conditions. The protein expression profiles of tobacco leaves harvested at 70 days after transplanting were analyzed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis, and five differentially expressed proteins including a putative protein were identified. Except for the MCM protein-like protein, the other three differentially expressed proteins of cyclophilin-like protein, vacuolar invertase INV2, MAR-binding protein and the one putative protein showed increased expression in the low-N nutrition group. Among these proteins, the cyclophilin-like protein, which is a stress-responsive signal protein, may play pivotal roles in regulating leaf development under stress conditions. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the mRNA expression level of the cyclophilin-like protein at day 50, 60 and 70 under low-N conditions was 0.90, 1.43 and 6.9-fold higher than that under normal-N conditions, indicating that the gene expression of cyclophilin-like protein was strongly induced by low-N conditions.

  16. Transfructosylation reaction in cured tobacco leaf (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Nagai, Atsushi; Mine, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    Tobacco plant was known to be a non-fructan-storing plant. However, we demonstrated that fructo-oligosaccharides (FOSs) were formed in cured tobacco leaf on adding sucrose to the leaf in our previous report (Nagai et al., J. Agric. Food Chem., 60, 6606-6612, 2012). Also, it was expected from the results obtained in previous study that FOSs were generated by enzymatic reaction in cured tobacco leaf. The purpose of this study is to confirm and understand the mechanisms of above-mentioned FOSs formation. Thus, we tried to purify the enzymes related to the production of FOSs. The enzymes were extracted from pulverized cured tobacco leaf (burley type leaf), and were purified by charcoal treatment, ultrafiltration, and several chromatography techniques. As a result, one of the enzymes was purified up to 414-fold. It was revealed that this enzyme was acid invertase exhibiting maximum transfructosylation activity at pH 6.0, 60 °C. In addition, general properties of this enzyme were also investigated. The enzyme purified in this study enhanced the ratio of FOSs formation under the condition of high concentrated sucrose. From these results, it was suggested that this enzyme participated in the formation of FOSs in tobacco leaf after curing. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. AFLP analysis of genetic polymorphism and evolutionary relationships among cultivated and wild Nicotiana species.

    PubMed

    Ren, N; Timko, M P

    2001-08-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was used to determine the degree of intra- and inter-specific genetic variation in the genus Nicotiana. Forty-six lines of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and seven wild Nicotiana species, including N. sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis, N. otophora, N. glutinosa, N. suaveolens, N. rustica, and N. longiflora, were analyzed, using at least eight different oligonucleotide primer combinations capable of detecting a minimum of 50 polymorphic bands per primer pair. The amount of genetic polymorphism present among cultivated tobacco lines (N. tabacum) was limited, as evidenced by the high degree of similarity in the AFLP profiles of cultivars collected worldwide. Six major clusters were found within cultivated tobacco that were primarily based upon geographic origin and manufacturing quality traits. A greater amount of genetic polymorphism exists among wild species of Nicotiana than among cultivated forms. Pairwise comparisons of the AFLP profiles of wild and cultivated Nicotiana species show that polymorphic bands present in N. tabacum can be found in at least one of three proposed wild progenitor species (i.e., N. sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis, and N. otophora). This observation provides additional support for these species contributing to the origin of N. tabacum.

  18. Shifting Nicotiana attenuata’s diurnal rhythm does not alter its resistance to the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Herden, Jasmin; Meldau, Stefan; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kunert, Grit; Joo, Youngsung; Baldwin, Ian T.; Schuman, Meredith C.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants are less resistant to attack by the generalist lepidopteran Trichoplusia ni when plants and herbivores are entrained to opposite, versus identical diurnal cycles and tested under constant conditions. This effect is associated with circadian fluctuations in levels of jasmonic acid, the transcription factor MYC2, and glucosinolate contents in leaves. We tested whether a similar effect could be observed in a different plant-herbivore system: the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata and its co-evolved specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. We measured larval growth on plants under both constant and diurnal conditions following identical or opposite entrainment, profiled the metabolome of attacked leaf tissue, quantified specific metabolites known to reduce M. sexta growth, and monitored M. sexta feeding activity under all experimental conditions. Entrainment did not consistently affect M. sexta growth or plant defense induction. However, both were reduced under constant dark conditions, as was M. sexta feeding activity. Our data indicate that the response induced by M. sexta in N. attenuata is robust to diurnal cues and independent of plant or herbivore entrainment. We propose that while the patterns of constitutive or general damage-induced defense may undergo circadian fluctuation, the orchestration of specific induced responses is more complex. PMID:26699809

  19. Lack of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complex I and alteration of the respiratory chain in Nicotiana sylvestris mitochondrial deletion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gutierres, Sophie; Sabar, Mohammed; Lelandais, Christine; Chetrit, Philippe; Diolez, Philippe; Degand, Hervé; Boutry, Marc; Vedel, Fernand; de Kouchkovsky, Yaroslav; De Paepe, Rosine

    1997-01-01

    We previously have shown that Nicotiana sylvestris cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) mutants I and II present large mtDNA deletions and that the NAD7 subunit of complex I (the main dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial respiratory chain) is absent in CMS I. Here, we show that, despite a large difference in size in the mtDNA deletion, CMS I and II display similar alterations. Both have an impaired development from germination to flowering, with partial male sterility that becomes complete under low light. Besides NAD7, two other complex I subunits are missing (NAD9 and the nucleus-encoded, 38-kDa subunit), identified on two-dimensional patterns of mitochondrial proteins. Mitochondria isolated from CMS leaves showed altered respiration. Although their succinate oxidation through complex II was close to that of the wild type, oxidation of glycine, a priority substrate of plant mitochondria, was significantly reduced. The remaining activity was much less sensitive to rotenone, indicating the breakdown of Complex I activity. Oxidation of exogenous NADH (coupled to proton gradient generation and partly sensitive to rotenone) was strongly increased. These results suggest respiratory compensation mechanisms involving additional NADH dehydrogenases to complex I. Finally, the capacity of the cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase pathway was enhanced in CMS, and higher amounts of enzyme were evidenced by immunodetection. PMID:9096412

  20. The evolution of fraction i protein during the origin of a new species of Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Kung, S D; Sakano, K; Gray, J C; Wildman, S G

    1975-12-31

    The polypeptide composition of Fraction I protein from Nicotiana digluta, a synthetic species which arose by chromosome doubling following the interspecific hybridization of N. glutinosa and N. tabacum, has been examined by isoelectric focusing. The composition of the protein from N. digluta, which was identical to the protein from the infertile F1 hybrid N. glutinosa x N. tabacum, showed 3 polypeptides in the large subunit and 4 polypeptides in the small subunit. The large subunit polypeptides were identical to those from N. glutinosa, the maternal parent in the original hybridization, whereas the small subunit polypeptides were a composite of the small subunit polypeptides from both N. glutinosa and N. tabacum. This analysis demonstrates how the polypeptide composition of Fraction I protein evolves during the origin of new species of Nicotiana.

  1. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana *

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Fen; Zhou, Guo-jun; Chu, Guo-hai; Huang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao-mei; Jin, Li-feng; Lin, Fu-cheng; Yang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from all six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were observed both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R 2=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding. PMID:24302710

  2. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Fen; Zhou, Guo-jun; Chu, Guo-hai; Huang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao-mei; Jin, Li-feng; Lin, Fu-cheng; Yang, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from all six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were observed both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R(2)=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding.

  3. Current status and prospects for the study of Nicotiana genomics, genetics, and nicotine biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2015-02-01

    Nicotiana, a member of the Solanaceae family, is one of the most important research model plants, and of high agricultural and economic value worldwide. To better understand the substantial and rapid research progress with Nicotiana in recent years, its genomics, genetics, and nicotine gene studies are summarized, with useful web links. Several important genetic maps, including a high-density map of N. tabacum consisting of ~2,000 markers published in 2012, provide tools for genetics research. Four whole genome sequences are from allotetraploid species, including N. benthamiana in 2012, and three N. tabacum cultivars (TN90, K326, and BX) in 2014. Three whole genome sequences are from diploids, including progenitors N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis in 2013 and N. otophora in 2014. These and additional studies provide numerous insights into genome evolution after polyploidization, including changes in gene composition and transcriptome expression in N. tabacum. The major genes involved in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway have been identified and the genetic basis of the differences in nicotine levels among Nicotiana species has been revealed. In addition, other progress on chloroplast, mitochondrial, and NCBI-registered projects on Nicotiana are discussed. The challenges and prospects for genomic, genetic and application research are addressed. Hence, this review provides important resources and guidance for current and future research and application in Nicotiana.

  4. Ectopic Terpene Synthase Expression Enhances Sesquiterpene Emission in Nicotiana attenuata without Altering Defense or Development of Transgenic Plants or Neighbors1[W

    PubMed Central

    Schuman, Meredith C.; Palmer-Young, Evan C.; Schmidt, Axel; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Sesquiterpenoids, with approximately 5,000 structures, are the most diverse class of plant volatiles with manifold hypothesized functions in defense, stress tolerance, and signaling between and within plants. These hypotheses have often been tested by transforming plants with sesquiterpene synthases expressed behind the constitutively active 35S promoter, which may have physiological costs measured as inhibited growth and reduced reproduction or may require augmentation of substrate pools to achieve enhanced emission, complicating the interpretation of data from affected transgenic lines. Here, we expressed maize (Zea mays) terpene synthase10 (ZmTPS10), which produces (E)-α-bergamotene and (E)-β-farnesene, or a point mutant ZmTPS10M, which produces primarily (E)-β-farnesene, under control of the 35S promoter in the ecological model plant Nicotiana attenuata. Transgenic N. attenuata plants had specifically enhanced emission of target sesquiterpene(s) with no changes detected in their emission of any other volatiles. Treatment with herbivore or jasmonate elicitors induces emission of (E)-α-bergamotene in wild-type plants and also tended to increase emission of (E)-α-bergamotene and (E)-β-farnesene in transgenics. However, transgenics did not differ from the wild type in defense signaling or chemistry and did not alter defense chemistry in neighboring wild-type plants. These data are inconsistent with within-plant and between-plant signaling functions of (E)-β-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene in N. attenuata. Ectopic sesquiterpene emission was apparently not costly for transgenics, which were similar to wild-type plants in their growth and reproduction, even when forced to compete for common resources. These transgenics would be well suited for field experiments to investigate indirect ecological effects of sesquiterpenes for a wild plant in its native habitat. PMID:25187528

  5. Ozone, sulfur dioxide, and ultraviolet B have similar effects on mRNA accumulation of antioxidant genes in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L.

    SciTech Connect

    Willekens, H.; Van Camp, W.; Van Montagu, M.; Inze, D.; Langebartels, C.; Sandermann, H. Jr. |

    1994-11-01

    We have studied the expression of antioxidant genes in response to near ambient conditions of O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and ultraviolet B (UV-B) in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L. The genes analyzed encode four different superoxide dismutases (SODs), three catalases (Cat1, Cat2, and Cat3), the cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (cyt APx), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). The experimental setup for each treatment was essentially the same and caused no visible damage, thus allowing direct comparison of the different stress responses. Our data showed that the effects of O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and UV-B on the antioxidant genes are very similar, although the response to SO{sub 2} is generally less pronounced and delayed. The effects of the different stresses are characterized by a decline in Cat1, a moderate increase in Cat3, and a strong increase in Cat2 and GPx. Remarkably, SODs and cyt APx were not affected. Analysis of SOD and APx expression in the ozone-sensitive Nicotiana tabacum L. cv PBD6 revealed that induction of the cytosolic copper/zinc SOD and cyt APx occurs only with the onset of visible damage. It is proposed that alterations in mRNA levels of catalases and GPx, but not of SODs and cyt APx, form part of the initial antioxidant response to O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and UV-B in Nicotiana. 57 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Interspecific chloroplast recombination in a Nicotiana somatic hybrid.

    PubMed

    Medgyesy, P; Fejes, E; Maliga, P

    1985-10-01

    Genetic recombination between chloroplasts of two flowering plant species, Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, after somatic cell fusion is described. The parental lines differed in three cytoplasmic genetic markers. The N. tabacum mutant SR1-A15 was streptomycin-resistant, defective in chloroplast greening, and lincomycin-sensitive. The N. plumbaginifolia mutant LR400 was streptomycin-sensitive, normal green, and lincomycin-resistant. Streptomycin-resistant clones in cell culture are identified by their ability to form a green callus on a selective medium. Streptomycin resistance in the SR1-A15 mutant could not be expressed due to defective chloroplasts. Protoplasts of the two species were fused, and calli grown from the fused population were screened for the expression of streptomycin resistance from the SR1-A15 line as the result of interspecific chloroplast recombination. A somatic hybrid, pt14, expressed a new combination of the cytoplasmic genetic markers. In the pt14 chloroplast genome three N. tabacum and four N. plumbaginifolia parent specific restriction sites have been identified, indicating that the pt14 chloroplast genome contains at least six recombination sites.

  7. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  8. Assessing the bioconfinement potential of a Nicotiana hybrid platform for use in plant molecular farming applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The introduction of pharmaceutical traits in tobacco for commercial production could benefit from the utilization of a transgene bioconfinement system. It has been observed that interspecific F1Nicotiana hybrids (Nicotiana tabacum × Nicotiana glauca) are sterile and thus proposed that hybrids could be suitable bioconfined hosts for biomanufacturing. We genetically tagged hybrids with green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a visual marker to enable gene flow tracking and quantification for field and greenhouse studies. GFP was used as a useful proxy for pharmaceutical transgenes. Results Analysis of DNA content revealed significant genomic downsizing of the hybrid relative to that of N. tabacum. Hybrid pollen was capable of germination in vitro, albeit with a very low frequency and with significant differences between plants. In two field experiments, one each in Tennessee and Kentucky, we detected outcrossing at only one location (Tennessee) at 1.4%. Additionally, from 50 hybrid plants at each field site, formation of 84 and 16 seed was observed, respectively. Similar conclusions about hybrid fertility were drawn from greenhouse crosses. In terms of above-ground biomass, the hybrid yield was not significantly different than that of N. tabacum in the field. Conclusion N. tabacum × N. glauca hybrids show potential to contribute to a bioconfinement- and biomanufacturing host system. Hybrids exhibit extremely low fertility with no difference of green biomass yields relative to N. tabacum. In addition, hybrids are morphologically distinguishable from tobacco allowing for identity preservation. This hybrid system for biomanufacturing would optimally be used where N. glauca is not present and in physical isolation of N. tabacum production to provide total bioconfinement. PMID:23914736

  9. Assessing the bioconfinement potential of a Nicotiana hybrid platform for use in plant molecular farming applications.

    PubMed

    Rice, J Hollis; Mundell, Richard E; Millwood, Reginald J; Chambers, Orlando D; Stewart, C Neal; Davies, H Maelor

    2013-08-06

    The introduction of pharmaceutical traits in tobacco for commercial production could benefit from the utilization of a transgene bioconfinement system. It has been observed that interspecific F1Nicotiana hybrids (Nicotiana tabacum × Nicotiana glauca) are sterile and thus proposed that hybrids could be suitable bioconfined hosts for biomanufacturing. We genetically tagged hybrids with green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a visual marker to enable gene flow tracking and quantification for field and greenhouse studies. GFP was used as a useful proxy for pharmaceutical transgenes. Analysis of DNA content revealed significant genomic downsizing of the hybrid relative to that of N. tabacum. Hybrid pollen was capable of germination in vitro, albeit with a very low frequency and with significant differences between plants. In two field experiments, one each in Tennessee and Kentucky, we detected outcrossing at only one location (Tennessee) at 1.4%. Additionally, from 50 hybrid plants at each field site, formation of 84 and 16 seed was observed, respectively. Similar conclusions about hybrid fertility were drawn from greenhouse crosses. In terms of above-ground biomass, the hybrid yield was not significantly different than that of N. tabacum in the field. N. tabacum × N. glauca hybrids show potential to contribute to a bioconfinement- and biomanufacturing host system. Hybrids exhibit extremely low fertility with no difference of green biomass yields relative to N. tabacum. In addition, hybrids are morphologically distinguishable from tobacco allowing for identity preservation. This hybrid system for biomanufacturing would optimally be used where N. glauca is not present and in physical isolation of N. tabacum production to provide total bioconfinement.

  10. Putative Serine Protease Effectors of Clavibacter michiganensis Induce a Hypersensitive Response in the Apoplast of Nicotiana Species.

    PubMed

    Lu, You; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Ishimaru, Carol A; Glazebrook, Jane

    2015-11-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subspp. michiganensis and sepedonicus cause diseases on solanaceous crops. The genomes of both subspecies encode members of the pat-1 family of putative serine proteases known to function in virulence on host plants and induction of hypersensitive responses (HR) on nonhosts. One gene of this family in C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, chp-7, is required for triggering HR in Nicotiana tabacum. Here, further investigation revealed that mutation of the putative catalytic serine residue at position 232 to threonine abolished the HR induction activity of Chp-7, suggesting that enzymatic activity is required. Purified Chp-7 triggered an HR in N. tabacum leaves in the absence of the pathogen, indicating Chp-7 itself is the HR elicitor from C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. Ectopic expression of chp-7 constructs in N. tabacum leaves revealed that Chp-7 targeted to the apoplast triggered an HR while cytoplasmic Chp-7 did not, indicating that Chp-7 induces the HR in the apoplast of N. tabacum leaves. Chp-7 also induced HR in N. sylvestris, a progenitor of N. tabacum, but not in other Nicotiana species tested. ChpG, a related protein from C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, also triggered HR in N. tabacum and N. sylvestris. Unlike Chp-7, ChpG triggered HR in N. clevelandii and N. glutinosa.

  11. Molecular diversity in the genus Nicotiana as revealed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA.

    PubMed

    Siva Raju, K; Sheshumadhav, M; Murthy, T G K

    2008-10-01

    The genus Nicotiana consists of 64 recognized species of which, only two species, tabacum and rustica are cultivated extensively. Wild Nicotiana species are storehouses of genes for several diseases and pests, besides genes for several important phytochemicals and quality traits, which are not present in cultivated varieties. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was used to determine the degree of genetic variation in the genus Nicotiana and to develop species specific markers. Twenty two species and two interspecific hybrids were analyzed by using 18 random decamer primers. Genetic polymorphism abounds among the wild species of genus Nicotiana (99.5 %) as evidenced by the high degree of polymorphism in RAPD profiles. The pairwise similarity measures in the species of subgenus Rustica was 0.252 whereas in the subgenus Tabacum was 0.189, suggesting that there was significant diversity among the species of these subgenera. In the species of subgenus Petunioides, the range of pairwise similarity measures was 0.128 to 0.941. The clustering pattern coincided with the traditional classification of Nicotiana species. All the primers generated specific bands in the various species. Thirty six species-specific markers identified in the present study will be useful in interspecific breeding programs.

  12. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Nicotiana otophora and its Comparison with Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul L.; Khan, Abdur R.; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad A.; Lee, Seok-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana otophora is a wild parental species of Nicotiana tabacum, an interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris. However, N. otophora is least understood as an alternative paternal donor. Here, we compared the fully assembled chloroplast (cp) genome of N. otophora and with those of closely related species. The analysis showed a cp genome size of 156,073 bp and exhibited a typical quadripartite structure, which contains a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, containing 163 representative genes, with 165 microsatellites distributed unevenly throughout the genome. Comparative analysis of a gene with known function across Nicotiana species revealed 76 protein-coding sequences, 20 tRNA sequences, and 3 rRNA sequence shared between the cp genomes. The analysis revealed that N. otophora is a sister species to N. tomentosiformis within the Nicotiana genus, and Atropha belladonna and Datura stramonium are their closest relatives. These findings provide a valuable analysis of the complete N. otophora cp genome, which can identify species, elucidate taxonomy, and reconstruct the phylogeny of genus Nicotiana. PMID:27379132

  13. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Nicotiana otophora and its Comparison with Related Species.

    PubMed

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul L; Khan, Abdur R; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad A; Lee, Seok-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana otophora is a wild parental species of Nicotiana tabacum, an interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris. However, N. otophora is least understood as an alternative paternal donor. Here, we compared the fully assembled chloroplast (cp) genome of N. otophora and with those of closely related species. The analysis showed a cp genome size of 156,073 bp and exhibited a typical quadripartite structure, which contains a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, containing 163 representative genes, with 165 microsatellites distributed unevenly throughout the genome. Comparative analysis of a gene with known function across Nicotiana species revealed 76 protein-coding sequences, 20 tRNA sequences, and 3 rRNA sequence shared between the cp genomes. The analysis revealed that N. otophora is a sister species to N. tomentosiformis within the Nicotiana genus, and Atropha belladonna and Datura stramonium are their closest relatives. These findings provide a valuable analysis of the complete N. otophora cp genome, which can identify species, elucidate taxonomy, and reconstruct the phylogeny of genus Nicotiana.

  14. Reactions of Nicotiana species to inoculation with monopartite and bipartite begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some Nicotiana species are widely used as experimental hosts for plant viruses. Nicotiana species differ in ploidy levels, chromosome numbers and have diverse geographical origins. Thus, these species are useful model systems to investigate virus-host interactions, co-evolution of pathogens and hosts and the effects of ploidy level on virus resistance/susceptibility. Results Here we have studied the responses of seven Nicotiana species to inoculation with Cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMV), a monopartite begomovirus, and Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV), a bipartite begomovirus, both from the Indian subcontinent. All Nicotiana species supported the replication of both begomoviruses in inoculated leaves. However, only three Nicotiana species, namely N. benthamiana, N. tabacum and N. sylvestris showed symptoms when inoculated with ToLCNDV, while N. benthamiana was the only species that developed leaf curl symptoms when inoculated with CLCuMV. CLCuMV accumulated to detectable levels in N. tabacum, but plants remained asymptomatic. A previously identified mutation of RNA dependent RNA polymerase 1 was shown to be present only in N. benthamiana. The finding is in line with earlier results showing that the susceptibility of this species to a diverse range of plant viruses correlates with a defective RNA silencing-mediated host defense. Conclusions The results presented show that individual Nicotiana species respond differently to inoculation with begomoviruses. The inability of begomoviruses to systemically infect several Nicotiana species is likely due to inhibition of virus movement, rather than replication, and thus provides a novel model to study virus-host interactions in resistant/susceptible hosts. PMID:22011413

  15. Enhancement of volatile aglycone recovery facilitated by acid hydrolysis of glucosides from Nicotiana flower species.

    PubMed

    Coleman, William M; Dube, Michael F; Gerardi, Anthony R; Ashraf-Khorassani, Mehdi; Taylor, Larry T

    2012-11-21

    Four different Nicotiana flowers (Nicotiana alata (alata), Nicotiana sylvestris (Sy), Nicotiana suaveolens (Su), and Nicotiana tabacum cv. Flue-Cured (FC)) from farms in Virginia and North Carolina were harvested and promptly quenched with liquid nitrogen and hand-ground prior to analysis. Each Nicotiana flower was pre-extracted with hexane to remove unbound volatiles. Fifteen standard compounds that were thought to be in the pre-extract were employed to aid in GC-MS identification and quantification. Glucosides were then chromatographically isolated and next hydrolyzed via 2 M sulfuric acid for 24 h at 75 °C. For each flower, the products of hydrolysis were extracted in tandem with hexane and dichloromethane (DCM) prior to analysis by GC-MS. The mixture of hexane and DCM extracts of the flowers after hydrolysis were then analyzed for each of 15 external standards via GC-MS to determine the concentration of any isolated flower-derived aglycone. Quantitative results for each of the possible 15 free volatile compounds extracted before and after hydrolysis were compared. Benzyl alcohol, phenethyl alcohol, and cis-3-hexenol were found in all Nicotiana both before and after acid hydrolysis. Enormous increases in the mass of benzyl alcohol and phenethyl alcohol were obtained with all flowers as a result of acid hydrolysis. With selected Nicotiana flowers, significant increases were observed for eugenol and cinnamaldehyde. The significant increases observed in cinnamaldehyde and eugenol upon mild acid hydrolysis strongly indicate that this approach could be a viable alternative process for the production scale isolation of these important natural flavor compounds.

  16. A distinct endogenous pararetrovirus family in Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a diploid progenitor of polyploid tobacco.

    PubMed

    Gregor, Wolfgang; Mette, M Florian; Staginnus, Christina; Matzke, Marjori A; Matzke, Antonius J M

    2004-03-01

    A distinct endogenous pararetrovirus (EPRV) family corresponding to a previously unknown virus has been identified in the genome of Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a diploid ancestor of allotetraploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The putative virus giving rise to N. tomentosiformis EPRVs (NtoEPRVs) is most similar to tobacco vein clearing virus, an episomal form of a normally silent EPRV family in Nicotiana glutinosa; it is also related to a putative virus giving rise to the NsEPRV family in Nicotiana sylvestris (the second diploid progenitor of tobacco) and in the N. sylvestris fraction of the tobacco genome. The copy number of NtoEPRVs is significantly higher in N. tomentosiformis than in tobacco. This suggests that after the polyploidization event, many copies were lost from the polyploid genome or were accumulated specifically in the diploid genome. By contrast, the copy number of NsEPRVs has remained constant in N. sylvestris and tobacco, indicating that changes have occurred preferentially in the NtoEPRV family during evolution of the three Nicotiana species. NtoEPRVs are often flanked by Gypsy retrotransposon-containing plant DNA. Although the mechanisms of NtoEPRV integration, accumulation, and/or elimination are unknown, these processes are possibly linked to retrotransposon activity.

  17. A Distinct Endogenous Pararetrovirus Family in Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a Diploid Progenitor of Polyploid Tobacco1[w

    PubMed Central

    Gregor, Wolfgang; Mette, M. Florian; Staginnus, Christina; Matzke, Marjori A.; Matzke, Antonius J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A distinct endogenous pararetrovirus (EPRV) family corresponding to a previously unknown virus has been identified in the genome of Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a diploid ancestor of allotetraploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The putative virus giving rise to N. tomentosiformis EPRVs (NtoEPRVs) is most similar to tobacco vein clearing virus, an episomal form of a normally silent EPRV family in Nicotiana glutinosa; it is also related to a putative virus giving rise to the NsEPRV family in Nicotiana sylvestris (the second diploid progenitor of tobacco) and in the N. sylvestris fraction of the tobacco genome. The copy number of NtoEPRVs is significantly higher in N. tomentosiformis than in tobacco. This suggests that after the polyploidization event, many copies were lost from the polyploid genome or were accumulated specifically in the diploid genome. By contrast, the copy number of NsEPRVs has remained constant in N. sylvestris and tobacco, indicating that changes have occurred preferentially in the NtoEPRV family during evolution of the three Nicotiana species. NtoEPRVs are often flanked by Gypsy retrotransposon-containing plant DNA. Although the mechanisms of NtoEPRV integration, accumulation, and/or elimination are unknown, these processes are possibly linked to retrotransposon activity. PMID:14988473

  18. PHANTASTICA regulates development of the adaxial mesophyll in Nicotiana leaves.

    PubMed

    McHale, Neil A; Koning, Ross E

    2004-05-01

    Initiation and growth of leaf blades is oriented by an adaxial/abaxial axis aligned with the original axis of polarity in the leaf primordium. To investigate mechanisms regulating this process, we cloned the Nicotiana tabacum ortholog of PHANTASTICA (NTPHAN) and generated a series of antisense transgenics in N. sylvestris. We show that NSPHAN is expressed throughout emerging blade primordia in the wild type and becomes localized to the middle mesophyll in the expanding lamina. Antisense NSPHAN leaves show ectopic expression of NTH20, a class I KNOX gene. Juvenile transgenic leaves have normal adaxial/abaxial polarity and generate leaf blades in the normal position, but the adaxial mesophyll shows disorganized patterns of cell division, delayed maturation of palisade, and ectopic reinitiation of blade primordia along the midrib. Reversal of the phenotype with exogenous gibberellic acid suggests that NSPHAN, acting via KNOX repression, maintains determinacy in the expanding lamina and sustains the patterns of cell proliferation critical to palisade development.

  19. PHANTASTICA Regulates Development of the Adaxial Mesophyll in Nicotiana Leaves

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Neil A.; Koning, Ross E.

    2004-01-01

    Initiation and growth of leaf blades is oriented by an adaxial/abaxial axis aligned with the original axis of polarity in the leaf primordium. To investigate mechanisms regulating this process, we cloned the Nicotiana tabacum ortholog of PHANTASTICA (NTPHAN) and generated a series of antisense transgenics in N. sylvestris. We show that NSPHAN is expressed throughout emerging blade primordia in the wild type and becomes localized to the middle mesophyll in the expanding lamina. Antisense NSPHAN leaves show ectopic expression of NTH20, a class I KNOX gene. Juvenile transgenic leaves have normal adaxial/abaxial polarity and generate leaf blades in the normal position, but the adaxial mesophyll shows disorganized patterns of cell division, delayed maturation of palisade, and ectopic reinitiation of blade primordia along the midrib. Reversal of the phenotype with exogenous gibberellic acid suggests that NSPHAN, acting via KNOX repression, maintains determinacy in the expanding lamina and sustains the patterns of cell proliferation critical to palisade development. PMID:15084717

  20. Nicotiana Roots Recruit Rare Rhizosphere Taxa as Major Root-Inhabiting Microbes.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Law, Audrey D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Root-associated microbes have a profound impact on plant health, yet little is known about the distribution of root-associated microbes among different root morphologies or between rhizosphere and root environments. We explore these issues here with two commercial varieties of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing from rhizosphere soil, as well as from primary, secondary, and fine roots. While rhizosphere soils exhibited a fairly rich and even distribution, root samples were dominated by Proteobacteria. A comparison of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between rhizosphere and root samples indicated that Nicotiana roots select for rare taxa (predominantly Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria) from their corresponding rhizosphere environments. The majority of root-inhabiting OTUs (~80 %) exhibited habitat generalism across the different root morphological habitats, although habitat specialists were noted. These results suggest a specific process whereby roots select rare taxa from a larger community.

  1. Effects of Host Resistance and Temperature on Development of Globodera tabacum solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Johnson, C. S.; Eisenback, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Penetration and development of juveniles of tobacco cyst nematode (Globodera tabacum solanacearum) on a resistant (NC567) and a susceptible (K326) cultivar of flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were determined in root zone chamber experiments. More vermiform juveniles developed into a swollen shape at 22, 27, and 31 °C than at 17 °C. Development of flask-shaped nematodes appeared to be similar across tested temperatures (17, 22, 27, and 31 °C). General patterns of penetration and development of juveniles in both resistant and susceptible cultivars were similar under all temperatures tested. More vermiform, swollen, and flask-shaped nematodes were found in roots of K326 than in those of NC567. Development from swollen to flaskshaped nematodes appeared to be similar between the two cultivars, although more vermiform juveniles developed into swollen nematodes on K326 than on NC567. Differences in resistance between the two cultivars remained stable across tested temperatures. PMID:19266009

  2. Indole-3-acetic Acid Synthesis in Tumorous and Nontumorous Species of Nicotiana 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shih-Tung; Katz, Charles D.; Knight, C. Arthur

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in the enzyme extracts of Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana langsdorffii, their F1 hybrid, their amphidiploid hybrid, and the nontumorous mutant of the hybrid was investigated. Tryptamine, a possible precursor of IAA biosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum, was not found in the callus tissue of N. glauca, N. langsdorffii, and their F1 hybrid. In petiole slices, the synthesis of IAA progressively increased during 5 hours of incubation in [14C]tryptophan. The rate of synthesis was about equal in the hybrid and N. langsdorffii but lower in N. glauca on either a cell or fresh weight basis. It was also found that tryptophan was about 25 times more efficient than tryptamine in promoting synthesis of IAA in petiole slices. It was found that indoleacetaldehyde oxidase, indoleacetaldehyde reductase, and tryptophan aminotransferase activities were present in all of the species examined; however, tryptophan decarboxylase activity was not found. The tryptophan aminotransferase activity in N. glauca, N. langsdorffii, and the nontumorous mutant required α-ketoglutaric acid and pyridoxal 5-phosphate whereas the addition of pyridoxal 5-phosphate seemed not to increase the enzyme activity in tumor plants. The tryptophan aminotransferase in the amphidiploid hybrid was partially purified by acetone precipitation. The enzyme activity had a temperature optimum at 49 C and a pH optimum at 8.9. It is suggested that there is an indolepyruvic acid pathway in the synthesis of IAA in the Nicotiana species examined. PMID:16660376

  3. Heterologous expression of rice calnexin (OsCNX) confers drought tolerance in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Sarwat, Maryam; Naqvi, Afsar Raza

    2013-09-01

    Calnexin (CNX) is an integral membrane protein of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is a critical component of ER quality control machinery. It acts as a chaperone and ensures proper folding of newly synthesised glycoproteins. CNX shares a considerable homology with its luminal counterpart calreticulin (CRT). Together, they constitute CNX/CRT cycle which is imperative for proper folding of nascent proteins. CNX deficient organisms develop severe complications because of improper folding of proteins and consequently ER stress. CNX maintains calcium homeostasis by binding to the Ca(2+) which is a central node in various signaling pathways. Phosphorylation of cytoplasmic tail of CNX controls the sarco endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase and thus the movement of Ca(2+) in and out of its store-house, i.e. ER. Our studies on Oryza sativa CNX (OsCNX) reveal constitutive expression at various developmental stages and various tissues, thereby proving its requirement throughout the plant development. Further, its expression under various stress conditions gives an insight of the crosstalk existing between ER stress and abiotic stress signaling. This was confirmed by heterologous expression of OsCNX (OsCNX-HE) in tobacco and the OsCNX-HE lines were observed to exhibit better germination under mannitol stress and survival under dehydration stress conditions. The dehydration tolerance conferred by OsCNX appears to be ABA-dependent pathway.

  4. Rhizosecretion improves the production of Cyanovirin-N in Nicotiana tabacum through simplified downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Luisa M; Szeto, Tim H; Ma, Julian K-C; Drake, Pascal M W

    2016-07-01

    Rhizosecretion has many advantages for the production of recombinant pharmaceuticals, notably facile downstream processing from hydroponic medium. The aim of this study was to increase yields of the HIV microbicide candidate, Cyanovirin-N (CV-N), obtained using this production platform and to develop a simplified methodology for its downstream processing from hydroponic medium. Placing hydroponic cultures on an orbital shaker more than doubled the concentration of CV-N in the hydroponic medium compared to plants which remained stationary, reaching a maximum of approximately 20μg/ml in one week, which is more than 3 times higher than previously reported yields. The protein composition of the hydroponic medium, the rhizosecretome, was characterised in plants cultured with or without the plant growth regulator alpha-napthaleneacetic acid by LC-ESI-MS/MS, and CV-N was the most abundant protein. The issue of large volumes in the rhizosecretion system was addressed by using ion exchange chromatography to concentrate CV-N and partially remove impurities. The semi-purified CV-N was demonstrated to bind to HIV gp120 in an ELISA and to neutralise HIVBa-L with an IC50 of 6nM in a cell-based assay. Rhizosecretion is therefore a practicable and inexpensive method for the production of functional CV-N.

  5. Inhibition of Trehalose Breakdown Increases New Carbon Partitioning into Cellulosic Biomass in Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Best, F.M.; Ferrieri, R.; Best, F.M.; Koenig, K.; McDonald, K.; Schueller, M.J.; Rogers, A.; Ferrieri, R.A.

    2011-01-18

    Validamycin A was used to inhibit in vivo trehalase activity in tobacco enabling the study of subsequent changes in new C partitioning into cellulosic biomass and lignin precursors. After 12-h exposure to treatment, plants were pulse labeled using radioactive {sup 11}CO{sub 2}, and the partitioning of isotope was traced into [{sup 11}C]cellulose and [{sup 11}C]hemicellulose, as well as into [{sup 11}C]phenylalanine, the precursor for lignin. Over this time course of treatment, new carbon partitioning into hemicellulose and cellulose was increased, while new carbon partitioning into phenylalanine was decreased. This trend was accompanied by a decrease in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity. After 4 d of exposure to validamycin A, we also measured leaf protein content and key C and N metabolite pools. Extended treatment increased foliar cellulose and starch content, decreased sucrose, and total amino acid and nitrate content, and had no effect on total protein.

  6. (E)-β-farnesene synthase genes affect aphid (Myzus persicae) infestation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiudao; Jones, Huw D; Ma, Youzhi; Wang, Genping; Xu, Zhaoshi; Zhang, Baoming; Zhang, Yongjun; Ren, Guangwei; Pickett, John A; Xia, Lanqin

    2012-03-01

    Aphids are major agricultural pests which cause significant yield losses of the crop plants each year. (E)-β-farnesene (EβF) is the alarm pheromone involved in the chemical communication between aphids and particularly in the avoidance of predation. In the present study, two EβF synthase genes were isolated from sweet wormwood and designated as AaβFS1 and AaβFS2, respectively. Overexpression of AaβFS1 or AaβFS2 in tobacco plants resulted in the emission of EβF ranging from 1.55 to 4.65 ng/day/g fresh tissues. Tritrophic interactions involving the peach aphids (Myzus persicae), predatory lacewings (Chrysopa septempunctata) demonstrated that the transgenic tobacco expressing AaβFS1 and AaβFS2 could repel peach aphids, but not as strongly as expected. However, AaβFS1 and AaβFS2 lines exhibited strong and statistically significant attraction to lacewings. Further experiments combining aphids and lacewing larvae in an octagon arrangement showed transgenic tobacco plants could repel aphids and attract lacewing larvae, thus minimizing aphid infestation. Therefore, we demonstrated a potentially valuable strategy of using EβF synthase genes from sweet wormwood for aphid control in tobacco or other economic important crops in an environmentally benign way.

  7. Exogenous jasmonic acid induces stress tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exposed to imazapic.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Armagan; Doganlar, Zeynep Banu

    2016-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is one of the important phytohormones, regulating the stress responses as well as plant growth and development. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of exogenous JA application on stress responses of tobacco plant exposed to imazapic. In this study, phytotoxic responses resulting from both imazapic and imazapic combined with JA treatment are investigated comparatively for tobacco plants. For plants treated with imazapic at different concentrations (0.030, 0.060 and 0.120mM), antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase), carotenoids, glutathione and malondialdehyte (MDA) contents, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid and indole-3-acetic acid levels as well as herbicide residue amounts on leaves increased in general compared to the control group. In the plants treated with 45µM jasmonic acid, pigment content, antioxidant activity and phytohormone level increased whereas MDA content and the amount of herbicidal residue decreased compared to the non-treated plants. Our findings show that imazapic treatment induces some phytotoxic responses on tobacco leaves and that exogenous jasmonic acid treatment alleviates the negative effects of herbicide treatment by regulating these responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Short polyhistidine peptides penetrate effectively into Nicotiana tabacum-cultured cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Sayaka; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The polyhistidine peptides (PHPs) have been previously reported as novel cell-penetrating peptides and are efficiently internalized into mammal cells; however, penetration of PHPs into other cell types is unknown. In this study, the cellular uptake of PHPs in plant and yeast cells was found to be dependent on the number of histidines, and short PHPs (H6-H10 peptides) showed effective internalization. The H8 peptide showed the highest cell-penetrating capacity and localized to vacuoles in plant and yeast cells. Low-temperature conditions inhibited significantly the cellular uptake of short PHPs by both cells. However, net charge neutralization of PHPs also completely inhibited cellular uptake by plant cells, but not by yeast cells. These results indicate that short PHPs penetrate effectively into plant and yeast cells by similar mechanism with the exception of net charge dependency. The findings show the short PHPs are promising candidates for new delivery tools into plant and yeast cells.

  9. Co-ordinated development of the leaf midrib xylem with the lamina in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Taneda, Haruhiko; Terashima, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The water-transport capacity of leaf venation is positively related to the leaf-lamina area, because the number and diameter of vein-xylem conduits are controlled to match the lamina area. This study aimed to investigate how this co-ordinated relationship between the leaf-lamina area and vein-xylem characteristics is achieved by examining the midrib xylem of tobacco leaves. Methods The changes in the midrib-xylem characteristics over time were quantified using leaves with four different final lamina areas. The measured data were fitted to sigmoidal functions. From the constants of the fitted curves, the final values in mature leaves, maximal developmental rates (VDev) and developmental duration (TDev) were estimated for each of the xylem characteristics. Whether it is the lamina or the midrib xylem that drives the co-ordinated development was examined by lamina removal from unfolding leaves. The effects of the application of 0·1 % IAA (indole-3-acetic acid) to leaves with the laminas removed were also analysed. Key Results For both the leaf lamina and the midrib-xylem characteristics, the differences in final values among leaves with different lamina areas were more strongly associated with those in VDev. Notably, the VDev values of the midrib-xylem characteristics were related to those of the leaf-lamina area. By lamina removal, the conduit diameter was reduced but the number of conduits did not significantly change. By IAA application, the decrease in the conduit diameter was halted, and the number of conduits in the midrib xylem increased. Conclusions According to the results, the VDev values of the lamina area and the midrib-xylem characteristics changed in a co-ordinated manner, so that the water-transport capacity of the midrib xylem was positively related to the leaf-lamina area. The results also suggest that IAA derived from the leaf lamina plays a crucial role in the development of the leaf venation. PMID:22589329

  10. Rhizosecretion improves the production of Cyanovirin-N in Nicotiana tabacum through simplified downstream processing

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Luisa M.; Szeto, Tim H.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizosecretion has many advantages for the production of recombinant pharmaceuticals, notably facile downstream processing from hydroponic medium. The aim of this study was to increase yields of the HIV microbicide candidate, Cyanovirin-N (CV-N), obtained using this production platform and to develop a simplified methodology for its downstream processing from hydroponic medium. Placing hydroponic cultures on an orbital shaker more than doubled the concentration of CV-N in the hydroponic medium compared to plants which remained stationary, reaching a maximum of approximately 20μg/ml in one week, which is more than 3 times higher than previously reported yields. The protein composition of the hydroponic medium, the rhizosecretome, was characterised in plants cultured with or without the plant growth regulator alpha-napthaleneacetic acid by LC-ESI-MS/MS, and CV-N was the most abundant protein. The issue of large volumes in the rhizosecretion system was addressed by using ion exchange chromatography to concentrate CV-N and partially remove impurities. The semi-purified CV-N was demonstrated to bind to HIV gp120 in an ELISA and to neutralise HIVBa-L with an IC50 of 6nM in a cell-based assay. Rhizosecretion is therefore a practicable and inexpensive method for the production of functional CV-N. PMID:26901579

  11. Characterisation of detergent-insoluble membranes in pollen tubes of Nicotiana tabacum (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Moscatelli, Alessandra; Gagliardi, Assunta; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Bini, Luca; Stroppa, Nadia; Onelli, Elisabetta; Landi, Claudia; Scali, Monica; Idilli, Aurora Irene; Moreau, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pollen tubes are the vehicle for sperm cell delivery to the embryo sac during fertilisation of Angiosperms. They provide an intriguing model for unravelling mechanisms of growing to extremes. The asymmetric distribution of lipids and proteins in the pollen tube plasma membrane modulates ion fluxes and actin dynamics and is maintained by a delicate equilibrium between exocytosis and endocytosis. The structural constraints regulating polarised secretion and asymmetric protein distribution on the plasma membrane are mostly unknown. To address this problem, we investigated whether ordered membrane microdomains, namely membrane rafts, might contribute to sperm cell delivery. Detergent insoluble membranes, rich in sterols and sphingolipids, were isolated from tobacco pollen tubes. MALDI TOF/MS analysis revealed that actin, prohibitins and proteins involved in methylation reactions and in phosphoinositide pattern regulation are specifically present in pollen tube detergent insoluble membranes. Tubulins, voltage-dependent anion channels and proteins involved in membrane trafficking and signalling were also present. This paper reports the first evidence of membrane rafts in Angiosperm pollen tubes, opening new perspectives on the coordination of signal transduction, cytoskeleton dynamics and polarised secretion. PMID:25701665

  12. Inoculation methods using Rhodococcus erythropolis strain P30 affects bacterial assisted phytoextraction capacity of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-López, V; Prieto-Fernández, A; Janssen, J; Herzig, R; Vangronsveld, J; Kidd, P S

    2016-01-01

    In this study different bacterial inoculation methods were tested for tobacco plants growing in a mine-soil contaminated with Pb, Zn, and Cd. The inoculation methods evaluated were: seed inoculation, soil inoculation, dual soil inoculation event, and seed+soil inoculation. Each inoculum was added at two bacterial densities (10(6) CFUs mL(-1) and 10(8) CFUs mL(-1)). The objectives were to evaluate whether or not the mode of inoculation or the number of applied microorganisms influences plant response. The most pronounced bacterial-induced effect was found for biomass production, and the soil inoculation treatment (using 10(6) CFUs mL(-1)) led to the highest increase in shoot dry weight yield (up to 45%). Bacterial-induced effects on shoot metal concentrations were less pronounced; although a positive effect was found on shoot Pb concentration when using 10(8) CFUs mL(-1) in the soil inoculation (29% increase) and in the seed+soil inoculation (34% increase). Also shoot Zn concentration increased by 24% after seed inoculation with 10(6) CFUs mL(-1). The best effects on the total metal yield were not correlated with an increasing number of inoculated bacteria. In fact the best results were found after a single soil inoculation using the lower cellular density of 10(6) CFUs mL(-1).

  13. Multi-Platform Metabolomic Analyses of Ergosterol-Induced Dynamic Changes in Nicotiana tabacum Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tugizimana, Fidele; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is providing new dimensions into understanding the intracellular adaptive responses in plants to external stimuli. In this study, a multi-technology-metabolomic approach was used to investigate the effect of the fungal sterol, ergosterol, on the metabolome of cultured tobacco cells. Cell suspensions were treated with different concentrations (0–1000 nM) of ergosterol and incubated for different time periods (0–24 h). Intracellular metabolites were extracted with two methods: a selective dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction and a general methanol extraction. Chromatographic techniques (GC-FID, GC-MS, GC×GC-TOF-MS, UHPLC-MS) and 1H NMR spectroscopy were used for quantitative and qualitative analyses. Multivariate data analyses (PCA and OPLS-DA models) were used to extract interpretable information from the multidimensional data generated from the analytical techniques. The results showed that ergosterol triggered differential changes in the metabolome of the cells, leading to variation in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PCA scores plots revealed dose- and time-dependent metabolic variations, with optimal treatment conditions being found to be 300 nM ergosterol and an 18 h incubation period. The observed ergosterol-induced metabolic changes were correlated with changes in defence-related metabolites. The ‘defensome’ involved increases in terpenoid metabolites with five antimicrobial compounds (the bicyclic sesquiterpenoid phytoalexins: phytuberin, solavetivone, capsidiol, lubimin and rishitin) and other metabolites (abscisic acid and phytosterols) putatively identified. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors, cinnamic acid derivatives and - conjugates, coumarins and lignin monomers were annotated. These annotated metabolites revealed a dynamic reprogramming of metabolic networks that are functionally correlated, with a high complexity in their regulation. PMID:24498209

  14. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles affect the growth and microRNA expression of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Frazier, Taylor P; Burklew, Caitlin E; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is one of the most widely used pigments in the world. Due to its heavy use in industry and daily life, such as food additives, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and paints, many residues are released into the environment and currently TiO(2) nanoparticles are considered an emerging environmental contaminant. Although several studies have shown the effect of TiO(2) nanoparticles on a wide range of organisms including bacteria, algae, plankton, fish, mice, and rats, little research has been performed on land plants. In this study, we investigated the effect of TiO(2) nanoparticles on the growth, development, and gene expression of tobacco, an important economic and agricultural crop in the southeastern USA as well as around the world. We found that TiO(2) nanoparticles significantly inhibited the germination rates, root lengths, and biomasses of tobacco seedlings after 3 weeks of exposure to 0.1, 1, 2.5, and 5 % TiO(2) nanoparticles and that overall growth and development of the tobacco seedlings significantly decreased as TiO(2) nanoparticle concentrations increased. Overall, tobacco roots were the most sensitive to TiO(2) nanoparticle exposure. Nano-TiO(2) also significantly influenced the expression profiles of microRNAs (miRNAs), a recently discovered class of small endogenous noncoding RNAs (∼20-22 nt) that are considered important gene regulators and have been shown to play an important role in plant development as well as plant tolerance to abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, cold, and heavy metal. Low concentrations (0.1 and 1 %) of TiO(2) nanoparticles dramatically induced miRNA expression in tobacco seedlings with miR395 and miR399 exhibiting the greatest fold changes of 285-fold and 143-fold, respectively. The results of this study show that TiO(2) nanoparticles have a negative impact on tobacco growth and development and that miRNAs may play an important role in tobacco response to heavy metals/nanoparticles by regulating gene expression.

  15. Characterization of natural leaf senescence in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uzelac, Branka; Janošević, Dušica; Simonović, Ana; Motyka, Václav; Dobrev, Petre I; Budimir, Snežana

    2016-03-01

    Leaf senescence is a highly regulated final phase of leaf development preceding massive cell death. It results in the coordinated degradation of macromolecules and the subsequent nutrient relocation to other plant parts. Very little is still known about early stages of leaf senescence during normal leaf ontogeny that is not triggered by stress factors. This paper comprises an integrated study of natural leaf senescence in tobacco plants grown in vitro, using molecular, structural, and physiological information. We determined the time sequence of ultrastructural changes in mesophyll cells during leaf senescence, showing that the degradation of chloroplast ultrastructure fully correlated with changes in chlorophyll content. The earliest degenerative changes in chloroplast ultrastructure coinciding with early chromatin condensation were observed already in mature green leaves. A continuum of degradative changes in chloroplast ultrastructure, chromatin condensation and aggregation, along with progressive decrease in cytoplasm organization and electron density were observed in the course of mesophyll cells ageing. Although the total amounts of endogenous cytokinins gradually increased during leaf ontogenesis, the proportion of bioactive cytokinin forms, as well as their phosphate precursors, in total cytokinin content rapidly declined with ageing. Endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were strongly reduced in senescent leaves, and a decreasing tendency was also observed for abscisic acid (ABA) levels. Senescence-associated tobacco cysteine proteases (CP, E.C. 3.4.22) CP1 and CP23 genes were induced in the initial phase of senescence. Genes encoding glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, E.C. 1.4.1.2) and one isoform of cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1, E.C. 6.3.1.2) were induced in the late stage of senescence, while chloroplastic GS (GS2) gene showed a continuous decrease with leaf ageing.

  16. Analysis of methylated patterns and quality-related genes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Junna; Jia, Yanlong; Lv, Zhuangwei; Sun, Chuanfei; Gao, Lijie; Yan, Xiaoxiao; Cui, Liusu; Tang, Zongxiang; Yan, Benju

    2014-08-01

    Methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism was used in this study to investigate epigenetic information of four tobacco cultivars: Yunyan 85, NC89, K326, and Yunyan 87. The DNA fragments with methylated information were cloned by reamplified PCR and sequenced. The results of Blast alignments showed that the genes with methylation information included chitinase, nitrate reductase, chloroplast DNA, mitochondrial DNA, ornithine decarboxylase, ribulose carboxylase, and promoter sequences. Homologous comparison in three cloned gene sequences (nitrate reductase, ornithine decarboxylase, and ribulose decarboxylase) indicated that geographic factors had significant influence on the whole genome methylation. Introns also contained different information in different tobacco cultivars. These findings suggest that synthetic mechanisms for tobacco aromatic components could be affected by different environmental factors leading to variation of noncoding regions in the genome, which finally results in different fragrance and taste in different tobacco cultivars.

  17. The influence of light quality on the accumulation of flavonoids in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Ji, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingqin; He, Fan; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yiding; Liu, Pengfei; Niu, Lu

    2016-09-01

    Flavonoids are important secondary metabolites in plants regulated by the environment. To analyze the effect of light quality on the accumulation of flavonoids, we performed a rapid analysis of flavonoids in extracts of tobacco leaves using UHPLC-QTOF. A total of 12 flavonoids were detected and identified in tobacco leaves, which were classified into flavonoid methyl derivatives and flavonoid glycoside derivatives according to the groups linked to the flavonoid core. Correlation analysis was further conducted to investigate the effect of different wavelengths of light on their accumulation. The content of flavonoid methyl derivatives was positively correlated with the proportions of far-red light (FR; 716-810nm) and near-infrared light (NIR; 810-2200nm) in the sunlight spectrum and negatively correlated with the proportion of ultraviolet (UV-A; 350-400nm) and the red/far-red ratio (R/FR). By contrast, the content of flavonoid glycoside derivatives was positively correlated with the proportion of UV-A and the R/FR, and negatively correlated with FR and NIR. The results indicated that light quality with higher proportions of FR and NIR increases the activity of flavonoid methyltransferases but suppresses the activity of flavonoid glycoside transferases. While a high proportion of UV-A and a high R/FR can increase flavonoid glycoside transferase activity but suppress flavonoid methyltransferase activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression of a mammalian PCB-metabolizing cytochrome P-450 in Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, V.D.; Galbraith, D.W.; Halpert, J.R.; Bourque, D.P. )

    1991-05-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are resistant to metabolism in most animal species. The dog possesses the unique ability to metabolize and eliminate certain PCB congeners, as a result of the activity of the cytochrome P-450 isozyme PBD-2. An expressible cDNA coding for PBD-2 has been introduced into the genome of tobacco plants. PBD-2 cDNA and a screenable marker gene coding for neomycin phosphotransferase were introduced into tobacco leaf disks using a binary Agrobacterium tumefaciens vector system. Southern and Western blot analyses have confirmed chromosomal integration of the cDNA and expression of the PBD-2 polypeptide. Differential centrifugation and Western blot analyses have shown the PBD-2 protein to be associated with a membrane fraction in transgenic tobacco leaf homogenates. The authors goal is to develop transgenic plants in which the PBD-2 protein metabolizes PCBs, thus providing a novel method for bioremediation of PCB-contaminated soils.

  19. Identification of wounding and topping responsive small RNAs in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are two major classes of small RNAs. They play important regulatory roles in plants and animals by regulating transcription, stability and/or translation of target genes in a sequence-complementary dependent manner. Over 4,000 miRNAs and several classes of siRNAs have been identified in plants, but in tobacco only computational prediction has been performed and no tobacco-specific miRNA has been experimentally identified. Wounding is believed to induce defensive response in tobacco, but the mechanism responsible for this response is yet to be uncovered. Results To get insight into the role of small RNAs in damage-induced responses, we sequenced and analysed small RNA populations in roots and leaves from wounding or topping treated tobacco plants. In addition to confirmation of expression of 27 known miRNA families, we identified 59 novel tobacco-specific miRNA members of 38 families and a large number of loci generating phased 21- or 24-nt small RNAs (including ta-siRNAs). A number of miRNAs and phased small RNAs were found to be responsive to wounding or topping treatment. Targets of small RNAs were further surveyed by degradome sequencing. Conclusions The expression changes of miRNAs and phased small RNAs responsive to wounding or topping and identification of defense related targets for these small RNAs suggest that the inducible defense response in tobacco might be controlled by pathways involving small RNAs. PMID:22353177

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis of two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) genotypes differing in Cd tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lupeng; He, Xiaoyan; Shang, Shenghua; Zheng, Weite; Liu, Wenxing; Zhang, Guoping; Wu, Feibo

    2014-12-01

    Tobacco can easily accumulate cadmium (Cd) in leaves and thus poses a potential threat to human health. Cd-stress-hydroponic-experiments were performed, and the proteomic and transcriptional features of two contrasting tobacco genotypes Yun-yan2 (Cd-tolerant) and Guiyan1 (Cd-sensitive) were compared. We identified 18 Cd-tolerance-associated proteins in leaves, using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry, whose expression were significantly induced in Yunyan2 leaves but down-regulated/unchanged in Guiyan1, or unchanged in Yunyan2 but down-regulated in Guiyan1 under 50 µM Cd stress. They are including epoxide hydrolase, enoyl-acyl-carrier-protein reductase, NPALDP1, chlorophyll a-b binding protein 25, heat shock protein 70 and 14-3-3 proteins. They categorized as 8 groups of their functions: metabolism, photosynthesis, stress response, signal transduction, protein synthesis, protein processing, transport and cell structure. Furthermore, the expression patterns of three Cd-responsive proteins were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Our findings provide an insight into proteomic basis for Cd-detoxification in tobacco which offers molecular resource for Cd-tolerance.

  1. Expression of microRNAs and their targets regulates floral development in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Burklew, Caitlin E; Xie, Fuliang; Ashlock, Jordan; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an extensive class of endogenous posttranscriptional gene regulators that function to mediate gene expression by cleaving target mRNAs or by preventing protein translation. Because of their importance in mediating gene regulation, identifying and elucidating the function of miRNAs have been the primary focus of many researchers. Now that many miRNAs have been identified and assessed for their functionality, the next step is to create expression profiles for miRNAs, so that gene expression studies can be further enhanced with knowledge of the basal expression levels of miRNAs and their targets. In a previous study, 259 putative miRNAs were identified in tobacco, in which 11 of them were confirmed. The primary goal of this study was to further expand on that study and create an expression profile for nine miRNAs and their targets in a tissue-specific manner in tobacco. We chose to study miRNAs that largely play a role in floral development and nutrient stress response. The results of our study show that all tested miRNAs and their targets were expressed in a differential manner. The results of our study also show that out of the tested miRNAs and their targets, miR159, miR157, miR167, miR172, and superoxide dismutase were expressed the highest, suggesting that these genes may play a vital role in the growth and development of tobacco. Corrected expression of miRNAs and their targets regulates floral development.

  2. Identification of wounding and topping responsive small RNAs in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Tang, She; Wang, Yu; Li, Zefeng; Gui, Yijie; Xiao, Bingguang; Xie, Jiahua; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Fan, Longjiang

    2012-02-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are two major classes of small RNAs. They play important regulatory roles in plants and animals by regulating transcription, stability and/or translation of target genes in a sequence-complementary dependent manner. Over 4,000 miRNAs and several classes of siRNAs have been identified in plants, but in tobacco only computational prediction has been performed and no tobacco-specific miRNA has been experimentally identified. Wounding is believed to induce defensive response in tobacco, but the mechanism responsible for this response is yet to be uncovered. To get insight into the role of small RNAs in damage-induced responses, we sequenced and analysed small RNA populations in roots and leaves from wounding or topping treated tobacco plants. In addition to confirmation of expression of 27 known miRNA families, we identified 59 novel tobacco-specific miRNA members of 38 families and a large number of loci generating phased 21- or 24-nt small RNAs (including ta-siRNAs). A number of miRNAs and phased small RNAs were found to be responsive to wounding or topping treatment. Targets of small RNAs were further surveyed by degradome sequencing. The expression changes of miRNAs and phased small RNAs responsive to wounding or topping and identification of defense related targets for these small RNAs suggest that the inducible defense response in tobacco might be controlled by pathways involving small RNAs.

  3. Osmotic Adjustment of Cultured Tobacco Cells (Nicotiana tabacum var. Samsum) Grown on Sodium Chloride 1

    PubMed Central

    Heyser, James W.; Nabors, Murray W.

    1981-01-01

    Tobacco cell cultures (var. Samsum) were grown on increasing levels of NaCl to select variants for increased salt tolerance. The osmotic adjustment of NaCl-adapted and nonadapted cell lines was studied. Both cell lines were grown on modified Linsmaier and Skoog medium with or without NaCl. Few differences were found in the response of adapted and nonadapted lines to NaCl. The concentrations of sugars, Na+, Cl−, and NO3− were identical in the cells and medium. Potassium and amino acids were accumulated by the cells. All of the above solutes accounted for 80 to 90% of the osmotic potential for both cell lines when grown on basal medium with or without NaCl. The osmotic potential of growing cells was always 1 to 3 bars more negative than that of the medium. During the first 10 days culture, the cells hydrolyzed the 117 millimolar sucrose present in the fresh media, and the media became more negative by 3 bars. Growing cells absorbed and metabolized the sugars, NH4+, and NO3− during the next 25 days, and the osmotic potential of the media and cells became less negative. The addition of 130 millimolar NaCl made the media and cells osmotically more negative by 6 bars throughout the growth cycle, as compared with cells growing on basal medium. The efflux of cellular solutes during distilled H2O washes was resolved into two components. The fast component (0.6 to 1.7 minutes half-time) included solutes of the free space and cytoplasm, whereas the slow component (1.6 to 4.9 hours half-time) represented the vacuolar solutes. Sodium and Cl− were present in the vacuole. No differences were observed in the solute efflux between the adapted and nonadapted cell lines. PMID:16661743

  4. Growth of nicotiana in response to atmospheric CO sub 2 enrichment and various light regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, S.; Thomas, J.F. )

    1989-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum NCTG-22, N. tabacum Petite Havana and N. plumbaginifolia were grown in chambers (24 C, 12-h light) under daytime atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels of 340 ppm (ambient) or 1000 ppm (enriched). All 3 types of tobacco grew faster and had open flowers sooner under CO2 enrichment, but patterns of dry weight distribution varied with type of tobacco. In N. plumbaginifolia significant proportions of dry weight were allocated to stems and branches, while in tabacum types, less was allocated to stems and more to leaves and roots. Increases in dry weight due to CO2 enrichment were accompanied by increases in leaf area and thickness. Plants given a far-red low intensity night break exhibited few differences from controls except having thinner leaves under ambient CO2; but under enriched CO2, had greater total dry weight and thicker leaves containing a higher proportion of spongy mesophyll than controls. A 50% reduction in light intensity led to a comparable reduction in dry weight and leaf area across treatments.

  5. Regulation of catalase activity in leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris by high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Havir, E.A.; McHale, N.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The effect of high CO{sub 2} (1% CO{sub 2}/21% O{sub 2}) on the activity of specific forms of catalase (CAT-1, -2, and -3) in seedling leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum) was examined. In high CO{sub 2} total catalase activity decreased by 50% in the first 2 days, followed by a more gradual decline in the next 4 days. The loss of total activity resulted primarily from a decrease in CAT-1 catalase. In contrast, the activity of CAT-3 catalase, a form with enhanced peroxidatic activity, increased 3-fold in high CO{sub 2} relative to air controls after 4 days. Short-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} indicated that the 50% loss of total activity occurs in the firs 12 hours. Catalase levels increased to normal within 12 hours after seedlings were returned to air. When seedlings were transferred to air after prolonged exposure to high CO{sub 2} (13 days), the levels of CAT-1 catalase were partially restored while CAT-3 remained at its elevated level. Levels of superoxide dismutase activity and those of several peroxisomal enzymes were not affected by high CO{sub 2}. Total catalase levels did not decline when seedlings were exposed to atmospheres of 0.04% CO{sub 2}/5% O{sub 2} or 0.04% CO{sub 2}/1% O{sub 2}, indicating that regulation of catalase in high CO{sub 2} is not related directly to suppression of photorespiration. Antibodies prepared against CAT-1 catalase from N. tabacum reacted strongly against CAT-1 catalase from both N. sylvestris and N. tabacum but not against CAT-3 catalase from either species.

  6. Metabolic engineering to simultaneously activate anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathways in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fresquet-Corrales, Sandra; Roque, Edelín; Sarrión-Perdigones, Alejandro; Rochina, Maricruz; López-Gresa, María P.; Díaz-Mula, Huertas M.; Bellés, José M.; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Beltrán, José P.

    2017-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs), or condensed tannins, are powerful antioxidants that remove harmful free oxygen radicals from cells. To engineer the anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathways to de novo produce PAs in two Nicotiana species, we incorporated four transgenes to the plant chassis. We opted to perform a simultaneous transformation of the genes linked in a multigenic construct rather than classical breeding or retransformation approaches. We generated a GoldenBraid 2.0 multigenic construct containing two Antirrhinum majus transcription factors (AmRosea1 and AmDelila) to upregulate the anthocyanin pathway in combination with two Medicago truncatula genes (MtLAR and MtANR) to produce the enzymes that will derivate the biosynthetic pathway to PAs production. Transient and stable transformation of Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum with the multigenic construct were respectively performed. Transient expression experiments in N. benthamiana showed the activation of the anthocyanin pathway producing a purple color in the agroinfiltrated leaves and also the effective production of 208.5 nmol (-) catechin/g FW and 228.5 nmol (-) epicatechin/g FW measured by the p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) method. The integration capacity of the four transgenes, their respective expression levels and their heritability in the second generation were analyzed in stably transformed N. tabacum plants. DMACA and phoroglucinolysis/HPLC-MS analyses corroborated the activation of both pathways and the effective production of PAs in T0 and T1 transgenic tobacco plants up to a maximum of 3.48 mg/g DW. The possible biotechnological applications of the GB2.0 multigenic approach in forage legumes to produce “bloat-safe” plants and to improve the efficiency of conversion of plant protein into animal protein (ruminal protein bypass) are discussed. PMID:28902886

  7. Metabolic engineering to simultaneously activate anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathways in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed

    Fresquet-Corrales, Sandra; Roque, Edelín; Sarrión-Perdigones, Alejandro; Rochina, Maricruz; López-Gresa, María P; Díaz-Mula, Huertas M; Bellés, José M; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Beltrán, José P; Cañas, Luis A

    2017-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs), or condensed tannins, are powerful antioxidants that remove harmful free oxygen radicals from cells. To engineer the anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathways to de novo produce PAs in two Nicotiana species, we incorporated four transgenes to the plant chassis. We opted to perform a simultaneous transformation of the genes linked in a multigenic construct rather than classical breeding or retransformation approaches. We generated a GoldenBraid 2.0 multigenic construct containing two Antirrhinum majus transcription factors (AmRosea1 and AmDelila) to upregulate the anthocyanin pathway in combination with two Medicago truncatula genes (MtLAR and MtANR) to produce the enzymes that will derivate the biosynthetic pathway to PAs production. Transient and stable transformation of Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum with the multigenic construct were respectively performed. Transient expression experiments in N. benthamiana showed the activation of the anthocyanin pathway producing a purple color in the agroinfiltrated leaves and also the effective production of 208.5 nmol (-) catechin/g FW and 228.5 nmol (-) epicatechin/g FW measured by the p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) method. The integration capacity of the four transgenes, their respective expression levels and their heritability in the second generation were analyzed in stably transformed N. tabacum plants. DMACA and phoroglucinolysis/HPLC-MS analyses corroborated the activation of both pathways and the effective production of PAs in T0 and T1 transgenic tobacco plants up to a maximum of 3.48 mg/g DW. The possible biotechnological applications of the GB2.0 multigenic approach in forage legumes to produce "bloat-safe" plants and to improve the efficiency of conversion of plant protein into animal protein (ruminal protein bypass) are discussed.

  8. Altered sucrose metabolism impacts plant biomass production and flower development.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather D; Beamish, Leigh; Reid, Anya; Park, Ji-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2010-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) was transformed with three genes involved in sucrose metabolism, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase, EC 2.7.7.9), sucrose synthase (SuSy, EC 2.4.1.13) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS, EC 2.4.1.14). Plants harbouring the single transgenes were subsequently crossed to produce double and triple transgenic lines, including: 2 x 35S::UGPase x SPS, 4CL::UGPase x SPS, 2 x 35S::SuSy x SPS, 4CL::SuSy x SPS, 2 x 35S::UGPase x SuSy x SPS, and 4CL::UGPase x SuSy x SPS. The ultimate aim of the study was to examine whether it is possible to alter cellulose production through the manipulation of sucrose metabolism genes. While altering sucrose metabolism using UGPase, SuSy and SPS does not have an end effect on cellulose production, their simultaneous overexpression resulted in enhanced primary growth as seen in an increase in height growth, in some cases over 50%. Furthermore, the pyramiding strategy of simultaneously altering the expression of multiple genes in combination resulted in increased time to reproductive bud formation as well as altered flower morphology and foliar stipule formation in 4CL lines. Upregulation of these sucrose metabolism genes appears to directly impact primary growth and therefore biomass production in tobacco.

  9. Predisposition of Broadleaf Tobacco to Fusarium Wilt by Early Infection with Globodera tabacum tabacum or Meloidogyne hapla

    PubMed Central

    LaMondia, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    In greenhouse experiments, broadleaf tobacco plants were inoculated with tobacco cyst (Globodera tabacum tabacum) or root-knot (Meloidogyne hapla) nematodes 3, 2, or 1 week before or at the same time as Fusarium oxysporum. Plants infected with nematodes prior to fungal inoculation had greater Fusarium wilt incidence and severity than those simultaneously inoculated. G. t. tabacum increased wilt incidence and severity more than did M. hapla. Mechanical root wounding within 1 week of F. oxysporum inoculation increased wilt severity. In field experiments, early-season G. t. tabacum control by preplant soil application of oxamyl indirectly limited the incidence and severity of wilt. Wilt incidence was 48%, 23%, and 8% in 1989 and 64%, 60%, and 19% in 1990 for 0.0, 2.2, and 6.7 kg oxamyl/ha, respectively. Early infection of tobacco by G. t. tabacum predisposed broadleaf tobacco to wilt by F. oxysporum. PMID:19283018

  10. Root-to-shoot translocation of alkaloids is dominantly suppressed in Nicotiana alata.

    PubMed

    Pakdeechanuan, Phattharaporn; Shoji, Tsubasa; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    In tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), nicotine and related pyridine alkaloids are produced in the root, and then transported to the aerial parts where these toxic chemicals function as part of chemical defense against insect herbivory. Although a few tobacco transporters have been recently reported to take up nicotine into the vacuole from the cytoplasm or into the cytoplasm from the apoplast, it is not known how the long-range translocation of tobacco alkaloids between organs is controlled. Nicotiana langsdorffii and N. alata are closely related species of diploid Nicotiana section Alatae, but the latter does not accumulate tobacco alkaloids in the leaf. We show here that N. alata does synthesize alkaloids in the root, but lacks the capacity to mobilize the root-borne alkaloids to the aerial parts. Interspecific grafting experiments between N. alata and N. langsdorffii indicate that roots of N. alata are unable to translocate alkaloids to their shoot system. Interestingly, genetic studies involving interspecific hybrids between N. alata and N. langsdorffii and their self-crossed or back-crossed progeny showed that the non-translocation phenotype is dominant over the translocation phenotype. These results indicate that a mechanism to retain tobacco alkaloids within the root organ has evolved in N. alata, which may represent an interesting strategy to control the distribution of secondary products within a whole plant.

  11. The effect of polyploidy and hybridization on the evolution of floral colour in Nicotiana (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W.; Arnold, Sarah E. J.; Chittka, Lars; Le Comber, Steven C.; Verity, Robert; Dodsworth, Steven; Knapp, Sandra; Kelly, Laura J.; Chase, Mark W.; Baldwin, Ian T.; Kovařík, Aleš; Mhiri, Corinne; Taylor, Lin; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Speciation in angiosperms can be accompanied by changes in floral colour that may influence pollinator preference and reproductive isolation. This study investigates whether changes in floral colour can accompany polyploid and homoploid hybridization, important processes in angiosperm evolution. Methods Spectral reflectance of corolla tissue was examined for 60 Nicotiana (Solanaceae) accessions (41 taxa) based on spectral shape (corresponding to pigmentation) as well as bee and hummingbird colour perception in order to assess patterns of floral colour evolution. Polyploid and homoploid hybrid spectra were compared with those of their progenitors to evaluate whether hybridization has resulted in floral colour shifts. Key Results Floral colour categories in Nicotiana seem to have arisen multiple times independently during the evolution of the genus. Most younger polyploids displayed an unexpected floral colour, considering those of their progenitors, in the colour perception of at least one pollinator type, whereas older polyploids tended to resemble one or both of their progenitors. Conclusions Floral colour evolution in Nicotiana is weakly constrained by phylogeny, and colour shifts do occur in association with both polyploid and homoploid hybrid divergence. Transgressive floral colour in N. tabacum has arisen by inheritance of anthocyanin pigmentation from its paternal progenitor while having a plastid phenotype like its maternal progenitor. Potentially, floral colour evolution has been driven by, or resulted in, pollinator shifts. However, those polyploids that are not sympatric (on a regional scale) with their progenitor lineages are typically not divergent in floral colour from them, perhaps because of a lack of competition for pollinators. PMID:25979919

  12. Polymorphism and structure of style-specific arabinogalactan proteins as determinants of pollen tube growth in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Noyszewski, Andrzej K; Liu, Yi-Cheng; Tamura, Koichiro; Smith, Alan G

    2017-08-10

    Pollen tube growth and fertilization are key processes in angiosperm sexual reproduction. The transmitting tract (TT) of Nicotiana tabacum controls pollen tube growth in part by secreting pistil extensin-like protein III (PELPIII), transmitting-tract-specific (TTS) protein and 120 kDa glycoprotein (120 K) into the stylar extracellular matrix. The three arabinogalactan proteins (AGP) are referred to as stylar AGPs and are the focus of this research. The transmitting tract regulates pollen tube growth, promoting fertilization or rejecting pollen tubes. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of the stylar AGPs is proline rich and polymorphic among Nicotiana spp. The NTD was predicted to be mainly an intrinsically disordered region (IDR), making it a candidate for protein-protein interactions. The NTD is also the location for the majority of the predicted O-glycosylation sites that were variable among Nicotiana spp. The C-terminal domain (CTD) contains an Ole e 1-like domain, that was predicted to form beta-sheets that are similar in position and length among Nicotiana spp. and among stylar AGPs. The TTS protein had the greatest amino acid and predicted O-glycosylation conservation among Nicotiana spp. relative to the PELPIII and 120 K. The PELPIII, TTS and 120 K genes undergo negative selection, with dn/ds ratios of 0.59, 0.29 and 0.38 respectively. The dn/ds ratio for individual species ranged from 0.4 to 0.9 and from 0.1 to 0.8, for PELPIII and TTS genes, respectively. These data indicate that PELPIII and TTS genes are under different selective pressures. A newly discovered AGP gene, Nicotiana tabacum Proline Rich Protein (NtPRP), was found with a similar intron-exon configuration and protein structure resembling other stylar AGPs, particularly TTS. Further studies of the NtPRP gene are necessary to elucidate its biological role. Due to its high similarity to the TTS gene, NtPRP may be involved in pollen tube guidance and growth. In contrast to TTS, both PELPIII and 120

  13. Non-functionalization of two CYP82E nicotine N-demethylase genes abolishes nornicotine formation in Nicotiana langsdorffii.

    PubMed

    Pakdeechanuan, Phattharaporn; Teoh, Seddon; Shoji, Tsubasa; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    Nornicotine is formed from nicotine by nicotine N-demethylase, a CYP82E family monooxygenase, and accumulates to high levels in some tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivars and many wild Nicotiana species. Nicotiana langsdorffii does not form nornicotine, whereas the closely related species N. alata accumulates this alkaloid abundantly. We show here that the two nicotine N-demethylase genes in N. langsdorffii have been inactivated by different molecular mechanisms. We identified four N. alata CYP82E genes that encode functional nicotine N-demethylases. In N. langsdorffii, however, one CYP82E gene encoding a functional enzyme was not expressed at all, whereas the other was weakly expressed but contained a one-nucleotide deletion in the first exon, yielding a truncated protein. Expression analysis of interspecific F(1) hybrids between N. alata and N. langsdorffii indicated that cis-acting polymorphisms abolish expression of the otherwise functional CYP82E gene in N. langsdorffii. Segregation analysis of tobacco alkaloids and individual CYP82E alleles in F(2) progeny revealed that duplicated CYP82E genes in both species are genetically linked, and provide genetic evidence that CYP82E genes are solely responsible for nornicotine formation in these wild Nicotiana species.

  14. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  15. Stable genetic transformation of intact Nicotiana cells by the particle bombardment process

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Theodore M.; Harper, Elisabeth C.; Svab, Zora; Sanford, John C.; Fromm, Michael E.; Maliga, Pal

    1988-01-01

    We show that the genetic transformation of Nicotiana tabacum can be achieved by bombarding intact cells and tissues with DNA-coated particles. Leaves or suspension culture cells were treated with tungsten microprojectiles carrying plasmid DNA containing a neomycin phosphotransferase gene. Callus harboring the foreign gene was recovered from the bombarded tissue by selection on medium containing kanamycin. Kanamycin-resistant plants have subsequently been regenerated from the callus derived from leaves. Transient expression of an introduced β-glucuronidase gene was used to assess the efficiency of DNA delivery by microprojectiles. The frequency of cells that were stably transformed with the neomycin phosphotransferase gene was a few percent of the cells that transiently expressed the β-glucuronidase gene. These results show that gene transfer by high-velocity microprojectiles is a rapid and direct means for transforming intact plant cells and tissues that eliminates the need for production of protoplasts or infection by Agrobacterium. Images PMID:16593993

  16. A TOM1 homologue is required for multiplication of Tobacco mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana *

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing; Jiang, Jin-hua; Zhou, Xue-ping

    2007-01-01

    The AtTOM1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana had been shown to be essential for the efficient multiplication of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in A. thaliana. In this study, we cloned an AtTOM1-like gene from Nicotiana benthamiana named as NbTOM1. Sequence alignment showed that NbTOM1 is closely related to AtTOM1 homologues of N. tabacum and Lycopersicon esculentum with 97.2% and 92.6% nucleotide sequence identities, respectively. Silencing of NbTOM1 by a modified viral satellite DNA-based vector resulted in complete inhibition of the multiplication of TMV in N. benthamiana. The result suggests that inhibition of NbTOM1 via RNA silencing is a potentially useful method for generating TMV-resistant plants. PMID:17444600

  17. The Evolutionary Fate of the Horizontally Transferred Agrobacterial Mikimopine Synthase Gene in the Genera Nicotiana and Linaria

    PubMed Central

    Talianova, Martina; Vyskot, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Few cases of spontaneously horizontally transferred bacterial genes into plant genomes have been described to date. The occurrence of horizontally transferred genes from the T-DNA of Agrobacterium rhizogenes into the plant genome has been reported in the genus Nicotiana and in the species Linaria vulgaris. Here we compare patterns of evolution in one of these genes (a gene encoding mikimopine synthase, mis) following three different events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). As this gene plays an important role in Agrobacterium, and there are known cases showing that genes from pathogens can acquire plant protection function, we hypothesised that in at least some of the studied species we will find signs of selective pressures influencing mis sequence. The mikimopine synthase (mis) gene evolved in a different manner in the branch leading to Nicotiana tabacum and N. tomentosiformis, in the branch leading to N. glauca and in the genus Linaria. Our analyses of the genus Linaria suggest that the mis gene began to degenerate soon after the HGT. In contrast, in the case of N. glauca, the mis gene evolved under significant selective pressures. This suggests a possible role of mikimopine synthase in current N. glauca and its ancestor(s). In N. tabacum and N. tomentosiformis, the mis gene has a common frameshift mutation that disrupted its open reading frame. Interestingly, our results suggest that in spite of the frameshift, the mis gene could evolve under selective pressures. This sequence may still have some regulatory role at the RNA level as suggested by coverage of this sequence by small RNAs in N. tabacum. PMID:25420106

  18. Morphometrics of Globodera tabacum tabacum, G. t. virginiae, and G. t. solanacearum (Nemata: Heteroderinae)

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Manuel M.; Eisenback, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    A morphometric evaluation of second-stage juveniles (J2), males, females, cysts, and eggs of several isolates of the tobacco cyst nematode (TCN) complex, Globodera tabacum tabacum (GTT), G. t. virginiae (GTV), and G. t. solanacearum (GTS) is presented. Morphometrics of eggs, J2, and males are considerably less variable than of females and cysts. No measurements of eggs and J2 are useful for identification of the three subspecies. Distance from the median bulb and excretory pore to the head end in J2 and males is quite stable. Stylet knob width of males is useful for identifying GTV isolates and tail length in separating males of GTT isolates from GTV and GTS. Body length/width (L/W) ratio of females and cysts discriminates GTT from GTV and GTS; stylet knob width is an auxiliary character for identifying GTV. This subspecies complex has a continuum of values for the other characters. Data suggest a close relationship between GTV and GTS, which also occur in close proximity in Virginia. PMID:19279753

  19. Changes in Air CO2 Concentration Differentially Alter Transcript Levels of NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 Aquaporin Genes in Tobacco Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Secchi, Francesca; Schubert, Andrea; Lovisolo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The aquaporin specific control on water versus carbon pathways in leaves is pivotal in controlling gas exchange and leaf hydraulics. We investigated whether Nicotiana tabacum aquaporin 1 (NtAQP1) and Nicotiana tabacum plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2;1 (NtPIP2;1) gene expression varies in tobacco leaves subjected to treatments with different CO2 concentrations (ranging from 0 to 800 ppm), inducing changes in photosynthesis, stomatal regulation and water evaporation from the leaf. Changes in air CO2 concentration ([CO2]) affected net photosynthesis (Pn) and leaf substomatal [CO2] (Ci). Pn was slightly negative at 0 ppm air CO2; it was one-third that of ambient controls at 200 ppm, and not different from controls at 800 ppm. Leaves fed with 800 ppm [CO2] showed one-third reduced stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration (E), and their gs was in turn slightly lower than in 200 ppm– and in 0 ppm–treated leaves. The 800 ppm air [CO2] strongly impaired both NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 gene expression, whereas 0 ppm air [CO2], a concentration below any in vivo possible conditions and specifically chosen to maximize the gene expression alteration, increased only the NtAQP1 transcript level. We propose that NtAQP1 expression, an aquaporin devoted to CO2 transport, positively responds to CO2 scarcity in the air in the whole range 0–800 ppm. On the contrary, expression of NtPIP2;1, an aquaporin not devoted to CO2 transport, is related to water balance in the leaf, and changes in parallel with gs. These observations fit in a model where upregulation of leaf aquaporins is activated at low Ci, while downregulation occurs when high Ci saturates photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. PMID:27089333

  20. Low abundant spacer 5S rRNA transcripts are frequently polyadenylated in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Fulnecek, Jaroslav; Kovarik, Ales

    2007-11-01

    In plants, 5S rRNA genes (5S rDNA) encoding 120-nt structural RNA molecules of ribosomes are organized in tandem arrays comprising thousands of units. Failure to correctly terminate transcription would generate longer inaccurately processed transcripts interfering with ribosome biogenesis. Hence multiple termination signals occur immediately after the 5S rRNA coding sequence. To obtain information about the efficiency of termination of 5S rDNA transcription in plants we analyzed 5S rRNA pools in three Nicotiana species, N. sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis and N. tabacum. In addition to highly abundant 120-nt 5S rRNA transcripts, we also detected RNA species composed of a genic region and variable lengths of intergenic sequences. These genic-intergenic RNA molecules occur at a frequency severalfold lower than the mature 120-nt transcripts, and are posttranscriptionally modified by polyadenylation at their 3' end in contrast to 120-nt transcripts. An absence of 5S small RNAs (smRNA) argue against a dominant role for the smRNA biosynthesis pathway in the degradation of aberrant 5S rRNA in Nicotiana. This work is the first description of polyadenylated 5S rRNA species in higher eukaryotes originating from a read-through transcription into the intergenic spacer. We propose that polyadenylation may function in a "quality control" pathway ensuring that only correctly processed molecules enter the ribosome biogenesis.

  1. Lipoxygenase gene expression in the tobacco-Phytophthora parasitica nicotianae interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Véronési, C; Rickauer, M; Fournier, J; Pouénat, M L; Esquerré-Tugayé, M T

    1996-01-01

    A recently isolated cDNA clone of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) lipoxygenase (LOX) was used to study LOX gene expression in tobacco cell-suspension cultures and intact plants in response to infection with Phytophthora parasitica nicotianae (Ppn). Southern blot analysis of tobacco DNA indicated that only a small number of LOX genes hybridize to this probe. These genes were not constitutively expressed to a detectable level in control cells and healthy plants. In contrast, a rapid and transient accumulation of transcripts occurred in cells and plants after treatment with elicitor and inoculation with zoospores of Ppn, respectively. In cell cultures LOX gene expression could also be induced by linolenic acid, a LOX substrate, and by methyl jasmonate, one of the products derived from the action of LOX on linolenic acid. In the infection assays, LOX gene expression and enzyme activity were observed earlier when the plants carried a resistance gene against the race of Ppn used for inoculation. The differential expression of LOX during the race-cultivar-specific interaction between tobacco and Ppn, as well as its regulation by elicitors and jasmonate, suggest a role of LOX in plant resistance and establishment of the defense status against this pathogen. PMID:8938408

  2. Some physiological aspects of nitrate reductase-deficient Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    SciTech Connect

    Saux, C.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.; Lemoine, Y.; Caboche, M.

    1986-04-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv. Viviani) mutants were found to be defective in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR/sup -/ nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild type Nicotiana tabacum. The grafts of NR/sup -/ plants were found to contain less malate but more amino acids, sugars and starch than the wild type. Moreover they were chlorotic, with a slight increase of the proportion of LH Chl a/b protein complexes and they exhibited a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between the light-harvesting complexes and the active centers. After /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse and chase experiments. The total /sup 14/C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20% of that of the control. The NR/sup -/ leaves mainly accumulated /sup 14/C in the whole intermediates of the Calvin-cycle and in sucrose. In the most deficient NR leaves, chloroplasts were stuffed with large starch inclusions disorganizing the lamellar system.

  3. Consequence of absence of nitrate reductase activity on photosynthesis in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    SciTech Connect

    Saux, C.; Lemoine, Y.; Marion-Poll, A.; Valadier, M.H.; Deng, M.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv Viviani) mutants were found to be deficient in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR/sup -/ nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild-type Nicotiana tabacum plants. The grafts of mutant plants were chlorotic compared to the grafts of wild type. Mutant leaves did not accumulate nitrogen but contained less malate and more glutamine than wild leaves. They exhibited a slight increase of the proportion of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complexes and a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between these complexes and the active centers. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse, the total /sup 14/C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20/sup 5/ of that of the control. The /sup 14/C was essentially recovered in ribulose bisphosphate in these plants. It was consistent with a decline of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity observed in the mutant. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse followed by a 60 second chase with normal CO/sub 2/, /sup 14/C was mainly accumulated in starch which was labeled more in the mutant than in the wild type. These results confirm the observation that in the nitrate reductase deficient leaves, chloroplasts were loaded with large starch inclusions preceding disorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  4. How can plant virus satellite RNAs alter the effects of plant virus infection? A study of the changes in the Nicotiana benthamiana proteome after infection by peanut stunt virus in the presence or absence of its satellite RNA.

    PubMed

    Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra; Wieczorek, Przemysław; Budziszewska, Marta; Jeszke, Arnika; Renaut, Jenny

    2013-07-01

    Peanut stunt virus (PSV), which belongs to the Cucumovirus genus, is a pathogen of legumes. Certain PSV strains associated with a satellite RNA (satRNA) modify the symptoms of infected plants and interfere with plant metabolism. We used PSV-P genomic transcripts (GTs) with and without PSV-P satRNA and a comparative proteomic 2D-DIGE/MS study to assess their effects on Nicotiana benthamiana infection. When the proteomes of the PSV-P genomic transcripts-infected (no satRNA present) and mock-inoculated plants were compared 29 differentially regulated proteins were found. When comparisons were made for plants infected with PSV-P-GT in the presence or absence of satRNA, and for mock-infected plants and those infected with the satRNA-associated PSV-P-GT, 40 and 60 such proteins, respectively, were found. The presence of satRNA mostly decreased the amounts of the affected host proteins. Proteins involved in photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, for example ferredoxin-NADP-reductase and malate dehydrogenase, are among the identified affected proteins in all comparisons. Proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation were also affected. Such proteins include chaperonin 60β--whose abundance of the proteins changed for all comparisons--and aminopeptidase that is a satRNA- or PSV-P-GT/satRNA-responsive protein. Additionally, the levels of the stress-related proteins superoxide dismutase and acidic endochitinase Q increased in the PSV-P-GT- and PSV-P-GT/satRNA-infected plants. This study appears to be the first report on plant proteome changes in response to a satRNA presence during viral infection and, as such, may provide a reference for future studies concerning the influence of satRNAs during viral infections.

  5. Coniferyl alcohol hinders the growth of tobacco BY-2 cells and Nicotiana benthamiana seedlings.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Enni E; Smeds, Annika I; Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Teeri, Teemu H; Willför, Stefan M; Kärkönen, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Externally added coniferyl alcohol at high concentrations reduces the growth of Nicotiana cells and seedlings. Coniferyl alcohol is metabolized by BY-2 cells to several compounds. Coniferyl alcohol (CA) is a common monolignol and a building block of lignin. The toxicity of monolignol alcohols has been stated in the literature, but there are only few studies suggesting that this is true. We investigated the physiological effects of CA on living plant cells in more detail. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright yellow-2 cells (BY-2) and Nicotiana benthamiana seedlings both showed concentration-dependent growth retardation in response to 0.5-5 mM CA treatment. In some cases, CA addition caused cell death in BY-2 cultures, but this response was dependent on the growth stage of the cells. Based on LC-MS/MS analysis, BY-2 cells did not accumulate the externally supplemented CA, but metabolized it to ferulic acid, ferulic acid glycoside, coniferin, and to some other phenolic compounds. In addition to growth inhibition, CA caused the formation of a lignin-like compound detected by phloroglucinol staining in N. benthamiana roots and occasionally in BY-2 cells. To prevent this, we added potassium iodide (KI, at 5 mM) to overcome the peroxidase-mediated CA polymerization to lignin. KI had, however, toxic effects on its own: in N. benthamiana seedlings, it caused reduction in growth; in BY-2 cells, reduction in growth and cell viability. Surprisingly, CA restored the growth of KI-treated BY-2 cells and N. benthamiana seedlings. Our results suggest that CA at high concentrations is toxic to plant cells.

  6. The effect of polyploidy and hybridization on the evolution of floral colour in Nicotiana (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W; Arnold, Sarah E J; Chittka, Lars; Le Comber, Steven C; Verity, Robert; Dodsworth, Steven; Knapp, Sandra; Kelly, Laura J; Chase, Mark W; Baldwin, Ian T; Kovařík, Aleš; Mhiri, Corinne; Taylor, Lin; Leitch, Andrew R

    2015-06-01

    Speciation in angiosperms can be accompanied by changes in floral colour that may influence pollinator preference and reproductive isolation. This study investigates whether changes in floral colour can accompany polyploid and homoploid hybridization, important processes in angiosperm evolution. Spectral reflectance of corolla tissue was examined for 60 Nicotiana (Solanaceae) accessions (41 taxa) based on spectral shape (corresponding to pigmentation) as well as bee and hummingbird colour perception in order to assess patterns of floral colour evolution. Polyploid and homoploid hybrid spectra were compared with those of their progenitors to evaluate whether hybridization has resulted in floral colour shifts. Floral colour categories in Nicotiana seem to have arisen multiple times independently during the evolution of the genus. Most younger polyploids displayed an unexpected floral colour, considering those of their progenitors, in the colour perception of at least one pollinator type, whereas older polyploids tended to resemble one or both of their progenitors. Floral colour evolution in Nicotiana is weakly constrained by phylogeny, and colour shifts do occur in association with both polyploid and homoploid hybrid divergence. Transgressive floral colour in N. tabacum has arisen by inheritance of anthocyanin pigmentation from its paternal progenitor while having a plastid phenotype like its maternal progenitor. Potentially, floral colour evolution has been driven by, or resulted in, pollinator shifts. However, those polyploids that are not sympatric (on a regional scale) with their progenitor lineages are typically not divergent in floral colour from them, perhaps because of a lack of competition for pollinators. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Dynamic changes in the distribution of a satellite homologous to intergenic 26-18S rDNA spacer in the evolution of Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K Y; Skalicka, K; Koukalova, B; Volkov, R A; Matyasek, R; Hemleben, V; Leitch, A R; Kovarik, A

    2004-01-01

    An approximately 135-bp sequence called the A1/A2 repeat was isolated from the transcribed region of the 26-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) of Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Southern blot analysis revealed its occurrence as an independent satellite (termed an A1/A2 satellite) outside of rDNA loci in species of Nicotiana section Tomentosae. The chromosomal location, patterns of genomic dispersion, and copy numbers of its tandemly arranged units varied between the species. In more distantly related Nicotiana species the A1/A2 repeats were found only at the nucleolar organizer regions (NOR). There was a trend toward the elimination of the A1/A2 satellite in N. tabacum (tobacco), an allotetraploid with parents closely related to the diploids N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. This process may have already commenced in an S(3) generation of synthetic tobacco. Cytosine residues in the IGS were significantly hypomethylated compared with the A1/A2 satellite. There was no clear separation between the IGS and satellite fractions in sequence analysis of individual clones and we found no evidence for CG suppression. Taken together the data indicate a dynamic nature of the A1/A2 repeats in Nicotiana genomes, with evidence for recurrent integration, copy number expansions, and contractions. PMID:15126410

  8. A survey of resistance to Tomato bushy stunt virus in the genus Nicotiana reveals that the hypersensitive response is triggered by one of three different viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Angel, Carlos A; Schoelz, James E

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we screened 22 Nicotiana spp. for resistance to the tombusviruses Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), Cucumber necrosis virus, and Cymbidium ringspot virus. Eighteen species were resistant, and resistance was manifested in at least two different categories. In all, 13 species responded with a hypersensitive response (HR)-type resistance, whereas another five were resistant but either had no visible response or responded with chlorotic lesions rather than necrotic lesions. Three different TBSV proteins were found to trigger HR in Nicotiana spp. in an agroinfiltration assay. The most common avirulence (avr) determinant was the TBSV coat protein P41, a protein that had not been previously recognized as an avr determinant. A mutational analysis confirmed that the coat protein rather than the viral RNA sequence was responsible for triggering HR, and it triggered HR in six species in the Alatae section. The TBSV P22 movement protein triggered HR in two species in section Undulatae (Nicotiana glutinosa and N. edwardsonii) and one species in section Alatae (N. forgetiana). The TBSV P19 RNA silencing suppressor protein triggered HR in sections Sylvestres (N. sylvestris), Nicotiana (N. tabacum), and Alatae (N. bonariensis). In general, Nicotiana spp. were capable of recognizing only one tombusvirus avirulence determinant, with the exceptions of N. bonariensis and N. forgetiana, which were each able to recognize P41, as well as P19 and P22, respectively. Agroinfiltration failed to detect the TBSV avr determinants responsible for triggering HR in N. arentsii, N. undulata, and N. rustica. This study illustrates the breadth and variety of resistance responses to tombusviruses that exists in the Nicotiana genus.

  9. An interspecific Nicotiana hybrid as a useful and cost-effective platform for production of animal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ling, Huai-Yian; Edwards, Aaron M; Gantier, Michael P; Deboer, Kathleen D; Neale, Alan D; Hamill, John D; Walmsley, Amanda M

    2012-01-01

    The use of transgenic plants to produce novel products has great biotechnological potential as the relatively inexpensive inputs of light, water, and nutrients are utilised in return for potentially valuable bioactive metabolites, diagnostic proteins and vaccines. Extensive research is ongoing in this area internationally with the aim of producing plant-made vaccines of importance for both animals and humans. Vaccine purification is generally regarded as being integral to the preparation of safe and effective vaccines for use in humans. However, the use of crude plant extracts for animal immunisation may enable plant-made vaccines to become a cost-effective and efficacious approach to safely immunise large numbers of farm animals against diseases such as avian influenza. Since the technology associated with genetic transformation and large-scale propagation is very well established in Nicotiana, the genus has attributes well-suited for the production of plant-made vaccines. However the presence of potentially toxic alkaloids in Nicotiana extracts impedes their use as crude vaccine preparations. In the current study we describe a Nicotiana tabacum and N. glauca hybrid that expresses the HA glycoprotein of influenza A in its leaves but does not synthesize alkaloids. We demonstrate that injection with crude leaf extracts from these interspecific hybrid plants is a safe and effective approach for immunising mice. Moreover, this antigen-producing alkaloid-free, transgenic interspecific hybrid is vigorous, with a high capacity for vegetative shoot regeneration after harvesting. These plants are easily propagated by vegetative cuttings and have the added benefit of not producing viable pollen, thus reducing potential problems associated with bio-containment. Hence, these Nicotiana hybrids provide an advantageous production platform for partially purified, plant-made vaccines which may be particularly well suited for use in veterinary immunization programs.

  10. An Interspecific Nicotiana Hybrid as a Useful and Cost-Effective Platform for Production of Animal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Huai-Yian; Edwards, Aaron M.; Gantier, Michael P.; DeBoer, Kathleen D.; Neale, Alan D.; Hamill, John D.; Walmsley, Amanda M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of transgenic plants to produce novel products has great biotechnological potential as the relatively inexpensive inputs of light, water, and nutrients are utilised in return for potentially valuable bioactive metabolites, diagnostic proteins and vaccines. Extensive research is ongoing in this area internationally with the aim of producing plant-made vaccines of importance for both animals and humans. Vaccine purification is generally regarded as being integral to the preparation of safe and effective vaccines for use in humans. However, the use of crude plant extracts for animal immunisation may enable plant-made vaccines to become a cost-effective and efficacious approach to safely immunise large numbers of farm animals against diseases such as avian influenza. Since the technology associated with genetic transformation and large-scale propagation is very well established in Nicotiana, the genus has attributes well-suited for the production of plant-made vaccines. However the presence of potentially toxic alkaloids in Nicotiana extracts impedes their use as crude vaccine preparations. In the current study we describe a Nicotiana tabacum and N. glauca hybrid that expresses the HA glycoprotein of influenza A in its leaves but does not synthesize alkaloids. We demonstrate that injection with crude leaf extracts from these interspecific hybrid plants is a safe and effective approach for immunising mice. Moreover, this antigen-producing alkaloid-free, transgenic interspecific hybrid is vigorous, with a high capacity for vegetative shoot regeneration after harvesting. These plants are easily propagated by vegetative cuttings and have the added benefit of not producing viable pollen, thus reducing potential problems associated with bio-containment. Hence, these Nicotiana hybrids provide an advantageous production platform for partially purified, plant-made vaccines which may be particularly well suited for use in veterinary immunization programs. PMID:22539991

  11. Respiratory ATP cost and benefit of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis with Nicotiana tabacum at different growth stages and under salinity.

    PubMed

    Del-Saz, Néstor Fernández; Romero-Munar, Antonia; Alonso, David; Aroca, Ricardo; Baraza, Elena; Flexas, Jaume; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel

    2017-09-07

    Growth and maintenance partly depend on both respiration and ATP production during oxidative phosphorylation in leaves. Under stress, ATP is needed to maintain the accumulated biomass. ATP production mostly proceeds from the cytochrome oxidase pathway (COP), while respiration via the alternative oxidase pathway (AOP) may decrease the production of ATP per oxygen consumed, especially under phosphorus (P) limitation and salinity conditions. Symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is reputed by their positive effect on plant growth under stress at mature stages of colonization; however, fungal colonization may decrease plant growth at early stages. Thus, the present research is based on the hypothesis that AM fungus colonization will increase both foliar respiration and ATP production at mature stages of plant growth while decreasing them both at early stages. We used the oxygen-isotope-fractionation technique to study the in vivo respiratory activities and ATP production of the COP and AOP in AM and non-AM (NM) tobacco plants grown under P-limiting and saline conditions in sand at different growth stages (14, 28 and 49days). Our results suggest that AM symbiosis represents an ATP cost detrimental for shoot growth at early stages, whilst it represents a benefit on ATP allowing for faster rates of growth at mature stages, even under salinity conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of miR156 to identify traits associated with vegetative phase change in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Feng, Shengjun; Xu, Yunmin; Guo, Changkui; Zheng, Jirong; Zhou, Bingying; Zhang, Yuting; Ding, Yue; Zhang, Lu; Zhu, Zhujun; Wang, Huasen; Wu, Gang

    2016-03-01

    After germination, plants progress through juvenile and adult phases of vegetative development before entering the reproductive phase. The character and timing of these phases vary significantly between different plant species, which makes it difficult to know whether temporal variations in various vegetative traits represent the same, or different, developmental processes. miR156 has been shown to be the master regulator of vegetative development in plants. Overexpression of miR156 prolongs the juvenile phase of development, whereas knocking-down the level of miR156 promotes the adult phase of development. Therefore, artificial modulation of miR156 expression is expected to cause corresponding changes in vegetative-specific traits in different plant species, particularly in those showing no substantial difference in morphology during vegetative development. To identify specific traits associated with the juvenile-to-adult transition in tobacco, we examined the phenotype of transgenic tobacco plants with elevated or reduced levels of miR156. We found that leaf shape, the density of abaxial trichomes, the number of leaf veins, the number of stomata, the size and density of epidermal cells, patterns of epidermal cell staining, the content of chlorophyll and the rate of photosynthesis, are all affected by miR156. These newly identified miR156-regulated traits therefore can be used to distinguish between juvenile and adult phases of development in tobacco, and provide a starting point for future studies of vegetative phase change in the family Solanaceae. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Exogenous auxin regulates multi-metabolic network and embryo development, controlling seed secondary dormancy and germination in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Yiling; Zhao, Jiehong; Fu, Junjie; Ren, Xueliang; Wang, Guoying; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-02-09

    Auxin was recognized as a secondary dormancy phytohormone, controlling seed dormancy and germination. However, the exogenous auxin-controlled seed dormancy and germination remain unclear in physiological process and gene network. Tobacco seeds soaked in 1000 mg/l auxin solution showed markedly decreased germination compared with that in low concentration of auxin solutions and ddH2O. Using an electron microscope, observations were made on the seeds which did not unfold properly in comparison to those submerged in ddH2O. The radicle traits measured by WinRHIZO, were found to be also weaker than the other treatment groups. Quantified by ELISA, there was no significant difference found in β-1,3glucanase activity and abscisic acid (ABA) content between the seeds imbibed in gradient concentration of auxin solution and those soaked in ddH2O. However, gibberellic acid (GA) and auxin contents were significantly higher at the time of exogenous auxin imbibition and were gradually reduced at germination. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), revealed that the transcriptome of auxin-responsive dormancy seeds were more similar to that of the imbibed seeds when compared with primary dormancy seeds by principal component analysis. The results of gene differential expression analysis revealed that auxin-controlled seed secondary dormancy was associated with flavonol biosynthetic process, gibberellin metabolic process, adenylyl-sulfate reductase activity, thioredoxin activity, glutamate synthase (NADH) activity and chromatin regulation. In addition, auxin-responsive germination responded to ABA, auxin, jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) mediated signaling pathway (red, far red and blue light), glutathione and methionine (Met) metabolism. In this study, exogenous auxin-mediated seed secondary dormancy is an environmental model that prevents seed germination in an unfavorable condition. Seeds of which could not imbibe normally, and radicles of which also could not develop normally and emerge. To complete the germination, seeds of which would stimulate more GA synthesis to antagonize the stimulation of exogenous auxin. Exogenous auxin regulates multi-metabolic networks controlling seed secondary dormancy and germination, of which the most important thing was that we found the auxin-responsive seed secondary dormancy refers to epigenetic regulation and germination to enhance Met pathway. Therefore, this study uncovers a previously unrecognized transcriptional regulatory networks and physiological development process of seed dormancy and germination with superfluous auxin signal activate.

  14. Construction of phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) transformation vectors and evaluation of the effectiveness of vectors in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L)

    PubMed Central

    Bahariah, Bohari; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Khalid, Norzulaani

    2012-01-01

    Phosphomannose isomerase (pmi) gene isolated from Escherichia coli allows transgenic plants carrying it to convert mannose-6- phosphate (from mannose), a carbon source that could not be naturally utilized by plants into fructose-6-phosphate which can be utilized by plants as a carbon source. This conversion ability provides energy source to allow the transformed cells to survive on the medium containing mannose. In this study, four transformation vectors carrying the pmi gene alone or in combination with the β-glucuronidase (gusA) gene were constructed and driven by either the maize ubiquitin (Ubi1) or the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV35S) promoter. Restriction digestion, PCR amplification and sequencing were carried out to ensure sequence integrity and orientation. Tobacco was used as a model system to study the effectiveness of the constructs and selection system. PMI11G and pMI3G, which carry gusA gene, were used to study the gene transient expression in tobacco. PMI3 construct, which only carries the pmi gene driven by CaMV35S promoter, was stably transformed into tobacco using biolistics after selection on 30 g 1-1 mannose without sucrose. Transgenic plants were verified using PCR analysis. Abbreviations PMI/pmi - Phosphomannose isomerase, Ubi1 - Maize ubiquitin promoter, CaMV35S - Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, gusA - β-glucuronidase GUS reporter gene. PMID:22368388

  15. Construction of phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) transformation vectors and evaluation of the effectiveness of vectors in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L).

    PubMed

    Bahariah, Bohari; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Khalid, Norzulaani

    2012-01-01

    Phosphomannose isomerase (pmi) gene isolated from Escherichia coli allows transgenic plants carrying it to convert mannose-6- phosphate (from mannose), a carbon source that could not be naturally utilized by plants into fructose-6-phosphate which can be utilized by plants as a carbon source. This conversion ability provides energy source to allow the transformed cells to survive on the medium containing mannose. In this study, four transformation vectors carrying the pmi gene alone or in combination with the β-glucuronidase (gusA) gene were constructed and driven by either the maize ubiquitin (Ubi1) or the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV35S) promoter. Restriction digestion, PCR amplification and sequencing were carried out to ensure sequence integrity and orientation. Tobacco was used as a model system to study the effectiveness of the constructs and selection system. PMI11G and pMI3G, which carry gusA gene, were used to study the gene transient expression in tobacco. PMI3 construct, which only carries the pmi gene driven by CaMV35S promoter, was stably transformed into tobacco using biolistics after selection on 30 g 1(-1) mannose without sucrose. Transgenic plants were verified using PCR analysis. PMI/pmi - Phosphomannose isomerase, Ubi1 - Maize ubiquitin promoter, CaMV35S - Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, gusA - β-glucuronidase GUS reporter gene.

  16. Cloning and characterization of TaVIP2 gene from Triticum aestivum and functional analysis in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pei; Wang, Ke; Lin, Zhishan; Zhang, Wei; Du, Lipu; Zhang, Yunlong; Ye, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is recalcitrant to genetic transformation. A potential solution is to manipulate the expression of some host proteins involved in T-DNA integration process. VirE2 interacting protein 2 (VIP2) plays an important role in T-DNA transport and integration. In this study, a TaVIP2 gene was cloned from common wheat. Southern blot and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) combined with an online chromosomal location software tool revealed that three TaVIP2 genes were located on wheat chromosomes 1AL, 1BL, and 1DL. These three homoeoallelic TaVIP2 genes all contained 13 exons and 12 introns, and their coding sequences were the same; there were a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the three genes. The heterologous expression of the TaVIP2 gene in tobacco led to enhancement of the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency up to 2.5-fold. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing TaVIP2 showed enhanced resistance to powdery mildew. Further quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that overexpression of TaVIP2 in transgenic tobacco up-regulated the expression of an endogenous gene, NtPR-1, which likely contributed to powdery mildew resistance in transgenic tobacco. Our study indicates that the TaVIP2 gene may be highly useful in efforts to improve Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency and to enhance powdery mildew resistance in wheat. PMID:27857194

  17. Effect of calcium carbonate on cadmium and nutrients uptake in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) planted on contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Ai; Li, Fan; Zhou, Hang; Qin, Xiao-Li; Zou, Zi-Jin; Tian, Tao; Zeng, Min; Liao, Bo-Han

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was applied to Cd-contaminated soil at rates of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 g kg(-1). The effect of CaCO3 on soil pH, organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd and level of major nutrients in a tobacco field and on accumulation of various elements in tobacco plants was determined. The results showed that CaCO3 application significantly increased the pH level, available P and exchangeable Ca but decreased organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd, available heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) and available K in soil. Additionally, CaCO3 application substantially reduced Cd accumulation in tobacco roots, stems, upper leaves, middle leaves and lower leaves, with maximum decrease of 22.3%, 32.1%, 24.5%, 22.0% and 18.2%, respectively. There were large increase in total Ca and slight increases in total N and K but decrease to varying degrees in total Fe, Cu and Zn due to CaCO3 application. CaCO3 had little effect on total P and Mn levels in tobacco leaves.

  18. Role of transpiration and metabolism in translocation and accumulation of cadmium in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiwei; Wang, Haiyun; Ma, Yibing; Wang, Haohao; Shi, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Tobacco plants grown in pots and in hydroponic culture accumulated cadmium (Cd) particularly: the Cd content of tobacco leaves exceeded 100 mg/kg and the enrichment factor (the ratio of Cd in leaves to that in soil) was more than 4. These high levels of accumulation identify tobacco as a hyperaccumulator of Cd. Two transpiration inhibitors (paraffin or CaCl2) and shade decreased the Cd content of tobacco leaves, and the decrease showed a linear relationship with the leaf transpiration rate. A metabolism inhibitor, namely 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), and low temperature (4 °C) also lowered the Cd content of tobacco leaves, but the inhibitory effect of low temperature was greater. In the half number of leaves that were shaded, the Cd content decreased to 26.5% of that in leaves that were not shaded in the same tobacco plants. These results suggests that translocation of Cd from the medium to the leaves is driven by the symplastic and the apoplastic pathways. Probably, of the two crucial steps in the translocation of Cd in tobacco plants, one, namely uptake from the medium to the xylem, is energy-dependent whereas the other, namely the transfer from the xylem to the leaves, is driven mainly by transpiration.

  19. The role of gluconate production by Pseudomonas spp. in the mineralization and bioavailability of calcium-phytate to Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Giles, Courtney D; Hsu, Pei-Chun Lisa; Richardson, Alan E; Hurst, Mark R H; Hill, Jane E

    2015-12-01

    Organic phosphorus (P) is abundant in most soils but is largely unavailable to plants. Pseudomonas spp. can improve the availability of P to plants through the production of phytases and organic anions. Gluconate is a major component of Pseudomonas organic anion production and may therefore play an important role in the mineralization of insoluble organic P forms such as calcium-phytate (CaIHP). Organic anion and phytase production was characterized in 2 Pseudomonas spp. soil isolates (CCAR59, Ha200) and an isogenic mutant of strain Ha200, which lacked a functional glucose dehydrogenase (Gcd) gene (strain Ha200 gcd::Tn5B8). Wild-type and mutant strains of Pseudomonas spp. were evaluated for their ability to solubilize and hydrolyze CaIHP and to promote the growth and assimilation of P by tobacco plants. Gluconate, 2-keto-gluconate, pyruvate, ascorbate, acetate, and formate were detected in Pseudomonas spp. supernatants. Wild-type pseudomonads containing a functional gcd could produce gluconate and mineralize CaIHP, whereas the isogenic mutant could not. Inoculation with Pseudomonas improved the bioavailability of CaIHP to tobacco plants, but there was no difference in plant growth response due to Gcd function. Gcd function is required for the mineralization of CaIHP in vitro; however, further studies will be needed to quantify the relative contribution of specific organic anions such as gluconate to plant growth promotion by soil pseudomonads.

  20. Cloning, Transformation and Expression of Human Interferon α2b Gene in Tobacco Plant (Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi)

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarzadeh, Shahrzad; Daneshvar, Mohammad Hosein; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Galehdari, Hamid; Alamisaied, Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular farming is the production of important recombinant proteins in transgenic organisms on an agricultural scale. Interferons are proteins with antiviral and antitumor activities and can be used for viral infections and cancers treatments. Objectives This study reports the transformation of INF α2b gene in tobacco plant for the first time in Iran. Materials and Methods Interferon α2b gene was amplified by PCR using specific primers containing appropriate restriction enzymes, plant highly expression sequence and Histidine tag sequence. Target sequence was cloned in plant expression vector pCAMBIA1304 and the construct named pCAMINFα. pCAMINFα was transferred to E. coli strain DH5α and plated on LB agar medium containing kanamycin 50 mgl-1. The colonies were confirmed by colony PCR and sequencing. The construct was transferred into Agrobacterium tumefaciens by freeze-thaw method and transformed colonies were confirmed by colony PCR. Tobacco plants (cultivar xanthi) were inoculated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 by leaf disc method. Inoculated explants were cultured on MSII (MS + BAP 1mgl-1 + NAA 0.1 mgl-1) at 28°C and darkness for 48 hours. Then explants were transferred to selection medium containing cephotaxime (250 mgl-1) and hygromycin (15 mgl-1) in a 16/8 (day/night) h photoperiod in growth room with an irradiance of 5000 lux. Transgenic plants were regenerated and transferred to perlite. Genomic DNA was extracted from regenerated plants by Dellaporta method at 5-leaf step and transgenic lines were confirmed by PCR with specific primers. Expression of Interferon α2b gene was confirmed by dot blotting. Conclusions Since no report of interferon alpha production in plants in Iran has been expressed yet, this research could create a field of producing this drug in tobacco, in Iran. PMID:24624166

  1. Dynamic expression analysis of early response genes induced by potato virus Y in PVY-resistant Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Li, Fengxia; Liu, Dan; Jiang, Caihong; Cui, Lijie; Shen, Lili; Liu, Guanshan; Yang, Aiguo

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic transcriptional changes of the host early responses genes were detected in PVY-resistant tobacco varieties infected with Potato virus Y; PVY resistance is a complex process that needs series of stress responses. Potato virus Y (PVY) causes a severe viral disease in cultivated crops, especially in Solanum plants. To understand the molecular basis of plant responses to the PVY stress, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and microarray approaches were combined to identify the potentially important or novel genes that were involved in early stages (12 h, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 days) of tobacco response to PVY infection. Dynamic changes of the host plant early responses to PVY infection on a transcriptional level were detected. In total, 167 different expressed ESTs were identified. The majority of genes involved in the metabolic process were found to be down-regulated at 12 h and 1 day, and then up-regulated at least one later period. Genes related to signaling and transcriptions were almost up-regulated at 12 h, 1 or 2 days, while stress response genes were almost up-regulated at a later stage. Genes involved in transcription, transport, cell wall, and several stress responses were found to have changed expression during the PVY infection stage, and numbers of these genes have not been previously reported to be associated with tobacco PVY infection. The diversity expression of these genes indicated that PVY resistance is a complex process that needs a series of stress responses. To resist the PVY infection, the tobacco plant has numerous active and silent responses.

  2. Arabidopsis LOS5/ABA3 overexpression in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc) results in enhanced drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuesen; Zhang, Mingcai; Zhang, Jiachang; Duan, Liusheng; Li, Zhaohu

    2011-10-01

    Drought is a major environmental stress factor that affects growth and development of plants. Abscisic acid (ABA), osmotically active compounds, and synthesis of specific proteins, such as proteins that scavenge oxygen radicals, are crucial for plants to adapt to water deficit. LOS5/ABA3 (LOS5) encodes molybdenum-cofactor sulfurase, which is a key regulator of ABA biosynthesis. We overexpressed LOS5 in tobacco using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Detached leaves of LOS5-overexpressing seedlings showed lower transpirational water loss than that of nontransgenic seedlings in the same period under normal conditions. When subjected to water-deficit stress, transgenic plants showed less wilting, maintained higher water content and better cellular membrane integrity, accumulated higher quantities of ABA and proline, and exhibited higher activities of antioxidant enzymes, i.e., superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase, as compared with control plants. Furthermore, LOS5-overexpressing plants treated with 30% polyethylene glycol showed similar performance in cellular membrane protection, ABA and proline accumulation, and activities of catalase and peroxidase to those under drought stress. Thus, overexpression of LOS5 in transgenic tobacco can enhance drought tolerance.

  3. Effect of lead (Pb) on the systemic movement of RNA viruses in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Turkish).

    PubMed

    Alkhatib, Rami; Creamer, Rebecca; Lartey, Robert T; Ghoshroy, Soumitra

    2011-08-01

    Effect of various lead (Pb) concentrations on the systemic movement of RNA viruses was examined in tobacco plants. Prior to inoculation, plants were grown hydroponically for 6 days in Hoagland's solution supplemented with five concentrations of lead nitrate [Pb(NO(3))(2)]: 0.0 (control), 10, 15, 50, and 100 μM. Four different RNA viruses with different cell-to-cell movement mechanisms were used. Two weeks after inoculation lower and upper leaves of each treatment were harvested and examined for the presence of viral coat protein. In plants inoculated with Tobacco mosaic virus, Potato virus X, and Tobacco etch virus, TEM images and western blot assays confirmed the presence of viral coat proteins in the upper leaves of all lead treatments. However, in plants inoculated with Turnip vein-clearing virus (TVCV), no signs of viral particles were detected in the upper leaves of plants treated with 10 μM or 15 μM lead nitrate. In contrast, plants treated with high concentrations of lead nitrate (50 μM or 100 μM) showed viral particles in their upper leaves. In plants treated with 10 μM or 15 μM lead nitrate, callose accumulation was the same as in control plants. This suggests that non-toxic concentrations of lead nitrate may trigger the production of putative cellular factors in addition to callose that interfere with the TVCV systemic movement. In contrast, plants treated with 100 μM lead nitrate showed less callose as compared to control plants, facilitating the systemic movement of TVCV.

  4. Effects of Lead (Pb) on the Systemic Movement of RNA Viruses in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Turkish)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effect of different lead (Pb) concentrations on the systemic movement of RNA viruses was examined in tobacco plants. Prior to inoculation, plants were grown hydroponically for six days in Hoagland's solution supplemented with five concentrations of lead nitrate [Pb(NO3)2]:0.0 (control), 10 uM, 15 u...

  5. Predictive models for transient protein expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) can optimize process time, yield, and downstream costs.

    PubMed

    Buyel, J F; Fischer, R

    2012-10-01

    The transient expression of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in plants can suffer inter-batch variation, which is considered a major drawback under the strict regulatory demands imposed by current good manufacturing practice (cGMP). However, we have achieved transient expression of the monoclonal antibody 2G12 and the fluorescent marker protein DsRed in tobacco leaves with ∼ 15% intra-batch coefficients of variation, which is within the range reported for transgenic plants. We developed models for the transient expression of both proteins that predicted quantitative expression levels based on five parameters: The OD(600 nm) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens (from 0.13 to 2.00), post-inoculation incubation temperature (15-30°C), plant age (harvest at 40 or 47 days after seeding), leaf age, and position within the leaf. The expression models were combined with a model of plant biomass distribution and extraction, generating a yield model for each target protein that could predict the amount of protein in specific leaf parts, individual leaves, groups of leaves, and whole plants. When the yield model was combined with a cost function for the production process, we were able to perform calculations to optimize process time, yield, or downstream costs. We illustrate this procedure by transferring the cost function from a production process using transgenic plants to a hypothetical process for the transient expression of 2G12. Our models allow the economic evaluation of new plant-based production processes and provide greater insight into the parameters that affect transient protein expression in plants. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. iTRAQ protein profile analysis provides integrated insight into mechanisms of tolerance to TMV in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiao-ran; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Jin-miao; Guo, Hong-xiang; Yang, Li-jun; Liu, Wei-qun

    2016-01-30

    To further investigate the mechanism of the plant tolerance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) infection, tobacco NC89 (N) hypersensitive to TMV and its natural mutant Yuyan8 (Y) with tolerance to TMV were employed for differential accumulation proteome analysis. There were 260 specifically accumulated proteins in Yuyan8 after 24 h inoculation (Yd), and the accumulations of 285 proteins inherent in Y have changed after TMV infection. Equally, there were 183 specifically accumulated proteins in NC89 after 24 h inoculation (Nd), and 132 proteins inherent in N have changed after TMV infection. These differential proteins were respectively enriched in two pathways, of which photosynthesis pathway was the common pathway in two varieties. In photoreaction system, the accumulations of differential proteins, especially D1 protein, were not decreased in Yd compared to Nd. The results indicated that maintaining the stability of D1 protein and reasonable utilization of the energy was the essential for tolerance to TMV infection. It was also revealed that 14-3-3 protein and PR4 was specific expressed, and the expression of LRR was enhanced in Yd, suggesting that regulation of defense protein mediated by 14-3-3 protein quickly activated resistance system and enhanced the plant tolerance to TMV infection. This is the first work that the molecular basis of tobacco tolerance was discussed basic on proteomic investigation performed on wild type and its natural mutant. Our results lay the foundation for development of molecular breeding and further proteome research in tobacco. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spatial patterns of senescence and development-dependent distribution of reactive oxygen species in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomska, Ewa; Polzien, Lisa; Desel, Christine; Rozpadek, Piotr; Miszalski, Zbigniew; Krupinska, Karin

    2009-07-01

    Senescence of tobacco leaves is distributed non-uniformly over a leaf blade. While photosynthetic competence and expression of photosynthesis-associated genes decline in interveinal areas of the leaf lamina with advancing age of the leaf, they are maintained at high levels in the tissue surrounding the veins. In contrast, expression of senescence-associated genes (SAG) was enhanced in both areas of the leaf blade. Accumulation of hydrogen peroxide was shown to precede the phase of senescence initiation in the veinal tissue. In the interveinal tissue, the level of hydrogen peroxide was increased with senescence progression and paralleled by an increase in the level of superoxide anions. It is hypothesized that the spatial differences in superoxide anions are important for the non-uniform down-regulation of photosynthesis-associated genes (PAG), while hydrogen peroxide is responsible for up-regulation of SAG.

  8. Molecular diversity, population structure, and linkage disequilibrium in a worldwide collection of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) germplasm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The goals of our study were to assess the phylogeny and the population structure of tobacco accessions representing a wide range of genetic diversity; identify a subset of accessions as a core collection capturing most of the existing genetic diversity; and estimate, in the tobacco core collection, the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in seven genomic regions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. To this end, a collection of accessions were genotyped with SSR markers. Molecular diversity was evaluated and LD was analyzed across seven regions of the genome. Results A genotyping database for 312 tobacco accessions was profiled with 49 SSR markers. Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) and Bayesian cluster analysis revealed structuring of the tobacco population with regard to commercial classes and six main clades were identified, which correspond to "Oriental", Flue-Cured", "Burley", "Dark", "Primitive", and "Other" classes. Pairwise kinship was calculated between accessions, and an overall low level of co-ancestry was observed. A set of 89 genotypes was identified that captured the whole genetic diversity detected at the 49 loci. LD was evaluated on these genotypes, using 422 SSR markers mapping on seven linkage groups. LD was estimated as squared correlation of allele frequencies (r2). The pattern of intrachromosomal LD revealed that in tobacco LD extended up to distances as great as 75 cM with r2 > 0.05 or up to 1 cM with r2 > 0.2. The pattern of LD was clearly dependent on the population structure. Conclusions A global population of tobacco is highly structured. Clustering highlights the accessions with the same market class. LD in tobacco extends up to 75 cM and is strongly dependent on the population structure. PMID:22435796

  9. Isolation and Compositional Analysis of a CP12-Associated Complex of Calvin Cycle Enzymes from Nicotiana tabacum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CP12 is a small intrinsically unstructured protein that forms a multiprotein complex with two Calvin Cycle enzymes, phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and NAD(P)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The complex can be reconstituted in vitro from recombinant proteins under conditions t...

  10. Isolation and compositional analysis of a CP12-associated complex of calvin cycle enzymes from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Marri, Lucia; Sparla, Francesca; Salvucci, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Two Calvin Cycle enzymes, NAD(P)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) form a multiprotein complex with CP12, a small intrinsically-unstructured protein. Under oxidizing conditions, association with CP12 confers redox-sensitivity to the otherwise redox-insensitive A isoform of GAPDH (GapA) and provides an additional level of down-regulation to the redox-regulated PRK. To determine if CP12-mediated regulation is specific for GAPDH and PRK in vivo, a high molecular weight complex containing CP12 was isolated from tobacco chloroplasts and leaves and its protein composition was characterized. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analyses after separation of stromal proteins by size fractionation verified that the GAPDH (both isoforms) and PRK co-migrated with CP12 in dark- but not light-adapted chloroplasts. Nano-liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry of the isolated complex identified only CP12, GAPDH and PRK. Since nearly all of the CP12 from darkened chloroplasts migrates with GADPH and PRK as a high molecular mass species, these data indicate that the tight association of tobacco CP12 with GAPDH and PRK is specific and involves no other Calvin Cycle enzymes.

  11. Contribution of Nicotine and Nornicotine toward the Production of N'-Nitrosonornicotine in Air-Cured Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Ji, Huihua; Fannin, Franklin F; Bush, Lowell P

    2016-04-22

    N'-Nitrosonornicotine (6) is a potent and organ-specific carcinogen found in tobacco and tobacco smoke in substantial amounts. Nicotine (1) and nornicotine (2) are proposed to be the precursors of 6 in tobacco. Since 1 can be rapidly demethylated to 2 in tobacco, to distinguish between the direct formation of 6 from these potential precursors is difficult. A gas chromatography/thermal energy analyzer method using two columns in series was developed to separate the enantiomers of 6, N'-nitrosoanabasine (7), and N'-nitrosoanatabine (8). Tobacco lines with different combinations of three nicotine demethylases inhibited were grown in the field. Air-cured leaves were analyzed for the enantiomeric composition of four main alkaloids and their corresponding tobacco-specific nitrosamines. The percentage of (R)-6 of total 6 varied from 7% to 69% in mutant lines. The measured 6 had the same enantiomeric composition as 2, rather than 1, even when the level of 2 was reduced to 0.6% of 1 in a triple mutant line. The pattern of the enantiomeric composition of 1, 2, and 6 demonstrated that the direct formation of 6 from 1, if it occurs, is negligible in air-cured tobacco. Since (S)-6 is more highly carcinogenic than its R form, the reduction of (S)-2 should be a priority for the reduction of 6.

  12. RNA sequencing analysis reveals transcriptomic variations in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves affected by climate, soil, and tillage factors.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bo; Lu, Kun; Ding, Fuzhang; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Yi; Zhao, Huina; Zhang, Lin; Ren, Zhu; Qu, Cunmin; Guo, Wenjing; Wang, Jing; Pan, Wenjie

    2014-04-11

    The growth and development of plants are sensitive to their surroundings. Although numerous studies have analyzed plant transcriptomic variation, few have quantified the effect of combinations of factors or identified factor-specific effects. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis on tobacco leaves derived from 10 treatment combinations of three groups of ecological factors, i.e., climate factors (CFs), soil factors (SFs), and tillage factors (TFs). We detected 4980, 2916, and 1605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that were affected by CFs, SFs, and TFs, which included 2703, 768, and 507 specific and 703 common DEGs (simultaneously regulated by CFs, SFs, and TFs), respectively. GO and KEGG enrichment analyses showed that genes involved in abiotic stress responses and secondary metabolic pathways were overrepresented in the common and CF-specific DEGs. In addition, we noted enrichment in CF-specific DEGs related to the circadian rhythm, SF-specific DEGs involved in mineral nutrient absorption and transport, and SF- and TF-specific DEGs associated with photosynthesis. Based on these results, we propose a model that explains how plants adapt to various ecological factors at the transcriptomic level. Additionally, the identified DEGs lay the foundation for future investigations of stress resistance, circadian rhythm and photosynthesis in tobacco.

  13. Identification and characterization of miRNAome in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) by deep sequencing combined with microarray.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yushuang; Liu, Hanhua; Yang, Zhixiao; Chen, Jing; Sun, Yimin; Ren, Xueliang

    2012-06-10

    Tobacco is one of the most important economic and agricultural crops worldwide. miRNAs have been increasingly acknowledged for their important roles in different biological processes of tobacco. However, few miRNAs have been identified so far in tobacco impeding the development of new tobacco strains with better properties. In this study, high-throughput sequencing technology was employed to identify novel tobacco miRNAs. A total of 84 potential miRNAs were obtained in tobacco, including 33 conserved and 51 novel miRNAs. Tissue-specific and topping-related miRNAs were identified. A tobacco miRNA microarray was also constructed to investigate miRNA expression patterns in different tissues, and their expression patterns were further validated by qRT-PCR and Northern Blot. Finally, the potential targets of these miRNAs were predicted based on a sequence homology search. Thus, in the current study, we have performed the comprehensive analysis of tobacco miRNAs, including their identification, expression pattern and target prediction. Our study opens a new avenue for further elucidation for their roles underlying the regulation of diversity of physiological processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome-wide identification of chromium stress-responsive micro RNAs and their target genes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) roots.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Asad Hussain; Shang, Shenghua; Zhang, Mian; Zheng, Weite; Zhang, Guoping; Wang, Ting-Zhang; Shamsi, Imran Haider; Wu, Feibo

    2015-11-01

    Tobacco easily accumulates certain heavy metals in leaves and thus poses a potential threat to human health. To systematically dissect Cr-responsive microRNAs (miRNAs) and their targets at the global level, 4 small RNA libraries were constructed from the roots of Cr-treated (Cr) and Cr-free (control) for 2 contrasting tobacco genotypes,Yunyan2 (Cr-sensitive) and Guiyan1 (Cr-tolerant). Using high-throughput-sequencing-technology, the authors identified 53 conserved and 29 novel miRNA families. Comparative genomic analysis of 41 conserved Cr-responsive miRNA families revealed that 11 miRNA families showed up-regulation in Guiyan1 but unaltered in Yunyan2, and 17 miRNA families were up-regulated only in Yunyan2 under Cr stress. Only 1 family, miR6149, was down-regulated in Yunyan2 but remained unchanged in Guiyan1. Of the 29 novel miRNA families, 14 expressed differently in the 2 genotypes under Cr stress. Based on a high-throughput degradome sequencing homology search, potential targets were predicted for the 41 conserved and 14 novel Cr-responsive miRNA families. Clusters of Orthologous Groups functional category analysis revealed that some of these predicted target transcripts of miRNAs are responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses. Furthermore, the expression patterns of many Cr-responsive miRNAs were validated by stem-loop real-time transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study provide valuable information and a framework for understanding the function of miRNAs in Cr tolerance. © 2015 SETAC.

  15. Membrane topology of Golgi-localized probable S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianping; Hayashi, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Ken

    2015-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases (MTases) transfer methyl groups to substrates. In this study, a novel putative tobacco SAM-MTase termed Golgi-localized methyl transferase 1 (GLMT1) has been characterized. GLMT1 is comprised of 611 amino acids with short N-terminal region, putative transmembrane region, and C-terminal SAM-MTase domain. Expression of monomeric red fluorescence protein (mRFP)-tagged protein in tobacco BY-2 cell indicated that GLMT1 is a Golgi-localized protein. Analysis of the membrane topology by protease digestion suggested that both C-terminal catalytic region and N-terminal region seem to be located to the cytosolic side of the Golgi apparatus. Therefore, GLMT1 might have a different function than the previously studied SAM-MTases in plants.

  16. Comparative transcriptome analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves to identify aroma compound-related genes expressed in different cultivated regions.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bo; Zhao, Xue-Hua; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ren, Zhu; Chen, Yi; Zhao, Hui-Na; Pan, Wen-Jie; Chen, Wei; Li, Hong-Xun; Deng, Wen-Ya; Ding, Fu-Zhang; Lu, Kun

    2013-01-01

    To identify genes that are differentially expressed in tobacco in response to environmental changes and to decipher the mechanisms by which aromatic carotenoids are formed in tobacco, an Agilent Tobacco Gene Expression microarray was adapted for transcriptome comparison of tobacco leaves derived from three cultivated regions of China, Kaiyang (KY), Weining (WN) and Tianzhu (TZ). A total of 1,005 genes were differentially expressed between leaves derived from KY and TZ, 733 between KY and WN, and 517 between TZ and WN. Genes that were upregulated in leaves from WN and TZ tended to be involved in secondary metabolism pathways, and included several carotenoid pathway genes, e.g., NtPYS, NtPDS, and NtLCYE, whereas those that were down-regulated tended to be involved in the response to temperature and light. The expression of 10 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) was evaluated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and found to be consistent with the microarray data. Gene Ontology and MapMan analyses indicate that the genes that were differentially expressed among the three cultivated regions were associated with the light reaction of photosystem II, response to stimuli, and secondary metabolism. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that leaves derived from KY had the lowest levels of lutein, β-carotene, and neoxanthin, whereas the total carotenoid content in leaves from TZ was greatest, a finding that could well be explained by the expression patterns of DEGs in the carotenoid pathway. These results may help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying environmental adaptation and accumulation of aroma compounds in tobacco.

  17. RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Transcriptomic Variations in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Leaves Affected by Climate, Soil, and Tillage Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Bo; Lu, Kun; Ding, Fuzhang; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Yi; Zhao, Huina; Zhang, Lin; Ren, Zhu; Qu, Cunmin; Guo, Wenjing; Wang, Jing; Pan, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    The growth and development of plants are sensitive to their surroundings. Although numerous studies have analyzed plant transcriptomic variation, few have quantified the effect of combinations of factors or identified factor-specific effects. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis on tobacco leaves derived from 10 treatment combinations of three groups of ecological factors, i.e., climate factors (CFs), soil factors (SFs), and tillage factors (TFs). We detected 4980, 2916, and 1605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that were affected by CFs, SFs, and TFs, which included 2703, 768, and 507 specific and 703 common DEGs (simultaneously regulated by CFs, SFs, and TFs), respectively. GO and KEGG enrichment analyses showed that genes involved in abiotic stress responses and secondary metabolic pathways were overrepresented in the common and CF-specific DEGs. In addition, we noted enrichment in CF-specific DEGs related to the circadian rhythm, SF-specific DEGs involved in mineral nutrient absorption and transport, and SF- and TF-specific DEGs associated with photosynthesis. Based on these results, we propose a model that explains how plants adapt to various ecological factors at the transcriptomic level. Additionally, the identified DEGs lay the foundation for future investigations of stress resistance, circadian rhythm and photosynthesis in tobacco. PMID:24733065

  18. Differential expression of miRNAs in response to topping in flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) roots.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongxiang; Kan, Yunchao; Liu, Weiqun

    2011-01-01

    Topping is an important cultivating measure for flue-cured tobacco, and many genes had been found to be differentially expressed in response to topping. But it is still unclear how these genes are regulated. MiRNAs play a critical role in post-transcriptional gene regulation, so we sequenced two sRNA libraries from tobacco roots before and after topping, with a view to exploring transcriptional differences in miRNAs. Two sRNA libraries were generated from tobacco roots before and after topping. Solexa high-throughput sequencing of tobacco small RNAs revealed a total of 12,104,207 and 11,292,018 reads representing 3,633,398 and 3,084,102 distinct sequences before and after topping. The expressions of 136 conserved miRNAs (belonging to 32 families) and 126 new miRNAs (belonging to 77 families) were determined. There were three major conserved miRNAs families (nta-miR156, nta-miR172 and nta-miR171) and two major new miRNAs families (nta-miRn2 and nta-miRn26). All of these identified miRNAs can be folded into characteristic miRNA stem-loop secondary hairpin structures, and qRT-PCR was adopted to validate and measure the expression of miRNAs. Putative targets were identified for 133 out of 136 conserved miRNAs and 126 new miRNAs. Of these miRNAs whose targets had been identified, the miRNAs which change markedly (>2 folds) belong to 53 families and their targets have different biological functions including development, response to stress, response to hormone, N metabolism, C metabolism, signal transduction, nucleic acid metabolism and other metabolism. Some interesting targets for miRNAs had been determined. The differential expression profiles of miRNAs were shown in flue-cured tobacco roots before and after topping, which can be expected to regulate transcripts distinctly involved in response to topping. Further identification of these differentially expressed miRNAs and their targets would allow better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for flue-cured tobacco response to topping.

  19. Differential Expression of miRNAs in Response to Topping in Flue-Cured Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Roots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiqun

    2011-01-01

    Background Topping is an important cultivating measure for flue-cured tobacco, and many genes had been found to be differentially expressed in response to topping. But it is still unclear how these genes are regulated. MiRNAs play a critical role in post-transcriptional gene regulation, so we sequenced two sRNA libraries from tobacco roots before and after topping, with a view to exploring transcriptional differences in miRNAs. Methodology/Principal Findings Two sRNA libraries were generated from tobacco roots before and after topping. Solexa high-throughput sequencing of tobacco small RNAs revealed a total of 12,104,207 and 11,292,018 reads representing 3,633,398 and 3,084,102 distinct sequences before and after topping. The expressions of 136 conserved miRNAs (belonging to 32 families) and 126 new miRNAs (belonging to 77 families) were determined. There were three major conserved miRNAs families (nta-miR156, nta-miR172 and nta-miR171) and two major new miRNAs families (nta-miRn2 and nta-miRn26). All of these identified miRNAs can be folded into characteristic miRNA stem-loop secondary hairpin structures, and qRT-PCR was adopted to validate and measure the expression of miRNAs. Putative targets were identified for 133 out of 136 conserved miRNAs and 126 new miRNAs. Of these miRNAs whose targets had been identified, the miRNAs which change markedly (>2 folds) belong to 53 families and their targets have different biological functions including development, response to stress, response to hormone, N metabolism, C metabolism, signal transduction, nucleic acid metabolism and other metabolism. Some interesting targets for miRNAs had been determined. Conclusions/Significance The differential expression profiles of miRNAs were shown in flue-cured tobacco roots before and after topping, which can be expected to regulate transcripts distinctly involved in response to topping. Further identification of these differentially expressed miRNAs and their targets would allow better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for flue-cured tobacco response to topping. PMID:22194852

  20. The RING finger protein NtRCP1 is involved in the floral transition in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yun; Yu, Yi; Sun, Yong-Duo; Han, Li-Bo; Wu, Xiao-Min; Wu, Jia-He; Xia, Gui-Xian; Liu, Guo-Qin

    2015-06-20

    The transition from the vegetative phase to the reproductive phase is a major developmental process in flowering plants. The underlying mechanism controlling this cellular process remains a research focus in the field of plant molecular biology. In the present work, we identified a gene encoding the C3H2C3-type RING finger protein NtRCP1 from tobacco BY-2 cells. Enzymatic analysis demonstrated that NtRCP1 is a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. In tobacco plants, expression level of NtRCP1 was higher in the reproductive shoot apices than in the vegetative ones. NtRCP1-overexpressing plants underwent a more rapid transition from the vegetative to the reproductive phase and flowered markedly earlier than the wild-type control. Histological analysis revealed that the shoot apical meristem of NtRCP1-overexpressing plants initiated inflorescence primordia precociously compared to the wild-type plant due to accelerated cell division. Overexpression of NtRCP1 in BY-2 suspension cells promoted cell division, which was a consequence of the shortened G2 phase in the cell cycle. Together, our data suggest that NtRCP1 may act as a regulator of the phase transition, possibly through its role in cell cycle regulation, during vegetative/reproductive development in tobacco plant. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diversity arrays technology (DArT) for studying the genetic polymorphism of flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiu-Ping; Xiao, Bing-Guang; Li, Yong-Ping; Gui, Yi-Jie; Wang, Yu; Fan, Long-Jiang

    2013-07-01

    Diversity arrays technology (DArT) is a microarray-based marker system that achieves high throughput by reducing the complexity of the genome. A DArT chip has recently been developed for tobacco. In this study, we genotyped 267 flue-cured cultivars/landraces, including 121 Chinese accessions over five decades from widespread geographic regions in China, 103 from the Americas, and 43 other foreign cultivars, using the newly developed chip. Three hundred and thirty polymorphic DArT makers were selected and used for a phylogenetic analysis, which suggested that the 267 accessions could be classified into two subgroups, which could each be further divided into 2‒4 sections. Eight elite cultivars, which account for 83% of the area of Chinese tobacco production, were all found in one subgroup. Two high-quality cultivars, HHDJY and Cuibi1, were grouped together in one section, while six other high-yield cultivars were grouped into another section. The 330 DArT marker clones were sequenced and close to 95% of them are within non-repetitive regions. Finally, the implications of this study for Chinese flue-cured tobacco breeding and production programs were discussed.

  2. Molecular diversity, population structure, and linkage disequilibrium in a worldwide collection of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) germplasm.

    PubMed

    Fricano, Agostino; Bakaher, Nicolas; Del Corvo, Marcello; Piffanelli, Pietro; Donini, Paolo; Stella, Alessandra; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Pozzi, Carlo

    2012-03-21

    The goals of our study were to assess the phylogeny and the population structure of tobacco accessions representing a wide range of genetic diversity; identify a subset of accessions as a core collection capturing most of the existing genetic diversity; and estimate, in the tobacco core collection, the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in seven genomic regions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. To this end, a collection of accessions were genotyped with SSR markers. Molecular diversity was evaluated and LD was analyzed across seven regions of the genome. A genotyping database for 312 tobacco accessions was profiled with 49 SSR markers. Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) and Bayesian cluster analysis revealed structuring of the tobacco population with regard to commercial classes and six main clades were identified, which correspond to "Oriental", Flue-Cured", "Burley", "Dark", "Primitive", and "Other" classes. Pairwise kinship was calculated between accessions, and an overall low level of co-ancestry was observed. A set of 89 genotypes was identified that captured the whole genetic diversity detected at the 49 loci. LD was evaluated on these genotypes, using 422 SSR markers mapping on seven linkage groups. LD was estimated as squared correlation of allele frequencies (r2). The pattern of intrachromosomal LD revealed that in tobacco LD extended up to distances as great as 75 cM with r2 > 0.05 or up to 1 cM with r2 > 0.2. The pattern of LD was clearly dependent on the population structure. A global population of tobacco is highly structured. Clustering highlights the accessions with the same market class. LD in tobacco extends up to 75 cM and is strongly dependent on the population structure.

  3. Diversity arrays technology (DArT) for studying the genetic polymorphism of flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)* #

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiu-ping; Xiao, Bing-guang; Li, Yong-ping; Gui, Yi-jie; Wang, Yu; Fan, Long-jiang

    2013-01-01

    Diversity arrays technology (DArT) is a microarray-based marker system that achieves high throughput by reducing the complexity of the genome. A DArT chip has recently been developed for tobacco. In this study, we genotyped 267 flue-cured cultivars/landraces, including 121 Chinese accessions over five decades from widespread geographic regions in China, 103 from the Americas, and 43 other foreign cultivars, using the newly developed chip. Three hundred and thirty polymorphic DArT makers were selected and used for a phylogenetic analysis, which suggested that the 267 accessions could be classified into two subgroups, which could each be further divided into 2‒4 sections. Eight elite cultivars, which account for 83% of the area of Chinese tobacco production, were all found in one subgroup. Two high-quality cultivars, HHDJY and Cuibi1, were grouped together in one section, while six other high-yield cultivars were grouped into another section. The 330 DArT marker clones were sequenced and close to 95% of them are within non-repetitive regions. Finally, the implications of this study for Chinese flue-cured tobacco breeding and production programs were discussed. PMID:23825142

  4. Non-host Plant Resistance against Phytophthora capsici Is Mediated in Part by Members of the I2 R Gene Family in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Arreguín, Julio C.; Shimada-Beltrán, Harumi; Sevillano-Serrano, Jacobo; Moffett, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The identification of host genes associated with resistance to Phytophthora capsici is crucial to developing strategies of control against this oomycete pathogen. Since there are few sources of resistance to P. capsici in crop plants, non-host plants represent a promising source of resistance genes as well as excellent models to study P. capsici – plant interactions. We have previously shown that non-host resistance to P. capsici in Nicotiana spp. is mediated by the recognition of a specific P. capsici effector protein, PcAvr3a1 in a manner that suggests the involvement of a cognate disease resistance (R) genes. Here, we have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing dsRNA in Nicotiana spp. to identify candidate R genes that mediate non-host resistance to P. capsici. Silencing of members of the I2 multigene family in the partially resistant plant N. edwardsonii and in the resistant N. tabacum resulted in compromised resistance to P. capsici. VIGS of two other components required for R gene-mediated resistance, EDS1 and SGT1, also enhanced susceptibility to P. capsici in N. edwardsonii, as well as in the susceptible plants N. benthamiana and N. clevelandii. The silencing of I2 family members in N. tabacum also compromised the recognition of PcAvr3a1. These results indicate that in this case, non-host resistance is mediated by the same components normally associated with race-specific resistance. PMID:28261255

  5. Non-host Plant Resistance against Phytophthora capsici Is Mediated in Part by Members of the I2 R Gene Family in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed

    Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Shimada-Beltrán, Harumi; Sevillano-Serrano, Jacobo; Moffett, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The identification of host genes associated with resistance to Phytophthora capsici is crucial to developing strategies of control against this oomycete pathogen. Since there are few sources of resistance to P. capsici in crop plants, non-host plants represent a promising source of resistance genes as well as excellent models to study P. capsici - plant interactions. We have previously shown that non-host resistance to P. capsici in Nicotiana spp. is mediated by the recognition of a specific P. capsici effector protein, PcAvr3a1 in a manner that suggests the involvement of a cognate disease resistance (R) genes. Here, we have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing dsRNA in Nicotiana spp. to identify candidate R genes that mediate non-host resistance to P. capsici. Silencing of members of the I2 multigene family in the partially resistant plant N. edwardsonii and in the resistant N. tabacum resulted in compromised resistance to P. capsici. VIGS of two other components required for R gene-mediated resistance, EDS1 and SGT1, also enhanced susceptibility to P. capsici in N. edwardsonii, as well as in the susceptible plants N. benthamiana and N. clevelandii. The silencing of I2 family members in N. tabacum also compromised the recognition of PcAvr3a1. These results indicate that in this case, non-host resistance is mediated by the same components normally associated with race-specific resistance.

  6. Extensive nuclear influence on mitochondrial transcription and genome structure in male-fertile and male-sterile alloplasmic Nicotiana materials.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, G; Glimelius, K

    1991-10-01

    Nuclear influences on mitochondrial transcription and genome organization were analysed in six different male-fertile and male-sterile alloplasmic Nicotiana cultivars. The alloplasmic materials were compared with the corresponding nuclear species (N. tabacum) and cytoplasmic donor species (N. debneyi, N. rapanda or N. suaveolens) in Northern and Southern analyses using twelve different mitochondrial genes as probes. The investigation revealed that the nucleus exerts extensive influence on the expression and structure of the mitochondrial genome. For the majority of the probes, changes in both mitochondrial transcription and DNA patterns in alloplasmic cultivars were detected. Even though changes in transcription patterns, which correlated with male sterility, were detected for three of the probes (atpA, orf25 and coxII), the changes were not consistent for all the male-sterile materials. Likewise, no consistent association between mtDNA restriction patterns and cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) was detected.

  7. Spicing Up the N Gene: F. O. Holmes and Tobacco mosaic virus Resistance in Capsicum and Nicotiana Plants.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2017-02-01

    One of the seminal events in plant pathology was the discovery by Francis O. Holmes that necrotic local lesions induced on certain species of Nicotiana following rub-inoculation of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was due to a specific interaction involving a dominant host gene (N). From this, Holmes had an idea that if the N gene from N. glutinosa was introgressed into susceptible tobacco, the greatly reduced titer of TMV would, by extension, prevent subsequent infection of tomato and pepper plants by field workers whose hands were contaminated with TMV from their use of chewing and smoking tobacco. The ultimate outcome has many surprising twists and turns, including Holmes' failure to obtain fertile crosses of N. glutinosa × N. tabacum after 3 years of intensive work. Progress was made with N. digluta, a rare amphidiploid that was readily crossed with N. tabacum. And, importantly, the first demonstration by Holmes of the utility of interspecies hybridization for virus resistance was made with Capsicum (pepper) species with the identification of the L gene in Tabasco pepper, that he introgressed into commercial bell pepper varieties. Holmes' findings are important as they predate Flor's gene-for-gene hypothesis, show the use of interspecies hybridization for control of plant pathogens, and the use of the local lesion as a bioassay to monitor resistance events in crop plants.

  8. High-Level Transient Expression of ER-Targeted Human Interleukin 6 in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Henrik; Mikschofsky, Heike; Koslowski, Roswitha; Meyer, Udo; Broer, Inge; Huckauf, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco plants can be used to express recombinant proteins that cannot be produced in a soluble and active form using traditional platforms such as Escherichia coli. We therefore expressed the human glycoprotein interleukin 6 (IL6) in two commercial tobacco cultivars (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Virginia and cv. Geudertheimer) as well as the model host N. benthamiana to compare different transformation strategies (stable vs. transient expression) and subcellular targeting (apoplast, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and vacuole). In T0 transgenic plants, the highest expression levels were achieved by ER targeting but the overall yields of IL6 were still low in the leaves (0.005% TSP in the ER, 0.0008% in the vacuole and 0.0005% in the apoplast). The apoplast variant accumulated to similar levels in leaves and seeds, whereas the ER-targeted variant was 1.2-fold more abundant in seeds and the vacuolar variant was 6-fold more abundant in seeds. The yields improved in subsequent generations, with the best-performing T2 plants producing the ER-targeted IL6 at 0.14% TSP in both leaves and seeds. Transient expression of ER-targeted IL6 in leaves using the MagnICON system resulted in yields of up to 7% TSP in N. benthamiana, but only 1% in N. tabacum cv. Virginia and 0.5% in cv. Geudertheimer. Although the commercial tobacco cultivars produced up to threefold more biomass than N. benthamiana, this was not enough to compensate for the lower overall yields. The recombinant IL6 produced by transient and stable expression in plants was biologically active and presented as two alternative bands matching the corresponding native protein. PMID:23152824

  9. Quantitative Analysis of the Fate of Exogenous DNA in Nicotiana Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Murashige, Toshio

    1977-01-01

    After a 5-hour incubation of protoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum L. `Xanthi' with 3H-DNA (7.26 μg/ml) from N. tabacum L. `Xanthi nc' 3.5% of the initial radioactivity was found in acid-insoluble substances of the protoplasts. The addition of DEAE-dextran and poly-l-lysine to the incubation medium nearly doubled radioactivity adsorption. The absorption was inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol, KCN, and low temperature (0 C); this inhibition could not be reversed by exogenous ATP. About 500 tobacco plants established from protoplasts of a normally tobacco-mosaic virus-susceptible cultivar that had been allowed to absorb DNA prepared from a resistant cultivar did not show transfer of the virus-resistant gene. A detailed analysis was performed of the disposition of exogenous DNA in plant protoplasts, by employing Escherichia coli3H-DNA and Nicotiana glutinosa protoplasts. In 5 to 20 hours, about 10% of the 3H-DNA entered the protoplasts. Competition experiments between the 3H-DNA and unlabeled DNA or thymidine showed that the entry occurred as undegraded 3H-DNA. Examination of intraprotoplast fractions revealed that 60 to 80% of the absorbed radioactivity resided in the “soluble” fraction of the cytoplasm and 20% in the nuclear fraction. The mitochondrion fraction also contained measurable radioactivity. Sizing on sucrose density gradients showed that the bulk of the absorbed E. coli DNA had been depolymerized. Of the incorporated radioactivity, 15% was accountable as DNA, exogenous as well as resynthesized, and 15% as RNA, protein, and other cell constituents. DNA/DNA hybridization test indicated that 17.6% of the re-extractable 3H-DNA retained homology with the E. coli DNA; this was equivalent to 2.6% of the absorbed radioactivity. Resynthesized receptor protoplast DNA was represented by a fraction at least 1.7% of the total absorbed radioactivity. The amount of bacterial DNA remaining in protoplasts suggests that each protoplast retained 2.3 × 10−15g donor DNA, or

  10. Plant oxidosqualene metabolism: cycloartenol synthase-dependent sterol biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ(5)-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis.

  11. Plant Oxidosqualene Metabolism: Cycloartenol Synthase–Dependent Sterol Biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J.; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ5-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis. PMID:25343375

  12. Mechanisms of nitric-oxide-induced increase of free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cells.

    PubMed

    Lamotte, Olivier; Courtois, Cécile; Dobrowolska, Grazyna; Besson, Angélique; Pugin, Alain; Wendehenne, David

    2006-04-15

    In this study, we investigated a role for nitric oxide (NO) in mediating the elevation of the free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](cyt)) in plants using Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cells expressing the Ca(2+) reporter apoaequorin. Hyperosmotic stress induced a fast increase of [Ca(2+)](cyt) which was strongly reduced by pretreating cell suspensions with the NO scavenger carboxy PTIO, indicating that NO mediates [Ca(2+)](cyt) changes in plant cells challenged by abiotic stress. Accordingly, treatment of transgenic N. plumbaginifolia cells with the NO donor diethylamine NONOate was followed by a transient increase of [Ca(2+)](cyt) sensitive to plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel inhibitors and antagonist of cyclic ADP ribose. We provided evidence that NO might activate plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels by inducing a rapid and transient plasma membrane depolarization. Furthermore, NO-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](cyt) was suppressed by the kinase inhibitor staurosporine, suggesting that NO enhances [Ca(2+)](cyt) by promoting phosphorylation-dependent events. This result was further supported by the demonstration that the NO donor induced the activation of a 42-kDa protein kinase which belongs to SnRK2 families and corresponds to Nicotiana tabacum osmotic-stress-activated protein kinase (NtOSAK). Interestingly, NtOSAK was activated in response to hyperosmotic stress through a NO-dependent process, supporting the hypothesis that NO also promotes protein kinase activation during physiological processes.

  13. Two faces of Solanaceae telomeres: a comparison between Nicotiana and Cestrum telomeres and telomere-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Peska, V; Sýkorová, E; Fajkus, J

    2008-01-01

    While most Solanaceae genera (e.g.Solanum, Nicotiana) possess Arabidopsis-type telomeres of (TTTAGGG)n maintained by telomerase, the genera Cestrum, Vestia and Sessea (Cestrum group) lack these telomeres. Here we show that in the Cestrum-group the activity of telomerase has been lost. Nevertheless, proteins binding the single-stranded G-rich strand of the Arabidopsis-type and related human-type (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences are present in nuclear extracts of both Nicotiana and Cestrum species. These proteins may have a role in telomere function or other cellular activities. In addition to characterizing DNA binding specificity and molecular weights of these proteins, we searched in both N. tabacum (tobacco) and C. parqui for the presence of POT1-like proteins, involved in telomere capping and telomerase regulation. Analysis of POT1-like proteins available on public databases and cloned by us from C. parqui, revealed the N-terminal OB folds typical for this protein family and a novel, plant-specific conserved C-terminal OB-fold domain (CTOB). We propose that CTOB is involved in protein-protein interactions.

  14. S-Glycoprotein-Like Protein Regulates Defense Responses in Nicotiana Plants against Ralstonia solanacearum1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Maimbo, Milimo; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    RsRGA4 (for Ralstonia solanacearum-responsive gene A4) encodes a polypeptide similar to S-locus glycoprotein (SGP) from Brassica rapa and SGP-like proteins from Ipomoea trifida and Medicago truncatula. Therefore, we designated RsRGA4 as NtSGLP (for Nicotiana tabacum SGP-like protein) and NbSGLP (its Nicotiana benthamiana ortholog). NbSGLP is expressed in root, leaf, petal, gynoecium, and stamen. Expression of NbSGLP was strongly induced by inoculation with an avirulent strain of R. solanacearum (Rs8107) and slightly enhanced by inoculation with virulent R. solanacearum (RsOE1-1). Expression of NbSGLP was induced by inoculation with an hrpY-deficient mutant of RsOE1-1 and Rs8107. Expression was also induced by aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid and salicylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSGLP enhanced the growth of Rs8107. Growth of RsOE1-1 and appearance of wilt symptoms were also accelerated in silenced plants. Expression of PR-1a and EREBP was reduced, and markers for basal defense, such as callose deposition and reduced vascular flow, were compromised in NbSGLP-silenced plants. Moreover, growth of Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci, and P. syringae pv mellea was also enhanced in the silenced plants. On the other hand, silencing of NbSGLP did not interfere with the appearance of the hypersensitive response. NbSGLP was secreted in a signal peptide-dependent manner. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression of NbSGLP induced PR-1a and EREBP expression, callose deposition, and reduced vascular flow. NbSGLP-induced callose deposition and reduced vascular flow were not observed in salicylic acid-deficient N. benthamiana NahG plants. Taken together, SGLP might have a role in the induction of basal defense in Nicotiana plants. PMID:20118275

  15. A glycoside of Nicotina tabacum affects mouse dopaminergic behavior.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Ohnuma, S; Kawagoe, M; Sugiyama, T

    2003-01-01

    Climbing in the forced swimming test is considered a dopaminergic-specific behavior. A substance of Nicotina tabacum affecting dopamine neuronal activity was investigated using the mouse behavioral system. The substance was found to be a glycoside with the peripheral sugar chain structures Fuc alpha 1-2Gal, Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc and GalNAc alpha 1-3GalNAc and with basic polymannoses. The glycoside dose-dependently increased behavior via D2 neuronal activity, but not D1 activity. This suggests that smoking can affect human brain function not only via the nicotinic cholinergic neuron, but also via the D2 neuron.

  16. Moss is a key nurse plant for reintroduction of the endangered herb, Primulina tabacum Hance.

    Treesearch

    Hai Ren; Guohua Ma; Qianmei Zhang; Qinfeng Guo; Jun Wang; Zhengfeng Wang

    2010-01-01

    The rare and endangered plant Primulina tabacum is a calciphilous perennial herb found only at the entrances of a small number of karst cave drainages in southern China. In a conservation effort, we identified potentially suitable habitats and reintroduced P. tabacum plantlets (propagated in vitro) to one historical and two new cave entrances. The transplanted...

  17. Polyphenol content, polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase activity in certain Nicotiana species, varieties and interspecific hybrids.

    PubMed

    Sheen, S J

    1970-01-01

    Eight Nicotiana species including the putative progenitors of N. tabacum, Kostoff's amphidiploid (N. sylvestris × N. tomentosiformis), and 19 cultivars have been compared for total polyphenols, polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase activity in the leaf and/or root by a small plant technique. Greater variations for these chemical constituents occurred in the species than in the cultivars. N. tomentosiformis was highest in polyphenol content. Root extracts contained more polyphenoloxidase than the leaf, but its peroxidase content may not exceed the concentration in the leaf. The Kostoff's amphidiploid tended to resemble more the low oxidase and polyphenol parent. An additional study based on mature green leaves of Burley 21, the progenitor species, and their F 1 hybrids confirmed the quantitative differences of these chemical constituents in the species. The magnitude of the heterosis appeared to be greater in the hybrids of N. tomentosiformis or N. otophora crossed to N. sylvestris than those between the Tomentosae members or involving Burley 21 as the parent. An exception was the hybrid Burley 21 × N. tomentosiformis which showed heterosis for oxidase activities.

  18. Altered Epiphytic Colonization of Mannityl Opine-Producing Transgenic Tobacco Plants by a Mannityl Opine-Catabolizing Strain of Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M.; Savka, M. A.; Hwang, I.; Farrand, S. K.; Lindow, S. E.

    1995-01-01

    The plasmid pYDH208, which confers the ability to catabolize the mannityl opines mannopine and agropine, was mobilized into the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strain Cit7. The growth of the mannityl opine-catabolizing strain Cit7(pYDH208) was compared with that of the near-isogenic non-opine-catabolizing strain Cit7xylE on leaves of wild-type tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) and transgenic mannityl opine-producing tobacco plants (N. tabacum cv. Xanthi, line 2-26). The population size of Cit7(pYDH208) was significantly greater on the lower leaves of transgenic plants than on middle or upper leaves of those plants. The population size of Cit7(pYDH208) on lower leaves of transgenic plants was also significantly greater than the population size of Cit7xylE on similar leaves of wild-type plants. High-voltage paper electrophoresis demonstrated higher levels of mannityl opines in washings from lower- and mid-level leaves than in washings from upper-level leaves. The ability of Cit7(pYDH208) to catabolize mannityl opines in the carbon-limited phyllosphere increased the carrying capacity of the lower leaves of transgenic plants for Cit7(pYDH208). In coinoculations, the increase in the ratio of population sizes of Cit7(pYDH208) to Cit7xylE on transgenic plants was apparently due to a subtle difference in the growth rates of the two strains and to the difference in final population sizes. An ability to utilize additional carbon sources on the transgenic plants also enabled Cit7(pYDH208) to achieve a higher degree of coexistence with Cit7xylE on transgenic plants than on wild-type plants. This supports the hypothesis that the level of coexistence between epiphytic bacterial populations can be altered through nutritional resource partitioning. PMID:16535040

  19. Altered stomatal dynamics in ascorbate oxidase over-expressing tobacco plants suggest a role for dehydroascorbate signalling.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios; De Tullio, Mario C; Barnes, Jeremy; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2008-01-01

    Control of stomatal aperture is of paramount importance for plant adaptation to the surrounding environment. Here, we report on several parameters related to stomatal dynamics and performance in transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Xanthi) over-expressing cucumber ascorbate oxidase (AO), a cell wall-localized enzyme of uncertain biological function that oxidizes ascorbic acid (AA) to monodehydroascorbic acid which dismutates yielding AA and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). In comparison to WT plants, leaves of AO over-expressing plants exhibited reduced stomatal conductance (due to partial stomatal closure), higher water content, and reduced rates of water loss on detachment. Transgenic plants also exhibited elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide and a decline in hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme activity. Leaf ABA content was also higher in AO over-expressing plants. Treatment of epidermal strips with either 1 mM DHA or 100 microM hydrogen peroxide resulted in rapid stomatal closure in WT plants, but not in AO-over-expressing plants. This suggests that signal perception and/or transduction associated with stomatal closure is altered by AO over-expression. These data support a specific role for cell wall-localized AA in the perception of environmental cues, and suggest that DHA acts as a regulator of stomatal dynamics.

  20. Alteration of the alkaloid profile in genetically modified tobacco reveals a role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in nicotine N-demethylation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Fan, Longjiang; Kittur, Farooqahmed S; Sun, Kehan; Qiu, Jie; Tang, She; Holliday, Bronwyn M; Xiao, Bingguang; Burkey, Kent O; Bush, Lowell P; Conkling, Mark A; Roje, Sanja; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-02-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of the tetrahydrofolate (THF)-mediated one-carbon (C1) metabolic network. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylene-THF to 5-methyl-THF. The latter donates its methyl group to homocysteine, forming methionine, which is then used for the synthesis of S-adenosyl-methionine, a universal methyl donor for numerous methylation reactions, to produce primary and secondary metabolites. Here, we demonstrate that manipulating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) MTHFR gene (NtMTHFR1) expression dramatically alters the alkaloid profile in transgenic tobacco plants by negatively regulating the expression of a secondary metabolic pathway nicotine N-demethylase gene, CYP82E4. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and alkaloid analyses revealed that reducing NtMTHFR expression by RNA interference dramatically induced CYP82E4 expression, resulting in higher nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. Conversely, overexpressing NtMTHFR1 suppressed CYP82E4 expression, leading to lower nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. However, the reduced expression of NtMTHFR did not affect the methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine levels in the knockdown lines. Our finding reveals a new regulatory role of NtMTHFR1 in nicotine N-demethylation and suggests that the negative regulation of CYP82E4 expression may serve to recruit methyl groups from nicotine into the C1 pool under C1-deficient conditions.

  1. The Ca(2+) status of the endoplasmic reticulum is altered by induction of calreticulin expression in transgenic plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persson, S.; Wyatt, S. E.; Love, J.; Thompson, W. F.; Robertson, D.; Boss, W. F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores in plant cells, we generated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum; NT1) suspension cells and Arabidopsis plants with altered levels of calreticulin (CRT), an ER-localized Ca(2+)-binding protein. NT1 cells and Arabidopsis plants were transformed with a maize (Zea mays) CRT gene in both sense and antisense orientations under the control of an Arabidopsis heat shock promoter. ER-enriched membrane fractions from NT1 cells were used to examine how altered expression of CRT affects Ca(2+) uptake and release. We found that a 2.5-fold increase in CRT led to a 2-fold increase in ATP-dependent (45)Ca(2+) accumulation in the ER-enriched fraction compared with heat-shocked wild-type controls. Furthermore, after treatment with the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin, ER microsomes from NT1 cells overproducing CRT showed a 2-fold increase in the amount of (45)Ca(2+) released, and a 2- to 3-fold increase in the amount of (45)Ca(2+) retained compared with wild type. These data indicate that altering the production of CRT affects the ER Ca(2+) pool. In addition, CRT transgenic Arabidopsis plants were used to determine if altered CRT levels had any physiological effects. We found that the level of CRT in heat shock-induced CRT transgenic plants correlated positively with the retention of chlorophyll when the plants were transferred from Ca(2+)-containing medium to Ca(2+)-depleted medium. Together these data are consistent with the hypothesis that increasing CRT in the ER increases the ER Ca(2+) stores and thereby enhances the survival of plants grown in low Ca(2+) medium.

  2. The Ca(2+) status of the endoplasmic reticulum is altered by induction of calreticulin expression in transgenic plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persson, S.; Wyatt, S. E.; Love, J.; Thompson, W. F.; Robertson, D.; Boss, W. F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores in plant cells, we generated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum; NT1) suspension cells and Arabidopsis plants with altered levels of calreticulin (CRT), an ER-localized Ca(2+)-binding protein. NT1 cells and Arabidopsis plants were transformed with a maize (Zea mays) CRT gene in both sense and antisense orientations under the control of an Arabidopsis heat shock promoter. ER-enriched membrane fractions from NT1 cells were used to examine how altered expression of CRT affects Ca(2+) uptake and release. We found that a 2.5-fold increase in CRT led to a 2-fold increase in ATP-dependent (45)Ca(2+) accumulation in the ER-enriched fraction compared with heat-shocked wild-type controls. Furthermore, after treatment with the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin, ER microsomes from NT1 cells overproducing CRT showed a 2-fold increase in the amount of (45)Ca(2+) released, and a 2- to 3-fold increase in the amount of (45)Ca(2+) retained compared with wild type. These data indicate that altering the production of CRT affects the ER Ca(2+) pool. In addition, CRT transgenic Arabidopsis plants were used to determine if altered CRT levels had any physiological effects. We found that the level of CRT in heat shock-induced CRT transgenic plants correlated positively with the retention of chlorophyll when the plants were transferred from Ca(2+)-containing medium to Ca(2+)-depleted medium. Together these data are consistent with the hypothesis that increasing CRT in the ER increases the ER Ca(2+) stores and thereby enhances the survival of plants grown in low Ca(2+) medium.

  3. Pollination in Nicotiana alata stimulates synthesis and transfer to the stigmatic surface of NaStEP, a vacuolar Kunitz proteinase inhibitor homologue

    PubMed Central

    Busot, Grethel Yanet; McClure, Bruce; Ibarra-Sánchez, Claudia Patricia; Jiménez-Durán, Karina; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia; Cruz-García, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    After landing on a wet stigma, pollen grains hydrate and germination generally occurs. However, there is no certainty of the pollen tube growth through the style to reach the ovary. The pistil is a gatekeeper that evolved in many species to recognize and reject the self-pollen, avoiding endogamy and encouraging cross-pollination. However, recognition is a complex process, and specific factors are needed. Here the isolation and characterization of a stigma-specific protein from N. alata, NaStEP (N. alata Stigma Expressed Protein), that is homologous to Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors, are reported. Activity gel assays showed that NaStEP is not a functional serine proteinase inhibitor. Immunohistochemical and protein blot analyses revealed that NaStEP is detectable in stigmas of self-incompatible (SI) species N. alata, N. forgetiana, and N. bonariensis, but not in self-compatible (SC) species N. tabacum, N. plumbaginifolia, N. benthamiana, N. longiflora, and N. glauca. NaStEP contains the vacuolar targeting sequence NPIVL, and immunocytochemistry experiments showed vacuolar localization in unpollinated stigmas. After self-pollination or pollination with pollen from the SC species N. tabacum or N. plumbaginifolia, NaStEP was also found in the stigmatic exudate. The synthesis and presence in the stigmatic exudate of this protein was strongly induced in N. alata following incompatible pollination with N. tabacum pollen. The transfer of NaStEP to the stigmatic exudate was accompanied by perforation of the stigmatic cell wall, which appeared to release the vacuolar contents to the apoplastic space. The increase in NaStEP synthesis after pollination and its presence in the stigmatic exudates suggest that this protein may play a role in the early pollen–stigma interactions that regulate pollen tube growth in Nicotiana. PMID:18689443

  4. Tobacco mosaic virus infection disproportionately impacts phloem associated translatomes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Collum, Tamara D; Culver, James N

    2017-10-01

    In this study we use vascular specific promoters and a translating ribosome affinity purification strategy to identify phloem associated translatome responses to infection by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in systemic hosts Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Shahdara and Nicotiana benthamiana. Results demonstrate that in both hosts the number of translatome gene alterations that occurred in response to infection is at least four fold higher in phloem specific translatomes than in non-phloem translatomes. This finding indicates that phloem functions as a key responsive tissue to TMV infection. In addition, host comparisons of translatome alterations reveal both similarities and differences in phloem responses to infection, representing both conserved virus induced phloem alterations involved in promoting infection and virus spread as well as host specific alterations that reflect differences in symptom responses. Combined these results suggest phloem tissues play a disproportion role in the mediation and control of host responses to virus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Virus Infection Suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana Adaptive Phenotypic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Elena, Santiago F.

    2011-01-01

    Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus). Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana – potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked. PMID:21359142

  6. Virus infection suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-02-17

    Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus). Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana--potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked.

  7. Alteration of the Alkaloid Profile in Genetically Modified Tobacco Reveals a Role of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase in Nicotine N-Demethylation1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Fan, Longjiang; Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Sun, Kehan; Qiu, Jie; Tang, She; Holliday, Bronwyn M.; Xiao, Bingguang; Burkey, Kent O.; Bush, Lowell P.; Conkling, Mark A.; Roje, Sanja; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of the tetrahydrofolate (THF)-mediated one-carbon (C1) metabolic network. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylene-THF to 5-methyl-THF. The latter donates its methyl group to homocysteine, forming methionine, which is then used for the synthesis of S-adenosyl-methionine, a universal methyl donor for numerous methylation reactions, to produce primary and secondary metabolites. Here, we demonstrate that manipulating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) MTHFR gene (NtMTHFR1) expression dramatically alters the alkaloid profile in transgenic tobacco plants by negatively regulating the expression of a secondary metabolic pathway nicotine N-demethylase gene, CYP82E4. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and alkaloid analyses revealed that reducing NtMTHFR expression by RNA interference dramatically induced CYP82E4 expression, resulting in higher nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. Conversely, overexpressing NtMTHFR1 suppressed CYP82E4 expression, leading to lower nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. However, the reduced expression of NtMTHFR did not affect the methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine levels in the knockdown lines. Our finding reveals a new regulatory role of NtMTHFR1 in nicotine N-demethylation and suggests that the negative regulation of CYP82E4 expression may serve to recruit methyl groups from nicotine into the C1 pool under C1-deficient conditions. PMID:23221678

  8. A pollen tube growth-promoting arabinogalactan protein from nicotiana alata is similar to the tobacco TTS protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, H M; Wong, E; Ogdahl, J; Cheung, A Y

    2000-04-01

    Upon germination on the stigma, pollen tubes elongate in the stylar transmitting tract, aided by female factors, with speed and directionality not mimicked in in vitro pollen tube growth cultures. We have shown that a stylar transmitting tissue arabinogalactan protein (AGP) from Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco), TTS protein, stimulates pollen tube growth in vivo and in vitro and attracts pollen tubes grown in a semi-in vivo culture system. It has been reported that the self-incompatible Nicotiana alata produced a stylar glycoprotein, GaRSGP, which had a backbone polypeptide that shared 97% identity with those of TTS proteins but some of its properties were different from those described for TTS proteins. We report here the characterization of a family of stylar transmitting tissue glycoproteins from N. alata that is virtually identical to tobacco TTS proteins and which we refer to as NaTTS proteins. Like their tobacco counterparts, NaTTS proteins are recognized by the traditional AGP-diagnostic reagent beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent, and they are also recognized by JIM13, a monoclonal antibody against AGP. NaTTS proteins also stimulate pollen tube elongation in vitro and attract pollen tubes in a semi-in vivo pollen tube culture system. Biochemical and immunological characterization of NaTTS proteins revealed that they have extraordinary variability in the extent of sugar modifications of their polypeptide backbones. The extent of sugar modifications on NaTTS proteins significantly affects their biochemical properties, influences how they interact with the transmitting tissue extracellular matrix, and affects their solubility from this matrix. Our results suggest that the strategy used to purify GaRSGP only recovered a less glycosylated, more tightly extracellular matrix-bound sub-population of the entire spectrum of N. alata TTS proteins.

  9. Metabolic survey of defense responses to a compatible hemibiotroph, Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae, in ethylene signaling-impaired tobacco.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoungwon; Kim, Yuran; Wi, Soo jin; Seo, Jong Bok; Kwon, Joseph; Chung, Joo Hee; Park, Ky Young; Nam, Myung Hee

    2013-09-04

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ethylene play an important role in determining the resistance or susceptibility of plants to pathogen attack. A previous study of the response of tobacco cultivar ( Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38) to a compatible hemibiotroph, Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae (Ppn) showed that biphasic bursts of ROS and ethylene are positively associated with disease severity. The levels of ethylene and ROS might influence the susceptibility of plants to pathogens, with changing levels of metabolite related to disease resistance or susceptibility. In this study, to obtain more detailed information on the interaction of ROS and ethylene signaling related to resistance and/or susceptibility of plants to pathogen, Ppn-induced metabolic profiles from wild type (WT) and ethylene signaling-impaired transgenic plants that expressed Ein3 antisense (Ein3-AS) were compared using ultraperformance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). Nonredundant mass ions (576 in ESI+ mode and 336 in ESI- mode) were selected, and 56 mass ions were identified on the basis of their accurate mass ions and MS/MS spectra. Two-way hierarchical clustering analysis of the selected mass ions revealed that nicotine and phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates, such as caffeoyl-dihydrocaffeoyl-spermidine, dicaffeoyl-spermidine, caffeoyl-feruloyl-spermidine, and two bis(dihydrocaffeoyl)-spermine isomers, and their intermediates, such as arginine and putrecine, were present at lower levels in Ein3-AS transgenic plants during Ppn interaction than in WT, whereas galactolipid and oxidized free fatty acid levels were higher in Ein3-AS transgenic plants. Taken together, these results reveal a function for ethylene signaling in tobacco defense responses during Ppn interaction.

  10. The hydroxyproline-rich glycopeptide systemin precursor NapreproHypSys does not play a central role in Nicotiana attenuata's anti-herbivore defense responses.

    PubMed

    Berger, Beatrice; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-11-01

    To determine whether the Nicotiana tabacum preproHypSys homolog in Nicotiana attenuata (NapreproHypSys) mediates anti-herbivore responses, we silenced (IRsys) and ectopically over-expressed (OVsys) NapreproHypSys in N. attenuata. Neither herbivore simulation nor methyl jasmonate (MeJA) application increased transcripts in wild-type (WT) or transformed lines. Compared to WT plants, OVsys plants had marginally higher constitutive levels but normally induced levels of trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPIs) and nicotine; IRsys plants did not differ from WT plants. Herbivory-associated signalling [salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) activity, jasmonic acid (JA), jasmonic acid-isoleucine/leucine (JA-Ile/Leu) and ethylene production or perception] did not differ strongly among the lines, but JA, JA-Ile/Leu and ethylene were marginally higher in OVsys plants. Manduca sexta larval performance did not differ among the lines, but feeding induced levels of TPI and nicotine in OVsys plants and decreased them in IRsys plants relative to WT. The secondary metabolite profiles of plants transplanted into N. attenuata's native habitat in the Great Basin Desert (UT, USA) mirrored those of glasshouse-grown plants, and compared to WT plants, OVsys plants suffered marginally less damage from grasshoppers, mirids and flea beetles but did not differ in their ability to attract Geocoris predators. We conclude that NapreproHypSys does not play a central role in anti-herbivore defense signalling in this native tobacco.

  11. Fitness consequences of a clock pollinator filter in Nicotiana attenuata flowers in nature.

    PubMed

    Yon, Felipe; Kessler, Danny; Joo, Youngsung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T

    2017-08-19

    Nicotiana attenuata flowers, diurnally open, emit scents and move vertically to interact with nocturnal hawkmoth and day-active hummingbird pollinators. To examine the fitness consequences of these floral rhythms, we conducted pollination trials in the plant's native habitat with phase-shifted flowers of plants silenced in circadian clock genes. The results revealed that some pollination benefits observed under glasshouse conditions were not reproduced under natural field conditions. Floral arrhythmicity increased pollination success by hummingbirds, while reducing those by hawkmoths in the field. Thus floral circadian rhythms may influence a plant's fitness by filtering pollinators leading to altered seed set from outcrossed pollen. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Human influence on the dispersal and genetic structure of French Globodera tabacum populations.

    PubMed

    Alenda, Charline; Montarry, Josselin; Grenier, Eric

    2014-10-01

    The dispersal abilities and the population genetic structure of nematodes living in soils are poorly known. In the present study, we have pursued these issues in the tobacco cyst nematode, Globodera tabacum, which is responsible of significant yield reductions. Nine microsatellites markers were used to explore the dispersal and genetic structure of 18 French G. tabacum populations. All the populations sampled belong to the "tabacum" subspecies and low level of gene flow was observed among G. tabacum populations in France. Bayesian genetic assignments revealed two distinct genetic groups that matched with the geographic limits of two agricultural cooperative societies. An important part of the genetic variability was observed between these agricultural cooperative societies and also within populations. Those results highlight the impact of the human organization of agricultural practices on the genetic structure of G. tabacum populations and complement previous results obtained on other cyst nematodes, showing the major contribution of human activities and soil transports during harvest in the passive dispersion of these organisms.

  13. Phylogenetic fragrance patterns in Nicotiana sections Alatae and Suaveolentes.

    PubMed

    Raguso, Robert A; Schlumpberger, Boris O; Kaczorowski, Rainee L; Holtsford, Timothy P

    2006-09-01

    We analyzed floral volatiles from eight tobacco species (Nicotiana; Solanaceae) including newly discovered Brazilian taxa (Nicotiana mutabilis and "Rastroensis") in section Alatae. Eighty-four compounds were found, including mono- and sesquiterpenoids, nitrogenous compounds, benzenoid and aliphatic alcohols, aldehydes and esters. Floral scent from recent accessions of Nicotiana alata, Nicotiana bonariensis and Nicotiana langsdorffii differed from previously published data, suggesting intraspecific variation in scent composition at the level of biosynthetic class. Newly discovered taxa in Alatae, like their relatives, emit large amounts of 1,8-cineole and smaller amounts of monoterpenes on a nocturnal rhythm, constituting a chemical synapomorphy for this lineage. Fragrance data from three species of Nicotiana sect. Suaveolentes, the sister group of Alatae, (two Australian species: N. cavicola, N. ingulba; one African species: N. africana), were compared to previously reported data from their close relative, N. suaveolens. Like N. suaveolens, N. cavicola and N. ingulba emit fragrances dominated by benzenoids and phenylpropanoids, whereas the flowers of N. africana lacked a distinct floral scent and instead emitted only small amounts of an aliphatic methyl ester from foliage. Interestingly, this ester also is emitted from foliage of N. longiflora and N. plumbaginifolia (both in section Alatae s.l.), which share a common ancestor with N. africana. This result, combined with the synapomorphic pattern of 1,8 cineole emission in Alatae s.s., suggests that phylogenetic signal explains a major component of fragrance composition among tobacco species in sections Alatae and Suaveolentes. At the intraspecific level, interpopulational scent variation is widespread in sect. Alatae, and may reflect edaphic specialization, introgression, local pollinator shifts, genetic drift or artificial selection in cultivation. Further studies with genetically and geographically well

  14. Molecular heterogeneity of photosystem I. psaD, psaE, psaF, psaH, and psaL are all present in isoforms in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed

    Obokata, J; Mikami, K; Hayashida, N; Nakamura, M; Sugiura, M

    1993-08-01

    The protein composition of photosystem I (PSI) was examined in Nicotiana spp. by high-resolution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and immunoblot analysis. Five PSI proteins show polymorphism in an amphidiploid species, Nicotiana tabacum, but not in its ancestral diploid species, Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis. These Nicotiana spp. appear to have at least 18 PSI proteins per genome that range in molecular mass from 3 to 20 kD. They include the products of nuclear genes psaD, psaE, psaF, psaG, psaH, psaK, and psaL, the product of chloroplast gene psaC, N-terminally blocked proteins of 4.5 and 3.0 kD, and an unidentified protein of 12.5 kD. The psaD, psaF, psaH, and psaL products have two isoforms each that are distinguished by different mobilities in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the psaE product has four isoforms. The two isoforms of the psaD product have distinct amino acid sequences, indicating that they are encoded by different genes within the genome. Four isoforms of the psaE products can be classified into two groups by N-terminal amino acid sequence, indicating that at least two psaE genes are present in the genome. To examine whether the polymorphic nature of PSI is peculiar to Nicotiana spp., we carried out immunoblot analysis of the psaD and psaE products in isogenic lines of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), Arabidopsis thaliana, red bean (Vigna angularis), and corn (Zea mays). Two electrophoretically distinct isoforms were found for the psaD products of tomato, A. thaliana, and corn, and two isoforms of psaE products were detected in tomato, A. thaliana, and red bean. These results suggest that the nuclear-encoded subunits of PSI, except for the psaG and psaK products, generally have two isoforms.

  15. Overexpression of the PAP1 Transcription Factor Reveals a Complex Regulation of Flavonoid and Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Nicotiana tabacum Plants Attacked by Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Mitsunami, Tomoko; Nishihara, Masahiro; Galis, Ivan; Alamgir, Kabir Md; Hojo, Yuko; Fujita, Kohei; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Nemoto, Keichiro; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Arimura, Gen-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanin pigments and associated flavonoids have demonstrated antioxidant properties and benefits for human health. Consequently, current plant bioengineers have focused on how to modify flavonoid metabolism in plants. Most of that research, however, does not consider the role of natural biotic stresses (e.g., herbivore attack). To understand the influence of herbivore attack on the metabolic engineering of flavonoids, we examined tobacco plants overexpressing the Arabidopsis PAP1 gene (encoding an MYB transcription factor), which accumulated anthocyanin pigments and other flavonoids/phenylpropanoids. In comparison to wild-type and control plants, transgenic plants exhibited greater resistance to Spodoptera litura. Moreover, herbivory suppressed the PAP1-induced increase of transcripts of flavonoid/phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes (e.g., F3H) and the subsequent accumulation of these genes' metabolites, despite the unaltered PAP1 mRNA levels after herbivory. The instances of down-regulation were independent of the signaling pathways mediated by defense-related jasmonates but were relevant to the levels of PAP1-induced and herbivory-suppressed transcription factors, An1a and An1b. Although initially F3H transcripts were suppressed by herbivory, after the S. litura feeding was interrupted, F3H transcripts increased. We hypothesize that in transgenic plants responding to herbivory, there is a complex mechanism regulating enriched flavonoid/phenylpropanoid compounds, via biotic stress signals. PMID:25268129

  16. Increased Nicotiana tabacum fitness through positive regulation of carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways promoted by Daucus carota lycopene β-cyclase (Dclcyb1) expression.

    PubMed

    Moreno, J C; Cerda, A; Simpson, K; Lopez-Diaz, I; Carrera, E; Handford, M; Stange, C

    2016-04-01

    Carotenoids, chlorophylls and gibberellins are derived from the common precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). One of the enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis is lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) that catalyzes the conversion of lycopene into β-carotene. In carrot, Dclcyb1 is essential for carotenoid synthesis in the whole plant. Here we show that when expressed in tobacco, increments in total carotenoids, β-carotene and chlorophyll levels occur. Furthermore, photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced in transgenic lines. Interestingly, and contrary to previous observations where overexpression of a carotenogenic gene resulted in the inhibition of the synthesis of gibberellins, we found raised levels of active GA4 and the concommitant increases in plant height, leaf size and whole plant biomass, as well as an early flowering phenotype. Moreover, a significant increase in the expression of the key carotenogenic genes, Ntpsy1, Ntpsy2 and Ntlcyb, as well as those involved in the synthesis of chlorophyll (Ntchl), gibberellin (Ntga20ox, Ntcps and Ntks) and isoprenoid precursors (Ntdxs2 and Ntggpps) was observed. These results indicate that the expression of Dclcyb1 induces a positive feedback affecting the expression of isoprenoid gene precursors and genes involved in carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways leading to an enhancement in fitness measured as biomass, photosynthetic efficiency and carotenoid/chlorophyll composition.

  17. Enhancing tonoplast Cd/H antiport activity increases Cd, Zn, and Mn tolerance, and impacts root/shoot Cd partitioning in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sequestration mechanisms that prevent high concentrations of free metal ions from persisting in metabolically active compartments of cells are thought to be central in tolerance of plants to high levels of divalent cation metals. Expression of "AtCAX2" or "AtCAX4", which encode divalent cation/proto...

  18. Functional analysis of the Sesbania rostrata leghemoglobin glb3 gene 5'-upstream region in transgenic Lotus corniculatus and Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Szabados, L; Ratet, P; Grunenberg, B; de Bruijn, F J

    1990-10-01

    Expression of the Sesbania rostrata leghemoglobin glb3 gene was analyzed in transgenic Lotus corniculatus and tobacco plants harboring chimeric glb3-uidA (gus) gene fusions to identify cis-acting elements involved in nodule-specific gene expression and general transcriptional control. A 1.9-kilobase fragment of the glb3 5'-upstream region was found to direct a high level of nodule-specific beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in L. corniculatus, restricted to the Rhizobium-infected cells of the nodules. The same fragment directed a low level of GUS activity in tobacco, restricted primarily to the roots and to phloem cells of the stem and petiole vascular system. A deletion analysis revealed that the region between coordinates -429 and -48 relative to the ATG was sufficient for nodule-specific expression. Replacement of the -161 to -48 region, containing the glb3 CAAT and TATA boxes, with the heterologous truncated promoters delta-p35S and delta-pnos resulted in a loss of nodule specificity and reduction of GUS activity in L. corniculatus but a significant increase in tobacco, primarily in the roots. The same fragment could not direct nodule-specific expression when fused to a heterologous enhancer in cis. This region contains DNA sequences required, but not sufficient, for nodule-specific expression in L. corniculatus that function poorly or may be involved in promoter silencing in tobacco. By fusing further upstream fragments to the delta-p35S and delta-pnos promoters, two positive regulatory regions were delimited between coordinates -1601 and -670, as well as -429 and -162. The former region appears to function as a general enhancer because it significantly increased promoter activity in both orientations in L. corniculatus and tobacco. The latter region could enhance gene expression in both orientations in tobacco, but only in the correct orientation in L. corniculatus. These results show that efficient expression of the S. rostrata glb3 gene in nodules is mediated by an ATG-proximal, tissue-specific element, as well as further 5'-upstream positive elements; that the S. rostrata glb3 promoter is induced in a nodule-specific fashion in the heterologous legume L. corniculatus, suggesting a high degree of conservation of the relevant regulatory signals; and that the S. rostrata lb promoter is not silent in the nonlegume tobacco, but is expressed primarily in the roots.

  19. Inhibition of biphasic ethylene production enhances tolerance to abiotic stress by reducing the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Wi, Soo Jin; Jang, Su Jin; Park, Ky Young

    2010-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as H(2)O(2), are important plant cell signaling molecules involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses and in developmental and physiological processes. Despite the well-known physiological functions of ethylene production and stress signaling via ROS during stresses, whether ethylene acts alone or in conjunction with ROS has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between ethylene production and ROS accumulation during the response to abiotic stress. We used three independent transgenic tobacco lines, CAS-AS-2, -3 and -4, in which an antisense transcript of the senescence-related ACC synthase (ACS) gene from carnation flower (CARACC, Gen-Bank accession No. M66619) was expressed heterologously. Biphasic ethylene biosynthesis was reduced significantly in these transgenic plants, with or without H(2)O(2) treatment. These plants exhibited significantly reduced H(2)O(2)-induced gene-specific expression of ACS members, which were regulated in a time-dependent manner. The higher levels of NtACS1 expression in wild-type plants led to a second peak in ethylene production, which resulted in a more severe level of necrosis and cell death, as determined by trypan blue staining. In the transgenic lines, upregulated transcription of CAB, POR1 and RbcS resulted in increased photosynthetic performance following salt stress. This stress tolerance of H(2)O(2)-treated transgenic plants resulted from reduced ethylene biosynthesis, which decreased ROS accumulation via increased gene expression and activity of ROS-detoxifying enzymes, including MnSOD, CuZnSOD, and catalase. Therefore, it is suggested that ethylene plays a potentially critical role as an amplifier for ROS accumulation, implying a synergistic effect between biosynthesis of ROS and ethylene.

  20. Alternation of light/dark period priming enhances clomazone tolerance by increasing the levels of ascorbate and phenolic compounds and ROS detoxification in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plantlets.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Majd; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; Vidal, Véronique; El Maâtaoui, Mohamed; Sallanon, Huguette

    2015-07-01

    The effect of the alternation of light/dark periods (AL) (16/8 min light/dark cycles and a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 50 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) for three days) to clarify the mechanisms involved in the clomazone tolerance of tobacco plantlets primed with AL was studied. Clomazone decreased PSII activity, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), and the ascorbate and total polyphenol contents and increased H2O2 and starch grain accumulation and the number of the cells that underwent programmed cell death (PCD). The pretreatment with AL reduced the inhibitory effect of clomazone on the PSII activity and photosynthesis, as indicated by the decreases in the H2O2 and starch grain accumulation and the PCD levels, and increased the content of ascorbate and certain phenolic compounds, such as chlorogenic acid, neochlorogenic acid and rutin. The AL treatment could promote photorespiration via post-illumination burst (PIB) effects. This alternative photorespiratory electron pathway may reduce H2O2 generation via the consumption of photochemical energy, such as NADH+H(+). At 10 days (D10) of AL treatment, this process induced moderate stress which stimulates H2O2 detoxification systems by increasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes and the biosynthesis of antioxidant components. Therefore, the PCD levels provoked by clomazone were noticeably decreased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. CDPK1 from ginger promotes salinity and drought stress tolerance without yield penalty by improving growth and photosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, transient changes in calcium concentrations of cytosol have been observed during stress conditions like high salt, drought, extreme temperature and mechanical disturbances. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in relaying these calcium signatures into downstream effects. In this study, a stress-responsive CDPK gene, ZoCDPK1 was isolated from a stress cDNA generated from ginger using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) - PCR technique and characterized its role in stress tolerance. An important aspect seen during the analysis of the deduced protein is a rare coupling between the presence of a nuclear localization sequence in the junction domain and consensus sequence in the EF-hand loops of calmodulin-like domain. ZoCDPK1 is abundantly expressed in rhizome and is rapidly induced by high-salt stress, drought, and jasmonic acid treatment but not by low temperature stress or abscissic acid treatment. The sub-cellular localization of ZoCDPK1-GFP fusion protein was studied in transgenic tobacco epidermal cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Over-expression of ginger CDPK1 gene in tobacco conferred tolerance to salinity and drought stress as reflected by the high percentage of seed germination, higher relative water content, expression of stress responsive genes, higher leaf chlorophyll content, increased photosynthetic efficiency and other photosynthetic parameters. In addition, transgenic tobacco subjected to salinity/drought stress exhibited 50% more growth during stress conditions as compared to wild type plant during normal conditions. T3 transgenic plants are able to grow to maturity, flowers early and set viable seeds under continuous salinity or drought stress without yield penalty. The ZoCDPK1 up-regulated the expression levels of stress-related genes RD21A and ERD1 in tobacco plants. These results suggest that ZoCDPK1 functions in the positive regulation of the signaling pathways that are involved in the response to salinity and drought stress in ginger and it is likely operating in a DRE/CRT independent manner.

  2. Root-selective expression of "AtCAX4" and "AtCAX2" results in reduced lamina cadmium in field-grown "Nicotiana tabacum L"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To assess the impact of enhanced root vacuole cadmium (Cd) sequestration on leaf Cd accumulation under a low Cd dose, as generally occurs in agriculture, leaf Cd accumulation was examined in field-grown tobacco plants expressing genes encoding the high-capacity-Cd, tonoplast-localized, divalent cati...

  3. CbCBF from Capsella bursa-pastoris enhances cold tolerance and restrains growth in Nicotiana tabacum by antagonizing with gibberellin and affecting cell cycle signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingqi; Xu, Ming; Wu, Lihua; Shen, Chen; Ma, Hong; Lin, Juan

    2014-06-01

    Plant cells respond to cold stress via a regulatory mechanism leading to enhanced cold acclimation accompanied by growth retardation. The C-repeat binding factor (CBF) signaling pathway is essential for cold response of flowering plants. Our previously study documented a novel CBF-like gene from the cold-tolerant Capsella bursa-pastoris named CbCBF, which was responsive to chilling temperatures. Here, we show that CbCBF expression is obviously responsive to chilling, freezing, abscisic acid, gibberellic acid (GA), indoleacetic acid or methyl jasmonate treatments and that the CbCBF:GFP fusion protein was localized to the nucleus. In addition, CbCBF overexpression conferred to the cold-sensitive tobacco plants enhanced tolerance to chilling and freezing, as well as dwarfism and delayed flowering. The leaf cells of CbCBF overexpression tobacco lines attained smaller sizes and underwent delayed cell division with reduced expression of cyclin D genes. The dwarfism of CbCBF transformants can be partially restored by GA application. Consistently, CbCBF overexpression reduced the bioactive gibberellin contents and disturbed the expression of gibberellin metabolic genes in tobacco. Meanwhile, cold induced CbCBF expression and cold tolerance in C. bursa-pastoris are reduced by GA. We conclude that CbCBF confers cold resistance and growth inhibition to tobacco cells by interacting with gibberellin and cell cycle pathways, likely through activation of downstream target genes.

  4. Validation of a GC-FID method for rapid quantification of nicotine in fermented extracts prepared from Nicotiana tabacum fresh leaves and studies of nicotine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Millet, Agnès; Stintzing, Florian; Merfort, Irmgard

    2009-07-12

    A new GC-FID method, which allows rapid and reliable quantitation of nicotine in tobacco leaf extracts, was developed and validated. To avoid nicotine adsorption on the column, an amine-deactivated capillary column was used. The method developed was applied to study the degradation of nicotine in a fermented aqueous extract, and a loss of nearly 20% of nicotine over 12 months was observed. Careful inspection of GC-MS runs from concentrated samples of the same extract revealed the presence of nicotine metabolites such as nornicotine, anatabine, myosmine, 2,3'-bipyridyl, and 2-pyrrolidinone.

  5. Overexpression of the PAP1 transcription factor reveals a complex regulation of flavonoid and phenylpropanoid metabolism in Nicotiana tabacum plants attacked by Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Mitsunami, Tomoko; Nishihara, Masahiro; Galis, Ivan; Alamgir, Kabir Md; Hojo, Yuko; Fujita, Kohei; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Nemoto, Keichiro; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Arimura, Gen-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanin pigments and associated flavonoids have demonstrated antioxidant properties and benefits for human health. Consequently, current plant bioengineers have focused on how to modify flavonoid metabolism in plants. Most of that research, however, does not consider the role of natural biotic stresses (e.g., herbivore attack). To understand the influence of herbivore attack on the metabolic engineering of flavonoids, we examined tobacco plants overexpressing the Arabidopsis PAP1 gene (encoding an MYB transcription factor), which accumulated anthocyanin pigments and other flavonoids/phenylpropanoids. In comparison to wild-type and control plants, transgenic plants exhibited greater resistance to Spodoptera litura. Moreover, herbivory suppressed the PAP1-induced increase of transcripts of flavonoid/phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes (e.g., F3H) and the subsequent accumulation of these genes' metabolites, despite the unaltered PAP1 mRNA levels after herbivory. The instances of down-regulation were independent of the signaling pathways mediated by defense-related jasmonates but were relevant to the levels of PAP1-induced and herbivory-suppressed transcription factors, An1a and An1b. Although initially F3H transcripts were suppressed by herbivory, after the S. litura feeding was interrupted, F3H transcripts increased. We hypothesize that in transgenic plants responding to herbivory, there is a complex mechanism regulating enriched flavonoid/phenylpropanoid compounds, via biotic stress signals.

  6. The role of sink strength and nitrogen availability in the down-regulation of photosynthetic capacity in field-grown Nicotiana tabacum at elevated CO2 concentration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Down-regulation of photosynthesis is one of the most frequent responses observed in C3 plants grown under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Down-regulation is often attributed to an insufficient capacity of sink organs to use or store the increase in carbohydrate production in leaves t...

  7. RNA interference of the nicotine demethylase gene CYP82E4v1 reduces nornicotine content and enhances Myzus persicae resistance in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Qin, Li-Jun; Zhao, De-Gang

    2016-10-01

    The CYP82E4v1 gene was identified to encode nicotine demethylase, which catalyzed the conversion of nicotine to nornicotine. In this study, we constructed CYP82E4v1-RNAi vector and genetically transformed tobacco variety K326. The determination results of nicotine and nornicotine content via HPLC demonstrated that there was significant increase of nicotine content and reduction of nornicotine content in transgenic plants compared with those in wild-type plants. Exogenous application of IAA or GA3 could reduce the nicotine content in tobaccos, while ABA or 6-BA could increase the content of nicotine. And the more significant difference of nicotine content change in transgenic plants. Aphid-inoculation experiment demonstrated the number of aphid population in transgenic plants was significantly lower than wild-type plants at 12 d after aphid-inoculation. Meanwhile, the activity of AOEs and PAL in transgenic and wild-type tobacco plants after aphid-inoculation was measured. At 3 d after aphid-inoculation, both AOEs and PAL activity were significantly higher than controls, including wild-type plants with aphid-inoculation and transgenic plants with mock-inoculation. Also, the relative expression of these genes involved in salicylic acid/jasmonic acid (SA/JA) signaling pathways was analyzed at different stages after aphid-inoculation and the results demonstrated that there was significantly higher expression of JA-induced LOX gene in both transgenic and wild-type plants inoculated by aphid than the non-inoculated ones while no significant difference in the expression of SA-induced PR-1a gene among them was found, which indicated the JA-mediated resistance response was activated during aphid infestation. Moreover, although the expression level of BGL (another JA-induced gene) was less significant between the two inoculated tobaccos, it was significantly higher than the plant without inoculation, which was 1.4 and 2.2 folds higher than the non-inoculated controls respectively. To sum up, the improvement of aphid-resistance in transgenic tobaccos was based on nicotine accumulation which might cause nerve and antifeed toxicity and JA-mediated resistance response by enhancing the activities of AOEs and PAL. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Transgenic expression and functional characterization of human platelet derived growth factor BB (hPDGF-BB) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Deepa, Kanagasabapathy; Rodionov, Roman N; Weiss, Norbert; Parani, Madasamy

    2013-11-01

    Recombinant human platelet derived growth factor BB (rhPDGF-BB) is clinically approved for treating diabetic neuropathic ulcers. Plant-based expression systems offer less expensive ways of producing recombinant drugs, which do not require purification for clinical use. From this perspective, rhPDGF-BB is an ideal candidate for expression in plants as it can be applied topically. Here, we report a proof of concept study, in which rhPDGF-BB was expressed in tobacco plants, and its biological activity was tested in vitro. The mature human platelet derived growth factor BB (hPDGF-BB) gene was codon-optimized for tobacco and fused with ER targeting and retention signals, 5' and 3' UTRs of arc5-1 gene along with CaMV 35S promoter, and then, transferred by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Gene and protein expression of hPDGF-BB were confirmed by PCR and immunoblot studies. Bioactivity of hPDGF-BB expressed protein was determined by in vitro assays such as proliferation and migration in NIH3T3 cells. Our data reveals that total soluble proteins containing hPDGF-BB from transgenic plants showed a 4.5-fold increase in fibroblast proliferation compared to non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, plant-made rhPDGF-BB induced chemotaxis of treated cells and promoted wound healing in vitro. These results clearly demonstrate that functionally active rhPDGF-BB protein can be produced in plants and might have therapeutic benefits.

  9. The upregulation of NtAN2 expression at low temperature is required for anthocyanin accumulation in juvenile leaves of Lc-transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Zong-An; Zhao, Ting; Fan, Hua-Jie; Wang, Ning; Zheng, Shu-Song; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2012-03-20

    Anthocyanins often accumulate in plants subjected to environmental stress, including low temperature. However, the molecular regulatory mechanism of anthocyanin biosynthesis at low temperature is largely unknown. Here, tobacco was transformed with a maize anthocyanin regulatory gene Lc driven by AtSPX3 promoter to investigate the effect of Lc upon the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway. We found that the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway could not be activated in wild type, while Lc-transgenic tobacco lines exhibited purple pigmentation in juvenile leaves at low temperature. Accordingly, the total anthocyanin contents increased specifically in juvenile leaves in Lc-transgenic lines. Transcriptional analysis showed that NtCHS and NtCHI were induced by low temperature in leaves of wild type and transgenic lines. NtDFR was uniquely expressed in Lc-transgenic lines, but its transcript was not detected in wild type, implying that NtDFR expression in tobacco leaves was dependent on Lc. Furthermore, the expression of NtAN2 (regulatory gene) and NtANS (anthocyanidin synthase gene) was coordinately upregulated in Lc-transgenic lines under low temperature, suggesting that both Lc and NtAN2 might activate the expression of NtANS. Based on our findings and previous reports, we postulated that Lc interacted with NtAN2 induced by low-temperature stress and consequently stimulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in juvenile leaves of Lc-transgenic tobacco lines. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Increased Nicotiana tabacum fitness through positive regulation of carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways promoted by Daucus carota lycopene β-cyclase (Dclcyb1) expression

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J.C.; Cerda, A.; Simpson, K.; Lopez-Diaz, I.; Carrera, E; Handford, M.; Stange, C.

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids, chlorophylls and gibberellins are derived from the common precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). One of the enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis is lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) that catalyzes the conversion of lycopene into β-carotene. In carrot, Dclcyb1 is essential for carotenoid synthesis in the whole plant. Here we show that when expressed in tobacco, increments in total carotenoids, β-carotene and chlorophyll levels occur. Furthermore, photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced in transgenic lines. Interestingly, and contrary to previous observations where overexpression of a carotenogenic gene resulted in the inhibition of the synthesis of gibberellins, we found raised levels of active GA4 and the concommitant increases in plant height, leaf size and whole plant biomass, as well as an early flowering phenotype. Moreover, a significant increase in the expression of the key carotenogenic genes, Ntpsy1, Ntpsy2 and Ntlcyb, as well as those involved in the synthesis of chlorophyll (Ntchl), gibberellin (Ntga20ox, Ntcps and Ntks) and isoprenoid precursors (Ntdxs2 and Ntggpps) was observed. These results indicate that the expression of Dclcyb1 induces a positive feedback affecting the expression of isoprenoid gene precursors and genes involved in carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways leading to an enhancement in fitness measured as biomass, photosynthetic efficiency and carotenoid/chlorophyll composition. PMID:26893492

  11. CDPK1 from Ginger Promotes Salinity and Drought Stress Tolerance without Yield Penalty by Improving Growth and Photosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, transient changes in calcium concentrations of cytosol have been observed during stress conditions like high salt, drought, extreme temperature and mechanical disturbances. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in relaying these calcium signatures into downstream effects. In this study, a stress-responsive CDPK gene, ZoCDPK1 was isolated from a stress cDNA generated from ginger using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) – PCR technique and characterized its role in stress tolerance. An important aspect seen during the analysis of the deduced protein is a rare coupling between the presence of a nuclear localization sequence in the junction domain and consensus sequence in the EF-hand loops of calmodulin-like domain. ZoCDPK1 is abundantly expressed in rhizome and is rapidly induced by high-salt stress, drought, and jasmonic acid treatment but not by low temperature stress or abscissic acid treatment. The sub-cellular localization of ZoCDPK1-GFP fusion protein was studied in transgenic tobacco epidermal cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Over-expression of ginger CDPK1 gene in tobacco conferred tolerance to salinity and drought stress as reflected by the high percentage of seed germination, higher relative water content, expression of stress responsive genes, higher leaf chlorophyll content, increased photosynthetic efficiency and other photosynthetic parameters. In addition, transgenic tobacco subjected to salinity/drought stress exhibited 50% more growth during stress conditions as compared to wild type plant during normal conditions. T3 transgenic plants are able to grow to maturity, flowers early and set viable seeds under continuous salinity or drought stress without yield penalty. The ZoCDPK1 up-regulated the expression levels of stress-related genes RD21A and ERD1 in tobacco plants. These results suggest that ZoCDPK1 functions in the positive regulation of the signaling pathways that are involved in the response to salinity and drought stress in ginger and it is likely operating in a DRE/CRT independent manner. PMID:24194837

  12. The morphological and physiological properties of the genetic tumours from a Nicotiana interspecific hybrid.

    PubMed

    Wang, M H

    1998-06-01

    Many plant tumours have been loosely referred to as genetic tumours when no obvious external cause was identifiable. In this study, the morphology of genetic tumours was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the influence of exogenous phytohormones on genetic tumour growth was examined. Genetic tumours in Nicotiana hybrid were first observed in the hypocotyl area and later appeared from stems as a cluster complex. In vitro, genetic tumours were produced 5-6 days after explant treatment near each of the cut ends. The morphology of genetic tumours was investigated using SEM. Genetic tumours are mainly composed of epidermal cells surrounded by a well developed extracellular matrix (ECM), that is organized in a network linking surface cells. Globular structures containing several cells were formed from these clusters of epidermal cells. Vigorous tumourous growth from the leaf discs of the Nicotiana hybrid was obtained on medium supplemented with auxin and cytokinin at 0 to 10 muM, but 100 muM of auxin and cytokinin inhibited genetic tumour growth. Leaf discs treated with 10 muM cytokinin or auxin alone produced genetic tumours, but 10 muM cytokinin supplemented with 100 muM auxin stopped growth. Therefore genetic tumours are tissues that are, clearly, disturbed in endogenous hormone balance or have altered sensitivity to hormones and response to exogenous hormones.

  13. Effect of chitosan on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) accumulation, hydrolase activity, and morphological abnormalities of the viral particles in leaves of N. tabacum L. cv. Samsun.

    PubMed

    Nagorskaya, Vera; Reunov, Anatoliy; Lapshina, Larisa; Davydova, Viktoriya; Yermak, Irina

    2014-08-01

    The effect of chitosan on the development of infection caused by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Samsun has been studied. It was shown that the infectivity and viral coat protein content in leaves inoculated with a mixture of TMV (2 μg/mL) and chitosan (1 mg/mL) were lower in the early period of infection (3 days after inoculation), by 63% and 66% respectively, than in leaves inoculated with TMV only. Treatment of leaves with chitosan 24 h before inoculation with TMV also caused the antiviral effects, but these were less apparent than when the virus and polysaccharide were applied simultaneously. The inhibitory effects of the agent decreased as the infection progressed. Inoculation of leaves with TMV together with chitosan considerably enhanced the activity of hydrolases (proteases, RNases) in the leaves, in comparison with leaves inoculated with TMV alone. Electron microscope assays of phosphotungstic acid (PTA)-stained suspensions from infected tobacco leaves showed that, in addition to the normal TMV particles (18 nm in diameter, 300 nm long), these suspensions contained abnormal (swollen, "thin" and "short") virions. The highest number of abnormal virions was found in suspensions from leaves inoculated with a mixture of TMV and chitosan. Immuno-electron microscopy showed that "thin" virus particles, in contrast to the particles of normal diameter, lost the ability to bind to specific antiserum. It seems that the chitosan-induced activation of hydrolases stimulates the intracellular degradation of TMV particles and hence hydrolase activation may be considered to be one of the polysaccharide-mediated cellular defense mechanisms that limit virus accumulation in cells.

  14. Response of cytoplasmic pH to anoxia in plant tissues with altered activities of fermentation enzymes: application of methyl phosphonate as an NMR pH probe.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, D L; Dunford, R; Kruger, N J; Lloyd, D C; Ratcliffe, R G; Smith, A M O

    2009-01-01

    Acidification of the cytoplasm is a commonly observed response to oxygen deprivation in plant tissues that are intolerant of anoxia. The response was monitored in plant tissues with altered levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) with the aim of assessing the contribution of the targeted enzymes to cytoplasmic pH (pH(cyt)) regulation. The pH(cyt) was measured by in vivo (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using methyl phosphonate (MeP) as a pH probe. The potential toxicity of MeP was investigated by analysing its effect on the metabolism of radiolabelled glucose. MeP accumulated to detectable levels in the cytoplasm and vacuole of plant tissues exposed to millimolar concentrations of MeP, and the pH-dependent (31)P NMR signals provided a convenient method for measuring pH(cyt) values in tissues with poorly defined signals from the cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate pool. Pretreatment of potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber slices with 5 mm MeP for 24 h did not affect the metabolism of [U-(14)C]glucose or the pattern of (14)CO(2) release from specifically labelled [(14)C]-substrates. Time-courses of pH(cyt) measured before, during and after an anoxic episode in potato tuber tissues with reduced activities of LDH, or in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves with increased activities of PDC, were indistinguishable from their respective controls. MeP can be used as a low toxicity (31)P NMR probe for measuring intracellular pH values in plant tissues with altered levels of fermentation enzymes. The measurements on transgenic tobacco leaves suggest that the changes in pH(cyt) during an anoxic episode are not dominated by fermentation processes; while the pH changes in the potato tuber tissue with reduced LDH activity show that the affected isozymes do not influence the anoxic pH response.

  15. Alteration of the Physical and Chemical Structure of the Primary Cell Wall of Growth-Limited Plant Cells Adapted to Osmotic Stress 1

    PubMed Central

    Iraki, Naim M.; Bressan, Ray A.; Hasegawa, P. M.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    1989-01-01

    Cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) adapted to grow in severe osmotic stress of 428 millimolar NaCl (−23 bar) or 30% polyethylene glycol 8000 (−28 bar) exhibit a drastically altered growth physiology that results in slower cell expansion and fully expanded cells with volumes only one-fifth to one-eighth those of unadapted cells. This reduced cell volume occurs despite maintenance of turgor pressures sometimes severalfold higher than those of unadapted cells. This report and others (NM Iraki et al [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 000-000 and 000-000) document physical and biochemical alterations of the cell walls which might explain how adapted cells decrease the ability of the wall to expand despite diversion of carbon used for osmotic adjustment away from synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. Tensile strength measured by a gas decompression technique showed empirically that walls of NaCl-adapted cells are much weaker than those of unadapted cells. Correlated with this weakening was a substantial decrease in the proportion of crystalline cellulose in the primary cell wall. Even though the amount of insoluble protein associated with the wall was increased relative to other wall components, the amount of hydroxyproline in the insoluble protein of the wall was only about 10% that of unadapted cells. These results indicate that a cellulosic-extensin framework is a primary determinant of absolute wall tensile strength, but complete formation of this framework apparently is sacrificed to divert carbon to substances needed for osmotic adjustment. We propose that the absolute mass of this framework is not a principal determinant of the ability of the cell wall to extend. PMID:16667031

  16. Heterologous Expression of Moss Light-harvesting Complex Stress-related 1 (LHCSR1), the Chlorophyll a-Xanthophyll Pigment-protein Complex Catalyzing Non-photochemical Quenching, in Nicotiana sp.*

    PubMed Central

    Pinnola, Alberta; Ghin, Leonardo; Gecchele, Elisa; Merlin, Matilde; Alboresi, Alessandro; Avesani, Linda; Pezzotti, Mario; Capaldi, Stefano; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bassi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms evolved mechanisms for thermal dissipation of energy absorbed in excess to prevent formation of reactive oxygen species. The major and fastest component, called non-photochemical quenching, occurs within the photosystem II antenna system by the action of two essential light-harvesting complex (LHC)-like proteins, photosystem II subunit S (PSBS) in plants and light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) in green algae and diatoms. In the evolutionary intermediate Physcomitrella patens, a moss, both gene products are active. These proteins, which are present in low amounts, are difficult to purify, preventing structural and functional analysis. Here, we report on the overexpression of the LHCSR1 protein from P. patens in the heterologous systems Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum using transient and stable nuclear transformation. We show that the protein accumulated in both heterologous systems is in its mature form, localizes in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes, and is correctly folded with chlorophyll a and xanthophylls but without chlorophyll b, an essential chromophore for plants and algal LHC proteins. Finally, we show that recombinant LHCSR1 is active in quenching in vivo, implying that the recombinant protein obtained is a good material for future structural and functional studies. PMID:26260788

  17. Heterologous expression of moss light-harvesting complex stress-related 1 (LHCSR1), the chlorophyll a-xanthophyll pigment-protein complex catalyzing non-photochemical quenching, in Nicotiana sp.

    PubMed

    Pinnola, Alberta; Ghin, Leonardo; Gecchele, Elisa; Merlin, Matilde; Alboresi, Alessandro; Avesani, Linda; Pezzotti, Mario; Capaldi, Stefano; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bassi, Roberto

    2015-10-02

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms evolved mechanisms for thermal dissipation of energy absorbed in excess to prevent formation of reactive oxygen species. The major and fastest component, called non-photochemical quenching, occurs within the photosystem II antenna system by the action of two essential light-harvesting complex (LHC)-like proteins, photosystem II subunit S (PSBS) in plants and light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) in green algae and diatoms. In the evolutionary intermediate Physcomitrella patens, a moss, both gene products are active. These proteins, which are present in low amounts, are difficult to purify, preventing structural and functional analysis. Here, we report on the overexpression of the LHCSR1 protein from P. patens in the heterologous systems Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum using transient and stable nuclear transformation. We show that the protein accumulated in both heterologous systems is in its mature form, localizes in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes, and is correctly folded with chlorophyll a and xanthophylls but without chlorophyll b, an essential chromophore for plants and algal LHC proteins. Finally, we show that recombinant LHCSR1 is active in quenching in vivo, implying that the recombinant protein obtained is a good material for future structural and functional studies. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Intraspecific Variability within Globodera tabacum solanacearum Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Syracuse, A. J.; Johnson, C. S.; Eisenback, J. D.; Nessler, C. L.; Smith, E. P.

    2004-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs) were used to investigate the intraspecific variability among 19 geographic isolates of Globodera tabacum solanacearum from eight counties in Virginia and one county in North Carolina. Globodera tabacum tabacum, G. t. virginiae, and the Mexican cyst nematode (MCN) were included as outgroups. Six primers were used and 119 amplification products were observed. Each primer yielded reproducible differences in fragment patterns that differentiated the isolates and species. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to illustrate the relatedness among isolates and species. The average Jaccard's similarity index among isolates of G. t. solanacearum was 74%, possibly representing greater variation than that reported in the literature across different pathotypes of the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida, in studies where RAPD were also employed. The RAPD markers described here may be useful for the development of specific primers or probes that could improve the identification of TCN populations. Such improvements in the characterization of TCN genotypes would facilitate the effective deployment of existing and future resistant cultivars to control these economically important pests. PMID:19262823

  19. Characterization of Cercospora nicotianae Hypothetical Proteins in Cercosporin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Beseli, Aydin; Noar, Roslyn; Daub, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    The photoactivated toxin, cercosporin, produced by Cercospora species, plays an important role in pathogenesis of this fungus to host plants. Cercosporin has almost universal toxicity to cells due to its production of reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen. For that reason, Cercospora species, which are highly resistant to their own toxin, are good candidates to identify genes for resistance to cercosporin and to the reactive oxygen species it produces. In previous research, the zinc cluster transcription factor CRG1 (cercosporin resistance gene 1) was found to be crucial for Cercospora species’ resistance against cercosporin, and subtractive hybridization analysis identified 185 genes differentially expressed between Cercospora nicotianae wild type (wt) and a crg1 mutant. The focus of this work was to identify and characterize the hypothetical proteins that were identified in the Cercospora nicotianae subtractive library as potential resistance factors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the 20 genes encoding hypothetical proteins showed that two, 24cF and 71cR, were induced under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, suggesting a role in resistance. Transformation and expression of 24cF and 71cR in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus, Neurospora crassa, showed that 71cR provided increased resistance to cercosporin toxicity, whereas no significant increase was observed in 24cF transformants. Gene disruption was used to generate C. nicotianae 71cR mutants; these mutants did not differ from wt C. nicotianae in cercosporin resistance or production. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed induction of other resistance genes in the 71cR mutant that may compensate for the loss of 71cR. Analysis of 71cR conserved domains and secondary and tertiary structure identify the protein as having an NTF2-like superfamily DUF1348 domain with unknown function, to be intracellular and localized in the cytosol, and to have similarities to proteins in the steroid delta

  20. Characterization of Cercospora nicotianae Hypothetical Proteins in Cercosporin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Noar, Roslyn; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    The photoactivated toxin, cercosporin, produced by Cercospora species, plays an important role in pathogenesis of this fungus to host plants. Cercosporin has almost universal toxicity to cells due to its production of reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen. For that reason, Cercospora species, which are highly resistant to their own toxin, are good candidates to identify genes for resistance to cercosporin and to the reactive oxygen species it produces. In previous research, the zinc cluster transcription factor CRG1 (cercosporin resistance gene 1) was found to be crucial for Cercospora species' resistance against cercosporin, and subtractive hybridization analysis identified 185 genes differentially expressed between Cercospora nicotianae wild type (wt) and a crg1 mutant. The focus of this work was to identify and characterize the hypothetical proteins that were identified in the Cercospora nicotianae subtractive library as potential resistance factors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the 20 genes encoding hypothetical proteins showed that two, 24cF and 71cR, were induced under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, suggesting a role in resistance. Transformation and expression of 24cF and 71cR in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus, Neurospora crassa, showed that 71cR provided increased resistance to cercosporin toxicity, whereas no significant increase was observed in 24cF transformants. Gene disruption was used to generate C. nicotianae 71cR mutants; these mutants did not differ from wt C. nicotianae in cercosporin resistance or production. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed induction of other resistance genes in the 71cR mutant that may compensate for the loss of 71cR. Analysis of 71cR conserved domains and secondary and tertiary structure identify the protein as having an NTF2-like superfamily DUF1348 domain with unknown function, to be intracellular and localized in the cytosol, and to have similarities to proteins in the steroid delta-isomerase family.

  1. S RNase and Interspecific Pollen Rejection in the Genus Nicotiana: Multiple Pollen-Rejection Pathways Contribute to Unilateral Incompatibility between Self-Incompatible and Self-Compatible Species.

    PubMed

    Murfett, J.; Strabala, T. J.; Zurek, D. M.; Mou, B.; Beecher, B.; McClure, B. A.

    1996-06-01

    In self-incompatible (SI) plants, the S locus acts to prevent growth of self-pollen and thus promotes outcrossing within the species. Interspecific crosses between SI and self-compatible (SC) species often show unilateral incompatibility that follows the SI x SC rule: SI species reject pollen from SC species, but the reciprocal crosses are usually compatible. The general validity of the SI x SC rule suggests a link between SI and interspecific pollen rejection; however, this link has been questioned because of a number of exceptions to the rule. To clarify the role of the S locus in interspecific pollen rejection, we transformed several Nicotiana species and hybrids with genes encoding SA2 or SC10 RNase from SI N. alata. Compatibility phenotypes in the transgenic plants were tested using pollen from three SC species showing unilateral incompatibility with N. alata. S RNase was implicated in rejecting pollen from all three species. Rejection of N. plumbaginifolia pollen was similar to S allele-specific pollen rejection, showing a requirement for both S RNase and other genetic factors from N. alata. In contrast, S RNase-dependent rejection of N. glutinosa and N. tabacum pollen proceeded without these additional factors. N. alata also rejects pollen from the latter two species through an S RNase-independent mechanism. Our results implicate the S locus in all three systems, but it is clear that multiple mechanisms contribute to interspecific pollen rejection.

  2. Overexpression of the synthetic chimeric native-T-phylloplanin-GFP genes optimized for monocot and dicot plants renders enhanced resistance to blue mold disease in tobacco (N. tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak K; Raha, Sumita; Hall, James T; Maiti, Indu B

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the natural plant resistance and to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of phylloplanin against blue mold, we have expressed a synthetic chimeric native-phylloplanin-GFP protein fusion in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. KY14, a cultivar that is highly susceptible to infection by Peronospora tabacina. The coding sequence of the tobacco phylloplanin gene along with its native signal peptide was fused with GFP at the carboxy terminus. The synthetic chimeric gene (native-phylloplanin-GFP) was placed between the modified Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter with duplicated enhancer domains and the terminator sequence from the rbcSE9 gene. The chimeric gene, expressed in transgenic tobacco, was stably inherited in successive plant generations as shown by molecular characterization, GFP quantification, and confocal fluorescent microscopy. Transgenic plants were morphologically similar to wild-type plants and showed no deleterious effects due to transgene expression. Blue mold-sensitivity assays of tobacco lines were performed by applying P. tabacina sporangia to the upper leaf surface. Transgenic lines expressing the fused synthetic native-phyllopanin-GFP gene in the leaf apoplast showed resistance to infection. Our results demonstrate that in vivo expression of a synthetic fused native-phylloplanin-GFP gene in plants can potentially achieve natural protection against microbial plant pathogens, including P. tabacina in tobacco.

  3. Overexpression of the Synthetic Chimeric Native-T-phylloplanin-GFP Genes Optimized for Monocot and Dicot Plants Renders Enhanced Resistance to Blue Mold Disease in Tobacco (N. tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Dipak K.; Hall, James T.; Maiti, Indu B.

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the natural plant resistance and to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of phylloplanin against blue mold, we have expressed a synthetic chimeric native-phylloplanin-GFP protein fusion in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. KY14, a cultivar that is highly susceptible to infection by Peronospora tabacina. The coding sequence of the tobacco phylloplanin gene along with its native signal peptide was fused with GFP at the carboxy terminus. The synthetic chimeric gene (native-phylloplanin-GFP) was placed between the modified Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter with duplicated enhancer domains and the terminator sequence from the rbcSE9 gene. The chimeric gene, expressed in transgenic tobacco, was stably inherited in successive plant generations as shown by molecular characterization, GFP quantification, and confocal fluorescent microscopy. Transgenic plants were morphologically similar to wild-type plants and showed no deleterious effects due to transgene expression. Blue mold-sensitivity assays of tobacco lines were performed by applying P. tabacina sporangia to the upper leaf surface. Transgenic lines expressing the fused synthetic native-phyllopanin-GFP gene in the leaf apoplast showed resistance to infection. Our results demonstrate that in vivo expression of a synthetic fused native-phylloplanin-GFP gene in plants can potentially achieve natural protection against microbial plant pathogens, including P. tabacina in tobacco. PMID:24778589

  4. Cercosporin-deficient mutants by plasmid tagging in the asexual fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, K-R; Ehrenshaft, M; Wetzel, D K; Daub, M E

    2003-11-01

    We have successfully adapted plasmid insertion and restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) to produce cercosporin toxin-deficient mutants in the asexual phytopathogenic fungus Cercospora nicotianae. The use of pre-linearized plasmid or restriction enzymes in the transformation procedure significantly decreased the transformation frequency, but promoted a complicated and undefined mode of plasmid integration that leads to mutations in the C. nicotianae genome. Vector DNA generally integrated in multiple copies, and no increase in single-copy insertion was observed when enzymes were added to the transformation mixture. Out of 1873 transformants tested, 39 putative cercosporin toxin biosynthesis ( ctb) mutants were recovered that showed altered levels of cercosporin production. Seven ctb mutants were recovered using pre-linearized plasmids without the addition of enzymes, and these were considered to be non-REMI mutants. The correlation between a specific insertion and a mutant phenotype was confirmed using rescued plasmids as gene disruption vectors in the wild-type strain. Six out of fifteen rescued plasmids tested yielded cercosporin-deficient transformants when re-introduced into the wild-type strain, suggesting a link between the insertion site and the cercosporin-deficient phenotype. Sequence analysis of a fragment flanking the insert site recovered from one insertion mutant showed it to be disrupted in sequences with high homology to the acyl transferase domain of polyketide synthases from other fungi. Disruption of this polyketide synthase gene ( CTB1) using a rescued plasmid resulted in mutants that were defective in cercosporin production. Thus, we provide the first molecular evidence that cercosporin is synthesized via a polyketide pathway as previously hypothesized.

  5. Capsicum annuum Tobacco Mosaic Virus-Induced Clone 1 Expression Perturbation Alters the Plant's Response to Ethylene and Interferes with the Redox Homeostasis1

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ryoung; An, Jong-Min; Park, Chang-Jin; Jin Kim, Young; Joo, Sunjoo; Taek Kim, Woo; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2004-01-01

    Capsicum annuum tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced clone 1 (CaTin1) gene was expressed early during incompatible interaction of hot pepper (Caspsicum annuum) plants with TMV and Xanthomonas campestris. RNA-blot analysis showed that CaTin1 gene was expressed only in roots in untreated plants and induced mainly in leaf in response to ethylene, NaCl, and methyl viologen but not by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. The ethylene dependence of CaTin1 induction upon TMV inoculation was demonstrated by the decrease of CaTin1 expression in response to several inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or its action. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing CaTin1 gene in sense- or antisense-orientation showed interesting characteristics such as the accelerated growth and the enhanced resistance to biotic as well as abiotic stresses. Such characteristics appear to be caused by the elevated level of ethylene and H2O2. Moreover, in transgenic plants expressing antisense CaTin1 gene, the expression of some pathogenesis-related genes was enhanced constitutively, which may be mainly due to the increased ethylene level. The promoter of CaTin1 has four GCC-boxes, two AT-rich regions, and an elicitor-inducible W-box. The induction of the promoter activity by ethylene depends on GCC-boxes and by TMV on W-box. Taken together, we propose that the CaTin1 up-regulation or down-regulation interferes with the redox balance of plants leading to the altered response to ethylene and biotic as well as abiotic stresses. PMID:15107506

  6. The "drought-inducible" histone H1s of tobacco play no role in male sterility linked to alterations in H1 variants.

    PubMed

    Przewloka, Marcin R; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T; Slusarczyk, Joanna; Kuraś, Mieczyslaw; Grasser, Klaus D; Stemmer, Christian; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2002-07-01

    Tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.) has two major H1 variants (H1A and H1B), which account for over 80% of chromatin linker histones, and four minor variants: H1C, H1D, H1E and H1F. We have shown previously [M. Prymakowska-Bosak et al. (1999) Plant Cell 11:2317-2329] that reversal of the natural proportion of major to minor H1 variants in transgenic tobacco plants results in a characteristic male-sterility phenotype identical to that occurring in many plant species subjected to water deficit at the time of male meiosis. It has been proposed by others that the drought-induced arrest of male gametophyte development is linked to decreased sugar delivery to reproductive tissues. Within the family of angiosperm H1s there is a well-defined class of minor H1 variants named "drought inducible" because some of its members have been shown to be induced by water deficit. We have identified and cloned the tobacco H1C gene, which, based on sequence similarity, represents a "drought-inducible" minor H1 variant. Analysis of the un-translated mRNA and promoter regions of H1C suggests a regulation by sucrose concentration. Antisense silencing of H1C and its close homologue H1D in plants that do not express H1A and H1B does not affect the characteristic H1A(-)/ H1B(-) male-sterility phenotype. Silencing of H1C and H1D also has no effect on growth and development of plants. Our findings demonstrate that H1C and H1D are dispensable for normal growth and development of tobacco, and that the compensatory up-regulation of "drought-inducible" H1s observed in H1A(-)/ H1B(-) plants is not the direct cause of male sterility linked to alterations in H1 variants.

  7. Capsicum annuum tobacco mosaic virus-induced clone 1 expression perturbation alters the plant's response to ethylene and interferes with the redox homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; An, Jong-Min; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Joo, Sunjoo; Kim, Woo Taek; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2004-05-01

    Capsicum annuum tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced clone 1 (CaTin1) gene was expressed early during incompatible interaction of hot pepper (Caspsicum annuum) plants with TMV and Xanthomonas campestris. RNA-blot analysis showed that CaTin1 gene was expressed only in roots in untreated plants and induced mainly in leaf in response to ethylene, NaCl, and methyl viologen but not by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. The ethylene dependence of CaTin1 induction upon TMV inoculation was demonstrated by the decrease of CaTin1 expression in response to several inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or its action. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing CaTin1 gene in sense- or antisense-orientation showed interesting characteristics such as the accelerated growth and the enhanced resistance to biotic as well as abiotic stresses. Such characteristics appear to be caused by the elevated level of ethylene and H2O2. Moreover, in transgenic plants expressing antisense CaTin1 gene, the expression of some pathogenesis-related genes was enhanced constitutively, which may be mainly due to the increased ethylene level. The promoter of CaTin1 has four GCC-boxes, two AT-rich regions, and an elicitor-inducible W-box. The induction of the promoter activity by ethylene depends on GCC-boxes and by TMV on W-box. Taken together, we propose that the CaTin1 up-regulation or down-regulation interferes with the redox balance of plants leading to the altered response to ethylene and biotic as well as abiotic stresses.

  8. Genetic analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae populations from different hosts using microsatellite markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two hundred thirty-one isolates of P. nicotianae representing 14 populations from different host genera, including agricultural crops (Citrus, Nicotiana, and Lycopersicon), potted ornamental species in nurseries (Lavandula, Convolvulus, Myrtus, Correa and Ruta) and other plant genera of lesser econo...

  9. [Turkish (Aztec) tobbaco (Nicotiana rustica L.) unnoticeable danger?].

    PubMed

    Modnicki, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Tobacco harmful influence on men's health is usually linked with smoking cigarettes. Alternative ways of intake tobacco are also dangerous. Nicotine and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines with carcinogenic activity are not only present in tobacco smoke but also of nicotine-rich product for chewing. There are some internet sources about Turkish (Aztec) tobacco (Nicotiana rustica L.) as easy available material for home-made tobacco mixtures. A some reports about dangerous effects connected with chewing tobacco and similar to smoking-related disorders are present in current literature.

  10. Influence of green leaf herbivory by Manduca sexta on floral volatile emission by Nicotiana suaveolens.

    PubMed

    Effmert, Uta; Dinse, Claudia; Piechulla, Birgit

    2008-04-01

    Plants have to cope with various abiotic and biotic impacts as a consequence of changing environments, which can impair their ability to sexually reproduce. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether green leaf herbivory, having one of the most hazardous biotic impacts, would have any direct effect on the production and emission of floral volatiles because volatiles are known to play a crucial role in pollination. Nicotiana suaveolens plants were challenged with Manduca sexta feeding on leaves, and alterations in the quality and quantity of the floral blend, shifts in emission patterns, and changes in expression patterns of the floral benzoic/salicylic acid carboxyl-methyltransferase were monitored in noninfested and infested plants. Leaves responded to larval feeding by herbivory-induced diurnal emission of semiochemicals, whereas the emission of floral volatiles remained unchanged in comparison to the noninfested control. Neither the volatile composition nor the quantity of components or the nocturnal emission patterns was altered. The mRNA and protein levels of the benzoic/salicylic acid carboxyl-methyltransferase, as well as its enzyme activity, also did not show any significant differences. These results indicate that metabolism in flowers at and postanthesis is an autonomous process and is independent of metabolic changes in green leaves. By this sustaining mechanism, N. suaveolens plants ensure sexual reproduction even under unfavorable conditions.

  11. Large-scale detection and application of expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhou, D; Wang, S; Yang, L

    2015-07-14

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widespread in the Nicotiana genome. Using an alignment and variation detection method, we developed 20,607,973 SNPs, based on the expressed sequence tag sequences of 10 Nicotiana species. The replacement rate was much higher than the transversion rate in the SNPs, and SNPs widely exist in the Nicotiana. In vitro verification indicated that all of the SNPs were high quality and accurate. Evolutionary relationships between 15 varieties were investigated by polymerase chain reaction with a special primer; the specific 302 locus of these sequence results clearly indicated the origin of Zhongyan 100. A database of Nicotiana SNPs (NSNP) was developed to store and search for SNPs in Nicotiana. NSNP is a tool for researchers to develop SNP markers of sequence data.

  12. Conservation and possible reintroduction of an endangered plant based on an analysis of community ecology: a case study of Primulina tabacum Hance in China

    Treesearch

    Hai Ren; Qianmei Zhang; Zhengfeng Wang; Qinfeng Guo; June Wang; Nan Liu; Kaiming. Liang

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of the rare and endangered perennial herb Primulina tabacum Hance is restricted to eight karst caves in southern China. To conserve P. tabacum and to evaluate possible reintroduction, we studied its historical distribution and conducted field surveys of both its biotic and physical environment. We used detrended...

  13. Characteristic alatoid 'cineole cassette' monoterpene synthase present in Nicotiana noctiflora.

    PubMed

    Fähnrich, Anke; Neumann, Madeleine; Piechulla, Birgit

    2014-05-01

    Nicotiana species of the section Alatae emit a characteristic floral scent comprising the' cineole cassette' monoterpenes 1,8-cineole, limonene, myrcene, β-pinene, α-pinene, sabinene and α-terpineol. All previously isolated 'cineole cassette'-monoterpene synthase genes are multi product enzymes that synthesize the seven compounds of the 'cineole cassette'. Interestingly, so far this 'alatoid' trait was only shared with the eponymous species Nicotiana suaveolens of the sister section Suaveolentes. To determine the origin of the 'cineole cassette' monoterpene phenotype other potential parent species of section Noctiflorae or Petunoides as well as of the distantly related section Trigonophyllae were analysed. A monoterpene synthase producing the set of 'cineole cassette' compounds was isolated from N. noctiflorae. N. obtusifolia emitted solely 1,8-cineole and no monoterpenes were found in floral scents of N. petunoides and N. palmeri. Interestingly, the phylogenetic analysis clustered the new gene of N. noctiflora closely to the terpineol synthase genes of e.g. N. alata rather than to cineole synthase genes of e.g. N. forgetiana.

  14. A Jasmonate ZIM-Domain Protein NaJAZd Regulates Floral Jasmonic Acid Levels and Counteracts Flower Abscission in Nicotiana attenuata Plants

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.; Galis, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is an important regulator of plant growth, development and defense. The jasmonate-ZIM domain (JAZ) proteins are key regulators in jasmonate signaling ubiquitously present in flowering plants but their functional annotation remains largely incomplete. Recently, we identified 12 putative JAZ proteins in native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, and initiated systematic functional characterization of these proteins by reverse genetic approaches. In this report, Nicotiana attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaJAZd (irJAZd) by RNA interference were used to characterize NaJAZd function. Although NaJAZd transcripts were strongly and transiently up-regulated in the rosette leaves by simulated herbivory treatment, we did not observe strong defense-related phenotypes, such as altered herbivore performance or the constitutive accumulation of defense-related secondary metabolites in irJAZd plants compared to wild type plants, both in the glasshouse and the native habitat of Nicotiana attenuata in the Great Basin Desert, Utah, USA. Interestingly, irJAZd plants produced fewer seed capsules than did wild type plants as a result of increased flower abscission in later stages of flower development. The early- and mid-developmental stages of irJAZd flowers had reduced levels of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, while fully open flowers had normal levels, but these were impaired in NaMYB305 transcript accumulations. Previously, NaMYB305-silenced plants were shown to have strong flower abscission phenotypes and contained lower NECTARIN 1 transcript levels, phenotypes which are copied in irJAZd plants. We propose that the NaJAZd protein is required to counteract flower abscission, possibly by regulating jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine levels and/or expression of NaMYB305 gene in Nicotiana attenuata flowers. This novel insight into the function of JAZ proteins in flower and seed development highlights the diversity of functions played by jasmonates

  15. Acute respiratory failure due to Nicotiana glauca ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, D; Kargakis, M; Topalis, T; Drouzas, A; Potolidis, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: A variety of organisms produce potent toxins that impact human health through compromising respiratory function. Case report: We describe a rare case of abrupt respiratory failure afterNicotiana glaucaingestion in a previously healthy sixty years old female patient. She presented complaining for gait instability and malaise after ingestion of cooked leaves of the wild plant and two hours after the onset she developed respiratory failurefor which she was intubated and mechanically ventilated for two days. The patient fully recovered and was discharged from the hospital. Conclusion: Anabasine, the plant’s main active ingredient, can cause severe systemic intoxication due to its nicotinic receptor agonist action with respiratory muscle paralysis being the main effect. PMID:24376330

  16. GhWRKY68 reduces resistance to salt and drought in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haihong; Wang, Chen; Wang, Fang; Liu, Shuchang; Li, Guilin; Guo, Xingqi

    2015-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factors modulate numerous physiological processes, including plant growth, development and responses to various environmental stresses. Currently, our understanding of the functions of the majority of the WRKY family members and their possible roles in signalling crosstalk is limited. In particular, very few WRKYs have been identified and characterised from an economically important crop, cotton. In this study, we characterised a novel group IIc WRKY gene, GhWRKY68, which is induced by different abiotic stresses and multiple defence-related signalling molecules. The β-glucuronidase activity driven by the GhWRKY68 promoter was enhanced after exposure to drought, salt, abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2. The overexpression of GhWRKY68 in Nicotiana benthamiana reduced resistance to drought and salt and affected several physiological indices. GhWRKY68 may mediate salt and drought responses by modulating ABA content and enhancing the transcript levels of ABA-responsive genes. GhWRKY68-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced tolerance to oxidative stress after drought and salt stress treatments, which correlated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced enzyme activities, elevated malondialdehyde (MDA) content and altered ROS-related gene expression. These results indicate that GhWRKY68 is a transcription factor that responds to drought and salt stresses by regulating ABA signalling and modulating cellular ROS.

  17. Functional specialization of Nicotiana attenuata phytochromes in leaf development and flowering time.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Variluska; Oh, Youngjoo; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Gase, Klaus; Baldwin, Ian Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Phytochromes mainly function in photoautotrophic organisms to adjust growth in response to fluctuating light signals. The different isoforms of plant phytochromes often display both conserved and divergent roles, presumably to fine-tune plant responses to environmental signals and optimize fitness. Here we describe the distinct, yet partially redundant, roles of phytochromes NaPHYA, NaPHYB1 and NaPHYB2 in a wild tobacco species, Nicotiana attenuata using RNAi-silenced phytochrome lines. Consistent with results reported from other species, silencing the expression of NaPHYA or NaPHYB2 in N. attenuata had mild or no influence on plant development as long as NaPHYB1 was functional; whereas silencing the expression of NaPHYB1 alone strongly altered flowering time and leaf morphology. The contribution of NaPHYB2 became significant only in the absence of NaPHYB1; plants silenced for both NaPHYB1 and NaPHYB2 largely skipped the rosette-stage of growth to rapidly produce long, slender stalks that bore flowers early: hallmarks of the shade-avoidance responses. The phenotyping of phytochrome-silenced lines, combined with sequence and transcript accumulation analysis, suggest the independent functional diversification of the phytochromes, and a dominant role of NaPHYB1 and NaPHYB2 in N. attenuata's vegetative and reproductive development. © 2016 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Changes in photosynthetic metabolism induced by tobamovirus infection in Nicotiana benthamiana studied in vivo by thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Sajnani, Carlota; Zurita, Jorge L; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M; Barón, Matilde; Ducruet, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    * In thylakoids from Nicotiana benthamiana infected with the pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), a decreased amount of the PsbP and PsbQ proteins of photosystem II and different proteins of the Calvin cycle have been previously observed. We used thermoluminescence to study the consequences in vivo. * Measurements on unfrozen discs from symptomatic and asymptomatic leaves of plants infected by two tobamovirus PMMoV-S and PMMoV-I strains were compared with homologous samples in control plants. * Thermoluminescence emission did not reveal noticeable alteration of PSII electron transfer activity in infected symptomatic leaves. In these leaves, the relative intensity of the 'afterglow' emission indicated an increase of the NADPH + ATP assimilatory potential, contrasting with its decrease in asymptomatic leaves. High-temperature thermoluminescence, as a result of peroxides, increased in symptomatic and asymptomatic leaves. * In young infected leaves, PSII activity is preserved, producing a high assimilatory potential. Older asymptomatic leaves export more nutrients towards young infected leaves. This depresses their assimilatory potential and weakens their defence mechanisms against reactive oxygen species, resulting in higher peroxide content.

  19. NMR-based structural validation of therapeutic antibody produced in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hirokazu; Fukuzawa, Noriho; Tasaka, Yasushi; Matsuo, Kouki; Zhang, Ying; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Kondo, Sachiko; Nakazawa, Shiori; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Matsumura, Takeshi; Kato, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    We successfully developed a method for metabolic isotope labeling of recombinant proteins produced in transgenic tobacco. This enabled assessment of structural integrity of plant-derived therapeutic antibodies by NMR analysis. A variety of expression vehicles have been developed for the production of promising biologics, including plants, fungi, bacteria, insects, and mammals. Glycoprotein biologics often experience altered folding and post-translational modifications that are typified by variant glycosylation patterns. These differences can dramatically affect their efficacy, as exemplified by therapeutic antibodies. However, it is generally difficult to validate the structural integrity of biologics produced using different expression vehicles. To address this issue, we have developed and applied a stable-isotope-assisted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method for the conformational characterization of recombinant antibodies produced in plants. Nicotiana benthamiana used as a vehicle for the production of recombinant immunoglobulin G (IgG) was grown in a (15)N-enriched plant growth medium. The Fc fragment derived from the (15)N-labeled antibody thus prepared was subjected to heteronuclear two-dimensional (2D) NMR measurements. This approach enabled assessment of the structural integrity of the plant-derived therapeutic antibodies by comparing their NMR spectral properties with those of an authentic IgG-Fc derived from mammalian cells.

  20. Use of a New Tetrazolium-Based Assay to Study the Production of Superoxide Radicals by Tobacco Cell Cultures Challenged with Avirulent Zoospores of Phytophthora parasitica var nicotianae1

    PubMed Central

    Able, Amanda J.; Guest, David I.; Sutherland, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between the production of reactive oxygen species and the hypersensitive response (HR) of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) toward an incompatible race of the Oomycete Phytophthora parasitica var nicotianae has been investigated. A new assay for superoxide radical (O2−) production based on reduction of the tetrazolium dye sodium,3′-(1-[phenylamino-carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium)-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro) benzene-sulfonic acid hydrate (XTT) has enabled the quantitative estimation of perhydroxyl/superoxide radical acid-base pair (HO2·/O2−) production during the resistant response. Tobacco suspension cells were inoculated with zoospores from compatible or incompatible races of the pathogen. Subsequent HO2·/O2− production was monitored by following the formation of XTT formazan. In the incompatible interaction only, HO2·/O2− was produced in a minor burst between 0 and 2 h and then in a major burst between 8 and 10 h postinoculation. During this second burst, rates of XTT reduction equivalent to a radical flux of 9.9 × 10−15 mol min−1 cell−1 were observed. The HO2·/O2− scavengers O2− dismutase and Mn(III)desferal each inhibited dye reduction. An HR was observed in challenged, resistant cells immediately following the second burst of radical production. Both scavengers inhibited the HR when added prior to the occurrence of either radical burst, indicating that O2− production is a necessary precursor to the HR. PMID:9625702

  1. Alterations in adenylate ratios in plant cells after accelerated ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilenko, A.; Sidorenko, P. G.

    Levels of adenylate metabolism have been studied in cells of Nicotiana tabacum growing in vitro, and in root apex extracts of Pisum sativum irradiated at the 95-in. isochronous cyclotron U-240, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Kyiv. Particle beams of accelerated helium ions with energy 9.34 keV/mum were used. Replacement and rapid freezing of the irradiated plant samples in liquid nitrogen were carried out with a manipulator and a remote control system. After doses of 5, 20, 50, and 100 Gy of gamma-irradiation, as well as 50 and 100 Gy ^4He irradiation, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio increased during early stages of the response. This effect was absent at higher doses and after exposure to sparsely-ionizing radiation, when a rapid decline in the cellular ATP concentration and the ATP/ADP ratio occurred.

  2. Cucumber mosaic virus and its 2b protein alter emission of host volatile organic compounds but not aphid vector settling in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Tungadi, Trisna; Groen, Simon C; Murphy, Alex M; Pate, Adrienne E; Iqbal, Javaid; Bruce, Toby J A; Cunniffe, Nik J; Carr, John P

    2017-05-03

    Aphids, including the generalist herbivore Myzus persicae, transmit cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). CMV (strain Fny) infection affects M. persicae feeding behavior and performance on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), Arabidopsis thaliana and cucurbits in varying ways. In Arabidopsis and cucurbits, CMV decreases host quality and inhibits prolonged feeding by aphids, which may enhance virus transmission rates. CMV-infected cucurbits also emit deceptive, aphid-attracting volatiles, which may favor virus acquisition. In contrast, aphids on CMV-infected tobacco (cv. Xanthi) exhibit increased survival and reproduction. This may not increase transmission but might increase virus and vector persistence within plant communities. The CMV 2b counter-defense protein diminishes resistance to aphid infestation in CMV-infected tobacco plants. We hypothesised that in tobacco CMV and its 2b protein might also alter the emission of volatile organic compounds that would influence aphid behavior. Analysis of headspace volatiles emitted from tobacco plants showed that CMV infection both increased the total quantity and altered the blend produced. Furthermore, experiments with a CMV 2b gene deletion mutant (CMV∆2b) showed that the 2b counter-defense protein influences volatile emission. Free choice bioassays were conducted where wingless M. persicae could choose to settle on infected or mock-inoculated plants under a normal day/night regime or in continual darkness. Settling was recorded at 15 min, 1 h and 24 h post-release. Statistical analysis indicated that aphids showed no marked preference to settle on mock-inoculated versus infected plants, except for a marginally greater settlement of aphids on mock-inoculated over CMV-infected plants under normal illumination. CMV infection of tobacco plants induced quantitative and qualitative changes in host volatile emission and these changes depended in part on the activity of the 2b counter-defense protein. However, CMV-induced alterations in

  3. Cell physiology of mortality and i